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Are You an Order of Magnitude More Likely to be Killed Riding a Bike Than Driving a Car?
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But what about bicycles? They are much advocated by The Establishment, so it would seem incumbent upon The Establishment to publicize data about the relative risk, but that seems a lower priority relative to bicycles advantages in fighting climate change (and obesity).

A report from the National Transportation Safety Board suggests bicycles are about an order of magnitude more dangerous than cars per mile, about 40% as dangerous as motorcycles, which sounds about right. It’s easier to get yourself killed on a motorcycle because it’s hard work to go really fast on a bicycle. On the other hand, you’re about equally vulnerable to getting killed by a car when on a motorcycle or a bicycle.

If we revamped our entire infrastructure to be bicycle friendly at a cost of trillions, we could, perhaps, get down to Northwestern European standards where bicycles are only a few times deadlier than cars. But still, look at Belgium, Austria, France and UK. They are half as deadly to cyclists as the US. And Italy is even worse than we are.

The problem with cycling is that you are at the mercy of drivers, and driver have gotten much worse since 2019, and even worse than that since 2010 during the Great Recession, when people couldn’t afford to drive much:

But now car owners are driving like maniacs, so I wouldn’t want to share a surface street with them. Cyclist deaths apparently were up to 932 in 2020 from 857 in 2018, but who knows if this is an apples to apples comparison?

Dedicated bike paths are superb, but they are hard to retrofit. For example, in the San Fernando Valley two decades ago, a disused railroad line was up for conversion to another use. It was hoped that it was wide enough to be both a busline and a bikelane, but it wound up only having enough room for buses. It’s hard to argue with the ultimate choice of buses over bikes.

It would be absolutely terrific if there were room left over in the Valley to install a bike path with a dedicated right-of-way, but there isn’t. The best they’ve come up with is installing bike paths along the (slightly smelly) Los Angeles River. But they can afford to dig tunnels under major cross-streets, so every 0.4 miles or so, you have to come up and get yourself across Laurel Canyon Blvd. or Van Nuys Blvd. or whatever.

There are a lot of wonderful things about cycling, but it’s basically 1970s-level safety in a world with 2020s-level demands. But for various reasons it’s in fashion with the normally safety-crazed elite, so the dangers get glossed over.

 
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  1. Pixo says:

    Bikes are mostly used for short trips, and often in dense areas.

    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.

    If you do an apples to apples comparison the gap would be much smaller.

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    I still think bike riding is more dangerous, just not a 10x difference when you account for this. Motorcycle danger is similarly overstated because the people who ride them are more reckless by nature.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Pixo


    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.
     
    Are they very safe?

    I suspect that far more car accidents happen on both urban and rural roads than on freeways and highways, but I also suspect that the most dangerous and fatal accidents take place when driving at the high speeds allowed by the latter types of roads.

    I've been in several accidents in the towns in which I've lived that I reported to the insurance companies, but not one of them resulted in a person's injury. I've never been in a highway accident at all, but the ones I've driven by have often been horrific.

    Another thing to consider is the rate of accidents per trip by road type. You can easily build up a lot of "safe highway miles" with several long trips without incident. But most motorists drive far fewer miles on town roads per trip.

    Replies: @Sollipsist

    , @John Johnson
    @Pixo

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    Something like half the wrecks are in the first two years of the license.

    Motorcycles are really a bad idea for commuting in urban areas. They don't save much in gas and one wreck can lead to a million in hospital bills.

    Even in rural areas they are sketch. Too many bad drivers in big trucks on the backroads typing or drinking a few. I don't even like driving a coupe. F150 is the entry level truck now and it is the same size as an older 250.

    Replies: @Barnard, @everybodyhatesscott

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Pixo


    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle.
     
    That's sometimes the case, but from what I see the guys with DUIs ride mopeds, moterpecans, whatever one can use with no license. Then, there's the riding mower, worst case ..., George Jones style...
    , @Jack D
    @Pixo

    It shows you how statistics are vulnerable to manipulation - if you were to present fatalities per hour rather than per mile, bikes and cars would be much closer.

    Also if you look at the total numbers, there are about 40,000 auto deaths/year vs. fewer than 1K bike deaths. Each bike death is a tragedy but it's not one of our major public health problems compared to cars or guns or drug overdose or for that matter, Covid.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    , @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Pixo

    Bikes far more dangerous in dense urban areas than using a car. When driving a car in dense urban areas you rarely get above 30 miles per hour in your car, hard to get killed in an auto accident traveling less than 35 mph

    Car fatalities are lower in urban areas, yet bicycle fatalities are probably much higher than average in urban areas like NYC, Philadelphia , Boston, Washington DC, San Francisco et...

    , @MGB
    @Pixo

    the few motorcycle accidents i have personally witnessed were the result of the motorcyclist's stupidity. one time, a motorcyclist was tooling in between lanes of stopped traffic in the city, and he went flying over a cab that was gingerly pulling from one lane to the other. got up limping and shoved the cabbie. i was hoping the cabbie would cold cock him, but no such luck.

    , @Travis
    @Pixo

    In 2019 New York City 74 motorists (57 drivers and 17 passengers) died in accidents and 25 bicyclists died in accidents. 24 of the 25 cyclist fatalities were hit by a vehicle. 4,207 cyclists were hit by a vehicle in NYC in 2019 and 3,800 were seriously injured.

    Cycling in urban areas is more dangerous than cycling anywhere else due to the increased number of drivers, traffic and pedestrians..It is much safer to bike anywhere else in New York State outside of NYC. In contrast it is actually safer to drive in NYC than outside the city where you can drive much faster, yet face the risk of hitting deer or falling asleep driving. It is almost impossible to fall asleep driving in NYC. While almost half the NYC state population lives in the NYC metro area, only 25% of traffic fatalities occur in the city and 75% of New York State driving deaths occur outside NYC. Yet half the bicycle fatalities occur within NYC, despite people taking short trips on their bikes in NYC they face a far greater risk of being killed by a vehicle in NYC than biking elsewhere.

  2. I don’t know how much bicycles do for obesity either given the trend towards electric bicycles. In addition the e-bikes seem to be ridden at higher average speeds. They can hit 20-25mph on the level and a lot more going downhill. I regularly see kids and teenagers whizzing past my house at the bottom of a gentle slope doing automobile speeds.
    Particularly dangerous when combined with the way that cars are also being driven at higher speeds. Modern cars are so quick and isolated drivers don’t even realize how fast they are going. A modern garden-variety V6 or turbo-4 sedan can run a standing start 1/4 mile in one half to a full second faster than the iconic 1960’s muscle cars such as the Pontiac GTO or Plymouth Roadrunner. They will also corner faster than the Corvettes and Porsches of that era. People are just whipping along nowadays.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Alfa158

    New York is full of e-bikes being used for food deliveries - people need their $20 orders of avocado toast right now - and in addition to traffic issues their lithium ion batteries are forever catching on fire and burning ferociously. Once one of the batteries catches fire it's difficult to extinguish. If the fire department can separate a burning battery from the bike they usually try to immerse it in a large bucket of water.

    Here's a recent example: an e-bike's battery catches on fire while the bike is inside a bicycle shop, the shop is destroyed, and the tenants in the upstairs apartments are displaced.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hLBEuJ4BiA

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Forbes
    @Alfa158

    NYC has revamped traffic lanes to accommodate separated bicycle lanes--and then they are taken over by E-bikes and E-mopeds. Pre-SARS-2, travel across the Queensboro bridge was maybe 25% E-bike, now it's 75-90%. The speed of E-bikes overwhelms bicycles. Reckless and dangerous is the result.

  3. bicycles are about an order of magnitude more dangerous than cars per mile, about 40% as dangerous as motorcycles, which sounds about right. It’s easier to get yourself killed on a motorcycle because it’s hard work to go really fast on a bicycle.

    I would much rather take a motorcycle to work. Motorcycle fatalities normally involve high speeds or alcohol. I have no doubt that bicycles are more dangerous for commuting in typical cases.

    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn’t believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn’t matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.

    Oh and this was a liberal city where the paper would write articles about how progressive they were because of all the bicycles.

    • Agree: Gamecock
    • Thanks: AndrewR
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @John Johnson


    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn’t believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn’t matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.
     
    People who don't ride bikes have no idea how common this is. An unbelievable amount of abuse, and yes—people will deliberately try to hit you. IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I'm a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Paleo Liberal, @AndrewR, @Mike Tre

    , @AndrewR
    @John Johnson

    What city? I imagine this behavior is more common in some regions/areas than others.

    And was this why she gave it up?

    I stopped cycling not because of intentionally aggressive human behavior but because of dogs and generally foolish driving by others.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Gamecock
    @John Johnson

    I ride my motorcycle about 6,000 miles a year. I don't find it dangerous at all.

    My theory is stupid people do stupid things on motorcycles and get themselves killed. That does not make the motorcycle dangerous.

    Plus, I am a believer in "all the gear, all the time." I see plenty of riders wearing a T-shirt and tennis shoes with no helmet. Around here, we call them "organ donors."

    Replies: @John Johnson, @AndrewR

  4. @Pixo
    Bikes are mostly used for short trips, and often in dense areas.

    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.

    If you do an apples to apples comparison the gap would be much smaller.

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    I still think bike riding is more dangerous, just not a 10x difference when you account for this. Motorcycle danger is similarly overstated because the people who ride them are more reckless by nature.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @MGB, @Travis

    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.

    Are they very safe?

    I suspect that far more car accidents happen on both urban and rural roads than on freeways and highways, but I also suspect that the most dangerous and fatal accidents take place when driving at the high speeds allowed by the latter types of roads.

    I’ve been in several accidents in the towns in which I’ve lived that I reported to the insurance companies, but not one of them resulted in a person’s injury. I’ve never been in a highway accident at all, but the ones I’ve driven by have often been horrific.

    Another thing to consider is the rate of accidents per trip by road type. You can easily build up a lot of “safe highway miles” with several long trips without incident. But most motorists drive far fewer miles on town roads per trip.

    • Replies: @Sollipsist
    @Pincher Martin

    I don't know the big picture, but I do know that compared to other US states, Utah has one of the higher (80 mph) speed limits but stays very low on the fatality rankings.

    Say what you will about Mormons, but they do seem very big on personal responsibility and law-abiding conduct. Maybe that's the difference, maybe not...

  5. Thank you for being very fair to the bicyclists on this one, Steve. You usually seem to have an anti-biker bent in the few posts on cycling. Yeah, “climate change”, that might really be a reason for 5% of the people that ride, but it’s probably more of a nice virtual signaling excuse: “Hey, you guys are always clogging up the elevators in the morning with your bikes!” “We’re saving the planet, man!” (Everyone shuts up.)

    You mentioned weight loss, but how about aerobic/cardio reasons to want to ride? Running/jogging is an option, but that’s just TOO SLOW. (OK, I am too slow when I – if ever – run or jog.)

    Finally, I am surprised that the bicycle numbers are not even worse and closer to the numbers for motorcycles. At least on a motorcycle, you’ve got lots of power to get away from the bad drivers – IF, and big IF, you ride with an awareness that you can’t act like you’re driving a car. (Having ridden a bicycle before for many years helps in this regard.)

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I had a motor bike in London when I was a callow yoof.
    I came off it 6 times. five was car drivers not seeing me and the sixth was my swerving to avoid a Chinaman scuttling across Shaftsbury Avenue on a rainy evening, while going to see Maggie Smith in a Restoration Comedy. It was hilarious and very painful. I'd cracked my sternum as I discovered the next day.
    I swore to myself then that the Next Chinaman Gets It! of which oath word must have got around as I never saw another while on the bike- Triumph Bonneville as I recall.

    I found myself plotting often more circuitous routes using roads like the Embankment rather than Taxi crammed West End or God forbid, City streets,

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Bill Jones
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I had a motor bike in London when I was a callow yoof.
    I came off it 6 times. five was car drivers not seeing me and the sixth was my swerving to avoid a Chinaman scuttling across Shaftsbury Avenue on a rainy evening, while going to see Maggie Smith in a Restoration Comedy. It was hilarious and very painful. I'd cracked my sternum as I discovered the next day.
    I swore to myself then that the Next Chinaman Gets It! of which oath word must have got around as I never saw another while on the bike- Triumph Bonneville as I recall.

  6. I see bicycles making a Rich Strike-like surge to take the lead in the near future.

    “Chicago police say a couple of men are robbing Divvy riders of their bicycles on the Gold Coast lakefront. It’s happened twice since May 13, according to an alert from Area Three detectives.

    Both times, two men threatened Divvy customers and took their rental bikes along the Lakefront Trail.”

    • Replies: @Anon
    @JimDandy

    Two black men are stealing Divvy bikes from white people on Chicago's lakefront bike path. FIFY.

  7. Bicycling in traffic is for the young, fit and agile. And you can’t expect protected bike lanes everywhere.

    I’ve ridden thousands of highway miles but sadly am aging out. I could have ridden today but opted to walk. At 73 I don’t need any mishaps, like happened to the old guy here who tried to execute a left turn alongside a semi trailer.

    What is really troubling us all the years of preaching bike helmet use gets thrown out the window for bike and scooter rental vendors.
    Just like that, protecting your brain cage doesn’t matter anymore.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Carol

    Um... Would you care to share that story?

  8. The excellent FortNine Youtube channel has a video about:

    Why Electric Bikes are More Dangerous than Motorcycles

    [MORE]

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    @SIMP simp

    Good video- thanks for posting.

  9. @Pixo
    Bikes are mostly used for short trips, and often in dense areas.

    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.

    If you do an apples to apples comparison the gap would be much smaller.

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    I still think bike riding is more dangerous, just not a 10x difference when you account for this. Motorcycle danger is similarly overstated because the people who ride them are more reckless by nature.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @MGB, @Travis

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    Something like half the wrecks are in the first two years of the license.

    Motorcycles are really a bad idea for commuting in urban areas. They don’t save much in gas and one wreck can lead to a million in hospital bills.

    Even in rural areas they are sketch. Too many bad drivers in big trucks on the backroads typing or drinking a few. I don’t even like driving a coupe. F150 is the entry level truck now and it is the same size as an older 250.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @John Johnson

    The Sturgis motorcycle rally has fatalities every year. The typical cause isn't even alcohol related, but is driver error caused by inexperience. Particularly, riders from other parts of the country who can't adapt to riding in mountain roads with sharper turns. There does seem to be a fair amount of recklessness involved.

    , @everybodyhatesscott
    @John Johnson

    The key to realizing the benefits of riding a motorcycle to commute in urban areas is to be a little lax with the rules of the road. If you live in California, you don't even have to be lax because lane splitting is legal. I've pretty much stopped riding since I've had children but a 2 hour commute to go to a baseball game in a car could be done in 35 minutes on a motorcycle AND the parking was free.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  10. @Pixo
    Bikes are mostly used for short trips, and often in dense areas.

    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.

    If you do an apples to apples comparison the gap would be much smaller.

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    I still think bike riding is more dangerous, just not a 10x difference when you account for this. Motorcycle danger is similarly overstated because the people who ride them are more reckless by nature.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @MGB, @Travis

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle.

    That’s sometimes the case, but from what I see the guys with DUIs ride mopeds, moterpecans, whatever one can use with no license. Then, there’s the riding mower, worst case …, George Jones style…

  11. John says: • Website

    I’ve bicycled about 200,000 miles over the past 40 years. Mostly commuting, in Texas; but a lot of long trips too, in the U.S. and Canada and South America. Numerous day trips in Mexico. Several short trips in Europe, if you count Iceland, Portugal, and Slovenia as Europe. OK, several short trips in NATO, how about that?

    I’ve never had a serious accident, indeed have scarcely had any accident. I don’t think anyone’s ever going to write a book about me; or, if anyone does, title it Outlier. Just not many people bicycle a lot, for the simple reason that it is very impractical. One does it because one likes it, and if not, not. The activity is so rare, no policymaker should worry about it. Except maybe for the NTSB, maybe none does. I myself do not, although when in the saddle, I often think that I’d trust someone texting far less than I’d trust a drunk driver. A drunk driver would at least know he was doing something foolish, and attempt to compensate for his impairment, however vainly.

    • Replies: @Badger Down
    @John

    Don't be too confident. You can hear trucks and nutters coming up behind you. The unforeseen (unforeheard?) danger is the little old lady driving smoothly, same speed as the traffic, who just drives straight into you.
    The Netherlands has the answer.

  12. Fox says:

    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
    Naturally, my comment is unfair towards decent bicyclists who are aware of other traffic participants, are considerate, respect traffic laws and are interested in safety and pleasant human interactions, and I apologize to those.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Fox

    I completely agree. I can't stand bicyclists. They are the worst people on the roads. Their advocacy groups are the worst. They campaign to have special dispensations, like running through stop signs. Or they close down roads for drivers altogether.

    I'm not saying that we drivers should be excused for wanting to run bicyclists over, but I do understand the inclination.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    , @John Johnson
    @Fox

    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens.

    They behave aggressively because that is how you can get through a gridlocked downtown in minutes.

    If you are going to follow every traffic law then you might as well walk.

    The big cities really don't crack down on any type of traffic behavior.

    The police are too focused on urban community interactions.

    Replies: @Alden, @Pincher Martin, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Fox


    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens.
     
    Yes, there's a certain kind of personality that is attracted to this kind of venue for extreme antisocial behavior - keeping ordinary working people from getting to their jobs on time, or getting home expeditiously, etc. Sometimes when they're not getting their fix from riding in the streets and interfering with motorists, they jump the curb and menace pedestrians on the pavement by riding their bicycles at speed very close to people walking.
    , @Henry's Cat
    @Fox

    Plus the fact that cyclists are not another species - the majority of them will also be car drivers.

    Do these fatality stats refer only to deaths caused by crashes? How can the subway be that high?

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @Fox


    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens.
     
    I, too, have seen aggressive cyclists and am always left wondering how long they last on the road.

    It's purely a guess, but I suspect the average lifespan of an aggressive cyclist is much less than that of paranoid, traffic-aware cyclists who fully understand they are part of the flow of traffic, and a minor part of the flow at that.

    When you are on a bike, you are at the mercy of people driving 2,000 pound-plus chunks of metal, and who may or may not be paying attention. I suppose some self-important cyclists forget this in the self-absorbed present day, but they do so at their peril.

    That "better citizen" nonsense you mention is not something any sane person should want to test out on a city roadway full of distracted motorists. But I suppose some cyclists will anyway.
    , @Coemgen
    @Fox


    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
     
    LOL, that reminds of my (former) daily commute through Cambridge, Massachusetts where I saw that type of behavior on a regular basis. It's probably worse now since all the "barely big enough for a car" lanes have been split into two separate lanes (one for cars, one for bicycles and buses).
    , @sb
    @Fox

    I never realized that so many cyclists are bi

    , @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @Fox

    I've even seen bicyclists behaving aggressively toward other bicyclists.

    It's not unlike small dogs behaving more badly than big dogs because we can tolerate it. Similarly, woman on man violence is more common, than the opposite but gets less attention because women do far less actual damage.

    Nonetheless, the 2% rule applies. Most drivers and cyclists are pretty reasonable. maybe 1 of 50 or so is a complete jerk. But a jerk with 2000 lbs of steel and > 150 HP is more dangerous to others.

  13. Who cares? Motorcycles are fucking cool.

  14. @Alfa158
    I don’t know how much bicycles do for obesity either given the trend towards electric bicycles. In addition the e-bikes seem to be ridden at higher average speeds. They can hit 20-25mph on the level and a lot more going downhill. I regularly see kids and teenagers whizzing past my house at the bottom of a gentle slope doing automobile speeds.
    Particularly dangerous when combined with the way that cars are also being driven at higher speeds. Modern cars are so quick and isolated drivers don’t even realize how fast they are going. A modern garden-variety V6 or turbo-4 sedan can run a standing start 1/4 mile in one half to a full second faster than the iconic 1960’s muscle cars such as the Pontiac GTO or Plymouth Roadrunner. They will also corner faster than the Corvettes and Porsches of that era. People are just whipping along nowadays.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Forbes

    New York is full of e-bikes being used for food deliveries – people need their \$20 orders of avocado toast right now – and in addition to traffic issues their lithium ion batteries are forever catching on fire and burning ferociously. Once one of the batteries catches fire it’s difficult to extinguish. If the fire department can separate a burning battery from the bike they usually try to immerse it in a large bucket of water.

    Here’s a recent example: an e-bike’s battery catches on fire while the bike is inside a bicycle shop, the shop is destroyed, and the tenants in the upstairs apartments are displaced.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @prosa123

    The delivery bikes go the wrong way down one way streets to make deliveries (you're not going to go 3 1/2 additional blocks out of your way just to avoid going a few dozen yards the wrong way) and they are nearly silent so pedestrians step out in front of them (it's normal to jaywalk in the middle of the block in NY) and get killed.

    Here's a pro tip - when you are in NYC nowadays, before you cross the street look BOTH ways even if it is a one way street.

    The last time I was in NY I saw something I hadn't seen before. Amazon makes deliveries using totes carried on large electric bicycle towed flatbed trailers. There are guys riding bikes towing these enormous trailers behind them.

    https://cdn.geekwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/IMG_9324-620x386.jpg

    This can't possibly be safe.

    Replies: @epebble, @Hibernian, @Harry Baldwin, @Rob

  15. Sorry Steve, your post is misinformed.

    The problem is not the bicycle. The problem is car-centric urbanism. Even many European countries, despite much fanfare, have not made a decisive shift away even if there has been enormously positive changes in the past decade.

    Ultimately a decision has to be made to ban most cars from cities. There’s no way going around that. I suspect the US will be the last man standing, due to how US cities look like. But even that is not an excuse. Berlin was razed to the ground and has a typical “American” look, yet the progress in that city has been spectacular.

    Retrofitting isn’t an issue. It’s about priorities. Do you want a city that’s primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can’t have both.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Thulean Friend


    Do you want a city that’s primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can’t have both.
     
    "Do you want a city that’s primarily based around [children] or one based around [drivers]? You can’t have both."

    There. Humanized it for you.

    If you people only would talk about trikeability, not "walkability".

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Alden
    @Thulean Friend

    You can’t have a city based on walking cycling and public transit when black predators are everywhere attacking pedestrians. And lying in wait at the bus and subway stops for the prey to emerge and start walking home. Bus stops. Regular travelers can’t even sit on the bus benches to wait for a bus because black deranged derelicts live in bus benches. Even in the highest income zip code in town.

    Much of the reason city people drive cars instead of using public transit is safety. Plus the horrors of being stuck on buses with snarling vicious blacks screaming instead of talking quietly.

    Take public transit in any major city or suburb that has about 15% of blacks for a month and get back to us . Alternate days and evenings for the full American public transit experience.

    Or why we can’t have nice things.

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @John Johnson

    , @AnotherDad
    @Thulean Friend


    Retrofitting isn’t an issue. It’s about priorities. Do you want a city that’s primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can’t have both.
     
    But you can easily have separate cities, even separate parts of cities. Pretty straightforward.

    One very noticeable thing--even here--is that people tend to think their way should be the only way.

    Nah, different strokes for different folks. For instance, I want to junk minoritarianism and return to a traditional American self-governing republic, centered on normal productive family people reproducing our nation for "our posterity". I think there are 100 million Americans who want the same--probably quite a few more once it was an option and they gave it some thought. But I do not begrudge the Rainbow people their rainbow. (I suspect without boring "white bread" guys like me to kick around anymore it will crash and burn. But that's their problem.)

    Likewise urbanism. It does not all have to be the same. From region to region, city to city, even communities within a particular urban conglomeration.

    Replies: @Travis

    , @aNewBanner
    @Thulean Friend

    A significant fraction of vehicles on the road are vans, trucks, and semis moving food, materials, and equipment from point A to point B. It’s the last mile problem, and it’s not going away. You can’t move it in public transportation, on bicycles, or with porters. That means you need roads. The only way you eliminate cars from these roads is by some sort of sumptuary law, which were regularly ignored or mass poverty.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @David Davenport
    @Thulean Friend

    Do you want a city that’s primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can’t have both.

    I choose cars. Public transport is the worst.

  16. Tangent: it seems like we have a lot more assholes on the road than we did 10 years ago, be they on a bike or a car.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @nebulafox


    Tangent: it seems like we have a lot more assholes on the road than we did 10 years ago, be they on a bike or a car.
     
    And it doesn't help much that many of them have their eyes glued to their phones with only occasional glances toward the roadway.
  17. I would say it depends on the individual, and the level of law-enforcement. Laws make it more dangerous where I live because except for dedicated bicycle lanes, which are very rare, bicycles are considered vehicles and legally have to share the road with cars and trucks. Yes, people in general drive aggressively, so you are forced into a situation where you rely on strangers to not run you over.

    I prefer a mountain bike, because their ability to handle rough terrain means you can ride on the pavement where there is heavy or fast traffic. This is illegal in many countries, and cops will tell people to get back in traffic. Cops don’t enforce this law where I live, but most cyclists seem determined to take their chances with vehicles that can crush them rushing by.

    As for skills, you should have good enough balance to be able to turn your head and look over both shoulders without changing direction or losing balance.

    I concur with Mr. Sailer’s talking points on traffic. Since democracy came to South Africa, there was a drop in the quality of policing, and traffic quickly got worse during the 90’s, and is still getting worse. What also made it more acute is the explosion in black ownership of cars and access to driver’s licenses, at the same time. Our roads are generally in bad condition but it’s not that much of a challenge to maintain high speeds.

    It’s sad, because cycling is such an easy way to get much needed exercise.

  18. Herbert Meyers who worked with William Casey to arrange the fall of the Soviet Union died in a bicycle crash. https://www.sanjuanjournal.com/obituaries/herb-meyer-dec-31-1945-june-23-2019/

    • Replies: @MGB
    @Too observant

    as did mark buller 'one of the nation's foremost poxvirus researchers'.

    https://www.slu.edu/news/2017/february/mark-buller-obituary.php


    His lab aimed to use poxviruses as vectors to deliver gene therapy, vaccines and anti-viral drugs, and find ways to protect against poxviruses should they be turned into weapons of bioterrorism. He also studied a number of other viruses that are extremely lethal, such as SARS.
     
  19. @Pixo
    Bikes are mostly used for short trips, and often in dense areas.

    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.

    If you do an apples to apples comparison the gap would be much smaller.

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    I still think bike riding is more dangerous, just not a 10x difference when you account for this. Motorcycle danger is similarly overstated because the people who ride them are more reckless by nature.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @MGB, @Travis

    It shows you how statistics are vulnerable to manipulation – if you were to present fatalities per hour rather than per mile, bikes and cars would be much closer.

    Also if you look at the total numbers, there are about 40,000 auto deaths/year vs. fewer than 1K bike deaths. Each bike death is a tragedy but it’s not one of our major public health problems compared to cars or guns or drug overdose or for that matter, Covid.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    It shows you how statistics are vulnerable to manipulation – if you were to present fatalities per hour rather than per mile, bikes and cars would be much closer.
     
    Per hour is only relevant if you are looking at biking as a recreational activity compared to driving or say skiing. If you are talking about transportation--i'm going to ride to work--then per mile is correct.

    AnotherMom and I will roll out of here in another few weeks and drive 2500 miles. There's zero doubt that is significantly less safe and more costly than flying. But we'll sightsee in the Smokey's and Blue Ridge Parkway, visit several relatives and some friends along the way. Recreation. Otherwise makes no sense. Biking does cost less--at the price of your time. But as transportation, yes it is significantly more dangerous--almost entirely because of the people in cars. Doing it for fun/exercise--great!

    Replies: @International Jew, @Alden

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    By the same token, airplanes are "only" about as safe as trains if we consider they travel near 600mph, on an hourly basis. Since we do consider travel on a time basis... for me (one way)

    Bike < 30-60min
    3min < Car 45min

    Kubrick's fear of flying was likely rational back in 1970, especially if he did not keep up with stats. Roughly 60 times more dangerous per passenger mile compared to today. 3.6x more dangerous then than driving is today on an hourly basis. Driving was more dangerous too though.

    https://aviation-safety.net/graphics/infographics/Fatal-Accidents-Per-Mln-Flights-1977-2017.jpg

    If you were a jet setter, especially in light aircraft or non-third world airlines, pretty risky if you did a lot of hours.

    Making Eyes Wide Shut was a lot more dangerous than flying though. If only the world had his original cut.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Charlesz Martel

  20. The Miami Metrorail and Busway run along the right-of-way of the old Florida East Coast Railway. There is a wide asphalt bike path running directly alongside the transit line all the way from downtown Miami to Florida City, some 30 to 40 miles to the south.

    I walk along portions of that bike path frequently. In a three- or four-mile walk, I might encounter one or two bike riders. Otherwise, zip.

  21. @prosa123
    @Alfa158

    New York is full of e-bikes being used for food deliveries - people need their $20 orders of avocado toast right now - and in addition to traffic issues their lithium ion batteries are forever catching on fire and burning ferociously. Once one of the batteries catches fire it's difficult to extinguish. If the fire department can separate a burning battery from the bike they usually try to immerse it in a large bucket of water.

    Here's a recent example: an e-bike's battery catches on fire while the bike is inside a bicycle shop, the shop is destroyed, and the tenants in the upstairs apartments are displaced.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hLBEuJ4BiA

    Replies: @Jack D

    The delivery bikes go the wrong way down one way streets to make deliveries (you’re not going to go 3 1/2 additional blocks out of your way just to avoid going a few dozen yards the wrong way) and they are nearly silent so pedestrians step out in front of them (it’s normal to jaywalk in the middle of the block in NY) and get killed.

    Here’s a pro tip – when you are in NYC nowadays, before you cross the street look BOTH ways even if it is a one way street.

    The last time I was in NY I saw something I hadn’t seen before. Amazon makes deliveries using totes carried on large electric bicycle towed flatbed trailers. There are guys riding bikes towing these enormous trailers behind them.

    This can’t possibly be safe.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Jack D

    How is it even legal? Secondly, isn't the guy wearing a Stick Me Up sign on his forehead? Even a child can easily undo one of those containers, and if lucky, may end up with a MacBook or IPhone.

    , @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    In Chicago bicyclists almost never stop for a stop sign or red light.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Anon, @Mike Tre

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Jack D

    I too saw these e-bike towed trailers in Manhattan during a recent visit. They are a menace. There's no way these vehicles should have the use of bike lanes. They should be registered and licensed as motor vehicles.

    , @Rob
    @Jack D


    it’s normal to jaywalk in the middle of the block in NY
     
    What I don’t get is why this is not normal everywhere. It’s much safer than crossing at corners. At corners, you have cars going straight in 4 directions. You have cars turning right and left. In the middle of a block, you can see the cars coming in both directions for a fairly long way off.

    Maybe before you could turn right on red, corners were safer just because that’s where everyone expected pedestrians.

    I think most places, the people who get stopped by the cops for jaywalking are doing the black thing of walking down the middle of the road. The Gentle Giant, the one who had just robbed a convenience store, was doing that with his friend when the cop stopped him.

    Replies: @Jack D

  22. Two people were shot at a bus stop in downtown Austin yesterday. The shooter was on a bike. It was a pedal-by shooting

  23. With the high gas prices due to Putin’s war I am seeing more of Xi’s eBikes on the streets and roads. I await the year end accident statistics.

  24. I remember a study years ago in the Netherlands that asked why women were so much more likely to get into road cycling accidents at traffic lights. They found men were more likely to be unconsciousness and start their bike early, getting out of any potential danger zone or blind spot of large trucks turning on the inside.

    Generally making a road system safe and designed for bikes is a choice. In many places it is just unpleasant and unsafe to cycle. Only Copenhagen and Amsterdam can truly claim to be true cycling commuter cities and to a lesser extent other large cities in the Netherlands. I’m not sure if it is an odd coincidence or something about the design that Copenhagen a city modeled on Amsterdam would also resemble it in this way too.

    It would be good to give more space to bikes on roads but even better to design the whole system and make urban living pleasant again. But all the time you get from ‘planners’ is a fetish for hyper density and demolishing historic buildings and green spaces/prime farmland to make crappy poorly built apartments. By contrast Copenhagen is quite mid density without a lot of big buildings or inhuman scaled places to live.

    That is to say nothing of the demographics of who lives there. Diversity makes building Copenhagen hard if not necessarily impossible. But people won’t accept it. Indeed, the kind of loss of ownership of their society, country or local area makes the emergence of predatory individualistic and parasitic ‘developers’ who create poorly planned developments is likewise something people can’t accept.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Altai

    Copenhagen seems great but what if you are elderly or handicapped or have several young children or need to transport something heavy, etc.? What if it is pouring rain or snowing and the streets are icy? Bikes can be PART of a transit system but they can't be the complete answer. Having one 120 lb. woman riding around with 2 tons of SUV just to buy a coffee is stupid but depending solely on bikes is equally stupid. The bike had a brief heyday in America (the Wright Brothers owned a bicycle factory at the height of the craze) but the automobile quickly displaced it because it was so much more convenient.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @AnotherDad
    @Altai


    That is to say nothing of the demographics of who lives there. Diversity makes building Copenhagen hard if not necessarily impossible. But people won’t accept it. Indeed, the kind of loss of ownership of their society, country or local area makes the emergence of predatory individualistic and parasitic ‘developers’ who create poorly planned developments is likewise something people can’t accept.
     
    Another terrific paragraph Altai.

    "Diversity" is one of the things that make the whole urbanist, eco-y project impossible. If you want to share public spaces and public transit then you must have common--and pleasant--norms. These are cooperative, conscientious, law-abiding, high-trust visions of a city. But--of course--the minoritarian lefties will never admit--even let into their consciousness--the direct conflict of their various visions.

    And yes ... that means "collect ownership". A community, a nation that is owned by a particular people, who think of it as "their place" and work to keep it productive, pleasant, nice, on-track and reproducing itself for their kids.

    As with everything else ... minoritarianism wrecks that. Seriously who are America's "owners" now? No one. Though the American nation still exists out there somewhere. What's there now is just a querulous marketplace. Public anything? Why bother?
    , @slumber_j
    @Altai

    Flat, dense cities where the weather is seldom freezing are good for bicycling. Cities that don't meet those criteria are not.

  25. @nebulafox
    Tangent: it seems like we have a lot more assholes on the road than we did 10 years ago, be they on a bike or a car.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Tangent: it seems like we have a lot more assholes on the road than we did 10 years ago, be they on a bike or a car.

    And it doesn’t help much that many of them have their eyes glued to their phones with only occasional glances toward the roadway.

  26. @John Johnson
    bicycles are about an order of magnitude more dangerous than cars per mile, about 40% as dangerous as motorcycles, which sounds about right. It’s easier to get yourself killed on a motorcycle because it’s hard work to go really fast on a bicycle.

    I would much rather take a motorcycle to work. Motorcycle fatalities normally involve high speeds or alcohol. I have no doubt that bicycles are more dangerous for commuting in typical cases.

    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn't believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn't matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.

    Oh and this was a liberal city where the paper would write articles about how progressive they were because of all the bicycles.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @AndrewR, @Gamecock

    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn’t believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn’t matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.

    People who don’t ride bikes have no idea how common this is. An unbelievable amount of abuse, and yes—people will deliberately try to hit you. IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I’m a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference.

    • Thanks: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @HammerJack


    People who don’t ride bikes have no idea how common this is. An unbelievable amount of abuse, and yes—people will deliberately try to hit you. IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I’m a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference.
     
    Riding a bicycle in situations where you know that you're going to irritate people (i.e., block to block in an urban environment, or on a narrow two lane road with no shoulder) is antisocial behavior. Often, bike riders act in a passive-aggressive manner by shifting the responsibility for their own safety to motorists and then get hot and bothered when motorists don't act in the ways that the bike riders tacitly expect. What is especially frustrating is when bicyclists block traffic, then you patiently wait for the opportunity to get around and past them, only to get stopped at a red light which the bicyclists themselves ignore so the process must be repeated successively. Bicyclists must know that this is infuriating, but they do it anyway. I don't abuse bicyclists, threaten or commit violence against them, but I do dislike then intensely.

    The U.S. has a car culture, and does not have a bicycle culture even in its urban environs. No measure of demanding otherwise will make it so.

    Road and highway funding is largely by way of fuel taxes, so no, bicycles don't have an equal moral right to the roads that cars do.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Paleo Liberal
    @HammerJack

    Where I live there are a lot of dedicated bike trails. The drivers at the occasional intersections tend to be polite.

    I knew a guy who would do his recreational biking during NFL games, when the roads were clear. He said if the home team lost the drivers were really bad. At one point he ran for city council in his town so as to get a new bike path for his commute to work.

    , @AndrewR
    @HammerJack

    Whereabouts are you speaking about? I imagine this behavior is much more common in some places than in others.

    , @Mike Tre
    @HammerJack

    "IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I’m a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference. "

    Bull fuggin shit pal. I avoid you assholes like the plague. All it takes is one stupid move from you people and my career is over, regardless of fault.

    Every single biker claims to be a careful and considerate biker and everyone one of you ignores just about every traffic device in place. I have never seen a bicyclist stop at a stop sign. Ever.

    Replies: @Alden, @Brutusale

  27. @Pixo
    Bikes are mostly used for short trips, and often in dense areas.

    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.

    If you do an apples to apples comparison the gap would be much smaller.

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    I still think bike riding is more dangerous, just not a 10x difference when you account for this. Motorcycle danger is similarly overstated because the people who ride them are more reckless by nature.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @MGB, @Travis

    Bikes far more dangerous in dense urban areas than using a car. When driving a car in dense urban areas you rarely get above 30 miles per hour in your car, hard to get killed in an auto accident traveling less than 35 mph

    Car fatalities are lower in urban areas, yet bicycle fatalities are probably much higher than average in urban areas like NYC, Philadelphia , Boston, Washington DC, San Francisco et…

  28. @Jack D
    @prosa123

    The delivery bikes go the wrong way down one way streets to make deliveries (you're not going to go 3 1/2 additional blocks out of your way just to avoid going a few dozen yards the wrong way) and they are nearly silent so pedestrians step out in front of them (it's normal to jaywalk in the middle of the block in NY) and get killed.

    Here's a pro tip - when you are in NYC nowadays, before you cross the street look BOTH ways even if it is a one way street.

    The last time I was in NY I saw something I hadn't seen before. Amazon makes deliveries using totes carried on large electric bicycle towed flatbed trailers. There are guys riding bikes towing these enormous trailers behind them.

    https://cdn.geekwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/IMG_9324-620x386.jpg

    This can't possibly be safe.

    Replies: @epebble, @Hibernian, @Harry Baldwin, @Rob

    How is it even legal? Secondly, isn’t the guy wearing a Stick Me Up sign on his forehead? Even a child can easily undo one of those containers, and if lucky, may end up with a MacBook or IPhone.

  29. It would be absolutely terrific if there were room left over in the Valley to install a bike path with a dedicated right-of-way, but there isn’t. The best they’ve come up with is installing bike paths along the (slightly smelly) Los Angeles River. But they can afford to dig tunnels under major cross-streets, so every 0.4 miles or so, you have to come up and get yourself across Laurel Canyon Blvd. or Van Nuys Blvd. or whatever.

    Brass tacks–it is going to be hard for anything to improve without better people.

    We can not “afford” 1st world–much less enhanced–infrastructure anymore, because most public expenditure is spoken for and sucked down the maw of welfare state bureaucracy. You need more productive/less dependent people.

    Generally, the US is simply going to have more and more the look and feel of Latin America. Ugly commercial districts, trash floating around, corruption, mediocrity, mañana. (And unfortunately now absent even attractive Latina women, as the Indios are dumpy and broad. Mexico is now as fat as the US–or close.)

    They may be CRISPRing up better people in the future. But that’s likely after the Chinese have already risen to utter dominance–and itself a Chinese driven project. Too late for America.

  30. There is only one thing I know about road safety. When you find yourself in a dangerous situation, speed up! You need to get out of the dangerous situation before you have an accident.

    • LOL: HammerJack
  31. What about dogs? For Miz Alden and all the other cynophiles here:

    Dog Lover Mauled to Death in Alabama by Her Neighbor’s Mutts

    The (human) principals were both white, and good friends. Cullman is pretty white by US standards, never mind Alabam[i]an:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cullman,_Alabama#2020_census

  32. I have tried taking the much safer ferry but it is not going where I want to go! I guess I will stick to the motorcycle.

  33. Whose ass did they pull the miles ridden from?

    Most of the motorcycle deaths are one at a time, too, as opposed to whole families being killed by some drunk who survived. What’s the deaths/accident and deaths/injury rates for motorcycles vs. cars?

  34. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    It was hoped that it was wide enough to be both a busline and a bikelane, but it wound up only having enough room for buses. It’s hard to argue with the ultimate choice of buses over bikes.

    The argument would be, though not likely to be made, that riding a bike in city traffic is hazardous to your health. Though autos are equipped with catalytic converters, the resulting emission is ammonia. While ammonia is better for the ozone layer, it’s something to avoid when breathing, especially the deep breathing required to power a bicycle.

    Furthermore, that’s why it’s a terrible idea to build dense apartment housing right next to a freeway, and should be outlawed. The output of ammonia from a freeway will fuck with your lungs, liver, kidney, endocrine system, and brain over time.

    Running or cycling along a busy street will absolutely do your overall health more harm than good in the long run. Just don’t do it. I drive by chubby joggers in the mornings and just shake my head.

    If you live in the valley, which is, particularly in the summer, just a self-generating cesspool of entrapped toxic gasses, don’t exert yourself outside consistently. It’s really bad for your health.

    • Agree: Travis
  35. @Fox
    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
    Naturally, my comment is unfair towards decent bicyclists who are aware of other traffic participants, are considerate, respect traffic laws and are interested in safety and pleasant human interactions, and I apologize to those.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Henry's Cat, @Luddite in Chief, @Coemgen, @sb, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    I completely agree. I can’t stand bicyclists. They are the worst people on the roads. Their advocacy groups are the worst. They campaign to have special dispensations, like running through stop signs. Or they close down roads for drivers altogether.

    I’m not saying that we drivers should be excused for wanting to run bicyclists over, but I do understand the inclination.

    • Agree: TWS, Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Pincher Martin

    This is on a college campus.

    I am on foot about to enter a crosswalk protected by a stop sign.

    A dude on a bicycle blows by the stop sign.

    I call out, "Stop sign!"

    He calls back "Bicycle!"

    As to that traffic law, who knew?

  36. Anonymous[474] • Disclaimer says:

    London, England must surely be the worst place in the world to be a bicyclist – narrow, busy, highly congested roads at all hours, with all types of vehicles plus a multiplicity of four or even more way crossings and junctions all on the level. Basically you have an extremely over crowded multi million inhabitant city squeezed into a very small space, shoe horned into pre motor age – in fact, pre industrial age – road alignments.

    With monotonous, depressing frequency one reads of young professional commuters into the city being crushed to death by heavy trucks.

  37. @Jack D
    @Pixo

    It shows you how statistics are vulnerable to manipulation - if you were to present fatalities per hour rather than per mile, bikes and cars would be much closer.

    Also if you look at the total numbers, there are about 40,000 auto deaths/year vs. fewer than 1K bike deaths. Each bike death is a tragedy but it's not one of our major public health problems compared to cars or guns or drug overdose or for that matter, Covid.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    It shows you how statistics are vulnerable to manipulation – if you were to present fatalities per hour rather than per mile, bikes and cars would be much closer.

    Per hour is only relevant if you are looking at biking as a recreational activity compared to driving or say skiing. If you are talking about transportation–i’m going to ride to work–then per mile is correct.

    AnotherMom and I will roll out of here in another few weeks and drive 2500 miles. There’s zero doubt that is significantly less safe and more costly than flying. But we’ll sightsee in the Smokey’s and Blue Ridge Parkway, visit several relatives and some friends along the way. Recreation. Otherwise makes no sense. Biking does cost less–at the price of your time. But as transportation, yes it is significantly more dangerous–almost entirely because of the people in cars. Doing it for fun/exercise–great!

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @AnotherDad

    The problem with bike lanes is that you meet all the dumbasses who would get culled if they had to mix it up with cars.

    , @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    Have fun and please keep us posted.

  38. A report from the National Transportation Safety Board suggests bicycles are about an order of magnitude more dangerous than cars per mile, about 40% as dangerous as motorcycles, which sounds about right. It’s easier to get yourself killed on a motorcycle because it’s hard work to go really fast on a bicycle. On the other hand, you’re about equally vulnerable to getting killed by a car when on a motorcycle or a bicycle.

    I say:

    In the early spring, on a bicycle, when the road sand is still on the curvy, hilly roads, it’s important to remember that high speed coasting around hilly curves involves negotiating sandy spots that will cause much calamity.

    Hills are good for your heart and lungs, on a bicycle, if you let them do the work while in granny gear.

    Granny gear will prevent cramps in your legs, and it will give your heart and lungs a good workout.


  39. I know a woman who is seeking romance on a dating app, and one of her rules is: If the guy’s photo he selected shows him wearing his bicycle lycra, cross him off the list. But setting aside the off-bike correlates of lycra guys, I wonder: Are they less safe or more safe on the streets compared to non-lycras? It would make for an interesting subgroup. And, speaking of subgrouping, what about people who have a 3-foot-tall safety flag attached to their bikes.? Obviously hard to control for… they are more prudent people to begin with

    As for me, my bike has a basket and a bell. These are useful, but aside from that, I think that they put me into a nerdy, doofussy, take-no-risks frame of mind.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @SafeNow

    I wonder: Are they less safe or more safe on the streets compared to non-lycras?

    More safe but only because a lot of the spandex is designed to catch your eye.

    Contrary to popular belief it isn't normally worn to make them more aero dynamic. They wear it to prevent chafing.

    , @Chriscom
    @SafeNow

    I think some study found that cyclists on Mary Poppins-type bikes (or even Pee Wee Herman's!) are treated more kindly by drivers than the Lycra Tour de France wannabes. Less aggressive visuals tend to trigger less aggressive lizard-brain reactions (and perhaps not for nothing).

  40. @Fox
    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
    Naturally, my comment is unfair towards decent bicyclists who are aware of other traffic participants, are considerate, respect traffic laws and are interested in safety and pleasant human interactions, and I apologize to those.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Henry's Cat, @Luddite in Chief, @Coemgen, @sb, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens.

    They behave aggressively because that is how you can get through a gridlocked downtown in minutes.

    If you are going to follow every traffic law then you might as well walk.

    The big cities really don’t crack down on any type of traffic behavior.

    The police are too focused on urban community interactions.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @John Johnson

    I saw the funniest thing once. And it wasn’t a downtown gridlock. It was just another city street gridlock. Every body was stopped. When the lights changed we could move about 3 miles an hour. Then a bus door opened, right there in the middle of the street. A guy got out. He took his bike off the rack and got on. He was out of sight before I could move again.

    , @Pincher Martin
    @John Johnson


    They behave aggressively because that is how you can get through a gridlocked downtown in minutes.
     
    That's not true. They act the same way everywhere.

    I lived in SF until recently. The bicycling community in the Bay Area acts like an entitled plague. The bicyclists ride however they like not only in the city's urban center, where they believe the traffic laws do not apply to them, and in the city's parks, where they commandeer the roads on the weekend for their pleasure, but they ride the same way even in the winding roads of Marin. Try making your way from San Francisco to Stinson Beach on the weekend without having to squeeze by at least three or four dozen bicyclists on a steep hilly road with no shoulder. Tremendous fun if you like screaming at bicyclists and having them scream at you.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    They behave what you might think is aggressively because they need to stay AWAY from the cars. That's why I'll run lights, move onto the sidewalk for stretches, whatever it takes. Safety comes first, and that mean staying as much away from the motor vehicles as is possible. Safety trumps traffic laws, and unlike with cars, there is not always a big overlap between the two.

    I recall being chewed out by a cop for breaking some law, but he didn't realize I'd broken 6 of them just in the last 1/2 mile. Those 6 violations were/are part of my standard route for safety reasons. After dealing with this cop, the thing it taught me is to watch out for that particular cop car after that, that's all.

    If you don't ride a bicycle in the city, you probably can't understand fully.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @slumber_j

  41. @Pincher Martin
    @Pixo


    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.
     
    Are they very safe?

    I suspect that far more car accidents happen on both urban and rural roads than on freeways and highways, but I also suspect that the most dangerous and fatal accidents take place when driving at the high speeds allowed by the latter types of roads.

    I've been in several accidents in the towns in which I've lived that I reported to the insurance companies, but not one of them resulted in a person's injury. I've never been in a highway accident at all, but the ones I've driven by have often been horrific.

    Another thing to consider is the rate of accidents per trip by road type. You can easily build up a lot of "safe highway miles" with several long trips without incident. But most motorists drive far fewer miles on town roads per trip.

    Replies: @Sollipsist

    I don’t know the big picture, but I do know that compared to other US states, Utah has one of the higher (80 mph) speed limits but stays very low on the fatality rankings.

    Say what you will about Mormons, but they do seem very big on personal responsibility and law-abiding conduct. Maybe that’s the difference, maybe not…

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  42. @SafeNow
    https://i.pinimg.com/564x/75/fb/9c/75fb9cd4b8bc49a62349342268cf5a57.jpg

    I know a woman who is seeking romance on a dating app, and one of her rules is: If the guy’s photo he selected shows him wearing his bicycle lycra, cross him off the list. But setting aside the off-bike correlates of lycra guys, I wonder: Are they less safe or more safe on the streets compared to non-lycras? It would make for an interesting subgroup. And, speaking of subgrouping, what about people who have a 3-foot-tall safety flag attached to their bikes.? Obviously hard to control for… they are more prudent people to begin with

    As for me, my bike has a basket and a bell. These are useful, but aside from that, I think that they put me into a nerdy, doofussy, take-no-risks frame of mind.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Chriscom

    I wonder: Are they less safe or more safe on the streets compared to non-lycras?

    More safe but only because a lot of the spandex is designed to catch your eye.

    Contrary to popular belief it isn’t normally worn to make them more aero dynamic. They wear it to prevent chafing.

    • Thanks: SafeNow
  43. Speaking of SUVs, the iSteve perennial favorite Rolls-Royce Cullinan has popped up in the news again.

    BTW. 19 previous arrests, including at least 8 shootings. Out on bail at the time.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @HammerJack


    19 previous arrests, including at least 8 shootings. Out on bail at the time.
     
    Maybe there was some logic behind California's "three strikes and you're out" law (passed in the 1990s and repealed about ten years ago because of "overincarceration").
    , @Clyde
    @HammerJack

    Good for posting. This is a 5 dimensional shitshow along with a ripoff Black Reverend vying for the TV cameras.

    , @J.Ross
    @HammerJack

    >randomly

  44. There are a lot of wonderful things about cycling, but it’s basically 1970s-level safety in a world with 2020s-level demands.

    One of the things I emphasized with my kids when teaching them to drive was awareness of pedestrians, bicyclists and motorcycles. My theory is that a lot of car/bicycle crashes happen when drivers are focused on avoiding other cars, and bicyclists are off the radar. In our city, many bicyclists will use sidewalks instead of car lanes when traveling busy streets…not exactly legal, but I can’t really blame them when you consider how crazy drivers have become.

    The problem is that drivers who are turning onto a busy street need to take the opportunity to merge into traffic quickly, so when cyclists enter an intersection swiftly on a pedestrian path, they’re at risk of getting nailed by a turning car. I’ve winessed a lot of near misses in these scenarios.

    I see less bicycles on the street than I used to 15 or more years ago. A larger percentage of the people on bicycles (that I see in traffic) look like poor folks who can’t afford cars. I think the high end fitness bicyclists have migrated to the country trails just outside of town.

  45. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    It shows you how statistics are vulnerable to manipulation – if you were to present fatalities per hour rather than per mile, bikes and cars would be much closer.
     
    Per hour is only relevant if you are looking at biking as a recreational activity compared to driving or say skiing. If you are talking about transportation--i'm going to ride to work--then per mile is correct.

    AnotherMom and I will roll out of here in another few weeks and drive 2500 miles. There's zero doubt that is significantly less safe and more costly than flying. But we'll sightsee in the Smokey's and Blue Ridge Parkway, visit several relatives and some friends along the way. Recreation. Otherwise makes no sense. Biking does cost less--at the price of your time. But as transportation, yes it is significantly more dangerous--almost entirely because of the people in cars. Doing it for fun/exercise--great!

    Replies: @International Jew, @Alden

    The problem with bike lanes is that you meet all the dumbasses who would get culled if they had to mix it up with cars.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  46. It’s an interesting question to ask, particularly because 1) cars are getting so expensive to drive, and 2) electric-assist bicycles are incredibly popular, more popular than electric cars.

    There appears to be a crescendo of effort to try to get towns to set aside bike lanes of different sorts. It also happens to dovetail with strategies to make roads safer by reducing four-lane roads to two lanes, with a left turn lane down the center, making room for bike lanes on the sides.

    The biggest problem lies in places that have real winter, with some amount of snow and ice. It simply isn’t safe to ride a bike under those conditions, and so you can’t depend on your bike to get to work.

  47. @HammerJack
    @John Johnson


    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn’t believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn’t matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.
     
    People who don't ride bikes have no idea how common this is. An unbelievable amount of abuse, and yes—people will deliberately try to hit you. IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I'm a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Paleo Liberal, @AndrewR, @Mike Tre

    People who don’t ride bikes have no idea how common this is. An unbelievable amount of abuse, and yes—people will deliberately try to hit you. IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I’m a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference.

    Riding a bicycle in situations where you know that you’re going to irritate people (i.e., block to block in an urban environment, or on a narrow two lane road with no shoulder) is antisocial behavior. Often, bike riders act in a passive-aggressive manner by shifting the responsibility for their own safety to motorists and then get hot and bothered when motorists don’t act in the ways that the bike riders tacitly expect. What is especially frustrating is when bicyclists block traffic, then you patiently wait for the opportunity to get around and past them, only to get stopped at a red light which the bicyclists themselves ignore so the process must be repeated successively. Bicyclists must know that this is infuriating, but they do it anyway. I don’t abuse bicyclists, threaten or commit violence against them, but I do dislike then intensely.

    The U.S. has a car culture, and does not have a bicycle culture even in its urban environs. No measure of demanding otherwise will make it so.

    Road and highway funding is largely by way of fuel taxes, so no, bicycles don’t have an equal moral right to the roads that cars do.

    • Agree: Mike Tre, Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    There’s only one thing that really bothers me about bikers. Other than on the whole, they are gay pompous pretentious liberals.

    It’s when I’m walking on a sidewalk and they come up behind me very close, bump into me and almost knock me down. They do call “left”
    But never in time for me to realize what they’re saying and that they want me to move to my right.

    Arrogant assholes First I do a lot of walking in very high traffic city business streets with cars trucks and buses making noise so I can’t hear them call left. And it’s illegal to bike in city sidewalks. But being asshole pretentious liberals, they’re always in the right. Even if they’re illegally on the sidewalk and bump into people who didn’t get out of their way fast enough.

    I watch out for them as I watch out for cars trucks and pedestrians.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  48. Just as an anecdotal apples-to-oranges comparison: I’ve walked away from 3 car accidents in my life that would have killed or at the very least permanently maimed me on a bicycle.

    Currently shopping for a motorcycle because it sucks being so immortal. The longer I live, the worse the world gets.

  49. I used to occasionally bike on a dedicated path. I refused to wear spandex and would just bike at a moderate pace to avoid chafing. I mostly did it in the summer just for a nice ride and breeze.

    What annoyed me was that there were these spandex gangs that would fly by and be upset that they had to slow down half a second to pass. They seemed to think it was their raceway and being a muscular guy in a tank on a mountain bike meant I was a clueless normie or something.

    They would yell “on your left” with a nasty tone and I would yell back “on your right” or something random like “pizza pie” just to piss them off. I actually exchanged f-bombs a couple times but they never stopped. Bikers can really be a-holes. Most are fine but some think the dedicated bike ways are their personal race tracks. Sorry dorks but guys in tanks and kids get to use them as well.

    • LOL: William Badwhite
  50. @Altai
    I remember a study years ago in the Netherlands that asked why women were so much more likely to get into road cycling accidents at traffic lights. They found men were more likely to be unconsciousness and start their bike early, getting out of any potential danger zone or blind spot of large trucks turning on the inside.

    Generally making a road system safe and designed for bikes is a choice. In many places it is just unpleasant and unsafe to cycle. Only Copenhagen and Amsterdam can truly claim to be true cycling commuter cities and to a lesser extent other large cities in the Netherlands. I'm not sure if it is an odd coincidence or something about the design that Copenhagen a city modeled on Amsterdam would also resemble it in this way too.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXw_t172BKY

    It would be good to give more space to bikes on roads but even better to design the whole system and make urban living pleasant again. But all the time you get from 'planners' is a fetish for hyper density and demolishing historic buildings and green spaces/prime farmland to make crappy poorly built apartments. By contrast Copenhagen is quite mid density without a lot of big buildings or inhuman scaled places to live.

    That is to say nothing of the demographics of who lives there. Diversity makes building Copenhagen hard if not necessarily impossible. But people won't accept it. Indeed, the kind of loss of ownership of their society, country or local area makes the emergence of predatory individualistic and parasitic 'developers' who create poorly planned developments is likewise something people can't accept.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad, @slumber_j

    Copenhagen seems great but what if you are elderly or handicapped or have several young children or need to transport something heavy, etc.? What if it is pouring rain or snowing and the streets are icy? Bikes can be PART of a transit system but they can’t be the complete answer. Having one 120 lb. woman riding around with 2 tons of SUV just to buy a coffee is stupid but depending solely on bikes is equally stupid. The bike had a brief heyday in America (the Wright Brothers owned a bicycle factory at the height of the craze) but the automobile quickly displaced it because it was so much more convenient.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jack D

    Great post jack. Transporting food and kids is why families need cars. Even single people if they don’t have a car for food shopping the end up living in take out it frozen pizza from the nearest convenience store. A weeks worth of food can’t be carried bussed or biked home in one trip. Food shopping every couple days means small amounts than can be carried. But it’s such a waster of time and a pain people just don’t do it. If I didn’t have a car, I’d rent a car once a week or 3 times a month for food shopping and other errands.

    A new microwave and other heavy or bulky items need a car. How do you arrange a load of laundry or dry cleaning in a bike?

    Some welfare Mom advocates lobby for welfare department paid cab Uber service once a week so the welfare Moms can do a weekly grocery shopping to feed the brats. I know most commenters are men, not Moms, but think how you’d grocery shop for a family if you didn’t have car.

    100 years ago city people didn’t need cars because everything was delivered. Cabs were plentiful and cheap But things changed. No more delivery for decades. Now delivery is coming back. Plus plus plus the matter of safety from black predators.

    Nurses, who often work evening and night shifts, used to be pretty low paid. Right up to the 1960s when they formed a union to lobby for higher pay.

    One of the big reasons nurses needed higher pay so they could easily afford both rent and a car was black predators. The union won . And nurses no longer have a high rate of being raped. Remember that hospitals, like colleges were built in the 19th century in safe neighborhoods Which became the most dangerous neighborhoods in town once the blacks moved in.

    Nurses Needed cars, not wanted cars as we learned in Econ 101. Needed cars to avoid robbery rape and murder by blacks defended by ACLU

    I wonder how the supercilious Scandinavians will feel about their no car policies when the Muslims take over.

    I was a Probation Officer. Virtually every mugging was because people were on foot. Unfortunate people can’t walk the dog or walk home from the bus stop without being attacked but that’s life in America.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @Charlesz Martel

  51. @Fox
    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
    Naturally, my comment is unfair towards decent bicyclists who are aware of other traffic participants, are considerate, respect traffic laws and are interested in safety and pleasant human interactions, and I apologize to those.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Henry's Cat, @Luddite in Chief, @Coemgen, @sb, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens.

    Yes, there’s a certain kind of personality that is attracted to this kind of venue for extreme antisocial behavior – keeping ordinary working people from getting to their jobs on time, or getting home expeditiously, etc. Sometimes when they’re not getting their fix from riding in the streets and interfering with motorists, they jump the curb and menace pedestrians on the pavement by riding their bicycles at speed very close to people walking.

  52. @HammerJack
    @John Johnson


    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn’t believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn’t matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.
     
    People who don't ride bikes have no idea how common this is. An unbelievable amount of abuse, and yes—people will deliberately try to hit you. IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I'm a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Paleo Liberal, @AndrewR, @Mike Tre

    Where I live there are a lot of dedicated bike trails. The drivers at the occasional intersections tend to be polite.

    I knew a guy who would do his recreational biking during NFL games, when the roads were clear. He said if the home team lost the drivers were really bad. At one point he ran for city council in his town so as to get a new bike path for his commute to work.

  53. OMG JACK D WAS RIGHT ALL ALONG

    • LOL: JimDandy
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @HammerJack

    Finally, some REAL Nazis, as opposed to that Ukrainian Bandera boy band snowflakes are clutching their pearls over.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @HammerJack

    Every day is Halloween in Beverly Hills.

  54. OT:

  55. Tim says:

    In every city I’ve ever lived in there is always THAT GUY at every city council meeting urging an increase in bike lanes. He’s always a middle aged white guy who lives in the young hipster part of town. He clacks up to the microphone in his cleated shoes, and he’s still wearing his bike helmet.

    Every city has one of THIS GUY and the same thing always happens to him, he gets killed by a black guy driving his mother’s car, and he has no license.

  56. @Carol
    Bicycling in traffic is for the young, fit and agile. And you can't expect protected bike lanes everywhere.

    I've ridden thousands of highway miles but sadly am aging out. I could have ridden today but opted to walk. At 73 I don't need any mishaps, like happened to the old guy here who tried to execute a left turn alongside a semi trailer.

    What is really troubling us all the years of preaching bike helmet use gets thrown out the window for bike and scooter rental vendors.
    Just like that, protecting your brain cage doesn't matter anymore.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Um… Would you care to share that story?

  57. anonymous[325] • Disclaimer says:

    The popularity of bicycling for exercise, recreation and commuting continues to grow. Unfortunately, injuries and fatalities for all vulnerable road users also are growing. Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA)finds that adults are more likely than children to die in a bicyclist-motor vehicle crash, with adults accounting for 88% of bicyclist fatalities.

    One-third of non-fatal bicyclist injuries are to the head. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), a majority of the 80,000 cycling-related head injuries treated in emergency rooms each year are brain injuries.

    Brain injury increases your chance of brain damage. If you’re over 55 you and your less dense skull should consider whether or not it’s worth it to bicycle at all.

    https://www.nsc.org/safety-first-blog/bicycle-safety-statistics-may-surprise-you

  58. @Thulean Friend
    Sorry Steve, your post is misinformed.

    The problem is not the bicycle. The problem is car-centric urbanism. Even many European countries, despite much fanfare, have not made a decisive shift away even if there has been enormously positive changes in the past decade.

    Ultimately a decision has to be made to ban most cars from cities. There's no way going around that. I suspect the US will be the last man standing, due to how US cities look like. But even that is not an excuse. Berlin was razed to the ground and has a typical "American" look, yet the progress in that city has been spectacular.

    Retrofitting isn't an issue. It's about priorities. Do you want a city that's primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can't have both.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @aNewBanner, @David Davenport

    Do you want a city that’s primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can’t have both.

    “Do you want a city that’s primarily based around [children] or one based around [drivers]? You can’t have both.”

    There. Humanized it for you.

    If you people only would talk about trikeability, not “walkability”.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Reg Cæsar

    All over the world billions of people live in big cities. Some cities in China have 20 million people living in them. And they go about their daily lives just fine. They go to school and work and back again. They shop for small items that can be carried home. And big bulky items like refrigerators that must be delivered by truck, a large size dolly and a couple strong men.

    They visit friends engage in sports go for medical care go to movies concerts restaurants bars and other events. They go to government offices to get a permit apply for something mail packages and numerous reasons.

    And it’s all done by a combination of walking baby strollers bikes motorcycles cars and trucks.

    Since cities began it was a combination of walking and hand carts then animals pulling wagons then horse drawn char a bancs or buses in early 1600s France.

    Char a bancs vs modern buses. Think of the millions of tons of manure deposited on city streets before the internal combustion engine.

    Internal combustion or auto or self driven vehicles rather than horse drawn vehicles is probably one of the biggest and best public health measure since we began to wall in 2 legs.

    Waiting for buses must be unpleasant in Scandinavian winters. As well as walking. I love getting into a freezing car on a cold winter morning and turning the heat on.

  59. @HammerJack
    @John Johnson


    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn’t believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn’t matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.
     
    People who don't ride bikes have no idea how common this is. An unbelievable amount of abuse, and yes—people will deliberately try to hit you. IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I'm a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Paleo Liberal, @AndrewR, @Mike Tre

    Whereabouts are you speaking about? I imagine this behavior is much more common in some places than in others.

  60. @John Johnson
    bicycles are about an order of magnitude more dangerous than cars per mile, about 40% as dangerous as motorcycles, which sounds about right. It’s easier to get yourself killed on a motorcycle because it’s hard work to go really fast on a bicycle.

    I would much rather take a motorcycle to work. Motorcycle fatalities normally involve high speeds or alcohol. I have no doubt that bicycles are more dangerous for commuting in typical cases.

    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn't believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn't matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.

    Oh and this was a liberal city where the paper would write articles about how progressive they were because of all the bicycles.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @AndrewR, @Gamecock

    What city? I imagine this behavior is more common in some regions/areas than others.

    And was this why she gave it up?

    I stopped cycling not because of intentionally aggressive human behavior but because of dogs and generally foolish driving by others.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @AndrewR

    There are dog lovers and bike riders. But there are no bike riding dog lovers..

  61. They used to say European cars weren’t as safe as American autos because they were lighter (on average). So I wouldn’t be too sure that a lower bike deaths/mile vs car deaths means the Europeans are doing better on bike safety or worse on cars

  62. I wonder how dangerous electric unicycles are. I ride one myself, most days.

  63. @Thulean Friend
    Sorry Steve, your post is misinformed.

    The problem is not the bicycle. The problem is car-centric urbanism. Even many European countries, despite much fanfare, have not made a decisive shift away even if there has been enormously positive changes in the past decade.

    Ultimately a decision has to be made to ban most cars from cities. There's no way going around that. I suspect the US will be the last man standing, due to how US cities look like. But even that is not an excuse. Berlin was razed to the ground and has a typical "American" look, yet the progress in that city has been spectacular.

    Retrofitting isn't an issue. It's about priorities. Do you want a city that's primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can't have both.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @aNewBanner, @David Davenport

    You can’t have a city based on walking cycling and public transit when black predators are everywhere attacking pedestrians. And lying in wait at the bus and subway stops for the prey to emerge and start walking home. Bus stops. Regular travelers can’t even sit on the bus benches to wait for a bus because black deranged derelicts live in bus benches. Even in the highest income zip code in town.

    Much of the reason city people drive cars instead of using public transit is safety. Plus the horrors of being stuck on buses with snarling vicious blacks screaming instead of talking quietly.

    Take public transit in any major city or suburb that has about 15% of blacks for a month and get back to us . Alternate days and evenings for the full American public transit experience.

    Or why we can’t have nice things.

    • Thanks: Calvin Hobbes
    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Alden

    Greetings, Alden,

    That sounds truly horrible. Nightmarish even.
    Where I live we have no bus stops, very few africans and very little crime.
    We do have a bus that you can ride, by appointment, but not many people do.
    Our roads really are not safe for bicycles. Too steep and curvy.
    And we have one zip code that covers pretty much the whole county.

    Snarling vicious blacks? No thank you!

    Replies: @Alden

    , @John Johnson
    @Alden

    My favorite is when liberals in the press talk about making public transport free to encourage ridership.

    They are announcing that they have never taken a bus in the city but have all kinds of ideas on to how to encourage other people to use them.

    It is already the norm in 15%+ areas to not charge Blacks. Whether or not Whites will be charged depends on the driver and the situation. If there are a lot of people getting on the bus the driver will actually get annoyed that you are slowing down the line by taking out coins. In other areas you will be expected to pay. It is implied that the Blacks ahead of you have a bus pass and the driver doesn't need to check them. Well what happens is that Blacks get the attitude that the bus is their playground since they can use it as they please.

    One concept we have in America is the commuter bus.

    What is a commuter bus? A bus that you get on at a park in ride with nice seats and away from areas where homeless Blacks will get on. Riding one is quite an experience compared to a city bus. Basically a bus filled entirely with polite Whites. You can actually take a nap in one and without having to worry about getting robbed.

    It's really an amusing aspect of the circus. You are on this bus with tinted windows and large luxurious seats that goes into the city. Basically the system is ferrying in Whites on a private bus as part of reality avoidance.

    Replies: @Rob

  64. @John Johnson
    @Pixo

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    Something like half the wrecks are in the first two years of the license.

    Motorcycles are really a bad idea for commuting in urban areas. They don't save much in gas and one wreck can lead to a million in hospital bills.

    Even in rural areas they are sketch. Too many bad drivers in big trucks on the backroads typing or drinking a few. I don't even like driving a coupe. F150 is the entry level truck now and it is the same size as an older 250.

    Replies: @Barnard, @everybodyhatesscott

    The Sturgis motorcycle rally has fatalities every year. The typical cause isn’t even alcohol related, but is driver error caused by inexperience. Particularly, riders from other parts of the country who can’t adapt to riding in mountain roads with sharper turns. There does seem to be a fair amount of recklessness involved.

  65. Anonymous[406] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @Pixo

    It shows you how statistics are vulnerable to manipulation - if you were to present fatalities per hour rather than per mile, bikes and cars would be much closer.

    Also if you look at the total numbers, there are about 40,000 auto deaths/year vs. fewer than 1K bike deaths. Each bike death is a tragedy but it's not one of our major public health problems compared to cars or guns or drug overdose or for that matter, Covid.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    By the same token, airplanes are “only” about as safe as trains if we consider they travel near 600mph, on an hourly basis. Since we do consider travel on a time basis… for me (one way)

    Bike < 30-60min
    3min < Car 45min

    Kubrick’s fear of flying was likely rational back in 1970, especially if he did not keep up with stats. Roughly 60 times more dangerous per passenger mile compared to today. 3.6x more dangerous then than driving is today on an hourly basis. Driving was more dangerous too though.

    If you were a jet setter, especially in light aircraft or non-third world airlines, pretty risky if you did a lot of hours.

    Making Eyes Wide Shut was a lot more dangerous than flying though. If only the world had his original cut.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anonymous


    If you were a jet setter, especially in light aircraft or [non-?]third world airlines, pretty risky if you did a lot of hours.
     
    The same thing was true of pilots and other crew, except even more so. 700 to 1000 hrs per year is not unusual for an airline pilot so over the course of a career it could be 25,000 hrs or more in the air (I think the record is 65,000 hrs). Even the most frequent flier rarely flies that much.

    For general aviation, the risk is 16 deaths per 1M hrs or 1 death per 62,500 hrs. So you can see that as a pilot, while any one flight was not particularly risky, over the course of 25,000 hrs you had a considerable cumulative risk. Therefore pilots could not get life insurance at regular rates.

    However nowadays, crashes on major American carriers on main line routes (not regional jets) are almost unknown. In 2018, 1 passenger was sucked out of the window on a Southwest flight when the engine flew apart and parts hit the window. Before that, the last crash involving an American carrier and a Boeing or Airbus jet was November, 2001. 265 died supposedly due to pilot error (excessive rudder inputs, in response to wake turbulence which led to the vertical stabilizer breaking off).

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel

    , @Charlesz Martel
    @Anonymous

    The best comment I ever saw about "Eyes Wide Shut" is:

    "If I wanted to watch married people f**king, I'd watch the Lifetime channel!"

    Replies: @Anonymous

  66. @John Johnson
    @Pixo

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    Something like half the wrecks are in the first two years of the license.

    Motorcycles are really a bad idea for commuting in urban areas. They don't save much in gas and one wreck can lead to a million in hospital bills.

    Even in rural areas they are sketch. Too many bad drivers in big trucks on the backroads typing or drinking a few. I don't even like driving a coupe. F150 is the entry level truck now and it is the same size as an older 250.

    Replies: @Barnard, @everybodyhatesscott

    The key to realizing the benefits of riding a motorcycle to commute in urban areas is to be a little lax with the rules of the road. If you live in California, you don’t even have to be lax because lane splitting is legal. I’ve pretty much stopped riding since I’ve had children but a 2 hour commute to go to a baseball game in a car could be done in 35 minutes on a motorcycle AND the parking was free.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @everybodyhatesscott

    If you live in California, you don’t even have to be lax because lane splitting is legal. I’ve pretty much stopped riding since I’ve had children but a 2 hour commute to go to a baseball game in a car could be done in 35 minutes on a motorcycle AND the parking was free.

    Yea I'm aware of lane splitting.

    It's still a terrible gamble. California has awful drivers that hop lanes and cut each other off. There are road ragers, drunks, gangsters, tourists, illegals, rich people speeding in exotics and then the average driver who is stressed out from all of it. I'd only get on I5 on a motorcycle in California at 2AM.

    The better risk is to move. Awful state.

  67. @Altai
    I remember a study years ago in the Netherlands that asked why women were so much more likely to get into road cycling accidents at traffic lights. They found men were more likely to be unconsciousness and start their bike early, getting out of any potential danger zone or blind spot of large trucks turning on the inside.

    Generally making a road system safe and designed for bikes is a choice. In many places it is just unpleasant and unsafe to cycle. Only Copenhagen and Amsterdam can truly claim to be true cycling commuter cities and to a lesser extent other large cities in the Netherlands. I'm not sure if it is an odd coincidence or something about the design that Copenhagen a city modeled on Amsterdam would also resemble it in this way too.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXw_t172BKY

    It would be good to give more space to bikes on roads but even better to design the whole system and make urban living pleasant again. But all the time you get from 'planners' is a fetish for hyper density and demolishing historic buildings and green spaces/prime farmland to make crappy poorly built apartments. By contrast Copenhagen is quite mid density without a lot of big buildings or inhuman scaled places to live.

    That is to say nothing of the demographics of who lives there. Diversity makes building Copenhagen hard if not necessarily impossible. But people won't accept it. Indeed, the kind of loss of ownership of their society, country or local area makes the emergence of predatory individualistic and parasitic 'developers' who create poorly planned developments is likewise something people can't accept.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad, @slumber_j

    That is to say nothing of the demographics of who lives there. Diversity makes building Copenhagen hard if not necessarily impossible. But people won’t accept it. Indeed, the kind of loss of ownership of their society, country or local area makes the emergence of predatory individualistic and parasitic ‘developers’ who create poorly planned developments is likewise something people can’t accept.

    Another terrific paragraph Altai.

    “Diversity” is one of the things that make the whole urbanist, eco-y project impossible. If you want to share public spaces and public transit then you must have common–and pleasant–norms. These are cooperative, conscientious, law-abiding, high-trust visions of a city. But–of course–the minoritarian lefties will never admit–even let into their consciousness–the direct conflict of their various visions.

    And yes … that means “collect ownership”. A community, a nation that is owned by a particular people, who think of it as “their place” and work to keep it productive, pleasant, nice, on-track and reproducing itself for their kids.

    As with everything else … minoritarianism wrecks that. Seriously who are America’s “owners” now? No one. Though the American nation still exists out there somewhere. What’s there now is just a querulous marketplace. Public anything? Why bother?

  68. I’m sure Steve is too cheap to subscribe to HBO, but a bicycle accident was the catalyst behind Winning Time, the story of the 80s Los Angeles Lakers. Brand new coach Jack McKinney, a protégé of Dr. Jack Ramsay, fell off his bicycle after only 14 games (10-4) in 1979 and hit his head. Interim coach Paul Westhead led the Lakers to the NBA Finals and McKinney never coached the Lakers again.

    Steve was in college at Rice at the time, so he might not remember this sequence of events.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @ScarletNumber


    I’m sure Steve is too cheap to subscribe to HBO
     
    HBO = MSM

    For some of us it's not about the money..
  69. • Replies: @prosa123
    @Reg Cæsar

    No word yet on the ethnic groups involved, though Uvalde is mostly Hispanic.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    , @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar



    La ley de Sailer?

    14 students, 1 teacher dead after shooting at elementary school: Governor
     
    I haven't been through there in darn near 40 years, but it's a Mexican town--they are not loving on blacks down there--so yes if Steve's law is phrased as black/non-black. Shooter is likely a Mexican loon.

    Replies: @epebble, @prosa123

    , @JimDandy
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well, he/they is Latinx so they can't blame White Nationalist rhetoric this time. But they can go with "toxic masculinity" and "incel" right?

    Replies: @anonymous

    , @Brutusale
    @Reg Cæsar

    Salvador Ramos.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/least-two-children-dead-multiple-injured-after-texas-elementary-school-shooting

    , @Alden
    @Reg Cæsar

    It’s now 21 people dead. Perp is Salvatore Ramos 18 student at the high school American citizen. Killed grandma first then went to the school. Or why the second worst thing the satanic supremes ever did was closing down the mental hospitals.

    O’Connor vs Donaldson plaintiffs attorney was the satanic ACLU. Every person harmed by a lunatic out on the streets should sue the ACLU. Causation is very clear.

  70. OT: Elementary school shooting. Hispanic killer shoots up 91% minority Texas school. I wonder what his motive was. He killed 14 students.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/least-two-children-dead-multiple-injured-after-texas-elementary-school-shooting

    https://www.usnews.com/education/k12/texas/robb-elementary-278634

  71. I think bicycles are very safe so long as you go cautiously and keep looking behind you, this will cost you time though and you will probably not average more than 15mph. Also cycling only works where it is dead flat, Flordia ought to be brilliant for cycling on that count. Here in Europe there is a reason why you only get people cycling a lot in the Netherlands, northern Belgium/Germany and Denmark, in the UK it is hopeless really except a few flatter regions of the east as well as in most of London which is quite a flat city in the centre at least.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @oliver elkington


    I think bicycles are very safe so long as you go cautiously and keep looking behind you, this will cost you time though and you will probably not average more than 15mph. Also cycling only works where it is dead flat,
     
    I agree about the being flat part, though with multiple gears (some w/ electronic shifting now, plus e-bikes) elevations can be managed.

    However the looking back part is solvable w/ handlebar or helmet mirrors. They aren't perfect but I used to use them (various kinds) and they worked pretty well. I suspect now some may have rear facing cameras and screens, like back ups in cars. A good idea.

    Bikes are inherently unsafe when in mixed traffic. Okay in empty streets in good weather.

    Years back as a student in an urban city with bad roads, I relied on my crappy old 10 speed. A lot of fun but dangerous. Horrible in high winds, heavy rain. cracked streets, at night.

    Later I did suburban road biking for exercise, until too many near here were killed by drivers.

    I don't see many bikers now other than on light traffic weekends. Too many cars.

    It is a great way to see things and the country side. But not for the old, infirm, fat or lazy. Or if you need to carry groceries, etc. Mostly a male risk taker thing anyway.

    Bikers can be annoying, but no worse than lane splitting motorcycles or the clueless car/truck drivers. But much more risky. I gave it up when I figured I had done my 20K miles and was still alive. You gotta know when to fold 'em.
  72. When young I commuted by motorbike both in the city and in the country.

    Later I commuted by push bike (as we used to call them) because it was quicker than driving and anyway there was nowhere to park. The exercise was probably a good thing too. It was in a city where the drivers were used to cyclists and treated then well (except taxi drivers, for reasons unknown). My main risk of death was that some other cyclist – incompetent and self-absorbed – would force me under the wheels of, say, a bus.

  73. @Jack D
    @Altai

    Copenhagen seems great but what if you are elderly or handicapped or have several young children or need to transport something heavy, etc.? What if it is pouring rain or snowing and the streets are icy? Bikes can be PART of a transit system but they can't be the complete answer. Having one 120 lb. woman riding around with 2 tons of SUV just to buy a coffee is stupid but depending solely on bikes is equally stupid. The bike had a brief heyday in America (the Wright Brothers owned a bicycle factory at the height of the craze) but the automobile quickly displaced it because it was so much more convenient.

    Replies: @Alden

    Great post jack. Transporting food and kids is why families need cars. Even single people if they don’t have a car for food shopping the end up living in take out it frozen pizza from the nearest convenience store. A weeks worth of food can’t be carried bussed or biked home in one trip. Food shopping every couple days means small amounts than can be carried. But it’s such a waster of time and a pain people just don’t do it. If I didn’t have a car, I’d rent a car once a week or 3 times a month for food shopping and other errands.

    A new microwave and other heavy or bulky items need a car. How do you arrange a load of laundry or dry cleaning in a bike?

    Some welfare Mom advocates lobby for welfare department paid cab Uber service once a week so the welfare Moms can do a weekly grocery shopping to feed the brats. I know most commenters are men, not Moms, but think how you’d grocery shop for a family if you didn’t have car.

    100 years ago city people didn’t need cars because everything was delivered. Cabs were plentiful and cheap But things changed. No more delivery for decades. Now delivery is coming back. Plus plus plus the matter of safety from black predators.

    Nurses, who often work evening and night shifts, used to be pretty low paid. Right up to the 1960s when they formed a union to lobby for higher pay.

    One of the big reasons nurses needed higher pay so they could easily afford both rent and a car was black predators. The union won . And nurses no longer have a high rate of being raped. Remember that hospitals, like colleges were built in the 19th century in safe neighborhoods Which became the most dangerous neighborhoods in town once the blacks moved in.

    Nurses Needed cars, not wanted cars as we learned in Econ 101. Needed cars to avoid robbery rape and murder by blacks defended by ACLU

    I wonder how the supercilious Scandinavians will feel about their no car policies when the Muslims take over.

    I was a Probation Officer. Virtually every mugging was because people were on foot. Unfortunate people can’t walk the dog or walk home from the bus stop without being attacked but that’s life in America.

    • Thanks: Muggles
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Alden


    I was a Probation Officer. Virtually every mugging was because people were on foot. Unfortunate people can’t walk the dog or walk home from the bus stop without being attacked but that’s life in America.
     
    When you're in a car, don't they call it a carjacking, instead?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden

    , @Charlesz Martel
    @Alden

    Here is one of the most intelligent urban transportation solutions out there, so naturally it won't ever come to the U.S.

    https://www.whichev.net/2020/02/28/citroen-ami-promises-electric-mobility-for-all-at-20-euros-a-month/

    The other great solution is mopeds, but American men are so insecure they consider them dorky and effeminate. Go to Europe and see how well they work there.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Muggles

  74. @Thulean Friend
    Sorry Steve, your post is misinformed.

    The problem is not the bicycle. The problem is car-centric urbanism. Even many European countries, despite much fanfare, have not made a decisive shift away even if there has been enormously positive changes in the past decade.

    Ultimately a decision has to be made to ban most cars from cities. There's no way going around that. I suspect the US will be the last man standing, due to how US cities look like. But even that is not an excuse. Berlin was razed to the ground and has a typical "American" look, yet the progress in that city has been spectacular.

    Retrofitting isn't an issue. It's about priorities. Do you want a city that's primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can't have both.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @aNewBanner, @David Davenport

    Retrofitting isn’t an issue. It’s about priorities. Do you want a city that’s primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can’t have both.

    But you can easily have separate cities, even separate parts of cities. Pretty straightforward.

    One very noticeable thing–even here–is that people tend to think their way should be the only way.

    Nah, different strokes for different folks. For instance, I want to junk minoritarianism and return to a traditional American self-governing republic, centered on normal productive family people reproducing our nation for “our posterity”. I think there are 100 million Americans who want the same–probably quite a few more once it was an option and they gave it some thought. But I do not begrudge the Rainbow people their rainbow. (I suspect without boring “white bread” guys like me to kick around anymore it will crash and burn. But that’s their problem.)

    Likewise urbanism. It does not all have to be the same. From region to region, city to city, even communities within a particular urban conglomeration.

    • Replies: @Travis
    @AnotherDad

    Unfortunately not even close to 100 million Americans want a return to a traditional American self-governing republic, centered on normal productive family people reproducing our nation for “our posterity”

    There are only 190 million Whites in America today. just 150 million whites over the age of 20 and 10 million of them are over the age of 80 so pretty much useless. More than half of the whites are women. Married white women with children may share your vision, but unmarried white females mostly vote for more government and more diversity.

    Assuming 90% of married whites want a return to a traditional American self-governing republic, this would be less than 100 million Americans. Less than 60% of White adults are married, so we have about 90 million married White people in America but 10% of them are married to non-whites. So just 40 million white couples in America....at most 70 million whites want a return to a traditional American self-governing republic.

    A key reason that minoritarianism is popular, more Americans benefit from it in some way. so-called minoritarianism is an anti-white male ideology, and only about 24% of the US population consists of straight white males. While the married white women typically side with their white husbands, we still have a minority of white males plus married White females....the total number of straight white males plus their white wives is just 34% of the US population. We are a minority. Married white couples with kids is a shrinking demographic.

    A big reason that minoritarianism is popular is due to the 60 million unmarried white females who consistently support feminism (a main component of minoritarianism). Not to mention the significant number of white males who support feminism and minoritarianism.


    The best case scenario for a separate White state would be in Maine, which is still 95% white. Any whites who want to live in a white state could and should move to Maine so they can create a Whitopia. There is enough space and potential in Maine to support 10 million whites. The weather helps repel non-whites and they have ports and a large coast, good infrastructure. If just 100,00o white nationalist families moved to main they could choose the governor and their congressmen and school boards without interference from non-whites. They could demonstrate how to create a white separate state, which is the first step to separate nations.

  75. @Reg Cæsar
    La ley de Sailer?


    14 students, 1 teacher dead after shooting at elementary school: Governor

    Replies: @prosa123, @AnotherDad, @JimDandy, @Brutusale, @Alden

    No word yet on the ethnic groups involved, though Uvalde is mostly Hispanic.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @prosa123


    No word yet on the ethnic groups involved
     
    Yeah, that part is called "Coulter's Law"..

    14 Students, 1 Teacher Dead in Texas Elementary School Shooting
     
    This Diversity Project is going swimmingly!

    However, white supremacy is to blame.
  76. @ScarletNumber
    I'm sure Steve is too cheap to subscribe to HBO, but a bicycle accident was the catalyst behind Winning Time, the story of the 80s Los Angeles Lakers. Brand new coach Jack McKinney, a protégé of Dr. Jack Ramsay, fell off his bicycle after only 14 games (10-4) in 1979 and hit his head. Interim coach Paul Westhead led the Lakers to the NBA Finals and McKinney never coached the Lakers again.

    Steve was in college at Rice at the time, so he might not remember this sequence of events.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    I’m sure Steve is too cheap to subscribe to HBO

    HBO = MSM

    For some of us it’s not about the money..

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
  77. @Reg Cæsar
    La ley de Sailer?


    14 students, 1 teacher dead after shooting at elementary school: Governor

    Replies: @prosa123, @AnotherDad, @JimDandy, @Brutusale, @Alden

    La ley de Sailer?

    14 students, 1 teacher dead after shooting at elementary school: Governor

    I haven’t been through there in darn near 40 years, but it’s a Mexican town–they are not loving on blacks down there–so yes if Steve’s law is phrased as black/non-black. Shooter is likely a Mexican loon.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @AnotherDad

    Salvador Ramos

    https://twitter.com/IntelDoge/status/1529204932229976064/photo/1

    , @prosa123
    @AnotherDad

    Shooter identified as Salvador Ramos. Age 18, same as the Buffalo shooter. There won't be a trial as the police made him good.

  78. @John Johnson
    @Fox

    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens.

    They behave aggressively because that is how you can get through a gridlocked downtown in minutes.

    If you are going to follow every traffic law then you might as well walk.

    The big cities really don't crack down on any type of traffic behavior.

    The police are too focused on urban community interactions.

    Replies: @Alden, @Pincher Martin, @Achmed E. Newman

    I saw the funniest thing once. And it wasn’t a downtown gridlock. It was just another city street gridlock. Every body was stopped. When the lights changed we could move about 3 miles an hour. Then a bus door opened, right there in the middle of the street. A guy got out. He took his bike off the rack and got on. He was out of sight before I could move again.

  79. @Fox
    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
    Naturally, my comment is unfair towards decent bicyclists who are aware of other traffic participants, are considerate, respect traffic laws and are interested in safety and pleasant human interactions, and I apologize to those.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Henry's Cat, @Luddite in Chief, @Coemgen, @sb, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    Plus the fact that cyclists are not another species – the majority of them will also be car drivers.

    Do these fatality stats refer only to deaths caused by crashes? How can the subway be that high?

  80. @prosa123
    @Reg Cæsar

    No word yet on the ethnic groups involved, though Uvalde is mostly Hispanic.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    No word yet on the ethnic groups involved

    Yeah, that part is called “Coulter’s Law”..

    14 Students, 1 Teacher Dead in Texas Elementary School Shooting

    This Diversity Project is going swimmingly!

    However, white supremacy is to blame.

  81. @Reg Cæsar
    La ley de Sailer?


    14 students, 1 teacher dead after shooting at elementary school: Governor

    Replies: @prosa123, @AnotherDad, @JimDandy, @Brutusale, @Alden

    Well, he/they is Latinx so they can’t blame White Nationalist rhetoric this time. But they can go with “toxic masculinity” and “incel” right?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @JimDandy


    so they can’t blame White Nationalist rhetoric this time
     
    The climate of fear created by Whitesupremiasma made him paranoid and crazy?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @JimDandy

  82. MGB says:
    @Pixo
    Bikes are mostly used for short trips, and often in dense areas.

    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.

    If you do an apples to apples comparison the gap would be much smaller.

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    I still think bike riding is more dangerous, just not a 10x difference when you account for this. Motorcycle danger is similarly overstated because the people who ride them are more reckless by nature.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @MGB, @Travis

    the few motorcycle accidents i have personally witnessed were the result of the motorcyclist’s stupidity. one time, a motorcyclist was tooling in between lanes of stopped traffic in the city, and he went flying over a cab that was gingerly pulling from one lane to the other. got up limping and shoved the cabbie. i was hoping the cabbie would cold cock him, but no such luck.

  83. MGB says:
    @Too observant
    Herbert Meyers who worked with William Casey to arrange the fall of the Soviet Union died in a bicycle crash. https://www.sanjuanjournal.com/obituaries/herb-meyer-dec-31-1945-june-23-2019/

    Replies: @MGB

    as did mark buller ‘one of the nation’s foremost poxvirus researchers’.

    https://www.slu.edu/news/2017/february/mark-buller-obituary.php

    His lab aimed to use poxviruses as vectors to deliver gene therapy, vaccines and anti-viral drugs, and find ways to protect against poxviruses should they be turned into weapons of bioterrorism. He also studied a number of other viruses that are extremely lethal, such as SARS.

  84. They should have included space travel in the safety statistics. One out of 50 rockets explodes. But successful launches travel millions of miles orbiting the earth or going to the moon and back. So on a per mile basis it may be safer to be an astronaut than a bicyclist. Just sayin’

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Hypnotoad666

    That's a good, thought-provoking point. I'm not sure even the several hundred thousand (million) miles travelled on a typical mission give you a big enough denominator. But your pount is still thought-provoking!

    But for sure, if all I wanted to do was travel from Cape Canaveral, FL, to Edwards Air Force Base, CA, the Space Shuttle wouldn't be my vehicle of choice.

  85. @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar



    La ley de Sailer?

    14 students, 1 teacher dead after shooting at elementary school: Governor
     
    I haven't been through there in darn near 40 years, but it's a Mexican town--they are not loving on blacks down there--so yes if Steve's law is phrased as black/non-black. Shooter is likely a Mexican loon.

    Replies: @epebble, @prosa123

  86. @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar



    La ley de Sailer?

    14 students, 1 teacher dead after shooting at elementary school: Governor
     
    I haven't been through there in darn near 40 years, but it's a Mexican town--they are not loving on blacks down there--so yes if Steve's law is phrased as black/non-black. Shooter is likely a Mexican loon.

    Replies: @epebble, @prosa123

    Shooter identified as Salvador Ramos. Age 18, same as the Buffalo shooter. There won’t be a trial as the police made him good.

  87. @John Johnson
    @Fox

    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens.

    They behave aggressively because that is how you can get through a gridlocked downtown in minutes.

    If you are going to follow every traffic law then you might as well walk.

    The big cities really don't crack down on any type of traffic behavior.

    The police are too focused on urban community interactions.

    Replies: @Alden, @Pincher Martin, @Achmed E. Newman

    They behave aggressively because that is how you can get through a gridlocked downtown in minutes.

    That’s not true. They act the same way everywhere.

    I lived in SF until recently. The bicycling community in the Bay Area acts like an entitled plague. The bicyclists ride however they like not only in the city’s urban center, where they believe the traffic laws do not apply to them, and in the city’s parks, where they commandeer the roads on the weekend for their pleasure, but they ride the same way even in the winding roads of Marin. Try making your way from San Francisco to Stinson Beach on the weekend without having to squeeze by at least three or four dozen bicyclists on a steep hilly road with no shoulder. Tremendous fun if you like screaming at bicyclists and having them scream at you.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Pincher Martin

    Highway One? Their favorite trick in the city is at stop signs. They squiggle between the curb and a car stooped at the sign. So drivers in the cross streets can’t see them. Then they zoom out hoping to get hit. Partly for the Personal injury claim and partly to lobby the city for more bike favoritism.

    Follow the money Who’s funding all the save Mother Earth groups? . The bike manufacturers. That’s who. Just like the entire electrical industry from copper miners to the electricians funds all save the earth end consumption of fossil fuels propaganda. Result will be winter heat bills quadruple what we pay now. And running the electric washer and dryer a big budget item.

    And never being able to cook broiled near again because electric broilers don’t broil. Or even properly pan fry steaks and pork chops.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  88. Attention graphic artists of America! It’s still okay to use white males–and only white males–in certain informational images.

  89. @Pixo
    Bikes are mostly used for short trips, and often in dense areas.

    A lot of car miles are very safe highway miles.

    If you do an apples to apples comparison the gap would be much smaller.

    Another issue is that in the poorest 1/4 of the USA, a lot of bike riders are unemployable losers with a lot of DUIs or other issues preventing their getting a vehicle. They get hit a lot because they are reckless and often high or drunk.

    I still think bike riding is more dangerous, just not a 10x difference when you account for this. Motorcycle danger is similarly overstated because the people who ride them are more reckless by nature.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @MGB, @Travis

    In 2019 New York City 74 motorists (57 drivers and 17 passengers) died in accidents and 25 bicyclists died in accidents. 24 of the 25 cyclist fatalities were hit by a vehicle. 4,207 cyclists were hit by a vehicle in NYC in 2019 and 3,800 were seriously injured.

    Cycling in urban areas is more dangerous than cycling anywhere else due to the increased number of drivers, traffic and pedestrians..It is much safer to bike anywhere else in New York State outside of NYC. In contrast it is actually safer to drive in NYC than outside the city where you can drive much faster, yet face the risk of hitting deer or falling asleep driving. It is almost impossible to fall asleep driving in NYC. While almost half the NYC state population lives in the NYC metro area, only 25% of traffic fatalities occur in the city and 75% of New York State driving deaths occur outside NYC. Yet half the bicycle fatalities occur within NYC, despite people taking short trips on their bikes in NYC they face a far greater risk of being killed by a vehicle in NYC than biking elsewhere.

  90. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    It shows you how statistics are vulnerable to manipulation – if you were to present fatalities per hour rather than per mile, bikes and cars would be much closer.
     
    Per hour is only relevant if you are looking at biking as a recreational activity compared to driving or say skiing. If you are talking about transportation--i'm going to ride to work--then per mile is correct.

    AnotherMom and I will roll out of here in another few weeks and drive 2500 miles. There's zero doubt that is significantly less safe and more costly than flying. But we'll sightsee in the Smokey's and Blue Ridge Parkway, visit several relatives and some friends along the way. Recreation. Otherwise makes no sense. Biking does cost less--at the price of your time. But as transportation, yes it is significantly more dangerous--almost entirely because of the people in cars. Doing it for fun/exercise--great!

    Replies: @International Jew, @Alden

    Have fun and please keep us posted.

  91. @Fox
    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
    Naturally, my comment is unfair towards decent bicyclists who are aware of other traffic participants, are considerate, respect traffic laws and are interested in safety and pleasant human interactions, and I apologize to those.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Henry's Cat, @Luddite in Chief, @Coemgen, @sb, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens.

    I, too, have seen aggressive cyclists and am always left wondering how long they last on the road.

    It’s purely a guess, but I suspect the average lifespan of an aggressive cyclist is much less than that of paranoid, traffic-aware cyclists who fully understand they are part of the flow of traffic, and a minor part of the flow at that.

    When you are on a bike, you are at the mercy of people driving 2,000 pound-plus chunks of metal, and who may or may not be paying attention. I suppose some self-important cyclists forget this in the self-absorbed present day, but they do so at their peril.

    That “better citizen” nonsense you mention is not something any sane person should want to test out on a city roadway full of distracted motorists. But I suppose some cyclists will anyway.

  92. @Pincher Martin
    @Fox

    I completely agree. I can't stand bicyclists. They are the worst people on the roads. Their advocacy groups are the worst. They campaign to have special dispensations, like running through stop signs. Or they close down roads for drivers altogether.

    I'm not saying that we drivers should be excused for wanting to run bicyclists over, but I do understand the inclination.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    This is on a college campus.

    I am on foot about to enter a crosswalk protected by a stop sign.

    A dude on a bicycle blows by the stop sign.

    I call out, “Stop sign!”

    He calls back “Bicycle!”

    As to that traffic law, who knew?

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  93. Bicycling in my neck of the woods is pretty popular given the scenery, winding roads and hills to test a serious biker’s ticker. Only problem is the roads are full of wannabe NASCAR drivers, git-r-dones driving huge trucks and other assorted bumper fuckers who ignore speed limits, stop signs, and think nothing of crossing the yellow line into your side of the road while taking a sharp turn at 50 mph. Yep, hit and runs are almost routine in these parts. The crazy part is these bicyclist obey the law and ride with the traffic, trusting these yahoos not to mow them down with their out of control driving. If I were crazy enough to brave the roads on a bike around here, you can bet your sweet ass I will be riding facing the traffic.

  94. jb says:

    We have bike paths all over the place where I live. We call them “sidewalks”.

    Also, a friend of mine worked for a while in a hospital way back when. The way she tells it, every year a batch of newly minted doctors would show up for their first day of work riding motorcycles, and then six months later they would all be driving Volvos.

    • Thanks: Inquiring Mind
  95. @John Johnson
    bicycles are about an order of magnitude more dangerous than cars per mile, about 40% as dangerous as motorcycles, which sounds about right. It’s easier to get yourself killed on a motorcycle because it’s hard work to go really fast on a bicycle.

    I would much rather take a motorcycle to work. Motorcycle fatalities normally involve high speeds or alcohol. I have no doubt that bicycles are more dangerous for commuting in typical cases.

    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn't believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn't matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.

    Oh and this was a liberal city where the paper would write articles about how progressive they were because of all the bicycles.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @AndrewR, @Gamecock

    I ride my motorcycle about 6,000 miles a year. I don’t find it dangerous at all.

    My theory is stupid people do stupid things on motorcycles and get themselves killed. That does not make the motorcycle dangerous.

    Plus, I am a believer in “all the gear, all the time.” I see plenty of riders wearing a T-shirt and tennis shoes with no helmet. Around here, we call them “organ donors.”

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Gamecock

    My theory is stupid people do stupid things on motorcycles and get themselves killed. That does not make the motorcycle dangerous.

    Even without stupid people it is dangerous to be on two wheels without a cage when the vehicle traveling 20 feet behind you weighs 5 tons and is driven by a soccer mom that is putting on her makeup.

    For urban commutes a motorcycle is a very bad idea. You can be the best rider in the world and all it takes is for some stoner to look at his phone while vaping and you are in the hospital for months.

    Plus, I am a believer in “all the gear, all the time.” I see plenty of riders wearing a T-shirt and tennis shoes with no helmet. Around here, we call them “organ donors.”

    Yes gear is good but if you get hit by an F150 going 60 mph you are still going to be smashed.

    That motorcycle gear is designed for falls and not hits from 5 ton vehicles.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    , @AndrewR
    @Gamecock

    As John pointed out, the lack of a metal cage is what makes bikes so dangerous.

    Riding in a safe manner and wearing all your gear is essential of course, but you can't control others' actions, and a collision when you're on a bike could be fatal, whereas an identical collision when you're in a car might not involve even minor injury.

  96. @Pincher Martin
    @John Johnson


    They behave aggressively because that is how you can get through a gridlocked downtown in minutes.
     
    That's not true. They act the same way everywhere.

    I lived in SF until recently. The bicycling community in the Bay Area acts like an entitled plague. The bicyclists ride however they like not only in the city's urban center, where they believe the traffic laws do not apply to them, and in the city's parks, where they commandeer the roads on the weekend for their pleasure, but they ride the same way even in the winding roads of Marin. Try making your way from San Francisco to Stinson Beach on the weekend without having to squeeze by at least three or four dozen bicyclists on a steep hilly road with no shoulder. Tremendous fun if you like screaming at bicyclists and having them scream at you.

    Replies: @Alden

    Highway One? Their favorite trick in the city is at stop signs. They squiggle between the curb and a car stooped at the sign. So drivers in the cross streets can’t see them. Then they zoom out hoping to get hit. Partly for the Personal injury claim and partly to lobby the city for more bike favoritism.

    Follow the money Who’s funding all the save Mother Earth groups? . The bike manufacturers. That’s who. Just like the entire electrical industry from copper miners to the electricians funds all save the earth end consumption of fossil fuels propaganda. Result will be winter heat bills quadruple what we pay now. And running the electric washer and dryer a big budget item.

    And never being able to cook broiled near again because electric broilers don’t broil. Or even properly pan fry steaks and pork chops.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Alden


    Highway One?
     
    Yes, but also on the longer (i.e., slower) scenic routes through the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. For example, if you take the road up toward Mount Tamalpais and then cut over to make your way to Muir Beach, bicyclists are all over those roads on the weekends.

    It takes a strong man when passing them to not want to bump them off the side of a steep cliff after driving slowly behind them for several minutes waiting for an opening to pass. A few years back one young driver was not strong enough to fight the inclination and delibarately ran over several of them on a Marin or Sonoma County rural roadway.

    I certainly don't applaud the sentiment, but I understand it. I have sometimes yelled at them to get off the road.


    Their favorite trick in the city is at stop signs. They squiggle between the curb and a car stooped at the sign. So drivers in the cross streets can’t see them. Then they zoom out hoping to get hit. Partly for the Personal injury claim and partly to lobby the city for more bike favoritism.
     
    My favorite story about SF bicyclists was when they protested the city's desire to enforce traffic laws against them by purposely going slow through the city's streets to clog up the traffic.
  97. @Alfa158
    I don’t know how much bicycles do for obesity either given the trend towards electric bicycles. In addition the e-bikes seem to be ridden at higher average speeds. They can hit 20-25mph on the level and a lot more going downhill. I regularly see kids and teenagers whizzing past my house at the bottom of a gentle slope doing automobile speeds.
    Particularly dangerous when combined with the way that cars are also being driven at higher speeds. Modern cars are so quick and isolated drivers don’t even realize how fast they are going. A modern garden-variety V6 or turbo-4 sedan can run a standing start 1/4 mile in one half to a full second faster than the iconic 1960’s muscle cars such as the Pontiac GTO or Plymouth Roadrunner. They will also corner faster than the Corvettes and Porsches of that era. People are just whipping along nowadays.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Forbes

    NYC has revamped traffic lanes to accommodate separated bicycle lanes–and then they are taken over by E-bikes and E-mopeds. Pre-SARS-2, travel across the Queensboro bridge was maybe 25% E-bike, now it’s 75-90%. The speed of E-bikes overwhelms bicycles. Reckless and dangerous is the result.

  98. @JimDandy
    I see bicycles making a Rich Strike-like surge to take the lead in the near future.

    "Chicago police say a couple of men are robbing Divvy riders of their bicycles on the Gold Coast lakefront. It’s happened twice since May 13, according to an alert from Area Three detectives.

    Both times, two men threatened Divvy customers and took their rental bikes along the Lakefront Trail."

    Replies: @Anon

    Two black men are stealing Divvy bikes from white people on Chicago’s lakefront bike path. FIFY.

  99. Well I’m late to this party, but as a professional driver I have a few observations about “cyclists”:

    “but that seems a lower priority relative to bicycles advantages in fighting climate change (and obesity).”

    There is no evidence that riding a bicycle prevents either of these things. (climate change is a fake term anyway)

    “The problem with cycling is that you are at the mercy of drivers, ”

    HAHAHA!!! No. The problem with cycling is that cyclists ignore pretty much every law, traffic device, custom and or courtesy that have been established officially or unofficially as “rules of the road.”

    Further, when some smug asshole on a bicycle cuts in front of me on a busy street, or glides through a stop sign, or stop light, or cuts across three lanes, or rides the wrong way down the street, and I have to slam on my brakes, whom exactly is at who’s mercy?

    “Cyclist deaths apparently were up to 932 in 2020 from 857 in 2018, but who knows if this is an apples to apples comparison?”

    Wow – there might have been a larger increase in deaths from drowning in three inches of water during the same time period. That stat is practically meaningless.

    “Dedicated bike paths are superb, but they are hard to retrofit. ” No, they are an unmitigated disaster. And we already have dedicated bike paths. They are called sidewalks.

    “But for various reasons it’s in fashion with the normally safety-crazed elite, so the dangers get glossed over.”

    Again, the biggest threat to cyclists is themselves. But as with most other things, we are conditioned to accommodate the minority, specifically to the majority’s detriment.

    The attempt to integrate bicycles with motor vehicles on the same roadways is like holding a NASCAR race and a go-kart race on the same track, at the same time.

    Diversity is not our strength, and that goes for roadway transportation as well. And if bicycles want to be treated “as equals” to motor vehicles, then every bicycle on the road should be registered, plated, and insured.

  100. Your 2007 – 2018 fatalities chart reminds me of a spring/summer in Chicago in 2015 or 2016 where there were at least five bicyclists killed in traffic accidents. I remember they were all white young people in their 20s.

  101. @Jack D
    @prosa123

    The delivery bikes go the wrong way down one way streets to make deliveries (you're not going to go 3 1/2 additional blocks out of your way just to avoid going a few dozen yards the wrong way) and they are nearly silent so pedestrians step out in front of them (it's normal to jaywalk in the middle of the block in NY) and get killed.

    Here's a pro tip - when you are in NYC nowadays, before you cross the street look BOTH ways even if it is a one way street.

    The last time I was in NY I saw something I hadn't seen before. Amazon makes deliveries using totes carried on large electric bicycle towed flatbed trailers. There are guys riding bikes towing these enormous trailers behind them.

    https://cdn.geekwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/IMG_9324-620x386.jpg

    This can't possibly be safe.

    Replies: @epebble, @Hibernian, @Harry Baldwin, @Rob

    In Chicago bicyclists almost never stop for a stop sign or red light.

    • Agree: JimDandy, Mike Tre
    • Disagree: Corvinus
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Hibernian

    But at the same time they bitch like the worst self-righteous Karens about how people drive.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Anon
    @Hibernian

    How bout the roadside bicycle memorials you see here and there around the city. Usually the memorial or shrine is a white bike with flowers all around it.

    Replies: @Daniel H

    , @Mike Tre
    @Hibernian

    I put my own dash cam in my commercial vehicle, and one reason is to specifically protect myself from the ridiculously entitled behavior of pedestrians and cyclists on busy streets.

    In the ghettos, it's even worse, because the crackheads/wine heads who ride around on stolen bikes just lazily weave in and out of traffic lanes and walkways, not a care in the world, as they go out of their way to be a nuisance to motorists. It's my theory that they want to get hit because they think it's another form of ghetto lottery jackpot. Never mind they'll be in a wheelchair at best the rest of their pathetic lives.

    And bicyclists on beachfront path are downright hostile. They scream at pedestrians to get out of their way and will hit you if you're not careful.

    Seriously, bicyclists are the negroes of ground transportation and motorcyclists are the homosexual negroes.

    The last few years on Chicago, one now has to worry about the negroes on ATV's, motorized scooters, dirt bikes, golf carts, and in the winter, snowmobiles.

    The cops are nowhere to be found.

  102. @SafeNow
    https://i.pinimg.com/564x/75/fb/9c/75fb9cd4b8bc49a62349342268cf5a57.jpg

    I know a woman who is seeking romance on a dating app, and one of her rules is: If the guy’s photo he selected shows him wearing his bicycle lycra, cross him off the list. But setting aside the off-bike correlates of lycra guys, I wonder: Are they less safe or more safe on the streets compared to non-lycras? It would make for an interesting subgroup. And, speaking of subgrouping, what about people who have a 3-foot-tall safety flag attached to their bikes.? Obviously hard to control for… they are more prudent people to begin with

    As for me, my bike has a basket and a bell. These are useful, but aside from that, I think that they put me into a nerdy, doofussy, take-no-risks frame of mind.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Chriscom

    I think some study found that cyclists on Mary Poppins-type bikes (or even Pee Wee Herman’s!) are treated more kindly by drivers than the Lycra Tour de France wannabes. Less aggressive visuals tend to trigger less aggressive lizard-brain reactions (and perhaps not for nothing).

    • Thanks: SafeNow
  103. @Reg Cæsar
    @Thulean Friend


    Do you want a city that’s primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can’t have both.
     
    "Do you want a city that’s primarily based around [children] or one based around [drivers]? You can’t have both."

    There. Humanized it for you.

    If you people only would talk about trikeability, not "walkability".

    Replies: @Alden

    All over the world billions of people live in big cities. Some cities in China have 20 million people living in them. And they go about their daily lives just fine. They go to school and work and back again. They shop for small items that can be carried home. And big bulky items like refrigerators that must be delivered by truck, a large size dolly and a couple strong men.

    They visit friends engage in sports go for medical care go to movies concerts restaurants bars and other events. They go to government offices to get a permit apply for something mail packages and numerous reasons.

    And it’s all done by a combination of walking baby strollers bikes motorcycles cars and trucks.

    Since cities began it was a combination of walking and hand carts then animals pulling wagons then horse drawn char a bancs or buses in early 1600s France.

    Char a bancs vs modern buses. Think of the millions of tons of manure deposited on city streets before the internal combustion engine.

    Internal combustion or auto or self driven vehicles rather than horse drawn vehicles is probably one of the biggest and best public health measure since we began to wall in 2 legs.

    Waiting for buses must be unpleasant in Scandinavian winters. As well as walking. I love getting into a freezing car on a cold winter morning and turning the heat on.

  104. @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    In Chicago bicyclists almost never stop for a stop sign or red light.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Anon, @Mike Tre

    But at the same time they bitch like the worst self-righteous Karens about how people drive.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @JimDandy

    Speaking of driving. Maybe our host can chime in here.

    https://www.mic.com/impact/how-cars-became-a-deadly-anti-protest-weapon-53291831/amp

    University of Chicago Ph.D. student Ari Weil concluded his masters thesis on the increase in vehicle ramming attacks over the last decade in May 2020. Little did Weil know that a whole new batch of data would come trickling in over the summer. In June, he created his own database to track incoming reports, using social media posts and local and federal court documents as available.

    According to Weil, between late May and early September, there were 104 vehicle-ramming incidents at protests in the U.S. Weil speculates the rise in vehicle-ramming could, in part, be due to an increase in opportunity: The 2020 uprising for Black lives may be the largest protest mobilization in U.S. history.

    Weil stresses that this trend is not a coordinated effort coming from “card-carrying extremists.” Instead, he tells Mic, this is evidence of a greater normalization, through widely-shared memes on Facebook and Twitter, of violence against protesters. “None of these memes are new. The ‘run them over’ memes started six years ago with the start of Black Lives Matter protests,” Weil points out. “People were then joking about this online, that hashtag ‘all lives splatter’. I tracked those and saw them picking up again in late May, as the protests took off.” Memes joking about hitting protesters and about drivers’ “right to the road” contribute to a normalization of these actions, says Weil. “That discourse is a discourse about rights. ‘By being in the street, you're giving up your rights, therefore, I have full liberty to drive right through you,’” he says, paraphrasing perpetrators’ logic.

    Replies: @Malla

  105. anonymous[357] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimDandy
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well, he/they is Latinx so they can't blame White Nationalist rhetoric this time. But they can go with "toxic masculinity" and "incel" right?

    Replies: @anonymous

    so they can’t blame White Nationalist rhetoric this time

    The climate of fear created by Whitesupremiasma made him paranoid and crazy?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @anonymous

    That's actually not that far-fetched.

    , @JimDandy
    @anonymous

    Whereas the Buffalo shooter represented all kinds of GOP evils, according the the MSM narrative, the hispanic Texas shooter has inspired this narrative, which is currently linked on the front page of Drudge:

    Our greatest public-health crisis? The angry young American male

    Replies: @Anonymous

  106. @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    In Chicago bicyclists almost never stop for a stop sign or red light.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Anon, @Mike Tre

    How bout the roadside bicycle memorials you see here and there around the city. Usually the memorial or shrine is a white bike with flowers all around it.

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @Anon


    How bout the roadside bicycle memorials you see here and there around the city. Usually the memorial or shrine is a white bike with flowers all around it.
     
    I think that this is largely a Mexican thing.
  107. @HammerJack
    OMG JACK D WAS RIGHT ALL ALONG

    https://i.ibb.co/0r2mv7W/Screenshot-20220524-162726-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Reg Cæsar

    Finally, some REAL Nazis, as opposed to that Ukrainian Bandera boy band snowflakes are clutching their pearls over.

  108. @John Johnson
    @Fox

    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens.

    They behave aggressively because that is how you can get through a gridlocked downtown in minutes.

    If you are going to follow every traffic law then you might as well walk.

    The big cities really don't crack down on any type of traffic behavior.

    The police are too focused on urban community interactions.

    Replies: @Alden, @Pincher Martin, @Achmed E. Newman

    They behave what you might think is aggressively because they need to stay AWAY from the cars. That’s why I’ll run lights, move onto the sidewalk for stretches, whatever it takes. Safety comes first, and that mean staying as much away from the motor vehicles as is possible. Safety trumps traffic laws, and unlike with cars, there is not always a big overlap between the two.

    I recall being chewed out by a cop for breaking some law, but he didn’t realize I’d broken 6 of them just in the last 1/2 mile. Those 6 violations were/are part of my standard route for safety reasons. After dealing with this cop, the thing it taught me is to watch out for that particular cop car after that, that’s all.

    If you don’t ride a bicycle in the city, you probably can’t understand fully.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    They behave what you might think is aggressively because they need to stay AWAY from the cars. That’s why I’ll run lights, move onto the sidewalk for stretches, whatever it takes.

    Actually I have biked in the city and I would do stuff like use the crosswalk at red lights or pick up my bike and walk to get out of traffic. I would get glares all the time from cars, pedestrians and other bikers. Didn't care at all. These cities are a mess and I don't submit well to liberal authority. Most the bike lanes are a joke since people turn into them.

    I actually wasn't criticizing the people that do it.

    I was saying that the bike is pointless in the city if you just sit there with traffic.

    Safety comes first, and that mean staying as much away from the motor vehicles as is possible.

    Yea I didn't like cars behind me and didn't give a damn.

    I didn't bike much though since I preferred walking even if it took longer. Didn't like playing games with cars.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @slumber_j
    @Achmed E. Newman


    That’s why I’ll run lights, move onto the sidewalk for stretches, whatever it takes. Safety comes first [...] If you don’t ride a bicycle in the city, you probably can’t understand fully.
     
    It's safe to say that as a pedestrian in NYC I understand very fully indeed--more fully than you do apparently.
  109. so riders of loud motorcycles are being exterminated?
    Not really seeing a downside here…

  110. @HammerJack
    @John Johnson


    My wife commuted by bike for a year and I couldn’t believe the stories. There were a few sections where she would bike with traffic and people scream at her, honk, throw stuff, try to run her off the road, etc. It didn’t matter that it was the city and she could keep up with traffic. People took it personally that a bike was in the road. This happened all the time.
     
    People who don't ride bikes have no idea how common this is. An unbelievable amount of abuse, and yes—people will deliberately try to hit you. IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I'm a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Paleo Liberal, @AndrewR, @Mike Tre

    “IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I’m a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference. ”

    Bull fuggin shit pal. I avoid you assholes like the plague. All it takes is one stupid move from you people and my career is over, regardless of fault.

    Every single biker claims to be a careful and considerate biker and everyone one of you ignores just about every traffic device in place. I have never seen a bicyclist stop at a stop sign. Ever.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Mike Tre

    I consider city bus drivers and all truck drivers to be the best and safest drivers on the road. I drive Los Angeles to San Francisco several times a year and I feel safest between 2 huge trucks. Not in the car lane with car drivers behind me trying to push me into going 100 MPH instead of 90MPH

    Unbelievable how drivers of those huge trucks can navigate city driving with the tightest right turns crowded parking lots etc.

    They are the safest and most expert drivers. In my opinion. And I am always right

    , @Brutusale
    @Mike Tre

    All I need to know about bikers and their self-preservation instinct is how many of them I see pulled over on Route 93 at the MA/NH border to REMOVE THEIR HELMETS when heading to Bike Week in Laconia.

    Live Free or Die!

  111. I stay away from traffic and snap off salutes to cars as I meet them at intersections. Rarely have issues with cars, love riding my bike.

    I wear USMC cycling jerseys when I ride mostly. Plus I have a Ruger LC9S that fits in my jersey pocket, which is probably not needed since I’m a bigger guy. It’s 7+1…cute little thing.

    From the sounds of the bad asses on here in their 3,000lbs guided missiles, it’s good I carry I guess?

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @ATate


    Plus I have a Ruger LC9S that fits in my jersey pocket, which is probably not needed since I’m a bigger guy. It’s 7+1…cute little thing.
     
    Carrying while biking.

    Yes, I kept my six shooter in my little bag behind my seat doing my suburban biking.

    Started doing that when some SUV mama on her cell nearly killed me.

    I figured the gun wouldn't save my life, but in my bloody, dying breath, could get some cold revenge.

    Never pulled it out though. I figured it would also handle big vicious dogs.

    Now I take walks. Getting old and mellow. At least older...
  112. I ride a bicycle for basic transportation in town from about late April to mid-October.

    I don’t give a hoot about climate change, though I would strongly prefer it to be much warmer in Winter where I live if we could change it.

    I ride because I have 70% loss of vision in my left eye and can’t pass the exam fir a driver’s license. I have a weird job so i rarely need to see people in person.

    Riding in my small town is dangerous, even with some dedicated bike paths in it, because driver’s aren’t used to seeing cyclists. I’ve been within feet of being hit many times, within inches twice.

    Riding in the countryside is very dangerous because of narrow roadway shoulders and lack of speed enforcement out among the cornfields. I will never ride out there while alone.

    Back in town, keep in mind that momentum is precious on a bike, and riderscl will almost always “try that” just to conserve energy. Look out for them; they aren’t ever going away.

    Electric bikes are folly. One can buy a very good used motorcycle for waht those cost, and ride hundreds of miles at a stretch.

  113. @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    In Chicago bicyclists almost never stop for a stop sign or red light.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Anon, @Mike Tre

    I put my own dash cam in my commercial vehicle, and one reason is to specifically protect myself from the ridiculously entitled behavior of pedestrians and cyclists on busy streets.

    In the ghettos, it’s even worse, because the crackheads/wine heads who ride around on stolen bikes just lazily weave in and out of traffic lanes and walkways, not a care in the world, as they go out of their way to be a nuisance to motorists. It’s my theory that they want to get hit because they think it’s another form of ghetto lottery jackpot. Never mind they’ll be in a wheelchair at best the rest of their pathetic lives.

    And bicyclists on beachfront path are downright hostile. They scream at pedestrians to get out of their way and will hit you if you’re not careful.

    Seriously, bicyclists are the negroes of ground transportation and motorcyclists are the homosexual negroes.

    The last few years on Chicago, one now has to worry about the negroes on ATV’s, motorized scooters, dirt bikes, golf carts, and in the winter, snowmobiles.

    The cops are nowhere to be found.

  114. O/T. Times have changed, A zillion years ago, a few friends and I managed to smuggle a real pizza into the high-school cafeteria without violating any “where’s your pass?” type of regulations. Classmates eating their fish sticks were envious.The cafeteria mother figured we must have violated some rule or other and sent the four us to the vice-principal’s office. He lined us up in a row in front of his desk and half sternly and half laughing asked how we did it, and then satisfied no rule been broken, said OK, but don’t do it again.

    So, in the course of two generations, the U.S. has gone from active-pizza prank to active shooter.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  115. @Jack D
    @prosa123

    The delivery bikes go the wrong way down one way streets to make deliveries (you're not going to go 3 1/2 additional blocks out of your way just to avoid going a few dozen yards the wrong way) and they are nearly silent so pedestrians step out in front of them (it's normal to jaywalk in the middle of the block in NY) and get killed.

    Here's a pro tip - when you are in NYC nowadays, before you cross the street look BOTH ways even if it is a one way street.

    The last time I was in NY I saw something I hadn't seen before. Amazon makes deliveries using totes carried on large electric bicycle towed flatbed trailers. There are guys riding bikes towing these enormous trailers behind them.

    https://cdn.geekwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/IMG_9324-620x386.jpg

    This can't possibly be safe.

    Replies: @epebble, @Hibernian, @Harry Baldwin, @Rob

    I too saw these e-bike towed trailers in Manhattan during a recent visit. They are a menace. There’s no way these vehicles should have the use of bike lanes. They should be registered and licensed as motor vehicles.

  116. I should have put this up top: One of my favorite writers, Lionel Shriver, in her novel The Motion of the Body through Space, has a protagonist* who has ridden a bike in NYC her adult life, though, with her bad knees, is getting too frail for it.

    There’s a great scene in which she is riding down some pathway along one of the rivers, and she describes what goes on on the supposedly just bicycle path. She hits it all, illegal alien delivery guys, the spandex crowd, “Wall Streeters with laptop panniers and prissy Velcro straps around the ankles of their suit pants”, oblivious teenagers texting like mad, etc.

    I wish I could paste in the whole thing, but I don’t have the book on me. She is a hell of a writer.

    .

    * The wife in the story, who I’m pretty sure is very much taken off of the author herself. She writes of what she knows, and I think that’s a good thing.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Who knew Lionel was now a girlie name?

    Gone the way of Evelyn I guess.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  117. @JimDandy
    @Hibernian

    But at the same time they bitch like the worst self-righteous Karens about how people drive.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Speaking of driving. Maybe our host can chime in here.

    https://www.mic.com/impact/how-cars-became-a-deadly-anti-protest-weapon-53291831/amp

    University of Chicago Ph.D. student Ari Weil concluded his masters thesis on the increase in vehicle ramming attacks over the last decade in May 2020. Little did Weil know that a whole new batch of data would come trickling in over the summer. In June, he created his own database to track incoming reports, using social media posts and local and federal court documents as available.

    According to Weil, between late May and early September, there were 104 vehicle-ramming incidents at protests in the U.S. Weil speculates the rise in vehicle-ramming could, in part, be due to an increase in opportunity: The 2020 uprising for Black lives may be the largest protest mobilization in U.S. history.

    Weil stresses that this trend is not a coordinated effort coming from “card-carrying extremists.” Instead, he tells Mic, this is evidence of a greater normalization, through widely-shared memes on Facebook and Twitter, of violence against protesters. “None of these memes are new. The ‘run them over’ memes started six years ago with the start of Black Lives Matter protests,” Weil points out. “People were then joking about this online, that hashtag ‘all lives splatter’. I tracked those and saw them picking up again in late May, as the protests took off.” Memes joking about hitting protesters and about drivers’ “right to the road” contribute to a normalization of these actions, says Weil. “That discourse is a discourse about rights. ‘By being in the street, you’re giving up your rights, therefore, I have full liberty to drive right through you,’” he says, paraphrasing perpetrators’ logic.

    • Replies: @Malla
    @Corvinus

    Yawn!! Why didn't he go all the way with his bullshit and say that evil White Nazis are trying to kill noble BLM revolutionaries?

  118. @Gamecock
    @John Johnson

    I ride my motorcycle about 6,000 miles a year. I don't find it dangerous at all.

    My theory is stupid people do stupid things on motorcycles and get themselves killed. That does not make the motorcycle dangerous.

    Plus, I am a believer in "all the gear, all the time." I see plenty of riders wearing a T-shirt and tennis shoes with no helmet. Around here, we call them "organ donors."

    Replies: @John Johnson, @AndrewR

    My theory is stupid people do stupid things on motorcycles and get themselves killed. That does not make the motorcycle dangerous.

    Even without stupid people it is dangerous to be on two wheels without a cage when the vehicle traveling 20 feet behind you weighs 5 tons and is driven by a soccer mom that is putting on her makeup.

    For urban commutes a motorcycle is a very bad idea. You can be the best rider in the world and all it takes is for some stoner to look at his phone while vaping and you are in the hospital for months.

    Plus, I am a believer in “all the gear, all the time.” I see plenty of riders wearing a T-shirt and tennis shoes with no helmet. Around here, we call them “organ donors.”

    Yes gear is good but if you get hit by an F150 going 60 mph you are still going to be smashed.

    That motorcycle gear is designed for falls and not hits from 5 ton vehicles.

    • Agree: J.Ross, AndrewR
    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @John Johnson

    [citation needed]

    It is dangerous to walk down the street with 2-ton cars passing by you just feet away.

  119. Back in the mid 1990s I lived in the Lincoln Park/Wrigleyville area. I had a car but it was randomly destroyed by a drunk driver. I worked in the Loop so the el worked well.

    I rode my bike like a maniac every day – about 15 miles daily, in city traffic, then the lakefront trail. Did it for fitness. Then I took long rides on the weekend. My longest was to Kenosha and back but that difficult.

    My parents white flighted to DuPage a few months before I was born. Hodag central was just over the Cook/DuPage border so for a couple years I would ride my bike out there every other weekend to visit.

    My mother begged me for over a year to get a helmet. I did not get one because I was stupid. So after a particularly vehement discussion, I decided to get one. I was always a Momma’s boy.

    I bought one on a Saturday morning and on the way out to DuPage a babushka with a Cadillac saw a parking spot on Belmont near St Pat’s HS and ran me off the road head first into a chain link fence. I was fine. The babushka was mad at me.

    Bottom line: listen to your mothers, lads.

  120. @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    They behave what you might think is aggressively because they need to stay AWAY from the cars. That's why I'll run lights, move onto the sidewalk for stretches, whatever it takes. Safety comes first, and that mean staying as much away from the motor vehicles as is possible. Safety trumps traffic laws, and unlike with cars, there is not always a big overlap between the two.

    I recall being chewed out by a cop for breaking some law, but he didn't realize I'd broken 6 of them just in the last 1/2 mile. Those 6 violations were/are part of my standard route for safety reasons. After dealing with this cop, the thing it taught me is to watch out for that particular cop car after that, that's all.

    If you don't ride a bicycle in the city, you probably can't understand fully.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @slumber_j

    They behave what you might think is aggressively because they need to stay AWAY from the cars. That’s why I’ll run lights, move onto the sidewalk for stretches, whatever it takes.

    Actually I have biked in the city and I would do stuff like use the crosswalk at red lights or pick up my bike and walk to get out of traffic. I would get glares all the time from cars, pedestrians and other bikers. Didn’t care at all. These cities are a mess and I don’t submit well to liberal authority. Most the bike lanes are a joke since people turn into them.

    I actually wasn’t criticizing the people that do it.

    I was saying that the bike is pointless in the city if you just sit there with traffic.

    Safety comes first, and that mean staying as much away from the motor vehicles as is possible.

    Yea I didn’t like cars behind me and didn’t give a damn.

    I didn’t bike much though since I preferred walking even if it took longer. Didn’t like playing games with cars.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    Got to tell you this one, since you are one who understands, John. Riding down this 3-lane 1-way street in a city, I noted that a cop car was blocking the bike lane completely. Going into the lanes would not work, so I got onto the sidewalk 50 yards ahead of time. It was a really wide sidewalk too.

    Well, the cop lady is there dealing with some passed-out bum, and as I ride by she yells "get off the sidewalk!" You think you're fast - that middle finger came out faster than a revolver off of one of the Doolin-Dalton gang. "Fuck you" is what I yelled, but it may have sounded a little off due to the Doppler effect.

    Replies: @Frank the Prof

  121. @John Johnson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    They behave what you might think is aggressively because they need to stay AWAY from the cars. That’s why I’ll run lights, move onto the sidewalk for stretches, whatever it takes.

    Actually I have biked in the city and I would do stuff like use the crosswalk at red lights or pick up my bike and walk to get out of traffic. I would get glares all the time from cars, pedestrians and other bikers. Didn't care at all. These cities are a mess and I don't submit well to liberal authority. Most the bike lanes are a joke since people turn into them.

    I actually wasn't criticizing the people that do it.

    I was saying that the bike is pointless in the city if you just sit there with traffic.

    Safety comes first, and that mean staying as much away from the motor vehicles as is possible.

    Yea I didn't like cars behind me and didn't give a damn.

    I didn't bike much though since I preferred walking even if it took longer. Didn't like playing games with cars.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Got to tell you this one, since you are one who understands, John. Riding down this 3-lane 1-way street in a city, I noted that a cop car was blocking the bike lane completely. Going into the lanes would not work, so I got onto the sidewalk 50 yards ahead of time. It was a really wide sidewalk too.

    Well, the cop lady is there dealing with some passed-out bum, and as I ride by she yells “get off the sidewalk!” You think you’re fast – that middle finger came out faster than a revolver off of one of the Doolin-Dalton gang. “Fuck you” is what I yelled, but it may have sounded a little off due to the Doppler effect.

    • Replies: @Frank the Prof
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yikes, it sounds like you should move out of the city. I live in idyllic rural America with lots of bike paths and little traveled gravel roads. When I lived in North Jersey, I didn't cycle much mostly indoors and on weekends.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  122. @Alden
    @Thulean Friend

    You can’t have a city based on walking cycling and public transit when black predators are everywhere attacking pedestrians. And lying in wait at the bus and subway stops for the prey to emerge and start walking home. Bus stops. Regular travelers can’t even sit on the bus benches to wait for a bus because black deranged derelicts live in bus benches. Even in the highest income zip code in town.

    Much of the reason city people drive cars instead of using public transit is safety. Plus the horrors of being stuck on buses with snarling vicious blacks screaming instead of talking quietly.

    Take public transit in any major city or suburb that has about 15% of blacks for a month and get back to us . Alternate days and evenings for the full American public transit experience.

    Or why we can’t have nice things.

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @John Johnson

    Greetings, Alden,

    That sounds truly horrible. Nightmarish even.
    Where I live we have no bus stops, very few africans and very little crime.
    We do have a bus that you can ride, by appointment, but not many people do.
    Our roads really are not safe for bicycles. Too steep and curvy.
    And we have one zip code that covers pretty much the whole county.

    Snarling vicious blacks? No thank you!

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Adam Smith

    It’s just life in the big city. Every city. You should the neighborhood 2 of my grandchildren have to take a bus through to get to their expensive private school.

    Aren’t all blacks snarling and vicious?

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  123. @AnotherDad
    @Thulean Friend


    Retrofitting isn’t an issue. It’s about priorities. Do you want a city that’s primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can’t have both.
     
    But you can easily have separate cities, even separate parts of cities. Pretty straightforward.

    One very noticeable thing--even here--is that people tend to think their way should be the only way.

    Nah, different strokes for different folks. For instance, I want to junk minoritarianism and return to a traditional American self-governing republic, centered on normal productive family people reproducing our nation for "our posterity". I think there are 100 million Americans who want the same--probably quite a few more once it was an option and they gave it some thought. But I do not begrudge the Rainbow people their rainbow. (I suspect without boring "white bread" guys like me to kick around anymore it will crash and burn. But that's their problem.)

    Likewise urbanism. It does not all have to be the same. From region to region, city to city, even communities within a particular urban conglomeration.

    Replies: @Travis

    Unfortunately not even close to 100 million Americans want a return to a traditional American self-governing republic, centered on normal productive family people reproducing our nation for “our posterity”

    There are only 190 million Whites in America today. just 150 million whites over the age of 20 and 10 million of them are over the age of 80 so pretty much useless. More than half of the whites are women. Married white women with children may share your vision, but unmarried white females mostly vote for more government and more diversity.

    Assuming 90% of married whites want a return to a traditional American self-governing republic, this would be less than 100 million Americans. Less than 60% of White adults are married, so we have about 90 million married White people in America but 10% of them are married to non-whites. So just 40 million white couples in America….at most 70 million whites want a return to a traditional American self-governing republic.

    A key reason that minoritarianism is popular, more Americans benefit from it in some way. so-called minoritarianism is an anti-white male ideology, and only about 24% of the US population consists of straight white males. While the married white women typically side with their white husbands, we still have a minority of white males plus married White females….the total number of straight white males plus their white wives is just 34% of the US population. We are a minority. Married white couples with kids is a shrinking demographic.

    A big reason that minoritarianism is popular is due to the 60 million unmarried white females who consistently support feminism (a main component of minoritarianism). Not to mention the significant number of white males who support feminism and minoritarianism.

    [MORE]

    The best case scenario for a separate White state would be in Maine, which is still 95% white. Any whites who want to live in a white state could and should move to Maine so they can create a Whitopia. There is enough space and potential in Maine to support 10 million whites. The weather helps repel non-whites and they have ports and a large coast, good infrastructure. If just 100,00o white nationalist families moved to main they could choose the governor and their congressmen and school boards without interference from non-whites. They could demonstrate how to create a white separate state, which is the first step to separate nations.

  124. The latest Honda Cub. Remember the Cub from the old days.

    I so much want one of these, but I am terrified that I will end up splattered all over the road.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    My dad had a Honda motorbike with a 90 cc engine. My mom made him give it up when he got knocked by a car when he was approaching 70.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Daniel H

    You want to meet the nicest people!

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2e/You_meet_the_nicest_people_on_a_Honda.jpg


    Random fact of the day: Honda has car factories in Marysville, Ohio and Lincoln, Alabama. Kawasaki has motorcycle plants in Maryville, Missouri and Lincoln, Nebraska.

    Oh, and Lincoln, Alabama isn't named for whom you might think it is.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    , @Anonymous
    @Daniel H

    I learned to ride on a Honda 50cc Cub when I was living in Japan as a SOFA dependent and got all my training and licensing, from 小型 to 大型 in Japan. My first solo licensed ride on the Cub was from NAF Atsugi to NSF Kamiseya, only about 3km, but I loved it.

    When I settled in the States and went to take the driving test to get a motorcycle license my mother drove me to the DMV. I was surprised to discover they didn't provide a motorcycle and I had to use my own. So we drove home and I got my bike and rode back to the DMV, pulling up in full view of some cops. The test guy had to know I had illegally ridden in but didn't care. The road test itself was a joke, but it became even more of a joke when I glanced over at the examiner and saw that he wasn't even paying attention and was talking to somebody with his back turned. I finished the test anyway and he signed me off and I was all legal. What a contrast with Japan, where fewer than 5 percent of riders pass the road test on the first try.

    In Japan, to receive your motorcycle license for a 400cc or larger bike you have to pass an aptitude test (適正 試験) and receive about 45 hours of instruction before you can take the written and driving tests. You have to have passed the tests for the smaller-sized motorcycles before you can take the test for the big bikes. Once you pass, you can't carry a passenger for the first year and not on an expressway for the first three years.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Anon
    @Daniel H

    I had a Honda CT90 for a few years. It’s the forerunner of the 125 in your picture.
    Fantastic, practical, and thrifty machine.

    Take a motorcycle course and gst one.

  125. If Democrat president then school shooting
    If Democrat president then school shooting
    If Democrat president then school shooting
    Remember when I said they will do this until we stop them, and Jack was outraged that I wasn’t properly hypnotized? They will do this until we stop them.

  126. Steve writes: “But now car owners are driving like maniacs, so I wouldn’t want to share a surface street with them.”

    Why “surface”? Are surface streets significantly different from underground or elevated roadways?

  127. @Thulean Friend
    Sorry Steve, your post is misinformed.

    The problem is not the bicycle. The problem is car-centric urbanism. Even many European countries, despite much fanfare, have not made a decisive shift away even if there has been enormously positive changes in the past decade.

    Ultimately a decision has to be made to ban most cars from cities. There's no way going around that. I suspect the US will be the last man standing, due to how US cities look like. But even that is not an excuse. Berlin was razed to the ground and has a typical "American" look, yet the progress in that city has been spectacular.

    Retrofitting isn't an issue. It's about priorities. Do you want a city that's primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can't have both.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @aNewBanner, @David Davenport

    A significant fraction of vehicles on the road are vans, trucks, and semis moving food, materials, and equipment from point A to point B. It’s the last mile problem, and it’s not going away. You can’t move it in public transportation, on bicycles, or with porters. That means you need roads. The only way you eliminate cars from these roads is by some sort of sumptuary law, which were regularly ignored or mass poverty.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @aNewBanner


    A significant fraction of vehicles on the road are vans, trucks, and semis moving food, materials, and equipment from point A to point B. It’s the last mile problem, and it’s not going away. You can’t move it in public transportation, on bicycles, or with porters.
     
    https://i.imgur.com/jRyQlkT.jpg

    For smaller deliveries, you can certainly do a lot with bicycles. Some amount of truck/van traffic will have to be accepted but this fraction will be certainly 1/5th of what we have now, if not less, once you get rid of personal vehicles.

    Replies: @Daniel H

  128. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @HammerJack


    People who don’t ride bikes have no idea how common this is. An unbelievable amount of abuse, and yes—people will deliberately try to hit you. IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I’m a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference.
     
    Riding a bicycle in situations where you know that you're going to irritate people (i.e., block to block in an urban environment, or on a narrow two lane road with no shoulder) is antisocial behavior. Often, bike riders act in a passive-aggressive manner by shifting the responsibility for their own safety to motorists and then get hot and bothered when motorists don't act in the ways that the bike riders tacitly expect. What is especially frustrating is when bicyclists block traffic, then you patiently wait for the opportunity to get around and past them, only to get stopped at a red light which the bicyclists themselves ignore so the process must be repeated successively. Bicyclists must know that this is infuriating, but they do it anyway. I don't abuse bicyclists, threaten or commit violence against them, but I do dislike then intensely.

    The U.S. has a car culture, and does not have a bicycle culture even in its urban environs. No measure of demanding otherwise will make it so.

    Road and highway funding is largely by way of fuel taxes, so no, bicycles don't have an equal moral right to the roads that cars do.

    Replies: @Alden

    There’s only one thing that really bothers me about bikers. Other than on the whole, they are gay pompous pretentious liberals.

    It’s when I’m walking on a sidewalk and they come up behind me very close, bump into me and almost knock me down. They do call “left”
    But never in time for me to realize what they’re saying and that they want me to move to my right.

    Arrogant assholes First I do a lot of walking in very high traffic city business streets with cars trucks and buses making noise so I can’t hear them call left. And it’s illegal to bike in city sidewalks. But being asshole pretentious liberals, they’re always in the right. Even if they’re illegally on the sidewalk and bump into people who didn’t get out of their way fast enough.

    I watch out for them as I watch out for cars trucks and pedestrians.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Alden

    A long time ago, bicycles came with bells. It was a pretty standardized warning system for pedestrians. Now, it's just somebody behind you saying "Left," and he waits until he's close enough to be heard. Can be scary.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman

  129. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    I’m betting on white folks enjoying the most bicycle deaths, but Latino’s MUST lead the pack with motorcycle deaths. Every time I see some shitty news story involving a motorcycle accident, it most often includes a dead Latino motorcyclist. They drive like assholes. They don’t think ahead.

    White bicyclists die often for the same reason, except they carry an extra scoop of insolence that helps create the circumstances that ensure their demise.

  130. @AndrewR
    @John Johnson

    What city? I imagine this behavior is more common in some regions/areas than others.

    And was this why she gave it up?

    I stopped cycling not because of intentionally aggressive human behavior but because of dogs and generally foolish driving by others.

    Replies: @Alden

    There are dog lovers and bike riders. But there are no bike riding dog lovers..

  131. Are off-road motorcycles included in the motorcycle death statistics? They’re a lot less likely (virtually zero chance) of getting hit by another vehicle, but there are plenty of other ways to get killed on those things.

    Somebody upthread mentioned that motorcycle riders are more reckless. If so, I haven’t seen much evidence for that. Most all the motorcycle riders I see on the road seem to drive carefully and responsibly. The most reckless two demos I see on the roads are middle-aged white guys driving expensive new pick-up trucks and young diverse ghetto-rat types in beaters (the cars I mean, not necessarily the T-shirt).

  132. @Reg Cæsar
    La ley de Sailer?


    14 students, 1 teacher dead after shooting at elementary school: Governor

    Replies: @prosa123, @AnotherDad, @JimDandy, @Brutusale, @Alden

    It’s now 21 people dead. Perp is Salvatore Ramos 18 student at the high school American citizen. Killed grandma first then went to the school. Or why the second worst thing the satanic supremes ever did was closing down the mental hospitals.

    O’Connor vs Donaldson plaintiffs attorney was the satanic ACLU. Every person harmed by a lunatic out on the streets should sue the ACLU. Causation is very clear.

  133. @Alden
    @Jack D

    Great post jack. Transporting food and kids is why families need cars. Even single people if they don’t have a car for food shopping the end up living in take out it frozen pizza from the nearest convenience store. A weeks worth of food can’t be carried bussed or biked home in one trip. Food shopping every couple days means small amounts than can be carried. But it’s such a waster of time and a pain people just don’t do it. If I didn’t have a car, I’d rent a car once a week or 3 times a month for food shopping and other errands.

    A new microwave and other heavy or bulky items need a car. How do you arrange a load of laundry or dry cleaning in a bike?

    Some welfare Mom advocates lobby for welfare department paid cab Uber service once a week so the welfare Moms can do a weekly grocery shopping to feed the brats. I know most commenters are men, not Moms, but think how you’d grocery shop for a family if you didn’t have car.

    100 years ago city people didn’t need cars because everything was delivered. Cabs were plentiful and cheap But things changed. No more delivery for decades. Now delivery is coming back. Plus plus plus the matter of safety from black predators.

    Nurses, who often work evening and night shifts, used to be pretty low paid. Right up to the 1960s when they formed a union to lobby for higher pay.

    One of the big reasons nurses needed higher pay so they could easily afford both rent and a car was black predators. The union won . And nurses no longer have a high rate of being raped. Remember that hospitals, like colleges were built in the 19th century in safe neighborhoods Which became the most dangerous neighborhoods in town once the blacks moved in.

    Nurses Needed cars, not wanted cars as we learned in Econ 101. Needed cars to avoid robbery rape and murder by blacks defended by ACLU

    I wonder how the supercilious Scandinavians will feel about their no car policies when the Muslims take over.

    I was a Probation Officer. Virtually every mugging was because people were on foot. Unfortunate people can’t walk the dog or walk home from the bus stop without being attacked but that’s life in America.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @Charlesz Martel

    I was a Probation Officer. Virtually every mugging was because people were on foot. Unfortunate people can’t walk the dog or walk home from the bus stop without being attacked but that’s life in America.

    When you’re in a car, don’t they call it a carjacking, instead?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Johann Ricke


    When you’re in a car, don’t they call it a carjacking, instead?
     
    If they take the car along with everything else.
    , @Alden
    @Johann Ricke

    Easier for 2 or 3 blacks in a car to rob a victim on foot. Procedure is drive around near a street with a bus line. Spot a victim go around the block. Drop off the robber half a block behind the victim. Robber walks quickly robs victim car is right there. And off they go.

    One reason there’s so much street crime in the big cities is because there is public transit. People waiting on subway and bus stops. People walking to and from subway bus stops. Instead of a locked garage to another garage. And then up to destination in an elevator.

    Walking on city streets is a cause of crime. Ban walking.

  134. @Alden
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    There’s only one thing that really bothers me about bikers. Other than on the whole, they are gay pompous pretentious liberals.

    It’s when I’m walking on a sidewalk and they come up behind me very close, bump into me and almost knock me down. They do call “left”
    But never in time for me to realize what they’re saying and that they want me to move to my right.

    Arrogant assholes First I do a lot of walking in very high traffic city business streets with cars trucks and buses making noise so I can’t hear them call left. And it’s illegal to bike in city sidewalks. But being asshole pretentious liberals, they’re always in the right. Even if they’re illegally on the sidewalk and bump into people who didn’t get out of their way fast enough.

    I watch out for them as I watch out for cars trucks and pedestrians.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    A long time ago, bicycles came with bells. It was a pretty standardized warning system for pedestrians. Now, it’s just somebody behind you saying “Left,” and he waits until he’s close enough to be heard. Can be scary.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    A long time ago, bicycles came with bells. It was a pretty standardized warning system for pedestrians. Now, it’s just somebody behind you saying “Left,” and he waits until he’s close enough to be heard. Can be scary.
     
    Bicyclists don't want to use a bell. Bells are gay. At least that's what all the bicyclists in their butt-hugging spandex bike-shorts think.

    Replies: @Clyde

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    It's supposed to be "on your left". If they just yell "left!", that's indeed a stupid and worthless communication. Then again ... Peak Stupidity.

    Long ago, I had a boat air horn attached to my left front fork on one bike till it ran out of propellant. That was for cars, not pedestrians.

  135. “But for various reasons it’s in fashion with the normally safety-crazed elite, so the dangers get glossed over.”

    Question: do the elite not also have cars of their own? Yes, they do.

    And, don’t they tend to use them during all kinds of weather year round? Yes, tehy do.

    Virtue signaling on its finest and most hypocritical display.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    They do have cars. They just want you on a bike so you don't clog up their roads and parking lots. Any more questions?

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  136. Strongtowns.org has a lot to say on the topic of mobility run by a traffic engineer.

    Not just bikes is a amusing youtube channel on the topic

  137. @Daniel H
    The latest Honda Cub. Remember the Cub from the old days.

    I so much want one of these, but I am terrified that I will end up splattered all over the road.

    https://www.cycleworld.com/resizer/wXYLGhFdtulM4jYI-lBabTlf0f0=/arc-photo-octane/arc3-prod/public/PA3XLZBJ3FC7VDBL2JHPO2QGGI.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous, @Anon

    My dad had a Honda motorbike with a 90 cc engine. My mom made him give it up when he got knocked by a car when he was approaching 70.

  138. @SIMP simp
    The excellent FortNine Youtube channel has a video about:

    Why Electric Bikes are More Dangerous than Motorcycles



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wM8Xli2KTzI

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe

    Good video- thanks for posting.

  139. @Anon
    @Hibernian

    How bout the roadside bicycle memorials you see here and there around the city. Usually the memorial or shrine is a white bike with flowers all around it.

    Replies: @Daniel H

    How bout the roadside bicycle memorials you see here and there around the city. Usually the memorial or shrine is a white bike with flowers all around it.

    I think that this is largely a Mexican thing.

  140. @Johann Ricke
    @Alden


    I was a Probation Officer. Virtually every mugging was because people were on foot. Unfortunate people can’t walk the dog or walk home from the bus stop without being attacked but that’s life in America.
     
    When you're in a car, don't they call it a carjacking, instead?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden

    When you’re in a car, don’t they call it a carjacking, instead?

    If they take the car along with everything else.

  141. @aNewBanner
    @Thulean Friend

    A significant fraction of vehicles on the road are vans, trucks, and semis moving food, materials, and equipment from point A to point B. It’s the last mile problem, and it’s not going away. You can’t move it in public transportation, on bicycles, or with porters. That means you need roads. The only way you eliminate cars from these roads is by some sort of sumptuary law, which were regularly ignored or mass poverty.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    A significant fraction of vehicles on the road are vans, trucks, and semis moving food, materials, and equipment from point A to point B. It’s the last mile problem, and it’s not going away. You can’t move it in public transportation, on bicycles, or with porters.


    For smaller deliveries, you can certainly do a lot with bicycles. Some amount of truck/van traffic will have to be accepted but this fraction will be certainly 1/5th of what we have now, if not less, once you get rid of personal vehicles.

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @Thulean Friend

    Back in the day - 1960's - one would see these delivery bikes all over Manhattan, NYC.

  142. @HammerJack
    OMG JACK D WAS RIGHT ALL ALONG

    https://i.ibb.co/0r2mv7W/Screenshot-20220524-162726-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Reg Cæsar

    Every day is Halloween in Beverly Hills.

  143. @Daniel H
    The latest Honda Cub. Remember the Cub from the old days.

    I so much want one of these, but I am terrified that I will end up splattered all over the road.

    https://www.cycleworld.com/resizer/wXYLGhFdtulM4jYI-lBabTlf0f0=/arc-photo-octane/arc3-prod/public/PA3XLZBJ3FC7VDBL2JHPO2QGGI.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous, @Anon

    You want to meet the nicest people!

    Random fact of the day: Honda has car factories in Marysville, Ohio and Lincoln, Alabama. Kawasaki has motorcycle plants in Maryville, Missouri and Lincoln, Nebraska.

    Oh, and Lincoln, Alabama isn’t named for whom you might think it is.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Reg Cæsar


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2e/You_meet_the_nicest_people_on_a_Honda.jpg
     
    A little glimpse of the civilized nation we once had.
  144. @Alden
    @Pincher Martin

    Highway One? Their favorite trick in the city is at stop signs. They squiggle between the curb and a car stooped at the sign. So drivers in the cross streets can’t see them. Then they zoom out hoping to get hit. Partly for the Personal injury claim and partly to lobby the city for more bike favoritism.

    Follow the money Who’s funding all the save Mother Earth groups? . The bike manufacturers. That’s who. Just like the entire electrical industry from copper miners to the electricians funds all save the earth end consumption of fossil fuels propaganda. Result will be winter heat bills quadruple what we pay now. And running the electric washer and dryer a big budget item.

    And never being able to cook broiled near again because electric broilers don’t broil. Or even properly pan fry steaks and pork chops.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    Highway One?

    Yes, but also on the longer (i.e., slower) scenic routes through the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. For example, if you take the road up toward Mount Tamalpais and then cut over to make your way to Muir Beach, bicyclists are all over those roads on the weekends.

    It takes a strong man when passing them to not want to bump them off the side of a steep cliff after driving slowly behind them for several minutes waiting for an opening to pass. A few years back one young driver was not strong enough to fight the inclination and delibarately ran over several of them on a Marin or Sonoma County rural roadway.

    I certainly don’t applaud the sentiment, but I understand it. I have sometimes yelled at them to get off the road.

    Their favorite trick in the city is at stop signs. They squiggle between the curb and a car stooped at the sign. So drivers in the cross streets can’t see them. Then they zoom out hoping to get hit. Partly for the Personal injury claim and partly to lobby the city for more bike favoritism.

    My favorite story about SF bicyclists was when they protested the city’s desire to enforce traffic laws against them by purposely going slow through the city’s streets to clog up the traffic.

  145. I’m 75 and I’ve bicycled 3,000 miles a year for the last 40 years. I’ve been lucky enough to have lived in Santa Barbara and Silicon Valley where there were bike trails and side streets so I could bicycle to my freelance projects and rarely have to be on the main roads.

    I started bicycling because I read that exercise could cure depression. It has worked very well. Plus, I am strong and fit while my friends and family are soft and obese.

    I’ve had a couple or three minor injuries but nothing serious. I’m not in a hurry. My longest commute was 20 miles a day when I was working at the San Jose Business Journal downtown, but there was a creekside trail bike path for most of the distance. These days I have a 12 mile round trip to Goleta Beach to study the Pacific Ocean.

    One of my bicycling rules is that I never never never ride in the dark. If it’s night, I drive.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Colinsky

    Thanks.

    , @HammerJack
    @Colinsky

    Recently I decided to take up biking again and to my amazement bikes are still affordable, among their many other virtues. Now if I can only figure out a way to get the SUV drivers to pay attention to what's outside their windshields.

  146. Better metric is per trip, not distance.

  147. @Corvinus
    @JimDandy

    Speaking of driving. Maybe our host can chime in here.

    https://www.mic.com/impact/how-cars-became-a-deadly-anti-protest-weapon-53291831/amp

    University of Chicago Ph.D. student Ari Weil concluded his masters thesis on the increase in vehicle ramming attacks over the last decade in May 2020. Little did Weil know that a whole new batch of data would come trickling in over the summer. In June, he created his own database to track incoming reports, using social media posts and local and federal court documents as available.

    According to Weil, between late May and early September, there were 104 vehicle-ramming incidents at protests in the U.S. Weil speculates the rise in vehicle-ramming could, in part, be due to an increase in opportunity: The 2020 uprising for Black lives may be the largest protest mobilization in U.S. history.

    Weil stresses that this trend is not a coordinated effort coming from “card-carrying extremists.” Instead, he tells Mic, this is evidence of a greater normalization, through widely-shared memes on Facebook and Twitter, of violence against protesters. “None of these memes are new. The ‘run them over’ memes started six years ago with the start of Black Lives Matter protests,” Weil points out. “People were then joking about this online, that hashtag ‘all lives splatter’. I tracked those and saw them picking up again in late May, as the protests took off.” Memes joking about hitting protesters and about drivers’ “right to the road” contribute to a normalization of these actions, says Weil. “That discourse is a discourse about rights. ‘By being in the street, you're giving up your rights, therefore, I have full liberty to drive right through you,’” he says, paraphrasing perpetrators’ logic.

    Replies: @Malla

    Yawn!! Why didn’t he go all the way with his bullshit and say that evil White Nazis are trying to kill noble BLM revolutionaries?

  148. In India, all of a sudden many mobile bike sharing companies emerged out of nowhere, including Chinese companies. Failed totally. It was seen too low class, even by the slum dwellers. The truth is most third worlders are some of the most yucchus (status) obsessed people in the World. Even the cheapest car in the World, TATA Nano failed for the same reason. Millions of people in India cannot afford a car and ride motorcycles , in the rain and sun. But they would not buy the NANO, because it would be seen low class.
    People outside Whites and East Asians and ESPECIALLY outside Germanic-Dutch-Scandinavian types and Japanese, are too status obsessed in a cheap gaudy way (bling bling gold chain, arrogance) to have bicycled filled Amsterdams in their countries, probably ever. They will ride bicycles only because they cannot afford any better, though there are a few Westernised Indians into bicycle racing and all that, lately.

  149. Superiority of Dutch bicycles.

  150. @Mike Tre
    @HammerJack

    "IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I’m a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference. "

    Bull fuggin shit pal. I avoid you assholes like the plague. All it takes is one stupid move from you people and my career is over, regardless of fault.

    Every single biker claims to be a careful and considerate biker and everyone one of you ignores just about every traffic device in place. I have never seen a bicyclist stop at a stop sign. Ever.

    Replies: @Alden, @Brutusale

    I consider city bus drivers and all truck drivers to be the best and safest drivers on the road. I drive Los Angeles to San Francisco several times a year and I feel safest between 2 huge trucks. Not in the car lane with car drivers behind me trying to push me into going 100 MPH instead of 90MPH

    Unbelievable how drivers of those huge trucks can navigate city driving with the tightest right turns crowded parking lots etc.

    They are the safest and most expert drivers. In my opinion. And I am always right

    • Thanks: Mike Tre
  151. @Steve Sailer
    @Alden

    A long time ago, bicycles came with bells. It was a pretty standardized warning system for pedestrians. Now, it's just somebody behind you saying "Left," and he waits until he's close enough to be heard. Can be scary.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman

    A long time ago, bicycles came with bells. It was a pretty standardized warning system for pedestrians. Now, it’s just somebody behind you saying “Left,” and he waits until he’s close enough to be heard. Can be scary.

    Bicyclists don’t want to use a bell. Bells are gay. At least that’s what all the bicyclists in their butt-hugging spandex bike-shorts think.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Mr. Anon


    Bicyclists don’t want to use a bell. Bells are gay. At least that’s what all the bicyclists in their butt-hugging spandex bike-shorts think.
     
    So get a horn. I would use this.

    https://www.amazon.com/Coolrunner-Classic-Vintage-Bicycle-Vehicles/dp/B01M5DCGNZ/ref=sr_1_3?crid=3PABG5MBKA3PK&keywords=bicycle%2Bhorn&qid=1653461185&sprefix=bicycle%2Bhorn%2Caps%2C87&sr=8-3&th=1

  152. @Adam Smith
    @Alden

    Greetings, Alden,

    That sounds truly horrible. Nightmarish even.
    Where I live we have no bus stops, very few africans and very little crime.
    We do have a bus that you can ride, by appointment, but not many people do.
    Our roads really are not safe for bicycles. Too steep and curvy.
    And we have one zip code that covers pretty much the whole county.

    Snarling vicious blacks? No thank you!

    Replies: @Alden

    It’s just life in the big city. Every city. You should the neighborhood 2 of my grandchildren have to take a bus through to get to their expensive private school.

    Aren’t all blacks snarling and vicious?

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Alden


    Aren’t all blacks snarling and vicious?
     
    Surely there must be some good, hard working Blacks! somewhere. [/sarc]

    More seriously though... I don't really know, as I never interact with africans. But yeah, it seems like the africans in America are in an almost constant state of rage, especially for the the last few years. It's like the TeeVee, or someone, told them to be even more snarling and vicious, as if they needed a reason.

  153. @Johann Ricke
    @Alden


    I was a Probation Officer. Virtually every mugging was because people were on foot. Unfortunate people can’t walk the dog or walk home from the bus stop without being attacked but that’s life in America.
     
    When you're in a car, don't they call it a carjacking, instead?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden

    Easier for 2 or 3 blacks in a car to rob a victim on foot. Procedure is drive around near a street with a bus line. Spot a victim go around the block. Drop off the robber half a block behind the victim. Robber walks quickly robs victim car is right there. And off they go.

    One reason there’s so much street crime in the big cities is because there is public transit. People waiting on subway and bus stops. People walking to and from subway bus stops. Instead of a locked garage to another garage. And then up to destination in an elevator.

    Walking on city streets is a cause of crime. Ban walking.

    • Agree: J.Ross
    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  154. @anonymous
    @JimDandy


    so they can’t blame White Nationalist rhetoric this time
     
    The climate of fear created by Whitesupremiasma made him paranoid and crazy?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @JimDandy

    That’s actually not that far-fetched.

  155. Before the pandemic I used to see packs of the lycra-clad on weekend days. I have not seen them since. What’s going on? By pack, I mean 20-40 cyclists pumping along the local roads.

  156. @Colinsky
    I'm 75 and I've bicycled 3,000 miles a year for the last 40 years. I've been lucky enough to have lived in Santa Barbara and Silicon Valley where there were bike trails and side streets so I could bicycle to my freelance projects and rarely have to be on the main roads.

    I started bicycling because I read that exercise could cure depression. It has worked very well. Plus, I am strong and fit while my friends and family are soft and obese.

    I've had a couple or three minor injuries but nothing serious. I'm not in a hurry. My longest commute was 20 miles a day when I was working at the San Jose Business Journal downtown, but there was a creekside trail bike path for most of the distance. These days I have a 12 mile round trip to Goleta Beach to study the Pacific Ocean.

    One of my bicycling rules is that I never never never ride in the dark. If it's night, I drive.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @HammerJack

    Thanks.

  157. @Mr. Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    A long time ago, bicycles came with bells. It was a pretty standardized warning system for pedestrians. Now, it’s just somebody behind you saying “Left,” and he waits until he’s close enough to be heard. Can be scary.
     
    Bicyclists don't want to use a bell. Bells are gay. At least that's what all the bicyclists in their butt-hugging spandex bike-shorts think.

    Replies: @Clyde

    Bicyclists don’t want to use a bell. Bells are gay. At least that’s what all the bicyclists in their butt-hugging spandex bike-shorts think.

    So get a horn. I would use this.

  158. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel H
    The latest Honda Cub. Remember the Cub from the old days.

    I so much want one of these, but I am terrified that I will end up splattered all over the road.

    https://www.cycleworld.com/resizer/wXYLGhFdtulM4jYI-lBabTlf0f0=/arc-photo-octane/arc3-prod/public/PA3XLZBJ3FC7VDBL2JHPO2QGGI.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous, @Anon

    I learned to ride on a Honda 50cc Cub when I was living in Japan as a SOFA dependent and got all my training and licensing, from 小型 to 大型 in Japan. My first solo licensed ride on the Cub was from NAF Atsugi to NSF Kamiseya, only about 3km, but I loved it.

    When I settled in the States and went to take the driving test to get a motorcycle license my mother drove me to the DMV. I was surprised to discover they didn’t provide a motorcycle and I had to use my own. So we drove home and I got my bike and rode back to the DMV, pulling up in full view of some cops. The test guy had to know I had illegally ridden in but didn’t care. The road test itself was a joke, but it became even more of a joke when I glanced over at the examiner and saw that he wasn’t even paying attention and was talking to somebody with his back turned. I finished the test anyway and he signed me off and I was all legal. What a contrast with Japan, where fewer than 5 percent of riders pass the road test on the first try.

    In Japan, to receive your motorcycle license for a 400cc or larger bike you have to pass an aptitude test (適正 試験) and receive about 45 hours of instruction before you can take the written and driving tests. You have to have passed the tests for the smaller-sized motorcycles before you can take the test for the big bikes. Once you pass, you can’t carry a passenger for the first year and not on an expressway for the first three years.

    • Thanks: Daniel H
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Anonymous

    Thanks (I am not allowed to [THANKS] you because of the time window).

  159. @HammerJack
    Speaking of SUVs, the iSteve perennial favorite Rolls-Royce Cullinan has popped up in the news again.

    https://i.ibb.co/sCpWsnz/Screenshot-20220524-151316-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    BTW. 19 previous arrests, including at least 8 shootings. Out on bail at the time.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Clyde, @J.Ross

    19 previous arrests, including at least 8 shootings. Out on bail at the time.

    Maybe there was some logic behind California’s “three strikes and you’re out” law (passed in the 1990s and repealed about ten years ago because of “overincarceration”).

  160. @HammerJack
    Speaking of SUVs, the iSteve perennial favorite Rolls-Royce Cullinan has popped up in the news again.

    https://i.ibb.co/sCpWsnz/Screenshot-20220524-151316-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    BTW. 19 previous arrests, including at least 8 shootings. Out on bail at the time.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Clyde, @J.Ross

    Good for posting. This is a 5 dimensional shitshow along with a ripoff Black Reverend vying for the TV cameras.

  161. @Hypnotoad666
    They should have included space travel in the safety statistics. One out of 50 rockets explodes. But successful launches travel millions of miles orbiting the earth or going to the moon and back. So on a per mile basis it may be safer to be an astronaut than a bicyclist. Just sayin'

    Replies: @International Jew

    That’s a good, thought-provoking point. I’m not sure even the several hundred thousand (million) miles travelled on a typical mission give you a big enough denominator. But your pount is still thought-provoking!

    But for sure, if all I wanted to do was travel from Cape Canaveral, FL, to Edwards Air Force Base, CA, the Space Shuttle wouldn’t be my vehicle of choice.

  162. Rob says:
    @Jack D
    @prosa123

    The delivery bikes go the wrong way down one way streets to make deliveries (you're not going to go 3 1/2 additional blocks out of your way just to avoid going a few dozen yards the wrong way) and they are nearly silent so pedestrians step out in front of them (it's normal to jaywalk in the middle of the block in NY) and get killed.

    Here's a pro tip - when you are in NYC nowadays, before you cross the street look BOTH ways even if it is a one way street.

    The last time I was in NY I saw something I hadn't seen before. Amazon makes deliveries using totes carried on large electric bicycle towed flatbed trailers. There are guys riding bikes towing these enormous trailers behind them.

    https://cdn.geekwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/IMG_9324-620x386.jpg

    This can't possibly be safe.

    Replies: @epebble, @Hibernian, @Harry Baldwin, @Rob

    it’s normal to jaywalk in the middle of the block in NY

    What I don’t get is why this is not normal everywhere. It’s much safer than crossing at corners. At corners, you have cars going straight in 4 directions. You have cars turning right and left. In the middle of a block, you can see the cars coming in both directions for a fairly long way off.

    Maybe before you could turn right on red, corners were safer just because that’s where everyone expected pedestrians.

    I think most places, the people who get stopped by the cops for jaywalking are doing the black thing of walking down the middle of the road. The Gentle Giant, the one who had just robbed a convenience store, was doing that with his friend when the cop stopped him.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Rob

    Another thing that I noticed in my recent visit to Manhattan is that at certain locations (I saw one on 6th Ave.) they have indeed moved the pedestrian crosswalk to the middle of the block, so you are not wrong.

    Once when I was walking in LA I crossed midblock and a cop yelled at me. It didn't even occur to me that I was committing a crime because I was so much in the habit of crossing mid block from living in the NE.

  163. @Thulean Friend
    @aNewBanner


    A significant fraction of vehicles on the road are vans, trucks, and semis moving food, materials, and equipment from point A to point B. It’s the last mile problem, and it’s not going away. You can’t move it in public transportation, on bicycles, or with porters.
     
    https://i.imgur.com/jRyQlkT.jpg

    For smaller deliveries, you can certainly do a lot with bicycles. Some amount of truck/van traffic will have to be accepted but this fraction will be certainly 1/5th of what we have now, if not less, once you get rid of personal vehicles.

    Replies: @Daniel H

    Back in the day – 1960’s – one would see these delivery bikes all over Manhattan, NYC.

  164. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "But for various reasons it’s in fashion with the normally safety-crazed elite, so the dangers get glossed over."

    Question: do the elite not also have cars of their own? Yes, they do.

    And, don't they tend to use them during all kinds of weather year round? Yes, tehy do.

    Virtue signaling on its finest and most hypocritical display.

    Replies: @International Jew

    They do have cars. They just want you on a bike so you don’t clog up their roads and parking lots. Any more questions?

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @International Jew

    The point was made, and the question was answered.

    "And that's all I have to say about that"

    Forrest Gump

  165. @HammerJack
    Speaking of SUVs, the iSteve perennial favorite Rolls-Royce Cullinan has popped up in the news again.

    https://i.ibb.co/sCpWsnz/Screenshot-20220524-151316-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    BTW. 19 previous arrests, including at least 8 shootings. Out on bail at the time.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Clyde, @J.Ross

    >randomly

  166. @Anonymous
    @Daniel H

    I learned to ride on a Honda 50cc Cub when I was living in Japan as a SOFA dependent and got all my training and licensing, from 小型 to 大型 in Japan. My first solo licensed ride on the Cub was from NAF Atsugi to NSF Kamiseya, only about 3km, but I loved it.

    When I settled in the States and went to take the driving test to get a motorcycle license my mother drove me to the DMV. I was surprised to discover they didn't provide a motorcycle and I had to use my own. So we drove home and I got my bike and rode back to the DMV, pulling up in full view of some cops. The test guy had to know I had illegally ridden in but didn't care. The road test itself was a joke, but it became even more of a joke when I glanced over at the examiner and saw that he wasn't even paying attention and was talking to somebody with his back turned. I finished the test anyway and he signed me off and I was all legal. What a contrast with Japan, where fewer than 5 percent of riders pass the road test on the first try.

    In Japan, to receive your motorcycle license for a 400cc or larger bike you have to pass an aptitude test (適正 試験) and receive about 45 hours of instruction before you can take the written and driving tests. You have to have passed the tests for the smaller-sized motorcycles before you can take the test for the big bikes. Once you pass, you can't carry a passenger for the first year and not on an expressway for the first three years.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Thanks (I am not allowed to [THANKS] you because of the time window).

  167. @Achmed E. Newman
    Thank you for being very fair to the bicyclists on this one, Steve. You usually seem to have an anti-biker bent in the few posts on cycling. Yeah, "climate change", that might really be a reason for 5% of the people that ride, but it's probably more of a nice virtual signaling excuse: "Hey, you guys are always clogging up the elevators in the morning with your bikes!" "We're saving the planet, man!" (Everyone shuts up.)

    You mentioned weight loss, but how about aerobic/cardio reasons to want to ride? Running/jogging is an option, but that's just TOO SLOW. (OK, I am too slow when I - if ever - run or jog.)

    Finally, I am surprised that the bicycle numbers are not even worse and closer to the numbers for motorcycles. At least on a motorcycle, you've got lots of power to get away from the bad drivers - IF, and big IF, you ride with an awareness that you can't act like you're driving a car. (Having ridden a bicycle before for many years helps in this regard.)

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Bill Jones

    I had a motor bike in London when I was a callow yoof.
    I came off it 6 times. five was car drivers not seeing me and the sixth was my swerving to avoid a Chinaman scuttling across Shaftsbury Avenue on a rainy evening, while going to see Maggie Smith in a Restoration Comedy. It was hilarious and very painful. I’d cracked my sternum as I discovered the next day.
    I swore to myself then that the Next Chinaman Gets It! of which oath word must have got around as I never saw another while on the bike- Triumph Bonneville as I recall.

    I found myself plotting often more circuitous routes using roads like the Embankment rather than Taxi crammed West End or God forbid, City streets,

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Bill Jones

    Bikes are fun, Bill!

    I rode a motorcyle, almost solely in town, for a number of years when I was younger. I never had a single incident with a car. Now, some could call that luck, but I understand that you don't operate the same way you do when you're in a vehicle with all the metal around you AND that people will just miss seeing you.

    Even with the defensiveness, it was so much fun that when I sold it, it was partially because I wasn't spending time on a bicycle exercising enough. I'd go through all kinds of neighborhoods on the way home just to keep riding!

    I got pulled by the cops a few times, but I think because I wore a helmet always, they gave me a break. One time, I was weaving back and forth on my side of the 2-lane road for fun, and a guy pulled me. I didn't even think about the "warming up the tires" idea, but I told him, it was just fun, that's all. Show me a law about that.

  168. @Fox
    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
    Naturally, my comment is unfair towards decent bicyclists who are aware of other traffic participants, are considerate, respect traffic laws and are interested in safety and pleasant human interactions, and I apologize to those.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Henry's Cat, @Luddite in Chief, @Coemgen, @sb, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.

    LOL, that reminds of my (former) daily commute through Cambridge, Massachusetts where I saw that type of behavior on a regular basis. It’s probably worse now since all the “barely big enough for a car” lanes have been split into two separate lanes (one for cars, one for bicycles and buses).

  169. @Gamecock
    @John Johnson

    I ride my motorcycle about 6,000 miles a year. I don't find it dangerous at all.

    My theory is stupid people do stupid things on motorcycles and get themselves killed. That does not make the motorcycle dangerous.

    Plus, I am a believer in "all the gear, all the time." I see plenty of riders wearing a T-shirt and tennis shoes with no helmet. Around here, we call them "organ donors."

    Replies: @John Johnson, @AndrewR

    As John pointed out, the lack of a metal cage is what makes bikes so dangerous.

    Riding in a safe manner and wearing all your gear is essential of course, but you can’t control others’ actions, and a collision when you’re on a bike could be fatal, whereas an identical collision when you’re in a car might not involve even minor injury.

  170. @International Jew
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    They do have cars. They just want you on a bike so you don't clog up their roads and parking lots. Any more questions?

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    The point was made, and the question was answered.

    “And that’s all I have to say about that”

    Forrest Gump

  171. @Fox
    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
    Naturally, my comment is unfair towards decent bicyclists who are aware of other traffic participants, are considerate, respect traffic laws and are interested in safety and pleasant human interactions, and I apologize to those.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Henry's Cat, @Luddite in Chief, @Coemgen, @sb, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    I never realized that so many cyclists are bi

  172. @John Johnson
    @Gamecock

    My theory is stupid people do stupid things on motorcycles and get themselves killed. That does not make the motorcycle dangerous.

    Even without stupid people it is dangerous to be on two wheels without a cage when the vehicle traveling 20 feet behind you weighs 5 tons and is driven by a soccer mom that is putting on her makeup.

    For urban commutes a motorcycle is a very bad idea. You can be the best rider in the world and all it takes is for some stoner to look at his phone while vaping and you are in the hospital for months.

    Plus, I am a believer in “all the gear, all the time.” I see plenty of riders wearing a T-shirt and tennis shoes with no helmet. Around here, we call them “organ donors.”

    Yes gear is good but if you get hit by an F150 going 60 mph you are still going to be smashed.

    That motorcycle gear is designed for falls and not hits from 5 ton vehicles.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    [citation needed]

    It is dangerous to walk down the street with 2-ton cars passing by you just feet away.

  173. The Netherlands has probably the best cycling infrastructure in the world; yet on a per-mile (or per-kilometer) basis, cylists there are still 6.8 times more likely to be killed than car drivers. Interestingly, a majority (59%) of cycling deaths in 2019 were of people aged 70+.

    Source: Statistics Netherlands, who helpfully publish a lot of data in English: https://www.cbs.nl/en-gb/news/2020/31/decline-in-road-fatalities-larger-among-motorists-than-cyclists

  174. @Fox
    In some cities bicyclists behave very aggressively, because they are being promoted by the city bureaucracy as the better citizens. Hence, running of stop signs or red lights, yelling aggressively at car drivers, making lewd gestures, speeding (yes, bicyclists are subject to speed laws as well, but lacking identifying marks, are getting off scotfree), slaloming through standing traffic, etc. constitutes a part of their behavior.
    Naturally, my comment is unfair towards decent bicyclists who are aware of other traffic participants, are considerate, respect traffic laws and are interested in safety and pleasant human interactions, and I apologize to those.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @John Johnson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Henry's Cat, @Luddite in Chief, @Coemgen, @sb, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    I’ve even seen bicyclists behaving aggressively toward other bicyclists.

    It’s not unlike small dogs behaving more badly than big dogs because we can tolerate it. Similarly, woman on man violence is more common, than the opposite but gets less attention because women do far less actual damage.

    Nonetheless, the 2% rule applies. Most drivers and cyclists are pretty reasonable. maybe 1 of 50 or so is a complete jerk. But a jerk with 2000 lbs of steel and > 150 HP is more dangerous to others.

  175. @Steve Sailer
    @Alden

    A long time ago, bicycles came with bells. It was a pretty standardized warning system for pedestrians. Now, it's just somebody behind you saying "Left," and he waits until he's close enough to be heard. Can be scary.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s supposed to be “on your left”. If they just yell “left!”, that’s indeed a stupid and worthless communication. Then again … Peak Stupidity.

    Long ago, I had a boat air horn attached to my left front fork on one bike till it ran out of propellant. That was for cars, not pedestrians.

  176. @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    They behave what you might think is aggressively because they need to stay AWAY from the cars. That's why I'll run lights, move onto the sidewalk for stretches, whatever it takes. Safety comes first, and that mean staying as much away from the motor vehicles as is possible. Safety trumps traffic laws, and unlike with cars, there is not always a big overlap between the two.

    I recall being chewed out by a cop for breaking some law, but he didn't realize I'd broken 6 of them just in the last 1/2 mile. Those 6 violations were/are part of my standard route for safety reasons. After dealing with this cop, the thing it taught me is to watch out for that particular cop car after that, that's all.

    If you don't ride a bicycle in the city, you probably can't understand fully.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @slumber_j

    That’s why I’ll run lights, move onto the sidewalk for stretches, whatever it takes. Safety comes first […] If you don’t ride a bicycle in the city, you probably can’t understand fully.

    It’s safe to say that as a pedestrian in NYC I understand very fully indeed–more fully than you do apparently.

  177. @Achmed E. Newman
    I should have put this up top: One of my favorite writers, Lionel Shriver, in her novel The Motion of the Body through Space, has a protagonist* who has ridden a bike in NYC her adult life, though, with her bad knees, is getting too frail for it.

    There's a great scene in which she is riding down some pathway along one of the rivers, and she describes what goes on on the supposedly just bicycle path. She hits it all, illegal alien delivery guys, the spandex crowd, "Wall Streeters with laptop panniers and prissy Velcro straps around the ankles of their suit pants", oblivious teenagers texting like mad, etc.

    I wish I could paste in the whole thing, but I don't have the book on me. She is a hell of a writer.


    .


    * The wife in the story, who I'm pretty sure is very much taken off of the author herself. She writes of what she knows, and I think that's a good thing.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Who knew Lionel was now a girlie name?

    Gone the way of Evelyn I guess.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Bill Jones

    It wasn't, Bill. Her given name was Margaret Ann(?), but she just picked herself a new name at 15 y/o. She's a character.

    (It wasn't about model train sets.)

  178. @Altai
    I remember a study years ago in the Netherlands that asked why women were so much more likely to get into road cycling accidents at traffic lights. They found men were more likely to be unconsciousness and start their bike early, getting out of any potential danger zone or blind spot of large trucks turning on the inside.

    Generally making a road system safe and designed for bikes is a choice. In many places it is just unpleasant and unsafe to cycle. Only Copenhagen and Amsterdam can truly claim to be true cycling commuter cities and to a lesser extent other large cities in the Netherlands. I'm not sure if it is an odd coincidence or something about the design that Copenhagen a city modeled on Amsterdam would also resemble it in this way too.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXw_t172BKY

    It would be good to give more space to bikes on roads but even better to design the whole system and make urban living pleasant again. But all the time you get from 'planners' is a fetish for hyper density and demolishing historic buildings and green spaces/prime farmland to make crappy poorly built apartments. By contrast Copenhagen is quite mid density without a lot of big buildings or inhuman scaled places to live.

    That is to say nothing of the demographics of who lives there. Diversity makes building Copenhagen hard if not necessarily impossible. But people won't accept it. Indeed, the kind of loss of ownership of their society, country or local area makes the emergence of predatory individualistic and parasitic 'developers' who create poorly planned developments is likewise something people can't accept.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad, @slumber_j

    Flat, dense cities where the weather is seldom freezing are good for bicycling. Cities that don’t meet those criteria are not.

  179. @Mike Tre
    @HammerJack

    "IME commercial truck drivers were the worst. I’m a very careful and considerate biker but that makes no difference. "

    Bull fuggin shit pal. I avoid you assholes like the plague. All it takes is one stupid move from you people and my career is over, regardless of fault.

    Every single biker claims to be a careful and considerate biker and everyone one of you ignores just about every traffic device in place. I have never seen a bicyclist stop at a stop sign. Ever.

    Replies: @Alden, @Brutusale

    All I need to know about bikers and their self-preservation instinct is how many of them I see pulled over on Route 93 at the MA/NH border to REMOVE THEIR HELMETS when heading to Bike Week in Laconia.

    Live Free or Die!

  180. Man, these comments are making me feel thankful for living where I live. Our city has miles of dedicated multi-use paths off the city streets, linking various suburban residential areas with commercial areas. They also link to a variety of lakes and parks throughout the system. And, while we have a mass-transit system, we have avoided participating too much in our broader metro-area system, which helps keep out too much vibrant diversity. Notwithstanding the occasional homeless vagrant setting up along a path, it’s a very safe system. Lots of single ladies use the paths without much worry of being accosted.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @FozzieT

    What city is this?

    Replies: @John Johnson, @FozzieT

  181. @Rob
    @Jack D


    it’s normal to jaywalk in the middle of the block in NY
     
    What I don’t get is why this is not normal everywhere. It’s much safer than crossing at corners. At corners, you have cars going straight in 4 directions. You have cars turning right and left. In the middle of a block, you can see the cars coming in both directions for a fairly long way off.

    Maybe before you could turn right on red, corners were safer just because that’s where everyone expected pedestrians.

    I think most places, the people who get stopped by the cops for jaywalking are doing the black thing of walking down the middle of the road. The Gentle Giant, the one who had just robbed a convenience store, was doing that with his friend when the cop stopped him.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Another thing that I noticed in my recent visit to Manhattan is that at certain locations (I saw one on 6th Ave.) they have indeed moved the pedestrian crosswalk to the middle of the block, so you are not wrong.

    Once when I was walking in LA I crossed midblock and a cop yelled at me. It didn’t even occur to me that I was committing a crime because I was so much in the habit of crossing mid block from living in the NE.

  182. @everybodyhatesscott
    @John Johnson

    The key to realizing the benefits of riding a motorcycle to commute in urban areas is to be a little lax with the rules of the road. If you live in California, you don't even have to be lax because lane splitting is legal. I've pretty much stopped riding since I've had children but a 2 hour commute to go to a baseball game in a car could be done in 35 minutes on a motorcycle AND the parking was free.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    If you live in California, you don’t even have to be lax because lane splitting is legal. I’ve pretty much stopped riding since I’ve had children but a 2 hour commute to go to a baseball game in a car could be done in 35 minutes on a motorcycle AND the parking was free.

    Yea I’m aware of lane splitting.

    It’s still a terrible gamble. California has awful drivers that hop lanes and cut each other off. There are road ragers, drunks, gangsters, tourists, illegals, rich people speeding in exotics and then the average driver who is stressed out from all of it. I’d only get on I5 on a motorcycle in California at 2AM.

    The better risk is to move. Awful state.

  183. @Alden
    @Thulean Friend

    You can’t have a city based on walking cycling and public transit when black predators are everywhere attacking pedestrians. And lying in wait at the bus and subway stops for the prey to emerge and start walking home. Bus stops. Regular travelers can’t even sit on the bus benches to wait for a bus because black deranged derelicts live in bus benches. Even in the highest income zip code in town.

    Much of the reason city people drive cars instead of using public transit is safety. Plus the horrors of being stuck on buses with snarling vicious blacks screaming instead of talking quietly.

    Take public transit in any major city or suburb that has about 15% of blacks for a month and get back to us . Alternate days and evenings for the full American public transit experience.

    Or why we can’t have nice things.

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @John Johnson

    My favorite is when liberals in the press talk about making public transport free to encourage ridership.

    They are announcing that they have never taken a bus in the city but have all kinds of ideas on to how to encourage other people to use them.

    It is already the norm in 15%+ areas to not charge Blacks. Whether or not Whites will be charged depends on the driver and the situation. If there are a lot of people getting on the bus the driver will actually get annoyed that you are slowing down the line by taking out coins. In other areas you will be expected to pay. It is implied that the Blacks ahead of you have a bus pass and the driver doesn’t need to check them. Well what happens is that Blacks get the attitude that the bus is their playground since they can use it as they please.

    One concept we have in America is the commuter bus.

    What is a commuter bus? A bus that you get on at a park in ride with nice seats and away from areas where homeless Blacks will get on. Riding one is quite an experience compared to a city bus. Basically a bus filled entirely with polite Whites. You can actually take a nap in one and without having to worry about getting robbed.

    It’s really an amusing aspect of the circus. You are on this bus with tinted windows and large luxurious seats that goes into the city. Basically the system is ferrying in Whites on a private bus as part of reality avoidance.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @John Johnson

    The problem with making any sort of public transport free is that people one would prefer not to associate with use it more. Homeless people to get out of the rain and cold and gangbangers looking to claim territory/wild in someone else's area.

    Also, having a car has fixed costs per month and variable costs per trip. Usually, once you’ve already paid to own and insure the car, the gas to drive somewhere is cheaper than public transport. That might not be true in the Current Year, though.

    So, we don’t want public transport to be free, but we want people to use it. Solution: Do you live in NYC? Your car insurance includes bus passes and subway passes. If you live in the boonies and commute to NYC, then include a light rail pass too.

    The car insurance company benefits, because every trip you don’t take in your car is a trip they don’t have to pay for an accident. You benefit, cuz sometimes the bus will be better than driving for whatever reason. The city benefits, because traffic is less congested. The bus ride is more pleasant than if unpleasant people could ride for free.

    I doubt this will ever happen.

    Park & Ride. I remember seeing signs for those when I was a little kid. I hated that my mom never stopped at parks and let me go on the rides.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  184. @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    By the same token, airplanes are "only" about as safe as trains if we consider they travel near 600mph, on an hourly basis. Since we do consider travel on a time basis... for me (one way)

    Bike < 30-60min
    3min < Car 45min

    Kubrick's fear of flying was likely rational back in 1970, especially if he did not keep up with stats. Roughly 60 times more dangerous per passenger mile compared to today. 3.6x more dangerous then than driving is today on an hourly basis. Driving was more dangerous too though.

    https://aviation-safety.net/graphics/infographics/Fatal-Accidents-Per-Mln-Flights-1977-2017.jpg

    If you were a jet setter, especially in light aircraft or non-third world airlines, pretty risky if you did a lot of hours.

    Making Eyes Wide Shut was a lot more dangerous than flying though. If only the world had his original cut.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Charlesz Martel

    If you were a jet setter, especially in light aircraft or [non-?]third world airlines, pretty risky if you did a lot of hours.

    The same thing was true of pilots and other crew, except even more so. 700 to 1000 hrs per year is not unusual for an airline pilot so over the course of a career it could be 25,000 hrs or more in the air (I think the record is 65,000 hrs). Even the most frequent flier rarely flies that much.

    For general aviation, the risk is 16 deaths per 1M hrs or 1 death per 62,500 hrs. So you can see that as a pilot, while any one flight was not particularly risky, over the course of 25,000 hrs you had a considerable cumulative risk. Therefore pilots could not get life insurance at regular rates.

    However nowadays, crashes on major American carriers on main line routes (not regional jets) are almost unknown. In 2018, 1 passenger was sucked out of the window on a Southwest flight when the engine flew apart and parts hit the window. Before that, the last crash involving an American carrier and a Boeing or Airbus jet was November, 2001. 265 died supposedly due to pilot error (excessive rudder inputs, in response to wake turbulence which led to the vertical stabilizer breaking off).

    • Replies: @Charlesz Martel
    @Jack D

    To be fair to the pilot, he responded as he had been trained. Carbon Fiber parts, like the vertical stabilizer, were much more brittle than was expected under an extreme load condition. The training has been since modified.

    Replies: @Jack D

  185. @FozzieT
    Man, these comments are making me feel thankful for living where I live. Our city has miles of dedicated multi-use paths off the city streets, linking various suburban residential areas with commercial areas. They also link to a variety of lakes and parks throughout the system. And, while we have a mass-transit system, we have avoided participating too much in our broader metro-area system, which helps keep out too much vibrant diversity. Notwithstanding the occasional homeless vagrant setting up along a path, it's a very safe system. Lots of single ladies use the paths without much worry of being accosted.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    What city is this?

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Pincher Martin

    He is probably in Canada or some smaller city that hasn't been discovered.

    I have been in a dozen US cities and they are all the same.

    White liberals driving a one hour commute to avoid Blacks while listening to a NPR show about how Republicans are racist and against public transportation.

    That is the US city in a nutshell.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    , @FozzieT
    @Pincher Martin

    Scottsdale, AZ. Granted in the Summer it’s a no-go for bikes, but most of the year is fantastic.

  186. @Bill Jones
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Who knew Lionel was now a girlie name?

    Gone the way of Evelyn I guess.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    It wasn’t, Bill. Her given name was Margaret Ann(?), but she just picked herself a new name at 15 y/o. She’s a character.

    (It wasn’t about model train sets.)

  187. @Pincher Martin
    @FozzieT

    What city is this?

    Replies: @John Johnson, @FozzieT

    He is probably in Canada or some smaller city that hasn’t been discovered.

    I have been in a dozen US cities and they are all the same.

    White liberals driving a one hour commute to avoid Blacks while listening to a NPR show about how Republicans are racist and against public transportation.

    That is the US city in a nutshell.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @John Johnson


    White liberals driving a one hour commute to avoid Blacks while listening to a NPR show about how Republicans are racist and against public transportation.
     
    What's remarkable is that two of the US cities I've lived in (San Francisco and San Jose) have very small black populations, and yet they both still have similar urban pathologies to what you describe.

    San Francisco is only 5% black, and a large portion of that small population is in out-of-the-way Bayview-Hunter's Point, which is a neighborhood over where Candlestick Park used to be.

    But blacks in the city still punch well above their weight in noticeable public dysfunctional behavior. They are a problem around Union Square. They are a problem in the Tenderloin. They are a problem in the lower Fillmore district. They are a problem on BART and other public transportation. And they have featured in the recent surge of shoplifting.

    This is in one of the world's wealthiest cities, where liberals dominate policymaking (the city is probably around 10% Republican), and in which blacks are a significantly smaller slice of the population than in the U.S. as a whole (thus being more manageable to policy if such a thing is possible). Yet the same failures abound in SF as in every other US city.

    San Francisco is too dense for the hour-long commutes for those who choose to live in the city, but in every other way it resembles what you describe. San Jose, however, has far more land and so it has spread just like most other US cities, despite the fact that less than 3% of the city's population is black. San Jose is really a suburbia without a serious urban core beyond office buildings.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  188. @Reg Cæsar
    @Daniel H

    You want to meet the nicest people!

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2e/You_meet_the_nicest_people_on_a_Honda.jpg


    Random fact of the day: Honda has car factories in Marysville, Ohio and Lincoln, Alabama. Kawasaki has motorcycle plants in Maryville, Missouri and Lincoln, Nebraska.

    Oh, and Lincoln, Alabama isn't named for whom you might think it is.

    Replies: @HammerJack

  189. @Colinsky
    I'm 75 and I've bicycled 3,000 miles a year for the last 40 years. I've been lucky enough to have lived in Santa Barbara and Silicon Valley where there were bike trails and side streets so I could bicycle to my freelance projects and rarely have to be on the main roads.

    I started bicycling because I read that exercise could cure depression. It has worked very well. Plus, I am strong and fit while my friends and family are soft and obese.

    I've had a couple or three minor injuries but nothing serious. I'm not in a hurry. My longest commute was 20 miles a day when I was working at the San Jose Business Journal downtown, but there was a creekside trail bike path for most of the distance. These days I have a 12 mile round trip to Goleta Beach to study the Pacific Ocean.

    One of my bicycling rules is that I never never never ride in the dark. If it's night, I drive.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @HammerJack

    Recently I decided to take up biking again and to my amazement bikes are still affordable, among their many other virtues. Now if I can only figure out a way to get the SUV drivers to pay attention to what’s outside their windshields.

  190. @Bill Jones
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I had a motor bike in London when I was a callow yoof.
    I came off it 6 times. five was car drivers not seeing me and the sixth was my swerving to avoid a Chinaman scuttling across Shaftsbury Avenue on a rainy evening, while going to see Maggie Smith in a Restoration Comedy. It was hilarious and very painful. I'd cracked my sternum as I discovered the next day.
    I swore to myself then that the Next Chinaman Gets It! of which oath word must have got around as I never saw another while on the bike- Triumph Bonneville as I recall.

    I found myself plotting often more circuitous routes using roads like the Embankment rather than Taxi crammed West End or God forbid, City streets,

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Bikes are fun, Bill!

    I rode a motorcyle, almost solely in town, for a number of years when I was younger. I never had a single incident with a car. Now, some could call that luck, but I understand that you don’t operate the same way you do when you’re in a vehicle with all the metal around you AND that people will just miss seeing you.

    Even with the defensiveness, it was so much fun that when I sold it, it was partially because I wasn’t spending time on a bicycle exercising enough. I’d go through all kinds of neighborhoods on the way home just to keep riding!

    I got pulled by the cops a few times, but I think because I wore a helmet always, they gave me a break. One time, I was weaving back and forth on my side of the 2-lane road for fun, and a guy pulled me. I didn’t even think about the “warming up the tires” idea, but I told him, it was just fun, that’s all. Show me a law about that.

  191. @Daniel H
    The latest Honda Cub. Remember the Cub from the old days.

    I so much want one of these, but I am terrified that I will end up splattered all over the road.

    https://www.cycleworld.com/resizer/wXYLGhFdtulM4jYI-lBabTlf0f0=/arc-photo-octane/arc3-prod/public/PA3XLZBJ3FC7VDBL2JHPO2QGGI.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar, @Anonymous, @Anon

    I had a Honda CT90 for a few years. It’s the forerunner of the 125 in your picture.
    Fantastic, practical, and thrifty machine.

    Take a motorcycle course and gst one.

  192. ‘There are a lot of wonderful things about cycling, but it’s basically 1970s-level safety in a world with 2020s-level demands.’

    aside from bicycle helmets, lights and more bike lanes, i think that is accurate.

    since being hit i can only imagine driving and barely that — the idea of cycling is out of the question.

  193. @oliver elkington
    I think bicycles are very safe so long as you go cautiously and keep looking behind you, this will cost you time though and you will probably not average more than 15mph. Also cycling only works where it is dead flat, Flordia ought to be brilliant for cycling on that count. Here in Europe there is a reason why you only get people cycling a lot in the Netherlands, northern Belgium/Germany and Denmark, in the UK it is hopeless really except a few flatter regions of the east as well as in most of London which is quite a flat city in the centre at least.

    Replies: @Muggles

    I think bicycles are very safe so long as you go cautiously and keep looking behind you, this will cost you time though and you will probably not average more than 15mph. Also cycling only works where it is dead flat,

    I agree about the being flat part, though with multiple gears (some w/ electronic shifting now, plus e-bikes) elevations can be managed.

    However the looking back part is solvable w/ handlebar or helmet mirrors. They aren’t perfect but I used to use them (various kinds) and they worked pretty well. I suspect now some may have rear facing cameras and screens, like back ups in cars. A good idea.

    Bikes are inherently unsafe when in mixed traffic. Okay in empty streets in good weather.

    Years back as a student in an urban city with bad roads, I relied on my crappy old 10 speed. A lot of fun but dangerous. Horrible in high winds, heavy rain. cracked streets, at night.

    Later I did suburban road biking for exercise, until too many near here were killed by drivers.

    I don’t see many bikers now other than on light traffic weekends. Too many cars.

    It is a great way to see things and the country side. But not for the old, infirm, fat or lazy. Or if you need to carry groceries, etc. Mostly a male risk taker thing anyway.

    Bikers can be annoying, but no worse than lane splitting motorcycles or the clueless car/truck drivers. But much more risky. I gave it up when I figured I had done my 20K miles and was still alive. You gotta know when to fold ’em.

  194. @ATate
    I stay away from traffic and snap off salutes to cars as I meet them at intersections. Rarely have issues with cars, love riding my bike.

    I wear USMC cycling jerseys when I ride mostly. Plus I have a Ruger LC9S that fits in my jersey pocket, which is probably not needed since I’m a bigger guy. It’s 7+1…cute little thing.

    From the sounds of the bad asses on here in their 3,000lbs guided missiles, it’s good I carry I guess?

    Replies: @Muggles

    Plus I have a Ruger LC9S that fits in my jersey pocket, which is probably not needed since I’m a bigger guy. It’s 7+1…cute little thing.

    Carrying while biking.

    Yes, I kept my six shooter in my little bag behind my seat doing my suburban biking.

    Started doing that when some SUV mama on her cell nearly killed me.

    I figured the gun wouldn’t save my life, but in my bloody, dying breath, could get some cold revenge.

    Never pulled it out though. I figured it would also handle big vicious dogs.

    Now I take walks. Getting old and mellow. At least older…

  195. @John Johnson
    @Pincher Martin

    He is probably in Canada or some smaller city that hasn't been discovered.

    I have been in a dozen US cities and they are all the same.

    White liberals driving a one hour commute to avoid Blacks while listening to a NPR show about how Republicans are racist and against public transportation.

    That is the US city in a nutshell.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    White liberals driving a one hour commute to avoid Blacks while listening to a NPR show about how Republicans are racist and against public transportation.

    What’s remarkable is that two of the US cities I’ve lived in (San Francisco and San Jose) have very small black populations, and yet they both still have similar urban pathologies to what you describe.

    San Francisco is only 5% black, and a large portion of that small population is in out-of-the-way Bayview-Hunter’s Point, which is a neighborhood over where Candlestick Park used to be.

    But blacks in the city still punch well above their weight in noticeable public dysfunctional behavior. They are a problem around Union Square. They are a problem in the Tenderloin. They are a problem in the lower Fillmore district. They are a problem on BART and other public transportation. And they have featured in the recent surge of shoplifting.

    This is in one of the world’s wealthiest cities, where liberals dominate policymaking (the city is probably around 10% Republican), and in which blacks are a significantly smaller slice of the population than in the U.S. as a whole (thus being more manageable to policy if such a thing is possible). Yet the same failures abound in SF as in every other US city.

    San Francisco is too dense for the hour-long commutes for those who choose to live in the city, but in every other way it resembles what you describe. San Jose, however, has far more land and so it has spread just like most other US cities, despite the fact that less than 3% of the city’s population is black. San Jose is really a suburbia without a serious urban core beyond office buildings.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Pincher Martin


    San Jose is really a suburbia without a serious urban core beyond office buildings.
     
    So is Los Angeles

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

  196. Rob says:
    @John Johnson
    @Alden

    My favorite is when liberals in the press talk about making public transport free to encourage ridership.

    They are announcing that they have never taken a bus in the city but have all kinds of ideas on to how to encourage other people to use them.

    It is already the norm in 15%+ areas to not charge Blacks. Whether or not Whites will be charged depends on the driver and the situation. If there are a lot of people getting on the bus the driver will actually get annoyed that you are slowing down the line by taking out coins. In other areas you will be expected to pay. It is implied that the Blacks ahead of you have a bus pass and the driver doesn't need to check them. Well what happens is that Blacks get the attitude that the bus is their playground since they can use it as they please.

    One concept we have in America is the commuter bus.

    What is a commuter bus? A bus that you get on at a park in ride with nice seats and away from areas where homeless Blacks will get on. Riding one is quite an experience compared to a city bus. Basically a bus filled entirely with polite Whites. You can actually take a nap in one and without having to worry about getting robbed.

    It's really an amusing aspect of the circus. You are on this bus with tinted windows and large luxurious seats that goes into the city. Basically the system is ferrying in Whites on a private bus as part of reality avoidance.

    Replies: @Rob

    The problem with making any sort of public transport free is that people one would prefer not to associate with use it more. Homeless people to get out of the rain and cold and gangbangers looking to claim territory/wild in someone else’s area.

    Also, having a car has fixed costs per month and variable costs per trip. Usually, once you’ve already paid to own and insure the car, the gas to drive somewhere is cheaper than public transport. That might not be true in the Current Year, though.

    So, we don’t want public transport to be free, but we want people to use it. Solution: Do you live in NYC? Your car insurance includes bus passes and subway passes. If you live in the boonies and commute to NYC, then include a light rail pass too.

    The car insurance company benefits, because every trip you don’t take in your car is a trip they don’t have to pay for an accident. You benefit, cuz sometimes the bus will be better than driving for whatever reason. The city benefits, because traffic is less congested. The bus ride is more pleasant than if unpleasant people could ride for free.

    I doubt this will ever happen.

    Park & Ride. I remember seeing signs for those when I was a little kid. I hated that my mom never stopped at parks and let me go on the rides.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Rob

    The problem with making any sort of public transport free is that people one would prefer not to associate with use it more. Homeless people to get out of the rain and cold and gangbangers looking to claim territory/wild in someone else’s area.

    It is already de facto free in areas with Blacks. That was really my point.

    Poor Blacks are already given transportation passes and no one asks to see them. That is why Blacks can hop on busses without paying.

    So, we don’t want public transport to be free, but we want people to use it. Solution: Do you live in NYC? Your car insurance includes bus passes and subway passes. If you live in the boonies and commute to NYC, then include a light rail pass too.

    The solution is actually quite easy which is to charge everyone. Liberals will never go for that so back to denying reality and living in some fantasy world where Black riders are polite and the problem is with Whites that won't get out of their cars. It's all liberal fantasy.

    If you give Whites free passes that won't change anything. Their decision to not ride has nothing to do with cost. White people buy $6 lattes all the time. I bought one two hours ago.

    I really don't care at all about public transportation. I moved away from the city and the reality denial circus. No one is going to discuss the issue honestly because it overlaps with race.

    Good luck to other countries. I really do think subways and light rail are neat but I live in America where reality denying egalitarians dominate the cities.

  197. I can’t remember exactly where I read it, I think it was in the 80’s or 90’s in a mid-level tech magazine like Discover or similar, but the most dangerous transportation method BY FAR is riding a horse. This was because they can get spooked and bolt, run you into tree branches that they pass under, and in severe incidents roll over on you if you get thrown after they stumble.
    An interesting point in the article was that at very low speeds, bicycles are more deadly than motorcycles, as your head is farther from the ground on a bike, so the speed of a (helmetless) impact, especially a lateral head impact, would often be enough to cause brain damage. Falling off a low speed motorcycle was less lethal, as most riders can put both feet on the ground while straddling a motorcycle, and use their hands and arms to slow their lateral fall better.
    Anyone else read this?

  198. @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    By the same token, airplanes are "only" about as safe as trains if we consider they travel near 600mph, on an hourly basis. Since we do consider travel on a time basis... for me (one way)

    Bike < 30-60min
    3min < Car 45min

    Kubrick's fear of flying was likely rational back in 1970, especially if he did not keep up with stats. Roughly 60 times more dangerous per passenger mile compared to today. 3.6x more dangerous then than driving is today on an hourly basis. Driving was more dangerous too though.

    https://aviation-safety.net/graphics/infographics/Fatal-Accidents-Per-Mln-Flights-1977-2017.jpg

    If you were a jet setter, especially in light aircraft or non-third world airlines, pretty risky if you did a lot of hours.

    Making Eyes Wide Shut was a lot more dangerous than flying though. If only the world had his original cut.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Charlesz Martel

    The best comment I ever saw about “Eyes Wide Shut” is:

    “If I wanted to watch married people f**king, I’d watch the Lifetime channel!”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Charlesz Martel

    Portraying EWS being about married people [email protected]#$ing is like saying that Sailer has a blog about golf course architecture.

    Well yeah, he does write about that... but it's not going to prick up the ears of the ADL, SPLC, etc.

  199. @Alden
    @Jack D

    Great post jack. Transporting food and kids is why families need cars. Even single people if they don’t have a car for food shopping the end up living in take out it frozen pizza from the nearest convenience store. A weeks worth of food can’t be carried bussed or biked home in one trip. Food shopping every couple days means small amounts than can be carried. But it’s such a waster of time and a pain people just don’t do it. If I didn’t have a car, I’d rent a car once a week or 3 times a month for food shopping and other errands.

    A new microwave and other heavy or bulky items need a car. How do you arrange a load of laundry or dry cleaning in a bike?

    Some welfare Mom advocates lobby for welfare department paid cab Uber service once a week so the welfare Moms can do a weekly grocery shopping to feed the brats. I know most commenters are men, not Moms, but think how you’d grocery shop for a family if you didn’t have car.

    100 years ago city people didn’t need cars because everything was delivered. Cabs were plentiful and cheap But things changed. No more delivery for decades. Now delivery is coming back. Plus plus plus the matter of safety from black predators.

    Nurses, who often work evening and night shifts, used to be pretty low paid. Right up to the 1960s when they formed a union to lobby for higher pay.

    One of the big reasons nurses needed higher pay so they could easily afford both rent and a car was black predators. The union won . And nurses no longer have a high rate of being raped. Remember that hospitals, like colleges were built in the 19th century in safe neighborhoods Which became the most dangerous neighborhoods in town once the blacks moved in.

    Nurses Needed cars, not wanted cars as we learned in Econ 101. Needed cars to avoid robbery rape and murder by blacks defended by ACLU

    I wonder how the supercilious Scandinavians will feel about their no car policies when the Muslims take over.

    I was a Probation Officer. Virtually every mugging was because people were on foot. Unfortunate people can’t walk the dog or walk home from the bus stop without being attacked but that’s life in America.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @Charlesz Martel

    Here is one of the most intelligent urban transportation solutions out there, so naturally it won’t ever come to the U.S.

    https://www.whichev.net/2020/02/28/citroen-ami-promises-electric-mobility-for-all-at-20-euros-a-month/

    The other great solution is mopeds, but American men are so insecure they consider them dorky and effeminate. Go to Europe and see how well they work there.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Charlesz Martel

    Mopeds are gay. American men dislike them not because they are 'insecure', but because they have more dignity and better taste than do Eurotrash.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Muggles
    @Charlesz Martel


    The other great solution is mopeds, but American men are so insecure they consider them dorky and effeminate. Go to Europe and see how well they work there.
     
    Mr. Martel might want to take a look at most large (and medium) sized American cities and actually look at how people commute.

    Apples and oranges to Europe. It has nothing to do with sexual identity or "dorkyness"

    Most European cities were formed centuries before autos and inside of them have small sized (tiny) roadways intended for horses and carts. Very little parking. Cars there are also small. If you live in a multistory apartment building, your parking is underneath or all chained up near a back alleyway. Public parking for cars is almost nonexistent. If you commute from a suburb the government has decades earlier built commuter rail lines, metros underground or have buses.

    American cars/trucks are big and you would be killed on any major American highway in a moped. Multi lanned and full of heavy trucks (lorries). Only in a few places are suburbs accessible by public transport (and in those, full of criminals and zombies, homeless crazies and beggars.).

    Aside from winter weather, heavy rains, ice, snow there are also poor street maintenance problems. Potholes, cracks, bumps, debris. Americans are spread out horizontally, not vertically as in cramped European cities centuries old. Most prefer single family houses, not small apartments.

    When I first moved to the Big City near which I now live, as a student, I rode a 50 CC Italian motorcycle (barely) or biked. I am lucky to still be alive. The motorcycle was stolen over summer break.

    Europeans can't afford automobiles, "petrol" or parking/insurance. So mostly they don't need them like New Yorkers. Everyone else in America needs a car. Try grocery shopping without one...

    Americans do not walk down the nearest street to six different food stores. Walking in other than in a few places, is considered as a last resort. For males, that is "effeminate."

  200. @Pincher Martin
    @FozzieT

    What city is this?

    Replies: @John Johnson, @FozzieT

    Scottsdale, AZ. Granted in the Summer it’s a no-go for bikes, but most of the year is fantastic.

    • Thanks: Pincher Martin
  201. @Achmed E. Newman
    Thank you for being very fair to the bicyclists on this one, Steve. You usually seem to have an anti-biker bent in the few posts on cycling. Yeah, "climate change", that might really be a reason for 5% of the people that ride, but it's probably more of a nice virtual signaling excuse: "Hey, you guys are always clogging up the elevators in the morning with your bikes!" "We're saving the planet, man!" (Everyone shuts up.)

    You mentioned weight loss, but how about aerobic/cardio reasons to want to ride? Running/jogging is an option, but that's just TOO SLOW. (OK, I am too slow when I - if ever - run or jog.)

    Finally, I am surprised that the bicycle numbers are not even worse and closer to the numbers for motorcycles. At least on a motorcycle, you've got lots of power to get away from the bad drivers - IF, and big IF, you ride with an awareness that you can't act like you're driving a car. (Having ridden a bicycle before for many years helps in this regard.)

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Bill Jones

    I had a motor bike in London when I was a callow yoof.
    I came off it 6 times. five was car drivers not seeing me and the sixth was my swerving to avoid a Chinaman scuttling across Shaftsbury Avenue on a rainy evening, while going to see Maggie Smith in a Restoration Comedy. It was hilarious and very painful. I’d cracked my sternum as I discovered the next day.
    I swore to myself then that the Next Chinaman Gets It! of which oath word must have got around as I never saw another while on the bike- Triumph Bonneville as I recall.

  202. @Pincher Martin
    @John Johnson


    White liberals driving a one hour commute to avoid Blacks while listening to a NPR show about how Republicans are racist and against public transportation.
     
    What's remarkable is that two of the US cities I've lived in (San Francisco and San Jose) have very small black populations, and yet they both still have similar urban pathologies to what you describe.

    San Francisco is only 5% black, and a large portion of that small population is in out-of-the-way Bayview-Hunter's Point, which is a neighborhood over where Candlestick Park used to be.

    But blacks in the city still punch well above their weight in noticeable public dysfunctional behavior. They are a problem around Union Square. They are a problem in the Tenderloin. They are a problem in the lower Fillmore district. They are a problem on BART and other public transportation. And they have featured in the recent surge of shoplifting.

    This is in one of the world's wealthiest cities, where liberals dominate policymaking (the city is probably around 10% Republican), and in which blacks are a significantly smaller slice of the population than in the U.S. as a whole (thus being more manageable to policy if such a thing is possible). Yet the same failures abound in SF as in every other US city.

    San Francisco is too dense for the hour-long commutes for those who choose to live in the city, but in every other way it resembles what you describe. San Jose, however, has far more land and so it has spread just like most other US cities, despite the fact that less than 3% of the city's population is black. San Jose is really a suburbia without a serious urban core beyond office buildings.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    San Jose is really a suburbia without a serious urban core beyond office buildings.

    So is Los Angeles

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Bill Jones

    True, but San Jose is still a much crappier place than Los Angeles.

    San Jose is the tenth largest city in America, it's incredibly wealthy ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._cities_by_adjusted_per_capita_personal_income ), and it's geographically proximate to the Bay Area, which has many fine places to visit and tour, but there are ...

    * no good restaurants in San Jose - of the more than fifty Michelin-starred restaurants in the Bay Area, only one has a San Jose address. I've eaten there ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adega ) and it's completely forgettable. Michelin is not the ultimate arbiter of restaurant value, but San Jose restaurants suck by just about any measure. The same is not true of LA

    *just two sports franchises and both are in crappy venues. Dallas, which is a comparatively large and wealthy city, has four, and two of those are in amazing venues.

    * no downtown to speak of. Even Los Angeles has the former Staples Center complex (now called Crypto.com Arena) which I've heard has sparked something of a renaissance in the area. Perhaps Google will spark something similar after it develops its business complex near the the Diridon station.

    About twenty years ago, San Jose tried to bring some class to the downtown area by having the architect Richard Meier design its new City Hall. The result was a monstrosity.

    https://live.staticflickr.com/6080/6091637832_33df5ee2bf_b.jpg

    I just cannot adequately describe to you how ugly this building is in person.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  203. “There are a lot of wonderful things about cycling, but it’s basically 1970s-level safety…”

    There certainly are. Which is more than can be said for automobiles; there’s nothing at all remotely wonderful about them. But except for a John Kerry or two, most “elites” don’t ride bikes; as with all virtues, they just like to talk big. That’s why there are so many abandoned rail lines, which could be used to connect every small town in America by rail, just as in the 19th century, for the price of what America wastes on auto’s every year – with enough left over to build local bike paths on all the newly abandoned roads & highways afterward. Wonderful.

  204. @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Johnson

    Got to tell you this one, since you are one who understands, John. Riding down this 3-lane 1-way street in a city, I noted that a cop car was blocking the bike lane completely. Going into the lanes would not work, so I got onto the sidewalk 50 yards ahead of time. It was a really wide sidewalk too.

    Well, the cop lady is there dealing with some passed-out bum, and as I ride by she yells "get off the sidewalk!" You think you're fast - that middle finger came out faster than a revolver off of one of the Doolin-Dalton gang. "Fuck you" is what I yelled, but it may have sounded a little off due to the Doppler effect.

    Replies: @Frank the Prof

    Yikes, it sounds like you should move out of the city. I live in idyllic rural America with lots of bike paths and little traveled gravel roads. When I lived in North Jersey, I didn’t cycle much mostly indoors and on weekends.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Frank the Prof

    That's wasn't where I live now.

  205. @Jack D
    @Anonymous


    If you were a jet setter, especially in light aircraft or [non-?]third world airlines, pretty risky if you did a lot of hours.
     
    The same thing was true of pilots and other crew, except even more so. 700 to 1000 hrs per year is not unusual for an airline pilot so over the course of a career it could be 25,000 hrs or more in the air (I think the record is 65,000 hrs). Even the most frequent flier rarely flies that much.

    For general aviation, the risk is 16 deaths per 1M hrs or 1 death per 62,500 hrs. So you can see that as a pilot, while any one flight was not particularly risky, over the course of 25,000 hrs you had a considerable cumulative risk. Therefore pilots could not get life insurance at regular rates.

    However nowadays, crashes on major American carriers on main line routes (not regional jets) are almost unknown. In 2018, 1 passenger was sucked out of the window on a Southwest flight when the engine flew apart and parts hit the window. Before that, the last crash involving an American carrier and a Boeing or Airbus jet was November, 2001. 265 died supposedly due to pilot error (excessive rudder inputs, in response to wake turbulence which led to the vertical stabilizer breaking off).

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel

    To be fair to the pilot, he responded as he had been trained. Carbon Fiber parts, like the vertical stabilizer, were much more brittle than was expected under an extreme load condition. The training has been since modified.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Charlesz Martel

    There was some controversy over this. Airplane rudders are like the steering wheel on your car in that you can make large inputs when you are going slowly but at highway speed if you clock the steering wheel back and forth 90 degrees the car is going to have a much greater response. Add to that the fact that the Airbus had in effect "power steering" on the rudder pedals with no feedback so the pilot had no notion that he was cranking the rudder wildly - to him it felt the same as if he were applying the rudder while taxiing.

    Still he was doing the totally wrong thing and something that no other pilot (thank goodness) had done and that he was absolutely not trained to do. Carbon fiber or not, the stabilizer was designed to take 100,000 lbs. of force and he ended up putting 200,000 lbs. of force on it and it broke.

    If he had done nothing no one would have died. This is very common in air crashes - something goes wrong and the thing that the pilot does to "correct" it makes the situation worse instead of better.

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel

  206. @Alden
    @Adam Smith

    It’s just life in the big city. Every city. You should the neighborhood 2 of my grandchildren have to take a bus through to get to their expensive private school.

    Aren’t all blacks snarling and vicious?

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    Aren’t all blacks snarling and vicious?

    Surely there must be some good, hard working Blacks! somewhere. [/sarc]

    More seriously though… I don’t really know, as I never interact with africans. But yeah, it seems like the africans in America are in an almost constant state of rage, especially for the the last few years. It’s like the TeeVee, or someone, told them to be even more snarling and vicious, as if they needed a reason.

  207. @Charlesz Martel
    @Jack D

    To be fair to the pilot, he responded as he had been trained. Carbon Fiber parts, like the vertical stabilizer, were much more brittle than was expected under an extreme load condition. The training has been since modified.

    Replies: @Jack D

    There was some controversy over this. Airplane rudders are like the steering wheel on your car in that you can make large inputs when you are going slowly but at highway speed if you clock the steering wheel back and forth 90 degrees the car is going to have a much greater response. Add to that the fact that the Airbus had in effect “power steering” on the rudder pedals with no feedback so the pilot had no notion that he was cranking the rudder wildly – to him it felt the same as if he were applying the rudder while taxiing.

    Still he was doing the totally wrong thing and something that no other pilot (thank goodness) had done and that he was absolutely not trained to do. Carbon fiber or not, the stabilizer was designed to take 100,000 lbs. of force and he ended up putting 200,000 lbs. of force on it and it broke.

    If he had done nothing no one would have died. This is very common in air crashes – something goes wrong and the thing that the pilot does to “correct” it makes the situation worse instead of better.

    • Replies: @Charlesz Martel
    @Jack D

    Thanks for your comment. I would like to point out, however, that not all sources agree with your conclusion. See here:

    http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/08/06/new.york.plane.crash/index.html

    https://flightsafety.org/asw-article/re-examining-the-rudder/

    Here's a story about a rudder just falling off an A-310 in flight, and the crew brought her home on a wing and a prayer....

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2005/mar/13/theairlineindustry.internationalnews

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/2012/11/19/airbus-rudder/1707421/

    https://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/14040/are-modern-airbus-aircraft-protected-from-excessive-rudder-input

    I still think the pilot got unlucky more than anything else. I can't find the articles from years ago where they claimed he had been trained to do what he did, but it's not uncommon for reasons for disasters to be reevaluated as time and more experiences accumulate. The other accidents seem to show a flaw in the design or build of the aircraft, but that's not uncommon in new planes filled with new technology- fly by wire, carbon fiber, etc. Apparently, the pilot was trying to correct "fishtailing" caused by wake turbulence and over-controlling. Increasing separation was probably the wisest course in retrospect.

    When I first learned to fly in the '70's, wake turbulence from much larger aircraft was pretty much unknown, or if not unknown, pilots and control towers did not account for it. By around 1980, the tower was having you hold for a couple minutes after a heavy aircraft departed, as planes had been shown to be thrown around the sky by it in certain conditions. IIRC, I think I recall a column by Dick Collins in Flying magazine where that had happened to him in his Mooney (231, I believe). He said that the aircraft had been spun nearly inverted twice, as he passed from smooth air into wing vortices, which did not show on radar (maybe they would have on a Stormscope?) and he was in CAVU conditions- Clear Air, Visiblity Unlimited- perfect flying conditions.

  208. @Frank the Prof
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yikes, it sounds like you should move out of the city. I live in idyllic rural America with lots of bike paths and little traveled gravel roads. When I lived in North Jersey, I didn't cycle much mostly indoors and on weekends.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    That’s wasn’t where I live now.

  209. @Bill Jones
    @Pincher Martin


    San Jose is really a suburbia without a serious urban core beyond office buildings.
     
    So is Los Angeles

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    True, but San Jose is still a much crappier place than Los Angeles.

    San Jose is the tenth largest city in America, it’s incredibly wealthy ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._cities_by_adjusted_per_capita_personal_income ), and it’s geographically proximate to the Bay Area, which has many fine places to visit and tour, but there are …

    * no good restaurants in San Jose – of the more than fifty Michelin-starred restaurants in the Bay Area, only one has a San Jose address. I’ve eaten there ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adega ) and it’s completely forgettable. Michelin is not the ultimate arbiter of restaurant value, but San Jose restaurants suck by just about any measure. The same is not true of LA

    *just two sports franchises and both are in crappy venues. Dallas, which is a comparatively large and wealthy city, has four, and two of those are in amazing venues.

    * no downtown to speak of. Even Los Angeles has the former Staples Center complex (now called Crypto.com Arena) which I’ve heard has sparked something of a renaissance in the area. Perhaps Google will spark something similar after it develops its business complex near the the Diridon station.

    About twenty years ago, San Jose tried to bring some class to the downtown area by having the architect Richard Meier design its new City Hall. The result was a monstrosity.

    I just cannot adequately describe to you how ugly this building is in person.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Pincher Martin

    San Jose has to be the most soulless place in California.

    I bag on LA but you can really have a good time there. Bad place to live but nice place to visit.

    San Jose is basically a crowded Office Depot.

    I'd much rather go to the Salton Sea or one of those creepy small towns by the Arizona border.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Jack D

  210. @John
    I've bicycled about 200,000 miles over the past 40 years. Mostly commuting, in Texas; but a lot of long trips too, in the U.S. and Canada and South America. Numerous day trips in Mexico. Several short trips in Europe, if you count Iceland, Portugal, and Slovenia as Europe. OK, several short trips in NATO, how about that?

    I've never had a serious accident, indeed have scarcely had any accident. I don't think anyone's ever going to write a book about me; or, if anyone does, title it Outlier. Just not many people bicycle a lot, for the simple reason that it is very impractical. One does it because one likes it, and if not, not. The activity is so rare, no policymaker should worry about it. Except maybe for the NTSB, maybe none does. I myself do not, although when in the saddle, I often think that I'd trust someone texting far less than I'd trust a drunk driver. A drunk driver would at least know he was doing something foolish, and attempt to compensate for his impairment, however vainly.

    Replies: @Badger Down

    Don’t be too confident. You can hear trucks and nutters coming up behind you. The unforeseen (unforeheard?) danger is the little old lady driving smoothly, same speed as the traffic, who just drives straight into you.
    The Netherlands has the answer.

  211. @Rob
    @John Johnson

    The problem with making any sort of public transport free is that people one would prefer not to associate with use it more. Homeless people to get out of the rain and cold and gangbangers looking to claim territory/wild in someone else's area.

    Also, having a car has fixed costs per month and variable costs per trip. Usually, once you’ve already paid to own and insure the car, the gas to drive somewhere is cheaper than public transport. That might not be true in the Current Year, though.

    So, we don’t want public transport to be free, but we want people to use it. Solution: Do you live in NYC? Your car insurance includes bus passes and subway passes. If you live in the boonies and commute to NYC, then include a light rail pass too.

    The car insurance company benefits, because every trip you don’t take in your car is a trip they don’t have to pay for an accident. You benefit, cuz sometimes the bus will be better than driving for whatever reason. The city benefits, because traffic is less congested. The bus ride is more pleasant than if unpleasant people could ride for free.

    I doubt this will ever happen.

    Park & Ride. I remember seeing signs for those when I was a little kid. I hated that my mom never stopped at parks and let me go on the rides.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    The problem with making any sort of public transport free is that people one would prefer not to associate with use it more. Homeless people to get out of the rain and cold and gangbangers looking to claim territory/wild in someone else’s area.

    It is already de facto free in areas with Blacks. That was really my point.

    Poor Blacks are already given transportation passes and no one asks to see them. That is why Blacks can hop on busses without paying.

    So, we don’t want public transport to be free, but we want people to use it. Solution: Do you live in NYC? Your car insurance includes bus passes and subway passes. If you live in the boonies and commute to NYC, then include a light rail pass too.

    The solution is actually quite easy which is to charge everyone. Liberals will never go for that so back to denying reality and living in some fantasy world where Black riders are polite and the problem is with Whites that won’t get out of their cars. It’s all liberal fantasy.

    If you give Whites free passes that won’t change anything. Their decision to not ride has nothing to do with cost. White people buy \$6 lattes all the time. I bought one two hours ago.

    I really don’t care at all about public transportation. I moved away from the city and the reality denial circus. No one is going to discuss the issue honestly because it overlaps with race.

    Good luck to other countries. I really do think subways and light rail are neat but I live in America where reality denying egalitarians dominate the cities.

  212. @Pincher Martin
    @Bill Jones

    True, but San Jose is still a much crappier place than Los Angeles.

    San Jose is the tenth largest city in America, it's incredibly wealthy ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._cities_by_adjusted_per_capita_personal_income ), and it's geographically proximate to the Bay Area, which has many fine places to visit and tour, but there are ...

    * no good restaurants in San Jose - of the more than fifty Michelin-starred restaurants in the Bay Area, only one has a San Jose address. I've eaten there ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adega ) and it's completely forgettable. Michelin is not the ultimate arbiter of restaurant value, but San Jose restaurants suck by just about any measure. The same is not true of LA

    *just two sports franchises and both are in crappy venues. Dallas, which is a comparatively large and wealthy city, has four, and two of those are in amazing venues.

    * no downtown to speak of. Even Los Angeles has the former Staples Center complex (now called Crypto.com Arena) which I've heard has sparked something of a renaissance in the area. Perhaps Google will spark something similar after it develops its business complex near the the Diridon station.

    About twenty years ago, San Jose tried to bring some class to the downtown area by having the architect Richard Meier design its new City Hall. The result was a monstrosity.

    https://live.staticflickr.com/6080/6091637832_33df5ee2bf_b.jpg

    I just cannot adequately describe to you how ugly this building is in person.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    San Jose has to be the most soulless place in California.

    I bag on LA but you can really have a good time there. Bad place to live but nice place to visit.

    San Jose is basically a crowded Office Depot.

    I’d much rather go to the Salton Sea or one of those creepy small towns by the Arizona border.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @John Johnson

    Yep. As much as I can't stand San Francisco's radical politics and boring people, my wife and I both enjoyed our time living in the city. The physical geography is incredible. The restaurants are among the world's best. While the infrastructure is increasingly ragged and the residential real estate often dilapidated (something which I think is unappreciated), there are many interesting historical buildings and sites that one can usually only find time to visit if one lives there. For example, taking a guided architectural walking tour through the city or a walking tour of trees through the Presidio.

    I had a great time living in San Francisco.

    San Jose, on the other hand, is like a poor man's Sacramento that has suddenly found itself flush with money and doesn't know what to do with it. I lived in Sacramento for several years. Given a choice between living there again or continuing to live in San Jose, I wouldn't hesitate to return to the former. And that's not because the city of Sacramento is such a great place to live. It's okay. But it's still a damn sight better than San Jose.

    , @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    Gertrude Stein famously remarked about her hometown, Oakland, that when you get there, there is not there there. Well Oakland, at least in her time, was Paris compared to San Jose. Cities that grew up in the age of the automobile tend to be lacking a "there" (the San Jose metro area went from 180,000 in 1950 to 1,800,000 today).

  213. @John Johnson
    @Pincher Martin

    San Jose has to be the most soulless place in California.

    I bag on LA but you can really have a good time there. Bad place to live but nice place to visit.

    San Jose is basically a crowded Office Depot.

    I'd much rather go to the Salton Sea or one of those creepy small towns by the Arizona border.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Jack D

    Yep. As much as I can’t stand San Francisco’s radical politics and boring people, my wife and I both enjoyed our time living in the city. The physical geography is incredible. The restaurants are among the world’s best. While the infrastructure is increasingly ragged and the residential real estate often dilapidated (something which I think is unappreciated), there are many interesting historical buildings and sites that one can usually only find time to visit if one lives there. For example, taking a guided architectural walking tour through the city or a walking tour of trees through the Presidio.

    I had a great time living in San Francisco.

    San Jose, on the other hand, is like a poor man’s Sacramento that has suddenly found itself flush with money and doesn’t know what to do with it. I lived in Sacramento for several years. Given a choice between living there again or continuing to live in San Jose, I wouldn’t hesitate to return to the former. And that’s not because the city of Sacramento is such a great place to live. It’s okay. But it’s still a damn sight better than San Jose.

  214. @anonymous
    @JimDandy


    so they can’t blame White Nationalist rhetoric this time
     
    The climate of fear created by Whitesupremiasma made him paranoid and crazy?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @JimDandy

    Whereas the Buffalo shooter represented all kinds of GOP evils, according the the MSM narrative, the hispanic Texas shooter has inspired this narrative, which is currently linked on the front page of Drudge:

    Our greatest public-health crisis? The angry young American male

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JimDandy

    One of the many untold stories of the 2020 election is who paid Drudge to give up control of his website circa the summer of that year. Considering how much money it must have brought in, it can't have been cheap to buy him out.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  215. I have no problem bicycling for short errands and meet no “oppo” car drivers. That’s because I have a drivers licence and know the rules of the road. Many cyclists unfortunately are unaccustomed to the idea that there are rules.

    • Thanks: Hibernian
  216. @Charlesz Martel
    @Alden

    Here is one of the most intelligent urban transportation solutions out there, so naturally it won't ever come to the U.S.

    https://www.whichev.net/2020/02/28/citroen-ami-promises-electric-mobility-for-all-at-20-euros-a-month/

    The other great solution is mopeds, but American men are so insecure they consider them dorky and effeminate. Go to Europe and see how well they work there.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Muggles

    Mopeds are gay. American men dislike them not because they are ‘insecure’, but because they have more dignity and better taste than do Eurotrash.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Art Deco


    Mopeds are gay.
     
    And motorcycles are savagely sexy.

    https://i.imgur.com/OZzqwsp.jpg

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel

  217. Anonymous[320] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimDandy
    @anonymous

    Whereas the Buffalo shooter represented all kinds of GOP evils, according the the MSM narrative, the hispanic Texas shooter has inspired this narrative, which is currently linked on the front page of Drudge:

    Our greatest public-health crisis? The angry young American male

    Replies: @Anonymous

    One of the many untold stories of the 2020 election is who paid Drudge to give up control of his website circa the summer of that year. Considering how much money it must have brought in, it can’t have been cheap to buy him out.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Anonymous

    Yeah. It seems like it would fairly easy for someone like Tucker to find out.

  218. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco
    @Charlesz Martel

    Mopeds are gay. American men dislike them not because they are 'insecure', but because they have more dignity and better taste than do Eurotrash.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Mopeds are gay.

    And motorcycles are savagely sexy.

    • Replies: @Charlesz Martel
    @Anonymous

    I can't believe you would sully an intellectual conversation with such filth! Where did you find this picture? I need the url of the site so I can carefully examine the other pictures there so I can be sure that they will not sully the eyes of Steve's readers....

    The things we must do to maintain community standards...

  219. @Jack D
    @Charlesz Martel

    There was some controversy over this. Airplane rudders are like the steering wheel on your car in that you can make large inputs when you are going slowly but at highway speed if you clock the steering wheel back and forth 90 degrees the car is going to have a much greater response. Add to that the fact that the Airbus had in effect "power steering" on the rudder pedals with no feedback so the pilot had no notion that he was cranking the rudder wildly - to him it felt the same as if he were applying the rudder while taxiing.

    Still he was doing the totally wrong thing and something that no other pilot (thank goodness) had done and that he was absolutely not trained to do. Carbon fiber or not, the stabilizer was designed to take 100,000 lbs. of force and he ended up putting 200,000 lbs. of force on it and it broke.

    If he had done nothing no one would have died. This is very common in air crashes - something goes wrong and the thing that the pilot does to "correct" it makes the situation worse instead of better.

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel

    Thanks for your comment. I would like to point out, however, that not all sources agree with your conclusion. See here:

    http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/08/06/new.york.plane.crash/index.html

    https://flightsafety.org/asw-article/re-examining-the-rudder/

    Here’s a story about a rudder just falling off an A-310 in flight, and the crew brought her home on a wing and a prayer….

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2005/mar/13/theairlineindustry.internationalnews

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/2012/11/19/airbus-rudder/1707421/

    https://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/14040/are-modern-airbus-aircraft-protected-from-excessive-rudder-input

    I still think the pilot got unlucky more than anything else. I can’t find the articles from years ago where they claimed he had been trained to do what he did, but it’s not uncommon for reasons for disasters to be reevaluated as time and more experiences accumulate. The other accidents seem to show a flaw in the design or build of the aircraft, but that’s not uncommon in new planes filled with new technology- fly by wire, carbon fiber, etc. Apparently, the pilot was trying to correct “fishtailing” caused by wake turbulence and over-controlling. Increasing separation was probably the wisest course in retrospect.

    When I first learned to fly in the ’70’s, wake turbulence from much larger aircraft was pretty much unknown, or if not unknown, pilots and control towers did not account for it. By around 1980, the tower was having you hold for a couple minutes after a heavy aircraft departed, as planes had been shown to be thrown around the sky by it in certain conditions. IIRC, I think I recall a column by Dick Collins in Flying magazine where that had happened to him in his Mooney (231, I believe). He said that the aircraft had been spun nearly inverted twice, as he passed from smooth air into wing vortices, which did not show on radar (maybe they would have on a Stormscope?) and he was in CAVU conditions- Clear Air, Visiblity Unlimited- perfect flying conditions.

  220. Anonymous[406] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charlesz Martel
    @Anonymous

    The best comment I ever saw about "Eyes Wide Shut" is:

    "If I wanted to watch married people f**king, I'd watch the Lifetime channel!"

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Portraying EWS being about married people [email protected]#\$ing is like saying that Sailer has a blog about golf course architecture.

    Well yeah, he does write about that… but it’s not going to prick up the ears of the ADL, SPLC, etc.

  221. @Anonymous
    @Art Deco


    Mopeds are gay.
     
    And motorcycles are savagely sexy.

    https://i.imgur.com/OZzqwsp.jpg

    Replies: @Charlesz Martel

    I can’t believe you would sully an intellectual conversation with such filth! Where did you find this picture? I need the url of the site so I can carefully examine the other pictures there so I can be sure that they will not sully the eyes of Steve’s readers….

    The things we must do to maintain community standards…

  222. @John Johnson
    @Pincher Martin

    San Jose has to be the most soulless place in California.

    I bag on LA but you can really have a good time there. Bad place to live but nice place to visit.

    San Jose is basically a crowded Office Depot.

    I'd much rather go to the Salton Sea or one of those creepy small towns by the Arizona border.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin, @Jack D

    Gertrude Stein famously remarked about her hometown, Oakland, that when you get there, there is not there there. Well Oakland, at least in her time, was Paris compared to San Jose. Cities that grew up in the age of the automobile tend to be lacking a “there” (the San Jose metro area went from 180,000 in 1950 to 1,800,000 today).

  223. @Thulean Friend
    Sorry Steve, your post is misinformed.

    The problem is not the bicycle. The problem is car-centric urbanism. Even many European countries, despite much fanfare, have not made a decisive shift away even if there has been enormously positive changes in the past decade.

    Ultimately a decision has to be made to ban most cars from cities. There's no way going around that. I suspect the US will be the last man standing, due to how US cities look like. But even that is not an excuse. Berlin was razed to the ground and has a typical "American" look, yet the progress in that city has been spectacular.

    Retrofitting isn't an issue. It's about priorities. Do you want a city that's primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can't have both.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @AnotherDad, @aNewBanner, @David Davenport

    Do you want a city that’s primarily based around walking, cycling and public transport or one based around cars? You can’t have both.

    I choose cars. Public transport is the worst.

  224. @Anonymous
    @JimDandy

    One of the many untold stories of the 2020 election is who paid Drudge to give up control of his website circa the summer of that year. Considering how much money it must have brought in, it can't have been cheap to buy him out.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Yeah. It seems like it would fairly easy for someone like Tucker to find out.

  225. @Charlesz Martel
    @Alden

    Here is one of the most intelligent urban transportation solutions out there, so naturally it won't ever come to the U.S.

    https://www.whichev.net/2020/02/28/citroen-ami-promises-electric-mobility-for-all-at-20-euros-a-month/

    The other great solution is mopeds, but American men are so insecure they consider them dorky and effeminate. Go to Europe and see how well they work there.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Muggles

    The other great solution is mopeds, but American men are so insecure they consider them dorky and effeminate. Go to Europe and see how well they work there.

    Mr. Martel might want to take a look at most large (and medium) sized American cities and actually look at how people commute.

    Apples and oranges to Europe. It has nothing to do with sexual identity or “dorkyness”

    Most European cities were formed centuries before autos and inside of them have small sized (tiny) roadways intended for horses and carts. Very little parking. Cars there are also small. If you live in a multistory apartment building, your parking is underneath or all chained up near a back alleyway. Public parking for cars is almost nonexistent. If you commute from a suburb the government has decades earlier built commuter rail lines, metros underground or have buses.

    American cars/trucks are big and you would be killed on any major American highway in a moped. Multi lanned and full of heavy trucks (lorries). Only in a few places are suburbs accessible by public transport (and in those, full of criminals and zombies, homeless crazies and beggars.).

    Aside from winter weather, heavy rains, ice, snow there are also poor street maintenance problems. Potholes, cracks, bumps, debris. Americans are spread out horizontally, not vertically as in cramped European cities centuries old. Most prefer single family houses, not small apartments.

    When I first moved to the Big City near which I now live, as a student, I rode a 50 CC Italian motorcycle (barely) or biked. I am lucky to still be alive. The motorcycle was stolen over summer break.

    Europeans can’t afford automobiles, “petrol” or parking/insurance. So mostly they don’t need them like New Yorkers. Everyone else in America needs a car. Try grocery shopping without one…

    Americans do not walk down the nearest street to six different food stores. Walking in other than in a few places, is considered as a last resort. For males, that is “effeminate.”

  226. Motorcycle (traditional definition):
    “A two-wheeled vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine”

    This one is as safe as a car:
    — (https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftse1.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DOIP.UNEfOkiCDqB-XVQh2VvP3wHaFj%26pid%3DApi&f=1)

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