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Astrology was big when I was in junior high school. It was part of a general boom in new age nonsense (talking to plants, bending spoons with your mind, pyramid power, the President having an astrologer via the First Lady (as perfectly predicted in Stranger in a Strange Land two decades prior, etc.) from the late 1960s into the early 1980s, when it suddenly vanished for awhile. I don’t know how big it was across the country, but it was huge in the San Fernando Valley: a combination of hippies, Hollywood, sci-fi, and aerospace. E.g., sci-fi novelist Michael Crichton wrote about attending spoon-bending parties at Lockheed engineers’ houses in Burbank.

But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

 
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  1. The girls of Twitter and Reddit have affirmed: Astrology is now a Hard Science! That stuff you guys call science? Turns out it was all racist. Not Science!

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Renard

    You have hit on the head. This is the Science that red-headed, one-legged, left-handed black lesbian trans-gender Mexican dwarfs can make their own.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Renard

    The Zman had a regular segment called Zirl science on his Friday podcasts a few years ago. Someone on the blog was complaining about it's absence a few days ago.
    Jared Taylor raises the same issue here on Unz. Meanwhile in the YUK, the new Chancellor, the wonderfully named Kwasi Kwarteng, a Yorkshire name, I believe, has revealed what is being called voodoo economics in his Budget.


    We are in a parallel fantasy universe created by the fever-dreams of the Wokels.It will not get better anytime soon.

    Meanwhile Young Emile looks at things we should look at.

    https://kirkegaard.substack.com/p/men-like-vs-women-like

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  2. Surely that’s a typo. Black.

  3. Anonymous[143] • Disclaimer says:

    It never went away – in Asia, at least.

    It’s fair to say that no big undertaking in India, by politicians, businessmen – all if the ‘great and good’ in fact, is not made without consulting an astrologer.
    Likely, astrology, Feng Shiu and the iChing are, to this day, used by the decision makers in China, although of course this is hotly denied.
    No doubt the same can be said of Taiwan and the other Pacific Rim nations.

  4. Astrology is big everywhere in the Western world.

    Although- I wouldn’t put it in the same category as parapsychology. Great minds like John Archibald Wheeler tried to see whether there is something in it; Wheeler was open minded, but also a critical mind. After a few years, he gave up & said that parapsychology had failed to produce results (Wheeler was scientifically, not scientistically oriented). Of course there are opinions that Wheeler, at the end, was wrong:https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1979/05/17/a-decade-of-permissiveness/,  https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1980/06/26/parapsychology-an-exchange/- but I don’t care.

    I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could “calculate” anything real about my past (not future). It was about what happened to me when I was a child, then in my early 20s, my health and finances and interests etc. They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Bardon Kaldian

    '...For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.'

    You coulda almost had a fatal car accident -- just not realized how if you hadn't stopped to take a leak, you woulda been hit by that semi whose driver was fishing for his cigarettes.

    It's possible.

    , @Dmon
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "Although- I wouldn’t put it in the same category as parapsychology."

    Or regular psychology for that matter.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I am going to take the pro-Astrology argument, here. Astrology is not necessarily a pseudo-science. Rather, it's just one of many ways to harness the very real and scientifically-documented Placebo Effect.

    It's hard to simply decide to fool yourself. So you need a little ritual, a semi-plausible backstory, and some other adherents to give the process some credibility (to yourself). And, luckily, the predictions and advice offered by astrologers are also 99% encouraging and optimistic. So you have an additional incentive to believe.

    Heck, Astrology is no less scientific than, say, Freudian Psychoanalysis, which lots of very smart and sophisticated people have believed in. They just spent a lot more time and money to get less encouraging advice. Positive self-delusion is underrated.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @prosa123
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Fun fact: John Archibald Wheeler once lost a top secret H-bomb document in a train restroom.

    Replies: @JimB

    , @HA
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could “calculate” anything real about my past....They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened."

    That's a very clever strategy, but if you had gone to ten astrologers instead of two, chances are that one or more of them would have gotten lucky, and you might have been tempted to believe you had come across the real deal.

    There's that old con about passing out 1024 emails (or some multiple thereof), with each one predicting a different outcome of the next 10 football or baseball games for a given local team. The guy who gets the email that predicted every one of those 10 games correctly will take you for a genuine clairvoyant, and will therefore be ripe for whatever grift is presented to him. The collective population of astrologers is kind of like an ongoing run of that same scam. Similarly, the clock-maker's analogy has historically played a large role in theological arguments, but many physicists these days hew to some variant of the many-worlds interpretation, which posits a bazillion alternate universes in existence alongside the one we observe, implying that the latter is completely unremarkable -- one big cosmic "duh".

    Anyway, astrologers don't have to get it right every time -- they just have to rig the game so the odds are in their favor, and by keeping their pronouncements sufficiently vague and also picking up on facial signals and other cues -- the way skilled cold readers do -- they're able to get by, and sometimes do very well.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    , @Prester John
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Wheeler never gets his due, buried as he is among the Einsteins, Fermis, Rutherfords, Heisenbergs etc. He was one of the early proponents of quantum physics and was something of a protege of Neils Bohr and his "Copenhagen School" of theoretical physics. One of the greatest American physicists.

  5. The world will be a shithole, but it’ll be a feel good shithole.

  6. Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences, and like alchemy dates back to the days when people really had no way of knowing any better. Quite a bit of math was invented to cast horoscopes, and it was one of the only applications for astronomical knowledge along with navigation.

    As for the company… it might not be a bad investment, at least for the short term. You are investing based on their ability to get people to pay for their advice. You’re not going to take it yourself. Speculative investment, of course, but Goop did pretty well. Woo can lead to wealth.

    I agree with Steve’s larger point…this seems kinda like a retread of the 1970s, with misandrist fourth wave feminism, inflation and probably an oncoming recession, rising crime, and a new Black Power movement in BLM. I don’t want to push these analogies too far, but maybe DeSantis will be our new Reagan?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @SFG


    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences, and like alchemy dates back to the days when people really had no way of knowing any better.
     
    One thought is that science and tech has brought us such wonderful devices and views of the universe that it is considered magic by the common man. If a phone or car breaks down, we burn some incense; chant; call in a druid with secret knowledge to fix it, or just buy a new magical device.

    A flip side is that the social sciences promised that their systematic examination and experimentation would yield solutions to crime, poverty, and general unhappiness. Not delivered, so it is back to burning the witches who are sowing the bad magic of patriarchy, able-ist supremacy, and systemic achievement.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Dvnjbbgc

    , @Dmon
    @SFG

    "maybe DeSantis will be our new Reagan?"

    Massive expansion of federal debt and amnesty for illegal aliens? Hell, Biden is the new Reagan.
    BTW - go back to RR's governor days and you can throw destruction of the family in there too.

    https://www.nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-evolution-of-divorce
    "In 1969, Governor Ronald Reagan of California made what he later admitted was one of the biggest mistakes of his political life. Seeking to eliminate the strife and deception often associated with the legal regime of fault-based divorce, Reagan signed the nation's first no-fault divorce bill."

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    @SFG

    Hello, SFG. You write, "Quite a bit of math was invented to cast horoscopes". Examples, please. What math topics were invented (not just applied) to cast horoscopes?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @SFG


    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences...
     
    Well, we can assume that "SFG" doesn't stand for "Steven Goldberg", who argued that astrology, while about as bad as science can get, is nevertheless science, not "pseudoscience".

    However, he puts astrology in a category with matriarchies, something for which no evidence has ever been found. His NYT LTE from 1988:

    No Reason to Believe That Astrology Is True

    (Now, if Mr Stix tells us he was taught by Goldberg as well as Michael Levin, I'll be most impressed.)

  7. But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    As I keep trying to explain, when smart phones emerged young girls began to spend more and more time on social media than males or adults.

    This has transformed the internet from ‘There are no girls on the internet’ of the mid 2000s to being a vehicle for the self-radicalisation or young girls of certain dispositions into a kind of religious moral panic. Tumblr is a kind of canary in the cole mine and might represent a particularly anti-rational black hole. A kind of electronic lord of the flies but with teenage girls. Here is a former Tumblr user realising how insane it was.

    https://4thwavenow.com/2019/03/20/tumblr-a-call-out-post

    I keep harping back on it but this clip from the Floyd protests in Stockholm (Yes, of course there was such a thing and despite the pandemic) represents something profound going on, this is not something somebody who isn’t a Gen Z girl can relate to because it represents a religion nobody but them was born into.

    These girls too don’t represent all teenage girls but they represent a significant chunk of them in terms of personality and sociologically and all that fall into that category are now religious zealots.

    Astrology appeals to the same demographic and social media has allowed them to bring back discussions of it.

    The big change has been a combination of social media being taken deadly seriously at the same time that the power users of it became Gen Z and Gen Y young women and girls. That’s what ‘cancel culture’ is, the emergence of teenage girl like shunning and shaming at a meta level.

    • Thanks: ic1000, Kylie, YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Thea
    @Altai

    Beginning In the 1970s parents began saying “I’m going to let my kids choose their religion instead of teaching them since that would be forcing them” since the adults offered no help or guidance, they turned to their peers.

    The corporations hope the kids would become boring drones with no higher purpose.

    Human nature just can’t be suppressed like that.

    , @AndrewR
    @Altai

    Barring total genocide, I don't think Russian hard power could possibly be worse for Sweden than American soft power has been. What reason has a single Swede to hear about a black drug addict ODing in Minneapolis, let alone care about it this much?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Allain

    , @Anon
    @Altai

    Then again, more striking would perhaps be recalling the police kneeling or dancing the macarena or the now President Biden of America kneeling along with various senior politicians in obeisance for BLM, which also happened. It was an interesting summer.

    , @Polistra
    @Altai

    https://i.ibb.co/mC0NG5q/Screenshot-20220924-223839-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    BUT if she had said........

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @Alden
    @Altai

    I doubt you don’t know any teen age girls personally. Although you seem obsessed with them to an unhealthy degree. While typing with one hand

    Replies: @bomag, @YetAnotherAnon, @Dvnjbbgc

    , @Fidelios Automata
    @Altai

    I rarely read commenter's links but since I've visited Tumblr off and on I had to check it out -- what a spot-on post. I thought Tumblr would die after they purged all the (mostly bizarre, fetishistic) pornography, but I was wrong.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  8. Are there social mediums on the internet, now that Miss Cleo is dead?

  9. Astrology never went anywhere. Now a majority of Americans do not consider themselves Christian but rather atheistic, pagan, newager, wiccan, etc.

    “When people stop believing in God, they don’t believe in nothing – they believe in anything.”

    – G.K. Chesterton

    • Replies: @24th Alabama
    @BB753

    Certainly a timely quote from the great man.It is our nature that we must believe.

    , @james wilson
    @BB753

    To paraphrase Chesterton, a large majority of Chrisians are not Cristians either.

    Replies: @BB753

  10. It goes to show, attempts to remove religion from its central place in society are doomed to fail. Best to just pick one that encourages pro-social behavior no matter how goofy or wro by you find it to be.

    We all crave an organizing, explanatory cosmology.

    • Agree: AnotherDad
  11. @Altai
    But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    As I keep trying to explain, when smart phones emerged young girls began to spend more and more time on social media than males or adults.

    This has transformed the internet from 'There are no girls on the internet' of the mid 2000s to being a vehicle for the self-radicalisation or young girls of certain dispositions into a kind of religious moral panic. Tumblr is a kind of canary in the cole mine and might represent a particularly anti-rational black hole. A kind of electronic lord of the flies but with teenage girls. Here is a former Tumblr user realising how insane it was.

    https://4thwavenow.com/2019/03/20/tumblr-a-call-out-post

    I keep harping back on it but this clip from the Floyd protests in Stockholm (Yes, of course there was such a thing and despite the pandemic) represents something profound going on, this is not something somebody who isn't a Gen Z girl can relate to because it represents a religion nobody but them was born into.

    https://twitter.com/samnyttsimon/status/1268266061801160711

    These girls too don't represent all teenage girls but they represent a significant chunk of them in terms of personality and sociologically and all that fall into that category are now religious zealots.

    Astrology appeals to the same demographic and social media has allowed them to bring back discussions of it.

    The big change has been a combination of social media being taken deadly seriously at the same time that the power users of it became Gen Z and Gen Y young women and girls. That's what 'cancel culture' is, the emergence of teenage girl like shunning and shaming at a meta level.

    Replies: @Thea, @AndrewR, @Anon, @Polistra, @Alden, @Fidelios Automata

    Beginning In the 1970s parents began saying “I’m going to let my kids choose their religion instead of teaching them since that would be forcing them” since the adults offered no help or guidance, they turned to their peers.

    The corporations hope the kids would become boring drones with no higher purpose.

    Human nature just can’t be suppressed like that.

  12. Generally speaking, the popularity of astrology seems to be also inversely linked to the popularity of mainstream religion.

    After 1989, church attendance fell in the former eastern bloc, while interest in astrology and tarot soared. Notably, with the fairer but dumber sex.

    There is something about astrology and how its adherents try to make sense of and communicate it’s divinations that is uniquely suited for the unserious, solipsistic yet highly social female mind.

    The PUA guys have made use of this shortcut and incorporate it into their stratagems with the “cold read”.

  13. Chani Nicholas explains:

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @PiltdownMan

    Fun fact:

    The zodiacal houses used by Chani and 99+% of Western astrologers do not correspond to the actual constellations that you see when you look up in the sky. Rather, they correspond to the constellations as they were at the birth of Christ, before a couple of millennia of equinoctial precession moved them to where they are now. Thus, whether Chani & Co. know it or not, they are practicing Christian (literally Christ-ian) astrology, a fact which would probably make many of their wooly hairs stand on end, if they understood it.

  14. Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @BenjaminL

    Reading about this stuff makes me wonder why women should be allowed any rights beyond what a ten year old boy has (if that).

    Men can be stupid but generally male stupidity is far less contagious.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    , @Woodsie
    @BenjaminL


    a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it
     
    Yup. Y'all need some Jesus.
    , @Anonymous
    @BenjaminL

    Reminds me of the well-known Chesterton quote.

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/51/68/97/516897bedac2c81e6bb7b7725efbea97.jpg

    , @AceDeuce
    @BenjaminL


    When men stop believing in God they don't believe in nothing; they believe in anything.

    G.K. Chesterton
     
    Most every woman of the present era believes in, or at least, to some extent, follows it. I was in a relationship with an ex-Catholic nun (who stayed Catholic after she left the order), and she'd read the freaking horoscope in the paper.
    , @SFG
    @BenjaminL

    Yeah, what’s interesting to me is the way it’s been recast for a female audience. Back when everyone believed in it there were auspicious times to go to war, start a business, plant crops, etc (and that last one would have been very hard for premodern people to distinguish from actual useful information about weather patterns, etc.) Now it’s aimed at women, so it’s all about relationships.

    There was a very funny article I read somewhere about the market for supplements-apparently Alex Jones and some weird left enviro site were hawking the same vitamin pills, but Alex Jones said it would get your testosterone up and the lefties said it would center your chakras or something.

    Replies: @prosa123

    , @Almost Missouri
    @BenjaminL


    I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away.
     
    Agree. A couple of data points from the supposed trough in "new age nonsense" around the turn of the century:

    • A hard-nosed lawyer lady with an advanced education and her own practice, who never flinches in front of the notoriously vindictive local magistrates or the occasionally violent clients, suddenly discovers one of the opposing clients is practicing "witchcraft". The heretofore rock-ribbed lawyer lady suddenly becomes discombobulated and considers whether she really needs to continue taking this case, citing the risk of "curse or spell".

    • A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings. She is more in demand for those latter skills than for her trained career path. Admittedly, she is quite good at them, not unlike the OP Chani.

    In other words, the new age stuff didn't "suddenly vanish", it became embedded in the woodwork of post-yuppie bohemian bourgeois society.

    Replies: @SFG, @Unintended Consequence, @ATBOTL, @Brutusale

    , @Alden
    @BenjaminL

    I remember someone talking about having her cards tarot cards read . I don’t think she ever did too expensive. I’ve never heard my teen granddaughters or any of their friends speak of astrology tarot cards or any other mystical new age revival stuff.

    But then, unlike some pervert Men of UNZ my knowledge of teen girls comes from knowing about 30 of them in the circles of teen granddaughters. Not wanking around the internet.

    , @Michelle
    @BenjaminL

    Many Black people, males and females, will still ask, "What sign are you"? And often will explain strange behavior, on the part of some relative, or partner, with the statement, "He a Virgo"! For white women, Wiccanism, is very popular. The library is buying a lot of books by, "Wiccans" and tarot books are always being reserved!

    Replies: @J.Ross, @YetAnotherAnon

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @BenjaminL

    Female readers?

    Replies: @Tracy, @Claudia

    , @Anon
    @BenjaminL

    New-Age services, sects and secretive networks. It is a fog, a miasma, a never-ending source of money and power to be exploited in each subsequent generation. Here are my observations, not really expecting to be able to give a comprehensive explanation because there’s always a new angle (as in all money-making schemes)

    1) Very few people have the intelligence, time and inclination to answer the three transcendental questions: Why is there something instead of nothing? What is man? How then are we to live?
    Yet we all need identity and purpose. Uncertainty is panic-inducing. So we choose, consciously or not, to follow our gurus. Mr. Sailer is one of those, in his own number-crunching way. Then there is Marx, Nietzsche, Osho, Keith Rainere, the Goddess thing, it is endless. The big picture, the small picture and the middle picture are full of gurus helpfully explaining how to think about man and the universe, and how to live.

    2) Men are prone to follow ideas that are debated on the public square, so to speak (ideologies, i.e., Marx or transhumanism). Women are prone to follow closer-to-home figures (Keith Rainere or the lady teaching Kabalah). They get dragged in by their friends, by word-of-mouth. These groups are less subject to public scrutiny, thus more open to being wacky and overwhelming the person. There are documentaries on Netflix about Osho (Wild, wild country), Rainere and Bikram which offer insights into the process.

    3) “New Age” is really a hodge-podge of gnosticisms. Someone has a special, secret knowledge to share that will provide salvation. It has two subsets: “mystical” and “scientific”. (I forget where I read that, but it was a cogent article about the squabbles inside the community). So mystical would be invoking angels, spirits, Goddess, Reiki, etc. “Scientific New Age” would include some knowledge handed down that can be studied. Astrology and meditation could be situated here, though lines are often blurry. What is clear is that regular science has, since the 90s, been added to the schtick. Concepts from psychology, medicine and quantum physics (!) have been used to justify gurus like Deepak Chopra and Greg Bradden and many others. The idea is that you can explain through Jung and quantum physics why going to Cancun to do three-hour long meditation sessions with Bradden can really, really, give you superpowers to change your mind, your heart, your health, your child’s health, your finances and the world. Updated way of marketing have been invented: you do coaching, wellness, self-actualization. No one speaks of “New Age” anymore. Gnosticism still sells, tho’.

    4) Underestimate at your peril manly involvement. John Dee and Newton were spiritists. Every lady teaching kabbalah needed an Isaac Luria. Many gurus (father figures?) are men, certainly the more successful ones, who spawned large organizations. Is it the sexual opportunities?

    5) Regular men are prone to secretive networks that will benefit them in practical terms: money, insider information, influence, deals, career. The Freemasons spring to mind, they excluded women until recently, yes they were extremely influential and still are in some parts. And all the initiation rituals are ultra-wacky, a mixture of mind control and luciferanism. Scientology also a useful network.
    More modern secretive networks pretend to be business-oriented. The Young President’s Organization is one such, certainly not the only one. Men meet monthly, for life, with the same eight guys in their cell. Only if one dies can another be chosen to replace him. No family members within one cell. They are not to meet socially, except in weddings and funerals. They bare their souls to these fellows, literally. (An original Illuminati control technique, per E Michael Jones.) If they miss two appointments, they are out. They organize one trip a year, only the 8-9 of them, where they do “in-depth” catching up. Plus one with the wives. The wives have their separate forum. It’s not that they aren’t allowed to talk about it, but they don’t, and don’t really know who is in whose cell. Except the higher ups. The YPOs I know are globalist mouthpieces, to the point of appearing dumb. And they are in other respects very smart people. Two such were shown the Breitbart video of Biden fondling kids. It was like watching a soldier hold the line under fire. Weird.


    But astrology or Yuval Harari, it is always "ye shall be like gods."

    , @HA
    @BenjaminL

    "...I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away."

    In some societies where religion is frowned upon (e.g. former Soviet Union) it got transformed into a fondness for pop psychology, another pseudo-science that serves the same esoteric purpose -- a mysterious key to unlocking the secrets of the universe, available to anyone who can glom on to the right guru or expert. (Kind of like certain websites that make a name for themselves peddling edgelord conspiracy theories that are beyond the reach of the normies, but that's a topic for another day.)

    I remember arguing with some seemingly intelligent woman from the Eastern bloc about how astrology can't be bogus because there are places where one can earn a PhD by studying it. Luckily, the meeting was scheduled to start at that point, so no further small talk was needed.

    , @BenjaminL
    @BenjaminL

    And, lest the opportunity be missed to bring up the Frankfurt School, Adorno also fulminated against the local astrology column (in the LA Times, 1952-53) as a tool of The Man to get readers to accept the Status Quo.

    More positively, C.S. Lewis (according to Michael Ward) saw the medieval cosmology of the planets as having lasting spiritual significance, and used it to shape Narnia.

    http://www.telospress.com/adorno-on-astrology/


    The column under scrutiny called, “Astrological Forecasts,” was written by Carroll Righter and appeared in the Los Angeles Times, described by Adorno as a conservative newspaper, leaning far to the right wing of the Republican Party. He engages in a detailed analysis of the column between November 1952 and February 1953. His method is that of the systematic construction of the imagined readers of the column and a critique of the ideology that the column reinforces, that of accepting the social system as fate. Adorno hypothesizes that columns such as these mold to some extent the reader’s thinking and foster an element of blind acceptance.
     
    http://michaelward.net/planet-narnia-reviews/

    By working with these “given,” indeed archetypal symbolic systems, Lewis was essentially working collaboratively. He was effectively summoning Dante and Spenser to his side, drawing from them, conversing with them, re-tuning their resonance to harmonize his own particular work, and paradoxically it is this very collaboration which set free in Lewis the creative flair and originality which has given his work its distinctive flavor and its staying power.
     
    https://sites.google.com/site/harveyscorner/narnia/dawn-treader-14

    "In our world," said Eustace, "a star is a huge ball of flaming gas."
    "Even in your world, my son, that is not what a star is, but only what it is made of."
     
  15. OT… or maybe not OT:

    Joel Kotkin has an interesting essay up on Spiked: “The revenge of the material economy.”

    The bottom line: it is really not a good idea to ignore physical reality.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Thanks: AnotherDad, Rob
    • Replies: @bomag
    @PhysicistDave

    Thanks, a lot of good points there.

    Doesn't mention immigration. Sigh.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @BB753
    @PhysicistDave

    From your interesting link:

    "Another difference between the 1970s and now is that the impetus for Net Zero policies comes not only from green activists and politicians, but also from the financial regime imposed by ‘woke’ capitalists, who have gone to great efforts to deprive fossil fuels of investment."

    That's just plain wrong. The Club of Rome',s green Agenda was pushed and funded by industrialists and financiers right from the outset, like Aurelio Peccei and Maurice Strong ( the Rockefeller's guy in Canada).

    , @Almost Missouri
    @PhysicistDave

    Thanks. Kotkin does a surprisingly good and sympathetic job of limning the different economic underpinnings of the coastal, urban, symbol-manipulator elites versus the flyover, exurban, material-laboring underclass, despite being a coastal, urban, symbol-manipulator elite ("CUSME") himself.

    And, he may be onto something: that a combination of new geopolitical realities and hilariously misguided CUSME policies have unexpectedly handed the downtrodden flyovers a series of trump cards [double entendre inevitable], but he reckons without the CUSME monopoly on money creation and CUSME hammerlock on the media, old and new. Even the material economy's new prospects may be insufficient to overcome those long standing trump cards of the CUSMEs. Specifically, the tried-and-true tactic of using debt, interest rates, and capital dilution to drain off the material economy's surplus value while the media monolith keeps material laborers on the back foot culturally will likely attrite away the material economy's advantages, as it has so often in the past.

    The end of the CUSME Imperium will likely come from the CUSME's own imperial overreach, particularly its overuse of the exorbitant privilege. This will happen eventually. It always has. Whether it will happen soon enough to matter to anyone reading this is harder to say. There are stirrings ...

    , @James Speaks
    @PhysicistDave

    The market is ripe for “Astrology For Dummies.”

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @Bill P
    @PhysicistDave

    My oldest just started trade school doing electrical and HVAC. I let him do it instead of finishing high school (he's a senior in HS). If he finishes - and I'll make damn sure he does - he'll never be out of work. What's more, he can get a 4-year degree in two years once he has learned the trades. If he wants to bother with it, that is.

    The so-called information economy doesn't pay as well as skilled trades and you have to work with a bunch of leftist weirdos. I'm not about to inflict that on my boys.

    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was -- she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don't know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she'd do well as a research scientist or physician -- I just hope she finds a good mentor.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad

    , @Rob
    @PhysicistDave

    I said “ • Thanks” but I can switch it to “• Disagree“ or “• LOL“ if you are trying to collect them all.

    I got all the reactions to a comment once. My life in the Before Time was an endless, featureless gray wasteland. Ever since, every meal is a feast. Every morning cherubim bring me breakfast in bed. I see a glorious array of colors. Every fluorescent light is a rainbow. Warm sunlight caresses (iPad changed that to “carcasses”) my skin at hours of the day and night. I enjoy music now. Every pop song is a symphony. Every advertising jingle is a rock opera. I can readily distinguish thousands of “pitches”. I see magnitude and phase now*.

    Life will never be the same if you get all the reactions to one comment. Trust me on this!

    * Q. What’s harder than solving mixed partial differential equations in closed form?
    A. Talking to girls.
    Gotta love physics and engineering humor.

  16. @Altai
    But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    As I keep trying to explain, when smart phones emerged young girls began to spend more and more time on social media than males or adults.

    This has transformed the internet from 'There are no girls on the internet' of the mid 2000s to being a vehicle for the self-radicalisation or young girls of certain dispositions into a kind of religious moral panic. Tumblr is a kind of canary in the cole mine and might represent a particularly anti-rational black hole. A kind of electronic lord of the flies but with teenage girls. Here is a former Tumblr user realising how insane it was.

    https://4thwavenow.com/2019/03/20/tumblr-a-call-out-post

    I keep harping back on it but this clip from the Floyd protests in Stockholm (Yes, of course there was such a thing and despite the pandemic) represents something profound going on, this is not something somebody who isn't a Gen Z girl can relate to because it represents a religion nobody but them was born into.

    https://twitter.com/samnyttsimon/status/1268266061801160711

    These girls too don't represent all teenage girls but they represent a significant chunk of them in terms of personality and sociologically and all that fall into that category are now religious zealots.

    Astrology appeals to the same demographic and social media has allowed them to bring back discussions of it.

    The big change has been a combination of social media being taken deadly seriously at the same time that the power users of it became Gen Z and Gen Y young women and girls. That's what 'cancel culture' is, the emergence of teenage girl like shunning and shaming at a meta level.

    Replies: @Thea, @AndrewR, @Anon, @Polistra, @Alden, @Fidelios Automata

    Barring total genocide, I don’t think Russian hard power could possibly be worse for Sweden than American soft power has been. What reason has a single Swede to hear about a black drug addict ODing in Minneapolis, let alone care about it this much?

    • Thanks: Fidelios Automata
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @AndrewR


    Barring total genocide, I don’t think Russian hard power could possibly be worse for Sweden than American soft power has been. What reason has a single Swede to hear about a black drug addict ODing in Minneapolis, let alone care about it this much?
     
    It's notable--but appalling--that essentially the closer you are to American media, the worse your situation.

    Most pickled in our minoritarian glop, is the Anglosphere. The small Nordics without much language population heft, where everyone learns English are next. Then the rest of Western Europe. Eastern Europe with the Russian enforced commie dictatorships and the East Asians have fared much better.
    , @Allain
    @AndrewR

    America. From the Arsenal of Democracy to the Arsenal of Globohomo.

  17. Astrology is for cowards. If you’re committed, practice haruspicy. If you really want to see the future, slice open your house cat and give his viscera a thorough reading.

  18. Democrats often encourage people to ‘believe the science’, but they are about twice as likely as Republicans to believe in Astrology etc. In truth, when they put Fauci on on pedestal, it’s because they view him as some sort of spiritual guru.

    • Thanks: Mark G., JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @martin_2
    @TelfoedJohn

    Reincarnation has some scientific evidence in its favour. Dr Ian Stevenson was a professor of psychology who researched several cases and wrote several books. There's a bloke in the UK Dr Chris French who goes around disproving parapsychological claims and he stated that there were cases of children recollecting past lives that he could not explain.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  19. But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    The general anti-science nature of the official narrative of The Science™️ around COVID indicates that astrology fits right in.

  20. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    Reading about this stuff makes me wonder why women should be allowed any rights beyond what a ten year old boy has (if that).

    Men can be stupid but generally male stupidity is far less contagious.

    • Agree: JR Ewing
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @AndrewR

    'Men can be stupid but generally male stupidity is far less contagious.'

    Socialism? War?

  21. Astrology has been “back” for a few years. Among millennials it’s a female-only thing but among Zoomers the guys are into it as well.

  22. Millionaires do not use astrologers.

    Billionaires do.

    The world changed in 2012 while you were watching internet pornography and unable to notice.

    I have calculated the dawn of the age of Aquarius. This text box is not quite big enough to contain the paperwork but it’s 1 July 2057. : )

    • Replies: @dimples
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    The beginning of the Age of Aquarius was December 21, 2020. This was the date of the Great Conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the first degree of Aquarius.

    No calculations necessary.

  23. Cue: Float On by The Floaters

  24. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it

    Yup. Y’all need some Jesus.

  25. Compared to the mystical and self-contradictory state-backed religions of equalism, negrolotry, transexualism, Our Values, and Our Democracy, astrology is positively rational. In astrology you even have to know a few actual facts: which planets are in alignment, the birthday of the subject, etc.

    feminist-led tech

    LOL. Of course there is no such animal. What this really means is that all the hard parts (actual tech: software coding, hardware infrastructure) will be outsourced, so the feminists can focus on the actual project: Being Heard.

    That said, I might take the other side of @tedfrank’s bet, except that the real warning flags aren’t the astrology per se, or even the feminism (which seems to be in a growth phase for the moment), but the high and non-scalable wage structure, and the branding to a single woman’s name. Competent VCs could fix this, but would ChaniNicholas listen? If the Moon is in the Seventh House, I suppose.

    • LOL: ic1000
    • Replies: @Mark G.
    @Almost Missouri


    Compared to the mystical and self-contradictory state-backed religions of equalism, negrolotry, transexualism, Our Values, and Our Democracy, astrology is positively rational.
     
    Add to that the pseudoscience of radical environmentalism. The left sometimes makes fun of religious conservative beliefs like creationism but many of them hold equally implausible beliefs. As Altai mentions in comment 2., females tend to be more prone to this.

    Polling has shown that females have always been more inclined to believe in various forms of pseudoscience. The one exception is UFOs. Men, for some reason, tend to be more fervent believers in that. There is also a tendency for believers in one pseudoscience to believe in others. My grandmother had Tarot cards, a Ouija board, did seances and was an astrologer. One of her astrology clients was the former thirties Hollywood actress Frances Farmer. When I was a small child, she took me with her when she visited Farmer one time. Afterwards she told me Farmer had been a famous Hollywood actress. My grandmother would often make up stuff, such as telling me tigers lived in the woods near my house, so I never believed anything she told me. I was surprised many years later when I saw there was a new movie with Jessica Lange playing Farmer and realized Grandma had actually told me the truth and she was a former actress.

    Replies: @Feryl

  26. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    Reminds me of the well-known Chesterton quote.

  27. Steve, we’re almost the same age, and I also recall those days.

    The Bermuda Triangle was swallowing ships and planes. Erich von Däniken was discovering absolute proof we were once visited by aliens (and probably making a small fortune from his books). If you placed a dull razorblade under a pyramid structure it would become sharp over night. Your inner energy would follow some mumbo-jumbo calendar, and you could scare the shit out of plants just by thinking of killing them.

    We ate it up… and then we grew up.

    I remember discovering The Amazing Randi’s website and learning, much to my chagrin, that the unexplainable abnormalities I still believed in, like mindreading/ESP, was just claptrap nonsense, and Randi’s million was as safe as ever. I became a convinced skeptic that day – and a cynic as well. Better late than never…

    • Agree: Mark G., MEH 0910
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Mr Mox

    I remember two authors who were big in the early 80s - Carlos Castañeda and T Lobsang Rampa. If you dropped into any youth hostel anywhere in Europe, there was sure to be at least one copy of their books in someone's rucksack or lying around on one of the tables.

    They were both fakes. "Lobsang Rampa" was from Devon, and was reported to be a plumber or surgical fitter by trade. He claimed to have had some kind of vision after falling from a tree, and followed the mystical path thereafter.

    , @Brutusale
    @Mr Mox

    70 million copies sold.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chariots_of_the_Gods%3F

  28. Pretty soon the 80’s will be wanting their Satanism back………

    Once you reject the Truth, you embrace every lie. Astrology, with frequent links to Satanism, is inevitable.

    I won’t be really impressed until the Cthulhu worshippers make their move.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @theMann

    Nobody worships Big C, he’s sleeping at the bottom of the ocean and won’t give you crap.

    Now Nyarlathotep, he’s doled out a few favors across the ages.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  29. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    When men stop believing in God they don’t believe in nothing; they believe in anything.

    G.K. Chesterton

    Most every woman of the present era believes in, or at least, to some extent, follows it. I was in a relationship with an ex-Catholic nun (who stayed Catholic after she left the order), and she’d read the freaking horoscope in the paper.

  30. @SFG
    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences, and like alchemy dates back to the days when people really had no way of knowing any better. Quite a bit of math was invented to cast horoscopes, and it was one of the only applications for astronomical knowledge along with navigation.

    As for the company… it might not be a bad investment, at least for the short term. You are investing based on their ability to get people to pay for their advice. You’re not going to take it yourself. Speculative investment, of course, but Goop did pretty well. Woo can lead to wealth.

    I agree with Steve’s larger point…this seems kinda like a retread of the 1970s, with misandrist fourth wave feminism, inflation and probably an oncoming recession, rising crime, and a new Black Power movement in BLM. I don’t want to push these analogies too far, but maybe DeSantis will be our new Reagan?

    Replies: @bomag, @Dmon, @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY), @Reg Cæsar

    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences, and like alchemy dates back to the days when people really had no way of knowing any better.

    One thought is that science and tech has brought us such wonderful devices and views of the universe that it is considered magic by the common man. If a phone or car breaks down, we burn some incense; chant; call in a druid with secret knowledge to fix it, or just buy a new magical device.

    A flip side is that the social sciences promised that their systematic examination and experimentation would yield solutions to crime, poverty, and general unhappiness. Not delivered, so it is back to burning the witches who are sowing the bad magic of patriarchy, able-ist supremacy, and systemic achievement.

    • Agree: Alden, Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @bomag

    There's an extremely disturbing and disappointing speech given recently by the otherwise excellent Albert Möller of Town Hall Review (the speech is the closing excerpt in Town Hall's weekly radio roundup). He argues that the future is religious (okay, sure, especially considering who has babies), but joshingly illustrates this with descriptions of the pseudo-religious Woke. This is not the thing to argue. If religion is an instinct, and religion be witch-burning utopian hysteria, then you vindicate Satan and atheism. Better to rule far from God than serve the Flav-R-Aid.

    , @Dvnjbbgc
    @bomag

    Yes, we finally live in Arthur C. Clarke’s world of science-indistinguishable-from-magic.

  31. After the past few years following and loving The Science as personified by Fauci and preached by Ibrahim X. Kendi, many people have apparently found that the path led right back home to good old astrology. And who is left to argue with them?

  32. @Altai
    But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    As I keep trying to explain, when smart phones emerged young girls began to spend more and more time on social media than males or adults.

    This has transformed the internet from 'There are no girls on the internet' of the mid 2000s to being a vehicle for the self-radicalisation or young girls of certain dispositions into a kind of religious moral panic. Tumblr is a kind of canary in the cole mine and might represent a particularly anti-rational black hole. A kind of electronic lord of the flies but with teenage girls. Here is a former Tumblr user realising how insane it was.

    https://4thwavenow.com/2019/03/20/tumblr-a-call-out-post

    I keep harping back on it but this clip from the Floyd protests in Stockholm (Yes, of course there was such a thing and despite the pandemic) represents something profound going on, this is not something somebody who isn't a Gen Z girl can relate to because it represents a religion nobody but them was born into.

    https://twitter.com/samnyttsimon/status/1268266061801160711

    These girls too don't represent all teenage girls but they represent a significant chunk of them in terms of personality and sociologically and all that fall into that category are now religious zealots.

    Astrology appeals to the same demographic and social media has allowed them to bring back discussions of it.

    The big change has been a combination of social media being taken deadly seriously at the same time that the power users of it became Gen Z and Gen Y young women and girls. That's what 'cancel culture' is, the emergence of teenage girl like shunning and shaming at a meta level.

    Replies: @Thea, @AndrewR, @Anon, @Polistra, @Alden, @Fidelios Automata

    Then again, more striking would perhaps be recalling the police kneeling or dancing the macarena or the now President Biden of America kneeling along with various senior politicians in obeisance for BLM, which also happened. It was an interesting summer.

    • Agree: Alden
  33. When did Chani turn lesbian? “Tell me of your home-world, Ursula.”

  34. Astrology is not a problem as long as people don’t get too superstitious about it. Astrological influences are real, but they are usually not important enough to need a thorough exploration. The movements of the heavenly wheels affect what are called the “powers of generation,” i.e. the processes by which new living organisms are educed, either from their parents (as in normal reproduction) or from nonliving matter (as in spontaneous generation, which does occur, the remonstrations of Louis Pasteur notwithstanding).

    It is primarily only lower organisms that are affected by astrological influences in any observable degree, for example planktonic migrations and coral spawning. In higher organisms behavior is governed more by the senses and internal motions, and in man also by the reason. For man, astrology may contribute to a baseline mood or temperament, but it does not in any way determine one’s fate.

    The danger is astrology is not that it is “pseudoscience,” but that it quite quickly becomes an idolatrous, occultic practice by which one attempts to know the future or gain control over fate. This it cannot do, and the people who attempt such things are abusing the credulity of others and need to be circumscribed.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Have you considered changing the first part of your name?

  35. @PhysicistDave
    OT... or maybe not OT:

    Joel Kotkin has an interesting essay up on Spiked: "The revenge of the material economy."

    The bottom line: it is really not a good idea to ignore physical reality.

    Replies: @bomag, @BB753, @Almost Missouri, @James Speaks, @Bill P, @Rob

    Thanks, a lot of good points there.

    Doesn’t mention immigration. Sigh.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @bomag



    Doesn’t mention immigration. Sigh.

     

    Yeah, there's always a blind spot from these folks, even when talking more sense than usual.

    Obvious if one opens ones eyes, that the verbalist parasites have been able to use immigration as a cudgel against the material people.

    A lot of the verbalist parasites' "work"--media, lawyering, finance, government bureaucracy, social work--has more "culturally specific" skills/background/credentialling and ergo less subject to immigration replacement. Basically, it requires culturally made up stuff--specific laws, regulations, practices, knowledge. Immigrants can do it but generally have to come here and do/redo their training and even then may lack some of the cultural "fit" to do it well.

    In contrast, the material work being about materially altering the real world is actually real. So if you were say a mason in Italy you could come and be one in New York or Philly. If you can do carpentry in Mexico you can come and do it here. Being instructed in our standards pretty straightforward. Or at the higher end if you were doing engineering in China or software in India you can come and do it here. (For real engineering you have to redo certification, but the core of the math, principles transfer.)

    Basically, if you are materially productive, your salary versus someone else equally skilled elsewhere, is supposed to be protected by a border, giving you--not some random foreign dude--the fruits of the capital and skill accumulation done by your ancestors.

    The verbalist parasites war on producers through immigration is definitely part of this equation.

    Replies: @bomag

  36. @PiltdownMan
    Chani Nicholas explains:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8qqIt_5HiY

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Fun fact:

    The zodiacal houses used by Chani and 99+% of Western astrologers do not correspond to the actual constellations that you see when you look up in the sky. Rather, they correspond to the constellations as they were at the birth of Christ, before a couple of millennia of equinoctial precession moved them to where they are now. Thus, whether Chani & Co. know it or not, they are practicing Christian (literally Christ-ian) astrology, a fact which would probably make many of their wooly hairs stand on end, if they understood it.

  37. Using Astrology would be an improvement for the Biden Administration. Much more logical than following the “science “ and wearing masks for two years and forcing young healthy teens to get inoculated with an obsolete vaccine in order to enlist in our military.

  38. Blm + astrology

    Neither pieces of hysterical bs possible w/o 19th

    • Agree: Kylie, Achmed E. Newman
  39. I don’t know how big it was across the country, but it was huge in the San Fernando Valley…

    New age nonsense was huge in Boulder Valley, and it still is.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Back in the ‘80s this gal I knew well in high school and from church in another state called to tell me she was moving to my city and could I help her move into her apartment. When she arrived I learned she was in town to become an ‘holistic’ doctor. While moving her stuff I also learned she had gotten into New Age/crystals, etc.

    Later, on a hike, I learned she now liked to hike naked and would I be interested? I declined and she remained dressed but she teased me with stories of hiking naked for the rest of that particular walk. For a moment I thought of playing the hypocrite and feigning interest, but I weighed the benefits (obvious) versus the downside (sitting through New Age drivel) and kept myself in check. Afterwords I considered that New Age was just a way for girls raised in traditional households to rationalize getting laid before marriage.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  40. Mrs. Reagan was laughed at in 1988 because astrology was passe. It was an amusement placed on the comics page, and likely not taken all that seriously by too many people in 1971. In Mrs. Reagan’s case, it was a means of anxiety management. RR accommodated his wife. His chief of staff was irritated by the degree to which she inserted herself into scheduling decisions and public relations.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Art Deco

    Did the astrologer take credit for breaking the 20-year curse? From 1840 to 1960, every president elected in a year divisible by 20 died in office. Reagan narrowly survived an assassination attempt. Bush the Son almost choked on a pretzel. Biden still has a few working neurons.

    There were times when Nancy didn't take the advice. The astrologer advised her that Ronnie would not be elected president in 1976 under any circumstances. But Nancy insisted on pushing his candidacy to the hilt. She was devastated when he failed to unseat Gerald Ford as the nominee.

    , @Rocko
    @Art Deco

    When Christian ladies like Nancy Reagan who should know better get drawn into astrology, you know it's hit the fan hard

    Replies: @Art Deco

  41. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    Yeah, what’s interesting to me is the way it’s been recast for a female audience. Back when everyone believed in it there were auspicious times to go to war, start a business, plant crops, etc (and that last one would have been very hard for premodern people to distinguish from actual useful information about weather patterns, etc.) Now it’s aimed at women, so it’s all about relationships.

    There was a very funny article I read somewhere about the market for supplements-apparently Alex Jones and some weird left enviro site were hawking the same vitamin pills, but Alex Jones said it would get your testosterone up and the lefties said it would center your chakras or something.

    • LOL: AndrewR, Inverness
    • Replies: @prosa123
    @SFG

    There was a very funny article I read somewhere about the market for supplements-apparently Alex Jones and some weird left enviro site were hawking the same vitamin pills, but Alex Jones said it would get your testosterone up and the lefties said it would center your chakras or something.

    I can say with confidence that it did not boost testosterone nor center one's chakras.

  42. @PhysicistDave
    OT... or maybe not OT:

    Joel Kotkin has an interesting essay up on Spiked: "The revenge of the material economy."

    The bottom line: it is really not a good idea to ignore physical reality.

    Replies: @bomag, @BB753, @Almost Missouri, @James Speaks, @Bill P, @Rob

    From your interesting link:

    “Another difference between the 1970s and now is that the impetus for Net Zero policies comes not only from green activists and politicians, but also from the financial regime imposed by ‘woke’ capitalists, who have gone to great efforts to deprive fossil fuels of investment.”

    That’s just plain wrong. The Club of Rome’,s green Agenda was pushed and funded by industrialists and financiers right from the outset, like Aurelio Peccei and Maurice Strong ( the Rockefeller’s guy in Canada).

  43. Anon[354] • Disclaimer says:

    In other words, our society lacks a proper amount of bitch-slapping and you-don’t-know-what-you’re-talking aboutism.

    People aren’t being humiliated enough and put in their place when they talk nonsense. That’s the sort of process that develops critical thinking skills.

    Teens go off the deep end because radicalized 20-somethings who work for social media control the conversations in these social spaces. And many of these 20-somethings are pretty stupid about life.

    But all the older, productive people in society don’t have enough time in their lives to monitor social spaces and smack around the young for their asininities.

  44. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away.

    Agree. A couple of data points from the supposed trough in “new age nonsense” around the turn of the century:

    • A hard-nosed lawyer lady with an advanced education and her own practice, who never flinches in front of the notoriously vindictive local magistrates or the occasionally violent clients, suddenly discovers one of the opposing clients is practicing “witchcraft”. The heretofore rock-ribbed lawyer lady suddenly becomes discombobulated and considers whether she really needs to continue taking this case, citing the risk of “curse or spell”.

    • A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings. She is more in demand for those latter skills than for her trained career path. Admittedly, she is quite good at them, not unlike the OP Chani.

    In other words, the new age stuff didn’t “suddenly vanish”, it became embedded in the woodwork of post-yuppie bohemian bourgeois society.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Almost Missouri

    Yeah, but those are two people. The stuff waxes and wanes; it probably was waning back then, just as baron-Cohen and Pinker were selling all those brain books. ‘Decade of the Brain’ and all that.

    , @Unintended Consequence
    @Almost Missouri

    " A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings."

    What do you think coeds get together and talk about late at night? Oh yes, astrology, crystals and the occasional weegee board session are more likely interests than a weekly dorm poker game. It's not too different from the more mystical aspects of Christianity though Christians often frown on such activities.

    As a category of mental processing, fortune telling is nonlinear and related to creative thinking. I once read an article in Psychology Today that demonstrated potential benefits to such pursuits by the use of hieroglyphics. The attempts at making meaning from unknown symbols helped in problem solving as well as generating ideas. It's also long been observed that skilled fortune tellers know a lot about people; so, the source of their prescience is their observation skills and not the tarot cards.

    While gullible types may believe too literally in horoscopes and tarot readings, I think the break from logical reasoning and the limitations thereof can be helpful. With an unresolvable problem, for instance, a person may have repeatedly considered their options to no avail: the logical choices being considered just aren't working. A little stimulation of divergent thinking might actually get the person to a eureka moment or get them off that unproductive though very logical path. Certainly, the Reagan White House was successful (because of or in spite of Nancy). Didn't General Patton believe in reincarnation? I'm sure there are many more famous people who had some occult beliefs.

    Other than "divergent", words like "synergy" come to mind in relation to the topic of predicting the future in order to better choose a course of action. The phrase "the sum is greater than the parts" may also relate to why often intelligent, successful people will utilize unorthodox methods when making decisions. Maybe it's a wholistic strategy for factoring in both unknowns and that which a person has simply failed to consider: Everything coming out in the wash as with statistical analysis.

    While I'm not a fan of astrology, I tend to like systems that include typical life scenarios like getting married or searching for a job or crises points like being betrayed or going broke. The tarot cards are probably the most complete as far as life events imo. I have sometimes wondered if the tarot and an instruction manual on the basic plots for fiction couldn't be combined with some good advice as some sort of problem-solving workbook. So, while I'm not advocating buying one of those robes with moons and stars on it to wear while consulting a crystal ball, I am saying don't sell these ancient strategies short.

    Replies: @Renard, @anonymous

    , @ATBOTL
    @Almost Missouri

    Many of the boomer moms of my friends in the 1980's and 1990's were still into that stuff.

    , @Brutusale
    @Almost Missouri

    One of my neighbors (wife) has been having a medium come to give readings at her house for her and her chardonnay-swilling friends for about 15 years now. My friend (the husband) says it must be important, as they drink half the wine that they usually imbibe!

  45. @Art Deco
    Mrs. Reagan was laughed at in 1988 because astrology was passe. It was an amusement placed on the comics page, and likely not taken all that seriously by too many people in 1971. In Mrs. Reagan's case, it was a means of anxiety management. RR accommodated his wife. His chief of staff was irritated by the degree to which she inserted herself into scheduling decisions and public relations.

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Rocko

    Did the astrologer take credit for breaking the 20-year curse? From 1840 to 1960, every president elected in a year divisible by 20 died in office. Reagan narrowly survived an assassination attempt. Bush the Son almost choked on a pretzel. Biden still has a few working neurons.

    There were times when Nancy didn’t take the advice. The astrologer advised her that Ronnie would not be elected president in 1976 under any circumstances. But Nancy insisted on pushing his candidacy to the hilt. She was devastated when he failed to unseat Gerald Ford as the nominee.

  46. @Almost Missouri
    @BenjaminL


    I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away.
     
    Agree. A couple of data points from the supposed trough in "new age nonsense" around the turn of the century:

    • A hard-nosed lawyer lady with an advanced education and her own practice, who never flinches in front of the notoriously vindictive local magistrates or the occasionally violent clients, suddenly discovers one of the opposing clients is practicing "witchcraft". The heretofore rock-ribbed lawyer lady suddenly becomes discombobulated and considers whether she really needs to continue taking this case, citing the risk of "curse or spell".

    • A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings. She is more in demand for those latter skills than for her trained career path. Admittedly, she is quite good at them, not unlike the OP Chani.

    In other words, the new age stuff didn't "suddenly vanish", it became embedded in the woodwork of post-yuppie bohemian bourgeois society.

    Replies: @SFG, @Unintended Consequence, @ATBOTL, @Brutusale

    Yeah, but those are two people. The stuff waxes and wanes; it probably was waning back then, just as baron-Cohen and Pinker were selling all those brain books. ‘Decade of the Brain’ and all that.

  47. Who remembers the biorhythms fad from the 1970s/80s? It was never clear to me why these cycles began at birth and not in the womb.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Henry's Cat

    I remember hearing about bio rhythms. I don’t think I ever knew much about them. Will there be a huge boom in house plants, terrariums, Muscha posters and the colors orange and gold in home decorating?

  48. Makes sense that the people who believe in magic/tragic dirt, transgenderism and gender fluidity, and structural white supremacy would latch onto a system of belief that essentially says whatever you want to be true, is.

    One of the most disconcerting thing about our age is just how many people in positions of power and influence believe in concepts that are absolute nonsense, and are committed to using the levers of government and culture to impose it on the unbelievers by force. Our society has lost any sense of common purpose, and in the absence of that people go looking for ways to invent meaning and virtue.

  49. @Altai
    But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    As I keep trying to explain, when smart phones emerged young girls began to spend more and more time on social media than males or adults.

    This has transformed the internet from 'There are no girls on the internet' of the mid 2000s to being a vehicle for the self-radicalisation or young girls of certain dispositions into a kind of religious moral panic. Tumblr is a kind of canary in the cole mine and might represent a particularly anti-rational black hole. A kind of electronic lord of the flies but with teenage girls. Here is a former Tumblr user realising how insane it was.

    https://4thwavenow.com/2019/03/20/tumblr-a-call-out-post

    I keep harping back on it but this clip from the Floyd protests in Stockholm (Yes, of course there was such a thing and despite the pandemic) represents something profound going on, this is not something somebody who isn't a Gen Z girl can relate to because it represents a religion nobody but them was born into.

    https://twitter.com/samnyttsimon/status/1268266061801160711

    These girls too don't represent all teenage girls but they represent a significant chunk of them in terms of personality and sociologically and all that fall into that category are now religious zealots.

    Astrology appeals to the same demographic and social media has allowed them to bring back discussions of it.

    The big change has been a combination of social media being taken deadly seriously at the same time that the power users of it became Gen Z and Gen Y young women and girls. That's what 'cancel culture' is, the emergence of teenage girl like shunning and shaming at a meta level.

    Replies: @Thea, @AndrewR, @Anon, @Polistra, @Alden, @Fidelios Automata

    BUT if she had said……..

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon, Renard
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Polistra

    The obvious question: Why is this thing employed as a school teacher. In Utah no less.

    American parents really have to get control of education again. We need vouchers--educational choice.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  50. Honestly I don’t think astrology is a big problem. Yes, women are into all that New Age stuff, but this is small potatoes in a world in which even medical journals write about “pregnant men” or “gender-affirming surgeries”. Astrology was initially not separated from Astronomy and led to a few insights. Just as chemistry developed from alchemy. Now it is just some other pastime for women.

    • Agree: Alden, Rob McX
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Dumbo

    Could we say that Astrology is a less toxic kind of porn for women?

  51. @SFG
    @BenjaminL

    Yeah, what’s interesting to me is the way it’s been recast for a female audience. Back when everyone believed in it there were auspicious times to go to war, start a business, plant crops, etc (and that last one would have been very hard for premodern people to distinguish from actual useful information about weather patterns, etc.) Now it’s aimed at women, so it’s all about relationships.

    There was a very funny article I read somewhere about the market for supplements-apparently Alex Jones and some weird left enviro site were hawking the same vitamin pills, but Alex Jones said it would get your testosterone up and the lefties said it would center your chakras or something.

    Replies: @prosa123

    There was a very funny article I read somewhere about the market for supplements-apparently Alex Jones and some weird left enviro site were hawking the same vitamin pills, but Alex Jones said it would get your testosterone up and the lefties said it would center your chakras or something.

    I can say with confidence that it did not boost testosterone nor center one’s chakras.

  52. Astrology and the newage (rhymes with sewage) never went away.

  53. @PhysicistDave
    OT... or maybe not OT:

    Joel Kotkin has an interesting essay up on Spiked: "The revenge of the material economy."

    The bottom line: it is really not a good idea to ignore physical reality.

    Replies: @bomag, @BB753, @Almost Missouri, @James Speaks, @Bill P, @Rob

    Thanks. Kotkin does a surprisingly good and sympathetic job of limning the different economic underpinnings of the coastal, urban, symbol-manipulator elites versus the flyover, exurban, material-laboring underclass, despite being a coastal, urban, symbol-manipulator elite (“CUSME”) himself.

    And, he may be onto something: that a combination of new geopolitical realities and hilariously misguided CUSME policies have unexpectedly handed the downtrodden flyovers a series of trump cards [double entendre inevitable], but he reckons without the CUSME monopoly on money creation and CUSME hammerlock on the media, old and new. Even the material economy’s new prospects may be insufficient to overcome those long standing trump cards of the CUSMEs. Specifically, the tried-and-true tactic of using debt, interest rates, and capital dilution to drain off the material economy’s surplus value while the media monolith keeps material laborers on the back foot culturally will likely attrite away the material economy’s advantages, as it has so often in the past.

    The end of the CUSME Imperium will likely come from the CUSME’s own imperial overreach, particularly its overuse of the exorbitant privilege. This will happen eventually. It always has. Whether it will happen soon enough to matter to anyone reading this is harder to say. There are stirrings

    • Agree: bomag
  54. @SFG
    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences, and like alchemy dates back to the days when people really had no way of knowing any better. Quite a bit of math was invented to cast horoscopes, and it was one of the only applications for astronomical knowledge along with navigation.

    As for the company… it might not be a bad investment, at least for the short term. You are investing based on their ability to get people to pay for their advice. You’re not going to take it yourself. Speculative investment, of course, but Goop did pretty well. Woo can lead to wealth.

    I agree with Steve’s larger point…this seems kinda like a retread of the 1970s, with misandrist fourth wave feminism, inflation and probably an oncoming recession, rising crime, and a new Black Power movement in BLM. I don’t want to push these analogies too far, but maybe DeSantis will be our new Reagan?

    Replies: @bomag, @Dmon, @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY), @Reg Cæsar

    “maybe DeSantis will be our new Reagan?”

    Massive expansion of federal debt and amnesty for illegal aliens? Hell, Biden is the new Reagan.
    BTW – go back to RR’s governor days and you can throw destruction of the family in there too.

    https://www.nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-evolution-of-divorce
    “In 1969, Governor Ronald Reagan of California made what he later admitted was one of the biggest mistakes of his political life. Seeking to eliminate the strife and deception often associated with the legal regime of fault-based divorce, Reagan signed the nation’s first no-fault divorce bill.”

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Dmon

    The great conservative hero Reagan also signed a law making it much easier to get abortions years before Roe. And had many gay men on his staff and fundraisers.

    And when the great conservative hero was elected president he;

    1 did nothing about affirmative action and the non White percentage of government employees at all levels, city county state and federal rose higher and higher as Whites retired and anything non White replaced them.

    2 created the first of many amnesties.

    3 did nothing to stop illegals entering the country and getting jobs and welfare.

    4 and it was under Raegan’s watch that our industrial sector left for China.

    5 also under Reagan’s presidency NASA and the NASA contractors in Silicon Valley began laying off and not renewing the contracts of the White men who put a man in the moon in favor of Chinese immigrants. These were men who graduated with their MSs in aeronautical astronautical engineering and software design in the mid 1960s and were laid off 15 years later in favor of non White immigrants.

    Or one of the many reasons I’m not a conservative.

    Replies: @BosTex, @Reg Cæsar, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @BB753

  55. Lesbians are really into astrology, to the point that it’s an enormous dating frustration for those that are science-minded.

    So this marks one of the places where they’re stereotypically feminine.

    Astrologists like Chani are talented cold-readers. People don’t like to be read in general, but they are okay with it if the reader is pretending to be a channel for higher powers.

    • Agree: bomag
  56. Hmm, I looked the Chani web site, and I don’t see a guaranteed failure. $80,000 isn’t what it used to be, and if they have the funding it’s not a ruinous minimum salary for a small (at the moment they seem to have three current openings) tech startup where everybody works from home (i.e., no $80,000 janitors). The rest is either fairly standard benefits or Woke posturing that won’t actually cost them much. Might still be worth shorting, but if they manage to produce a product people want it could work. Still hilarious though!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @jb

    It will fail the same way that these companies always fail.
    They will have a mixture of productive and non-productive staff. The productive staff will complain about the non-productive. There will be accusations of racism, white supremacy and toxic patriarchy and the whole thing will disintegrate.

  57. I seem to recall all that occult crap — astrology etc., — being big in the 1960s and 1970s. Not the 1980s, not even the early 1980s.

    Nancy Reagan’s astrologer is a case in point: the Reagans were roundly mocked for this (even though Reagan himself did not participate).

    That said, First Ladies have often had nutty ideas in comparison to their husbands. Mary Todd Lincoln, after all, held seances in the White House.

    • Replies: @Renard
    @Celt Darnell


    First Ladies have often had nutty ideas in comparison to their husbands.
     
    FIFY
    , @Anon
    @Celt Darnell

    As another example, Jill is an "Ed.Dr" -- not just nutty but actually harmful to children and students.

  58. Thomas Kuhn wrote in his book “The Copernican Revolution” that it was the astrologers that fretted about the anomolous retrograde motion of the planets because horoscopes had to do with the planets. Navigators and calendar makers only cared about the Sun, Moon and stars. Copernicus was in the business of casting horoscopes.

    A week before they were killed, Princess Diana and Dodi Fayed went to visit an astrologer somewhere in the South of England. Obviously an expert.

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    @martin_2

    Re: Copernicus was in the business of casting horoscopes

    Definitely not. It was Kepler who gained a reputation as a skillful
    astrologer while a professor of mathematics at the Protestant school
    in Graz. As to Copernicus, after he returned to Poland from Italy
    he became a minor official in the Catholic church, and Catholicism
    had no patience for astrology. In fact, for two three hundred years
    the Catholic Church was the biggest supporter of astronomy in terms
    of employing astronomers and funding telescopes. Let’s not forget
    that the Big Bang model was invented in 1927 by Georges Lemaitre who
    was a Belgian Catholic priest.

    , @J.Ross
    @martin_2

    Part of conspiracy theory culture is that everything trashy has some elite true form respected by hoi polloi (hamburgers & steak, cigarettes & cigars, astrology & real astrology, etc).
    The best argument against astrology is Asimov's, that the stars move, and aren't even close to where the ancients would expect to find them.
    There is an astrological term, for a thing I once saw, which I wish I could remember. Every brightest object was visible, aligned, in daylight. It's called the sword of something. The crescent moon is like a hilt, the horns line up with the rest. Pretty much every naked-eye-visible planet, plus several of the brightest stars. Even though you know the planets cannot but align, it's hard to look at something like that and consider it meaningless.

  59. The interest in astrology that exploded in the 1960s – ‘70s has never gone
    away. Let’s not forget that we left Modernity behind in the late ‘60s when
    the UC Berkeley radicals began to refer to scientists as the “whores in the
    service of the military-industrial complex.” We’re now gingerly moving
    through Postmodernity as more and more people no longer believe that the
    Universe was created by God, and is therefore at least partly
    irrational, with us included.

    There is one Nobel laureate who admitted to believing in
    astrology. That was Kary Mullis, co-winner of the 1993 Nobel
    Prize in Chemistry, as revealed in his autobiography “Dancing
    Naked in the Mind Field” (1998). But then he was quite a
    character – he dropped massive amounts of acid and was married
    four times. He certainly lived his life to the fullest.

    Few people apparently realize that there are two kinds of
    Christianity. No, not Catholicism and Protestantism. I’m
    talking about (1) Christianity for the hoi polloi, for people
    with IQ115. Belief in astrology (and reincarnation) has
    always been part of esoteric Christianity, and while
    mainstream Christianity appears to be a spent force,
    esoteric Christianity, with the publications of “A Course
    in Miracles” (1976) and “A Course of Love” (2000), is
    exploding in popularity worldwide.

    • Replies: @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    Correction: (1) Traditional Christianity for the hoi polloi, i.e., for people
    with IQ less than 115, and (2) Esoteric Christianity for those with IQ
    higher than 115

    Replies: @BB753

    , @epebble
    @Anon 2

    ... reincarnation) has always been part of esoteric Christianity ...

    I have never heard of reincarnation being part of any kind of Christianity, esoteric or mainstream. It is an Eastern term rooted in Asian religions. The Christian term for it is Resurrection.

  60. @Altai
    But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    As I keep trying to explain, when smart phones emerged young girls began to spend more and more time on social media than males or adults.

    This has transformed the internet from 'There are no girls on the internet' of the mid 2000s to being a vehicle for the self-radicalisation or young girls of certain dispositions into a kind of religious moral panic. Tumblr is a kind of canary in the cole mine and might represent a particularly anti-rational black hole. A kind of electronic lord of the flies but with teenage girls. Here is a former Tumblr user realising how insane it was.

    https://4thwavenow.com/2019/03/20/tumblr-a-call-out-post

    I keep harping back on it but this clip from the Floyd protests in Stockholm (Yes, of course there was such a thing and despite the pandemic) represents something profound going on, this is not something somebody who isn't a Gen Z girl can relate to because it represents a religion nobody but them was born into.

    https://twitter.com/samnyttsimon/status/1268266061801160711

    These girls too don't represent all teenage girls but they represent a significant chunk of them in terms of personality and sociologically and all that fall into that category are now religious zealots.

    Astrology appeals to the same demographic and social media has allowed them to bring back discussions of it.

    The big change has been a combination of social media being taken deadly seriously at the same time that the power users of it became Gen Z and Gen Y young women and girls. That's what 'cancel culture' is, the emergence of teenage girl like shunning and shaming at a meta level.

    Replies: @Thea, @AndrewR, @Anon, @Polistra, @Alden, @Fidelios Automata

    I doubt you don’t know any teen age girls personally. Although you seem obsessed with them to an unhealthy degree. While typing with one hand

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @bomag
    @Alden

    OUCH!

    Well, in defense, it's been pointed out that one reason people are so interested in young women is because their choice of mates and how they raise kids determine our future to a significant degree. Hand that rocks the cradle and all that.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Alden

    I don't know if any of your daughters were 15/16 during Peak Tumblr. Believe me, it was not good.

    And I don't think you should get so personal when answering comments. That's what girls do ;-)

    Replies: @Curle

    , @Dvnjbbgc
    @Alden

    They are HOT!

    Before anyone condemns me — search your feelings; you know it to be true.

  61. Uri Geller about to make a comeback.

  62. One of our neighbors made pyramids out of resin in his garage. About 8 inches high. He sold a few of them. They were supposed to rejuvenate re sharpen razor blades. And bring peace harmony alignment with something to the household. Basically a good luck charm.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Alden

    I remember the Pyramid Power boomlet!

    BTW I know one man who made a big elaborate zen garden and another man who created an accurate sundial by placing stones around his yard. Are these male expressions of new ageyness?

    And then there's this rock-balancing stuff that seems to be big now, I'm seeing those little piles all over the place. Is this supposed to represent life in balance or centeredness or something like that?

  63. Here is a possible astrology enthusiast: Entitled and emotionally stunted broad cuts the line at walmart then starts screaming hysterically about rape:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215108-snowflake-wearing-a-mask-cuts-the-line-at-walmart-has-a-mental-breakdown-when-called-out-on-it-screams-about-rape

    Not to be outdone, the negroes had a busy weekend as well. A 77 year old man is charged with child endangerment when his FIVE year old daughter takes his gun and starts chasing neighborhood kids around with it.

    https://vidmax.com/video/215114-wth-77-year-old-man-charged-after-his-5-year-old-daughter-was-caught-on-cam-chasing-kids-with-a-gun

    Negroes go berserk in a grocery store in Philly. Fat negress inquires about still getting a pound of sliced roast beef amidst the chaos:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215109-watch-as-a-mob-completely-destroys-a-wawa-in-philadelphia

    And example # 6 million as to why women shouldn’t be police officers, a female parks her patrol car on live railroad tracks during a traffic stop and the patrol car is hit by a train, with a suspect inside:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215105-colorado-cop-arrests-road-rage-suspect-while-parking-his-cruiser-on-the-train-tracks-things-don-t-end-well-for-the-cruiser-or-the-suspect

    The last one is a testament to the outrageous hubris of cops during traffic stops. They will pull over a vehicle in some of the most unsafe places possible, and expect all other traffic to just, well, deal with it. They will block driveways, live lanes, and turn lanes to conduct a stop, when there are plenty of safe places to direct a vehicle so they can commence with the armed tax collection.

    This foolish birthing unit probably legitimately thought the train would stop for the patrol car.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mike Tre

    The last one is a testament to the outrageous hubris of cops during traffic stops. They will pull over a vehicle in some of the most unsafe places possible, and expect all other traffic to just, well, deal with it. They will block driveways, live lanes, and turn lanes to conduct a stop, when there are plenty of safe places to direct a vehicle so they can commence with the armed tax collection.

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination. It's an education.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    , @Art Deco
    @Mike Tre

    Also not an argument against employing women as uniformed police. (Those arguments are out there, they just don't involve absent-mindedness).

    , @MEH 0910
    @Mike Tre

    The female officer is not the one who parked the patrol car on the tracks:

    https://www.wptv.com/news/national/video-shows-train-hit-colorado-police-car-with-woman-in-custody-inside


    One officer, a man referred to as “Vasquez,” stops his cruiser directly on the train tracks, and the female officer who was driving behind him stops hers behind his cruiser.
     
    8-minute video shows officer response, train hit woman in Platteville police car
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vISSDzz079o

    An 8-minute video CBS News Colorado obtained from Fort Lupton Police Department shows a Fort Lupton and Platteville officer response when a train hit a woman in Platteville a police car sitting on the tracks.
     
  64. @Almost Missouri
    @BenjaminL


    I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away.
     
    Agree. A couple of data points from the supposed trough in "new age nonsense" around the turn of the century:

    • A hard-nosed lawyer lady with an advanced education and her own practice, who never flinches in front of the notoriously vindictive local magistrates or the occasionally violent clients, suddenly discovers one of the opposing clients is practicing "witchcraft". The heretofore rock-ribbed lawyer lady suddenly becomes discombobulated and considers whether she really needs to continue taking this case, citing the risk of "curse or spell".

    • A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings. She is more in demand for those latter skills than for her trained career path. Admittedly, she is quite good at them, not unlike the OP Chani.

    In other words, the new age stuff didn't "suddenly vanish", it became embedded in the woodwork of post-yuppie bohemian bourgeois society.

    Replies: @SFG, @Unintended Consequence, @ATBOTL, @Brutusale

    ” A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings.”

    What do you think coeds get together and talk about late at night? Oh yes, astrology, crystals and the occasional weegee board session are more likely interests than a weekly dorm poker game. It’s not too different from the more mystical aspects of Christianity though Christians often frown on such activities.

    As a category of mental processing, fortune telling is nonlinear and related to creative thinking. I once read an article in Psychology Today that demonstrated potential benefits to such pursuits by the use of hieroglyphics. The attempts at making meaning from unknown symbols helped in problem solving as well as generating ideas. It’s also long been observed that skilled fortune tellers know a lot about people; so, the source of their prescience is their observation skills and not the tarot cards.

    While gullible types may believe too literally in horoscopes and tarot readings, I think the break from logical reasoning and the limitations thereof can be helpful. With an unresolvable problem, for instance, a person may have repeatedly considered their options to no avail: the logical choices being considered just aren’t working. A little stimulation of divergent thinking might actually get the person to a eureka moment or get them off that unproductive though very logical path. Certainly, the Reagan White House was successful (because of or in spite of Nancy). Didn’t General Patton believe in reincarnation? I’m sure there are many more famous people who had some occult beliefs.

    Other than “divergent”, words like “synergy” come to mind in relation to the topic of predicting the future in order to better choose a course of action. The phrase “the sum is greater than the parts” may also relate to why often intelligent, successful people will utilize unorthodox methods when making decisions. Maybe it’s a wholistic strategy for factoring in both unknowns and that which a person has simply failed to consider: Everything coming out in the wash as with statistical analysis.

    While I’m not a fan of astrology, I tend to like systems that include typical life scenarios like getting married or searching for a job or crises points like being betrayed or going broke. The tarot cards are probably the most complete as far as life events imo. I have sometimes wondered if the tarot and an instruction manual on the basic plots for fiction couldn’t be combined with some good advice as some sort of problem-solving workbook. So, while I’m not advocating buying one of those robes with moons and stars on it to wear while consulting a crystal ball, I am saying don’t sell these ancient strategies short.

    • Replies: @Renard
    @Unintended Consequence

    Sir this is an Arby's

    , @anonymous
    @Unintended Consequence

    In the early aughts in Berkeley there was a tarot guy who set up his table every day on Telegraph Avenue. Around the corner was a magazine/smoke shop that sold lottery tickets. One day I went into the shop and the tarot guy was there with a stack of scratchers. After every losing scratch, he’d throw the ticket on the floor and yell, “Fuck!” or “Shit!” After about 5 minutes of this he left, and I asked the proprietor, an Egyptian guy, why he let the guy litter his floor like that. He said, “he’s my best customer.” So I asked him how much the guy spent in the store and he said, “about $200 a week.”

    Replies: @Unintended Consequence

  65. @PhysicistDave
    OT... or maybe not OT:

    Joel Kotkin has an interesting essay up on Spiked: "The revenge of the material economy."

    The bottom line: it is really not a good idea to ignore physical reality.

    Replies: @bomag, @BB753, @Almost Missouri, @James Speaks, @Bill P, @Rob

    The market is ripe for “Astrology For Dummies.”

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @James Speaks


    The market is ripe for “Astrology For Dummies.”
     
    https://www.amazon.com/Astrology-Dummies-Rae-Orion/dp/1119594162

    https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Idiots-Guide-Astrology-4th/dp/1592575811

    Replies: @James Speaks

  66. I remember Jeane Dixon — not just an astrologer but a self-proclaimed psychic — being big in the 60s and coming on various shows to give her vague predictions for the upcoming year. Her claim to fame was apparently predicting JFK’s assassination.

    Eventually these people tried to gain some upscale pseudo-scientific sheen by calling themselves “futurists.” Remember Faith Popcorn?

  67. @Celt Darnell
    I seem to recall all that occult crap — astrology etc., — being big in the 1960s and 1970s. Not the 1980s, not even the early 1980s.

    Nancy Reagan’s astrologer is a case in point: the Reagans were roundly mocked for this (even though Reagan himself did not participate).

    That said, First Ladies have often had nutty ideas in comparison to their husbands. Mary Todd Lincoln, after all, held seances in the White House.

    Replies: @Renard, @Anon

    First Ladies have often had nutty ideas in comparison to their husbands.

    FIFY

    • LOL: Celt Darnell
  68. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    I remember someone talking about having her cards tarot cards read . I don’t think she ever did too expensive. I’ve never heard my teen granddaughters or any of their friends speak of astrology tarot cards or any other mystical new age revival stuff.

    But then, unlike some pervert Men of UNZ my knowledge of teen girls comes from knowing about 30 of them in the circles of teen granddaughters. Not wanking around the internet.

  69. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    Many Black people, males and females, will still ask, “What sign are you”? And often will explain strange behavior, on the part of some relative, or partner, with the statement, “He a Virgo”! For white women, Wiccanism, is very popular. The library is buying a lot of books by, “Wiccans” and tarot books are always being reserved!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Michelle

    There's a West African cartoonist who is bored with existing astrology schemes and came up with a much simpler one, in which your birth month determines certain personality traits (January-Borns are often good with money).

    Replies: @Michelle

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Michelle

    Many Black people, males and females, will still ask, “What sign are you”?


    What's your sign girl?
    Is it compatible to mine?
    What's your sign girl?
    Is it compatible to mine?
    Oh Yeah

    I'm a Capricorn
    We believe in life and living
    We trip on love and giving, oh yeah
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96eUR0fizQ0

    The original was Danny Pearson from 1978, he was in Barrry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra, it's pretty good. Reggae artist Barry Biggs had a UK hit with a reggae cover, which Mr Chilton (ex Box Tops) channels here.

    Replies: @Michelle

  70. In a late-60s Mission Impossible Cinnamon poses as a glamorous globe-trotting astrologer to woo some Eastern Bloc tyrant who is a big believer — the villains on that series usually had some personality quirk Peter Graves and his team could exploit with their psy-ops. Of course they make sure all her predictions come impressively true until she’s got the bad guy wrapped around her little finger.

  71. @Anon 2
    The interest in astrology that exploded in the 1960s - ‘70s has never gone
    away. Let’s not forget that we left Modernity behind in the late ‘60s when
    the UC Berkeley radicals began to refer to scientists as the “whores in the
    service of the military-industrial complex.” We’re now gingerly moving
    through Postmodernity as more and more people no longer believe that the
    Universe was created by God, and is therefore at least partly
    irrational, with us included.

    There is one Nobel laureate who admitted to believing in
    astrology. That was Kary Mullis, co-winner of the 1993 Nobel
    Prize in Chemistry, as revealed in his autobiography “Dancing
    Naked in the Mind Field” (1998). But then he was quite a
    character - he dropped massive amounts of acid and was married
    four times. He certainly lived his life to the fullest.

    Few people apparently realize that there are two kinds of
    Christianity. No, not Catholicism and Protestantism. I’m
    talking about (1) Christianity for the hoi polloi, for people
    with IQ115. Belief in astrology (and reincarnation) has
    always been part of esoteric Christianity, and while
    mainstream Christianity appears to be a spent force,
    esoteric Christianity, with the publications of “A Course
    in Miracles” (1976) and “A Course of Love” (2000), is
    exploding in popularity worldwide.

    Replies: @Anon 2, @epebble

    Correction: (1) Traditional Christianity for the hoi polloi, i.e., for people
    with IQ less than 115, and (2) Esoteric Christianity for those with IQ
    higher than 115

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Anon 2

    Your #2, that's gnosticism, not Christianity.

  72. @Almost Missouri
    Compared to the mystical and self-contradictory state-backed religions of equalism, negrolotry, transexualism, Our Values, and Our Democracy, astrology is positively rational. In astrology you even have to know a few actual facts: which planets are in alignment, the birthday of the subject, etc.

    feminist-led tech
     
    LOL. Of course there is no such animal. What this really means is that all the hard parts (actual tech: software coding, hardware infrastructure) will be outsourced, so the feminists can focus on the actual project: Being Heard.

    That said, I might take the other side of @tedfrank's bet, except that the real warning flags aren't the astrology per se, or even the feminism (which seems to be in a growth phase for the moment), but the high and non-scalable wage structure, and the branding to a single woman's name. Competent VCs could fix this, but would ChaniNicholas listen? If the Moon is in the Seventh House, I suppose.

    Replies: @Mark G.

    Compared to the mystical and self-contradictory state-backed religions of equalism, negrolotry, transexualism, Our Values, and Our Democracy, astrology is positively rational.

    Add to that the pseudoscience of radical environmentalism. The left sometimes makes fun of religious conservative beliefs like creationism but many of them hold equally implausible beliefs. As Altai mentions in comment 2., females tend to be more prone to this.

    Polling has shown that females have always been more inclined to believe in various forms of pseudoscience. The one exception is UFOs. Men, for some reason, tend to be more fervent believers in that. There is also a tendency for believers in one pseudoscience to believe in others. My grandmother had Tarot cards, a Ouija board, did seances and was an astrologer. One of her astrology clients was the former thirties Hollywood actress Frances Farmer. When I was a small child, she took me with her when she visited Farmer one time. Afterwards she told me Farmer had been a famous Hollywood actress. My grandmother would often make up stuff, such as telling me tigers lived in the woods near my house, so I never believed anything she told me. I was surprised many years later when I saw there was a new movie with Jessica Lange playing Farmer and realized Grandma had actually told me the truth and she was a former actress.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    @Mark G.

    UFOs have a "hard" sci-fi bent wrt being from (take your pick) outer space, the deep sea, other dimensions, ore even the future. There's a narrative of exploration that guys find appealing. Plus there's sepculation about who the alien race is and how we will interact with it. BTW, the government itself studies UFOs. They're not studying anything else of an esoteric nature.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  73. Ted Frank, as they say, won the internet yesterday.

  74. Astrology is distilled female egocentrism. Reality is seen as a competitor. There’s only so much attention people can give, and they can either care about reality or about women’s feelings. It doesn’t help that the people who do care about facts an awful lot are unfuckable nerds and the kind of internet conservatives who’ll say “facts don’t care about your feelings” without cringing at themselves. Women aren’t into astrology because they have thought about how likely it is to be true or how accurately it predicts anything. They’re into it as an act of solidarity with feelings and opposition to facts, and as an indication of which men they definitely do not want to be associated with, ever. It’s the natural counterattack to mansplaining.

  75. The one exception is UFOs. Men, for some reason, tend to be more fervent believers in that.

    F0r some reason? I’ll give you a hint. Aliens are technologically advanced rational beings who arrive in cool space ships.

  76. Anonymous[223] • Disclaimer says:

    Well, the current economic fad doctrine of ‘magic dirt’ – that is that emanations from the local soil have a direct bearing on the per capita GDP of the said locality, through an occult process which cannot be explained by profane science – is basically the orthodox dogma these days.

    Against that, belief in astrology is positively rational.

    • Agree: Rob McX
  77. @Mike Tre
    Here is a possible astrology enthusiast: Entitled and emotionally stunted broad cuts the line at walmart then starts screaming hysterically about rape:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215108-snowflake-wearing-a-mask-cuts-the-line-at-walmart-has-a-mental-breakdown-when-called-out-on-it-screams-about-rape

    Not to be outdone, the negroes had a busy weekend as well. A 77 year old man is charged with child endangerment when his FIVE year old daughter takes his gun and starts chasing neighborhood kids around with it.

    https://vidmax.com/video/215114-wth-77-year-old-man-charged-after-his-5-year-old-daughter-was-caught-on-cam-chasing-kids-with-a-gun

    Negroes go berserk in a grocery store in Philly. Fat negress inquires about still getting a pound of sliced roast beef amidst the chaos:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215109-watch-as-a-mob-completely-destroys-a-wawa-in-philadelphia


    And example # 6 million as to why women shouldn't be police officers, a female parks her patrol car on live railroad tracks during a traffic stop and the patrol car is hit by a train, with a suspect inside:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215105-colorado-cop-arrests-road-rage-suspect-while-parking-his-cruiser-on-the-train-tracks-things-don-t-end-well-for-the-cruiser-or-the-suspect

    The last one is a testament to the outrageous hubris of cops during traffic stops. They will pull over a vehicle in some of the most unsafe places possible, and expect all other traffic to just, well, deal with it. They will block driveways, live lanes, and turn lanes to conduct a stop, when there are plenty of safe places to direct a vehicle so they can commence with the armed tax collection.

    This foolish birthing unit probably legitimately thought the train would stop for the patrol car.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Art Deco, @MEH 0910

    The last one is a testament to the outrageous hubris of cops during traffic stops. They will pull over a vehicle in some of the most unsafe places possible, and expect all other traffic to just, well, deal with it. They will block driveways, live lanes, and turn lanes to conduct a stop, when there are plenty of safe places to direct a vehicle so they can commence with the armed tax collection.

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination. It’s an education.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Art Deco

    LOL Fart Gecko and his stale "you're imagination" replies. Ironically (lost to you) lacking in imagination. I'm out on the roads every single day; you reside in some bubble wrapped cubicle or other such make work cloud life. You don't even know what you don't know.

    And parking a vehicle on rail tracks isn't absent mindedness, you disingenuous little troll, it's utter lack of situational awareness and or stupid arrogance. Either way, taking flak from the likes of you is always an indicator that I'm over the target.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  78. @Mike Tre
    Here is a possible astrology enthusiast: Entitled and emotionally stunted broad cuts the line at walmart then starts screaming hysterically about rape:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215108-snowflake-wearing-a-mask-cuts-the-line-at-walmart-has-a-mental-breakdown-when-called-out-on-it-screams-about-rape

    Not to be outdone, the negroes had a busy weekend as well. A 77 year old man is charged with child endangerment when his FIVE year old daughter takes his gun and starts chasing neighborhood kids around with it.

    https://vidmax.com/video/215114-wth-77-year-old-man-charged-after-his-5-year-old-daughter-was-caught-on-cam-chasing-kids-with-a-gun

    Negroes go berserk in a grocery store in Philly. Fat negress inquires about still getting a pound of sliced roast beef amidst the chaos:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215109-watch-as-a-mob-completely-destroys-a-wawa-in-philadelphia


    And example # 6 million as to why women shouldn't be police officers, a female parks her patrol car on live railroad tracks during a traffic stop and the patrol car is hit by a train, with a suspect inside:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215105-colorado-cop-arrests-road-rage-suspect-while-parking-his-cruiser-on-the-train-tracks-things-don-t-end-well-for-the-cruiser-or-the-suspect

    The last one is a testament to the outrageous hubris of cops during traffic stops. They will pull over a vehicle in some of the most unsafe places possible, and expect all other traffic to just, well, deal with it. They will block driveways, live lanes, and turn lanes to conduct a stop, when there are plenty of safe places to direct a vehicle so they can commence with the armed tax collection.

    This foolish birthing unit probably legitimately thought the train would stop for the patrol car.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Art Deco, @MEH 0910

    Also not an argument against employing women as uniformed police. (Those arguments are out there, they just don’t involve absent-mindedness).

  79. @Dmon
    @SFG

    "maybe DeSantis will be our new Reagan?"

    Massive expansion of federal debt and amnesty for illegal aliens? Hell, Biden is the new Reagan.
    BTW - go back to RR's governor days and you can throw destruction of the family in there too.

    https://www.nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-evolution-of-divorce
    "In 1969, Governor Ronald Reagan of California made what he later admitted was one of the biggest mistakes of his political life. Seeking to eliminate the strife and deception often associated with the legal regime of fault-based divorce, Reagan signed the nation's first no-fault divorce bill."

    Replies: @Alden

    The great conservative hero Reagan also signed a law making it much easier to get abortions years before Roe. And had many gay men on his staff and fundraisers.

    And when the great conservative hero was elected president he;

    1 did nothing about affirmative action and the non White percentage of government employees at all levels, city county state and federal rose higher and higher as Whites retired and anything non White replaced them.

    2 created the first of many amnesties.

    3 did nothing to stop illegals entering the country and getting jobs and welfare.

    4 and it was under Raegan’s watch that our industrial sector left for China.

    5 also under Reagan’s presidency NASA and the NASA contractors in Silicon Valley began laying off and not renewing the contracts of the White men who put a man in the moon in favor of Chinese immigrants. These were men who graduated with their MSs in aeronautical astronautical engineering and software design in the mid 1960s and were laid off 15 years later in favor of non White immigrants.

    Or one of the many reasons I’m not a conservative.

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Alden

    I think the expression is: “We have a conservative movement that has conserved nothing.”

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Alden


    The great conservative hero Reagan also signed a law making it much easier to get abortions years before Roe.
     
    No, he did not. That bill made it easier for hospitals to give abortions, but it was in no way elective. This canard never dies, does it? Reagan's main influence on the bill was to have "fetal deformity" removed as an excuse for the hospital committee making the decision.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Alden

    Or one of the many reasons I’m not a conservative.

    Right! Because the alternative was so much better, comrade!

    Carter, was a great choice, such a human rights champion!

    Carter gave the Panama Canal away to endear himself to 'Hispanics,' created the Departments of Energy and Education, botched Iran, leading to the hostage debacle and the failed rescue attempt, imposed a grain embargo on the Soviets which harmed farmers through reduced commodity prices, did nothing about the oil shock except turn down the heat and wear a sweater, and deregulated the airlines.

    Yep, great choice.

    Reagan was imperfect, but he wasn't a globalist. Remember, Carter was run by Zbigniew Brzezinski, who was key to laying the groundwork for the problems the globalists have created.

    , @BB753
    @Alden

    6. Had Bush Sr. as his vice-president ( who called the shots), who then went on to become president and then got his idiot son the job too. An unmitigated disaster for America. Under Bush Sr ( a CIA man through and through) the deep state began openly running the executive branch and the neocons ran amok in the government.

    Come to think of it, Reagan put "conservatives" to sleep thinking they were running things when in fact trotskyites took over America under his watch. Even Steve Sailer can't comprehend that Reagan was a phony. Boiling the frog.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  80. @Alden
    @Altai

    I doubt you don’t know any teen age girls personally. Although you seem obsessed with them to an unhealthy degree. While typing with one hand

    Replies: @bomag, @YetAnotherAnon, @Dvnjbbgc

    OUCH!

    Well, in defense, it’s been pointed out that one reason people are so interested in young women is because their choice of mates and how they raise kids determine our future to a significant degree. Hand that rocks the cradle and all that.

  81. @Bardon Kaldian
    Astrology is big everywhere in the Western world.

    Although- I wouldn't put it in the same category as parapsychology. Great minds like John Archibald Wheeler tried to see whether there is something in it; Wheeler was open minded, but also a critical mind. After a few years, he gave up & said that parapsychology had failed to produce results (Wheeler was scientifically, not scientistically oriented). Of course there are opinions that Wheeler, at the end, was wrong:https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1979/05/17/a-decade-of-permissiveness/,  https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1980/06/26/parapsychology-an-exchange/- but I don't care.

    I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could "calculate" anything real about my past (not future). It was about what happened to me when I was a child, then in my early 20s, my health and finances and interests etc. They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @prosa123, @HA, @Prester John

    ‘…For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.’

    You coulda almost had a fatal car accident — just not realized how if you hadn’t stopped to take a leak, you woulda been hit by that semi whose driver was fishing for his cigarettes.

    It’s possible.

  82. @martin_2
    Thomas Kuhn wrote in his book "The Copernican Revolution" that it was the astrologers that fretted about the anomolous retrograde motion of the planets because horoscopes had to do with the planets. Navigators and calendar makers only cared about the Sun, Moon and stars. Copernicus was in the business of casting horoscopes.

    A week before they were killed, Princess Diana and Dodi Fayed went to visit an astrologer somewhere in the South of England. Obviously an expert.

    Replies: @Anon 2, @J.Ross

    Re: Copernicus was in the business of casting horoscopes

    Definitely not. It was Kepler who gained a reputation as a skillful
    astrologer while a professor of mathematics at the Protestant school
    in Graz. As to Copernicus, after he returned to Poland from Italy
    he became a minor official in the Catholic church, and Catholicism
    had no patience for astrology. In fact, for two three hundred years
    the Catholic Church was the biggest supporter of astronomy in terms
    of employing astronomers and funding telescopes. Let’s not forget
    that the Big Bang model was invented in 1927 by Georges Lemaitre who
    was a Belgian Catholic priest.

  83. @Henry's Cat
    Who remembers the biorhythms fad from the 1970s/80s? It was never clear to me why these cycles began at birth and not in the womb.

    Replies: @Alden

    I remember hearing about bio rhythms. I don’t think I ever knew much about them. Will there be a huge boom in house plants, terrariums, Muscha posters and the colors orange and gold in home decorating?

  84. @AndrewR
    @BenjaminL

    Reading about this stuff makes me wonder why women should be allowed any rights beyond what a ten year old boy has (if that).

    Men can be stupid but generally male stupidity is far less contagious.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘Men can be stupid but generally male stupidity is far less contagious.’

    Socialism? War?

  85. Not only Astrology, but all kinds of spiritualism is really popular right now. Marianne Williamson ran for president and was into that stuff.

  86. @Art Deco
    @Mike Tre

    The last one is a testament to the outrageous hubris of cops during traffic stops. They will pull over a vehicle in some of the most unsafe places possible, and expect all other traffic to just, well, deal with it. They will block driveways, live lanes, and turn lanes to conduct a stop, when there are plenty of safe places to direct a vehicle so they can commence with the armed tax collection.

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination. It's an education.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    LOL Fart Gecko and his stale “you’re imagination” replies. Ironically (lost to you) lacking in imagination. I’m out on the roads every single day; you reside in some bubble wrapped cubicle or other such make work cloud life. You don’t even know what you don’t know.

    And parking a vehicle on rail tracks isn’t absent mindedness, you disingenuous little troll, it’s utter lack of situational awareness and or stupid arrogance. Either way, taking flak from the likes of you is always an indicator that I’m over the target.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mike Tre

    Thanks for the string of assertions. I've been driving an automobile for 40+ years and lived in core cities, suburbs, and small towns. No, police officers do not behave that way. You get tickets because you don't think the rules apply to you. Pay your fines and quit complaining.


    And parking a vehicle on rail tracks isn’t absent mindedness, you disingenuous little troll, it’s utter lack of situational awareness

    IOW, she's absent-minded. Which is a handicap in all kinds of situations and not a categorical feature of being female.


    https://nypost.com/2022/04/07/eric-boehlert-journalist-dead-after-nj-transit-train-strikes-him-while-riding-bike/

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  87. @Alden
    One of our neighbors made pyramids out of resin in his garage. About 8 inches high. He sold a few of them. They were supposed to rejuvenate re sharpen razor blades. And bring peace harmony alignment with something to the household. Basically a good luck charm.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    I remember the Pyramid Power boomlet!

    BTW I know one man who made a big elaborate zen garden and another man who created an accurate sundial by placing stones around his yard. Are these male expressions of new ageyness?

    And then there’s this rock-balancing stuff that seems to be big now, I’m seeing those little piles all over the place. Is this supposed to represent life in balance or centeredness or something like that?

  88. But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    Typical Sagittarius

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  89. @theMann
    Pretty soon the 80's will be wanting their Satanism back.........

    Once you reject the Truth, you embrace every lie. Astrology, with frequent links to Satanism, is inevitable.

    I won't be really impressed until the Cthulhu worshippers make their move.

    Replies: @SFG

    Nobody worships Big C, he’s sleeping at the bottom of the ocean and won’t give you crap.

    Now Nyarlathotep, he’s doled out a few favors across the ages.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @SFG

    "Now Nyarlathotep, he’s doled out a few favors across the ages."

    I'm a Yog-Sothoth man myself.

    btw, since you know the lingo, it might interest you to know that I am distantly related to Lord Dunsany himself.

  90. But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    “If it keeps them off the streets…”

    (Did your parents used to say that too?)

    • Replies: @pyrrhus
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, the kind of "science" that said the clot shot was safe and effective, and that fusion power will solve our problems, despite 70 years of failure...

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  91. I think Astrology is a fairly harmless faith tradition that gives peace and satisfaction to its followers. As a faith tradition, it has caused least amount of harm compared to other faith traditions and hence may be safely ignored. Obviously, modern Science and Astrology contradict one another, but so do modern Science and other faith traditions that continue to be popular.

    • Agree: prosa123
  92. @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    Correction: (1) Traditional Christianity for the hoi polloi, i.e., for people
    with IQ less than 115, and (2) Esoteric Christianity for those with IQ
    higher than 115

    Replies: @BB753

    Your #2, that’s gnosticism, not Christianity.

  93. I read an article a few years ago where they took the daily horoscopes published in the 1950s and without posting the date they were published, showed them to people in 2015, and the people said they could relate, or were dealing with whatever was mentioned in their horoscope. It’s like thinking your fortune cookie was meant for you.

  94. @Anon 2
    The interest in astrology that exploded in the 1960s - ‘70s has never gone
    away. Let’s not forget that we left Modernity behind in the late ‘60s when
    the UC Berkeley radicals began to refer to scientists as the “whores in the
    service of the military-industrial complex.” We’re now gingerly moving
    through Postmodernity as more and more people no longer believe that the
    Universe was created by God, and is therefore at least partly
    irrational, with us included.

    There is one Nobel laureate who admitted to believing in
    astrology. That was Kary Mullis, co-winner of the 1993 Nobel
    Prize in Chemistry, as revealed in his autobiography “Dancing
    Naked in the Mind Field” (1998). But then he was quite a
    character - he dropped massive amounts of acid and was married
    four times. He certainly lived his life to the fullest.

    Few people apparently realize that there are two kinds of
    Christianity. No, not Catholicism and Protestantism. I’m
    talking about (1) Christianity for the hoi polloi, for people
    with IQ115. Belief in astrology (and reincarnation) has
    always been part of esoteric Christianity, and while
    mainstream Christianity appears to be a spent force,
    esoteric Christianity, with the publications of “A Course
    in Miracles” (1976) and “A Course of Love” (2000), is
    exploding in popularity worldwide.

    Replies: @Anon 2, @epebble

    … reincarnation) has always been part of esoteric Christianity …

    I have never heard of reincarnation being part of any kind of Christianity, esoteric or mainstream. It is an Eastern term rooted in Asian religions. The Christian term for it is Resurrection.

  95. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    Female readers?

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon, Kylie
    • Replies: @Tracy
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    For the record, I'm a female reader. An outlier, I know. But still...

    , @Claudia
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Another female reader here. There may be morr of us than you think!

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  96. Anon[241] • Disclaimer says:
    @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    New-Age services, sects and secretive networks. It is a fog, a miasma, a never-ending source of money and power to be exploited in each subsequent generation. Here are my observations, not really expecting to be able to give a comprehensive explanation because there’s always a new angle (as in all money-making schemes)

    1) Very few people have the intelligence, time and inclination to answer the three transcendental questions: Why is there something instead of nothing? What is man? How then are we to live?
    Yet we all need identity and purpose. Uncertainty is panic-inducing. So we choose, consciously or not, to follow our gurus. Mr. Sailer is one of those, in his own number-crunching way. Then there is Marx, Nietzsche, Osho, Keith Rainere, the Goddess thing, it is endless. The big picture, the small picture and the middle picture are full of gurus helpfully explaining how to think about man and the universe, and how to live.

    2) Men are prone to follow ideas that are debated on the public square, so to speak (ideologies, i.e., Marx or transhumanism). Women are prone to follow closer-to-home figures (Keith Rainere or the lady teaching Kabalah). They get dragged in by their friends, by word-of-mouth. These groups are less subject to public scrutiny, thus more open to being wacky and overwhelming the person. There are documentaries on Netflix about Osho (Wild, wild country), Rainere and Bikram which offer insights into the process.

    3) “New Age” is really a hodge-podge of gnosticisms. Someone has a special, secret knowledge to share that will provide salvation. It has two subsets: “mystical” and “scientific”. (I forget where I read that, but it was a cogent article about the squabbles inside the community). So mystical would be invoking angels, spirits, Goddess, Reiki, etc. “Scientific New Age” would include some knowledge handed down that can be studied. Astrology and meditation could be situated here, though lines are often blurry. What is clear is that regular science has, since the 90s, been added to the schtick. Concepts from psychology, medicine and quantum physics (!) have been used to justify gurus like Deepak Chopra and Greg Bradden and many others. The idea is that you can explain through Jung and quantum physics why going to Cancun to do three-hour long meditation sessions with Bradden can really, really, give you superpowers to change your mind, your heart, your health, your child’s health, your finances and the world. Updated way of marketing have been invented: you do coaching, wellness, self-actualization. No one speaks of “New Age” anymore. Gnosticism still sells, tho’.

    4) Underestimate at your peril manly involvement. John Dee and Newton were spiritists. Every lady teaching kabbalah needed an Isaac Luria. Many gurus (father figures?) are men, certainly the more successful ones, who spawned large organizations. Is it the sexual opportunities?

    5) Regular men are prone to secretive networks that will benefit them in practical terms: money, insider information, influence, deals, career. The Freemasons spring to mind, they excluded women until recently, yes they were extremely influential and still are in some parts. And all the initiation rituals are ultra-wacky, a mixture of mind control and luciferanism. Scientology also a useful network.
    More modern secretive networks pretend to be business-oriented. The Young President’s Organization is one such, certainly not the only one. Men meet monthly, for life, with the same eight guys in their cell. Only if one dies can another be chosen to replace him. No family members within one cell. They are not to meet socially, except in weddings and funerals. They bare their souls to these fellows, literally. (An original Illuminati control technique, per E Michael Jones.) If they miss two appointments, they are out. They organize one trip a year, only the 8-9 of them, where they do “in-depth” catching up. Plus one with the wives. The wives have their separate forum. It’s not that they aren’t allowed to talk about it, but they don’t, and don’t really know who is in whose cell. Except the higher ups. The YPOs I know are globalist mouthpieces, to the point of appearing dumb. And they are in other respects very smart people. Two such were shown the Breitbart video of Biden fondling kids. It was like watching a soldier hold the line under fire. Weird.

    But astrology or Yuval Harari, it is always “ye shall be like gods.”

  97. @Almost Missouri
    @BenjaminL


    I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away.
     
    Agree. A couple of data points from the supposed trough in "new age nonsense" around the turn of the century:

    • A hard-nosed lawyer lady with an advanced education and her own practice, who never flinches in front of the notoriously vindictive local magistrates or the occasionally violent clients, suddenly discovers one of the opposing clients is practicing "witchcraft". The heretofore rock-ribbed lawyer lady suddenly becomes discombobulated and considers whether she really needs to continue taking this case, citing the risk of "curse or spell".

    • A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings. She is more in demand for those latter skills than for her trained career path. Admittedly, she is quite good at them, not unlike the OP Chani.

    In other words, the new age stuff didn't "suddenly vanish", it became embedded in the woodwork of post-yuppie bohemian bourgeois society.

    Replies: @SFG, @Unintended Consequence, @ATBOTL, @Brutusale

    Many of the boomer moms of my friends in the 1980’s and 1990’s were still into that stuff.

  98. Re astrology, feminists are hoisted by their own party line, which holds that (1) anything done by women is exempt from criticism, and (2) anything women do that has conventionally been “marginalised”, ignored, or not taken seriously is in fact of hidden merit and importance. So they can’t say that astrology is a load of nonsense without suffering severe cognitive dissonance.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  99. Astrology never left…because it works pretty well…I’d wager that iSteve knows nothing about it…

  100. @Achmed E. Newman

    But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.
     
    "If it keeps them off the streets..."

    (Did your parents used to say that too?)

    Replies: @pyrrhus

    Yes, the kind of “science” that said the clot shot was safe and effective, and that fusion power will solve our problems, despite 70 years of failure…

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @pyrrhus

    I have no idea how that is a reply to my comment. Then again, that's how it is between water signs and fire signs.

  101. Re trannies, there is a historical connection between cross-dressing and magic. The Native Americans used to have tribal members who dressed as women and were credited with magical powers, for instance it was believed that males could indulge in anal sex with them without harm, whereas male-male sex was thought to lead to insanity.

  102. Lots of guys in the PUA/Game/MGTOW community have noticed the uptick in interest in astrology from chicks in the last 10 years or so. Feminazism and occult study seem to go together; in the late 19th Century/early 20th Century when feminists were organizing for the vote, there was long-term fad in seances, mysticism and table tipping and the like; usually, the seances/activities occurred at the homes of well-to-do feminist women, where the shysters could easily dupe a group of believers.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Spiritualism

    It became Harry Houdini’s second career to debunk the Spiritualist hucksters. After becoming a world-famous stage magician, he made his mission to debunk as many of these charlatans as he could, partly because they were horning in on his act but were cowards who did it in parlors rather than bare stages, partly because he felt bad for the tricked people (especially those seeking to contacts dead relatives), and partly because he truly did want to believe in the supernatural (he told his widow that he wanted her to hold a seance every year to try to contact him, and if he could he would reach out from the other side; magicians, by tradition, keep this seance going every year, with no confirmed hits yet).

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Harry_Houdini#Debunking_spiritualists

    Anyway, astrology as an ancient study was interesting, but involved so many variables that, like alchemy, it was humongously difficult to account for and thereby give definite answers. Some of the greatest minds in scientific and philosophical history believed in it and studied it. Certainly, the idea that cosmic activity could affect human behavior is, in itself, not absurd.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Astrology

    Its important to note that pre-19th century, astrology was a male field, where men tried to use math and science to discover truths. Many of those male pre-industrial astrologers worked out intricate calculations to try to test their theories of the stars, making it far more like a science than woo-woo feelings. Its how we got astronomy — men were noting the changing of the stars with the seasons, and thus could forecast summer or winter, and thus were seeing if there were any other things they could predict.

    It was only in the industrial era that rigorously-thinking men largely abandoned astrology as fruitless, unlike with say, alchemy, which was rigorized into modern chemistry. When left-brained, science-minded men abandoned it, women and right-brain men picked it up, discarded any idea of “testing” their methods and just made astrological predictions based on vague feelings and a few star signs.

    Astrology seems to wax and wane in importance in all humans when the world is in a period of change, when people seek answers to a world that keeps becoming topsy-turvy.

    1840-1920 (the era of Spiritualism) was a time of huge technological and political change in both America and Europe. A person born in 1840 and how died in 1920 — 80 years old, not an un heard of event– would have seen a pastoral, regionally-powered America run on slavery and wooden ships transformed by the railroad, telegraph, reliable repeating firearms, the Civil War, iron clad ships, factories, WW1, and industrialization into a far-more citified and connected world where the U.S. was a leading world power. Such a huge change would have caused much consternation and made people jump into spiritualism/astrology as a way of somehow explaining what was going on. No less a mind than Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle was seduced by spiritualism, trying to explain the world beyond Holmsian logic.

    Since 2000, the internet, smart phones, presidential-inspired Ferguson race riots, an international pandemic, stolen elections, and a major war involving Russia, etc. have probably made right-brained men and all women much more susceptible to looking for answers in the occult, including astrology. And since woke propaganda today make it verboten for rational men to tell their wives/girlfriends to knock it off with the nonsense and tell gays to shove it in the closet with them, women and gay men are back into it.

    In short, feminism and astrology go hand in hand. Both are exceedingly stupid and vapid, and lies leading only to misery, and both arise together in a culture.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @R.G. Camara


    It became Harry Houdini’s second career to debunk the Spiritualist hucksters. After becoming a world-famous stage magician, he made his mission to debunk as many of these charlatans as he could, partly because they were horning in on his act but were cowards who did it in parlors rather than bare stages, partly because he felt bad for the tricked people
     
    Houdini lost his mother when he was already famous, and, in his grief, he spent years, and a lot of money, looking for mediums to be able to contact her. The straw that broke the camel's back for him was an incident involving a famous man that he had befriended--Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, of Sherlock Holmes fame. Doyle had an interest in the supernatural, which deepened after his son was killed in WWI.

    Doyle's wife became a self-proclaimed psychic and medium, and one day in Atlantic City, the Doyles and Houdini held a séance in a hotel room to contact Houdini's mother. Mrs, Doyle claimed success, but Houdini realized it was fake. That ended his friendship with Doyle and started his vendetta on bogus mediums.

  103. I think if a young man were suffering from a bad case of the biological imperative, mastering astrology might be a great strategy for getting laid. When I was in high school, I was the captain of the math team, and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet. But it didn’t work. Maybe I had hold of the wrong end of the stick, if anyone still uses that expression.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @SafeNow


    I was the captain of the math team, and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet.
     
    LOL. C'mon you don't come across as someone who would be that seriously confused--even at 16. (Now, Corny ...)
    , @prosa123
    @SafeNow

    When I was in high school, I was the captain of the math team, and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet. But it didn’t work.

    Being captain of the math team has never been a chick magnet at any time or any place. To be sure, it won't repel girls in the same that being a fatty or pathologically introverted will, but it won't help either.

    , @Curle
    @SafeNow

    “and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet.”

    How did you not know that sports is the ONLY chick magnet in HS? I played sports but wasn’t good, in fact I got bloodied up once but discovered to my surprise that blood seemingly excites girls. I was walking from the football field to the locker room after an minor but rather messy cut and had a couple of girls make appreciative comments to me . . . for bleeding!

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  104. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    “…I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away.”

    In some societies where religion is frowned upon (e.g. former Soviet Union) it got transformed into a fondness for pop psychology, another pseudo-science that serves the same esoteric purpose — a mysterious key to unlocking the secrets of the universe, available to anyone who can glom on to the right guru or expert. (Kind of like certain websites that make a name for themselves peddling edgelord conspiracy theories that are beyond the reach of the normies, but that’s a topic for another day.)

    I remember arguing with some seemingly intelligent woman from the Eastern bloc about how astrology can’t be bogus because there are places where one can earn a PhD by studying it. Luckily, the meeting was scheduled to start at that point, so no further small talk was needed.

    • Agree: SFG
  105. @Bardon Kaldian
    Astrology is big everywhere in the Western world.

    Although- I wouldn't put it in the same category as parapsychology. Great minds like John Archibald Wheeler tried to see whether there is something in it; Wheeler was open minded, but also a critical mind. After a few years, he gave up & said that parapsychology had failed to produce results (Wheeler was scientifically, not scientistically oriented). Of course there are opinions that Wheeler, at the end, was wrong:https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1979/05/17/a-decade-of-permissiveness/,  https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1980/06/26/parapsychology-an-exchange/- but I don't care.

    I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could "calculate" anything real about my past (not future). It was about what happened to me when I was a child, then in my early 20s, my health and finances and interests etc. They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @prosa123, @HA, @Prester John

    “Although- I wouldn’t put it in the same category as parapsychology.”

    Or regular psychology for that matter.

  106. @Bardon Kaldian
    Astrology is big everywhere in the Western world.

    Although- I wouldn't put it in the same category as parapsychology. Great minds like John Archibald Wheeler tried to see whether there is something in it; Wheeler was open minded, but also a critical mind. After a few years, he gave up & said that parapsychology had failed to produce results (Wheeler was scientifically, not scientistically oriented). Of course there are opinions that Wheeler, at the end, was wrong:https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1979/05/17/a-decade-of-permissiveness/,  https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1980/06/26/parapsychology-an-exchange/- but I don't care.

    I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could "calculate" anything real about my past (not future). It was about what happened to me when I was a child, then in my early 20s, my health and finances and interests etc. They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @prosa123, @HA, @Prester John

    I am going to take the pro-Astrology argument, here. Astrology is not necessarily a pseudo-science. Rather, it’s just one of many ways to harness the very real and scientifically-documented Placebo Effect.

    It’s hard to simply decide to fool yourself. So you need a little ritual, a semi-plausible backstory, and some other adherents to give the process some credibility (to yourself). And, luckily, the predictions and advice offered by astrologers are also 99% encouraging and optimistic. So you have an additional incentive to believe.

    Heck, Astrology is no less scientific than, say, Freudian Psychoanalysis, which lots of very smart and sophisticated people have believed in. They just spent a lot more time and money to get less encouraging advice. Positive self-delusion is underrated.

    • Agree: SFG, Kratoklastes, prosa123
    • Thanks: loveshumanity
    • Replies: @SFG
    @Hypnotoad666

    Quite a bit of PUA focuses on raising your self image, so it’s not just women, either.

  107. I think it sounds like it could be a goldmine (not sarcastic).

    Nobody ever went broke underestimating the tastes of the American public.

  108. @martin_2
    Thomas Kuhn wrote in his book "The Copernican Revolution" that it was the astrologers that fretted about the anomolous retrograde motion of the planets because horoscopes had to do with the planets. Navigators and calendar makers only cared about the Sun, Moon and stars. Copernicus was in the business of casting horoscopes.

    A week before they were killed, Princess Diana and Dodi Fayed went to visit an astrologer somewhere in the South of England. Obviously an expert.

    Replies: @Anon 2, @J.Ross

    Part of conspiracy theory culture is that everything trashy has some elite true form respected by hoi polloi (hamburgers & steak, cigarettes & cigars, astrology & real astrology, etc).
    The best argument against astrology is Asimov’s, that the stars move, and aren’t even close to where the ancients would expect to find them.
    There is an astrological term, for a thing I once saw, which I wish I could remember. Every brightest object was visible, aligned, in daylight. It’s called the sword of something. The crescent moon is like a hilt, the horns line up with the rest. Pretty much every naked-eye-visible planet, plus several of the brightest stars. Even though you know the planets cannot but align, it’s hard to look at something like that and consider it meaningless.

  109. @Michelle
    @BenjaminL

    Many Black people, males and females, will still ask, "What sign are you"? And often will explain strange behavior, on the part of some relative, or partner, with the statement, "He a Virgo"! For white women, Wiccanism, is very popular. The library is buying a lot of books by, "Wiccans" and tarot books are always being reserved!

    Replies: @J.Ross, @YetAnotherAnon

    There’s a West African cartoonist who is bored with existing astrology schemes and came up with a much simpler one, in which your birth month determines certain personality traits (January-Borns are often good with money).

    • Replies: @Michelle
    @J.Ross

    Lazy, but smart! Real astrology is very complicated to fake!

  110. @AndrewR
    @Altai

    Barring total genocide, I don't think Russian hard power could possibly be worse for Sweden than American soft power has been. What reason has a single Swede to hear about a black drug addict ODing in Minneapolis, let alone care about it this much?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Allain

    Barring total genocide, I don’t think Russian hard power could possibly be worse for Sweden than American soft power has been. What reason has a single Swede to hear about a black drug addict ODing in Minneapolis, let alone care about it this much?

    It’s notable–but appalling–that essentially the closer you are to American media, the worse your situation.

    Most pickled in our minoritarian glop, is the Anglosphere. The small Nordics without much language population heft, where everyone learns English are next. Then the rest of Western Europe. Eastern Europe with the Russian enforced commie dictatorships and the East Asians have fared much better.

  111. @bomag
    @SFG


    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences, and like alchemy dates back to the days when people really had no way of knowing any better.
     
    One thought is that science and tech has brought us such wonderful devices and views of the universe that it is considered magic by the common man. If a phone or car breaks down, we burn some incense; chant; call in a druid with secret knowledge to fix it, or just buy a new magical device.

    A flip side is that the social sciences promised that their systematic examination and experimentation would yield solutions to crime, poverty, and general unhappiness. Not delivered, so it is back to burning the witches who are sowing the bad magic of patriarchy, able-ist supremacy, and systemic achievement.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Dvnjbbgc

    There’s an extremely disturbing and disappointing speech given recently by the otherwise excellent Albert Möller of Town Hall Review (the speech is the closing excerpt in Town Hall’s weekly radio roundup). He argues that the future is religious (okay, sure, especially considering who has babies), but joshingly illustrates this with descriptions of the pseudo-religious Woke. This is not the thing to argue. If religion is an instinct, and religion be witch-burning utopian hysteria, then you vindicate Satan and atheism. Better to rule far from God than serve the Flav-R-Aid.

  112. Critical race theory and astrology are epistemically and sociologically identical, including basis in lived experience.

    With one exception: Challenging astrology won’t result in getting your life destroyed.

    Yet.

  113. @Alden
    @Altai

    I doubt you don’t know any teen age girls personally. Although you seem obsessed with them to an unhealthy degree. While typing with one hand

    Replies: @bomag, @YetAnotherAnon, @Dvnjbbgc

    I don’t know if any of your daughters were 15/16 during Peak Tumblr. Believe me, it was not good.

    And I don’t think you should get so personal when answering comments. That’s what girls do 😉

    • LOL: Kylie
    • Replies: @Curle
    @YetAnotherAnon

    FYI -

    Alden’s the gal who thinks cross-fit will equalize the sexes.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  114. @SFG
    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences, and like alchemy dates back to the days when people really had no way of knowing any better. Quite a bit of math was invented to cast horoscopes, and it was one of the only applications for astronomical knowledge along with navigation.

    As for the company… it might not be a bad investment, at least for the short term. You are investing based on their ability to get people to pay for their advice. You’re not going to take it yourself. Speculative investment, of course, but Goop did pretty well. Woo can lead to wealth.

    I agree with Steve’s larger point…this seems kinda like a retread of the 1970s, with misandrist fourth wave feminism, inflation and probably an oncoming recession, rising crime, and a new Black Power movement in BLM. I don’t want to push these analogies too far, but maybe DeSantis will be our new Reagan?

    Replies: @bomag, @Dmon, @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY), @Reg Cæsar

    Hello, SFG. You write, “Quite a bit of math was invented to cast horoscopes”. Examples, please. What math topics were invented (not just applied) to cast horoscopes?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    Kepler made his living doing astrology.

  115. @Unintended Consequence
    @Almost Missouri

    " A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings."

    What do you think coeds get together and talk about late at night? Oh yes, astrology, crystals and the occasional weegee board session are more likely interests than a weekly dorm poker game. It's not too different from the more mystical aspects of Christianity though Christians often frown on such activities.

    As a category of mental processing, fortune telling is nonlinear and related to creative thinking. I once read an article in Psychology Today that demonstrated potential benefits to such pursuits by the use of hieroglyphics. The attempts at making meaning from unknown symbols helped in problem solving as well as generating ideas. It's also long been observed that skilled fortune tellers know a lot about people; so, the source of their prescience is their observation skills and not the tarot cards.

    While gullible types may believe too literally in horoscopes and tarot readings, I think the break from logical reasoning and the limitations thereof can be helpful. With an unresolvable problem, for instance, a person may have repeatedly considered their options to no avail: the logical choices being considered just aren't working. A little stimulation of divergent thinking might actually get the person to a eureka moment or get them off that unproductive though very logical path. Certainly, the Reagan White House was successful (because of or in spite of Nancy). Didn't General Patton believe in reincarnation? I'm sure there are many more famous people who had some occult beliefs.

    Other than "divergent", words like "synergy" come to mind in relation to the topic of predicting the future in order to better choose a course of action. The phrase "the sum is greater than the parts" may also relate to why often intelligent, successful people will utilize unorthodox methods when making decisions. Maybe it's a wholistic strategy for factoring in both unknowns and that which a person has simply failed to consider: Everything coming out in the wash as with statistical analysis.

    While I'm not a fan of astrology, I tend to like systems that include typical life scenarios like getting married or searching for a job or crises points like being betrayed or going broke. The tarot cards are probably the most complete as far as life events imo. I have sometimes wondered if the tarot and an instruction manual on the basic plots for fiction couldn't be combined with some good advice as some sort of problem-solving workbook. So, while I'm not advocating buying one of those robes with moons and stars on it to wear while consulting a crystal ball, I am saying don't sell these ancient strategies short.

    Replies: @Renard, @anonymous

    Sir this is an Arby’s

    • LOL: John Johnson
  116. @Michelle
    @BenjaminL

    Many Black people, males and females, will still ask, "What sign are you"? And often will explain strange behavior, on the part of some relative, or partner, with the statement, "He a Virgo"! For white women, Wiccanism, is very popular. The library is buying a lot of books by, "Wiccans" and tarot books are always being reserved!

    Replies: @J.Ross, @YetAnotherAnon

    Many Black people, males and females, will still ask, “What sign are you”?

    What’s your sign girl?
    Is it compatible to mine?
    What’s your sign girl?
    Is it compatible to mine?
    Oh Yeah

    I’m a Capricorn
    We believe in life and living
    We trip on love and giving, oh yeah

    The original was Danny Pearson from 1978, he was in Barrry White’s Love Unlimited Orchestra, it’s pretty good. Reggae artist Barry Biggs had a UK hit with a reggae cover, which Mr Chilton (ex Box Tops) channels here.

    • Thanks: Curle
    • Replies: @Michelle
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Thank for this!

  117. @TelfoedJohn
    Democrats often encourage people to ‘believe the science’, but they are about twice as likely as Republicans to believe in Astrology etc. In truth, when they put Fauci on on pedestal, it’s because they view him as some sort of spiritual guru.

    https://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2012/07/image009.gif

    Replies: @martin_2

    Reincarnation has some scientific evidence in its favour. Dr Ian Stevenson was a professor of psychology who researched several cases and wrote several books. There’s a bloke in the UK Dr Chris French who goes around disproving parapsychological claims and he stated that there were cases of children recollecting past lives that he could not explain.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @martin_2

    The big cheese in the Reincarnation realm was Edgar Cayce. He basically invented the whole "past life regression" business. I kind of like that stuff.

    And since not a soul on here got off his ass to embed this, I'll take care of it again, and most New Age Girl about Mary Moon:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TL5ofVC0EDQ

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  118. @Hypnotoad666
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I am going to take the pro-Astrology argument, here. Astrology is not necessarily a pseudo-science. Rather, it's just one of many ways to harness the very real and scientifically-documented Placebo Effect.

    It's hard to simply decide to fool yourself. So you need a little ritual, a semi-plausible backstory, and some other adherents to give the process some credibility (to yourself). And, luckily, the predictions and advice offered by astrologers are also 99% encouraging and optimistic. So you have an additional incentive to believe.

    Heck, Astrology is no less scientific than, say, Freudian Psychoanalysis, which lots of very smart and sophisticated people have believed in. They just spent a lot more time and money to get less encouraging advice. Positive self-delusion is underrated.

    Replies: @SFG

    Quite a bit of PUA focuses on raising your self image, so it’s not just women, either.

    • Agree: HA
  119. I find that the same person, post getting into astrology, is more rational and self-aware than they were pre.

    A straightforward empirical observation.

  120. Across the spectrum of parapsychology and the occult there are soft and hard targets. Astrology is a soft target, along with, say, the Loch Ness Monster.

    Poltergeists, Near Death Experiences, Crisis Apparitions, Reincarnation, some physical phenomena associated with Mediums, are not soft targets.

  121. “Predicting the future” is always a popular pastime, and has been.

    Lots of money to be made in various ways. Astrology is one of the older ones, but there are psychic readings, other ways of trying to read the future from objects or behavior of animals, etc.

    Investment publications and advisors are full of more rational approaches, but still rarely more correct than chance. No one “beats the market” for very long.

    Now we even have offshoots of “new” religions like BLM, Greta Thunberg’s (and Al Gore!) “end of the world in X years” mantra, mythical non carbon issuing energy and “self awareness” like Woody Allen style psychotherapy.

    Now “algorithms” are the new fortune tellers. Yes, formulas, plain and simple. And spreadsheets using them. “Collect the data” and the future will be revealed. At least this stuff has some predictive merit when conditions don’t change much. Which of course they do.

    The only people getting rich off of predicting the future are those selling the predictions.

    Crypto currency, anyone?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Muggles

    You write:

    "“Predicting the future” is always a popular pastime, and has been."

    I think that touches upon a human desire, perhaps human need.

    At work, I got co-workers interested when I said that I could predict if a worker would leave the firm in a bad way, such as getting fired or laid off.

    I did not always predict every lay off or firing. But about 80 percent of the time, when I felt that a person would get laid off or fired, it happened.

    My method was this: if I didn't like that person, for a rational reason (they were jerks, or they were not good workers), they were likely to be gotten rid of. The other 10 percent quit.

    Replies: @epebble, @Sidewalk Meanderings

  122. @Polistra
    @Altai

    https://i.ibb.co/mC0NG5q/Screenshot-20220924-223839-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    BUT if she had said........

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    The obvious question: Why is this thing employed as a school teacher. In Utah no less.

    American parents really have to get control of education again. We need vouchers–educational choice.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @AnotherDad

    Just be glad you're not in Canada.

    https://dab57h0r8ahff.cloudfront.net/585269/uploads/e237f9a0-3a4f-11ed-be3a-353e2cca9a78_800_420.jpeg

    Replies: @Brutusale

  123. The last broad I dated before I met my wife was an astrology nut. She really believed it all.

    Great ( . ) ( . ).

    Terrific \ ! /

    Fantastic ( / )

    However after dating her for a few months, I came to the conclusion that she was the type of dingbat that would burn the house down, etc. just no common sense.

    Tragic, cause she was so attractive. Aside from the above attributes she had beautiful blue/green eyes and auburn hair, both of which I really like.

    After I dumped her, my wife walked into my life 10 days later and I was just like: “where have you been? Been searching high and low!”

    Astrology broads are fine to date, but just assume the worst.

  124. @SafeNow
    I think if a young man were suffering from a bad case of the biological imperative, mastering astrology might be a great strategy for getting laid. When I was in high school, I was the captain of the math team, and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet. But it didn’t work. Maybe I had hold of the wrong end of the stick, if anyone still uses that expression.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @prosa123, @Curle

    I was the captain of the math team, and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet.

    LOL. C’mon you don’t come across as someone who would be that seriously confused–even at 16. (Now, Corny …)

  125. Jonathan Cainer was the highest-paid journalist in Great Britain when he was the Daily Mail astrologer. When he died in 2016, his nephew Oscar Cainer took over the job.

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
    @Rob McX

    Cainer bio
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Cainer

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker, @Rob McX

  126. @James Speaks
    @PhysicistDave

    The market is ripe for “Astrology For Dummies.”

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    The market is ripe for “Astrology For Dummies.”

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @MEH 0910

    Sure, but couldn't team iSteve produce an update, "Astrology For Dummies, the Criminally Woke Edition?"

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  127. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @BenjaminL

    Female readers?

    Replies: @Tracy, @Claudia

    For the record, I’m a female reader. An outlier, I know. But still…

  128. @AndrewR
    @Altai

    Barring total genocide, I don't think Russian hard power could possibly be worse for Sweden than American soft power has been. What reason has a single Swede to hear about a black drug addict ODing in Minneapolis, let alone care about it this much?

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Allain

    America. From the Arsenal of Democracy to the Arsenal of Globohomo.

  129. Side note to Steve’s comment: does feel a lot like the 1970s at times, but that seems like a much more innocent time to me, as well, compared to a lot of the sinister stuff going on now. (B. 1967)

    There were other “crazes”:

    -Roller skating.
    -Pet Rocks!
    -Yo-yos! (Walk the dog, anyone?)
    -In Boston we had this immense Bi-centennial celebration with the tall ships.
    -Jerry Ford’s “Whip Inflation Now!” Buttons (wearing a button will defeat a monetary problem caused by government over printing of currency). That seems like some Joe Biden could get behind.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  130. @Bardon Kaldian
    Astrology is big everywhere in the Western world.

    Although- I wouldn't put it in the same category as parapsychology. Great minds like John Archibald Wheeler tried to see whether there is something in it; Wheeler was open minded, but also a critical mind. After a few years, he gave up & said that parapsychology had failed to produce results (Wheeler was scientifically, not scientistically oriented). Of course there are opinions that Wheeler, at the end, was wrong:https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1979/05/17/a-decade-of-permissiveness/,  https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1980/06/26/parapsychology-an-exchange/- but I don't care.

    I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could "calculate" anything real about my past (not future). It was about what happened to me when I was a child, then in my early 20s, my health and finances and interests etc. They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @prosa123, @HA, @Prester John

    Fun fact: John Archibald Wheeler once lost a top secret H-bomb document in a train restroom.

    • Replies: @JimB
    @prosa123


    Fun fact: John Archibald Wheeler once lost a top secret H-bomb document in a train restroom.
     
    Like George Castanza’s infamous toilet book, I doubt anyone wanted to take it. The black porter probably chucked it in the trash at the rail terminus.
  131. anonymous[126] • Disclaimer says:
    @Unintended Consequence
    @Almost Missouri

    " A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings."

    What do you think coeds get together and talk about late at night? Oh yes, astrology, crystals and the occasional weegee board session are more likely interests than a weekly dorm poker game. It's not too different from the more mystical aspects of Christianity though Christians often frown on such activities.

    As a category of mental processing, fortune telling is nonlinear and related to creative thinking. I once read an article in Psychology Today that demonstrated potential benefits to such pursuits by the use of hieroglyphics. The attempts at making meaning from unknown symbols helped in problem solving as well as generating ideas. It's also long been observed that skilled fortune tellers know a lot about people; so, the source of their prescience is their observation skills and not the tarot cards.

    While gullible types may believe too literally in horoscopes and tarot readings, I think the break from logical reasoning and the limitations thereof can be helpful. With an unresolvable problem, for instance, a person may have repeatedly considered their options to no avail: the logical choices being considered just aren't working. A little stimulation of divergent thinking might actually get the person to a eureka moment or get them off that unproductive though very logical path. Certainly, the Reagan White House was successful (because of or in spite of Nancy). Didn't General Patton believe in reincarnation? I'm sure there are many more famous people who had some occult beliefs.

    Other than "divergent", words like "synergy" come to mind in relation to the topic of predicting the future in order to better choose a course of action. The phrase "the sum is greater than the parts" may also relate to why often intelligent, successful people will utilize unorthodox methods when making decisions. Maybe it's a wholistic strategy for factoring in both unknowns and that which a person has simply failed to consider: Everything coming out in the wash as with statistical analysis.

    While I'm not a fan of astrology, I tend to like systems that include typical life scenarios like getting married or searching for a job or crises points like being betrayed or going broke. The tarot cards are probably the most complete as far as life events imo. I have sometimes wondered if the tarot and an instruction manual on the basic plots for fiction couldn't be combined with some good advice as some sort of problem-solving workbook. So, while I'm not advocating buying one of those robes with moons and stars on it to wear while consulting a crystal ball, I am saying don't sell these ancient strategies short.

    Replies: @Renard, @anonymous

    In the early aughts in Berkeley there was a tarot guy who set up his table every day on Telegraph Avenue. Around the corner was a magazine/smoke shop that sold lottery tickets. One day I went into the shop and the tarot guy was there with a stack of scratchers. After every losing scratch, he’d throw the ticket on the floor and yell, “Fuck!” or “Shit!” After about 5 minutes of this he left, and I asked the proprietor, an Egyptian guy, why he let the guy litter his floor like that. He said, “he’s my best customer.” So I asked him how much the guy spent in the store and he said, “about $200 a week.”

    • Replies: @Unintended Consequence
    @anonymous

    I think dianetics or kabala would've been better choices for lotto. I myself would've gone for one of those gadgets that selects the numbers for you and stopped at $100.

  132. The key thing about astrology and fortune telling in general is the ambiguity. Basically, you can interpret it however you want, then you can use it to rationalize whatever feelings you have about things. This is why women love it — it’s like a subjectivity enhancement tool.

    I have heard some people recommend certain forms of it, such as the Chinese I-Qing, as a method for making rational decisions in a structured way. It may be useful in that regard but I don’t know either way, and the popular horoscopes don’t seem as though they could offer much value along those lines.

    But I don’t think the point of astrology is to replace science. I rather suspect it’s a form of divination, i.e. a psychological tool people use to help them make up their minds about non-scientific things, like whether one should go out to dinner with Bob, or go to a concert with Joe.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Bill P

    I did the I Ching for a while a long time ago. Its advice was almost always "Perseverance furthers", which isn't bad advice but not something you need a 300 page book for.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  133. @Renard
    The girls of Twitter and Reddit have affirmed: Astrology is now a Hard Science! That stuff you guys call science? Turns out it was all racist. Not Science!

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Bill Jones

    You have hit on the head. This is the Science that red-headed, one-legged, left-handed black lesbian trans-gender Mexican dwarfs can make their own.

  134. @prosa123
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Fun fact: John Archibald Wheeler once lost a top secret H-bomb document in a train restroom.

    Replies: @JimB

    Fun fact: John Archibald Wheeler once lost a top secret H-bomb document in a train restroom.

    Like George Castanza’s infamous toilet book, I doubt anyone wanted to take it. The black porter probably chucked it in the trash at the rail terminus.

  135. @BB753
    Astrology never went anywhere. Now a majority of Americans do not consider themselves Christian but rather atheistic, pagan, newager, wiccan, etc.

    “When people stop believing in God, they don’t believe in nothing – they believe in anything.”

    – G.K. Chesterton

    Replies: @24th Alabama, @james wilson

    Certainly a timely quote from the great man.It is our nature that we must believe.

    • Agree: BB753
  136. @bomag
    @PhysicistDave

    Thanks, a lot of good points there.

    Doesn't mention immigration. Sigh.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Doesn’t mention immigration. Sigh.

    Yeah, there’s always a blind spot from these folks, even when talking more sense than usual.

    Obvious if one opens ones eyes, that the verbalist parasites have been able to use immigration as a cudgel against the material people.

    A lot of the verbalist parasites’ “work”–media, lawyering, finance, government bureaucracy, social work–has more “culturally specific” skills/background/credentialling and ergo less subject to immigration replacement. Basically, it requires culturally made up stuff–specific laws, regulations, practices, knowledge. Immigrants can do it but generally have to come here and do/redo their training and even then may lack some of the cultural “fit” to do it well.

    In contrast, the material work being about materially altering the real world is actually real. So if you were say a mason in Italy you could come and be one in New York or Philly. If you can do carpentry in Mexico you can come and do it here. Being instructed in our standards pretty straightforward. Or at the higher end if you were doing engineering in China or software in India you can come and do it here. (For real engineering you have to redo certification, but the core of the math, principles transfer.)

    Basically, if you are materially productive, your salary versus someone else equally skilled elsewhere, is supposed to be protected by a border, giving you–not some random foreign dude–the fruits of the capital and skill accumulation done by your ancestors.

    The verbalist parasites war on producers through immigration is definitely part of this equation.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @AnotherDad

    Good points.

    I've heard arguments from the pro-immi people that, essentially, natives should be in the verbalist class while immigrants and natives who can't get a slot should be the working class. They are enthralled with the notion of having servants speaking with an accent who thank them profusely for a job in a nice place.

    Are current immigrants even working anymore? Our labor force has shrank the last two years, according to official stats. We mainly hear about migrants escaping crime and political persecution; maybe the bulk are verbalist grifters. Seems that back in the day we would at least get tossed a couple stories about carpenters who couldn't find enough work back home, so they were happy to come to America to build.

    Also, a line of thought here that the trades/material jobs are going to be automated away in the future, which makes one doubly wonder what is the point of mass immigration beyond punishing political foes.

  137. @bomag
    @SFG


    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences, and like alchemy dates back to the days when people really had no way of knowing any better.
     
    One thought is that science and tech has brought us such wonderful devices and views of the universe that it is considered magic by the common man. If a phone or car breaks down, we burn some incense; chant; call in a druid with secret knowledge to fix it, or just buy a new magical device.

    A flip side is that the social sciences promised that their systematic examination and experimentation would yield solutions to crime, poverty, and general unhappiness. Not delivered, so it is back to burning the witches who are sowing the bad magic of patriarchy, able-ist supremacy, and systemic achievement.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Dvnjbbgc

    Yes, we finally live in Arthur C. Clarke’s world of science-indistinguishable-from-magic.

  138. @AnotherDad
    @Polistra

    The obvious question: Why is this thing employed as a school teacher. In Utah no less.

    American parents really have to get control of education again. We need vouchers--educational choice.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Just be glad you’re not in Canada.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Rob McX

    It seems that this may all be just an epic troll.

    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/athena-thorne/2022/09/25/or-maybe-the-trans-shop-teacher-is-the-hero-we-need-right-now-n1632054

  139. @SafeNow
    I think if a young man were suffering from a bad case of the biological imperative, mastering astrology might be a great strategy for getting laid. When I was in high school, I was the captain of the math team, and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet. But it didn’t work. Maybe I had hold of the wrong end of the stick, if anyone still uses that expression.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @prosa123, @Curle

    When I was in high school, I was the captain of the math team, and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet. But it didn’t work.

    Being captain of the math team has never been a chick magnet at any time or any place. To be sure, it won’t repel girls in the same that being a fatty or pathologically introverted will, but it won’t help either.

  140. @Renard
    The girls of Twitter and Reddit have affirmed: Astrology is now a Hard Science! That stuff you guys call science? Turns out it was all racist. Not Science!

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Bill Jones

    The Zman had a regular segment called Zirl science on his Friday podcasts a few years ago. Someone on the blog was complaining about it’s absence a few days ago.
    Jared Taylor raises the same issue here on Unz. Meanwhile in the YUK, the new Chancellor, the wonderfully named Kwasi Kwarteng, a Yorkshire name, I believe, has revealed what is being called voodoo economics in his Budget.

    We are in a parallel fantasy universe created by the fever-dreams of the Wokels.It will not get better anytime soon.

    Meanwhile Young Emile looks at things we should look at.

    https://kirkegaard.substack.com/p/men-like-vs-women-like

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Bill Jones

    "Meanwhile in the YUK, the new Chancellor, the wonderfully named Kwasi Kwarteng, a Yorkshire name, I believe, has revealed what is being called voodoo economics in his Budget."

    Steve really should do a post on the current UK shambles.

    Let's go back 7 years, pre-Brexit, Tory conference.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-34450887


    Home Secretary Theresa May has unveiled a reform of the UK's asylum rules during an uncompromising speech to the Conservative Party conference. Mrs May pledged to reduce the numbers claiming in Britain while taking in the "most vulnerable" refugees from conflict zones around the world. She also said high migration made a "cohesive society" impossible.

    Her speech was criticised by business groups, with the Institute of Directors attacking its "irresponsible rhetoric".

    Net migration into the UK currently stands at a record high, reaching 330,000 in the year to March... Ministers have admitted missing their target to reduce net migration below 100,000, blaming the scale of migration from within Europe.

     

    But Brexit meant "taking back control" of UK borders. As this campaign put it:

    http://www.voteleavetakecontrol.org/why_vote_leave.html

    "Nearly two million people came to the UK from the EU in the last ten years. Vote Leave and control immigration"

    When Boris came to power, all things were possible. He had a huge majority, including the "Red Wall" of Northern, previously solid Labour seats where people were fed up with mass EU immigration. My own son worked for a while in a factory where everyone else on the "shop floor" spoke Polish.

    Result post-Brexit? Boris Johnson, a literal rootless cosmopolitan, handed out 1.1 million visas in a year.

    https://www.migrationwatchuk.org/news/2022/08/25/immigration-at-all-time-record-level-with-record-1-1-million-visas-issued-to-come-and-live-in-the-uk

    There hasn't been much political or media reaction to this huge rise, probably because journalists and politicians want to have continued careers.

    When Boris finally f***rd around too much and found put the most diverse (aka "foreign") leadership team since probably the Conquest took over. There wasn't great enthusiasm for Liz Truss, but nobody trusted her main competitor, a Brahmin with a tax-avoiding billionaire wife, either.

    https://e3.365dm.com/22/09/1600x900/skynews-reshuffle-truss_5889389.jpg

    The chancellor, Kwasi Karteng, is academically clever, son of Akan academics. Akans are a Ghanaian group who include the Ashanti, a pretty clever bunch. On a par with the Ibo in Nigeria perhaps.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Akan_people

    Whether he's so clever in the real world or just thinks that Britain in 2022 fits into an Adam Smith economic template I'm unsure. This book is a clue:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britannia_Unchained


    Britain needs to adopt a far-reaching form of free market economics, with fewer employment laws and suggesting the United Kingdom should learn lessons from the business and economic practices of other countries, including Canada, Australia and the tiger economies of the Far East like Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore.

     

    But his "mini-budget" on Friday was pretty remarkable in that it cut taxes substantially AND raised public spending substantially. The sums don't add up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_2022_United_Kingdom_mini-budget

    The budget was greeted by a collapse in sterling and a decline in the stock market, both losing about 2% in an afternoon. That's continued today after sterling declines on Asian exchanges overnight.

    https://twitter.com/ReutersJamie/status/1574364954618126337

    Still, why shouldn't a third-world country have a third-world economy and a third-world currency?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Rob McX, @J.Ross

  141. @Alden
    @Altai

    I doubt you don’t know any teen age girls personally. Although you seem obsessed with them to an unhealthy degree. While typing with one hand

    Replies: @bomag, @YetAnotherAnon, @Dvnjbbgc

    They are HOT!

    Before anyone condemns me — search your feelings; you know it to be true.

  142. @PhysicistDave
    OT... or maybe not OT:

    Joel Kotkin has an interesting essay up on Spiked: "The revenge of the material economy."

    The bottom line: it is really not a good idea to ignore physical reality.

    Replies: @bomag, @BB753, @Almost Missouri, @James Speaks, @Bill P, @Rob

    My oldest just started trade school doing electrical and HVAC. I let him do it instead of finishing high school (he’s a senior in HS). If he finishes – and I’ll make damn sure he does – he’ll never be out of work. What’s more, he can get a 4-year degree in two years once he has learned the trades. If he wants to bother with it, that is.

    The so-called information economy doesn’t pay as well as skilled trades and you have to work with a bunch of leftist weirdos. I’m not about to inflict that on my boys.

    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she’d do well as a research scientist or physician — I just hope she finds a good mentor.

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
    @Bill P

    would she consider STEM at the Coast Guard Academy? She can probably avoid pointless combat in Persian Gulf or off Taiwan, but still get Service academy prestige ?

    Replies: @Bill P

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Bill P

    Bill P wrote to me:


    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she’d do well as a research scientist or physician
     
    As someone with a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford (and a wife who is a Ph.D. biologist), let me strongly urge your daughter not to go into pure science.

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure -- which most people don't. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    The end result is that most Ph.D.s end up going into industry -- and earning less than if they had gotten the degrees that are directly relevant to industry, basically engineering degrees.

    If your daughter has the perseverance to get an M.D. great -- but keep in mind that you spend years in training and may acquire big debts: it only pays off if you really do spend four decades in practice as a physician. If a woman chose to take a decade off to raise kids, for example, it probably would not pay off.

    Otherwise, get a degree in engineering or computer science. CS pays great right now, but it may be a bubble (they are tending to off-shore work to Asia), and I would find it boring to be a "code monkey" for decades on end.

    My daughter just finished her degree in electrical engineering (EE) at UCLA and has a good job -- decent pay, nice working conditions -- with a spin-off of HP. If a high-school student likes physics and math, that is basically EE at the university level (majoring in math is for beings who are not quite humans!). If she loves chemistry, get a degree in chemical engineering. And, of course, with the above caveats, if she loves biology, medicine may make sense.

    Best of luck to her -- the world does need people who understand how physical reality works.

    Replies: @Bill P, @Rob McX, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

    , @AnotherDad
    @Bill P


    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead.
     
    Hopefully--however far she wants to pursue it--it will lead to a quality husband. Science--outside bio/medicine--is overloaded with guys. So the gals are the "scarce resource" and if they are looking to find a nice guy and have a family they can do so.

    (AnotherMom easily could have kept working in her field, but after the kids came she had no interest--been there done that.)

    I think the main thing for any young woman these days is they need to understand to take all the propaganda for a grain of salt. That the old truths are still true. That it is family and children--not career, not partying, not sexual liberation--that will make them happy and give them meaning and purpose through the long run of life. And that their attractiveness and simply biological capability are "on the clock".

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  143. Most astrologists agree:

    Beware of negroes when mercury is rising…

    • Replies: @Liger
    @Anonymous

    WIT!

  144. @Mr Mox
    Steve, we're almost the same age, and I also recall those days.

    The Bermuda Triangle was swallowing ships and planes. Erich von Däniken was discovering absolute proof we were once visited by aliens (and probably making a small fortune from his books). If you placed a dull razorblade under a pyramid structure it would become sharp over night. Your inner energy would follow some mumbo-jumbo calendar, and you could scare the shit out of plants just by thinking of killing them.

    We ate it up... and then we grew up.

    I remember discovering The Amazing Randi's website and learning, much to my chagrin, that the unexplainable abnormalities I still believed in, like mindreading/ESP, was just claptrap nonsense, and Randi's million was as safe as ever. I became a convinced skeptic that day - and a cynic as well. Better late than never...

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Brutusale

    I remember two authors who were big in the early 80s – Carlos Castañeda and T Lobsang Rampa. If you dropped into any youth hostel anywhere in Europe, there was sure to be at least one copy of their books in someone’s rucksack or lying around on one of the tables.

    They were both fakes. “Lobsang Rampa” was from Devon, and was reported to be a plumber or surgical fitter by trade. He claimed to have had some kind of vision after falling from a tree, and followed the mystical path thereafter.

  145. @BenjaminL
    Perhaps some of the female readers here can chime in, but I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away. All that empathy, personal narrative, drama, etc. is appealing for the same reason that soap operas and romance novels are appealing. Each horoscope is like a mini romance novel.

    More generally, a disenchanted, de-churched world has a huge gap in it, into which astrology fits, as the New Yorker observed:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/astrology-in-the-age-of-uncertainty

    Douthat sees this as bet-hedging:

    When spiritual ideas creep back into elite culture, it’s often in the form of “wellness” or self-help disciplines, or in enthusiasms like astrology, where there’s always a certain deniability about whether you’re really invoking a spiritual reality, really committing to metaphysical belief.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/10/opinion/sunday/religion-meritocracy-god.html

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Woodsie, @Anonymous, @AceDeuce, @SFG, @Almost Missouri, @Alden, @Michelle, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon, @HA, @BenjaminL

    And, lest the opportunity be missed to bring up the Frankfurt School, Adorno also fulminated against the local astrology column (in the LA Times, 1952-53) as a tool of The Man to get readers to accept the Status Quo.

    More positively, C.S. Lewis (according to Michael Ward) saw the medieval cosmology of the planets as having lasting spiritual significance, and used it to shape Narnia.

    [MORE]

    http://www.telospress.com/adorno-on-astrology/

    The column under scrutiny called, “Astrological Forecasts,” was written by Carroll Righter and appeared in the Los Angeles Times, described by Adorno as a conservative newspaper, leaning far to the right wing of the Republican Party. He engages in a detailed analysis of the column between November 1952 and February 1953. His method is that of the systematic construction of the imagined readers of the column and a critique of the ideology that the column reinforces, that of accepting the social system as fate. Adorno hypothesizes that columns such as these mold to some extent the reader’s thinking and foster an element of blind acceptance.

    http://michaelward.net/planet-narnia-reviews/

    By working with these “given,” indeed archetypal symbolic systems, Lewis was essentially working collaboratively. He was effectively summoning Dante and Spenser to his side, drawing from them, conversing with them, re-tuning their resonance to harmonize his own particular work, and paradoxically it is this very collaboration which set free in Lewis the creative flair and originality which has given his work its distinctive flavor and its staying power.

    https://sites.google.com/site/harveyscorner/narnia/dawn-treader-14

    “In our world,” said Eustace, “a star is a huge ball of flaming gas.”
    “Even in your world, my son, that is not what a star is, but only what it is made of.”

  146. @Bill P
    @PhysicistDave

    My oldest just started trade school doing electrical and HVAC. I let him do it instead of finishing high school (he's a senior in HS). If he finishes - and I'll make damn sure he does - he'll never be out of work. What's more, he can get a 4-year degree in two years once he has learned the trades. If he wants to bother with it, that is.

    The so-called information economy doesn't pay as well as skilled trades and you have to work with a bunch of leftist weirdos. I'm not about to inflict that on my boys.

    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was -- she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don't know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she'd do well as a research scientist or physician -- I just hope she finds a good mentor.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad

    would she consider STEM at the Coast Guard Academy? She can probably avoid pointless combat in Persian Gulf or off Taiwan, but still get Service academy prestige ?

    • Replies: @Bill P
    @Houston 1992

    Nice suggestion. This girl was born to serve in a hierarchical institution. Worries the hell out of me but you have to work with the child's nature. I do want her to have a family and be a mom at some point, and the military might ironically be better for that than private institutions.

  147. @Rob McX
    Jonathan Cainer was the highest-paid journalist in Great Britain when he was the Daily Mail astrologer. When he died in 2016, his nephew Oscar Cainer took over the job.

    Replies: @Houston 1992

    • Replies: @Joe S.Walker
    @Houston 1992


    An inquest found that he had taken cocaine shortly before his death, the cardiotoxic effects of which may have contributed to his heart attack.
     
    How cosmic.
    , @Rob McX
    @Houston 1992

    Thanks. His fatal heart attack at 58 seems to have been brought on by cocaine use. I guess he didn't see that coming.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  148. File this under: If there is no truth then everybody can make up their own truth about anything.

  149. @MEH 0910
    @James Speaks


    The market is ripe for “Astrology For Dummies.”
     
    https://www.amazon.com/Astrology-Dummies-Rae-Orion/dp/1119594162

    https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Idiots-Guide-Astrology-4th/dp/1592575811

    Replies: @James Speaks

    Sure, but couldn’t team iSteve produce an update, “Astrology For Dummies, the Criminally Woke Edition?”

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @James Speaks

    https://www.amazon.com/Diversity-Equity-Inclusion-Dummies-Business/dp/1119824753/

  150. @Houston 1992
    @Rob McX

    Cainer bio
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Cainer

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker, @Rob McX

    An inquest found that he had taken cocaine shortly before his death, the cardiotoxic effects of which may have contributed to his heart attack.

    How cosmic.

  151. @Houston 1992
    @Rob McX

    Cainer bio
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Cainer

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker, @Rob McX

    Thanks. His fatal heart attack at 58 seems to have been brought on by cocaine use. I guess he didn’t see that coming.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Rob McX


    Thanks. [Cainer's] fatal heart attack at 58 seems to have been brought on by cocaine use. I guess he didn’t see that coming.
     
    Astrology wouldn't predict that, but onomastics would. Blame it on 'caine!


    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/euonym#English
    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/aptonym

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  152. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    @SFG

    Hello, SFG. You write, "Quite a bit of math was invented to cast horoscopes". Examples, please. What math topics were invented (not just applied) to cast horoscopes?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Kepler made his living doing astrology.

  153. I used to read my newspaper horoscope every morning, although I was unsure of its legitimacy. Around age 13 I noticed my local afternoon paper horoscope gave me a different sign, making me a confirmed skeptic.

    Even so, I kept reading my horoscope, and took to reading all 12. They offered common sense advice, inspiration and motivation. Life has since rendered me too pessimistic for that.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dvnjbbgc

    Newspaper astrology column advice is generally pretty benign.

  154. Well I’m a Virgo and can say with absolute certainty that we Virgos are too smart to believe in astrology.

  155. @Dvnjbbgc
    I used to read my newspaper horoscope every morning, although I was unsure of its legitimacy. Around age 13 I noticed my local afternoon paper horoscope gave me a different sign, making me a confirmed skeptic.

    Even so, I kept reading my horoscope, and took to reading all 12. They offered common sense advice, inspiration and motivation. Life has since rendered me too pessimistic for that.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Newspaper astrology column advice is generally pretty benign.

  156. @Bill P
    @PhysicistDave

    My oldest just started trade school doing electrical and HVAC. I let him do it instead of finishing high school (he's a senior in HS). If he finishes - and I'll make damn sure he does - he'll never be out of work. What's more, he can get a 4-year degree in two years once he has learned the trades. If he wants to bother with it, that is.

    The so-called information economy doesn't pay as well as skilled trades and you have to work with a bunch of leftist weirdos. I'm not about to inflict that on my boys.

    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was -- she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don't know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she'd do well as a research scientist or physician -- I just hope she finds a good mentor.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad

    Bill P wrote to me:

    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she’d do well as a research scientist or physician

    As someone with a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford (and a wife who is a Ph.D. biologist), let me strongly urge your daughter not to go into pure science.

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure — which most people don’t. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    The end result is that most Ph.D.s end up going into industry — and earning less than if they had gotten the degrees that are directly relevant to industry, basically engineering degrees.

    If your daughter has the perseverance to get an M.D. great — but keep in mind that you spend years in training and may acquire big debts: it only pays off if you really do spend four decades in practice as a physician. If a woman chose to take a decade off to raise kids, for example, it probably would not pay off.

    Otherwise, get a degree in engineering or computer science. CS pays great right now, but it may be a bubble (they are tending to off-shore work to Asia), and I would find it boring to be a “code monkey” for decades on end.

    My daughter just finished her degree in electrical engineering (EE) at UCLA and has a good job — decent pay, nice working conditions — with a spin-off of HP. If a high-school student likes physics and math, that is basically EE at the university level (majoring in math is for beings who are not quite humans!). If she loves chemistry, get a degree in chemical engineering. And, of course, with the above caveats, if she loves biology, medicine may make sense.

    Best of luck to her — the world does need people who understand how physical reality works.

    • Replies: @Bill P
    @PhysicistDave

    Thanks, Dave, I really appreciate the response. Inside information is what I was looking for -- and why I asked you. I think I owe you a beer or whatever you drink down in CA.

    In light of what you wrote, I'm thinking medicine because although she's a US citizen she's also a permanent resident of Canada and the school is heavily subsidized. She should be able to get through it with minimal debt and then practice in the US without any immigration hassles.

    Of course it's all speculation at this point, but she listens closely to me and trusts me. Whatever my myriad failures may be, being a father is not one of them.

    Thanks again, from one dad to another. I know how you feel about your daughter and I feel the same about mine.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Rob McX
    @PhysicistDave

    A depressing summary of the situation.


    And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).
     
    I thought superstring theory was pushing the frontiers of knowledge about the universe.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @PhysicistDave

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure — which most people don’t. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    I actually saw this. An acquaintance in physics told me about the grant they were working on. After making sure I understood the concept, I asked, what's the point of this? The answer was a few uncomfortable, blinking moments before a stern lecture on "knowledge for its own sake."

    I had another acquaintance who was a truly brilliant medical doctor and graduate of one of the premier medical schools in the US. Unfortunately he exhibited certain red flags (conservative, meritocratic, liked country music), and got shafted in academic medicine, so he decided to just go make money in private practice instead.

    Replies: @Fidelios Automata, @PhysicistDave

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @PhysicistDave

    This is why women and minorities don't go into STEM-- too much common sense. It sucks as a career, leaving it open for obsessive white and yellow boys.

    Replies: @Curle, @Bill Jones

    , @Bill Jones
    @PhysicistDave

    Your post seems about right, with a minor quibble



    And, of course, with the above caveats, if she loves biology, medicine may make sense.
     
    Veterinarian?
  157. @Mike Tre
    @Art Deco

    LOL Fart Gecko and his stale "you're imagination" replies. Ironically (lost to you) lacking in imagination. I'm out on the roads every single day; you reside in some bubble wrapped cubicle or other such make work cloud life. You don't even know what you don't know.

    And parking a vehicle on rail tracks isn't absent mindedness, you disingenuous little troll, it's utter lack of situational awareness and or stupid arrogance. Either way, taking flak from the likes of you is always an indicator that I'm over the target.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Thanks for the string of assertions. I’ve been driving an automobile for 40+ years and lived in core cities, suburbs, and small towns. No, police officers do not behave that way. You get tickets because you don’t think the rules apply to you. Pay your fines and quit complaining.

    And parking a vehicle on rail tracks isn’t absent mindedness, you disingenuous little troll, it’s utter lack of situational awareness

    IOW, she’s absent-minded. Which is a handicap in all kinds of situations and not a categorical feature of being female.

    https://nypost.com/2022/04/07/eric-boehlert-journalist-dead-after-nj-transit-train-strikes-him-while-riding-bike/

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Art Deco

    I don't have any fines or accidents, so perhaps you should tend to your own imagination. Stop being a hypocrite (impossible) by telling people to stop making assertions as you can make assertions. And it's so cute! when you little motorists try to talk about all your little road experience driving your cute little sedans around. To me it's like a Cesna pilot trying to equate himself to an SR-71 pilot.

    "IOW, "

    ...you're a liar playing word games. Absent minded is leaving the garage door up all night by accident or leaving your house keys in the pocket of the last jacket you had on. Parking a car on railroad tracks is about as absent minded as dressing up like Hitler for a bar mitzvah. It's pure negligence wrapped in stupidity. I see that revealing simple truths about females employed in jobs they have no business being hired in triggers your delicate feminist sensibilities.


    "https://nypost.com/2022/04/07/eric-boehlert-journalist-dead-after-nj-transit-train-strikes-him-while-riding-bike/"

    This is like when Troof puts up a link showing two white kids fighting as if it's proof that negroes are no more violent than whites.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  158. @Houston 1992
    @Bill P

    would she consider STEM at the Coast Guard Academy? She can probably avoid pointless combat in Persian Gulf or off Taiwan, but still get Service academy prestige ?

    Replies: @Bill P

    Nice suggestion. This girl was born to serve in a hierarchical institution. Worries the hell out of me but you have to work with the child’s nature. I do want her to have a family and be a mom at some point, and the military might ironically be better for that than private institutions.

  159. @Bardon Kaldian
    Astrology is big everywhere in the Western world.

    Although- I wouldn't put it in the same category as parapsychology. Great minds like John Archibald Wheeler tried to see whether there is something in it; Wheeler was open minded, but also a critical mind. After a few years, he gave up & said that parapsychology had failed to produce results (Wheeler was scientifically, not scientistically oriented). Of course there are opinions that Wheeler, at the end, was wrong:https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1979/05/17/a-decade-of-permissiveness/,  https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1980/06/26/parapsychology-an-exchange/- but I don't care.

    I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could "calculate" anything real about my past (not future). It was about what happened to me when I was a child, then in my early 20s, my health and finances and interests etc. They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @prosa123, @HA, @Prester John

    “I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could “calculate” anything real about my past….They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.”

    That’s a very clever strategy, but if you had gone to ten astrologers instead of two, chances are that one or more of them would have gotten lucky, and you might have been tempted to believe you had come across the real deal.

    There’s that old con about passing out 1024 emails (or some multiple thereof), with each one predicting a different outcome of the next 10 football or baseball games for a given local team. The guy who gets the email that predicted every one of those 10 games correctly will take you for a genuine clairvoyant, and will therefore be ripe for whatever grift is presented to him. The collective population of astrologers is kind of like an ongoing run of that same scam. Similarly, the clock-maker’s analogy has historically played a large role in theological arguments, but many physicists these days hew to some variant of the many-worlds interpretation, which posits a bazillion alternate universes in existence alongside the one we observe, implying that the latter is completely unremarkable — one big cosmic “duh”.

    Anyway, astrologers don’t have to get it right every time — they just have to rig the game so the odds are in their favor, and by keeping their pronouncements sufficiently vague and also picking up on facial signals and other cues — the way skilled cold readers do — they’re able to get by, and sometimes do very well.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @HA


    There’s that old con about passing out 1024 emails (or some multiple thereof), with each one predicting a different outcome of the next 10 football or baseball games for a given local team. The guy who gets the email that predicted every one of those 10 games correctly will take you for a genuine clairvoyant, and will therefore be ripe for whatever grift is presented to him.
     
    This is what the "touts" that you hear advertised on sports radio do. The picks change with each phone call ("call now to get our free pre-recorded lock of the week!"). Most people just get losers or close to break even, but a few will get a long streak of winners and be convinced that this guy knows what he's talking about and keep coming back and end up being paid customers.
  160. Anon[199] • Disclaimer says:

    Among the benefits to employees:

    A stipend to help you build wealth.

    I’m thinking that they thought, “Those poor black people who suffer from income inequality! We’ll hire some of those wonderful, vibrant, oppressed black people and label part of their salary as a ‘wealth building stipend’ and tell them they have to put it into a savings account or mutual fund and not spend it on sneakers.”

    I’m sure this will work just as intended.

    Any “wealth building” that black employees experience will be in the form of lawsuit settlements when the company figures out they are not contributing (despite their “college degrees”) and fires them, or at least does not promote them, or does not fire their Asian star developer after he says “I’m going into the break room for a nappy,” and the word nappy offends the black employees.

    The “wealth” they get from the insurance company that steps in to take over the lawsuit will be frittered away in two years, but they can always get more by suing the banks that refused them as private banking customers since they “didn’t earn the money, it’s the same as lottery winnings, and our experience is that you will end up spending it right away,” which is obviously racist.

  161. @Bill P
    @PhysicistDave

    My oldest just started trade school doing electrical and HVAC. I let him do it instead of finishing high school (he's a senior in HS). If he finishes - and I'll make damn sure he does - he'll never be out of work. What's more, he can get a 4-year degree in two years once he has learned the trades. If he wants to bother with it, that is.

    The so-called information economy doesn't pay as well as skilled trades and you have to work with a bunch of leftist weirdos. I'm not about to inflict that on my boys.

    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was -- she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don't know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she'd do well as a research scientist or physician -- I just hope she finds a good mentor.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @PhysicistDave, @AnotherDad

    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead.

    Hopefully–however far she wants to pursue it–it will lead to a quality husband. Science–outside bio/medicine–is overloaded with guys. So the gals are the “scarce resource” and if they are looking to find a nice guy and have a family they can do so.

    (AnotherMom easily could have kept working in her field, but after the kids came she had no interest–been there done that.)

    I think the main thing for any young woman these days is they need to understand to take all the propaganda for a grain of salt. That the old truths are still true. That it is family and children–not career, not partying, not sexual liberation–that will make them happy and give them meaning and purpose through the long run of life. And that their attractiveness and simply biological capability are “on the clock”.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @AnotherDad

    'Hopefully–however far she wants to pursue it–it will lead to a quality husband. Science–outside bio/medicine–is overloaded with guys. So the gals are the “scarce resource” and if they are looking to find a nice guy and have a family they can do so...'

    I've seen that. I was moving a woman who was a professor of whatever-they-call-computer-robots from Cal Berkeley to her new position at Carnegie Mellon. Aside from the probable hiring-for-gender she was definitely getting plenty of attention from all the men in her department. And she wasn't a great looker or even Ms. Congeniality. Okay, but nothing great.

  162. @Art Deco
    @Mike Tre

    Thanks for the string of assertions. I've been driving an automobile for 40+ years and lived in core cities, suburbs, and small towns. No, police officers do not behave that way. You get tickets because you don't think the rules apply to you. Pay your fines and quit complaining.


    And parking a vehicle on rail tracks isn’t absent mindedness, you disingenuous little troll, it’s utter lack of situational awareness

    IOW, she's absent-minded. Which is a handicap in all kinds of situations and not a categorical feature of being female.


    https://nypost.com/2022/04/07/eric-boehlert-journalist-dead-after-nj-transit-train-strikes-him-while-riding-bike/

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    I don’t have any fines or accidents, so perhaps you should tend to your own imagination. Stop being a hypocrite (impossible) by telling people to stop making assertions as you can make assertions. And it’s so cute! when you little motorists try to talk about all your little road experience driving your cute little sedans around. To me it’s like a Cesna pilot trying to equate himself to an SR-71 pilot.

    “IOW, ”

    …you’re a liar playing word games. Absent minded is leaving the garage door up all night by accident or leaving your house keys in the pocket of the last jacket you had on. Parking a car on railroad tracks is about as absent minded as dressing up like Hitler for a bar mitzvah. It’s pure negligence wrapped in stupidity. I see that revealing simple truths about females employed in jobs they have no business being hired in triggers your delicate feminist sensibilities.

    https://nypost.com/2022/04/07/eric-boehlert-journalist-dead-after-nj-transit-train-strikes-him-while-riding-bike/”

    This is like when Troof puts up a link showing two white kids fighting as if it’s proof that negroes are no more violent than whites.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mike Tre

    I'm not paid to listen to you. Save it for the person who is.

  163. @Alden
    @Dmon

    The great conservative hero Reagan also signed a law making it much easier to get abortions years before Roe. And had many gay men on his staff and fundraisers.

    And when the great conservative hero was elected president he;

    1 did nothing about affirmative action and the non White percentage of government employees at all levels, city county state and federal rose higher and higher as Whites retired and anything non White replaced them.

    2 created the first of many amnesties.

    3 did nothing to stop illegals entering the country and getting jobs and welfare.

    4 and it was under Raegan’s watch that our industrial sector left for China.

    5 also under Reagan’s presidency NASA and the NASA contractors in Silicon Valley began laying off and not renewing the contracts of the White men who put a man in the moon in favor of Chinese immigrants. These were men who graduated with their MSs in aeronautical astronautical engineering and software design in the mid 1960s and were laid off 15 years later in favor of non White immigrants.

    Or one of the many reasons I’m not a conservative.

    Replies: @BosTex, @Reg Cæsar, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @BB753

    I think the expression is: “We have a conservative movement that has conserved nothing.”

  164. Western Astrology is not science. But it is also not something invented out of the air. The Greeks developed ideas they obtained from the Babylonians, and those Greek-modified ideas spread as far as India. In the early modern period, in Europe, people we know as astronomers, such as Johannes Kepler, made their living as astrologers (the principal imperial general during the early years of the Thirty Years War, Albrecht von Wallenstein, had great faith in Kepler’s horoscopes).

    For those comfortable with writing code, astrology is one of the easiest ways in which to develop abilities that, for want of a better term, one might call “divination”. Interest in astrology among skilled coders is therefore fairly widespread.

  165. @pyrrhus
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, the kind of "science" that said the clot shot was safe and effective, and that fusion power will solve our problems, despite 70 years of failure...

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I have no idea how that is a reply to my comment. Then again, that’s how it is between water signs and fire signs.

  166. @anonymous
    @Unintended Consequence

    In the early aughts in Berkeley there was a tarot guy who set up his table every day on Telegraph Avenue. Around the corner was a magazine/smoke shop that sold lottery tickets. One day I went into the shop and the tarot guy was there with a stack of scratchers. After every losing scratch, he’d throw the ticket on the floor and yell, “Fuck!” or “Shit!” After about 5 minutes of this he left, and I asked the proprietor, an Egyptian guy, why he let the guy litter his floor like that. He said, “he’s my best customer.” So I asked him how much the guy spent in the store and he said, “about $200 a week.”

    Replies: @Unintended Consequence

    I think dianetics or kabala would’ve been better choices for lotto. I myself would’ve gone for one of those gadgets that selects the numbers for you and stopped at $100.

  167. @PhysicistDave
    @Bill P

    Bill P wrote to me:


    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she’d do well as a research scientist or physician
     
    As someone with a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford (and a wife who is a Ph.D. biologist), let me strongly urge your daughter not to go into pure science.

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure -- which most people don't. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    The end result is that most Ph.D.s end up going into industry -- and earning less than if they had gotten the degrees that are directly relevant to industry, basically engineering degrees.

    If your daughter has the perseverance to get an M.D. great -- but keep in mind that you spend years in training and may acquire big debts: it only pays off if you really do spend four decades in practice as a physician. If a woman chose to take a decade off to raise kids, for example, it probably would not pay off.

    Otherwise, get a degree in engineering or computer science. CS pays great right now, but it may be a bubble (they are tending to off-shore work to Asia), and I would find it boring to be a "code monkey" for decades on end.

    My daughter just finished her degree in electrical engineering (EE) at UCLA and has a good job -- decent pay, nice working conditions -- with a spin-off of HP. If a high-school student likes physics and math, that is basically EE at the university level (majoring in math is for beings who are not quite humans!). If she loves chemistry, get a degree in chemical engineering. And, of course, with the above caveats, if she loves biology, medicine may make sense.

    Best of luck to her -- the world does need people who understand how physical reality works.

    Replies: @Bill P, @Rob McX, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

    Thanks, Dave, I really appreciate the response. Inside information is what I was looking for — and why I asked you. I think I owe you a beer or whatever you drink down in CA.

    In light of what you wrote, I’m thinking medicine because although she’s a US citizen she’s also a permanent resident of Canada and the school is heavily subsidized. She should be able to get through it with minimal debt and then practice in the US without any immigration hassles.

    Of course it’s all speculation at this point, but she listens closely to me and trusts me. Whatever my myriad failures may be, being a father is not one of them.

    Thanks again, from one dad to another. I know how you feel about your daughter and I feel the same about mine.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Bill P

    Your daughter is lucky to have you as her father, and Dave's is lucky to have him. I commend both of you.

  168. @martin_2
    @TelfoedJohn

    Reincarnation has some scientific evidence in its favour. Dr Ian Stevenson was a professor of psychology who researched several cases and wrote several books. There's a bloke in the UK Dr Chris French who goes around disproving parapsychological claims and he stated that there were cases of children recollecting past lives that he could not explain.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    The big cheese in the Reincarnation realm was Edgar Cayce. He basically invented the whole “past life regression” business. I kind of like that stuff.

    And since not a soul on here got off his ass to embed this, I’ll take care of it again, and most New Age Girl about Mary Moon:

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You've given me an excuse to finally share one of those 90s alternative rock songs I really like: "Lightening Crashes." It deals with reincarnation, but that's something I don't believe in, so I'll just say it's about the cycle of life, which it is.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsJ4O-nSveg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @JR Ewing

  169. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @BenjaminL

    Female readers?

    Replies: @Tracy, @Claudia

    Another female reader here. There may be morr of us than you think!

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Claudia

    Hi Claudia. What's your sign? ;)

  170. @PhysicistDave
    @Bill P

    Bill P wrote to me:


    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she’d do well as a research scientist or physician
     
    As someone with a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford (and a wife who is a Ph.D. biologist), let me strongly urge your daughter not to go into pure science.

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure -- which most people don't. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    The end result is that most Ph.D.s end up going into industry -- and earning less than if they had gotten the degrees that are directly relevant to industry, basically engineering degrees.

    If your daughter has the perseverance to get an M.D. great -- but keep in mind that you spend years in training and may acquire big debts: it only pays off if you really do spend four decades in practice as a physician. If a woman chose to take a decade off to raise kids, for example, it probably would not pay off.

    Otherwise, get a degree in engineering or computer science. CS pays great right now, but it may be a bubble (they are tending to off-shore work to Asia), and I would find it boring to be a "code monkey" for decades on end.

    My daughter just finished her degree in electrical engineering (EE) at UCLA and has a good job -- decent pay, nice working conditions -- with a spin-off of HP. If a high-school student likes physics and math, that is basically EE at the university level (majoring in math is for beings who are not quite humans!). If she loves chemistry, get a degree in chemical engineering. And, of course, with the above caveats, if she loves biology, medicine may make sense.

    Best of luck to her -- the world does need people who understand how physical reality works.

    Replies: @Bill P, @Rob McX, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

    A depressing summary of the situation.

    And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    I thought superstring theory was pushing the frontiers of knowledge about the universe.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Rob McX

    String theory is untestable. This was realized in the 1980s but I got the impression there was a hope it could eventually produce testable propositions, which has not come to pass. Thus is it not in any way "science."

    Last time I checked which was long ago around the time it was generally realized outside the subfield that it was bogus, it was said to be populated with people who were very good at math but had no physical intuition. Unfortunately, and confirming to a degree PhysicistDave's bleak picture of academic science from his viewpoint, it was dogma in the US and it was very hard to get paid to do high energy theoretical physics outside of it.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  171. @Dumbo
    Honestly I don't think astrology is a big problem. Yes, women are into all that New Age stuff, but this is small potatoes in a world in which even medical journals write about "pregnant men" or "gender-affirming surgeries". Astrology was initially not separated from Astronomy and led to a few insights. Just as chemistry developed from alchemy. Now it is just some other pastime for women.

    Replies: @Anon

    Could we say that Astrology is a less toxic kind of porn for women?

  172. @Buzz Mohawk

    I don’t know how big it was across the country, but it was huge in the San Fernando Valley...
     
    New age nonsense was huge in Boulder Valley, and it still is.

    Replies: @Curle

    Back in the ‘80s this gal I knew well in high school and from church in another state called to tell me she was moving to my city and could I help her move into her apartment. When she arrived I learned she was in town to become an ‘holistic’ doctor. While moving her stuff I also learned she had gotten into New Age/crystals, etc.

    Later, on a hike, I learned she now liked to hike naked and would I be interested? I declined and she remained dressed but she teased me with stories of hiking naked for the rest of that particular walk. For a moment I thought of playing the hypocrite and feigning interest, but I weighed the benefits (obvious) versus the downside (sitting through New Age drivel) and kept myself in check. Afterwords I considered that New Age was just a way for girls raised in traditional households to rationalize getting laid before marriage.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Curle

    An old girlfriend in Boulder gave up her corporate job to study traditional Chinese medicine and assorted woo, earning various certifications.

    She has an acupuncture studio there, where she does that plus something called reiki, a form of "energy healing." She also provides various herbal prescriptions and recommendations for Boulderites to get their energy right.

    A serious old flame, one I could have married, she was the girl who taught me how to read tarot cards. Oddly enough, she was a Republican.

  173. Standard BLACK! on Asian activity on ChiTown Red Line.

    Remember what the gun controller tells you.

    Guns on the bus: Still a bad idea
    By The Editorial Board
    Chicago Tribune
    Jul 19, 2015 at 8:00 am

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/opinion/editorials/ct-guns-transit-illinois-edit-0720-20150717-story.html

  174. Anon[219] • Disclaimer says:
    @Muggles
    "Predicting the future" is always a popular pastime, and has been.

    Lots of money to be made in various ways. Astrology is one of the older ones, but there are psychic readings, other ways of trying to read the future from objects or behavior of animals, etc.

    Investment publications and advisors are full of more rational approaches, but still rarely more correct than chance. No one "beats the market" for very long.

    Now we even have offshoots of "new" religions like BLM, Greta Thunberg's (and Al Gore!) "end of the world in X years" mantra, mythical non carbon issuing energy and "self awareness" like Woody Allen style psychotherapy.

    Now "algorithms" are the new fortune tellers. Yes, formulas, plain and simple. And spreadsheets using them. "Collect the data" and the future will be revealed. At least this stuff has some predictive merit when conditions don't change much. Which of course they do.

    The only people getting rich off of predicting the future are those selling the predictions.

    Crypto currency, anyone?

    Replies: @Anon

    You write:

    ““Predicting the future” is always a popular pastime, and has been.”

    I think that touches upon a human desire, perhaps human need.

    At work, I got co-workers interested when I said that I could predict if a worker would leave the firm in a bad way, such as getting fired or laid off.

    I did not always predict every lay off or firing. But about 80 percent of the time, when I felt that a person would get laid off or fired, it happened.

    My method was this: if I didn’t like that person, for a rational reason (they were jerks, or they were not good workers), they were likely to be gotten rid of. The other 10 percent quit.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Anon

    There is an academic discipline called Futurology.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futures_studies

    , @Sidewalk Meanderings
    @Anon

    Any correlation between workers getting fired or laid off and the number of visible
    tattoos and piercings they have?

  175. @Bill P
    @PhysicistDave

    Thanks, Dave, I really appreciate the response. Inside information is what I was looking for -- and why I asked you. I think I owe you a beer or whatever you drink down in CA.

    In light of what you wrote, I'm thinking medicine because although she's a US citizen she's also a permanent resident of Canada and the school is heavily subsidized. She should be able to get through it with minimal debt and then practice in the US without any immigration hassles.

    Of course it's all speculation at this point, but she listens closely to me and trusts me. Whatever my myriad failures may be, being a father is not one of them.

    Thanks again, from one dad to another. I know how you feel about your daughter and I feel the same about mine.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Your daughter is lucky to have you as her father, and Dave’s is lucky to have him. I commend both of you.

  176. I’ll preface this by saying I don’t believe in any woo.

    That said, adding some noise to a biological system sometimes makes it function better. There are lots of “attractors” in people’s heads.

    Take the retarded “everything that happens to you is because you willed it into your life.” I think the book was called The Secret? Obvious nonsense, but there are some things that what you do really will affect. So, if you’re bummed and everything sucks all the time, maybe there’s something you can do? If reading your horoscope gets you there, is it really so terrible?

    There’s also the fact that sometimes a little randomness is a good idea. Say you’re a general attaching a nearly perfectly symmetrical entrenched enemy. Should you attack the left flank or the right flank? Best course of action is to flip a coin. Especially if you’re a general all the time, flipping coins keeps you from being predictable.

    As to the current popularity of silliness, once you reject science (actual science, not activism) in one area, say, IQ, or IQ and race, where, exactly, do you stop? Then there’s the white maleness of science. Biology is so cruel and limiting! Biology says every cell in your body and brain is XY and male. Astrology says you have a woman’s soul. Both end in –ology, so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.

    There are also a lot more AWFLs in influential positions. That has to have some effect on culture.

    Ooh! AI-generated horoscopes? Our proprietary AIstrologer will give you a horoscope at any time, day or night, using the exact position of the planets as determined by NASA. Really, just train GPT-3 on horoscopes. This might be the business model of the astrology startup that inspired this post? Consistent with high salaries for everyone. That, and massive outsourcing of janitorial etc.

  177. @PhysicistDave
    @Bill P

    Bill P wrote to me:


    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she’d do well as a research scientist or physician
     
    As someone with a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford (and a wife who is a Ph.D. biologist), let me strongly urge your daughter not to go into pure science.

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure -- which most people don't. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    The end result is that most Ph.D.s end up going into industry -- and earning less than if they had gotten the degrees that are directly relevant to industry, basically engineering degrees.

    If your daughter has the perseverance to get an M.D. great -- but keep in mind that you spend years in training and may acquire big debts: it only pays off if you really do spend four decades in practice as a physician. If a woman chose to take a decade off to raise kids, for example, it probably would not pay off.

    Otherwise, get a degree in engineering or computer science. CS pays great right now, but it may be a bubble (they are tending to off-shore work to Asia), and I would find it boring to be a "code monkey" for decades on end.

    My daughter just finished her degree in electrical engineering (EE) at UCLA and has a good job -- decent pay, nice working conditions -- with a spin-off of HP. If a high-school student likes physics and math, that is basically EE at the university level (majoring in math is for beings who are not quite humans!). If she loves chemistry, get a degree in chemical engineering. And, of course, with the above caveats, if she loves biology, medicine may make sense.

    Best of luck to her -- the world does need people who understand how physical reality works.

    Replies: @Bill P, @Rob McX, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure — which most people don’t. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    I actually saw this. An acquaintance in physics told me about the grant they were working on. After making sure I understood the concept, I asked, what’s the point of this? The answer was a few uncomfortable, blinking moments before a stern lecture on “knowledge for its own sake.”

    I had another acquaintance who was a truly brilliant medical doctor and graduate of one of the premier medical schools in the US. Unfortunately he exhibited certain red flags (conservative, meritocratic, liked country music), and got shafted in academic medicine, so he decided to just go make money in private practice instead.

    • Replies: @Fidelios Automata
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Do lefties believe the Feds would actually fund objective studies in Climate Science? Anything privately funded is, of course, on behalf of the Evil Oil Companies.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    The Anti-Gnostic wrote to me:


    An acquaintance in physics told me about the grant they were working on. After making sure I understood the concept, I asked, what’s the point of this? The answer was a few uncomfortable, blinking moments before a stern lecture on “knowledge for its own sake.”
     
    Well, I'm actually interested in knowledge for its own sake: it's cool to use abstract knowledge to build satellite communication systems and hard-disk drive controllers (two areas in which I have worked), but it is also cool to know how black holes work or what the basic forces between elementary particles are (areas in which I have also worked).

    And, indeed, often "knowledge for its own sake" has ultimately yielded practical results, although I'll admit that truly esoteric science (black holes and the Higgs particle, for example) are so far removed from the physics of the everyday world that it is hard to see practical applications.

    So we could debate whether taxpayers should be funding work like that.

    The problem I am pointing to is deeper than that, though. Superstring theory has dominated theoretical elementary-particle physics, the field in which I did my Ph.D. , since shortly after I finished my Ph.D. -- for decades now. It is very pretty mathematically... but no one has ever shown any way whatsoever to connect it with possible experiments in elementary-particle physics.

    Nature, alas, seems to find it less beautiful than we physicists do.

    And that is a very, very serious problem. The reason to trust us crazy scientists is not our (supposed) brilliance but the fact that our theories are borne out by experiment. And no one has any real hope of doing that for superstring theory.

    I'm focusing on this because it happens to be in my field, but I could make similar points about, say, climate science. Yes, climate science is very intriguing... but when will the climate modelers lay out their cards and say, "These future observations will test our models: if these predictions are not borne out by observation, then our models are wrong."

    They have not done this, and that is a very real problem.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  178. @SafeNow
    I think if a young man were suffering from a bad case of the biological imperative, mastering astrology might be a great strategy for getting laid. When I was in high school, I was the captain of the math team, and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet. But it didn’t work. Maybe I had hold of the wrong end of the stick, if anyone still uses that expression.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @prosa123, @Curle

    “and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet.”

    How did you not know that sports is the ONLY chick magnet in HS? I played sports but wasn’t good, in fact I got bloodied up once but discovered to my surprise that blood seemingly excites girls. I was walking from the football field to the locker room after an minor but rather messy cut and had a couple of girls make appreciative comments to me . . . for bleeding!

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Curle

    "How did you not know that sports is the ONLY chick magnet in HS?"

    Not true. There is also Drama Club and Stage Crew.

    "in fact I got bloodied up once but discovered to my surprise that blood seemingly excites girls."

    It's not the blood that excites girls, it's the fact that you were injured in a manly way (viz playing sports, not tripping down the stairs): it brings out their instinct to nurse the wounded warrior. The blood just shows your commitment to winning, despite your wounds. Tingles all round.

    Die Wunden weise mir schnell! (Die Walkure, I.i)

    Replies: @Sidewalk Meanderings

  179. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Alden

    I don't know if any of your daughters were 15/16 during Peak Tumblr. Believe me, it was not good.

    And I don't think you should get so personal when answering comments. That's what girls do ;-)

    Replies: @Curle

    FYI –

    Alden’s the gal who thinks cross-fit will equalize the sexes.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Curle

    It will. Weaker men and stronger women.

  180. @Curle
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Back in the ‘80s this gal I knew well in high school and from church in another state called to tell me she was moving to my city and could I help her move into her apartment. When she arrived I learned she was in town to become an ‘holistic’ doctor. While moving her stuff I also learned she had gotten into New Age/crystals, etc.

    Later, on a hike, I learned she now liked to hike naked and would I be interested? I declined and she remained dressed but she teased me with stories of hiking naked for the rest of that particular walk. For a moment I thought of playing the hypocrite and feigning interest, but I weighed the benefits (obvious) versus the downside (sitting through New Age drivel) and kept myself in check. Afterwords I considered that New Age was just a way for girls raised in traditional households to rationalize getting laid before marriage.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    An old girlfriend in Boulder gave up her corporate job to study traditional Chinese medicine and assorted woo, earning various certifications.

    She has an acupuncture studio there, where she does that plus something called reiki, a form of “energy healing.” She also provides various herbal prescriptions and recommendations for Boulderites to get their energy right.

    A serious old flame, one I could have married, she was the girl who taught me how to read tarot cards. Oddly enough, she was a Republican.

  181. Judging by the prolific replies, astrology never went away, it’s evergreen. I live in the southern hemisphere which probably fks up astrological orthodoxy for me. I do love astrology because I’m a scorpio, the coolest star-sign there is. Cooler than Charles Manson!

  182. Of course you’d be dismissive of astrology,you’re A Sagittarius!!🙄

  183. @PhysicistDave
    OT... or maybe not OT:

    Joel Kotkin has an interesting essay up on Spiked: "The revenge of the material economy."

    The bottom line: it is really not a good idea to ignore physical reality.

    Replies: @bomag, @BB753, @Almost Missouri, @James Speaks, @Bill P, @Rob

    I said “ • Thanks” but I can switch it to “• Disagree“ or “• LOL“ if you are trying to collect them all.

    I got all the reactions to a comment once. My life in the Before Time was an endless, featureless gray wasteland. Ever since, every meal is a feast. Every morning cherubim bring me breakfast in bed. I see a glorious array of colors. Every fluorescent light is a rainbow. Warm sunlight caresses (iPad changed that to “carcasses”) my skin at hours of the day and night. I enjoy music now. Every pop song is a symphony. Every advertising jingle is a rock opera. I can readily distinguish thousands of “pitches”. I see magnitude and phase now*.

    Life will never be the same if you get all the reactions to one comment. Trust me on this!

    * Q. What’s harder than solving mixed partial differential equations in closed form?
    A. Talking to girls.
    Gotta love physics and engineering humor.

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
  184. @AnotherDad
    @Bill P


    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead.
     
    Hopefully--however far she wants to pursue it--it will lead to a quality husband. Science--outside bio/medicine--is overloaded with guys. So the gals are the "scarce resource" and if they are looking to find a nice guy and have a family they can do so.

    (AnotherMom easily could have kept working in her field, but after the kids came she had no interest--been there done that.)

    I think the main thing for any young woman these days is they need to understand to take all the propaganda for a grain of salt. That the old truths are still true. That it is family and children--not career, not partying, not sexual liberation--that will make them happy and give them meaning and purpose through the long run of life. And that their attractiveness and simply biological capability are "on the clock".

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘Hopefully–however far she wants to pursue it–it will lead to a quality husband. Science–outside bio/medicine–is overloaded with guys. So the gals are the “scarce resource” and if they are looking to find a nice guy and have a family they can do so…’

    I’ve seen that. I was moving a woman who was a professor of whatever-they-call-computer-robots from Cal Berkeley to her new position at Carnegie Mellon. Aside from the probable hiring-for-gender she was definitely getting plenty of attention from all the men in her department. And she wasn’t a great looker or even Ms. Congeniality. Okay, but nothing great.

  185. @Achmed E. Newman
    @martin_2

    The big cheese in the Reincarnation realm was Edgar Cayce. He basically invented the whole "past life regression" business. I kind of like that stuff.

    And since not a soul on here got off his ass to embed this, I'll take care of it again, and most New Age Girl about Mary Moon:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TL5ofVC0EDQ

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    You’ve given me an excuse to finally share one of those 90s alternative rock songs I really like: “Lightening Crashes.” It deals with reincarnation, but that’s something I don’t believe in, so I’ll just say it’s about the cycle of life, which it is.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Thanks, Buzz. That's a good song. I'd had no idea what that song was about - never saw the video before - till you wrote. Lyrics are in general unimportant compared to melody and sound. Not only that, but I'd have told you this was Collective Soul, if you'd asked me who this was while playing it. They were around that same time.

    , @JR Ewing
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I used to use that song as part of my "psych up" routine before track meets (i.e. shot put) in college. It starts slow and ends up pretty loud and hectic by the end.

  186. @Altai
    But now the return of astrology seems like part of the general turn against science and rationality due to feminism, transism, black pride, etc.

    As I keep trying to explain, when smart phones emerged young girls began to spend more and more time on social media than males or adults.

    This has transformed the internet from 'There are no girls on the internet' of the mid 2000s to being a vehicle for the self-radicalisation or young girls of certain dispositions into a kind of religious moral panic. Tumblr is a kind of canary in the cole mine and might represent a particularly anti-rational black hole. A kind of electronic lord of the flies but with teenage girls. Here is a former Tumblr user realising how insane it was.

    https://4thwavenow.com/2019/03/20/tumblr-a-call-out-post

    I keep harping back on it but this clip from the Floyd protests in Stockholm (Yes, of course there was such a thing and despite the pandemic) represents something profound going on, this is not something somebody who isn't a Gen Z girl can relate to because it represents a religion nobody but them was born into.

    https://twitter.com/samnyttsimon/status/1268266061801160711

    These girls too don't represent all teenage girls but they represent a significant chunk of them in terms of personality and sociologically and all that fall into that category are now religious zealots.

    Astrology appeals to the same demographic and social media has allowed them to bring back discussions of it.

    The big change has been a combination of social media being taken deadly seriously at the same time that the power users of it became Gen Z and Gen Y young women and girls. That's what 'cancel culture' is, the emergence of teenage girl like shunning and shaming at a meta level.

    Replies: @Thea, @AndrewR, @Anon, @Polistra, @Alden, @Fidelios Automata

    I rarely read commenter’s links but since I’ve visited Tumblr off and on I had to check it out — what a spot-on post. I thought Tumblr would die after they purged all the (mostly bizarre, fetishistic) pornography, but I was wrong.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Fidelios Automata

    Ongoing UK case - parents were IT-savvy and knew their high-functioning autist daughter (14), who was not allowed unmonitored internet use at home - but her school IT system was full of holes. And this was a girl who was obsessively online at school.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/03/30/00/11642136-6866801-Instagram_promised_an_immediate_crackdown_on_self_harm_and_suici-a-31_1553906789659.jpg

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2022/sep/26/posts-seen-by-molly-russell-of-self-harm-and-suicide-safe-for-children-meta-says


    A senior executive at Instagram’s owner has apologised after admitting that the platform had shown Molly Russell content that violated its policies before she died.

    Elizabeth Lagone, head of health and wellbeing policy at Meta, acknowledged that some of the posts and videos had broken Instagram guidelines at the time, which prohibited the glorification, encouragement and promotion of suicide and self-harm.

    “We are sorry that Molly saw content that violated our policies, and we don’t want that on the platform,” she said.

    Molly, 14, from Harrow, north-west London, killed herself in November 2017 after viewing extensive amounts of content online related to suicide, self-harm, depression and anxiety.

    North London coroner’s court also heard that a note started on Molly’s phone, and discovered after her death, used language that appeared in a video clip she had viewed.

    Before the apology, the KC representing Molly’s family, Oliver Sanders, had berated the Meta executive over the company letting teenagers view content related to suicide, depression and self-harm.

    “I suggest to you it is an inherently unsafe environment and it is dangerous and toxic to have 13- and 14-year-olds alone in their bedrooms scrolling through this rubbish on their phones,” said Sanders.

    Lagone replied: “I respectfully disagree.”

    Raising his voice, Sanders said: “Why on earth are you doing this?” He said Instagram was choosing to put content “in the bedrooms of depressed children”, adding: “You have no right to. You are not their parent. You are just a business in America.”

    The court heard that in the last six months of her life, Molly saved 16,300 images on her Instagram account, 2,100 of which related to depression, self-harm and suicide.

     

  187. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @PhysicistDave

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure — which most people don’t. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    I actually saw this. An acquaintance in physics told me about the grant they were working on. After making sure I understood the concept, I asked, what's the point of this? The answer was a few uncomfortable, blinking moments before a stern lecture on "knowledge for its own sake."

    I had another acquaintance who was a truly brilliant medical doctor and graduate of one of the premier medical schools in the US. Unfortunately he exhibited certain red flags (conservative, meritocratic, liked country music), and got shafted in academic medicine, so he decided to just go make money in private practice instead.

    Replies: @Fidelios Automata, @PhysicistDave

    Do lefties believe the Feds would actually fund objective studies in Climate Science? Anything privately funded is, of course, on behalf of the Evil Oil Companies.

  188. @Mark G.
    @Almost Missouri


    Compared to the mystical and self-contradictory state-backed religions of equalism, negrolotry, transexualism, Our Values, and Our Democracy, astrology is positively rational.
     
    Add to that the pseudoscience of radical environmentalism. The left sometimes makes fun of religious conservative beliefs like creationism but many of them hold equally implausible beliefs. As Altai mentions in comment 2., females tend to be more prone to this.

    Polling has shown that females have always been more inclined to believe in various forms of pseudoscience. The one exception is UFOs. Men, for some reason, tend to be more fervent believers in that. There is also a tendency for believers in one pseudoscience to believe in others. My grandmother had Tarot cards, a Ouija board, did seances and was an astrologer. One of her astrology clients was the former thirties Hollywood actress Frances Farmer. When I was a small child, she took me with her when she visited Farmer one time. Afterwards she told me Farmer had been a famous Hollywood actress. My grandmother would often make up stuff, such as telling me tigers lived in the woods near my house, so I never believed anything she told me. I was surprised many years later when I saw there was a new movie with Jessica Lange playing Farmer and realized Grandma had actually told me the truth and she was a former actress.

    Replies: @Feryl

    UFOs have a “hard” sci-fi bent wrt being from (take your pick) outer space, the deep sea, other dimensions, ore even the future. There’s a narrative of exploration that guys find appealing. Plus there’s sepculation about who the alien race is and how we will interact with it. BTW, the government itself studies UFOs. They’re not studying anything else of an esoteric nature.

    • Thanks: Mark G.
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Feryl

    There are no time travelers, there are no UFOs alas.

    http://fictionaut.com/stories/strannikov/the-fermi-panic

  189. @Anon
    @Muggles

    You write:

    "“Predicting the future” is always a popular pastime, and has been."

    I think that touches upon a human desire, perhaps human need.

    At work, I got co-workers interested when I said that I could predict if a worker would leave the firm in a bad way, such as getting fired or laid off.

    I did not always predict every lay off or firing. But about 80 percent of the time, when I felt that a person would get laid off or fired, it happened.

    My method was this: if I didn't like that person, for a rational reason (they were jerks, or they were not good workers), they were likely to be gotten rid of. The other 10 percent quit.

    Replies: @epebble, @Sidewalk Meanderings

    There is an academic discipline called Futurology.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futures_studies

  190. @Claudia
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Another female reader here. There may be morr of us than you think!

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Hi Claudia. What’s your sign? 😉

  191. @SFG
    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences, and like alchemy dates back to the days when people really had no way of knowing any better. Quite a bit of math was invented to cast horoscopes, and it was one of the only applications for astronomical knowledge along with navigation.

    As for the company… it might not be a bad investment, at least for the short term. You are investing based on their ability to get people to pay for their advice. You’re not going to take it yourself. Speculative investment, of course, but Goop did pretty well. Woo can lead to wealth.

    I agree with Steve’s larger point…this seems kinda like a retread of the 1970s, with misandrist fourth wave feminism, inflation and probably an oncoming recession, rising crime, and a new Black Power movement in BLM. I don’t want to push these analogies too far, but maybe DeSantis will be our new Reagan?

    Replies: @bomag, @Dmon, @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY), @Reg Cæsar

    Astrology is one of the older pseudosciences…

    Well, we can assume that “SFG” doesn’t stand for “Steven Goldberg”, who argued that astrology, while about as bad as science can get, is nevertheless science, not “pseudoscience”.

    However, he puts astrology in a category with matriarchies, something for which no evidence has ever been found. His NYT LTE from 1988:

    No Reason to Believe That Astrology Is True

    (Now, if Mr Stix tells us he was taught by Goldberg as well as Michael Levin, I’ll be most impressed.)

  192. @PhysicistDave
    @Bill P

    Bill P wrote to me:


    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she’d do well as a research scientist or physician
     
    As someone with a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford (and a wife who is a Ph.D. biologist), let me strongly urge your daughter not to go into pure science.

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure -- which most people don't. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    The end result is that most Ph.D.s end up going into industry -- and earning less than if they had gotten the degrees that are directly relevant to industry, basically engineering degrees.

    If your daughter has the perseverance to get an M.D. great -- but keep in mind that you spend years in training and may acquire big debts: it only pays off if you really do spend four decades in practice as a physician. If a woman chose to take a decade off to raise kids, for example, it probably would not pay off.

    Otherwise, get a degree in engineering or computer science. CS pays great right now, but it may be a bubble (they are tending to off-shore work to Asia), and I would find it boring to be a "code monkey" for decades on end.

    My daughter just finished her degree in electrical engineering (EE) at UCLA and has a good job -- decent pay, nice working conditions -- with a spin-off of HP. If a high-school student likes physics and math, that is basically EE at the university level (majoring in math is for beings who are not quite humans!). If she loves chemistry, get a degree in chemical engineering. And, of course, with the above caveats, if she loves biology, medicine may make sense.

    Best of luck to her -- the world does need people who understand how physical reality works.

    Replies: @Bill P, @Rob McX, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

    This is why women and minorities don’t go into STEM– too much common sense. It sucks as a career, leaving it open for obsessive white and yellow boys.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Curle
    @Reg Cæsar

    They don’t go into it because problem solving doesn’t interest them.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Bill Jones
    @Reg Cæsar


    This is why women and minorities don’t go into STEM– too much common sense.
     
    It's not too much of something, it's too little of something: The electron doesn't give a damn how you feel about it.
  193. Best song on the subject:

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Joe S.Walker

    Weird, song not available. What was it?

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker, @BB753, @Reg Cæsar

  194. @Alden
    @Dmon

    The great conservative hero Reagan also signed a law making it much easier to get abortions years before Roe. And had many gay men on his staff and fundraisers.

    And when the great conservative hero was elected president he;

    1 did nothing about affirmative action and the non White percentage of government employees at all levels, city county state and federal rose higher and higher as Whites retired and anything non White replaced them.

    2 created the first of many amnesties.

    3 did nothing to stop illegals entering the country and getting jobs and welfare.

    4 and it was under Raegan’s watch that our industrial sector left for China.

    5 also under Reagan’s presidency NASA and the NASA contractors in Silicon Valley began laying off and not renewing the contracts of the White men who put a man in the moon in favor of Chinese immigrants. These were men who graduated with their MSs in aeronautical astronautical engineering and software design in the mid 1960s and were laid off 15 years later in favor of non White immigrants.

    Or one of the many reasons I’m not a conservative.

    Replies: @BosTex, @Reg Cæsar, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @BB753

    The great conservative hero Reagan also signed a law making it much easier to get abortions years before Roe.

    No, he did not. That bill made it easier for hospitals to give abortions, but it was in no way elective. This canard never dies, does it? Reagan’s main influence on the bill was to have “fetal deformity” removed as an excuse for the hospital committee making the decision.

  195. Bizarrely, after reading this, I read Saint Augustine’s City of God.

    Long dismissal of astrology in Book Five, 1-8.

    In a very Steve Sailer-like approach, he cites the examples of twins having different fates to demolish astrology.

    Now feeling embarrassed I ever knew my star sign…

  196. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You've given me an excuse to finally share one of those 90s alternative rock songs I really like: "Lightening Crashes." It deals with reincarnation, but that's something I don't believe in, so I'll just say it's about the cycle of life, which it is.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsJ4O-nSveg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @JR Ewing

    Thanks, Buzz. That’s a good song. I’d had no idea what that song was about – never saw the video before – till you wrote. Lyrics are in general unimportant compared to melody and sound. Not only that, but I’d have told you this was Collective Soul, if you’d asked me who this was while playing it. They were around that same time.

  197. @Mike Tre
    Here is a possible astrology enthusiast: Entitled and emotionally stunted broad cuts the line at walmart then starts screaming hysterically about rape:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215108-snowflake-wearing-a-mask-cuts-the-line-at-walmart-has-a-mental-breakdown-when-called-out-on-it-screams-about-rape

    Not to be outdone, the negroes had a busy weekend as well. A 77 year old man is charged with child endangerment when his FIVE year old daughter takes his gun and starts chasing neighborhood kids around with it.

    https://vidmax.com/video/215114-wth-77-year-old-man-charged-after-his-5-year-old-daughter-was-caught-on-cam-chasing-kids-with-a-gun

    Negroes go berserk in a grocery store in Philly. Fat negress inquires about still getting a pound of sliced roast beef amidst the chaos:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215109-watch-as-a-mob-completely-destroys-a-wawa-in-philadelphia


    And example # 6 million as to why women shouldn't be police officers, a female parks her patrol car on live railroad tracks during a traffic stop and the patrol car is hit by a train, with a suspect inside:

    https://vidmax.com/video/215105-colorado-cop-arrests-road-rage-suspect-while-parking-his-cruiser-on-the-train-tracks-things-don-t-end-well-for-the-cruiser-or-the-suspect

    The last one is a testament to the outrageous hubris of cops during traffic stops. They will pull over a vehicle in some of the most unsafe places possible, and expect all other traffic to just, well, deal with it. They will block driveways, live lanes, and turn lanes to conduct a stop, when there are plenty of safe places to direct a vehicle so they can commence with the armed tax collection.

    This foolish birthing unit probably legitimately thought the train would stop for the patrol car.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Art Deco, @MEH 0910

    The female officer is not the one who parked the patrol car on the tracks:

    https://www.wptv.com/news/national/video-shows-train-hit-colorado-police-car-with-woman-in-custody-inside

    One officer, a man referred to as “Vasquez,” stops his cruiser directly on the train tracks, and the female officer who was driving behind him stops hers behind his cruiser.

    8-minute video shows officer response, train hit woman in Platteville police car

    An 8-minute video CBS News Colorado obtained from Fort Lupton Police Department shows a Fort Lupton and Platteville officer response when a train hit a woman in Platteville a police car sitting on the tracks.

  198. @Intelligent Dasein
    Astrology is not a problem as long as people don't get too superstitious about it. Astrological influences are real, but they are usually not important enough to need a thorough exploration. The movements of the heavenly wheels affect what are called the "powers of generation," i.e. the processes by which new living organisms are educed, either from their parents (as in normal reproduction) or from nonliving matter (as in spontaneous generation, which does occur, the remonstrations of Louis Pasteur notwithstanding).

    It is primarily only lower organisms that are affected by astrological influences in any observable degree, for example planktonic migrations and coral spawning. In higher organisms behavior is governed more by the senses and internal motions, and in man also by the reason. For man, astrology may contribute to a baseline mood or temperament, but it does not in any way determine one's fate.

    The danger is astrology is not that it is "pseudoscience," but that it quite quickly becomes an idolatrous, occultic practice by which one attempts to know the future or gain control over fate. This it cannot do, and the people who attempt such things are abusing the credulity of others and need to be circumscribed.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Have you considered changing the first part of your name?

  199. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @PhysicistDave

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure — which most people don’t. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    I actually saw this. An acquaintance in physics told me about the grant they were working on. After making sure I understood the concept, I asked, what's the point of this? The answer was a few uncomfortable, blinking moments before a stern lecture on "knowledge for its own sake."

    I had another acquaintance who was a truly brilliant medical doctor and graduate of one of the premier medical schools in the US. Unfortunately he exhibited certain red flags (conservative, meritocratic, liked country music), and got shafted in academic medicine, so he decided to just go make money in private practice instead.

    Replies: @Fidelios Automata, @PhysicistDave

    The Anti-Gnostic wrote to me:

    An acquaintance in physics told me about the grant they were working on. After making sure I understood the concept, I asked, what’s the point of this? The answer was a few uncomfortable, blinking moments before a stern lecture on “knowledge for its own sake.”

    Well, I’m actually interested in knowledge for its own sake: it’s cool to use abstract knowledge to build satellite communication systems and hard-disk drive controllers (two areas in which I have worked), but it is also cool to know how black holes work or what the basic forces between elementary particles are (areas in which I have also worked).

    And, indeed, often “knowledge for its own sake” has ultimately yielded practical results, although I’ll admit that truly esoteric science (black holes and the Higgs particle, for example) are so far removed from the physics of the everyday world that it is hard to see practical applications.

    So we could debate whether taxpayers should be funding work like that.

    The problem I am pointing to is deeper than that, though. Superstring theory has dominated theoretical elementary-particle physics, the field in which I did my Ph.D. , since shortly after I finished my Ph.D. — for decades now. It is very pretty mathematically… but no one has ever shown any way whatsoever to connect it with possible experiments in elementary-particle physics.

    Nature, alas, seems to find it less beautiful than we physicists do.

    And that is a very, very serious problem. The reason to trust us crazy scientists is not our (supposed) brilliance but the fact that our theories are borne out by experiment. And no one has any real hope of doing that for superstring theory.

    I’m focusing on this because it happens to be in my field, but I could make similar points about, say, climate science. Yes, climate science is very intriguing… but when will the climate modelers lay out their cards and say, “These future observations will test our models: if these predictions are not borne out by observation, then our models are wrong.”

    They have not done this, and that is a very real problem.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian, ic1000
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @PhysicistDave

    My impression is a lot of papers esp. in the squishy areas are designed to present non-falsifiable hypotheses, dressed up in the scientific method. The other perverse incentive is just to feed your lab and its grad students.

  200. @jb
    Hmm, I looked the Chani web site, and I don't see a guaranteed failure. $80,000 isn't what it used to be, and if they have the funding it's not a ruinous minimum salary for a small (at the moment they seem to have three current openings) tech startup where everybody works from home (i.e., no $80,000 janitors). The rest is either fairly standard benefits or Woke posturing that won't actually cost them much. Might still be worth shorting, but if they manage to produce a product people want it could work. Still hilarious though!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    It will fail the same way that these companies always fail.
    They will have a mixture of productive and non-productive staff. The productive staff will complain about the non-productive. There will be accusations of racism, white supremacy and toxic patriarchy and the whole thing will disintegrate.

  201. @James Speaks
    @MEH 0910

    Sure, but couldn't team iSteve produce an update, "Astrology For Dummies, the Criminally Woke Edition?"

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  202. Here in the UK, social media is awash with posts by women “celebrating” each and every non Christian “event” they can find. Of course, they understand none of it and use it merely to “prove” that the universe is not cold and indifferent. Their notions of ancient Celtic and Germanic festivals such as Beltane, Samhain, Eostre and Mabon are an excuse to centre on the self. It’s all about new beginnings, empowerment etc. It is a fake, self centred pseudo naturalistic but thinly veiled feminist belief. It asks nothing of its believers. It’s a mindless, empty sham. Rather like the modern Church of England. God or gods reduced to a comfort blanket.

  203. @SFG
    @theMann

    Nobody worships Big C, he’s sleeping at the bottom of the ocean and won’t give you crap.

    Now Nyarlathotep, he’s doled out a few favors across the ages.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Now Nyarlathotep, he’s doled out a few favors across the ages.”

    I’m a Yog-Sothoth man myself.

    btw, since you know the lingo, it might interest you to know that I am distantly related to Lord Dunsany himself.

  204. @Curle
    @SafeNow

    “and I thought, wow, this might well be a chick magnet.”

    How did you not know that sports is the ONLY chick magnet in HS? I played sports but wasn’t good, in fact I got bloodied up once but discovered to my surprise that blood seemingly excites girls. I was walking from the football field to the locker room after an minor but rather messy cut and had a couple of girls make appreciative comments to me . . . for bleeding!

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “How did you not know that sports is the ONLY chick magnet in HS?”

    Not true. There is also Drama Club and Stage Crew.

    “in fact I got bloodied up once but discovered to my surprise that blood seemingly excites girls.”

    It’s not the blood that excites girls, it’s the fact that you were injured in a manly way (viz playing sports, not tripping down the stairs): it brings out their instinct to nurse the wounded warrior. The blood just shows your commitment to winning, despite your wounds. Tingles all round.

    Die Wunden weise mir schnell! (Die Walkure, I.i)

    • Replies: @Sidewalk Meanderings
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Art Club and Dance Club also are good places to meet girls since these clubs
    have many more girls than boys, if you don't mind being called a sissy by
    jocks for wanting to learn how to draw or dance. If you're good at drawing
    faces, you have a good excuse to approach beautiful girls: "Wow, Rubens
    would have loved to paint you! May I draw your portrait?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  205. @Anonymous
    Most astrologists agree:

    Beware of negroes when mercury is rising…

    https://twitter.com/libsoftiktok/status/1573879098761392128?s=20&t=Bm3u1HOIqAzK8x9Tq4FB8Q

    Replies: @Liger

    WIT!

  206. @AnotherDad
    @bomag



    Doesn’t mention immigration. Sigh.

     

    Yeah, there's always a blind spot from these folks, even when talking more sense than usual.

    Obvious if one opens ones eyes, that the verbalist parasites have been able to use immigration as a cudgel against the material people.

    A lot of the verbalist parasites' "work"--media, lawyering, finance, government bureaucracy, social work--has more "culturally specific" skills/background/credentialling and ergo less subject to immigration replacement. Basically, it requires culturally made up stuff--specific laws, regulations, practices, knowledge. Immigrants can do it but generally have to come here and do/redo their training and even then may lack some of the cultural "fit" to do it well.

    In contrast, the material work being about materially altering the real world is actually real. So if you were say a mason in Italy you could come and be one in New York or Philly. If you can do carpentry in Mexico you can come and do it here. Being instructed in our standards pretty straightforward. Or at the higher end if you were doing engineering in China or software in India you can come and do it here. (For real engineering you have to redo certification, but the core of the math, principles transfer.)

    Basically, if you are materially productive, your salary versus someone else equally skilled elsewhere, is supposed to be protected by a border, giving you--not some random foreign dude--the fruits of the capital and skill accumulation done by your ancestors.

    The verbalist parasites war on producers through immigration is definitely part of this equation.

    Replies: @bomag

    Good points.

    I’ve heard arguments from the pro-immi people that, essentially, natives should be in the verbalist class while immigrants and natives who can’t get a slot should be the working class. They are enthralled with the notion of having servants speaking with an accent who thank them profusely for a job in a nice place.

    Are current immigrants even working anymore? Our labor force has shrank the last two years, according to official stats. We mainly hear about migrants escaping crime and political persecution; maybe the bulk are verbalist grifters. Seems that back in the day we would at least get tossed a couple stories about carpenters who couldn’t find enough work back home, so they were happy to come to America to build.

    Also, a line of thought here that the trades/material jobs are going to be automated away in the future, which makes one doubly wonder what is the point of mass immigration beyond punishing political foes.

    • Agree: Renard
  207. @Emil Nikola Richard
    Millionaires do not use astrologers.

    Billionaires do.

    The world changed in 2012 while you were watching internet pornography and unable to notice.

    I have calculated the dawn of the age of Aquarius. This text box is not quite big enough to contain the paperwork but it's 1 July 2057. : )

    Replies: @dimples

    The beginning of the Age of Aquarius was December 21, 2020. This was the date of the Great Conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the first degree of Aquarius.

    No calculations necessary.

  208. @Reg Cæsar
    @PhysicistDave

    This is why women and minorities don't go into STEM-- too much common sense. It sucks as a career, leaving it open for obsessive white and yellow boys.

    Replies: @Curle, @Bill Jones

    They don’t go into it because problem solving doesn’t interest them.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Curle


    They don’t go into it because problem solving doesn’t interest them.
     
    "They don’t go into it because problem solving [for low pay in substandard working conditions] doesn’t interest them."

    Reverse-engineered it for you. Money and comfy offices would attract many more, overriding any lack of interest.
  209. @Joe S.Walker
    Best song on the subject:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=QVBY7RQLSNU

    Replies: @Curle

    Weird, song not available. What was it?

    • Replies: @Joe S.Walker
    @Curle

    Juliette Greco, "L'Horoscope."

    , @BB753
    @Curle

    Juliette Gréco. L'horoscope.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Curle

    Under her chin it says "strip me".

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker

  210. @Bill P
    The key thing about astrology and fortune telling in general is the ambiguity. Basically, you can interpret it however you want, then you can use it to rationalize whatever feelings you have about things. This is why women love it -- it's like a subjectivity enhancement tool.

    I have heard some people recommend certain forms of it, such as the Chinese I-Qing, as a method for making rational decisions in a structured way. It may be useful in that regard but I don't know either way, and the popular horoscopes don't seem as though they could offer much value along those lines.

    But I don't think the point of astrology is to replace science. I rather suspect it's a form of divination, i.e. a psychological tool people use to help them make up their minds about non-scientific things, like whether one should go out to dinner with Bob, or go to a concert with Joe.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I did the I Ching for a while a long time ago. Its advice was almost always “Perseverance furthers”, which isn’t bad advice but not something you need a 300 page book for.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Jim Don Bob

    Hexagram 37: HBD in a nutshell.

  211. @PhysicistDave
    @Bill P

    Bill P wrote to me:


    My daughter says she wants to go into science, and she is an excellent student (far more diligent than I was — she somehow made valedictorian at a half-Asian school in Vancouver), but although I support her I really don’t know where that might lead. I kind of suspect she’d do well as a research scientist or physician
     
    As someone with a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford (and a wife who is a Ph.D. biologist), let me strongly urge your daughter not to go into pure science.

    The pure research world is essentially federally-funded academic research. And it is a horrific snake-pit: it is all a matter of corrupt networking and political games, with not that much connection to actual merit. Oh, and the pay is bad, the working hours stink, and there is no job security unless and until you get tenure -- which most people don't. And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).

    The end result is that most Ph.D.s end up going into industry -- and earning less than if they had gotten the degrees that are directly relevant to industry, basically engineering degrees.

    If your daughter has the perseverance to get an M.D. great -- but keep in mind that you spend years in training and may acquire big debts: it only pays off if you really do spend four decades in practice as a physician. If a woman chose to take a decade off to raise kids, for example, it probably would not pay off.

    Otherwise, get a degree in engineering or computer science. CS pays great right now, but it may be a bubble (they are tending to off-shore work to Asia), and I would find it boring to be a "code monkey" for decades on end.

    My daughter just finished her degree in electrical engineering (EE) at UCLA and has a good job -- decent pay, nice working conditions -- with a spin-off of HP. If a high-school student likes physics and math, that is basically EE at the university level (majoring in math is for beings who are not quite humans!). If she loves chemistry, get a degree in chemical engineering. And, of course, with the above caveats, if she loves biology, medicine may make sense.

    Best of luck to her -- the world does need people who understand how physical reality works.

    Replies: @Bill P, @Rob McX, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Reg Cæsar, @Bill Jones

    Your post seems about right, with a minor quibble

    And, of course, with the above caveats, if she loves biology, medicine may make sense.

    Veterinarian?

  212. Well no-one else seems to have noticed the obvious: The Western World has gone to hell in a hand-basket since it’s been run by that particularly nasty cult of Astrology called zionism.

  213. @Bill Jones
    @Renard

    The Zman had a regular segment called Zirl science on his Friday podcasts a few years ago. Someone on the blog was complaining about it's absence a few days ago.
    Jared Taylor raises the same issue here on Unz. Meanwhile in the YUK, the new Chancellor, the wonderfully named Kwasi Kwarteng, a Yorkshire name, I believe, has revealed what is being called voodoo economics in his Budget.


    We are in a parallel fantasy universe created by the fever-dreams of the Wokels.It will not get better anytime soon.

    Meanwhile Young Emile looks at things we should look at.

    https://kirkegaard.substack.com/p/men-like-vs-women-like

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “Meanwhile in the YUK, the new Chancellor, the wonderfully named Kwasi Kwarteng, a Yorkshire name, I believe, has revealed what is being called voodoo economics in his Budget.”

    Steve really should do a post on the current UK shambles.

    Let’s go back 7 years, pre-Brexit, Tory conference.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-34450887

    Home Secretary Theresa May has unveiled a reform of the UK’s asylum rules during an uncompromising speech to the Conservative Party conference. Mrs May pledged to reduce the numbers claiming in Britain while taking in the “most vulnerable” refugees from conflict zones around the world. She also said high migration made a “cohesive society” impossible.

    Her speech was criticised by business groups, with the Institute of Directors attacking its “irresponsible rhetoric”.

    Net migration into the UK currently stands at a record high, reaching 330,000 in the year to March… Ministers have admitted missing their target to reduce net migration below 100,000, blaming the scale of migration from within Europe.

    But Brexit meant “taking back control” of UK borders. As this campaign put it:

    http://www.voteleavetakecontrol.org/why_vote_leave.html

    “Nearly two million people came to the UK from the EU in the last ten years. Vote Leave and control immigration”

    When Boris came to power, all things were possible. He had a huge majority, including the “Red Wall” of Northern, previously solid Labour seats where people were fed up with mass EU immigration. My own son worked for a while in a factory where everyone else on the “shop floor” spoke Polish.

    Result post-Brexit? Boris Johnson, a literal rootless cosmopolitan, handed out 1.1 million visas in a year.

    https://www.migrationwatchuk.org/news/2022/08/25/immigration-at-all-time-record-level-with-record-1-1-million-visas-issued-to-come-and-live-in-the-uk

    There hasn’t been much political or media reaction to this huge rise, probably because journalists and politicians want to have continued careers.

    When Boris finally f***rd around too much and found put the most diverse (aka “foreign”) leadership team since probably the Conquest took over. There wasn’t great enthusiasm for Liz Truss, but nobody trusted her main competitor, a Brahmin with a tax-avoiding billionaire wife, either.

    The chancellor, Kwasi Karteng, is academically clever, son of Akan academics. Akans are a Ghanaian group who include the Ashanti, a pretty clever bunch. On a par with the Ibo in Nigeria perhaps.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Akan_people

    Whether he’s so clever in the real world or just thinks that Britain in 2022 fits into an Adam Smith economic template I’m unsure. This book is a clue:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britannia_Unchained

    Britain needs to adopt a far-reaching form of free market economics, with fewer employment laws and suggesting the United Kingdom should learn lessons from the business and economic practices of other countries, including Canada, Australia and the tiger economies of the Far East like Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore.

    But his “mini-budget” on Friday was pretty remarkable in that it cut taxes substantially AND raised public spending substantially. The sums don’t add up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_2022_United_Kingdom_mini-budget

    The budget was greeted by a collapse in sterling and a decline in the stock market, both losing about 2% in an afternoon. That’s continued today after sterling declines on Asian exchanges overnight.

    Still, why shouldn’t a third-world country have a third-world economy and a third-world currency?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @YetAnotherAnon

    https://twitter.com/AnnCoulter/status/1574134975548428288
    https://twitter.com/jackbuckby/status/1574186387938725888

    Replies: @Art Deco, @J.Ross

    , @Rob McX
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Here's a figure to consider in this time of rising fuel costs: £569,696.23. That's what the UK Border Force spent on fuel for its vessels in the English Channel picking up dinghy-loads of "migrants" during the first seven months of this year. This is just for BF vessels in the Channel and doesn't include fuel for the navy or RNLI.

    Not surprisingly, immigration watch journalist Steve Laws had to use the Freedom of Information Act to wring this figure from the authorities. Among the many things they won't divulge is the number of immigrants who walk in through the Channel Tunnel each day. They told him this is "not in the public interest".

    https://youtu.be/MJRwGAdFlWc

    , @J.Ross
    @YetAnotherAnon

    [looking left]
    [looking right]
    AKAN IS A CUNT!!
    Alright, the coast is clear.

  214. @Bardon Kaldian
    Astrology is big everywhere in the Western world.

    Although- I wouldn't put it in the same category as parapsychology. Great minds like John Archibald Wheeler tried to see whether there is something in it; Wheeler was open minded, but also a critical mind. After a few years, he gave up & said that parapsychology had failed to produce results (Wheeler was scientifically, not scientistically oriented). Of course there are opinions that Wheeler, at the end, was wrong:https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1979/05/17/a-decade-of-permissiveness/,  https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1980/06/26/parapsychology-an-exchange/- but I don't care.

    I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could "calculate" anything real about my past (not future). It was about what happened to me when I was a child, then in my early 20s, my health and finances and interests etc. They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @prosa123, @HA, @Prester John

    Wheeler never gets his due, buried as he is among the Einsteins, Fermis, Rutherfords, Heisenbergs etc. He was one of the early proponents of quantum physics and was something of a protege of Neils Bohr and his “Copenhagen School” of theoretical physics. One of the greatest American physicists.

  215. @Mr Mox
    Steve, we're almost the same age, and I also recall those days.

    The Bermuda Triangle was swallowing ships and planes. Erich von Däniken was discovering absolute proof we were once visited by aliens (and probably making a small fortune from his books). If you placed a dull razorblade under a pyramid structure it would become sharp over night. Your inner energy would follow some mumbo-jumbo calendar, and you could scare the shit out of plants just by thinking of killing them.

    We ate it up... and then we grew up.

    I remember discovering The Amazing Randi's website and learning, much to my chagrin, that the unexplainable abnormalities I still believed in, like mindreading/ESP, was just claptrap nonsense, and Randi's million was as safe as ever. I became a convinced skeptic that day - and a cynic as well. Better late than never...

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Brutusale

  216. @Almost Missouri
    @BenjaminL


    I have the impression that among women, astrology never really went away.
     
    Agree. A couple of data points from the supposed trough in "new age nonsense" around the turn of the century:

    • A hard-nosed lawyer lady with an advanced education and her own practice, who never flinches in front of the notoriously vindictive local magistrates or the occasionally violent clients, suddenly discovers one of the opposing clients is practicing "witchcraft". The heretofore rock-ribbed lawyer lady suddenly becomes discombobulated and considers whether she really needs to continue taking this case, citing the risk of "curse or spell".

    • A Harvard-trained educator and worldly woman has a sideline in horoscopes and tarot readings. She is more in demand for those latter skills than for her trained career path. Admittedly, she is quite good at them, not unlike the OP Chani.

    In other words, the new age stuff didn't "suddenly vanish", it became embedded in the woodwork of post-yuppie bohemian bourgeois society.

    Replies: @SFG, @Unintended Consequence, @ATBOTL, @Brutusale

    One of my neighbors (wife) has been having a medium come to give readings at her house for her and her chardonnay-swilling friends for about 15 years now. My friend (the husband) says it must be important, as they drink half the wine that they usually imbibe!

  217. Wasn’t “spoon bending” debunked as a parlor trick about as easy to learn as stealing noses or pulling quarters out of ears? An ordinary spoon would be flexed repeatedly until it had lost its resistance to bending? You’d think they’d have tried their mental powers onto some more substantial object long ago.

  218. @Rob McX
    @AnotherDad

    Just be glad you're not in Canada.

    https://dab57h0r8ahff.cloudfront.net/585269/uploads/e237f9a0-3a4f-11ed-be3a-353e2cca9a78_800_420.jpeg

    Replies: @Brutusale

    • Thanks: Rob McX
  219. @Reg Cæsar
    @PhysicistDave

    This is why women and minorities don't go into STEM-- too much common sense. It sucks as a career, leaving it open for obsessive white and yellow boys.

    Replies: @Curle, @Bill Jones

    This is why women and minorities don’t go into STEM– too much common sense.

    It’s not too much of something, it’s too little of something: The electron doesn’t give a damn how you feel about it.

  220. @Curle
    @Joe S.Walker

    Weird, song not available. What was it?

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker, @BB753, @Reg Cæsar

    Juliette Greco, “L’Horoscope.”

    • Thanks: Curle
  221. There is growing disillusionment with science and technology as
    the public realizes that millions of scientists and engineers around
    the world have dedicated their lives to developing increasingly
    diabolical weapons of mass destruction, including microwave beams
    that can at a distance boil enemy soldiers alive. Covid as a possible
    bioweapon and the Russian threat to use nukes in Ukraine are
    reinforcing this trend.

    By extension, there is also a growing distrust of very high IQ
    individuals since it takes a brilliant mind to inflict a massive
    amount of damage, and in this sense average IQ people can be
    said to be superior. Following this line of thought I think one
    can make a credible argument that there is something like
    the Conservation of Stupidity in the Universe, which would
    explain why the average global IQ is so low – around 86 if I
    recall.

    It appears that the archetype of the evil scientist is coming
    back. The archetype was fully fleshed out in Jules Verne’s
    novel “The Begum’s Fortune” (1879) where it appears
    in the form of a German scientist (of course) Prof. Schultze
    who is portrayed as a militarist and a racist. This allows
    Verne to have a good time making fun of Germans.

  222. @Curle
    @Joe S.Walker

    Weird, song not available. What was it?

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker, @BB753, @Reg Cæsar

    Juliette Gréco. L’horoscope.

    • Thanks: Curle
  223. @PhysicistDave
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    The Anti-Gnostic wrote to me:


    An acquaintance in physics told me about the grant they were working on. After making sure I understood the concept, I asked, what’s the point of this? The answer was a few uncomfortable, blinking moments before a stern lecture on “knowledge for its own sake.”
     
    Well, I'm actually interested in knowledge for its own sake: it's cool to use abstract knowledge to build satellite communication systems and hard-disk drive controllers (two areas in which I have worked), but it is also cool to know how black holes work or what the basic forces between elementary particles are (areas in which I have also worked).

    And, indeed, often "knowledge for its own sake" has ultimately yielded practical results, although I'll admit that truly esoteric science (black holes and the Higgs particle, for example) are so far removed from the physics of the everyday world that it is hard to see practical applications.

    So we could debate whether taxpayers should be funding work like that.

    The problem I am pointing to is deeper than that, though. Superstring theory has dominated theoretical elementary-particle physics, the field in which I did my Ph.D. , since shortly after I finished my Ph.D. -- for decades now. It is very pretty mathematically... but no one has ever shown any way whatsoever to connect it with possible experiments in elementary-particle physics.

    Nature, alas, seems to find it less beautiful than we physicists do.

    And that is a very, very serious problem. The reason to trust us crazy scientists is not our (supposed) brilliance but the fact that our theories are borne out by experiment. And no one has any real hope of doing that for superstring theory.

    I'm focusing on this because it happens to be in my field, but I could make similar points about, say, climate science. Yes, climate science is very intriguing... but when will the climate modelers lay out their cards and say, "These future observations will test our models: if these predictions are not borne out by observation, then our models are wrong."

    They have not done this, and that is a very real problem.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    My impression is a lot of papers esp. in the squishy areas are designed to present non-falsifiable hypotheses, dressed up in the scientific method. The other perverse incentive is just to feed your lab and its grad students.

  224. @Feryl
    @Mark G.

    UFOs have a "hard" sci-fi bent wrt being from (take your pick) outer space, the deep sea, other dimensions, ore even the future. There's a narrative of exploration that guys find appealing. Plus there's sepculation about who the alien race is and how we will interact with it. BTW, the government itself studies UFOs. They're not studying anything else of an esoteric nature.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    There are no time travelers, there are no UFOs alas.

    http://fictionaut.com/stories/strannikov/the-fermi-panic

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  225. @Alden
    @Dmon

    The great conservative hero Reagan also signed a law making it much easier to get abortions years before Roe. And had many gay men on his staff and fundraisers.

    And when the great conservative hero was elected president he;

    1 did nothing about affirmative action and the non White percentage of government employees at all levels, city county state and federal rose higher and higher as Whites retired and anything non White replaced them.

    2 created the first of many amnesties.

    3 did nothing to stop illegals entering the country and getting jobs and welfare.

    4 and it was under Raegan’s watch that our industrial sector left for China.

    5 also under Reagan’s presidency NASA and the NASA contractors in Silicon Valley began laying off and not renewing the contracts of the White men who put a man in the moon in favor of Chinese immigrants. These were men who graduated with their MSs in aeronautical astronautical engineering and software design in the mid 1960s and were laid off 15 years later in favor of non White immigrants.

    Or one of the many reasons I’m not a conservative.

    Replies: @BosTex, @Reg Cæsar, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @BB753

    Or one of the many reasons I’m not a conservative.

    Right! Because the alternative was so much better, comrade!

    Carter, was a great choice, such a human rights champion!

    Carter gave the Panama Canal away to endear himself to ‘Hispanics,’ created the Departments of Energy and Education, botched Iran, leading to the hostage debacle and the failed rescue attempt, imposed a grain embargo on the Soviets which harmed farmers through reduced commodity prices, did nothing about the oil shock except turn down the heat and wear a sweater, and deregulated the airlines.

    Yep, great choice.

    Reagan was imperfect, but he wasn’t a globalist. Remember, Carter was run by Zbigniew Brzezinski, who was key to laying the groundwork for the problems the globalists have created.

  226. @Rob McX
    @PhysicistDave

    A depressing summary of the situation.


    And an awful lot of the research really has no real point (in my own field, superstring theory is an unfortunate example).
     
    I thought superstring theory was pushing the frontiers of knowledge about the universe.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    String theory is untestable. This was realized in the 1980s but I got the impression there was a hope it could eventually produce testable propositions, which has not come to pass. Thus is it not in any way “science.”

    Last time I checked which was long ago around the time it was generally realized outside the subfield that it was bogus, it was said to be populated with people who were very good at math but had no physical intuition. Unfortunately, and confirming to a degree PhysicistDave’s bleak picture of academic science from his viewpoint, it was dogma in the US and it was very hard to get paid to do high energy theoretical physics outside of it.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @That Would Be Telling

    I think it was around 25 years ago that John Horgan published a trade book on the subject of 'ironic science' with a chapter on string theory.

  227. @That Would Be Telling
    @Rob McX

    String theory is untestable. This was realized in the 1980s but I got the impression there was a hope it could eventually produce testable propositions, which has not come to pass. Thus is it not in any way "science."

    Last time I checked which was long ago around the time it was generally realized outside the subfield that it was bogus, it was said to be populated with people who were very good at math but had no physical intuition. Unfortunately, and confirming to a degree PhysicistDave's bleak picture of academic science from his viewpoint, it was dogma in the US and it was very hard to get paid to do high energy theoretical physics outside of it.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    I think it was around 25 years ago that John Horgan published a trade book on the subject of ‘ironic science’ with a chapter on string theory.

  228. @Curle
    @Reg Cæsar

    They don’t go into it because problem solving doesn’t interest them.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    They don’t go into it because problem solving doesn’t interest them.

    “They don’t go into it because problem solving [for low pay in substandard working conditions] doesn’t interest them.”

    Reverse-engineered it for you. Money and comfy offices would attract many more, overriding any lack of interest.

  229. @Curle
    @Joe S.Walker

    Weird, song not available. What was it?

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker, @BB753, @Reg Cæsar

    Under her chin it says “strip me”.

    • Replies: @Joe S.Walker
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bIkbscg1qRY

    Miss Greco has many greatest hits albums, and almost all include this song.

  230. @Rob McX
    @Houston 1992

    Thanks. His fatal heart attack at 58 seems to have been brought on by cocaine use. I guess he didn't see that coming.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks. [Cainer’s] fatal heart attack at 58 seems to have been brought on by cocaine use. I guess he didn’t see that coming.

    Astrology wouldn’t predict that, but onomastics would. Blame it on ‘caine!

    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/euonym#English
    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/aptonym

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Reg Cæsar

    Elvis Costello - Blame It on Caine (Detour) ft. Larkin Poe
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qdk7k1dfydE
    Dec 22, 2015


    Music video by Elvis Costello performing Blame It On Cain.
     
    http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Blame_It_On_Cain
    http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Concert_2015-06-15_Liverpool
    http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Larkin_Poe
  231. I thought astrology was the Earth influenced by the Heavens. All those comets seen in the Heavens is what probably sent Nero off his rocker.
    The book CIVILIZATION ONE ia a How Can This Be kind of finding……by Christopher Knight and Alan Butler.

  232. I thought astrology was the Earth influenced by the Heavens. All those comets seen in the Heavens is what probably sent Nero off his rocker.
    The book CIVILIZATION ONE is a How Can This Be kind of finding……by Christopher Knight and Alan Butler.

  233. @HA
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "I contacted two big name astrologers ca. 15 years ago to see whether they could “calculate” anything real about my past....They were 80% to 100% wrong. For instance, one astrologer claimed I had an almost fatal car accident when I was 23. Nothing similar ever happened."

    That's a very clever strategy, but if you had gone to ten astrologers instead of two, chances are that one or more of them would have gotten lucky, and you might have been tempted to believe you had come across the real deal.

    There's that old con about passing out 1024 emails (or some multiple thereof), with each one predicting a different outcome of the next 10 football or baseball games for a given local team. The guy who gets the email that predicted every one of those 10 games correctly will take you for a genuine clairvoyant, and will therefore be ripe for whatever grift is presented to him. The collective population of astrologers is kind of like an ongoing run of that same scam. Similarly, the clock-maker's analogy has historically played a large role in theological arguments, but many physicists these days hew to some variant of the many-worlds interpretation, which posits a bazillion alternate universes in existence alongside the one we observe, implying that the latter is completely unremarkable -- one big cosmic "duh".

    Anyway, astrologers don't have to get it right every time -- they just have to rig the game so the odds are in their favor, and by keeping their pronouncements sufficiently vague and also picking up on facial signals and other cues -- the way skilled cold readers do -- they're able to get by, and sometimes do very well.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    There’s that old con about passing out 1024 emails (or some multiple thereof), with each one predicting a different outcome of the next 10 football or baseball games for a given local team. The guy who gets the email that predicted every one of those 10 games correctly will take you for a genuine clairvoyant, and will therefore be ripe for whatever grift is presented to him.

    This is what the “touts” that you hear advertised on sports radio do. The picks change with each phone call (“call now to get our free pre-recorded lock of the week!”). Most people just get losers or close to break even, but a few will get a long streak of winners and be convinced that this guy knows what he’s talking about and keep coming back and end up being paid customers.

  234. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You've given me an excuse to finally share one of those 90s alternative rock songs I really like: "Lightening Crashes." It deals with reincarnation, but that's something I don't believe in, so I'll just say it's about the cycle of life, which it is.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsJ4O-nSveg

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @JR Ewing

    I used to use that song as part of my “psych up” routine before track meets (i.e. shot put) in college. It starts slow and ends up pretty loud and hectic by the end.

  235. @Anon
    @Muggles

    You write:

    "“Predicting the future” is always a popular pastime, and has been."

    I think that touches upon a human desire, perhaps human need.

    At work, I got co-workers interested when I said that I could predict if a worker would leave the firm in a bad way, such as getting fired or laid off.

    I did not always predict every lay off or firing. But about 80 percent of the time, when I felt that a person would get laid off or fired, it happened.

    My method was this: if I didn't like that person, for a rational reason (they were jerks, or they were not good workers), they were likely to be gotten rid of. The other 10 percent quit.

    Replies: @epebble, @Sidewalk Meanderings

    Any correlation between workers getting fired or laid off and the number of visible
    tattoos and piercings they have?

  236. @Reg Cæsar
    @Rob McX


    Thanks. [Cainer's] fatal heart attack at 58 seems to have been brought on by cocaine use. I guess he didn’t see that coming.
     
    Astrology wouldn't predict that, but onomastics would. Blame it on 'caine!


    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/euonym#English
    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/aptonym

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Elvis Costello – Blame It on Caine (Detour) ft. Larkin Poe

    Dec 22, 2015

    Music video by Elvis Costello performing Blame It On Cain.

    http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Blame_It_On_Cain
    http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Concert_2015-06-15_Liverpool
    http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Larkin_Poe

  237. @Celt Darnell
    I seem to recall all that occult crap — astrology etc., — being big in the 1960s and 1970s. Not the 1980s, not even the early 1980s.

    Nancy Reagan’s astrologer is a case in point: the Reagans were roundly mocked for this (even though Reagan himself did not participate).

    That said, First Ladies have often had nutty ideas in comparison to their husbands. Mary Todd Lincoln, after all, held seances in the White House.

    Replies: @Renard, @Anon

    As another example, Jill is an “Ed.Dr” — not just nutty but actually harmful to children and students.

  238. Good-looking couple.

  239. @BB753
    Astrology never went anywhere. Now a majority of Americans do not consider themselves Christian but rather atheistic, pagan, newager, wiccan, etc.

    “When people stop believing in God, they don’t believe in nothing – they believe in anything.”

    – G.K. Chesterton

    Replies: @24th Alabama, @james wilson

    To paraphrase Chesterton, a large majority of Chrisians are not Cristians either.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @james wilson

    Christianity is a way of life not a religion like any other. Very few people have the strength to take up Christ's cross and follow His teachings.

  240. Anon[260] • Disclaimer says:

    Also, aren’t East Asians a rather superstitious group? Plenty of fortune telling, charms, curses, etc. And of course there is the next door neighbor of astrology, gambling.

    Let me end with what may be my greatest workplace contribution. If there is an annoying BIPOC in your office (particularly B, I suppose), visit a voodoo practitioner in the strip mall and buy a suitable little thing. You can also make one yourself, it’s basically a lure with some feathers and stuff. Then nail it above the office entrance or perhaps put it in the desk drawer of said BIPOC.

    You will not believe what happens next!

    (Journalist Ryszard Kapucinski had terrible problems with thievery when living in West Africa but successfully used this method to reduce break-ins to zero.)

  241. @Fidelios Automata
    @Altai

    I rarely read commenter's links but since I've visited Tumblr off and on I had to check it out -- what a spot-on post. I thought Tumblr would die after they purged all the (mostly bizarre, fetishistic) pornography, but I was wrong.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Ongoing UK case – parents were IT-savvy and knew their high-functioning autist daughter (14), who was not allowed unmonitored internet use at home – but her school IT system was full of holes. And this was a girl who was obsessively online at school.


    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2022/sep/26/posts-seen-by-molly-russell-of-self-harm-and-suicide-safe-for-children-meta-says

    A senior executive at Instagram’s owner has apologised after admitting that the platform had shown Molly Russell content that violated its policies before she died.

    Elizabeth Lagone, head of health and wellbeing policy at Meta, acknowledged that some of the posts and videos had broken Instagram guidelines at the time, which prohibited the glorification, encouragement and promotion of suicide and self-harm.

    “We are sorry that Molly saw content that violated our policies, and we don’t want that on the platform,” she said.

    Molly, 14, from Harrow, north-west London, killed herself in November 2017 after viewing extensive amounts of content online related to suicide, self-harm, depression and anxiety.

    North London coroner’s court also heard that a note started on Molly’s phone, and discovered after her death, used language that appeared in a video clip she had viewed.

    Before the apology, the KC representing Molly’s family, Oliver Sanders, had berated the Meta executive over the company letting teenagers view content related to suicide, depression and self-harm.

    “I suggest to you it is an inherently unsafe environment and it is dangerous and toxic to have 13- and 14-year-olds alone in their bedrooms scrolling through this rubbish on their phones,” said Sanders.

    Lagone replied: “I respectfully disagree.”

    Raising his voice, Sanders said: “Why on earth are you doing this?” He said Instagram was choosing to put content “in the bedrooms of depressed children”, adding: “You have no right to. You are not their parent. You are just a business in America.”

    The court heard that in the last six months of her life, Molly saved 16,300 images on her Instagram account, 2,100 of which related to depression, self-harm and suicide.

  242. @Art Deco
    Mrs. Reagan was laughed at in 1988 because astrology was passe. It was an amusement placed on the comics page, and likely not taken all that seriously by too many people in 1971. In Mrs. Reagan's case, it was a means of anxiety management. RR accommodated his wife. His chief of staff was irritated by the degree to which she inserted herself into scheduling decisions and public relations.

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Rocko

    When Christian ladies like Nancy Reagan who should know better get drawn into astrology, you know it’s hit the fan hard

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Rocko

    Well, that too. (The Reagans attended a Disciples of Christ congregation, which is a non creedal body). What I notice about Mrs. Reagan is her upbringing, manners, and vintage. The women I've known who took an interest in astrology were born around 1956 give or take about ten years. I can imagine Patti Reagan taking an interest in astrology, never her mother. Same deal with tarot cards and the like. It's always seemed sort of generational to me.

    Replies: @BosTex

  243. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Bill Jones

    "Meanwhile in the YUK, the new Chancellor, the wonderfully named Kwasi Kwarteng, a Yorkshire name, I believe, has revealed what is being called voodoo economics in his Budget."

    Steve really should do a post on the current UK shambles.

    Let's go back 7 years, pre-Brexit, Tory conference.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-34450887


    Home Secretary Theresa May has unveiled a reform of the UK's asylum rules during an uncompromising speech to the Conservative Party conference. Mrs May pledged to reduce the numbers claiming in Britain while taking in the "most vulnerable" refugees from conflict zones around the world. She also said high migration made a "cohesive society" impossible.

    Her speech was criticised by business groups, with the Institute of Directors attacking its "irresponsible rhetoric".

    Net migration into the UK currently stands at a record high, reaching 330,000 in the year to March... Ministers have admitted missing their target to reduce net migration below 100,000, blaming the scale of migration from within Europe.

     

    But Brexit meant "taking back control" of UK borders. As this campaign put it:

    http://www.voteleavetakecontrol.org/why_vote_leave.html

    "Nearly two million people came to the UK from the EU in the last ten years. Vote Leave and control immigration"

    When Boris came to power, all things were possible. He had a huge majority, including the "Red Wall" of Northern, previously solid Labour seats where people were fed up with mass EU immigration. My own son worked for a while in a factory where everyone else on the "shop floor" spoke Polish.

    Result post-Brexit? Boris Johnson, a literal rootless cosmopolitan, handed out 1.1 million visas in a year.

    https://www.migrationwatchuk.org/news/2022/08/25/immigration-at-all-time-record-level-with-record-1-1-million-visas-issued-to-come-and-live-in-the-uk

    There hasn't been much political or media reaction to this huge rise, probably because journalists and politicians want to have continued careers.

    When Boris finally f***rd around too much and found put the most diverse (aka "foreign") leadership team since probably the Conquest took over. There wasn't great enthusiasm for Liz Truss, but nobody trusted her main competitor, a Brahmin with a tax-avoiding billionaire wife, either.

    https://e3.365dm.com/22/09/1600x900/skynews-reshuffle-truss_5889389.jpg

    The chancellor, Kwasi Karteng, is academically clever, son of Akan academics. Akans are a Ghanaian group who include the Ashanti, a pretty clever bunch. On a par with the Ibo in Nigeria perhaps.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Akan_people

    Whether he's so clever in the real world or just thinks that Britain in 2022 fits into an Adam Smith economic template I'm unsure. This book is a clue:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britannia_Unchained


    Britain needs to adopt a far-reaching form of free market economics, with fewer employment laws and suggesting the United Kingdom should learn lessons from the business and economic practices of other countries, including Canada, Australia and the tiger economies of the Far East like Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore.

     

    But his "mini-budget" on Friday was pretty remarkable in that it cut taxes substantially AND raised public spending substantially. The sums don't add up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_2022_United_Kingdom_mini-budget

    The budget was greeted by a collapse in sterling and a decline in the stock market, both losing about 2% in an afternoon. That's continued today after sterling declines on Asian exchanges overnight.

    https://twitter.com/ReutersJamie/status/1574364954618126337

    Still, why shouldn't a third-world country have a third-world economy and a third-world currency?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Rob McX, @J.Ross

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @MEH 0910

    I think there's a possibility Truss will risk splitting her caucus down the middle if she attempts to go down that path. I've heard of two measures she wants, and both are stupid.

    , @J.Ross
    @MEH 0910

    voter: but why did you sting me, for now we both shall drown!
    unelected bureaucrat: LOL! LMAO!

  244. @Jim Don Bob
    @Bill P

    I did the I Ching for a while a long time ago. Its advice was almost always "Perseverance furthers", which isn't bad advice but not something you need a 300 page book for.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Hexagram 37: HBD in a nutshell.

  245. @Mike Tre
    @Art Deco

    I don't have any fines or accidents, so perhaps you should tend to your own imagination. Stop being a hypocrite (impossible) by telling people to stop making assertions as you can make assertions. And it's so cute! when you little motorists try to talk about all your little road experience driving your cute little sedans around. To me it's like a Cesna pilot trying to equate himself to an SR-71 pilot.

    "IOW, "

    ...you're a liar playing word games. Absent minded is leaving the garage door up all night by accident or leaving your house keys in the pocket of the last jacket you had on. Parking a car on railroad tracks is about as absent minded as dressing up like Hitler for a bar mitzvah. It's pure negligence wrapped in stupidity. I see that revealing simple truths about females employed in jobs they have no business being hired in triggers your delicate feminist sensibilities.


    "https://nypost.com/2022/04/07/eric-boehlert-journalist-dead-after-nj-transit-train-strikes-him-while-riding-bike/"

    This is like when Troof puts up a link showing two white kids fighting as if it's proof that negroes are no more violent than whites.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    I’m not paid to listen to you. Save it for the person who is.

  246. @Rocko
    @Art Deco

    When Christian ladies like Nancy Reagan who should know better get drawn into astrology, you know it's hit the fan hard

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Well, that too. (The Reagans attended a Disciples of Christ congregation, which is a non creedal body). What I notice about Mrs. Reagan is her upbringing, manners, and vintage. The women I’ve known who took an interest in astrology were born around 1956 give or take about ten years. I can imagine Patti Reagan taking an interest in astrology, never her mother. Same deal with tarot cards and the like. It’s always seemed sort of generational to me.

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Art Deco

    I seem to recall that her interest in astrology was a way of calming her anxiety/exerting some feeling of control over the safety of her husband after he came very close to being murdered by John Hinckley in 1981.

    There was a lot of ridicule at the time, but I think a lot of empathy, as well, since she had to live with the fact, everyday, that some nutcase might jump out of nowhere and kill her husband.

    That has to be pretty damn stressful for any person.

  247. @MEH 0910
    @YetAnotherAnon

    https://twitter.com/AnnCoulter/status/1574134975548428288
    https://twitter.com/jackbuckby/status/1574186387938725888

    Replies: @Art Deco, @J.Ross

    I think there’s a possibility Truss will risk splitting her caucus down the middle if she attempts to go down that path. I’ve heard of two measures she wants, and both are stupid.

  248. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Bill Jones

    "Meanwhile in the YUK, the new Chancellor, the wonderfully named Kwasi Kwarteng, a Yorkshire name, I believe, has revealed what is being called voodoo economics in his Budget."

    Steve really should do a post on the current UK shambles.

    Let's go back 7 years, pre-Brexit, Tory conference.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-34450887


    Home Secretary Theresa May has unveiled a reform of the UK's asylum rules during an uncompromising speech to the Conservative Party conference. Mrs May pledged to reduce the numbers claiming in Britain while taking in the "most vulnerable" refugees from conflict zones around the world. She also said high migration made a "cohesive society" impossible.

    Her speech was criticised by business groups, with the Institute of Directors attacking its "irresponsible rhetoric".

    Net migration into the UK currently stands at a record high, reaching 330,000 in the year to March... Ministers have admitted missing their target to reduce net migration below 100,000, blaming the scale of migration from within Europe.

     

    But Brexit meant "taking back control" of UK borders. As this campaign put it:

    http://www.voteleavetakecontrol.org/why_vote_leave.html

    "Nearly two million people came to the UK from the EU in the last ten years. Vote Leave and control immigration"

    When Boris came to power, all things were possible. He had a huge majority, including the "Red Wall" of Northern, previously solid Labour seats where people were fed up with mass EU immigration. My own son worked for a while in a factory where everyone else on the "shop floor" spoke Polish.

    Result post-Brexit? Boris Johnson, a literal rootless cosmopolitan, handed out 1.1 million visas in a year.

    https://www.migrationwatchuk.org/news/2022/08/25/immigration-at-all-time-record-level-with-record-1-1-million-visas-issued-to-come-and-live-in-the-uk

    There hasn't been much political or media reaction to this huge rise, probably because journalists and politicians want to have continued careers.

    When Boris finally f***rd around too much and found put the most diverse (aka "foreign") leadership team since probably the Conquest took over. There wasn't great enthusiasm for Liz Truss, but nobody trusted her main competitor, a Brahmin with a tax-avoiding billionaire wife, either.

    https://e3.365dm.com/22/09/1600x900/skynews-reshuffle-truss_5889389.jpg

    The chancellor, Kwasi Karteng, is academically clever, son of Akan academics. Akans are a Ghanaian group who include the Ashanti, a pretty clever bunch. On a par with the Ibo in Nigeria perhaps.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Akan_people

    Whether he's so clever in the real world or just thinks that Britain in 2022 fits into an Adam Smith economic template I'm unsure. This book is a clue:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britannia_Unchained


    Britain needs to adopt a far-reaching form of free market economics, with fewer employment laws and suggesting the United Kingdom should learn lessons from the business and economic practices of other countries, including Canada, Australia and the tiger economies of the Far East like Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore.

     

    But his "mini-budget" on Friday was pretty remarkable in that it cut taxes substantially AND raised public spending substantially. The sums don't add up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_2022_United_Kingdom_mini-budget

    The budget was greeted by a collapse in sterling and a decline in the stock market, both losing about 2% in an afternoon. That's continued today after sterling declines on Asian exchanges overnight.

    https://twitter.com/ReutersJamie/status/1574364954618126337

    Still, why shouldn't a third-world country have a third-world economy and a third-world currency?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Rob McX, @J.Ross

    Here’s a figure to consider in this time of rising fuel costs: £569,696.23. That’s what the UK Border Force spent on fuel for its vessels in the English Channel picking up dinghy-loads of “migrants” during the first seven months of this year. This is just for BF vessels in the Channel and doesn’t include fuel for the navy or RNLI.

    Not surprisingly, immigration watch journalist Steve Laws had to use the Freedom of Information Act to wring this figure from the authorities. Among the many things they won’t divulge is the number of immigrants who walk in through the Channel Tunnel each day. They told him this is “not in the public interest”.

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
  249. @R.G. Camara
    Lots of guys in the PUA/Game/MGTOW community have noticed the uptick in interest in astrology from chicks in the last 10 years or so. Feminazism and occult study seem to go together; in the late 19th Century/early 20th Century when feminists were organizing for the vote, there was long-term fad in seances, mysticism and table tipping and the like; usually, the seances/activities occurred at the homes of well-to-do feminist women, where the shysters could easily dupe a group of believers.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Spiritualism

    It became Harry Houdini's second career to debunk the Spiritualist hucksters. After becoming a world-famous stage magician, he made his mission to debunk as many of these charlatans as he could, partly because they were horning in on his act but were cowards who did it in parlors rather than bare stages, partly because he felt bad for the tricked people (especially those seeking to contacts dead relatives), and partly because he truly did want to believe in the supernatural (he told his widow that he wanted her to hold a seance every year to try to contact him, and if he could he would reach out from the other side; magicians, by tradition, keep this seance going every year, with no confirmed hits yet).

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Harry_Houdini#Debunking_spiritualists

    Anyway, astrology as an ancient study was interesting, but involved so many variables that, like alchemy, it was humongously difficult to account for and thereby give definite answers. Some of the greatest minds in scientific and philosophical history believed in it and studied it. Certainly, the idea that cosmic activity could affect human behavior is, in itself, not absurd.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Astrology

    Its important to note that pre-19th century, astrology was a male field, where men tried to use math and science to discover truths. Many of those male pre-industrial astrologers worked out intricate calculations to try to test their theories of the stars, making it far more like a science than woo-woo feelings. Its how we got astronomy -- men were noting the changing of the stars with the seasons, and thus could forecast summer or winter, and thus were seeing if there were any other things they could predict.

    It was only in the industrial era that rigorously-thinking men largely abandoned astrology as fruitless, unlike with say, alchemy, which was rigorized into modern chemistry. When left-brained, science-minded men abandoned it, women and right-brain men picked it up, discarded any idea of "testing" their methods and just made astrological predictions based on vague feelings and a few star signs.

    Astrology seems to wax and wane in importance in all humans when the world is in a period of change, when people seek answers to a world that keeps becoming topsy-turvy.

    1840-1920 (the era of Spiritualism) was a time of huge technological and political change in both America and Europe. A person born in 1840 and how died in 1920 -- 80 years old, not an un heard of event-- would have seen a pastoral, regionally-powered America run on slavery and wooden ships transformed by the railroad, telegraph, reliable repeating firearms, the Civil War, iron clad ships, factories, WW1, and industrialization into a far-more citified and connected world where the U.S. was a leading world power. Such a huge change would have caused much consternation and made people jump into spiritualism/astrology as a way of somehow explaining what was going on. No less a mind than Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle was seduced by spiritualism, trying to explain the world beyond Holmsian logic.

    Since 2000, the internet, smart phones, presidential-inspired Ferguson race riots, an international pandemic, stolen elections, and a major war involving Russia, etc. have probably made right-brained men and all women much more susceptible to looking for answers in the occult, including astrology. And since woke propaganda today make it verboten for rational men to tell their wives/girlfriends to knock it off with the nonsense and tell gays to shove it in the closet with them, women and gay men are back into it.

    In short, feminism and astrology go hand in hand. Both are exceedingly stupid and vapid, and lies leading only to misery, and both arise together in a culture.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    It became Harry Houdini’s second career to debunk the Spiritualist hucksters. After becoming a world-famous stage magician, he made his mission to debunk as many of these charlatans as he could, partly because they were horning in on his act but were cowards who did it in parlors rather than bare stages, partly because he felt bad for the tricked people

    Houdini lost his mother when he was already famous, and, in his grief, he spent years, and a lot of money, looking for mediums to be able to contact her. The straw that broke the camel’s back for him was an incident involving a famous man that he had befriended–Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, of Sherlock Holmes fame. Doyle had an interest in the supernatural, which deepened after his son was killed in WWI.

    Doyle’s wife became a self-proclaimed psychic and medium, and one day in Atlantic City, the Doyles and Houdini held a séance in a hotel room to contact Houdini’s mother. Mrs, Doyle claimed success, but Houdini realized it was fake. That ended his friendship with Doyle and started his vendetta on bogus mediums.

  250. @Art Deco
    @Rocko

    Well, that too. (The Reagans attended a Disciples of Christ congregation, which is a non creedal body). What I notice about Mrs. Reagan is her upbringing, manners, and vintage. The women I've known who took an interest in astrology were born around 1956 give or take about ten years. I can imagine Patti Reagan taking an interest in astrology, never her mother. Same deal with tarot cards and the like. It's always seemed sort of generational to me.

    Replies: @BosTex

    I seem to recall that her interest in astrology was a way of calming her anxiety/exerting some feeling of control over the safety of her husband after he came very close to being murdered by John Hinckley in 1981.

    There was a lot of ridicule at the time, but I think a lot of empathy, as well, since she had to live with the fact, everyday, that some nutcase might jump out of nowhere and kill her husband.

    That has to be pretty damn stressful for any person.

  251. @Alden
    @Dmon

    The great conservative hero Reagan also signed a law making it much easier to get abortions years before Roe. And had many gay men on his staff and fundraisers.

    And when the great conservative hero was elected president he;

    1 did nothing about affirmative action and the non White percentage of government employees at all levels, city county state and federal rose higher and higher as Whites retired and anything non White replaced them.

    2 created the first of many amnesties.

    3 did nothing to stop illegals entering the country and getting jobs and welfare.

    4 and it was under Raegan’s watch that our industrial sector left for China.

    5 also under Reagan’s presidency NASA and the NASA contractors in Silicon Valley began laying off and not renewing the contracts of the White men who put a man in the moon in favor of Chinese immigrants. These were men who graduated with their MSs in aeronautical astronautical engineering and software design in the mid 1960s and were laid off 15 years later in favor of non White immigrants.

    Or one of the many reasons I’m not a conservative.

    Replies: @BosTex, @Reg Cæsar, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @BB753

    6. Had Bush Sr. as his vice-president ( who called the shots), who then went on to become president and then got his idiot son the job too. An unmitigated disaster for America. Under Bush Sr ( a CIA man through and through) the deep state began openly running the executive branch and the neocons ran amok in the government.

    Come to think of it, Reagan put “conservatives” to sleep thinking they were running things when in fact trotskyites took over America under his watch. Even Steve Sailer can’t comprehend that Reagan was a phony. Boiling the frog.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @BB753

    6. Had Bush Sr. as his vice-president ( who called the shots),

    He didn't.


    who then went on to become president and then got his idiot son the job too.

    He didn't get his son the job.



    An unmitigated disaster for America.



    Under Bush Sr ( a CIA man through and through)

    He was a utility man who held a number of positions for short periods. He was director of the CIA for one year.


    the deep state began openly running the executive branch

    It didn't.


    and the neocons ran amok in the government.

    They didn't. Few of them even had positions in government.


    Come to think of it, Reagan put “conservatives” to sleep thinking they were running things when in fact trotskyites took over America under his watch.

    They didn't.



    Reagan was a phony. Boiling the frog.

    He wasn't.



    You really should confine your conversation to people who get paid to listen to you.

    Replies: @BB753

  252. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Curle

    "How did you not know that sports is the ONLY chick magnet in HS?"

    Not true. There is also Drama Club and Stage Crew.

    "in fact I got bloodied up once but discovered to my surprise that blood seemingly excites girls."

    It's not the blood that excites girls, it's the fact that you were injured in a manly way (viz playing sports, not tripping down the stairs): it brings out their instinct to nurse the wounded warrior. The blood just shows your commitment to winning, despite your wounds. Tingles all round.

    Die Wunden weise mir schnell! (Die Walkure, I.i)

    Replies: @Sidewalk Meanderings

    Art Club and Dance Club also are good places to meet girls since these clubs
    have many more girls than boys, if you don’t mind being called a sissy by
    jocks for wanting to learn how to draw or dance. If you’re good at drawing
    faces, you have a good excuse to approach beautiful girls: “Wow, Rubens
    would have loved to paint you! May I draw your portrait?”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Sidewalk Meanderings

    Don't use Rubens in your opening line. Use Botticelli. The word sounds nice.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Sidewalk Meanderings, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  253. @Sidewalk Meanderings
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Art Club and Dance Club also are good places to meet girls since these clubs
    have many more girls than boys, if you don't mind being called a sissy by
    jocks for wanting to learn how to draw or dance. If you're good at drawing
    faces, you have a good excuse to approach beautiful girls: "Wow, Rubens
    would have loved to paint you! May I draw your portrait?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Don’t use Rubens in your opening line. Use Botticelli. The word sounds nice.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Steve Sailer

    He's associated with fat women, hence the term Rubenesque.

    , @Sidewalk Meanderings
    @Steve Sailer

    Botticelli is a good painter's name to use with ethereal girls who are more
    interested in the spiritual realm than in the material realm, and are really
    into New Age stuff like astrology, tarot cards, numerology, saging, etc.
    Never, not under any circumstances whatsover, not even in jest, should
    a budding painter invoke the name of Fernando Botero when approaching
    girls, not even for grossly obese girls who really look like a Botero painting.
    Even if they wheeze when trundling up stairs because of their massive bulk,
    they can still pack quite a punch, in accordance with Newton's Second Law
    of Motion: Force equals mass times acceleration.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    iSteve: "Use Botticelli. The word sounds nice."

    Like Ronnie-Reagan-Sue-Ellen-Casanova-Boticelli"

    I am a TV savage.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=593gfSXemRE&list=RDGMEM6ijAnFTG9nX1G-kbWBUCJA&index=2

  254. @Curle
    @YetAnotherAnon

    FYI -

    Alden’s the gal who thinks cross-fit will equalize the sexes.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    It will. Weaker men and stronger women.

  255. @james wilson
    @BB753

    To paraphrase Chesterton, a large majority of Chrisians are not Cristians either.

    Replies: @BB753

    Christianity is a way of life not a religion like any other. Very few people have the strength to take up Christ’s cross and follow His teachings.

    • Agree: Renard
  256. Anonymous[126] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s been said on Wikipedia and elsewhere that the zodiac is a equal division of thirty degrees along the ecliptic. This results in twelve signs, but doesn’t really explain why there should be such a division. Rather, in the time it takes for the sun to return to the same place (a year) the Moon has made already twelve such orbits, so 12 * 30 = 360.

    https://cliffhigheconomics.wordpress.com/2022/09/05/why-are-there-twelve-zodiac-signs-in-the-sky-and-not-thirteen/

  257. @Reg Cæsar
    @Curle

    Under her chin it says "strip me".

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker

    Miss Greco has many greatest hits albums, and almost all include this song.

  258. @Steve Sailer
    @Sidewalk Meanderings

    Don't use Rubens in your opening line. Use Botticelli. The word sounds nice.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Sidewalk Meanderings, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    He’s associated with fat women, hence the term Rubenesque.

  259. @Steve Sailer
    @Sidewalk Meanderings

    Don't use Rubens in your opening line. Use Botticelli. The word sounds nice.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Sidewalk Meanderings, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Botticelli is a good painter’s name to use with ethereal girls who are more
    interested in the spiritual realm than in the material realm, and are really
    into New Age stuff like astrology, tarot cards, numerology, saging, etc.
    Never, not under any circumstances whatsover, not even in jest, should
    a budding painter invoke the name of Fernando Botero when approaching
    girls, not even for grossly obese girls who really look like a Botero painting.
    Even if they wheeze when trundling up stairs because of their massive bulk,
    they can still pack quite a punch, in accordance with Newton’s Second Law
    of Motion: Force equals mass times acceleration.

  260. @BB753
    @Alden

    6. Had Bush Sr. as his vice-president ( who called the shots), who then went on to become president and then got his idiot son the job too. An unmitigated disaster for America. Under Bush Sr ( a CIA man through and through) the deep state began openly running the executive branch and the neocons ran amok in the government.

    Come to think of it, Reagan put "conservatives" to sleep thinking they were running things when in fact trotskyites took over America under his watch. Even Steve Sailer can't comprehend that Reagan was a phony. Boiling the frog.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    6. Had Bush Sr. as his vice-president ( who called the shots),

    He didn’t.

    who then went on to become president and then got his idiot son the job too.

    He didn’t get his son the job.

    An unmitigated disaster for America.

    Under Bush Sr ( a CIA man through and through)

    He was a utility man who held a number of positions for short periods. He was director of the CIA for one year.

    the deep state began openly running the executive branch

    It didn’t.

    and the neocons ran amok in the government.

    They didn’t. Few of them even had positions in government.

    Come to think of it, Reagan put “conservatives” to sleep thinking they were running things when in fact trotskyites took over America under his watch.

    They didn’t.

    Reagan was a phony. Boiling the frog.

    He wasn’t.

    You really should confine your conversation to people who get paid to listen to you.

    • Agree: David In TN
    • Replies: @BB753
    @Art Deco

    Ok, Art Deco, you've shown your bona fides establishment republican credentials.
    Now what did Ronnie Ray Gun exactly accomplish and what's your take on both Bushes administrations? BTW, wasn't Bush Sr buddies with Bill Clinton?
    So, where did all the neocons come from?

    Replies: @Art Deco

  261. @Art Deco
    @BB753

    6. Had Bush Sr. as his vice-president ( who called the shots),

    He didn't.


    who then went on to become president and then got his idiot son the job too.

    He didn't get his son the job.



    An unmitigated disaster for America.



    Under Bush Sr ( a CIA man through and through)

    He was a utility man who held a number of positions for short periods. He was director of the CIA for one year.


    the deep state began openly running the executive branch

    It didn't.


    and the neocons ran amok in the government.

    They didn't. Few of them even had positions in government.


    Come to think of it, Reagan put “conservatives” to sleep thinking they were running things when in fact trotskyites took over America under his watch.

    They didn't.



    Reagan was a phony. Boiling the frog.

    He wasn't.



    You really should confine your conversation to people who get paid to listen to you.

    Replies: @BB753

    Ok, Art Deco, you’ve shown your bona fides establishment republican credentials.
    Now what did Ronnie Ray Gun exactly accomplish and what’s your take on both Bushes administrations? BTW, wasn’t Bush Sr buddies with Bill Clinton?
    So, where did all the neocons come from?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @BB753

    Your previous set of remarks made a number of assertions which were barking mad. I don't need to be a part of the 'Republican establishment' to object to them. I merely need to be sane.

    The 'neocons' were a collection of opinion journalists and academicians who objected to regnant attitudes in the Democratic Party as it was in 1972. Some left the Democratic Party (Irving Kristol, Norman Podhoretz and his wife, Jeane Kirkpatrick), some did not (Penn Kemble, Ben Wattenberg). Each had a different menu of interests. There were several letterhead organizations they were associated with, among them the Committee on the Present Danger and the Committee for the Free World. IIRC, the Committee for the Free World had about 3,000 members. It dissolved in 1990. There were also several publications edited by self-described neoconservatives, among them The Public Interest (folded in 2003), Commentary (on its last legs), the Georgetown Review (from which they were ejected from editorial control by the parent body), and The American Scholar (again, from which they were ejected from editorial control), and The New Criterion (which publishes little on topical political questions). The Public Interest employed all of four people; Commentary currently employs fewer than 10. There were a number of academicians who published in these outlets and had an affinity for this set of views - to a degree.

    A few people in this set held consequential positions in government, among them Elliot Abrams, Kennneth Adelman, Jeane Kirkpatrick, and Douglas Feith. No clue why you're addled by a scatter of 2d echelon officials in the foreign policy apparat. Some of them also belonged to a Trotskyist discussion circle at City College of New York ca 1939 (specifically Seymour Martin Lipset, Daniel Bell, Irving Kristol, and Nathan Glazer). The entire 'neocons are Trotsyists' babble is an acre of embroidery on a pinhead of fact - that these four men, who never held a position in government, ate cream cheese sandwiches, played ping pong, and discussed Plekhanov in a cafeteria alcove at City College when they were about 20 years old.

    I suppose I could mention Wm. Kristol. He's a lapsed history professor whose one position in government was working as Dan Quayle's chief of staff. He was never involved in any red haze organizations. He edited a magazine, first on the patronage of Rupert Murdoch, then of the owners of Salem Media. Salem Media shut him down when they discovered he was bad for business.


    They haven't been that numerous, they haven't been that important. They live rent-free in your head.


    My 'take' on the Bush Administrations is that the top man in each was a competitive man who liked challenges but did not have properly developed criteria for evaluating policy nor anything but inchoate views on American society. The younger Bush had commitments, not convictions. The older Bush was largely vacuous and opportunistic. There were things he wouldn't do and what he wouldn't do set boundaries for public policy, but the only issue he much cared about was preferential rates on capital gains. Ordinary Americans were never in the social circle of either man and the marks who voted for them were betrayed after they left office. This was so more piquantly with the younger Bush than the older.

    You want me to summarize eight years worth of policy shifts in a blog comment? I'll give you two accomplishments: giving the greenlight to the Federal Reserve to re-stabilize prices and getting it done and persuading Congress to adopt some salutary changes in the income tax code.

  262. @Steve Sailer
    @Sidewalk Meanderings

    Don't use Rubens in your opening line. Use Botticelli. The word sounds nice.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Sidewalk Meanderings, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    iSteve: “Use Botticelli. The word sounds nice.”

    Like Ronnie-Reagan-Sue-Ellen-Casanova-Boticelli”

    I am a TV savage.

  263. @J.Ross
    @Michelle

    There's a West African cartoonist who is bored with existing astrology schemes and came up with a much simpler one, in which your birth month determines certain personality traits (January-Borns are often good with money).

    Replies: @Michelle

    Lazy, but smart! Real astrology is very complicated to fake!

  264. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Michelle

    Many Black people, males and females, will still ask, “What sign are you”?


    What's your sign girl?
    Is it compatible to mine?
    What's your sign girl?
    Is it compatible to mine?
    Oh Yeah

    I'm a Capricorn
    We believe in life and living
    We trip on love and giving, oh yeah
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96eUR0fizQ0

    The original was Danny Pearson from 1978, he was in Barrry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra, it's pretty good. Reggae artist Barry Biggs had a UK hit with a reggae cover, which Mr Chilton (ex Box Tops) channels here.

    Replies: @Michelle

    Thank for this!

  265. @BB753
    @Art Deco

    Ok, Art Deco, you've shown your bona fides establishment republican credentials.
    Now what did Ronnie Ray Gun exactly accomplish and what's your take on both Bushes administrations? BTW, wasn't Bush Sr buddies with Bill Clinton?
    So, where did all the neocons come from?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Your previous set of remarks made a number of assertions which were barking mad. I don’t need to be a part of the ‘Republican establishment’ to object to them. I merely need to be sane.

    The ‘neocons’ were a collection of opinion journalists and academicians who objected to regnant attitudes in the Democratic Party as it was in 1972. Some left the Democratic Party (Irving Kristol, Norman Podhoretz and his wife, Jeane Kirkpatrick), some did not (Penn Kemble, Ben Wattenberg). Each had a different menu of interests. There were several letterhead organizations they were associated with, among them the Committee on the Present Danger and the Committee for the Free World. IIRC, the Committee for the Free World had about 3,000 members. It dissolved in 1990. There were also several publications edited by self-described neoconservatives, among them The Public Interest (folded in 2003), Commentary (on its last legs), the Georgetown Review (from which they were ejected from editorial control by the parent body), and The American Scholar (again, from which they were ejected from editorial control), and The New Criterion (which publishes little on topical political questions). The Public Interest employed all of four people; Commentary currently employs fewer than 10. There were a number of academicians who published in these outlets and had an affinity for this set of views – to a degree.

    A few people in this set held consequential positions in government, among them Elliot Abrams, Kennneth Adelman, Jeane Kirkpatrick, and Douglas Feith. No clue why you’re addled by a scatter of 2d echelon officials in the foreign policy apparat. Some of them also belonged to a Trotskyist discussion circle at City College of New York ca 1939 (specifically Seymour Martin Lipset, Daniel Bell, Irving Kristol, and Nathan Glazer). The entire ‘neocons are Trotsyists’ babble is an acre of embroidery on a pinhead of fact – that these four men, who never held a position in government, ate cream cheese sandwiches, played ping pong, and discussed Plekhanov in a cafeteria alcove at City College when they were about 20 years old.

    I suppose I could mention Wm. Kristol. He’s a lapsed history professor whose one position in government was working as Dan Quayle’s chief of staff. He was never involved in any red haze organizations. He edited a magazine, first on the patronage of Rupert Murdoch, then of the owners of Salem Media. Salem Media shut him down when they discovered he was bad for business.

    They haven’t been that numerous, they haven’t been that important. They live rent-free in your head.

    My ‘take’ on the Bush Administrations is that the top man in each was a competitive man who liked challenges but did not have properly developed criteria for evaluating policy nor anything but inchoate views on American society. The younger Bush had commitments, not convictions. The older Bush was largely vacuous and opportunistic. There were things he wouldn’t do and what he wouldn’t do set boundaries for public policy, but the only issue he much cared about was preferential rates on capital gains. Ordinary Americans were never in the social circle of either man and the marks who voted for them were betrayed after they left office. This was so more piquantly with the younger Bush than the older.

    You want me to summarize eight years worth of policy shifts in a blog comment? I’ll give you two accomplishments: giving the greenlight to the Federal Reserve to re-stabilize prices and getting it done and persuading Congress to adopt some salutary changes in the income tax code.

    • Thanks: BB753
  266. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Bill Jones

    "Meanwhile in the YUK, the new Chancellor, the wonderfully named Kwasi Kwarteng, a Yorkshire name, I believe, has revealed what is being called voodoo economics in his Budget."

    Steve really should do a post on the current UK shambles.

    Let's go back 7 years, pre-Brexit, Tory conference.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-34450887


    Home Secretary Theresa May has unveiled a reform of the UK's asylum rules during an uncompromising speech to the Conservative Party conference. Mrs May pledged to reduce the numbers claiming in Britain while taking in the "most vulnerable" refugees from conflict zones around the world. She also said high migration made a "cohesive society" impossible.

    Her speech was criticised by business groups, with the Institute of Directors attacking its "irresponsible rhetoric".

    Net migration into the UK currently stands at a record high, reaching 330,000 in the year to March... Ministers have admitted missing their target to reduce net migration below 100,000, blaming the scale of migration from within Europe.

     

    But Brexit meant "taking back control" of UK borders. As this campaign put it:

    http://www.voteleavetakecontrol.org/why_vote_leave.html

    "Nearly two million people came to the UK from the EU in the last ten years. Vote Leave and control immigration"

    When Boris came to power, all things were possible. He had a huge majority, including the "Red Wall" of Northern, previously solid Labour seats where people were fed up with mass EU immigration. My own son worked for a while in a factory where everyone else on the "shop floor" spoke Polish.

    Result post-Brexit? Boris Johnson, a literal rootless cosmopolitan, handed out 1.1 million visas in a year.

    https://www.migrationwatchuk.org/news/2022/08/25/immigration-at-all-time-record-level-with-record-1-1-million-visas-issued-to-come-and-live-in-the-uk

    There hasn't been much political or media reaction to this huge rise, probably because journalists and politicians want to have continued careers.

    When Boris finally f***rd around too much and found put the most diverse (aka "foreign") leadership team since probably the Conquest took over. There wasn't great enthusiasm for Liz Truss, but nobody trusted her main competitor, a Brahmin with a tax-avoiding billionaire wife, either.

    https://e3.365dm.com/22/09/1600x900/skynews-reshuffle-truss_5889389.jpg

    The chancellor, Kwasi Karteng, is academically clever, son of Akan academics. Akans are a Ghanaian group who include the Ashanti, a pretty clever bunch. On a par with the Ibo in Nigeria perhaps.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Akan_people

    Whether he's so clever in the real world or just thinks that Britain in 2022 fits into an Adam Smith economic template I'm unsure. This book is a clue:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britannia_Unchained


    Britain needs to adopt a far-reaching form of free market economics, with fewer employment laws and suggesting the United Kingdom should learn lessons from the business and economic practices of other countries, including Canada, Australia and the tiger economies of the Far East like Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore.

     

    But his "mini-budget" on Friday was pretty remarkable in that it cut taxes substantially AND raised public spending substantially. The sums don't add up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_2022_United_Kingdom_mini-budget

    The budget was greeted by a collapse in sterling and a decline in the stock market, both losing about 2% in an afternoon. That's continued today after sterling declines on Asian exchanges overnight.

    https://twitter.com/ReutersJamie/status/1574364954618126337

    Still, why shouldn't a third-world country have a third-world economy and a third-world currency?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Rob McX, @J.Ross

    [looking left]
    [looking right]
    AKAN IS A CUNT!!
    Alright, the coast is clear.

  267. @MEH 0910
    @YetAnotherAnon

    https://twitter.com/AnnCoulter/status/1574134975548428288
    https://twitter.com/jackbuckby/status/1574186387938725888

    Replies: @Art Deco, @J.Ross

    voter: but why did you sting me, for now we both shall drown!
    unelected bureaucrat: LOL! LMAO!

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