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As of 2018, the Late Ruth Bader Ginsburg Had Hired Only One Black Clerk in 38 Years on the Bench
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One of the impressive things about the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was her lack of Wokeness by 2020 standards. For example, she refused to saddle herself with an affirmative action law clerk. As a Supreme Court justice from 1993-2020, she had 119 clerks. In 2018, the Washington Post reported that only one had been black. Before her elevation to the Supreme Court, she had no black law clerks during her 13 years as a judge on the prestigious D.C. Circuit of the US Court of Appeals.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg can learn something from Brett Kavanaugh

Opinion by Paul Butler
Oct. 15, 2018 at 12:53 p.m. PDT

Paul Butler is the Albert Brick professor in law at Georgetown University Law Center.

… Ginsburg, on the other hand, has hired only one African American law clerk in her 25 years on the Supreme Court. This is an improvement from her 13-year tenure on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, when Ginsburg never had any black clerks. When this issue was raised during her Supreme Court confirmation hearings in 1993, Ginsburg said: “If you confirm me for this job, my attractiveness to black candidates is going to improve.” This remains a promise unfulfilled.

Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards. She was apparently arguing in 1993 that her being on the second highest court in the land meant that she was losing all the satisfactory black law clerks to the highest court.

My vague impression is that Justice Ginsburg’s finding that there were very, very few black law school grads competent enough to clerk for her seldom interfered with her ordering the rest of us to endure affirmative action. But the kind of old-fashioned liberal hypocrisy had a whiff of sanity about it, which is sadly missing in 2020.

One commenter suggests Ginsburg discriminated in favor of hiring as clerks her fellow opera lovers. Of course, this would be a classic example of disparate impact discrimination against blacks, who tend not to like opera as much as other races do. And liking opera would normally not be regarded by the Supreme Court as a necessity for performing the job.

Here’s another example of RBG’s lack of Wokeness: from her 2002 speech to the Jewish Council for Public Affairs on Jewish legal prodigies, such as Judah P. Benjamin, who served as Attorney General, Secretary of War, and Secretary of State in the Confederacy, before fleeing to England to avoid arrest for treason:

… [Judah P.] Benjamin’s political ventures in the Senate and in the Confederacy were bracketed by two discrete but equally remarkable legal careers, the first in New Orleans, the second in Britain.

… Benjamin came to New Orleans in 1832 and was called to the bar that same year. Although he struggled initially, his fame and fortune quickly grew large after the publication, in 1834 … Benjamin’s book treated comprehensively for the first time Louisiana’s uniquely cosmopolitan and complex legal system, derived from Roman, Spanish, French, and English sources. Benjamin’s flourishing practice and the public attention he garnered helped to propel his election by the Louisiana legislature to the United States Senate. …

Benjamin’s fortune plummeted with the defeat of the Confederacy. He arrived in England with little money and most of his property lost or confiscated. His wife and daughter settled in Paris, where they anticipated support from Benjamin in the comfortable style to which they were accustomed. He nevertheless turned down a promising business opportunity in the French capital, preferring to devote himself again to the practice of law, this time as a British barrister. He opted for a second career at the bar notwithstanding the requirement that he start over by enrolling as a student at an Inn of Court and completing a mandatory three-year apprenticeship before qualifying as a barrister. This, Benjamin’s contemporaries reported, he did cheerfully, although he was doubtless relieved when the Inn of Court to which he belonged, Lincoln’s Inn, determined to waive some of its requirements and admit him early.

Benjamin became a British barrister at age 55. His situation at that mature stage of life closely paralleled conditions of his youth. He was a newly-minted lawyer, with a struggling practice, but, he wrote to a friend, “as much interested in my profession as when I first commenced as a boy.” Repeating his Louisiana progress, Benjamin made his reputation among his new peers by publication. Drawing on the knowledge of civilian systems gained during his practice in Louisiana, Benjamin produced a volume in England that came to be known as Benjamin on Sales. The book was a near-instant classic. Its author was much praised, and Benjamin passed the remainder of his days as a top earning, highly esteemed, mainly appel-late advocate. His voice was often heard in appeals to the House of Lords and the Privy Council.

Benjamin’s biographer tells us that, “[h]owever desperate his case, Benjamin habitually addressed the court as if it were impossible for him to lose.” This in-domitable cast of mind characterized both Benjamin’s courtroom advocacy and his response to fortune’s vicissitudes. He rose to the top of the legal profession twice in one lifetime, on two continents, beginning his first ascent as a raw youth and his second as a fugitive minister of a vanquished power. The London Times, in an obituary, described Judah Benjamin as a man with “that elastic resistance to evil fortune which preserved [his] ancestors through a succession of exiles and plunder-ings.”

So, when you stop and think about it, leaving aside buying a sugar plantation worked by 140 of his slaves and being the #3 man in the Confederate government, Judah P. Benjamin was kind of a hero.

 
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  1. Anon[639] • Disclaimer says:

    Well, the article is clear enough.. but do jewish lesbians get cancelled?

    Also, does Justice Ginsburg dying wish counts less than sitting President Trump’s?

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8749599/Ruth-Bader-Ginsburgs-wish-NOT-replaced-new-president-installed.html

    In case Trump wins, should Americans drape Ginsburg’s seat in black ribbon for four years?

  2. Because blacks are 13% of the population social justice demands that they be 13% (or more! You can never have low enough white representation!) of Ginsberg’s clerks. This is incomprehensible! What a racist!

  3. And the law clerk’s name? Jessica Krug!

  4. Silly Sailer, principles are for Republicans!

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  5. Why should RBG have been saddled with token black incompetents when there were a plethora of deserving Jewish American Princes and Princesses plus a few token goyim!

    • LOL: Curmudgeon
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Dan Hayes

    Hey, this SCOTUS shizzle is too important to risk letting diversity get anywhere near its inner workings.

  6. The cry for civility after burning several cities rings hollow. Confirm a new justice now.

  7. “My vague impression is that Justice Ginsburg’s finding that there were very, very few black law school grads competent enough to clerk for her seldom interfered with her ordering the rest of us to endure affirmative action. ”

    And you don’t continue to hold a hand grenade once you pull the pin and release the spoon. You throw it as far away from you as you can.

  8. Her most recent photos were like a death mask. You have to admire her determination to get through a few more days of life, in order to stop the demon Trump from appointing her successor. She lasted long enough that the Dems can block Trump’s nominee, UNLESS TRUMP HAPPENS TO WIN THE ELECTION. Is that a desirable (least objectionable) outcome for you, comment thread peruser? If so…

  9. Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards.

    She could have found more than one over a period of 40 years. A more plausible explanation is that almost no blacks meshed well with her and she was not a woman who had a regard for appearances.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Art Deco

    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago. The ghetto claims the best African Americans (alive or dead) and we as a nation suffer because of it.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Dan Hayes, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymous, @jim jones

    , @Lagertha
    @Art Deco

    reality is awful when it bites us.

    , @JimB
    @Art Deco


    she was not a woman who had a regard for appearances
     
    Including her own. She looked like Pazuzu from the Exorcist, and the evil of her judicial career matched her appearance.
    , @Barnard
    @Art Deco

    The primary reason Ginsburg needed highly qualified clerks is that she was only doing about 10% of the job. She needed good clerks to cover for her since she was no longer able to do the job.

    Replies: @Wilkey

  10. She was black pilled about blacks.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    She was black pilled about blacks.
     
    She was a fan of Wagner. Scalia was decidedly not.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Lagertha, @TomSchmidt

  11. OT Biden AD just ran on TV A pathetic little boy vomiting. Mom says he has leukemia. If Trump is elected they will lose medical insurance and boy will get no medical care. It’s unusual for a democrat campaign AD in that the boy has a father and the family is White.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Alden

    This means the democrats are worried about the White vote.

  12. @JohnnyWalker123
    She was black pilled about blacks.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    She was black pilled about blacks.

    She was a fan of Wagner. Scalia was decidedly not.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Reg Cæsar

    I've never met a Jew who wasn't (a fan of Wagner)!

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @nobodyofnowhere

    , @Lagertha
    @Reg Cæsar

    she loved music. I never was a fan of hers, but she was very cultured. She was not an extremist - a Communist. If she was a Trotskyist, we will never know. But, she did not seem evil...even if I think all Democrats are evil pedos and rapists.

    Replies: @Pericles

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Reg Cæsar

    I like her a bit more now.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

  13. An appearance that defines ‘Frumpy Yenta’. Evolved cunning at expense of beauty.

    • Replies: @Thoughts
    @Ponce Faggy

    Disagree.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an attractive woman.

    Go back to photos of her in the 1950s and she's absolutely charming looking. Of course, in today's Leftist Culture, Young Ginsburg would he horrid looking, but when required to conform to 1950s standards she was 'A Betty.'

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  14. Whoa. How are her handlers ever gonna make it right with BLM folks of today when the sh*t will leak out!!!??!!!?

  15. • Replies: @notsaying
    @JohnnyWalker123

    They would never let you in far enough to see a receptionist. At best you'd talk to a security guard who isn't an Uber employee and has no friends in Human Resources.

    Can you drop off a resume at a big company anymore? I don't know. You certainly could in 1980. I would agree that it's a much different thing to get a job in 2020 with all the online applications, resume filters and inability to interact with real people at companies.

    A lot of important things are harder than they were in 1980.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  16. Remember when no one cared about Ginzo? Back when Trump wasn’t president.

    If you told me in 2005 she would be a celebrity meme-person with a Hollywood biopic…eh, I’d probably yawn.

    I think back to judges of way yesteryear. Ones I actually despise politically, and you know what? Either they’re impressive and people know them, or they aren’t. And we ignore them. This suddenly becoming super-popular because you’re politically important based on who happens to occupy the presidency is for the birds.

  17. @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    She was black pilled about blacks.
     
    She was a fan of Wagner. Scalia was decidedly not.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Lagertha, @TomSchmidt

    I’ve never met a Jew who wasn’t (a fan of Wagner)!

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Dan Hayes

    It's funny, but it happens often. Like with a good friend who did not care for the man because of Hitler and Wagner's own fanatical anti-Jewish writing, but who then fell in love with Die Meistersinger Von Nürnberg.

    Story (paraphrased) recounted by Bryan Magee in The Tristan Chord: Wagner borrowed money from an older Jew, and refused to pay it back, saying that the Jews had been stealing from the Germans for years, and so that justified his action.

    The man's friends asked why he wasn't upset. his answer: "There are many men who borrow money and do not repay. Of those men, a great number have hated the Jews. Many of that group have been scoundrels, ruining men's wives and daughters, and ignoring all the norms of civilized society. But only one of them wrote Tristan und Isolde."

    , @nobodyofnowhere
    @Dan Hayes

    Larry David has!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nS66IvbvcI

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

  18. What’s the gender skew of the 119 clerks? Was she just sisterhood uber alles?

  19. Good for her. Shows that she actually has good judgement.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @guillaume le batard

    It shows that she was a loathsome hypocrite. Affirmative action for thee, but not for me, thank you very much.

    One time I encountered an old lady at CVS who was blocking the aisle with her cart while blabbing away on her cell phone. I stood next to her for about ten seconds, hoping that she would take the hint. Finally I said, "Excuse me, but you're blocking the aisle." The woman turned around and gave me a disdainful look, as if she couldn't understand why some insignificant little insect was interrupting her conversation. I was a bit startled to realize that I was staring at the face of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (I'm not kidding - this woman could have been her doppelganger. It was freaky.) Then she turned back around and kept right on blabbing away on her phone. She made no effort to move her cart.

    (Not that it matters, but, yes, I pegged her as Jewish. She had a thick New York accent.)

    Recently I was getting on a train when a young Ginsburg type literally shoved an old white woman out of the way, almost knocking her over. The woman could barely walk and was attempting to exit the train through the door nearest to her seat, even though the door was marked "Enter Only."

    (These signs are supposed to enforce social distancing, but virtually no one pays any attention to them. People routinely enter and exit as they please, and the security guards make no effort to stop them. The guards do enforce the mask-wearing requirement.)

    The old woman was standing in front of the doors as they opened. The young JAP girl immediately walked inside the train and brushed against the old woman, pinning her against a glass divider and almost knocking her over. The girl made no attempt to apologize.

    As she walked out, the old woman said loudly, "That's very rude," and the young girl called back, "The sign says 'Enter Only,' lady."

    The Ginsburg girl didn't look like trash - she was dressed nicely and was carrying an expensive purse. She just acted like it.

    On that same day (at a different station), I witnessed a genuinely low-class person - a huge fat twentysomething black girl wearing short shorts and a sleeveless T-shirt - refusing to allow another elderly white lady entrance to an elevator.

    "You can't come in," she said sharply. "We already have two people in here." (Under COVID restrictions, elevators are restricted to "two strangers or one family" at a time.)

    The old lady harrumphed as the doors closed and the elevator began its descent.

    In fairness, I should add that, a few seconds later, a fortysomething black guy with a bike walked up to her and asked, "She didn't let you on the elevator?"

    "No, she didn't," the woman said.

    "That's not right," the guy said. "She should have more respect for her elders."

    Over the last few months I've seen a lot more passive-aggressive nastiness from blacks, especially women, and most especially 50+ women. The white-haters are getting bolder.

    I'm laid-back and thin-skinned, but lately I've been tempted to drop an occasional n-bomb (accompanied by an f-bomb, naturally) in response to the latest display of hostility by a PoS PoC.

    (I did unleash a c-bomb on a particularly nasty dinduette, but I don't think she heard me.)

  20. I think it would have been a tragedy if she had died earlier, but it was a far greater tragedy that incompetent African American affirmative action doctors had no chance of treating her.

  21. @Art Deco
    Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards.

    She could have found more than one over a period of 40 years. A more plausible explanation is that almost no blacks meshed well with her and she was not a woman who had a regard for appearances.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Lagertha, @JimB, @Barnard

    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago. The ghetto claims the best African Americans (alive or dead) and we as a nation suffer because of it.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Kronos

    No, he worked for some shizzy NGO in Chicago from 1985 to 1988, before attending law school. Don't recall hearing of any job offers after law school. He had some book contract, then after about a year landed a 40% time teaching position at the University of Chicago (by some accounts, contrary to regular hiring procedures). The following year, he landed an associate's position at a 12 lawyer firm which specialized in labor law and landlord-tenant law. He was an associate for three years, then of counsel for six years. His license to practice lapsed in 2002. I asked a lawyer I correspond with to assess this tale. He says Obama was a very common type, a law school graduate who had no interest in actually practicing law.

    Replies: @Marty, @David In TN, @I, Libertine

    , @Dan Hayes
    @Kronos

    Obama was offered a tenured appointment at the Univ of Chicago Law School despite having essentially no judicial publications!

    , @R.G. Camara
    @Kronos


    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago.
     
    I have never heard that before at all. And it seems extremely unlikely; Obama and his handlers would've known the extremely high value a judicial clerkship with a high-profile judge would've given him. They got him presidency of the Harvard Law Review, FFS, and he never even had to write the student article (note).

    If you get a clerkship with a "name" judge (especially federal appeals or SC), you have your career set; either permanent Washington insider or else partnership guarantee at any law firm, and for both a judgeship offer is guaranteed.

    Likely, Obama didn't apply for a clerkship because of all the writing he would've had to do (clerks write the majority of all judge's opinions), and his handlers would've realized that a sharp-eyed judge would've seen through him during the interview process, possibly damaging his future status. Working as a "community organizer' and part-time lecturing required far less writing and far less work overall, and yet would still put him in a position to run for office.

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @Anonymous
    @Kronos

    I have never heard this before, so I just did a Google search on this. According to a 2017 Above The Law Post, Obama turned down a DC Circuit clerkship, not a Supreme Court one.

    As Steve Sailor has pointed out before, Obama is probably fairly intelligent, but it very lazy. Being a clerk would have required far too much effort for Obama as he never did anything as an attorney- he didn’t even do the standard 2-3 years at a prestigious law firm like a lot of Harvard Law School grads do who end up becoming law professors.

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @jim jones
    @Kronos

    Blacks are only good at one thing and that is complaining

  22. @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    She was black pilled about blacks.
     
    She was a fan of Wagner. Scalia was decidedly not.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Lagertha, @TomSchmidt

    she loved music. I never was a fan of hers, but she was very cultured. She was not an extremist – a Communist. If she was a Trotskyist, we will never know. But, she did not seem evil…even if I think all Democrats are evil pedos and rapists.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Lagertha


    But, she did not seem evil…

     

    "The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that, you got it made."

    Replies: @Lagertha

  23. @Art Deco
    Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards.

    She could have found more than one over a period of 40 years. A more plausible explanation is that almost no blacks meshed well with her and she was not a woman who had a regard for appearances.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Lagertha, @JimB, @Barnard

    reality is awful when it bites us.

  24. Anonymous[411] • Disclaimer says:

    Here’s another example of RBG’s lack of Wokeness: from her 2002 speech to the Jewish Council for Public Affairs on Jewish legal prodigies, such as Judah P. Benjamin, who served as Attorney General, Secretary of War, and Secretary of State in the Confederacy, before fleeing to England to avoid arrest for treason:

    I don’t think this would be an example of a lack of Wokeness, but rather an example of ethnic narcissism. Ethnic narcissism is fully compatible with Wokeness. Of course, black ethnic narcissism trumps Jewish ethnic narcissism under Wokeness, but the only ethnic narcissism that’s completely verboten is white gentile ethnic narcissism. Ginsberg wouldn’t have written this way about a WASP Virginia cavalier who had a successful second career in law abroad after the war.

    • Agree: LondonBob
    • Replies: @Bert
    @Anonymous

    Perhaps a first step toward re-rationalizing the American polity would be the promotion of European ethnic narcissism. But not actually narcissism, rather an evidence-based meme centered on the creation of the science and technology which made the modern world. It would be an easy sell to the great mass of people who are unconvinced by BLM/antifa/MSM yet unsure as how to deal with the white guilt that is pushed on them.

  25. @Kronos
    @Art Deco

    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago. The ghetto claims the best African Americans (alive or dead) and we as a nation suffer because of it.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Dan Hayes, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymous, @jim jones

    No, he worked for some shizzy NGO in Chicago from 1985 to 1988, before attending law school. Don’t recall hearing of any job offers after law school. He had some book contract, then after about a year landed a 40% time teaching position at the University of Chicago (by some accounts, contrary to regular hiring procedures). The following year, he landed an associate’s position at a 12 lawyer firm which specialized in labor law and landlord-tenant law. He was an associate for three years, then of counsel for six years. His license to practice lapsed in 2002. I asked a lawyer I correspond with to assess this tale. He says Obama was a very common type, a law school graduate who had no interest in actually practicing law.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara, David In TN
    • Replies: @Marty
    @Art Deco

    a very common type, a law school graduate who had no interest in actually practicing law

    In the ‘90’s, a longtime dean of Yale or Harvard law signed on at Boalt in Berkeley. I’ll never forget what he said, in an interview, about his original institution: “we don’t expect that our graduates will actually get involved in the practice of law.”

    , @David In TN
    @Art Deco

    "He says Obama was a very common type, a law school graduate who had no interest in actually practicing law."

    This reminds me of a critical biography of Bobby Kennedy (written during his lifetime) that observed how RFK would talk of leaving politics to practice law but never did.

    , @I, Libertine
    @Art Deco

    I'm told, and I have no trouble believing, that a majority of those who hold a Juris Doctor degree do not practice law. Some are retired, of course. Some never pass a bar exam. But many just get fed up and decide to do something else -"recovering lawyers" they call themselves.

    We lawyers have these little sayings. It's hard work. It's time consuming ("The law is a jealous lover; she demands all of your time"). It's both stressful and dull. ("The practice of law consists of hour of boredom, punctuated by moments of terror"). Like many jobs, it's not as much fun as it looks like on television.

    Clerking is particularly hard. Your judge tell you what result to reach, and you have to craft an opinion that makes that result appear to be correct, even if it isn't. Under severe time pressure. It's harder than it looks.

    So I'm so not surprised that Obama turned down the job, and spent little time actually practising law. Maybe he's smarter than I've been giving him credit for.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Adam Smith, @ScarletNumber

  26. Why does the standard for clerking for the Supreme Court need to be so high? The standard for serving on the court isn’t. Give almost anyone a ten second description of 1000 cases and they will be able to predict how Kagan and Sotomayor will vote on 999 of them. And it’s not like the logic in the opinions is earth shattering, all left-wing opinions boil down to “because we say so”.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Che Blutarsky

    The clerks have the job of making the Justices look good.

  27. @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    She was black pilled about blacks.
     
    She was a fan of Wagner. Scalia was decidedly not.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Lagertha, @TomSchmidt

    I like her a bit more now.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @TomSchmidt

    Unfortunately lots of despicable leftists love Wagner, for example Ms Merkel.

  28. @Kronos
    @Art Deco

    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago. The ghetto claims the best African Americans (alive or dead) and we as a nation suffer because of it.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Dan Hayes, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymous, @jim jones

    Obama was offered a tenured appointment at the Univ of Chicago Law School despite having essentially no judicial publications!

    • Agree: Ponce Faggy
  29. @Kronos
    @Art Deco

    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago. The ghetto claims the best African Americans (alive or dead) and we as a nation suffer because of it.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Dan Hayes, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymous, @jim jones

    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago.

    I have never heard that before at all. And it seems extremely unlikely; Obama and his handlers would’ve known the extremely high value a judicial clerkship with a high-profile judge would’ve given him. They got him presidency of the Harvard Law Review, FFS, and he never even had to write the student article (note).

    If you get a clerkship with a “name” judge (especially federal appeals or SC), you have your career set; either permanent Washington insider or else partnership guarantee at any law firm, and for both a judgeship offer is guaranteed.

    Likely, Obama didn’t apply for a clerkship because of all the writing he would’ve had to do (clerks write the majority of all judge’s opinions), and his handlers would’ve realized that a sharp-eyed judge would’ve seen through him during the interview process, possibly damaging his future status. Working as a “community organizer’ and part-time lecturing required far less writing and far less work overall, and yet would still put him in a position to run for office.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @R.G. Camara

    Here we go, sorry for the delay.

    https://www.amazon.com/Rising-Star-Making-Barack-Obama/dp/0062641832


    One of Monday’s callers was 1989 Law Review member Sheryll Cashin, who was clerking for Judge Abner Mikva, a former Chicago congressman who now sat on the prestigious U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Cashin and Crystal Nix were close friends, and though Nix had not awoken her in the middle of the night, she had called early that morning with the historic news. Cashin in turn told Mikva, who in his ten years on the court had become known as a “feeder” judge, someone whose law clerks often went on to work for Supreme Court justices such as William J. Brennan and Thurgood Marshall. Judicial guidelines prevented formal clerkship offers from being extended until later in the spring, but Mikva was immediately interested in hiring the Review’s first African American president. Cashin knew Obama from the previous year, and the message Mikva asked her to convey was clear. “I was charged with letting him know that if he wanted a clerkship with him, he had it,” she remembered.
     

    Sometime Monday Cashin reached Obama. “I’m calling you because Judge Mikva’s very interested in you” and “very much would like you to apply” to clerk for him come 1991. Barack’s response was immediate: “I’m flattered, but no thanks—I’m going back to Chicago.” Cashin paused. “I was shocked—this was unheard of,” for especially among Review officers, “nobody didn’t clerk.” Cashin tried to persuade persuade Obama to at least apply, but he was adamant. “Tell the man thank you, but I’m going back to Chicago,” Barack reiterated. “I was just floored,” Sheryll recalled, especially because a clerkship with Mikva virtually guaranteed a subsequent Supreme Court clerkship, and large law firms were known to pay newly minted high court clerks a $35,000 bonus. Cashin remembered that Mikva reacted with “amused surprise” when she recounted the astonishing conversation.
     
    So my memory was wrong, it was an offer by a circuit judge (thanks Anonymous) but in the very lucrative D.C. circuit.

    But I’d argue he wasn’t lazy. He had a set politician career in mind.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Steve Sailer

  30. @Art Deco
    Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards.

    She could have found more than one over a period of 40 years. A more plausible explanation is that almost no blacks meshed well with her and she was not a woman who had a regard for appearances.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Lagertha, @JimB, @Barnard

    she was not a woman who had a regard for appearances

    Including her own. She looked like Pazuzu from the Exorcist, and the evil of her judicial career matched her appearance.

    • LOL: Kolya Krassotkin
  31. @Dan Hayes
    @Reg Cæsar

    I've never met a Jew who wasn't (a fan of Wagner)!

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @nobodyofnowhere

    It’s funny, but it happens often. Like with a good friend who did not care for the man because of Hitler and Wagner’s own fanatical anti-Jewish writing, but who then fell in love with Die Meistersinger Von Nürnberg.

    Story (paraphrased) recounted by Bryan Magee in The Tristan Chord: Wagner borrowed money from an older Jew, and refused to pay it back, saying that the Jews had been stealing from the Germans for years, and so that justified his action.

    The man’s friends asked why he wasn’t upset. his answer: “There are many men who borrow money and do not repay. Of those men, a great number have hated the Jews. Many of that group have been scoundrels, ruining men’s wives and daughters, and ignoring all the norms of civilized society. But only one of them wrote Tristan und Isolde.”

    • Thanks: Dan Hayes
  32. Most Supreme Court law clerks don’t have Wikipedia pages (though a substantial number do), and those pages don’t always list religion, but going on names and a few bios alone I’d guesstimate that at least 25% of Ginsburg’s law clerks were Jewish. So one black clerk and 30+ Jewish ones. This is the hero of the Left.

    If a corporation with Ginsburg’s record of hiring blacks had been sued and the case had come before Ginsburg, she would have ruled against the corporation. Unless that corporation was owned by Jews.

    Ruth Ginsburg is regarded as a hero for having “broken barriers.” “Breaking barriers” may or may not have positive social consequences, but it is basically just a selfish act – you break barriers to get to something you want, the same way burglars break through barriers to burgle your house.

    • Replies: @Richard of Melbourne
    @Wilkey

    On my rough count, 49 (give or take 5) out of the 119 clerks have Jewish names. That is 41 per cent, give or take perhaps 4 per cent.

    I for one don't have a problem with her choosing a greatly disproportionate number of her own tribe; but of course I find it monstrous that she should deny that basic freedom to everyone else in her country.

    , @ben tillman
    @Wilkey

    I get 54/127, or 43%

  33. All Supreme Court clerks have done a clerkship or two in lower courts first, so it’s doubtful RBG was using that as an excuse. She looked for people with similar interests and biographies, such as the future law professor from Brooklyn who was a stay-at-home dad during law school who was a big opera fan, and clerked for her twice.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Former clerk

    Did it occur to the sainted RBG that hiring opera fans was a classic example of disparate impact discrimination against blacks?

    Replies: @Bubba

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Former clerk

    Did it occur to the sainted RBG that hiring opera fans was a classic example of disparate impact discrimination against blacks?

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    , @Dan Hayes
    @Former clerk

    Don't keep me in suspense! Who is that former clerk?

  34. An interesting possibility…

    Justice Sandra Day O’Connor retired in early 2006 and was able to be replaced by George W. Bush and a Republican-controlled Senate. She was just 76 at the time (and is still alive) and was apparently telling people (including, I presume, her former co-workers on SCOTUS) that she regretted retiring so early because she was bored.

    Ginsburg was a bitter old hag, so she may have hung around anyway, but it’s interesting to think that she may have decided to stay on the Court because of O’Connor’s comments about being bored in retirement.

    If that was the case then O’Connor may actually have secured two Republican appointments to the Court: her own replacement as well as Ginsburg’s. I’m sure all the establishment would tell us that Ginsburg was smarter than O’Connor, but she may yet have been outmaneuvered by O’Connor at the very end.

    • Replies: @hOUSTON 1992
    @Wilkey

    Sandra Day O'Connor remained a Federal and Circuit Court judge. After her husband died, she substituted in on at least one circuit court. That must have been exhilarating,

    RBG seems to have rated herself a queen for life. She should have stepped down in 2014, and let Obama appoint her successor. But Queen Ruth wanted Hillary, our 1st female president to appoint her successor. So Obama was not good enough for her as her successor selector, just like most of those African American law grads who had sought a clerkship with queen Ruth.

    , @Stan Adams
    @Wilkey

    Not that it matters, but O'Connor announced her retirement in the summer of 2005, right after the end of the term. Bush nominated Roberts a couple of weeks after her retirement announcement and made a (successful) push to get him confirmed before October.

    At first, Bush nominated Roberts as an associate justice. Then William Rehnquist died over Labor Day weekend* and Bush quickly "upgraded" Roberts to chief justice, thinking that he could get confirmed quickly. The ploy worked, because Roberts was indeed confirmed and sworn in by mid-September.

    Then, on the first Monday of October - the very same day that Roberts began his tenure - Bush nominated White House counsel Harriet Miers to replace O'Connor. Washington threw a massive hissy fit. The general consensus among the politicos and the pundits was that Bush was having a political nervous breakdown, throwing dog turds against the wall to see if any of them would stick. But wiser heads counseled that surely Miers wasn't the "real" nominee and speculated that her faux nomination was part of Karl Rove's brilliant masterplan for world domination.

    Surely enough, Miers stepped aside in late October and Bush nominated Samuel Alito on Halloween. After a bruising confirmation battle, Alito was sworn in on the the last day of January.

    *This was in the midst of the Hurricane Katrina debacle, perhaps the lowest point of the Bush presidency. Katrina roared through Louisiana and Mississippi in late August and dominated the news cycle for months. New Orleans was underwater and the TV networks were flooding America with images of black bodies rotting in the putrid soup. Anderson Cooper was crying - literally bawling - on the air, because grandmas were dying and babies were starving and the Superdome toilets were overflowing and FEMA was stumbling around like an incontinent drunk and GEORGE W. BUSH WAS A STUPID RACIST MEANIE WHO DIDN'T F**KING CARE.

    Naturally, Cooper's ratings soared. The silver-haired power bottom received a major career boost, becoming the new face of the network.

    (The old face of the network, Aaron Brown, a bespectacled Jewish nebbish with an ultra-nasally twang, was tossed out of an upper-floor window of the CNN Center in Atlanta. He was never seen or heard from again.)

  35. @Art Deco
    Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards.

    She could have found more than one over a period of 40 years. A more plausible explanation is that almost no blacks meshed well with her and she was not a woman who had a regard for appearances.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Lagertha, @JimB, @Barnard

    The primary reason Ginsburg needed highly qualified clerks is that she was only doing about 10% of the job. She needed good clerks to cover for her since she was no longer able to do the job.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Barnard


    The primary reason Ginsburg needed highly qualified clerks is that she was only doing about 10% of the job. She needed good clerks to cover for her since she was no longer able to do the job.
     
    Nonsense. She was *not* hiring blacks and *was* hiring large numbers of Jewish clerks from the very beginning of her time on the Court. Was she only doing 10% of her job her entire 27 years on the Court?
  36. Get the Supreme arrogance from this black robbed crap weasel. Everyone else should suffer from affirmative action but not her. She could have hired a few incompetent blacks, blacks who did meet her white standards, who would be dead wood while others carried them. She was not required by law, so she did not.

  37. @Former clerk
    All Supreme Court clerks have done a clerkship or two in lower courts first, so it’s doubtful RBG was using that as an excuse. She looked for people with similar interests and biographies, such as the future law professor from Brooklyn who was a stay-at-home dad during law school who was a big opera fan, and clerked for her twice.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Dan Hayes

    Did it occur to the sainted RBG that hiring opera fans was a classic example of disparate impact discrimination against blacks?

    • Replies: @Bubba
    @Steve Sailer

    You'd think that Eric Holder would have addressed this when he was AG for 6 years. I guess that running guns to Mexico was a bigger priority for him.

  38. Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards.

    Despite her enormous self-regard (such that she deemed herself above the constraints to which she condemned the rest of us), the actual judicial opinions she wrote—or at least signed—rarely rose above sophistic casuistry. Happy to invoke a point of law when it was convenient, she retreated into abstract principle or irrelevant precedent when that would better suit her not very hidden agenda. She was no Judge Learned Hand, elucidating fundamental principles of justice. Nor was she even a Justice Scalia, whose jaundiced eye bemusedly surveyed the legal landscape congested with the corpses of leftist judicial dogmas asphyxiated by their absurd contortions, and whose flowing pen effortlessly mocked and cataloged these macabre monuments to liberal vanity. At the end of the day, Ginsburg was merely the agent of the prejudices she brought with her to the bench, busily fixing her preferences into legal stone, much to the disadvantage of everyone who has to live with the law she wrote.

    Good riddance. She will only be missed by those who view the law as nothing more than a channel to impose their self-righteous vision on those less privileged than themselves.

    • Thanks: wren, AnotherDad, Paul Jolliffe
    • Replies: @wren
    @Almost Missouri

    Nicely written, Almost Missouri.

    , @Mr McKenna
    @Almost Missouri

    Wow. You should write speeches for a literate society somewhere.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Almost Missouri

    Well said.

    Almost Missouri's statement is truer than Ginsburg's "sophistic casuistry." Nominating him to replace her would be an improvement.

  39. @Barnard
    @Art Deco

    The primary reason Ginsburg needed highly qualified clerks is that she was only doing about 10% of the job. She needed good clerks to cover for her since she was no longer able to do the job.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    The primary reason Ginsburg needed highly qualified clerks is that she was only doing about 10% of the job. She needed good clerks to cover for her since she was no longer able to do the job.

    Nonsense. She was *not* hiring blacks and *was* hiring large numbers of Jewish clerks from the very beginning of her time on the Court. Was she only doing 10% of her job her entire 27 years on the Court?

  40. The “out of 119 clerks” would be good in the title.

    Either way, the Current Year cancelled her.

    • Agree: Some Guy
    • Replies: @wren
    @wren

    Sorry, I forgot to ask how many clerks she had on the US Court of Appeals over 13 years. 50?

    This may be one of the first genuine cases of anti-black systemic racism that I have come across.

    What else could it be?

    ;)

    I think this is an important fact to inject into the current national conversation about rbg and why she was so revered on the left.

    Maybe Tucker could mention it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rob

  41. • Thanks: Father O'Hara
    • LOL: wren, AceDeuce
    • Replies: @wren
    @Dave Pinsen

    That guy just encouraged his 6.1M followers to write a letter to Rep. Collins using a fake name and fake local address.

    Why does Twitter shut down some folks for no apparent reason whatsoever whereas others can openly organize and promote political fraud without fear of retribution?

    https://www.twitter.com/TheTweetOfGod/status/1307166969527808000

  42. @Almost Missouri

    Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards.
     
    Despite her enormous self-regard (such that she deemed herself above the constraints to which she condemned the rest of us), the actual judicial opinions she wrote—or at least signed—rarely rose above sophistic casuistry. Happy to invoke a point of law when it was convenient, she retreated into abstract principle or irrelevant precedent when that would better suit her not very hidden agenda. She was no Judge Learned Hand, elucidating fundamental principles of justice. Nor was she even a Justice Scalia, whose jaundiced eye bemusedly surveyed the legal landscape congested with the corpses of leftist judicial dogmas asphyxiated by their absurd contortions, and whose flowing pen effortlessly mocked and cataloged these macabre monuments to liberal vanity. At the end of the day, Ginsburg was merely the agent of the prejudices she brought with her to the bench, busily fixing her preferences into legal stone, much to the disadvantage of everyone who has to live with the law she wrote.

    Good riddance. She will only be missed by those who view the law as nothing more than a channel to impose their self-righteous vision on those less privileged than themselves.

    Replies: @wren, @Mr McKenna, @Buzz Mohawk

    Nicely written, Almost Missouri.

  43. Benjamin’s fortune plummeted with the defeat of the Confederacy. He arrived in England with little money and most of his property lost or confiscated.

    Is this even true? Didn’t Benjamin “come into” some of the Confederacy’s reserves and other assets?

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
    @Anonymous

    There were accusations that he pillaged the Confederacy's assets and offshored them while rebel soldiers were trying to find shoes to put on their feet. He most definitely made money selling cotton to Britain during the war which was his grubstake once he arrived in London. But this is all anti-Semitic in the extreme.

    Someone should really make a movie about Benjamin. His escape into the Florida jungle in 1865 is really the stuff of legend. He had to adopt several disguises and almost got caught. Or maybe he just paid some people off, who knows. I nominate Paul Giamatti to play him.

    Replies: @Curmudgeon

  44. /pol has been overcome recently by JIDF slide threads, but on days like today it is always worth a visit.

    https://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/278132834

  45. @Dave Pinsen
    https://twitter.com/the_tabellion/status/1307117010946527232?s=21

    Replies: @wren

    That guy just encouraged his 6.1M followers to write a letter to Rep. Collins using a fake name and fake local address.

    Why does Twitter shut down some folks for no apparent reason whatsoever whereas others can openly organize and promote political fraud without fear of retribution?

  46. Off topic, but I was pretty surprised to see an overwhelming amount of pro-Trump anti-Ginsburg comments on the HuffPost and NBC videos about Ginsburg YouTube is recommending. Examples:

    “I wonder if Dorothy will be able to get that old lady smell off the bottom of her house once the munchkins move off off RBG?”

    “To quote Mark Twain…I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it”

    “The Supreme Court was ruthless until it became ruthless”

    “Satan finally called her home”

    “And that, kids, is why you always make TWO phylacteries”

    “The memory of the righteous is a blessing, but the name of the wicked will rot”

    All these are in the first ten or so comments on the HuffPost and NBC videos. They’ll probably close the comments at this rate, but I really didn’t expect to see stuff like this among the “top comments”

  47. @Dan Hayes
    @Reg Cæsar

    I've never met a Jew who wasn't (a fan of Wagner)!

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @nobodyofnowhere

    Larry David has!

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @nobodyofnowhere

    I love it!

    And it was obviously inspired by Woody Allen.

  48. @Art Deco
    @Kronos

    No, he worked for some shizzy NGO in Chicago from 1985 to 1988, before attending law school. Don't recall hearing of any job offers after law school. He had some book contract, then after about a year landed a 40% time teaching position at the University of Chicago (by some accounts, contrary to regular hiring procedures). The following year, he landed an associate's position at a 12 lawyer firm which specialized in labor law and landlord-tenant law. He was an associate for three years, then of counsel for six years. His license to practice lapsed in 2002. I asked a lawyer I correspond with to assess this tale. He says Obama was a very common type, a law school graduate who had no interest in actually practicing law.

    Replies: @Marty, @David In TN, @I, Libertine

    a very common type, a law school graduate who had no interest in actually practicing law

    In the ‘90’s, a longtime dean of Yale or Harvard law signed on at Boalt in Berkeley. I’ll never forget what he said, in an interview, about his original institution: “we don’t expect that our graduates will actually get involved in the practice of law.”

  49. @Wilkey
    An interesting possibility...

    Justice Sandra Day O'Connor retired in early 2006 and was able to be replaced by George W. Bush and a Republican-controlled Senate. She was just 76 at the time (and is still alive) and was apparently telling people (including, I presume, her former co-workers on SCOTUS) that she regretted retiring so early because she was bored.

    Ginsburg was a bitter old hag, so she may have hung around anyway, but it's interesting to think that she may have decided to stay on the Court because of O'Connor's comments about being bored in retirement.

    If that was the case then O'Connor may actually have secured two Republican appointments to the Court: her own replacement as well as Ginsburg's. I'm sure all the establishment would tell us that Ginsburg was smarter than O'Connor, but she may yet have been outmaneuvered by O'Connor at the very end.

    Replies: @hOUSTON 1992, @Stan Adams

    Sandra Day O’Connor remained a Federal and Circuit Court judge. After her husband died, she substituted in on at least one circuit court. That must have been exhilarating,

    RBG seems to have rated herself a queen for life. She should have stepped down in 2014, and let Obama appoint her successor. But Queen Ruth wanted Hillary, our 1st female president to appoint her successor. So Obama was not good enough for her as her successor selector, just like most of those African American law grads who had sought a clerkship with queen Ruth.

  50. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/mrmikeroach35/status/1307005487339188226

    Replies: @notsaying

    They would never let you in far enough to see a receptionist. At best you’d talk to a security guard who isn’t an Uber employee and has no friends in Human Resources.

    Can you drop off a resume at a big company anymore? I don’t know. You certainly could in 1980. I would agree that it’s a much different thing to get a job in 2020 with all the online applications, resume filters and inability to interact with real people at companies.

    A lot of important things are harder than they were in 1980.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123, Charon
    • Troll: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @notsaying

    Ah, yes, the Spergs come out to play.

    It is obvious from context that the Tweet JohnyWalker123 was quoting was facetious.

    Replies: @notsaying

  51. Anonymous[730] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kronos
    @Art Deco

    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago. The ghetto claims the best African Americans (alive or dead) and we as a nation suffer because of it.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Dan Hayes, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymous, @jim jones

    I have never heard this before, so I just did a Google search on this. According to a 2017 Above The Law Post, Obama turned down a DC Circuit clerkship, not a Supreme Court one.

    As Steve Sailor has pointed out before, Obama is probably fairly intelligent, but it very lazy. Being a clerk would have required far too much effort for Obama as he never did anything as an attorney- he didn’t even do the standard 2-3 years at a prestigious law firm like a lot of Harvard Law School grads do who end up becoming law professors.

    • Thanks: Kronos
    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Anonymous

    I currently don’t have access to my “Obama Bible” David Garrow’s “Rising Star” book so I can’t readily look it up. Still, I recall that many other students were stunned that he turned it down. That was essentially unheard of, especially as leader of the Harvard Law Review.

    If your right, a circuit clerkship is still a pretty big deal and offers quite a bit in potential advancement and bragging rights.

  52. Off-topic, but an intriguing example of the fraying at the edges of the coalition of the fringes possibly brought on by the recent rioting – Hillary fan launches recall effort against Democrat Seattle city council member:

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/the-current-for-november-9-2016-1.3841811/we-agree-to-disagree-best-friends-for-12-years-divided-on-election-results-1.3841829
    https://www.king5.com/article/news/local/seattle-man-claims-he-was-fired-for-launching-recall-effort-against-sawant/281-05d02257-4025-42ac-a5ed-7f40c252568f

  53. Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall.
    It is better to be of a lowly spirit (humility) among the poor than to divide the spoil with the proud (Proverbs 16:18 – 19).

  54. @Former clerk
    All Supreme Court clerks have done a clerkship or two in lower courts first, so it’s doubtful RBG was using that as an excuse. She looked for people with similar interests and biographies, such as the future law professor from Brooklyn who was a stay-at-home dad during law school who was a big opera fan, and clerked for her twice.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Dan Hayes

    Did it occur to the sainted RBG that hiring opera fans was a classic example of disparate impact discrimination against blacks?

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Steve Sailer

    NPR'S Woker-than-Thou show The Takeaway had a segment on getting minorities to listen to, play, and write classical music.

  55. @Anonymous
    @Kronos

    I have never heard this before, so I just did a Google search on this. According to a 2017 Above The Law Post, Obama turned down a DC Circuit clerkship, not a Supreme Court one.

    As Steve Sailor has pointed out before, Obama is probably fairly intelligent, but it very lazy. Being a clerk would have required far too much effort for Obama as he never did anything as an attorney- he didn’t even do the standard 2-3 years at a prestigious law firm like a lot of Harvard Law School grads do who end up becoming law professors.

    Replies: @Kronos

    I currently don’t have access to my “Obama Bible” David Garrow’s “Rising Star” book so I can’t readily look it up. Still, I recall that many other students were stunned that he turned it down. That was essentially unheard of, especially as leader of the Harvard Law Review.

    If your right, a circuit clerkship is still a pretty big deal and offers quite a bit in potential advancement and bragging rights.

  56. @wren
    The "out of 119 clerks" would be good in the title.

    Either way, the Current Year cancelled her.

    Replies: @wren

    Sorry, I forgot to ask how many clerks she had on the US Court of Appeals over 13 years. 50?

    This may be one of the first genuine cases of anti-black systemic racism that I have come across.

    What else could it be?

    😉

    I think this is an important fact to inject into the current national conversation about rbg and why she was so revered on the left.

    Maybe Tucker could mention it.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @wren

    My quick count was Ginsburg had 119 clerks in 27 years on the Supreme Court, plus several dozen as an appellate judge.

    Replies: @wren

    , @Rob
    @wren

    This would be a good opportunity for an LBJ-style lie. Have ‘out of 119 clerks over x many years on the Supreme Court, Ginsberg had NO Black clerks. Especially if Trump said it. Then the media would not be able to resist going with ‘Trump LIED! Ruth Bader Ginsberg had a Black clerk. Snopes would have to chose between ‘False’ and ‘Mostly True’, but the explanation would be where the fun would be.

    Maybe they’d just go with ‘Trump LIED’, but that’s the only story they ever report, so maybe the media would just not report it?

  57. @Steve Sailer
    @Former clerk

    Did it occur to the sainted RBG that hiring opera fans was a classic example of disparate impact discrimination against blacks?

    Replies: @Bubba

    You’d think that Eric Holder would have addressed this when he was AG for 6 years. I guess that running guns to Mexico was a bigger priority for him.

  58. So, when you stop and think about it, leaving aside buying a sugar plantation worked by 140 of his slaves and being the #3 man in the Confederate government, Judah P. Benjamin was kind of a hero.

    Tribal loyalty is a fine thing…

    … just don’t you goyim try it!

  59. she was an open enemy combatant of WASP America and acted accordingly. she was here to destroy the country, and did it competently. she needed the best clerks, to get the best outcomes. diversity was lip service, to be applied to her enemies only, the hated europeans.

    she hated America so much she did not even take the reasonable and logical step of retiring while Obama was President so that another extreme leftist 40 years younger could be appointed.

    she expected to be replaced by Clinton and said so openly, in contravention of legal convention for SC Justices.

    it’s time to celebrate. one of our open enemies has died. celebrate this weekend, whatever the outcome is with these useless Republicans.

    leftists everywhere are threatening violence, arson, and Democrat politicians are threatening to pack the court in 2021. it couldn’t be more clear where things are heading.

    • Agree: HammerJack, Joseph Doaks
  60. as i posted before, law firms get to sue you for not having enough (whatever) employees, but you can never sue a law firm for not having enough (whatever) people.

    lawyers aren’t about to let you use the rules against them.

  61. But the kind of old-fashioned liberal hypocrisy had a whiff of sanity about it, which is sadly missing in 2020.

    Withering sarcasm, the kind which keeps me coming back.

    Wait a minute–that’s not sarcasm, that’s just truth.

  62. @Wilkey
    Most Supreme Court law clerks don't have Wikipedia pages (though a substantial number do), and those pages don't always list religion, but going on names and a few bios alone I'd guesstimate that at least 25% of Ginsburg's law clerks were Jewish. So one black clerk and 30+ Jewish ones. This is the hero of the Left.

    If a corporation with Ginsburg's record of hiring blacks had been sued and the case had come before Ginsburg, she would have ruled against the corporation. Unless that corporation was owned by Jews.

    Ruth Ginsburg is regarded as a hero for having "broken barriers." "Breaking barriers" may or may not have positive social consequences, but it is basically just a selfish act - you break barriers to get to something you want, the same way burglars break through barriers to burgle your house.

    Replies: @Richard of Melbourne, @ben tillman

    On my rough count, 49 (give or take 5) out of the 119 clerks have Jewish names. That is 41 per cent, give or take perhaps 4 per cent.

    I for one don’t have a problem with her choosing a greatly disproportionate number of her own tribe; but of course I find it monstrous that she should deny that basic freedom to everyone else in her country.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  63. More off-topic goodness – MN Public Radio fires classical DJ who happens to be black. He claims they faulted him for playing too much black music:

    American Public Media Group has fired Minnesota Public Radio’s only Black classical music host Garrett McQueen. McQueen announced his firing on his social media accounts Thursday morning.

    McQueen said he was taken off the air after his shift on Aug. 25. He was then given two warnings — one of which was about his need to improve communication and the other warning was for switching out scheduled music to play pieces he felt were more appropriate to the moment and more diverse, McQueen told MPR News.

    “When things happened in the news or when there were hours of programming that only represented dead white men, I would take it upon myself to change that,” said McQueen. “That always got lots of really positive feedback, but it’s not exactly what protocol calls for.”

    McQueen joined Classical 24 in June 2018. Classical 24 is co-produced by American Public Media and Public Radio International, and provides round-the-clock classical music that public radio stations across the nation pay to carry. McQueen worked the overnight shift Monday through Thursday. McQueen also hosted Classical MPR’s first-ever Juneteenth special.

    “And let’s just face it,” said McQueen, “with [the killing of] George Floyd and all of those things, there was a lot of pressure for me to engage the audience while that’s happening. I’m on the air, literally while the 3rd Precinct is being burned down. So, it’s my responsibility to make sure that the programming spoke to that and that’s what I did.”

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @Johann Ricke

    So he's a professional bassoonist who knows a lot about classical music. He wanted to do things his way. Employers have less tolerance for that these days.

    I feel bad for him even though I can't fault them for firing him. He could end up delivering pizzas, that would be a waste. I bet he has a lot of student loans, too.

    Replies: @CBTerry

    , @Paul Jolliffe
    @Johann Ricke

    No, MPR made it very clear why he was fired: he felt no need to follow the established procedures for changing playlists. (Procedures from which he was exempt - he was black, doncha know!)

    As MPR stated
    “ The manner in which he made changes is what caused an issue. We have a process in place for changing playlists, and that process exists to maintain our more than 200 partner stations’ compliance with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and to ensure royalties are properly paid for the music played.”

    Apparently complying with federal law and paying royalties only apply to whites.

    I never thought I would write this Next phrase . . . good for Minnesota Public Radio!

    Replies: @Charon

    , @AceDeuce
    @Johann Ricke

    What music did this c olored boy play--George Floyd's Adagio for Fentanyl?

  64. Anonymous[314] • Disclaimer says:

    Can’t believe the respect from the “right” being paid to this hater tonight.

    She was a vicious bolshevik revolutionary in her legal rulings. Her Prime Directive was obviously to invert all standards norms values of our society.

    She was a world class axe grinder. Nursed a grudge against America her entire life. Relentless malice disguised as improving our flawed society.

    I always thought of her first after hearing Netanyahu say “My people know how to hate.”

    • Agree: Bert
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @Anonymous

    It was a horrible tragedy that she died, but it was a far greater tragedy that she didn’t die earlier.

  65. @wren
    @wren

    Sorry, I forgot to ask how many clerks she had on the US Court of Appeals over 13 years. 50?

    This may be one of the first genuine cases of anti-black systemic racism that I have come across.

    What else could it be?

    ;)

    I think this is an important fact to inject into the current national conversation about rbg and why she was so revered on the left.

    Maybe Tucker could mention it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rob

    My quick count was Ginsburg had 119 clerks in 27 years on the Supreme Court, plus several dozen as an appellate judge.

    • Replies: @wren
    @Steve Sailer

    The revolver.news guy did link to your tweet about it rbg's hypocrisy.

    Afaik, he's an ex-speech writer for Trump, so is politically connected, which is why Tucker had him on.

    There might be more to it though.

    It might be nice to get it out there that rbg's hiring practice was racist before the left riots on her behalf.

    Which I suspect they will.

  66. @TomSchmidt
    @Reg Cæsar

    I like her a bit more now.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

    Unfortunately lots of despicable leftists love Wagner, for example Ms Merkel.

  67. @Anonymous
    Can't believe the respect from the "right" being paid to this hater tonight.

    She was a vicious bolshevik revolutionary in her legal rulings. Her Prime Directive was obviously to invert all standards norms values of our society.

    She was a world class axe grinder. Nursed a grudge against America her entire life. Relentless malice disguised as improving our flawed society.

    I always thought of her first after hearing Netanyahu say "My people know how to hate."

    Replies: @reiner Tor

    It was a horrible tragedy that she died, but it was a far greater tragedy that she didn’t die earlier.

  68. @nobodyofnowhere
    @Dan Hayes

    Larry David has!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nS66IvbvcI

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    I love it!

    And it was obviously inspired by Woody Allen.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  69. @Almost Missouri

    Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards.
     
    Despite her enormous self-regard (such that she deemed herself above the constraints to which she condemned the rest of us), the actual judicial opinions she wrote—or at least signed—rarely rose above sophistic casuistry. Happy to invoke a point of law when it was convenient, she retreated into abstract principle or irrelevant precedent when that would better suit her not very hidden agenda. She was no Judge Learned Hand, elucidating fundamental principles of justice. Nor was she even a Justice Scalia, whose jaundiced eye bemusedly surveyed the legal landscape congested with the corpses of leftist judicial dogmas asphyxiated by their absurd contortions, and whose flowing pen effortlessly mocked and cataloged these macabre monuments to liberal vanity. At the end of the day, Ginsburg was merely the agent of the prejudices she brought with her to the bench, busily fixing her preferences into legal stone, much to the disadvantage of everyone who has to live with the law she wrote.

    Good riddance. She will only be missed by those who view the law as nothing more than a channel to impose their self-righteous vision on those less privileged than themselves.

    Replies: @wren, @Mr McKenna, @Buzz Mohawk

    Wow. You should write speeches for a literate society somewhere.

  70. Paul Butler:

    … during her Supreme Court confirmation hearings in 1993, Ginsburg said: “If you confirm me for this job, my attractiveness to black candidates is going to improve.” This remains a promise unfulfilled.

    It’s true: Ginsburg was never known for having a thiccc ass.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  71. @Steve Sailer
    @Former clerk

    Did it occur to the sainted RBG that hiring opera fans was a classic example of disparate impact discrimination against blacks?

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    NPR’S Woker-than-Thou show The Takeaway had a segment on getting minorities to listen to, play, and write classical music.

  72. @Johann Ricke
    More off-topic goodness - MN Public Radio fires classical DJ who happens to be black. He claims they faulted him for playing too much black music:

    American Public Media Group has fired Minnesota Public Radio’s only Black classical music host Garrett McQueen. McQueen announced his firing on his social media accounts Thursday morning.

    McQueen said he was taken off the air after his shift on Aug. 25. He was then given two warnings — one of which was about his need to improve communication and the other warning was for switching out scheduled music to play pieces he felt were more appropriate to the moment and more diverse, McQueen told MPR News.

    “When things happened in the news or when there were hours of programming that only represented dead white men, I would take it upon myself to change that,” said McQueen. “That always got lots of really positive feedback, but it's not exactly what protocol calls for.”

    McQueen joined Classical 24 in June 2018. Classical 24 is co-produced by American Public Media and Public Radio International, and provides round-the-clock classical music that public radio stations across the nation pay to carry. McQueen worked the overnight shift Monday through Thursday. McQueen also hosted Classical MPR’s first-ever Juneteenth special.

    “And let's just face it,” said McQueen, “with [the killing of] George Floyd and all of those things, there was a lot of pressure for me to engage the audience while that's happening. I'm on the air, literally while the 3rd Precinct is being burned down. So, it's my responsibility to make sure that the programming spoke to that and that's what I did.”
     

    Replies: @notsaying, @Paul Jolliffe, @AceDeuce

    So he’s a professional bassoonist who knows a lot about classical music. He wanted to do things his way. Employers have less tolerance for that these days.

    I feel bad for him even though I can’t fault them for firing him. He could end up delivering pizzas, that would be a waste. I bet he has a lot of student loans, too.

    • Replies: @CBTerry
    @notsaying

    I don't feel bad for him, I say good riddance. He supposedly appreciates classical music yet believes that programming the likes of Bach, Mozart, and Schubert "were hours of programming that only represented dead white men."

    And of course he portrays himself as a victim. “And let’s just face it,” said McQueen, “with [the killing of] George Floyd and all of those things, there was a lot of pressure for me to engage the audience while that’s happening." Hokum. What pressure? Is he saying the same people who fired him for what he did had been pressuring him to do what he did? He continues to babble: "I’m on the air, literally while the 3rd Precinct is being burned down. So, it’s my responsibility to make sure that the programming spoke to that and that’s what I did.” I'd love to know where that responsibility came from. As a classical music lover, the last thing I want to hear is programming that "speaks" (whatever that means) to a bunch of thugs who would delight in burning down my house.

    The story that he was fired for playing too much black music does not even ring true: fired for playing too much black music by the most woke institution in the most woke city during the most woke time? The actual article provides a prosaic and credible explanation: “The manner in which he made changes is what caused an issue. We have a process in place for changing playlists, and that process exists to maintain our more than 200 partner stations’ compliance with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and to ensure royalties are properly paid for the music played.”

    In other words, he was so entitled that even after several conversations with management he continued to run roughshod over a process, required of every other host, to maintain the station's legal compliance.

    Incidentally, the mprnews article has a nice photo of him making a fist while wearing a BLM shirt while in the taxpayer funded MPR studio.

    What would be a bigger waste than him delivering pizzas would be for him to continue going through life as a cry bully. But something tells me that career-wise he'll do just fine, and that getting fired may have even been a calculated move on his part.

  73. In the Los Angeles Times this evening:

    One way for Democrats to make clear they will not tolerate Republicans trying to fill this seat in advance of the election would be for them to pledge that, if they take the White House and Senate in November, they will increase the size of the Supreme Court to 13 justices.

    Yeah, I believe they’ve thought of that already.

    No other justice in history has become a popular icon in the way she did. She modeled for all of us in how to spend a life working to make society and individual lives better. We only can hope for a new justice in her mold.

    Erwin Chemerinsky is dean of the UC Berkeley School of Law

    At this juncture I will eschew stating the obvious. I’ll let Wiki do it:

    A study of legal publications between 2009 and 2013 found Chemerinsky to be the second-most frequently cited American legal scholar, behind Cass Sunstein and ahead of Richard Epstein.

    As Charles Blow said in the New York Times, you may want your country back, but you can’t have it. To which I’d add, well, not without a hell of a fight.

  74. @R.G. Camara
    @Kronos


    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago.
     
    I have never heard that before at all. And it seems extremely unlikely; Obama and his handlers would've known the extremely high value a judicial clerkship with a high-profile judge would've given him. They got him presidency of the Harvard Law Review, FFS, and he never even had to write the student article (note).

    If you get a clerkship with a "name" judge (especially federal appeals or SC), you have your career set; either permanent Washington insider or else partnership guarantee at any law firm, and for both a judgeship offer is guaranteed.

    Likely, Obama didn't apply for a clerkship because of all the writing he would've had to do (clerks write the majority of all judge's opinions), and his handlers would've realized that a sharp-eyed judge would've seen through him during the interview process, possibly damaging his future status. Working as a "community organizer' and part-time lecturing required far less writing and far less work overall, and yet would still put him in a position to run for office.

    Replies: @Kronos

    Here we go, sorry for the delay.

    One of Monday’s callers was 1989 Law Review member Sheryll Cashin, who was clerking for Judge Abner Mikva, a former Chicago congressman who now sat on the prestigious U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Cashin and Crystal Nix were close friends, and though Nix had not awoken her in the middle of the night, she had called early that morning with the historic news. Cashin in turn told Mikva, who in his ten years on the court had become known as a “feeder” judge, someone whose law clerks often went on to work for Supreme Court justices such as William J. Brennan and Thurgood Marshall. Judicial guidelines prevented formal clerkship offers from being extended until later in the spring, but Mikva was immediately interested in hiring the Review’s first African American president. Cashin knew Obama from the previous year, and the message Mikva asked her to convey was clear. “I was charged with letting him know that if he wanted a clerkship with him, he had it,” she remembered.

    Sometime Monday Cashin reached Obama. “I’m calling you because Judge Mikva’s very interested in you” and “very much would like you to apply” to clerk for him come 1991. Barack’s response was immediate: “I’m flattered, but no thanks—I’m going back to Chicago.” Cashin paused. “I was shocked—this was unheard of,” for especially among Review officers, “nobody didn’t clerk.” Cashin tried to persuade persuade Obama to at least apply, but he was adamant. “Tell the man thank you, but I’m going back to Chicago,” Barack reiterated. “I was just floored,” Sheryll recalled, especially because a clerkship with Mikva virtually guaranteed a subsequent Supreme Court clerkship, and large law firms were known to pay newly minted high court clerks a $35,000 bonus. Cashin remembered that Mikva reacted with “amused surprise” when she recounted the astonishing conversation.

    So my memory was wrong, it was an offer by a circuit judge (thanks Anonymous) but in the very lucrative D.C. circuit.

    But I’d argue he wasn’t lazy. He had a set politician career in mind.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Kronos

    If that's true, then we have the extremely rare (if not singular) situation of a judge asking someone to apply for a clerkship with them. That never happens. And he turned it down!

    People apply for clerkships, they aren't offered without them. He was offered it for being a black token. That's sad to all the whiles and yellows who worked their asses off and applied.

    Obama turned it down, likely, as I said, because it would've required a ton of writing and research, and not about himself.

    And yes, Obama was a lazy front man. His entire career from college onwards was (1) get a position; (2) do nothing in the position; (3) ) move on to next position. His entire presidency was him golfing or playing basketball while his cabinet ran wild doing whatever corruption they wanted.

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Kronos

    Obama wanted to follow Harold Washington's career to be Mayor of Chicago. Mayor of Chicago has power, which is what Obama wanted.

  75. When does Judah Benjamin get cancelled?

    It’s interesting that Judah Benjamin hasn’t been cancelled while Col. Hans Christian Heg has.

  76. @Almost Missouri

    Apparently, Justice Ginsburg didn’t find many young black law graduates up to her high standards.
     
    Despite her enormous self-regard (such that she deemed herself above the constraints to which she condemned the rest of us), the actual judicial opinions she wrote—or at least signed—rarely rose above sophistic casuistry. Happy to invoke a point of law when it was convenient, she retreated into abstract principle or irrelevant precedent when that would better suit her not very hidden agenda. She was no Judge Learned Hand, elucidating fundamental principles of justice. Nor was she even a Justice Scalia, whose jaundiced eye bemusedly surveyed the legal landscape congested with the corpses of leftist judicial dogmas asphyxiated by their absurd contortions, and whose flowing pen effortlessly mocked and cataloged these macabre monuments to liberal vanity. At the end of the day, Ginsburg was merely the agent of the prejudices she brought with her to the bench, busily fixing her preferences into legal stone, much to the disadvantage of everyone who has to live with the law she wrote.

    Good riddance. She will only be missed by those who view the law as nothing more than a channel to impose their self-righteous vision on those less privileged than themselves.

    Replies: @wren, @Mr McKenna, @Buzz Mohawk

    Well said.

    Almost Missouri’s statement is truer than Ginsburg’s “sophistic casuistry.” Nominating him to replace her would be an improvement.

  77. I think Mr. Sailer, who is admirable in the calm way he occasionally calls attention to Jewish hypocrisy (as when Jews write of “white privilege” but never “Jewish privilege”), wrote this column with the intention of letting his readers fill in the missing lines. I notice the encomia for the late justice by Nina Totenberg and Linda Greenhouse, and I wonder just how great the Jewish part of our legal and peri-legal establishment is. Specifically, for example, how many of Ginsburg’s clerks were Jewish? I am willing to grant that intelligence and proclivity should be allowed a free field, but the mandatory obscurity in which so many of the facts are kept displeases me.

    • Replies: @Richard of Melbourne
    @Tono Bungay

    As I pointed out above, I estimate that around 40 per cent of here SCOTUS clerks were Jewish.

  78. @guillaume le batard
    Good for her. Shows that she actually has good judgement.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    It shows that she was a loathsome hypocrite. Affirmative action for thee, but not for me, thank you very much.

    One time I encountered an old lady at CVS who was blocking the aisle with her cart while blabbing away on her cell phone. I stood next to her for about ten seconds, hoping that she would take the hint. Finally I said, “Excuse me, but you’re blocking the aisle.” The woman turned around and gave me a disdainful look, as if she couldn’t understand why some insignificant little insect was interrupting her conversation. I was a bit startled to realize that I was staring at the face of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (I’m not kidding – this woman could have been her doppelganger. It was freaky.) Then she turned back around and kept right on blabbing away on her phone. She made no effort to move her cart.

    (Not that it matters, but, yes, I pegged her as Jewish. She had a thick New York accent.)

    Recently I was getting on a train when a young Ginsburg type literally shoved an old white woman out of the way, almost knocking her over. The woman could barely walk and was attempting to exit the train through the door nearest to her seat, even though the door was marked “Enter Only.”

    (These signs are supposed to enforce social distancing, but virtually no one pays any attention to them. People routinely enter and exit as they please, and the security guards make no effort to stop them. The guards do enforce the mask-wearing requirement.)

    The old woman was standing in front of the doors as they opened. The young JAP girl immediately walked inside the train and brushed against the old woman, pinning her against a glass divider and almost knocking her over. The girl made no attempt to apologize.

    As she walked out, the old woman said loudly, “That’s very rude,” and the young girl called back, “The sign says ‘Enter Only,’ lady.”

    The Ginsburg girl didn’t look like trash – she was dressed nicely and was carrying an expensive purse. She just acted like it.

    On that same day (at a different station), I witnessed a genuinely low-class person – a huge fat twentysomething black girl wearing short shorts and a sleeveless T-shirt – refusing to allow another elderly white lady entrance to an elevator.

    “You can’t come in,” she said sharply. “We already have two people in here.” (Under COVID restrictions, elevators are restricted to “two strangers or one family” at a time.)

    The old lady harrumphed as the doors closed and the elevator began its descent.

    In fairness, I should add that, a few seconds later, a fortysomething black guy with a bike walked up to her and asked, “She didn’t let you on the elevator?”

    “No, she didn’t,” the woman said.

    “That’s not right,” the guy said. “She should have more respect for her elders.”

    Over the last few months I’ve seen a lot more passive-aggressive nastiness from blacks, especially women, and most especially 50+ women. The white-haters are getting bolder.

    I’m laid-back and thin-skinned, but lately I’ve been tempted to drop an occasional n-bomb (accompanied by an f-bomb, naturally) in response to the latest display of hostility by a PoS PoC.

    (I did unleash a c-bomb on a particularly nasty dinduette, but I don’t think she heard me.)

  79. @Tono Bungay
    I think Mr. Sailer, who is admirable in the calm way he occasionally calls attention to Jewish hypocrisy (as when Jews write of "white privilege" but never "Jewish privilege"), wrote this column with the intention of letting his readers fill in the missing lines. I notice the encomia for the late justice by Nina Totenberg and Linda Greenhouse, and I wonder just how great the Jewish part of our legal and peri-legal establishment is. Specifically, for example, how many of Ginsburg's clerks were Jewish? I am willing to grant that intelligence and proclivity should be allowed a free field, but the mandatory obscurity in which so many of the facts are kept displeases me.

    Replies: @Richard of Melbourne

    As I pointed out above, I estimate that around 40 per cent of here SCOTUS clerks were Jewish.

  80. @Former clerk
    All Supreme Court clerks have done a clerkship or two in lower courts first, so it’s doubtful RBG was using that as an excuse. She looked for people with similar interests and biographies, such as the future law professor from Brooklyn who was a stay-at-home dad during law school who was a big opera fan, and clerked for her twice.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Dan Hayes

    Don’t keep me in suspense! Who is that former clerk?

  81. “… through a succession of exiles and plunderings.”

    Said exiles resulted from day-by-day plunderings by Jews, not of Jews. Any plunderings of Jews were rough-and-ready reparations for their quotidian plunderings.

  82. @Wilkey
    An interesting possibility...

    Justice Sandra Day O'Connor retired in early 2006 and was able to be replaced by George W. Bush and a Republican-controlled Senate. She was just 76 at the time (and is still alive) and was apparently telling people (including, I presume, her former co-workers on SCOTUS) that she regretted retiring so early because she was bored.

    Ginsburg was a bitter old hag, so she may have hung around anyway, but it's interesting to think that she may have decided to stay on the Court because of O'Connor's comments about being bored in retirement.

    If that was the case then O'Connor may actually have secured two Republican appointments to the Court: her own replacement as well as Ginsburg's. I'm sure all the establishment would tell us that Ginsburg was smarter than O'Connor, but she may yet have been outmaneuvered by O'Connor at the very end.

    Replies: @hOUSTON 1992, @Stan Adams

    Not that it matters, but O’Connor announced her retirement in the summer of 2005, right after the end of the term. Bush nominated Roberts a couple of weeks after her retirement announcement and made a (successful) push to get him confirmed before October.

    At first, Bush nominated Roberts as an associate justice. Then William Rehnquist died over Labor Day weekend* and Bush quickly “upgraded” Roberts to chief justice, thinking that he could get confirmed quickly. The ploy worked, because Roberts was indeed confirmed and sworn in by mid-September.

    Then, on the first Monday of October – the very same day that Roberts began his tenure – Bush nominated White House counsel Harriet Miers to replace O’Connor. Washington threw a massive hissy fit. The general consensus among the politicos and the pundits was that Bush was having a political nervous breakdown, throwing dog turds against the wall to see if any of them would stick. But wiser heads counseled that surely Miers wasn’t the “real” nominee and speculated that her faux nomination was part of Karl Rove’s brilliant masterplan for world domination.

    Surely enough, Miers stepped aside in late October and Bush nominated Samuel Alito on Halloween. After a bruising confirmation battle, Alito was sworn in on the the last day of January.

    *This was in the midst of the Hurricane Katrina debacle, perhaps the lowest point of the Bush presidency. Katrina roared through Louisiana and Mississippi in late August and dominated the news cycle for months. New Orleans was underwater and the TV networks were flooding America with images of black bodies rotting in the putrid soup. Anderson Cooper was crying – literally bawling – on the air, because grandmas were dying and babies were starving and the Superdome toilets were overflowing and FEMA was stumbling around like an incontinent drunk and GEORGE W. BUSH WAS A STUPID RACIST MEANIE WHO DIDN’T F**KING CARE.

    Naturally, Cooper’s ratings soared. The silver-haired power bottom received a major career boost, becoming the new face of the network.

    (The old face of the network, Aaron Brown, a bespectacled Jewish nebbish with an ultra-nasally twang, was tossed out of an upper-floor window of the CNN Center in Atlanta. He was never seen or heard from again.)

  83. @Anonymous

    Here’s another example of RBG’s lack of Wokeness: from her 2002 speech to the Jewish Council for Public Affairs on Jewish legal prodigies, such as Judah P. Benjamin, who served as Attorney General, Secretary of War, and Secretary of State in the Confederacy, before fleeing to England to avoid arrest for treason:
     
    I don't think this would be an example of a lack of Wokeness, but rather an example of ethnic narcissism. Ethnic narcissism is fully compatible with Wokeness. Of course, black ethnic narcissism trumps Jewish ethnic narcissism under Wokeness, but the only ethnic narcissism that's completely verboten is white gentile ethnic narcissism. Ginsberg wouldn't have written this way about a WASP Virginia cavalier who had a successful second career in law abroad after the war.

    Replies: @Bert

    Perhaps a first step toward re-rationalizing the American polity would be the promotion of European ethnic narcissism. But not actually narcissism, rather an evidence-based meme centered on the creation of the science and technology which made the modern world. It would be an easy sell to the great mass of people who are unconvinced by BLM/antifa/MSM yet unsure as how to deal with the white guilt that is pushed on them.

  84. @Ponce Faggy
    An appearance that defines 'Frumpy Yenta'. Evolved cunning at expense of beauty.

    Replies: @Thoughts

    Disagree.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an attractive woman.

    Go back to photos of her in the 1950s and she’s absolutely charming looking. Of course, in today’s Leftist Culture, Young Ginsburg would he horrid looking, but when required to conform to 1950s standards she was ‘A Betty.’

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Thoughts

    Right.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg wasn an all-around superior person, including in looks when she was young:

    https://imagez.tmz.com/image/1e/o/2018/09/04/1e70723553bd5703aaf86d753141eb7f_md.jpg

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  85. @notsaying
    @JohnnyWalker123

    They would never let you in far enough to see a receptionist. At best you'd talk to a security guard who isn't an Uber employee and has no friends in Human Resources.

    Can you drop off a resume at a big company anymore? I don't know. You certainly could in 1980. I would agree that it's a much different thing to get a job in 2020 with all the online applications, resume filters and inability to interact with real people at companies.

    A lot of important things are harder than they were in 1980.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Ah, yes, the Spergs come out to play.

    It is obvious from context that the Tweet JohnyWalker123 was quoting was facetious.

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @ScarletNumber

    One of the impressive things about the people who post here is that they consistently treat others here with respect. As you should have noticed, Steve Sailer sets an excellent example for the rest of us.

    You on the other hand are quick to call troll for no reason and now you are name calling too.

    As I told you recently I have been posting here for years and have never been a troll. Please stop directing nasty comments my way. I do not deserve them.

  86. Surely she could have found a place for a Black law clerk during her last ten years to at least keep her inflated and roll her in and out of SCOTUS sessions on an appliance hand truck.

  87. @Thoughts
    @Ponce Faggy

    Disagree.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an attractive woman.

    Go back to photos of her in the 1950s and she's absolutely charming looking. Of course, in today's Leftist Culture, Young Ginsburg would he horrid looking, but when required to conform to 1950s standards she was 'A Betty.'

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Right.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg wasn an all-around superior person, including in looks when she was young:

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    There's another 3/4 portrait of her in her youth in which she looks really beautiful, but even that potrait, you can see her little pursed lip scowl. Over time, that characteristic expression of her mouth came to dominate her face. In photos of her over time, it becomes more and more prominent until she just starts to look like an angry bitch in old age.

  88. @notsaying
    @Johann Ricke

    So he's a professional bassoonist who knows a lot about classical music. He wanted to do things his way. Employers have less tolerance for that these days.

    I feel bad for him even though I can't fault them for firing him. He could end up delivering pizzas, that would be a waste. I bet he has a lot of student loans, too.

    Replies: @CBTerry

    I don’t feel bad for him, I say good riddance. He supposedly appreciates classical music yet believes that programming the likes of Bach, Mozart, and Schubert “were hours of programming that only represented dead white men.”

    And of course he portrays himself as a victim. “And let’s just face it,” said McQueen, “with [the killing of] George Floyd and all of those things, there was a lot of pressure for me to engage the audience while that’s happening.” Hokum. What pressure? Is he saying the same people who fired him for what he did had been pressuring him to do what he did? He continues to babble: “I’m on the air, literally while the 3rd Precinct is being burned down. So, it’s my responsibility to make sure that the programming spoke to that and that’s what I did.” I’d love to know where that responsibility came from. As a classical music lover, the last thing I want to hear is programming that “speaks” (whatever that means) to a bunch of thugs who would delight in burning down my house.

    The story that he was fired for playing too much black music does not even ring true: fired for playing too much black music by the most woke institution in the most woke city during the most woke time? The actual article provides a prosaic and credible explanation: “The manner in which he made changes is what caused an issue. We have a process in place for changing playlists, and that process exists to maintain our more than 200 partner stations’ compliance with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and to ensure royalties are properly paid for the music played.”

    In other words, he was so entitled that even after several conversations with management he continued to run roughshod over a process, required of every other host, to maintain the station’s legal compliance.

    Incidentally, the mprnews article has a nice photo of him making a fist while wearing a BLM shirt while in the taxpayer funded MPR studio.

    What would be a bigger waste than him delivering pizzas would be for him to continue going through life as a cry bully. But something tells me that career-wise he’ll do just fine, and that getting fired may have even been a calculated move on his part.

  89. As to the late Justice Ginsburg’s hiring practices: while she was on the D.C. Circuit, from 1980 to 1993, she would have been competing for top-drawer black law students (those academically strong enough to have a shot at federal appellate clerkships) with the few black appellate judges on the federal bench at the time, virtually all Carter appointees:

    1. fellow D.C. Circuit judge Harry Edwards (served 1980-present), who had taught at both the University of Michigan Law School and Harvard Law School;

    2. Second Circuit judge Amalya Kearse (served 1979-present), the first black woman to make partner at a major Wall Street law firm (Hughes, Hubbard & Reed; well, it was “major” in the 1960’s and ’70’s);

    3. Sixth Circuit judge Damon Keith (1977-2019), originally an LBJ appointee to the District Court in Detroit in 1967, then Jimmy Carter’s choice to replace Wade McCree, whom he had named Solicitor General; and

    4. Third Circuit judge A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr. (1977-1993), first an LBJ appointee to the District Court in Philadelphia when he was only 35, then a Carter nominee to the 3rd Circuit before he turned 50.

    Top black law students looking for future career mentors would have gravitated to one of these judges — or maybe to former Chicago congressman Abner Mikva, also a Carter appointee to the D.C. Circuit, who unsuccessfully tried to hire Barack Obama for a post-graduation clerkship (full story in David Garrow’s Rising Star) — and not to then-Judge Ginsburg (opera preferences aside).

    As for Supreme Court clerkships, other commenters have noted that strong candidates invariably come with one or even two prior clerkships on lower courts before beginning a clerkship on First Street. Preference goes to candidates who have already clerked for certain influential “feeder judges,” whose clerks just seem to have a leg, an arm, a spleen and a kidney up in the SCOTUS interview process. (Prime example: before current Justice Brett Kavanaugh clerked for Justice Kennedy, he spent a year each in the chambers of two appellate judges: Walter Stapleton of the Third Circuit, then Alex Kosinski of the Ninth Circuit. Stapleton wasn’t really a “feeder judge,” but Kosinski was.)

    So how large was the universe of black law students who

    (i) had the academic pedigree to get a clerkship with a federal appellate judge,

    (ii) would have gotten one with a “feeder judge,” who sent most of his or her clerks on to Supreme Court clerkships,

    (iii) would have performed well enough for the “feeder judge” to warrant the highest recommendation to the Supremes, and

    (iv) would have “meshed” well with RBG personally? (Even a Jewish law student who didn’t like opera — or knew little about it — would have been quick enough on the draw to deflect any inquiry from the Justice about the subject by referring to the classic Bugs Bunny cartoon satirizing Wagner, “What’s Opera, Doc?” [Otherwise known as “Kill the Wabbit.”])

    One in 25 years sounds about right.

  90. The jews or pseudo jews don’t like blacks.. However, they are being used for (their) AGENDA…

    We must realize that our Party’s most powerful weapon is racial tension. By propounding into the consciousness of the dark races, that for centuries have been oppressed by the Whites, we can mold them to the program of the Communist Party … In America, we will aim for subtle victory. While enflaming the Negro minority against the Whites, we will instill in the Whites, a guilt complex for the exploitation of the Negroes. We will aid the Negroes to rise to prominence in every walk of life, in the professions, and in the world of sports and entertainment. With this prestige, the Negroes will be able to intermarry with the Whites, and begin a process which will deliver America to our cause.”

    Israel Cohen…

  91. @Che Blutarsky
    Why does the standard for clerking for the Supreme Court need to be so high? The standard for serving on the court isn't. Give almost anyone a ten second description of 1000 cases and they will be able to predict how Kagan and Sotomayor will vote on 999 of them. And it's not like the logic in the opinions is earth shattering, all left-wing opinions boil down to "because we say so".

    Replies: @Hibernian

    The clerks have the job of making the Justices look good.

  92. @Johann Ricke
    More off-topic goodness - MN Public Radio fires classical DJ who happens to be black. He claims they faulted him for playing too much black music:

    American Public Media Group has fired Minnesota Public Radio’s only Black classical music host Garrett McQueen. McQueen announced his firing on his social media accounts Thursday morning.

    McQueen said he was taken off the air after his shift on Aug. 25. He was then given two warnings — one of which was about his need to improve communication and the other warning was for switching out scheduled music to play pieces he felt were more appropriate to the moment and more diverse, McQueen told MPR News.

    “When things happened in the news or when there were hours of programming that only represented dead white men, I would take it upon myself to change that,” said McQueen. “That always got lots of really positive feedback, but it's not exactly what protocol calls for.”

    McQueen joined Classical 24 in June 2018. Classical 24 is co-produced by American Public Media and Public Radio International, and provides round-the-clock classical music that public radio stations across the nation pay to carry. McQueen worked the overnight shift Monday through Thursday. McQueen also hosted Classical MPR’s first-ever Juneteenth special.

    “And let's just face it,” said McQueen, “with [the killing of] George Floyd and all of those things, there was a lot of pressure for me to engage the audience while that's happening. I'm on the air, literally while the 3rd Precinct is being burned down. So, it's my responsibility to make sure that the programming spoke to that and that's what I did.”
     

    Replies: @notsaying, @Paul Jolliffe, @AceDeuce

    No, MPR made it very clear why he was fired: he felt no need to follow the established procedures for changing playlists. (Procedures from which he was exempt – he was black, doncha know!)

    As MPR stated
    “ The manner in which he made changes is what caused an issue. We have a process in place for changing playlists, and that process exists to maintain our more than 200 partner stations’ compliance with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and to ensure royalties are properly paid for the music played.”

    Apparently complying with federal law and paying royalties only apply to whites.

    I never thought I would write this Next phrase . . . good for Minnesota Public Radio!

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Paul Jolliffe


    Apparently complying with federal law and paying royalties only apply to whites.
     
    All rules only apply to whites. Some rules also appear to apply to asians, but that's just because they choose to follow them.
  93. @Dan Hayes
    Why should RBG have been saddled with token black incompetents when there were a plethora of deserving Jewish American Princes and Princesses plus a few token goyim!

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    Hey, this SCOTUS shizzle is too important to risk letting diversity get anywhere near its inner workings.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  94. @Art Deco
    @Kronos

    No, he worked for some shizzy NGO in Chicago from 1985 to 1988, before attending law school. Don't recall hearing of any job offers after law school. He had some book contract, then after about a year landed a 40% time teaching position at the University of Chicago (by some accounts, contrary to regular hiring procedures). The following year, he landed an associate's position at a 12 lawyer firm which specialized in labor law and landlord-tenant law. He was an associate for three years, then of counsel for six years. His license to practice lapsed in 2002. I asked a lawyer I correspond with to assess this tale. He says Obama was a very common type, a law school graduate who had no interest in actually practicing law.

    Replies: @Marty, @David In TN, @I, Libertine

    “He says Obama was a very common type, a law school graduate who had no interest in actually practicing law.”

    This reminds me of a critical biography of Bobby Kennedy (written during his lifetime) that observed how RFK would talk of leaving politics to practice law but never did.

  95. Lox eaters, for all their bad points, are smart, and look out for themselves without apology-two vital qualities that most present day white goyim lack.

    As for the demographics of her clerks vs her public embrace of diversity and affirmative action-there’s a story, that,sometime in the late 70s, after Vietnam, a woman found herself at a dinner party where the other guests included Jane Fonda.

    The woman, who had never met Fonda, actually took Jane to task at the table over Fonda’s treasonous acts and radical stances during Vietnam. There was an uncomfortable silence, and supposedly Fonda, with a small smile on her face, replied something like “You don’t think that I actually believed all that, do you?”

    • Replies: @anon
    @AceDeuce

    a woman found herself at a dinner party where the other guests included Jane Fonda
    “You don’t think that I actually believed all that, do you?”

    #StuffThatNeverHappened

  96. @Alden
    OT Biden AD just ran on TV A pathetic little boy vomiting. Mom says he has leukemia. If Trump is elected they will lose medical insurance and boy will get no medical care. It’s unusual for a democrat campaign AD in that the boy has a father and the family is White.

    Replies: @David In TN

    This means the democrats are worried about the White vote.

  97. @Anonymous

    Benjamin’s fortune plummeted with the defeat of the Confederacy. He arrived in England with little money and most of his property lost or confiscated.
     
    Is this even true? Didn’t Benjamin “come into” some of the Confederacy’s reserves and other assets?

    Replies: @Bragadocious

    There were accusations that he pillaged the Confederacy’s assets and offshored them while rebel soldiers were trying to find shoes to put on their feet. He most definitely made money selling cotton to Britain during the war which was his grubstake once he arrived in London. But this is all anti-Semitic in the extreme.

    Someone should really make a movie about Benjamin. His escape into the Florida jungle in 1865 is really the stuff of legend. He had to adopt several disguises and almost got caught. Or maybe he just paid some people off, who knows. I nominate Paul Giamatti to play him.

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
    @Bragadocious


    He most definitely made money selling cotton to Britain during the war which was his grubstake once he arrived in London.
     
    Well, I don't know about during the war, particularly after the Union blockade, but selling cotton to Britain had been a huge revenue source for the South. It was the tariffs on the British manufactured goods, imposed by the Feds, and imported by the South, that was the cause for the split. The South's trade with Britain (and others) was subsidizing Northern industrialization, that didn't want Southern products.
  98. @Lagertha
    @Reg Cæsar

    she loved music. I never was a fan of hers, but she was very cultured. She was not an extremist - a Communist. If she was a Trotskyist, we will never know. But, she did not seem evil...even if I think all Democrats are evil pedos and rapists.

    Replies: @Pericles

    But, she did not seem evil…

    “The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that, you got it made.”

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Pericles

    I hope you are not correct, but I fear that you are.

  99. Like all the old wealthy Jews in DC who fired their black housekeepers in favor of Hispanics, I’m sure the situation was the same at the Supreme Court where nice things are found: “The Blacks, you know, they steal the liquor, silverware and crystal”.

  100. @Art Deco
    @Kronos

    No, he worked for some shizzy NGO in Chicago from 1985 to 1988, before attending law school. Don't recall hearing of any job offers after law school. He had some book contract, then after about a year landed a 40% time teaching position at the University of Chicago (by some accounts, contrary to regular hiring procedures). The following year, he landed an associate's position at a 12 lawyer firm which specialized in labor law and landlord-tenant law. He was an associate for three years, then of counsel for six years. His license to practice lapsed in 2002. I asked a lawyer I correspond with to assess this tale. He says Obama was a very common type, a law school graduate who had no interest in actually practicing law.

    Replies: @Marty, @David In TN, @I, Libertine

    I’m told, and I have no trouble believing, that a majority of those who hold a Juris Doctor degree do not practice law. Some are retired, of course. Some never pass a bar exam. But many just get fed up and decide to do something else -“recovering lawyers” they call themselves.

    We lawyers have these little sayings. It’s hard work. It’s time consuming (“The law is a jealous lover; she demands all of your time”). It’s both stressful and dull. (“The practice of law consists of hour of boredom, punctuated by moments of terror”). Like many jobs, it’s not as much fun as it looks like on television.

    Clerking is particularly hard. Your judge tell you what result to reach, and you have to craft an opinion that makes that result appear to be correct, even if it isn’t. Under severe time pressure. It’s harder than it looks.

    So I’m so not surprised that Obama turned down the job, and spent little time actually practising law. Maybe he’s smarter than I’ve been giving him credit for.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @I, Libertine

    There are certainly a few with nothing better to do than riot:

    https://nypost.com/2020/06/01/molotov-cocktail-tossing-lawyers-tried-to-pass-out-explosives-cops/

    , @Adam Smith
    @I, Libertine

    Your judge tells you what result to reach, and you have to craft an opinion that makes that result appear to be correct, even if it isn’t.

    Thank you for your honesty.

    , @ScarletNumber
    @I, Libertine


    a majority of those who hold a Juris Doctor degree do not practice law
     
    In addition to the examples you mention, you have a sizable proportion of women who trade in their JD for an MRS. When I taught in a rich town when I was younger, I had to deal with these mothers more than I would've liked to.

    There are also plenty of law schools that take the students' money and give them the degree, but they don't have a prayer of passing the bar. A well-known example is the most recent past-mayor of Los Angeles, Antonio Villaraigosa, who holds a JD from the People's College of Law.

    Your judge tell you what result to reach, and you have to craft an opinion that makes that result appear to be correct, even if it isn’t.
     
    This is known as liberal jurisprudence.
  101. @ScarletNumber
    @notsaying

    Ah, yes, the Spergs come out to play.

    It is obvious from context that the Tweet JohnyWalker123 was quoting was facetious.

    Replies: @notsaying

    One of the impressive things about the people who post here is that they consistently treat others here with respect. As you should have noticed, Steve Sailer sets an excellent example for the rest of us.

    You on the other hand are quick to call troll for no reason and now you are name calling too.

    As I told you recently I have been posting here for years and have never been a troll. Please stop directing nasty comments my way. I do not deserve them.

  102. @Johann Ricke
    More off-topic goodness - MN Public Radio fires classical DJ who happens to be black. He claims they faulted him for playing too much black music:

    American Public Media Group has fired Minnesota Public Radio’s only Black classical music host Garrett McQueen. McQueen announced his firing on his social media accounts Thursday morning.

    McQueen said he was taken off the air after his shift on Aug. 25. He was then given two warnings — one of which was about his need to improve communication and the other warning was for switching out scheduled music to play pieces he felt were more appropriate to the moment and more diverse, McQueen told MPR News.

    “When things happened in the news or when there were hours of programming that only represented dead white men, I would take it upon myself to change that,” said McQueen. “That always got lots of really positive feedback, but it's not exactly what protocol calls for.”

    McQueen joined Classical 24 in June 2018. Classical 24 is co-produced by American Public Media and Public Radio International, and provides round-the-clock classical music that public radio stations across the nation pay to carry. McQueen worked the overnight shift Monday through Thursday. McQueen also hosted Classical MPR’s first-ever Juneteenth special.

    “And let's just face it,” said McQueen, “with [the killing of] George Floyd and all of those things, there was a lot of pressure for me to engage the audience while that's happening. I'm on the air, literally while the 3rd Precinct is being burned down. So, it's my responsibility to make sure that the programming spoke to that and that's what I did.”
     

    Replies: @notsaying, @Paul Jolliffe, @AceDeuce

    What music did this c olored boy play–George Floyd’s Adagio for Fentanyl?

  103. @wren
    @wren

    Sorry, I forgot to ask how many clerks she had on the US Court of Appeals over 13 years. 50?

    This may be one of the first genuine cases of anti-black systemic racism that I have come across.

    What else could it be?

    ;)

    I think this is an important fact to inject into the current national conversation about rbg and why she was so revered on the left.

    Maybe Tucker could mention it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rob

    This would be a good opportunity for an LBJ-style lie. Have ‘out of 119 clerks over x many years on the Supreme Court, Ginsberg had NO Black clerks. Especially if Trump said it. Then the media would not be able to resist going with ‘Trump LIED! Ruth Bader Ginsberg had a Black clerk. Snopes would have to chose between ‘False’ and ‘Mostly True’, but the explanation would be where the fun would be.

    Maybe they’d just go with ‘Trump LIED’, but that’s the only story they ever report, so maybe the media would just not report it?

  104. @Paul Jolliffe
    @Johann Ricke

    No, MPR made it very clear why he was fired: he felt no need to follow the established procedures for changing playlists. (Procedures from which he was exempt - he was black, doncha know!)

    As MPR stated
    “ The manner in which he made changes is what caused an issue. We have a process in place for changing playlists, and that process exists to maintain our more than 200 partner stations’ compliance with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and to ensure royalties are properly paid for the music played.”

    Apparently complying with federal law and paying royalties only apply to whites.

    I never thought I would write this Next phrase . . . good for Minnesota Public Radio!

    Replies: @Charon

    Apparently complying with federal law and paying royalties only apply to whites.

    All rules only apply to whites. Some rules also appear to apply to asians, but that’s just because they choose to follow them.

  105. @Steve Sailer
    @wren

    My quick count was Ginsburg had 119 clerks in 27 years on the Supreme Court, plus several dozen as an appellate judge.

    Replies: @wren

    The revolver.news guy did link to your tweet about it rbg’s hypocrisy.

    Afaik, he’s an ex-speech writer for Trump, so is politically connected, which is why Tucker had him on.

    There might be more to it though.

    It might be nice to get it out there that rbg’s hiring practice was racist before the left riots on her behalf.

    Which I suspect they will.

  106. @Steve Sailer
    @Thoughts

    Right.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg wasn an all-around superior person, including in looks when she was young:

    https://imagez.tmz.com/image/1e/o/2018/09/04/1e70723553bd5703aaf86d753141eb7f_md.jpg

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    There’s another 3/4 portrait of her in her youth in which she looks really beautiful, but even that potrait, you can see her little pursed lip scowl. Over time, that characteristic expression of her mouth came to dominate her face. In photos of her over time, it becomes more and more prominent until she just starts to look like an angry bitch in old age.

  107. @AceDeuce
    Lox eaters, for all their bad points, are smart, and look out for themselves without apology-two vital qualities that most present day white goyim lack.

    As for the demographics of her clerks vs her public embrace of diversity and affirmative action-there's a story, that,sometime in the late 70s, after Vietnam, a woman found herself at a dinner party where the other guests included Jane Fonda.

    The woman, who had never met Fonda, actually took Jane to task at the table over Fonda's treasonous acts and radical stances during Vietnam. There was an uncomfortable silence, and supposedly Fonda, with a small smile on her face, replied something like "You don't think that I actually believed all that, do you?"

    Replies: @anon

    a woman found herself at a dinner party where the other guests included Jane Fonda
    “You don’t think that I actually believed all that, do you?”

    #StuffThatNeverHappened

  108. @Bragadocious
    @Anonymous

    There were accusations that he pillaged the Confederacy's assets and offshored them while rebel soldiers were trying to find shoes to put on their feet. He most definitely made money selling cotton to Britain during the war which was his grubstake once he arrived in London. But this is all anti-Semitic in the extreme.

    Someone should really make a movie about Benjamin. His escape into the Florida jungle in 1865 is really the stuff of legend. He had to adopt several disguises and almost got caught. Or maybe he just paid some people off, who knows. I nominate Paul Giamatti to play him.

    Replies: @Curmudgeon

    He most definitely made money selling cotton to Britain during the war which was his grubstake once he arrived in London.

    Well, I don’t know about during the war, particularly after the Union blockade, but selling cotton to Britain had been a huge revenue source for the South. It was the tariffs on the British manufactured goods, imposed by the Feds, and imported by the South, that was the cause for the split. The South’s trade with Britain (and others) was subsidizing Northern industrialization, that didn’t want Southern products.

  109. @Kronos
    @R.G. Camara

    Here we go, sorry for the delay.

    https://www.amazon.com/Rising-Star-Making-Barack-Obama/dp/0062641832


    One of Monday’s callers was 1989 Law Review member Sheryll Cashin, who was clerking for Judge Abner Mikva, a former Chicago congressman who now sat on the prestigious U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Cashin and Crystal Nix were close friends, and though Nix had not awoken her in the middle of the night, she had called early that morning with the historic news. Cashin in turn told Mikva, who in his ten years on the court had become known as a “feeder” judge, someone whose law clerks often went on to work for Supreme Court justices such as William J. Brennan and Thurgood Marshall. Judicial guidelines prevented formal clerkship offers from being extended until later in the spring, but Mikva was immediately interested in hiring the Review’s first African American president. Cashin knew Obama from the previous year, and the message Mikva asked her to convey was clear. “I was charged with letting him know that if he wanted a clerkship with him, he had it,” she remembered.
     

    Sometime Monday Cashin reached Obama. “I’m calling you because Judge Mikva’s very interested in you” and “very much would like you to apply” to clerk for him come 1991. Barack’s response was immediate: “I’m flattered, but no thanks—I’m going back to Chicago.” Cashin paused. “I was shocked—this was unheard of,” for especially among Review officers, “nobody didn’t clerk.” Cashin tried to persuade persuade Obama to at least apply, but he was adamant. “Tell the man thank you, but I’m going back to Chicago,” Barack reiterated. “I was just floored,” Sheryll recalled, especially because a clerkship with Mikva virtually guaranteed a subsequent Supreme Court clerkship, and large law firms were known to pay newly minted high court clerks a $35,000 bonus. Cashin remembered that Mikva reacted with “amused surprise” when she recounted the astonishing conversation.
     
    So my memory was wrong, it was an offer by a circuit judge (thanks Anonymous) but in the very lucrative D.C. circuit.

    But I’d argue he wasn’t lazy. He had a set politician career in mind.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Steve Sailer

    If that’s true, then we have the extremely rare (if not singular) situation of a judge asking someone to apply for a clerkship with them. That never happens. And he turned it down!

    People apply for clerkships, they aren’t offered without them. He was offered it for being a black token. That’s sad to all the whiles and yellows who worked their asses off and applied.

    Obama turned it down, likely, as I said, because it would’ve required a ton of writing and research, and not about himself.

    And yes, Obama was a lazy front man. His entire career from college onwards was (1) get a position; (2) do nothing in the position; (3) ) move on to next position. His entire presidency was him golfing or playing basketball while his cabinet ran wild doing whatever corruption they wanted.

    • Agree: sayless
    • Replies: @Kronos
    @R.G. Camara

    I’d argue Obama’s lack of written legal opinions wasn’t based primarily on laziness. Sailer made a very strong case in his own Obama book that Obama learned from the mistakes of his father very well. (Like don’t badmouth your boss’s free market policies while advocating your own socialistic ones. Also, don’t drink and drive, the Obama family stinks at it.)

    Obama largely kept his own opinions to himself. This definitely looked like a great idea when the Bork Supreme Court nomination occurred in 1987. There were already nasty ideological devisions within the Harvard Law Review during his tenure there and was often seen as a peacemaker amongst the warring “breathing constitutionalists” vs “textualists/originalists.”

    This lack of a “gotcha” paper trail helped immensely with Obama’s strategy of appearing to be everything good with everyone.

    In terms of his laziness in the Presidency, the Socialist Garrow clobbers him pretty hard in the book. Obama did seem to golf a lot. But I’d guess the real reason involved Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden essentially taking a majority share of the Presidency. As only a junior Senator, Obama lacked the same political capital and contacts either of those two possessed.

    Replies: @CBTerry

  110. @Kronos
    @R.G. Camara

    Here we go, sorry for the delay.

    https://www.amazon.com/Rising-Star-Making-Barack-Obama/dp/0062641832


    One of Monday’s callers was 1989 Law Review member Sheryll Cashin, who was clerking for Judge Abner Mikva, a former Chicago congressman who now sat on the prestigious U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Cashin and Crystal Nix were close friends, and though Nix had not awoken her in the middle of the night, she had called early that morning with the historic news. Cashin in turn told Mikva, who in his ten years on the court had become known as a “feeder” judge, someone whose law clerks often went on to work for Supreme Court justices such as William J. Brennan and Thurgood Marshall. Judicial guidelines prevented formal clerkship offers from being extended until later in the spring, but Mikva was immediately interested in hiring the Review’s first African American president. Cashin knew Obama from the previous year, and the message Mikva asked her to convey was clear. “I was charged with letting him know that if he wanted a clerkship with him, he had it,” she remembered.
     

    Sometime Monday Cashin reached Obama. “I’m calling you because Judge Mikva’s very interested in you” and “very much would like you to apply” to clerk for him come 1991. Barack’s response was immediate: “I’m flattered, but no thanks—I’m going back to Chicago.” Cashin paused. “I was shocked—this was unheard of,” for especially among Review officers, “nobody didn’t clerk.” Cashin tried to persuade persuade Obama to at least apply, but he was adamant. “Tell the man thank you, but I’m going back to Chicago,” Barack reiterated. “I was just floored,” Sheryll recalled, especially because a clerkship with Mikva virtually guaranteed a subsequent Supreme Court clerkship, and large law firms were known to pay newly minted high court clerks a $35,000 bonus. Cashin remembered that Mikva reacted with “amused surprise” when she recounted the astonishing conversation.
     
    So my memory was wrong, it was an offer by a circuit judge (thanks Anonymous) but in the very lucrative D.C. circuit.

    But I’d argue he wasn’t lazy. He had a set politician career in mind.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Steve Sailer

    Obama wanted to follow Harold Washington’s career to be Mayor of Chicago. Mayor of Chicago has power, which is what Obama wanted.

  111. @R.G. Camara
    @Kronos

    If that's true, then we have the extremely rare (if not singular) situation of a judge asking someone to apply for a clerkship with them. That never happens. And he turned it down!

    People apply for clerkships, they aren't offered without them. He was offered it for being a black token. That's sad to all the whiles and yellows who worked their asses off and applied.

    Obama turned it down, likely, as I said, because it would've required a ton of writing and research, and not about himself.

    And yes, Obama was a lazy front man. His entire career from college onwards was (1) get a position; (2) do nothing in the position; (3) ) move on to next position. His entire presidency was him golfing or playing basketball while his cabinet ran wild doing whatever corruption they wanted.

    Replies: @Kronos

    I’d argue Obama’s lack of written legal opinions wasn’t based primarily on laziness. Sailer made a very strong case in his own Obama book that Obama learned from the mistakes of his father very well. (Like don’t badmouth your boss’s free market policies while advocating your own socialistic ones. Also, don’t drink and drive, the Obama family stinks at it.)

    Obama largely kept his own opinions to himself. This definitely looked like a great idea when the Bork Supreme Court nomination occurred in 1987. There were already nasty ideological devisions within the Harvard Law Review during his tenure there and was often seen as a peacemaker amongst the warring “breathing constitutionalists” vs “textualists/originalists.”

    This lack of a “gotcha” paper trail helped immensely with Obama’s strategy of appearing to be everything good with everyone.

    In terms of his laziness in the Presidency, the Socialist Garrow clobbers him pretty hard in the book. Obama did seem to golf a lot. But I’d guess the real reason involved Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden essentially taking a majority share of the Presidency. As only a junior Senator, Obama lacked the same political capital and contacts either of those two possessed.

    • Replies: @CBTerry
    @Kronos

    Do not overlook the fact that Obama could not write.
    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2011/08/early_obama_letter_confirms_inability_to_write.html
    A few years ago a much longer article by a pre-Bill Ayers Obama surfaced. I do not even remember what it was about. Trying to read it was like trying to swim through molasses.

  112. @I, Libertine
    @Art Deco

    I'm told, and I have no trouble believing, that a majority of those who hold a Juris Doctor degree do not practice law. Some are retired, of course. Some never pass a bar exam. But many just get fed up and decide to do something else -"recovering lawyers" they call themselves.

    We lawyers have these little sayings. It's hard work. It's time consuming ("The law is a jealous lover; she demands all of your time"). It's both stressful and dull. ("The practice of law consists of hour of boredom, punctuated by moments of terror"). Like many jobs, it's not as much fun as it looks like on television.

    Clerking is particularly hard. Your judge tell you what result to reach, and you have to craft an opinion that makes that result appear to be correct, even if it isn't. Under severe time pressure. It's harder than it looks.

    So I'm so not surprised that Obama turned down the job, and spent little time actually practising law. Maybe he's smarter than I've been giving him credit for.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Adam Smith, @ScarletNumber

  113. @Kronos
    @Art Deco

    I recall Obama refused a big judicial clerkship (I think US Supreme Court) but decided to become a community organizer in Chicago. The ghetto claims the best African Americans (alive or dead) and we as a nation suffer because of it.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Dan Hayes, @R.G. Camara, @Anonymous, @jim jones

    Blacks are only good at one thing and that is complaining

  114. @Kronos
    @R.G. Camara

    I’d argue Obama’s lack of written legal opinions wasn’t based primarily on laziness. Sailer made a very strong case in his own Obama book that Obama learned from the mistakes of his father very well. (Like don’t badmouth your boss’s free market policies while advocating your own socialistic ones. Also, don’t drink and drive, the Obama family stinks at it.)

    Obama largely kept his own opinions to himself. This definitely looked like a great idea when the Bork Supreme Court nomination occurred in 1987. There were already nasty ideological devisions within the Harvard Law Review during his tenure there and was often seen as a peacemaker amongst the warring “breathing constitutionalists” vs “textualists/originalists.”

    This lack of a “gotcha” paper trail helped immensely with Obama’s strategy of appearing to be everything good with everyone.

    In terms of his laziness in the Presidency, the Socialist Garrow clobbers him pretty hard in the book. Obama did seem to golf a lot. But I’d guess the real reason involved Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden essentially taking a majority share of the Presidency. As only a junior Senator, Obama lacked the same political capital and contacts either of those two possessed.

    Replies: @CBTerry

    Do not overlook the fact that Obama could not write.
    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2011/08/early_obama_letter_confirms_inability_to_write.html
    A few years ago a much longer article by a pre-Bill Ayers Obama surfaced. I do not even remember what it was about. Trying to read it was like trying to swim through molasses.

  115. @I, Libertine
    @Art Deco

    I'm told, and I have no trouble believing, that a majority of those who hold a Juris Doctor degree do not practice law. Some are retired, of course. Some never pass a bar exam. But many just get fed up and decide to do something else -"recovering lawyers" they call themselves.

    We lawyers have these little sayings. It's hard work. It's time consuming ("The law is a jealous lover; she demands all of your time"). It's both stressful and dull. ("The practice of law consists of hour of boredom, punctuated by moments of terror"). Like many jobs, it's not as much fun as it looks like on television.

    Clerking is particularly hard. Your judge tell you what result to reach, and you have to craft an opinion that makes that result appear to be correct, even if it isn't. Under severe time pressure. It's harder than it looks.

    So I'm so not surprised that Obama turned down the job, and spent little time actually practising law. Maybe he's smarter than I've been giving him credit for.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Adam Smith, @ScarletNumber

    Your judge tells you what result to reach, and you have to craft an opinion that makes that result appear to be correct, even if it isn’t.

    Thank you for your honesty.

  116. @I, Libertine
    @Art Deco

    I'm told, and I have no trouble believing, that a majority of those who hold a Juris Doctor degree do not practice law. Some are retired, of course. Some never pass a bar exam. But many just get fed up and decide to do something else -"recovering lawyers" they call themselves.

    We lawyers have these little sayings. It's hard work. It's time consuming ("The law is a jealous lover; she demands all of your time"). It's both stressful and dull. ("The practice of law consists of hour of boredom, punctuated by moments of terror"). Like many jobs, it's not as much fun as it looks like on television.

    Clerking is particularly hard. Your judge tell you what result to reach, and you have to craft an opinion that makes that result appear to be correct, even if it isn't. Under severe time pressure. It's harder than it looks.

    So I'm so not surprised that Obama turned down the job, and spent little time actually practising law. Maybe he's smarter than I've been giving him credit for.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Adam Smith, @ScarletNumber

    a majority of those who hold a Juris Doctor degree do not practice law

    In addition to the examples you mention, you have a sizable proportion of women who trade in their JD for an MRS. When I taught in a rich town when I was younger, I had to deal with these mothers more than I would’ve liked to.

    There are also plenty of law schools that take the students’ money and give them the degree, but they don’t have a prayer of passing the bar. A well-known example is the most recent past-mayor of Los Angeles, Antonio Villaraigosa, who holds a JD from the People’s College of Law.

    Your judge tell you what result to reach, and you have to craft an opinion that makes that result appear to be correct, even if it isn’t.

    This is known as liberal jurisprudence.

  117. @Wilkey
    Most Supreme Court law clerks don't have Wikipedia pages (though a substantial number do), and those pages don't always list religion, but going on names and a few bios alone I'd guesstimate that at least 25% of Ginsburg's law clerks were Jewish. So one black clerk and 30+ Jewish ones. This is the hero of the Left.

    If a corporation with Ginsburg's record of hiring blacks had been sued and the case had come before Ginsburg, she would have ruled against the corporation. Unless that corporation was owned by Jews.

    Ruth Ginsburg is regarded as a hero for having "broken barriers." "Breaking barriers" may or may not have positive social consequences, but it is basically just a selfish act - you break barriers to get to something you want, the same way burglars break through barriers to burgle your house.

    Replies: @Richard of Melbourne, @ben tillman

    I get 54/127, or 43%

  118. @Pericles
    @Lagertha


    But, she did not seem evil…

     

    "The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that, you got it made."

    Replies: @Lagertha

    I hope you are not correct, but I fear that you are.

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