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My new Taki’s Magazine column more lucidly explains that new paper on what your taste in movies says about your personality. For example:

People who like movies about sports tend to rank high on the sociable personality traits and lower on the more artistically related traits.

For example, the two movies with the most extreme personality profiles are the polar-opposite high school cult classics Friday Night Lights, about a blue-collar Texas football team trying to win the state title, and Heathers, in which Winona Ryder is conflicted over whether or not to finish murdering all the popular girls:

Read the whole thing there.

By the way, Friday Night Lights, which went on to become a successful TV show, has the least neurotic fan base of any of the 846 movies. The second least neurotic is Mission Impossible, the action-suspense franchise in which Tom Cruise performs heroic feats of derring-do. In contrast:

Winona Ryder movies are strong in Neuroticism, with the most neurotic movie of the 846 being her hot-chicks-in-a-mental-institution Girl, Interrupted with Angelina Jolie.

That got me wondering about a fundamental question about who “likes” various movies. One plausible theory would be the “Secret Life of Walter Mitty” theory that the kind of people who like watching Tom Cruise dangle precariously are timid people who are scared of heights, and thus are extra-thrilled by the Mission: Impossible stunts.

There is some evidence for this: e.g., fans of horror movies like The Exorcist and Psycho are above average in neuroticism. They tend to find life scary and like scary movies.

On the other hand, most of the time it seems like the opposite: people tend to identify with movies about people who are rather like themselves in terms of personality, just better looking: e.g., self-confident non-neurotic people like Tom Cruise’s self-confident Ethan Hunt and emotionally fragile neurotic people like Girl, Interrupted.

Of course, this raises the question of whether Facebook “likes” translates directly to ticket sales. My guess is that people who like a movie on Facebook tend more toward the hard core fans who look forward to a Mission: Impossible 7 or whatever they are up to lately or a 25th anniversary sequel to Girl, Interrupted.

Anyway, read my new article.

 
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  1. The jocks won’t argue for really trying to change higher education because they rank to high in agreeableness.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Redneck farmer

    Am I being too agreeable if I say I agree?

    , @Abe
    @Redneck farmer


    The jocks won’t argue for really trying to change higher education because they rank to high in agreeableness.
     
    I know a lot of us give Steve crap for not properly ending some of his TAKI’S essays (not me personally, cuz I’m too [email protected]’ classy, but there are these guys I know...,) but that was a really good conclusion this time. Short, meaningful, integrally related to the body of the essay, yet totally out of let field and surprising, a sort of SIXTH SENSE type ending. I feel like a hipster douche reviewing some rap album (with all the disgusting literal and metaphorical yearning for a polar bear-ing all such sad exercises imply) in writing this, but that conclusion was “like a sucker punch that sent me to concrete. And I loved it!”

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  2. @Redneck farmer
    The jocks won't argue for really trying to change higher education because they rank to high in agreeableness.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Abe

    Am I being too agreeable if I say I agree?

    • Agree: ic1000, Abe, Escher
  3. I like the dreams (and maybe movies) as a random noise cure for overfitting by the wetware computer inside one’s head hypothesis. Timid people lead narrow uneventful lives, so what they need the scary movies for is to keep them realistically generalising about the shit that might happen.

    Film is also vicariously gratuitous. Every man wants to be seen a hero and someone who gets things done, in the same way that every woman wants to be seen as beautiful and desirable

    Not sure about Facebook, but the going rate for buying 1000 YouTube likes is $25.

  4. In a similar vein, I definitely judge people by the TV shows they watch, or if they watch TV at all.

    • Replies: @theMann
    @ScarletNumber

    People who sit around watching TV all day are the definition of useless eaters.( FWIW, I got rid of cable years ago, and Netflix months ago. So I guess I am really looking forward to Season 5 of The Expanse. ) TV watching should be severely limited, or ended, as the shows are puerile and the advertisements filth.


    Film, in Hollywood anyway, goes out of its way to insult my sex, race, and religion so I am done with them as well. For now, there are always Asian Martial Arts movies.


    When a society has 10's of millions of utterly passive creatures expecting to be ""entertained" with no input or effort on their part, it is already circling the drain. Normal people read a book, join a club, learn to play music, go for walks, in short, live. Blobs watch TV and obsess over films. It is the difference between Civilization and Degeneracy.

    Replies: @Feryl

  5. Winona Ryder movies are strong in Neuroticism, with the most neurotic movie of the 846 being her hot-chicks-in-a-mental-institution Girl, Interrupted with Angelina Jolie.

    It’s amusing how 90% of mental health issues are rich girls following fads – social contagion. All the teen girls wanted to be depressed around the time of Prozac Nation. I read somewhere about a school where half the girls were experiencing ‘gender dysphoria’, and after school closure (because of the lockdown) all the symptoms disappeared.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @TelfoedJohn

    Correlating movie preference with personality type is a really interesting idea and is good fun. But as our presumptive (presumptuous?) president-elect, might say: "C'mon man, you ain't science."

    The participants in this study are a totally non-random sample who: (a) are all on facebook to begin with. (b) are whatever type of person it is that clicks "like" on a movie. (And seriously who does this? And and what does that act mean anyway? That they actually saw and enjoyed the movie? that it's the kind of movie they think they are supposed to like? That it's the type of movie they wished they actually liked? Or that it's the type of movie they want to support and make other people like?) In addition, they (c) are the type of people who affirmatively decide to take on-line personality test and give their results to researchers.

    I am not sure who fits this profile but I bet you wouldn't want to take a long car ride or be stuck in an elevator with one of them. They are probably far from the average American (in fact, most of them may not even be American).

    However, someone should absolutely do a legit. scientific study on this topic. For example, if you gave the personality test and got consent from a random sample of Netflix or Amazon video subscribers, perhaps you could persuade the services to correlate the results with whatever movies they actually have been watching on the services.

    Come to think of it, why just the Big Five personality test. You could give them the full Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), and then use their movie preferences to diagnose their mental health. Find a way to get this "cinematic personality assessment" insurance covered and cha-ching!

    With his marketing background, interest in movies, and interest in HBD, I'd say Steve is the perfect person to get this project off the ground, if he was looking for a potentially lucrative side-hustle.

    , @njguy73
    @TelfoedJohn

    In the book "Prozac Nation" Elizabeth Wurtzel wrote about how as a depressed teen she identified with the music of Bruce Springsteen and how she wished to be a boy from New Jersey. If she had been birn a few decades later she'd be Elliot Wurtzel.

  6. How about Grosse Point Blank vs. Four Weddings and a Funeral?

    • Replies: @HFR
    @The Alarmist

    Is it OK to love both "Grosse Point Blank" and "Four Weddings and a Funeral"?

  7. How much of the difference between men and women’s taste in movies is down to personality differences ? So if you have a man and a woman who have similar scores on the “Big Five” will they have similar taste in movies ?

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @AKAHorace


    So if you have a man and a woman who have similar scores on the “Big Five” will they have similar taste in movies ?
     
    No. Education, taste, culture, refinement, erudition ...I recall when I watcting the US 90s series Northern Exposure.


    Those, mostly educated people could not get the following: how Twin Peaks differs from Northern Exposure.

    Lynch and NE creators Brand & Falsey have virtually nothing in common. B & F are educated intellectuals who have been working in TV industry; Lynch is a genuine filmmaker with little “high & broad” education.

    B & F vision is, as far as the NE is concerned, Joseph Campbell put into TV show. They both had undergone Esalen Institute experience & they tried, in this series, to merge three different strands: visionary fantasy that owes, probably, something to Castaneda & similar authors; satirical-comical comments on American society (for instance, treatment of homosexuality & race); and wisdom married to high culture, having roots in Jung & Joseph Campbell.

    I’ve seen that show 2-3 times & can vouchsafe that there is nothing similar in the entire history of TV. Where else could you find readings from Dostoevsky, Joe Campbell, Shakespeare, Melville, …; references to Mrs. Sartre (Simone de Beauvoir); Indian shamans in training quoting St. John’s Epistle; experienced Native American shaman trying to locate white people’s Jungian Collective Unconscious; music from Mahler & small talk about Melville, French painter Ingres or Michelangelo in the Sistine chapel, Meister Eckhart etc.

    So, it has nothing to do with TP.

    TP, and I’ve seen just a part of it- so I am not too qualified to comment- seems to me a typically Lynchean surrealist experiment, superior in imaginative boldness. But- NE characters, even if we include all fantasy trips, are “real”. Most of characters’ dilemmas are convincing human experiences: envy, jealousy, love, aging, illness, snobbery, magnanimity, boredom, …. On the other hand, TP characters & situations are not “real”. They are interesting & frequently impressive, but the entire atmosphere is surrealist & ineluctably a fantasy. There is no high culture content in TP; Lynch’s work is that of a professional, master, but- he has no vision of life in TP. All supposed Evil is a surrealist play: villains are not villains, psychos are not psychos; victims are not victims.

    TP is an orgy of visual mastery combined with low-level plotting. But it is a play to enjoy, not something deeper to absorb.

    And people definitely differ in their temperament & world-view how would they rate NE to TP. But temperament would not be enough; you'll have to put erudition, familiarity with cultural codes & knowledge of the Western culture.

    Replies: @jamie b.

    , @theMann
    @AKAHorace

    That is an excellent question!

    My guess is not even close, but I am curious to see an accurate answer.

  8. @ScarletNumber
    In a similar vein, I definitely judge people by the TV shows they watch, or if they watch TV at all.

    Replies: @theMann

    People who sit around watching TV all day are the definition of useless eaters.( FWIW, I got rid of cable years ago, and Netflix months ago. So I guess I am really looking forward to Season 5 of The Expanse. ) TV watching should be severely limited, or ended, as the shows are puerile and the advertisements filth.

    Film, in Hollywood anyway, goes out of its way to insult my sex, race, and religion so I am done with them as well. For now, there are always Asian Martial Arts movies.

    When a society has 10’s of millions of utterly passive creatures expecting to be “”entertained” with no input or effort on their part, it is already circling the drain. Normal people read a book, join a club, learn to play music, go for walks, in short, live. Blobs watch TV and obsess over films. It is the difference between Civilization and Degeneracy.

    • Agree: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Feryl
    @theMann

    Boomers having endless narcissistic arguments about the rock music of ther youth (much of ironically created by the Silent Generation) is what I find to be dreary and played out. Get over yourselves, people.

    Also, serialized entertainment sucks. It shouldn't take 50 hours (or 200 comic book issues) to tell a story.

  9. I’m here to confess that I (also) like chick flicks.

    You are welcome to use my preferred pronouns: ha / haha

    (I think I like every darn movie category, except anime)

  10. OT: It looks like with Biden comes not just the neocons but a new push for World War T. Ellen Page is now Elliot Page.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Altai

    She's just a lesbian who feels unhip now. Great article about this awful phenomenon.

    https://andrewsullivan.substack.com/p/where-have-all-the-lesbians-gone-0a7

    , @jon
    @Altai

    She passes surprisingly well, as does her trans lady friend:
    https://twitter.com/backflipossum/status/1333918476138844160

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Altai

    Being both trans and queer, she can continue to mate with males. It's a win-win!

    , @Justvisiting
    @Altai

    In the good old days, this "Trans announcement" would have been followed by men in the white coats coming to take the crazy "it" away to the funny farm.

    Today it is followed by a mass media celebration of perversity for perversity's sake.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    , @Malcolm X-Lax
    @Altai

    Ellen Page's reaction to the Jussie Smollet hoax was one of the more entertaining moments of that whole spectacle.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Altai

    Even in just a quickie scan of paragraph leads, she doesn't sound remotely like a guy.

    No idea who this BPD head case is--apparently an "actress".

    I'm a "nature" guy and a lot of flakey is baked in. But this girl needed better parents. More hard work. A spanking or two.

    We aren't adapted yet, and modern life enables all sorts of mental weakness. (I'm not as strong, touch as i should be.) But the feminine personality seems to be particularly ill-adapted, "loose", "flakey", without the base of the normal work in an agricultural society.

    If as a girl, she'd gotten up with the sun to milk the cows, collect some eggs, stoke the stove and start breakfast... i think she might well have been ok. Fit to marry at 22 or so and would have three or four or five kids now and be ... happy.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Altai, @Nathan

    , @MEH 0910
    @Altai

    https://twitter.com/PageSix/status/1333844530437779456


    In June 2019, the couple proudly showed their love for one another by posing topless together while kissing for a Pride Month photoshoot.
     
    https://twitter.com/PageSix/status/1333895829535526915

    Replies: @Muggles, @Rob McX

    , @Bugg
    @Altai

    If you're gonna be this silly, wouldn't you at least take a cooler name than Elliot?

  11. this raises the question of whether Facebook “likes” translates directly to ticket sales.

    What about the reverse: whether ticket sales (seeing a movie) translates directly into real world action? (Speaking of “We Are What We Watch”.)

    For instance, growing up around a certain demographic, I can vividly recall coming out of movie theaters that had just been showing, say, a kung fu movie, and—wouldn’tcha know it—kung fu fights immediately erupted on the street among exiting theater goers.

    “Heckuva coincidence, Brownie.”

    I seem to recall that it is accepted lore in Hollywood that when Clark Gable appeared undershirt-less in It Happened One Night, that undershirt sales immediately fell across the country.

    But maybe this type of correlation magically doesn’t apply to Hollywood’s relentless antiwhite incitement. When antiwhite violence goes up, it’s just a priori—a mystery, no one could have foreseen it, lone wolves, etc. …

    • Agree: TWS
    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Almost Missouri

    It's pre-coffee early in here, but in my mind the whole thing devolves into a chicken/egg problem: as The Last Psychiatrist was fond of saying, "If you're watching it, it's for you."

    A favorite example about soap advertising below the fold:


    That Dove wants you to think of it as the authority on beauty so it can sell you stuff makes sense, there's nothing underhanded about it and hardly worth the exposition. The question is, why do they think this will work? What do they know about us that makes them think we want an authority on beauty-- especially in an age where we loudly proclaim that we don't want an authority on beauty, we don't like authorities of any kind, we resist and resent being told what's beautiful (or good or moral or worthwhile) and what's not?

    You may feel your brain start trying to piece this together, but you should stop, there's a twist: where did you see this ad? It wasn't during an episode of The Mentalist on the assumption that you're a 55 year old woman whose husband is "working late." In fact... it's not even playing anywhere. You didn't stumble on it, you were sent to it, it was sent to you-- it was selected for you to see. How did they know? Because if you're watching it, it's for you.
     

    https://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2013/05/dove.html

    Replies: @Guest007, @Charles, @Almost Missouri

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Almost Missouri

    "When antiwhite violence goes up, it’s just a priori—a mystery, no one could have foreseen it, lone wolves, etc. …"

    The response of The Powers That Be is influential, as well.

    https://news.met.police.uk/news/man-given-suspended-sentence-after-assaulting-elderly-woman-in-camden-416380


    Bradley Weight, 24 (16.08.96), of Kentish Town, appeared at Wood Green Crown Court on Monday, 30 November, where he was sentenced to 12 months imprisonment suspended for 18 months. He must also carry out 250 hours of unpaid work and spend 35 days in rehabilitation.

    He previously pleaded guilty to GBH without intent at Highbury Corner Magistrates' Court on 25 August. At 16:40hrs on Monday, 4 May, officers on routine patrol on Camden Road, NW1, were informed that a 69-year-old woman had been found injured in the street.

    Officers established that the suspect had kicked the victim’s shopping bag as she got off a Route 29 bus. When she turned around to confront him, he pushed her hard which caused her to fall backwards and onto the floor. The woman, who walks with the aid of a stick, suffered a broken leg in the assault. She was taken by London Ambulance Service [LAS] to a central London hospital for treatment and after surgery was discharged several days later.

    A CCTV appeal was issued by police after the assault and, upon hearing this, Weight handed himself in at Kentish Town Police Station on 18 May. Judge Mathieson said the footage was ‘truly shocking’ and that Weight had carried out a ‘horrific act’ on an ‘entirely defenceless’ victim.
     

    Unprovoked GBH on an elderly lady who walks with a stick, break her leg, no prison. Amazing.

    I can't be 100% sure of Weight's race, because there are no media pictures, (itself an indicator), but a black guy called Jamie Weight runs the youth team at Kentish Town Community Centre. A brother perhaps?

    https://www.ktcc.org.uk/who-we-are

    , @njguy73
    @Almost Missouri

    "E.T." caused sales of Reese's Pieces to skyrocket. "Splash" caused legions of parents to name their daughters "Madison." And those are two examples off the top of my head.

  12. @Almost Missouri

    this raises the question of whether Facebook “likes” translates directly to ticket sales.
     
    What about the reverse: whether ticket sales (seeing a movie) translates directly into real world action? (Speaking of "We Are What We Watch".)

    For instance, growing up around a certain demographic, I can vividly recall coming out of movie theaters that had just been showing, say, a kung fu movie, and—wouldn'tcha know it—kung fu fights immediately erupted on the street among exiting theater goers.

    "Heckuva coincidence, Brownie."

    I seem to recall that it is accepted lore in Hollywood that when Clark Gable appeared undershirt-less in It Happened One Night, that undershirt sales immediately fell across the country.

    But maybe this type of correlation magically doesn't apply to Hollywood's relentless antiwhite incitement. When antiwhite violence goes up, it's just a priori—a mystery, no one could have foreseen it, lone wolves, etc. ...

    Replies: @slumber_j, @YetAnotherAnon, @njguy73

    It’s pre-coffee early in here, but in my mind the whole thing devolves into a chicken/egg problem: as The Last Psychiatrist was fond of saying, “If you’re watching it, it’s for you.”

    A favorite example about soap advertising below the fold:

    [MORE]

    That Dove wants you to think of it as the authority on beauty so it can sell you stuff makes sense, there’s nothing underhanded about it and hardly worth the exposition. The question is, why do they think this will work? What do they know about us that makes them think we want an authority on beauty– especially in an age where we loudly proclaim that we don’t want an authority on beauty, we don’t like authorities of any kind, we resist and resent being told what’s beautiful (or good or moral or worthwhile) and what’s not?

    You may feel your brain start trying to piece this together, but you should stop, there’s a twist: where did you see this ad? It wasn’t during an episode of The Mentalist on the assumption that you’re a 55 year old woman whose husband is “working late.” In fact… it’s not even playing anywhere. You didn’t stumble on it, you were sent to it, it was sent to you– it was selected for you to see. How did they know? Because if you’re watching it, it’s for you.

    https://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2013/05/dove.html

    • Replies: @Guest007
    @slumber_j

    Most people never understand that much of what they do not like is not aimed at them to begin with. Also, many people believe whatever they like is something that all people should like and what they do not like is something that all people should not like.

    Most people should have a simpler life if they just understand that much of what they see or hear is not aimed at them and they are not the audience.

    , @Charles
    @slumber_j

    Thank you for referencing TLP. I had never heard of or seen that (I suppose now-defunct) blog. The Dove commercials entry was interesting in-and-of itself, plus there were the asides to "House of Games". Much of his stuff made for good reading, if now a bit dated, though it was only six or seven years ago.

    Replies: @Moral Stone, @slumber_j

    , @Almost Missouri
    @slumber_j

    Some say "chicken", Ken Burns says "egg".

    After Ken Burns's Civil War documentary, Civil War battlefields had a large and sustained increase in visitors. After his National Parks documentary, there was a large and sustained increase in National Park attendance. It defies plausibility to believe that all those people were going to go there anyway when Burns' docs just happened to come out.

    I'm not especially a Ken Burns fan, but I mention him because he likes to talk about himself, and there was a PBS interview with him (can't find on YouTube, sorry) where he wrestles with the question you raise in his open if slightly solipsistic way. He professes to be unsure of whether he is leader or led, but there's no denying his films have generated real world actions, and more or less the ones intended by the filmmaker.

  13. @slumber_j
    @Almost Missouri

    It's pre-coffee early in here, but in my mind the whole thing devolves into a chicken/egg problem: as The Last Psychiatrist was fond of saying, "If you're watching it, it's for you."

    A favorite example about soap advertising below the fold:


    That Dove wants you to think of it as the authority on beauty so it can sell you stuff makes sense, there's nothing underhanded about it and hardly worth the exposition. The question is, why do they think this will work? What do they know about us that makes them think we want an authority on beauty-- especially in an age where we loudly proclaim that we don't want an authority on beauty, we don't like authorities of any kind, we resist and resent being told what's beautiful (or good or moral or worthwhile) and what's not?

    You may feel your brain start trying to piece this together, but you should stop, there's a twist: where did you see this ad? It wasn't during an episode of The Mentalist on the assumption that you're a 55 year old woman whose husband is "working late." In fact... it's not even playing anywhere. You didn't stumble on it, you were sent to it, it was sent to you-- it was selected for you to see. How did they know? Because if you're watching it, it's for you.
     

    https://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2013/05/dove.html

    Replies: @Guest007, @Charles, @Almost Missouri

    Most people never understand that much of what they do not like is not aimed at them to begin with. Also, many people believe whatever they like is something that all people should like and what they do not like is something that all people should not like.

    Most people should have a simpler life if they just understand that much of what they see or hear is not aimed at them and they are not the audience.

    • Agree: Mark G.
  14. People usually like the movies that reflect their world view, unless the movie has become a “classic” and/or the people feel socially pressured to like it.

    As I stated previously , I was far too jumpy and easily grossed out for horror movies, but a film major girlfriend and the Scream franchise flotsom and jetsom commentaries about final girl and the slasher formula helped to put pressure on me to watch a bunch and break them down and enjoy them on some level, which I wouldn’t have done otherwise.

    I’m sure back in the 80s tons of jocks hated things like The Karate Kid or Sixteen Candles, but social pressure these days means most jocks today will claim those films are great.

    As for Tom Cruise in particular:

    I think Tom Cruise works very, very hard to make sure his movies appeal to the most people, which is why we’re here nearly 40 years after he first hit the big screen and his movies are still among the top grossing films of the year and he’s still a leading man megastar. Ask Douglas Fairbanks or Cary Grant or any other once-huge Hollywood male star who ended up second rate by the end of their career about that.

    In short, Cruise’s plan works. I’ve never not been excited by a Tom Cruise movie trailer, even though I’m not a huge fan, and I instantly forget his film five minutes after I watch it (except maybe Top Gun or Eyes Wide Shut).

    However, to maintain his superstar status, Cruise’s plan means chucking a good portion of his character’s personality/worldview/quirks/ that might turn off some viewers, which means the vast majority of his roles are, more or less, “Movie Star Tom Cruise doing cool things and action stunts”.

    But you can’t really fault him for choosing Being a Star over Acting, his success rate is unbelievable. And he’ll always have Eyes Wide Shut and Born on the Fourth of July if anyone ever dares question his acting chops.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @R.G. Camara

    I think Tom Cruise works very, very hard to make sure his movies appeal to the most people, which is why we’re here nearly 40 years after he first hit the big screen and his movies are still among the top grossing films of the year and he’s still a leading man megastar. Ask Douglas Fairbanks or Cary Grant or any other once-huge Hollywood male star who ended up second rate by the end of their career about that.

    It remains to be seen if Tom Cruise's career will last all that much longer than Cary Grant's career. Grant's last big hit was Father Goose in 1964, when he was 60 years old, two years older than Cruise is now. He could have kept going, but within a couple of years decided to retire from acting.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @R.G. Camara

    You say Tom Cruise will always have Eyes Wide Shut to show his acting, but are you sure you're not just assuming something great happened there because it was a Stanley Kubrick thing?

    Not that it matters, but I was disappointed with that movie when it was released. Not much happened, and Cruise's affect was flat. His chemistry on screen with his then wife, Nicole Kidman, was featureless.

    Granted, all this could have been at the direction Kubrick. Maybe he thought he was directing 2001 again.

    A noble effort, perhaps, but in the end just hype about nothing.

  15. Fans of horror movies find life scary? I highly doubt that. People who are easily scared (or grossed out) don’t tend to like horror very much. Anyway, horror fans also tend to be liberal, and isn’t it Re-publicans who are scared of everything? (or just clever at scaring other Republicans to get more votes).

  16. Movies may have had some ability to nudge or some capacity for echo chambering (supposedly sales of a certain kind of undershirt took off after a movie in the thirties or forties showed its protagonist wearing one), but it must be very weak compared to the instantaneous and algorhythmically tailored attention of social media.

  17. Hugh Hewitt currently confirming what I had feared, which is that, despite abundant election fraud proof in almost every reasonable sense of the word, there is no evidence in the law talker understanding, which apparently requires a voluntary signed confession from the guilty party. This means that, as with the decision to not indict Hillary Clinton, Democrats will be “not guilty” but the legal institution and its destroyers will be. The crisis of authority intensifies. Good thing Republicans did everything they could to help Democrats because now they’ll all be thrown out and replaced with Chinese assets and Zuckerberg drones.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @Catdog
    @J.Ross

    If Republicans really believe that the election was stolen (rather than merely hoping it was stolen, or pretending that they believe it was because it's politically advantageous)- then we need to stop talking about winning elections.

    It's baffling to hear somebody talk with one side of their mouth about massive election fraud and then with the other start talking about 2022 or 24.

    , @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @J.Ross

    Hugh is a pretty smart guy for a cuck, but this is all very simple.

    The Republican state legislatures in Georgia, PA, Michigan,and Wisconsin have to have the balls to say, "'We're not going to let you steal this election, so we're sending a Trump slate of electors to the EC."

    That's it. It's the only way out.

    Because they will steal the Georgia senate runoff too. They won't stop. They are soulless and without conscience. And mail in ballots and compromised hackable voting machines will be the norm.

    Otherwise, it's the Harris administration and an attempt to institute their long list of horribles that we know all too well.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @anonymous
    @J.Ross


    despite abundant election fraud proof in almost every reasonable sense of the word
     
    If this were true then there would be massive civil disobedience. But something is obviously lacking for this to happen. People don't truly believe the election was stolen.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @JoeJoe

  18. @Altai
    OT: It looks like with Biden comes not just the neocons but a new push for World War T. Ellen Page is now Elliot Page.

    https://twitter.com/TheElliotPage/status/1333820783655837701

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jon, @YetAnotherAnon, @Justvisiting, @Malcolm X-Lax, @AnotherDad, @MEH 0910, @Bugg

    She’s just a lesbian who feels unhip now. Great article about this awful phenomenon.

    https://andrewsullivan.substack.com/p/where-have-all-the-lesbians-gone-0a7

  19. I’m sure there are heavy selection effects Facebook data. A true introvert wouldn’t be on social media in the first place. And only a moron would be open about themselves on a Facebook quiz, when their employer would be happy to have a look see at their social profile and scuttle a promotion. As in LinkedIn, most people cultivate an avatar personality online to impress others, and, like people asked whether they voted for Trump, they probably lie when truthfulness might have negative consequences. On the other hand, most devout Catholics eschew Facebook, are highly extroverted (must be all that handshaking at Mass), and love 2001. In the internet fun-house of mirrors where everyone knows they are being watched, everyone is (or should) be evasive and inconsistent.

  20. Why is it percentile for the first four personality traits but 1 minus percentile for neuroticism?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @David

    Good question. Because I'm pretty sure the data the paper's authors posted online gets the neuroticism column backwards. I kept coming up with the exact opposite of the results cited in the paper for neuroticism: e.g., in their paper, women tend to be more neurotic than men, and horror movies have neurotic audiences. In their data, however, the highest Neuroticism films are war movies, fraternity movies, sports movies, rap movies, and secret agent movies: i.e., movies about brave men.

    So, I wound up reversing the database's Neuroticism column.

  21. This “openness” seems perilously close to psychopathy.

    • Replies: @Some Guy
    @kaganovitch

    Nah, pretty sure psychopathy is more like low agreeableness and low conscientiousness.

    , @Elsewhere
    @kaganovitch

    Yeah, what's that phrase? "Don't be so open-minded that your brain falls out."

    , @jamie b.
    @kaganovitch

    Openness * low conscientiousness creates problems (eg. drug abuse). Openness * high conscientiousness is the stuff of science and exploration, and is what built the world that we live in.

  22. @Altai
    OT: It looks like with Biden comes not just the neocons but a new push for World War T. Ellen Page is now Elliot Page.

    https://twitter.com/TheElliotPage/status/1333820783655837701

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jon, @YetAnotherAnon, @Justvisiting, @Malcolm X-Lax, @AnotherDad, @MEH 0910, @Bugg

    She passes surprisingly well, as does her trans lady friend:

  23. @Altai
    OT: It looks like with Biden comes not just the neocons but a new push for World War T. Ellen Page is now Elliot Page.

    https://twitter.com/TheElliotPage/status/1333820783655837701

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jon, @YetAnotherAnon, @Justvisiting, @Malcolm X-Lax, @AnotherDad, @MEH 0910, @Bugg

    Being both trans and queer, she can continue to mate with males. It’s a win-win!

  24. @Almost Missouri

    this raises the question of whether Facebook “likes” translates directly to ticket sales.
     
    What about the reverse: whether ticket sales (seeing a movie) translates directly into real world action? (Speaking of "We Are What We Watch".)

    For instance, growing up around a certain demographic, I can vividly recall coming out of movie theaters that had just been showing, say, a kung fu movie, and—wouldn'tcha know it—kung fu fights immediately erupted on the street among exiting theater goers.

    "Heckuva coincidence, Brownie."

    I seem to recall that it is accepted lore in Hollywood that when Clark Gable appeared undershirt-less in It Happened One Night, that undershirt sales immediately fell across the country.

    But maybe this type of correlation magically doesn't apply to Hollywood's relentless antiwhite incitement. When antiwhite violence goes up, it's just a priori—a mystery, no one could have foreseen it, lone wolves, etc. ...

    Replies: @slumber_j, @YetAnotherAnon, @njguy73

    “When antiwhite violence goes up, it’s just a priori—a mystery, no one could have foreseen it, lone wolves, etc. …”

    The response of The Powers That Be is influential, as well.

    https://news.met.police.uk/news/man-given-suspended-sentence-after-assaulting-elderly-woman-in-camden-416380

    Bradley Weight, 24 (16.08.96), of Kentish Town, appeared at Wood Green Crown Court on Monday, 30 November, where he was sentenced to 12 months imprisonment suspended for 18 months. He must also carry out 250 hours of unpaid work and spend 35 days in rehabilitation.

    He previously pleaded guilty to GBH without intent at Highbury Corner Magistrates’ Court on 25 August. At 16:40hrs on Monday, 4 May, officers on routine patrol on Camden Road, NW1, were informed that a 69-year-old woman had been found injured in the street.

    Officers established that the suspect had kicked the victim’s shopping bag as she got off a Route 29 bus. When she turned around to confront him, he pushed her hard which caused her to fall backwards and onto the floor. The woman, who walks with the aid of a stick, suffered a broken leg in the assault. She was taken by London Ambulance Service [LAS] to a central London hospital for treatment and after surgery was discharged several days later.

    A CCTV appeal was issued by police after the assault and, upon hearing this, Weight handed himself in at Kentish Town Police Station on 18 May. Judge Mathieson said the footage was ‘truly shocking’ and that Weight had carried out a ‘horrific act’ on an ‘entirely defenceless’ victim.

    Unprovoked GBH on an elderly lady who walks with a stick, break her leg, no prison. Amazing.

    I can’t be 100% sure of Weight’s race, because there are no media pictures, (itself an indicator), but a black guy called Jamie Weight runs the youth team at Kentish Town Community Centre. A brother perhaps?

    https://www.ktcc.org.uk/who-we-are

  25. @mr_scientism explains that Communism failed because it managed supply, whereas the West manages demand as well.

    For example, it is indeed impressive how the Western consumer deciphers the technicalities of CPU, GPU, RAM, SSD, LCD and all other things that make up an electronic devices in the few hours of study that he requires for deciding he “prefers an iPhone”. Strangely, this technical knowledge comes naturally to the millions who otherwise struggled with high school maths when they needed to take the GMAT. (Or even the SAT, judging by the number of devices sold.)

    Movies are an even better example of the same Western confusion between inner wishes and advertised crap. You literally cannot watch a movie because you like it. You have to watch it first, and then you will know.

    Just two hours prior, your choice of watching that or another movie was a construct of external factors, where 10% is paid advertisement and 90% is mindless echoes of that same advertisements.

    By the time a decent body of people who watched the movie and can give a somewhat informed opinion, well, you all have already watched it.

    But sure, go ahead and tell us how a movie franchise or a smartphone brand maps on your soul asperities.

  26. @kaganovitch
    This "openness" seems perilously close to psychopathy.

    Replies: @Some Guy, @Elsewhere, @jamie b.

    Nah, pretty sure psychopathy is more like low agreeableness and low conscientiousness.

  27. This is indeed more digestible than the initial post, though it cuts off right as you’re getting rolling with some interpretive brainstorming (Hey speaking of which — no one has mentioned Brainstorm, I really liked that one with young Chris Walken and soon-to-be drowned Natalie Wood).

    I wouldn’t infer too from the sample they used, or from several facets of OCEAN — e.g. I’m pretty cautious/consistent but demand some inventiveness if I’m going to watch a film or TV show (or read a book). Even if it’s a standard type plot I’m looking for technical inventiveness from the director or photog to dress it up. Or some kind of narrative twist like Groundhog Day.

    I do enjoy seeing the demographic breakdowns on movie audiences, and would like to see a study on TV-viewing choices, which might be a more reliable gauge of personality as ScarletNumber also suggests.

  28. @Altai
    OT: It looks like with Biden comes not just the neocons but a new push for World War T. Ellen Page is now Elliot Page.

    https://twitter.com/TheElliotPage/status/1333820783655837701

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jon, @YetAnotherAnon, @Justvisiting, @Malcolm X-Lax, @AnotherDad, @MEH 0910, @Bugg

    In the good old days, this “Trans announcement” would have been followed by men in the white coats coming to take the crazy “it” away to the funny farm.

    Today it is followed by a mass media celebration of perversity for perversity’s sake.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Justvisiting


    mass media celebration of perversity for perversity’s sake
     
    No, it's to rub your face in it and dare you to say anything negative about it.
  29. @kaganovitch
    This "openness" seems perilously close to psychopathy.

    Replies: @Some Guy, @Elsewhere, @jamie b.

    Yeah, what’s that phrase? “Don’t be so open-minded that your brain falls out.”

  30. So based on this, if I liked Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, I would probably like Koyaanisqatsi too, I guess.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Joe Stalin

    If you like 20th Century classical music in general, rather than, say, loving Richard Strauss and hating Philip Glass, you should give Koyaanisqatsi a try. Keep in mind that Koyaanisqatsi was revolutionary in 1983, but TV commercials quickly imitated a number of its gimmicks, such as fast and slow speed aerial shots of traffic and pedestrians at rush hour. So it may remind you of the kind of TV commercials that played on golf broadcasts around 1990 for high end corporate image advertising for consulting firms and the like.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @prosa123, @MEH 0910

  31. I’m puzzled by some of those statistics. 99% Openness for 2001? What does that mean? That if you average the Openness score of the people who liked 2001 you get 99%? That seems really implausible, since even a small number of low scorers would pull the average down significantly.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @jb

    It means that if you rank the average Openness score for each group of Facebook users who liked movies on the list of 846, then those who Liked 2001 are in the 99th Percentile of the 846 different groups of fans: "2001" fans were 11th in average Openness, behind only the 10 movies we discussed over the weekend, such as Mulholland Drive and some of the more obscure works of Wes Anderson, Richard Linklater, Darren Aronofsky, and Michel Gondry. I chose "2001" to illustrate Openness because it's immensely more famous than the ten movies that rate higher on Openness.

    all

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @jb

    "What does that mean?"

    It means Steve is using statistics to ruin movies.

  32. I love Heathers. Never watched Friday Night Lights – no interest. Haven’t seen the other two movies you mentioned – again, no interest.

    My taste in movies is fairly lowbrow. My all-time favorite movie is the Arnold Schwarzenegger schlockfest Commando. Other Schwarzenegger flicks in my personal Top 100 are the first Terminator and Total Recall.

    Another favorite is Michael Mann’s Manhunter. “We don’t invent our natures; they’re issued to us along with our lungs and pancreas and everything else. Why fight it?”

    Being a millennial, I tend to think of favorite scenes rather than favorite movies. For example, I love the scene in Alien where Ripley escapes from the Nostromo. But the rest of the movie leaves me cold.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Stan Adams

    The screenwriter of "Heathers" went on to write "Demolition Man" for Stallone, Bullock, and Snipes, one of the better dystopian satires.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    , @syonredux
    @Stan Adams


    Another favorite is Michael Mann’s Manhunter. “We don’t invent our natures; they’re issued to us along with our lungs and pancreas and everything else. Why fight it?”
     
    Manhunter is a sadly neglected film. Brian Cox's Lector (bored, lounging about) is infinitely superior to Anthony Hopkin's OTT version.

    Replies: @Feryl, @Stan Adams

  33. So I loved Heathers and I love the Mission Impossible movies. How neurotic does that make me?

  34. @Altai
    OT: It looks like with Biden comes not just the neocons but a new push for World War T. Ellen Page is now Elliot Page.

    https://twitter.com/TheElliotPage/status/1333820783655837701

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jon, @YetAnotherAnon, @Justvisiting, @Malcolm X-Lax, @AnotherDad, @MEH 0910, @Bugg

    Ellen Page’s reaction to the Jussie Smollet hoax was one of the more entertaining moments of that whole spectacle.

  35. I haven’t seen most of the “newer” films; just, I wouldn’t say this analysis makes much sense.

    For instance, other characteristics like generation, taste, education and mental maturity are more important than the big 5 traits in assessing the liking of a movie (by the way- do Poland, Lithuania & Russia belong to WEIRD?).

    Generation- most people from 15 to 30 years old didn’t see any “classics”, even American films. They don’t know about movies made until, say, 1990.

    Taste- it comes with culture, knowledge etc. Or not.

    Education- which kind of education? Anyway, you can’t expect average film goers to appreciate an ambitious film, Terrence Malick type.

    Sex/gender- no need to explicate.

    Also, it is not fair to compare Pretty Woman with 2001. The first one is easy to watch & understand; the other is barely understandable.

    I could write tons & tons about other Steve’s comments, but I’ll offer just one example: two movies about OK Corral, Wyatt Earp & Tombstone, 1993/1994. I’ve seen them both; also, I know history of these events.

    If you go to IMDB, you’ll see that Tombstone has rating 7.8, while Costner’s Wyatt Earp – 6.7. If we accept that “cinephiles” are those who rate those movies- well then, “cinephiles” are complete idiots.

    Wyatt Earp is an epic history film, sometimes slow-going, ca. 80% historically accurate. It is a good realist film, with some great acting, well paced, including a few memorable quotes & generally- “real”.

    Tombstone is an absurdist idiocy, actually a screaming nonsense containing a few so ridiculous scenes that could fall into “so bad it is actually good” category. It has nothing to do with reality in any sense- historical, physical, mental, emotional,…. It can be enjoyed only as a parody of the genre, a deliberate effort to undermine any credibility of anything. Now, as an awful nonsense- it works. But, judging from reviews- most of the likes come from people who consider it to be “real”. Which poses an interesting question: what “reality” actually means for so many people. What is real? What is convincing? What is acceptable as a representation of a historical event?

    So, if your cinephiles are, to such an extent- tasteless morons who can’t distinguish fantasy from reality- what can be said of the Facebook crowd & their “likes”?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "Also, it is not fair to compare Pretty Woman with 2001. The first one is easy to watch & understand; the other is barely understandable."

    Fair's got nothing to do with it.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    , @TWS
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Tombstone is not real it's good.

    Who cares whether a movie is real or historically accurate? Being accurate does not make it entertaining nor interesting. Wyatt Earp was a failed gambler and referee better known for the questionable call he made in an illegal boxing match. The cinema Wyatt Earp who fought the Cowboys at OK Corral will live long past the part-time lawman and grifter.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    , @syonredux
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Eh. John Ford's poetic and poignant MY DARLING CLEMENTINE is the best movie about the gunfight at the OK Corral, and it only loosely resembles the actual events.

    For that matter, Ford's FORT APACHE also stands as the best treatment of the Custer legend.

    Art transcends historicity.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Bardon Kaldian

  36. @slumber_j
    @Almost Missouri

    It's pre-coffee early in here, but in my mind the whole thing devolves into a chicken/egg problem: as The Last Psychiatrist was fond of saying, "If you're watching it, it's for you."

    A favorite example about soap advertising below the fold:


    That Dove wants you to think of it as the authority on beauty so it can sell you stuff makes sense, there's nothing underhanded about it and hardly worth the exposition. The question is, why do they think this will work? What do they know about us that makes them think we want an authority on beauty-- especially in an age where we loudly proclaim that we don't want an authority on beauty, we don't like authorities of any kind, we resist and resent being told what's beautiful (or good or moral or worthwhile) and what's not?

    You may feel your brain start trying to piece this together, but you should stop, there's a twist: where did you see this ad? It wasn't during an episode of The Mentalist on the assumption that you're a 55 year old woman whose husband is "working late." In fact... it's not even playing anywhere. You didn't stumble on it, you were sent to it, it was sent to you-- it was selected for you to see. How did they know? Because if you're watching it, it's for you.
     

    https://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2013/05/dove.html

    Replies: @Guest007, @Charles, @Almost Missouri

    Thank you for referencing TLP. I had never heard of or seen that (I suppose now-defunct) blog. The Dove commercials entry was interesting in-and-of itself, plus there were the asides to “House of Games”. Much of his stuff made for good reading, if now a bit dated, though it was only six or seven years ago.

    • Replies: @Moral Stone
    @Charles

    It’s really a great blog, although as you said a bit dated. It’s central theme, which I think is that ad men are so good at psychology that the messages they try to send can be analyzed to tell you about yourself and your place in society, is unique.

    I do however find it a bit at odds with say Steve’s stories about working in marketing where a lot of the value of ad spends is illusory, and most ad value is created by promoting new products as one might expect. Are ad men cunning manipulative psychonauts hacking our collective psyche, or huxters who flatter executives for ad dollars that don’t move the needle much? Or some combination thereof?

    Replies: @Charles

    , @slumber_j
    @Charles

    I'm sure it's dated, but I think the writing and his central concerns both hold up very well. Glad you like it.

    Replies: @Charles

  37. So then I’m either a frustrated gladiator, 4-star general, or axe murderer.

  38. Are We What We Watch?

    Just seeing the headline–i guess the state of mind i was in–i thought you were going somewhere else.

    I think the current crisis in the West simply would not exist without Hollyweird. Movies and TV allowed minoritarians to inject their lies directly in people’s heads.

    Moving pictures bypass most of the critical “reality-check” skepticism we have toward people telling us stuff. People “see” it and process it as “observed reality” rather than “someone told me”. So people tend to believe it’s real, “how things are”.

    If this technology had never been developed, minoritarians could never have created their false reality inside the brains of so many people in the West, white peoples’ reality would still be what we actually experience, and we would not be in our present crisis.

    • Replies: @anon
    @AnotherDad

    Moving pictures bypass most of the critical “reality-check” skepticism we have toward people telling us stuff.

    That's because actual moving pictures do not exist. Video is a form of hypnosis. No reference handy but brain wave studies on people viewing older video showed there brain activity was closer to that of someone sleeping than someone awake. It has to do with the frame rate.

    Film movie projectors flash a series of still images on the screen, relying on the lag time of the retina / visual cortex to create the illusion of movement. Early movie projectors showed 28 frames per second, people with acute vision could actually see this. Television in the US projected 30 images per second, with interlacing to make it look like 60 frames per second.

    High def / high res video has much higher frame rates, but we still are looking at a series of still images flashed on our retinas quickly enough to give the illusion of movement. Movies even using HD projection equipment are even more conducive to semi-hypnotic states, due to the dim lighting, comfy chair, surround sound and controlled temperature.

    I'm not the first person to notice that modern video is a version of Plato's 'shadows on the cave wall', but it's worth pointing out.

    Video is hypnosis to varying degrees. Maybe shallow, maybe deep but always messing with the mind. It's worth noting that Millennials and especially genZ pretty much live on the phone, with the earbuds or Beats, continuously swimming in vid.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    , @dfordoom
    @AnotherDad


    Moving pictures bypass most of the critical “reality-check” skepticism we have toward people telling us stuff. People “see” it and process it as “observed reality” rather than “someone told me”. So people tend to believe it’s real, “how things are”.
     
    Yes. And it works to a certain extent even on people who are aware of it. We just can't help believing things that we've seen with our own eyes.

    It's not just that movies are regarded as reality. Movies are more real than reality. Because they make things more emotionally intense and more dramatic. Something you saw in a movie is much more real than something you read in a history book.
  39. And just one thing about Pretty Woman.

    Unfortunately, Molyeneux’s video was watsoned (as he was, I think, from YouTube), so I cannot present the case.
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9362786/?ref_=tt_ch

    Anyway.

    Stefan Molyneux, whatever he may be, has recorded a rather good video where a sugar daddy, some confused guy in his 60s, confesses about his experiences with good, sometimes even great looking & affluent girls, 18-25 years age range, who went with him to spend some time out & eventually screw for no reason at all (no gerontophilia, no real financial reasons, no nothing except emptiness of soul & boredom with life). There were perhaps 10-15 such girls; most of them rich & good-to-great looking & going to college.

    These girls do it just for fun. They don’t have gerontophilic fetish. They are not nymphomaniacs. They don’t need money (at least, most of them). They just are empty & like being sluts.

    Most of them were incessantly talking about finding their “Richard Gere”, referring to the position of Julia Roberts character in Pretty Woman. Those aspiring whores were, it seems, fascinated by the situation of becoming kept women by a good-looking affluent man & finding “romance” in such circumstances.

    How stupid can you get?

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Bardon Kaldian

    You just gave a lot of the older guys reading this blog hope. God bless you sir.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  40. I enjoyed reading your 2003 review of Spirited Away.

    It seems to me that I have been reading your blog since at least 2003. For how long did your blogging and writing for UPI overlap? Were those halcyon days of free speech really such a short time ago?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Grumpy

    I worked for UPI when John O'Sullivan was in charge in 2000-2003. I started this blog at the end of 2002. I started writing for VDARE at the beginning of 2000.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  41. @Altai
    OT: It looks like with Biden comes not just the neocons but a new push for World War T. Ellen Page is now Elliot Page.

    https://twitter.com/TheElliotPage/status/1333820783655837701

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jon, @YetAnotherAnon, @Justvisiting, @Malcolm X-Lax, @AnotherDad, @MEH 0910, @Bugg

    Even in just a quickie scan of paragraph leads, she doesn’t sound remotely like a guy.

    No idea who this BPD head case is–apparently an “actress”.

    I’m a “nature” guy and a lot of flakey is baked in. But this girl needed better parents. More hard work. A spanking or two.

    We aren’t adapted yet, and modern life enables all sorts of mental weakness. (I’m not as strong, touch as i should be.) But the feminine personality seems to be particularly ill-adapted, “loose”, “flakey”, without the base of the normal work in an agricultural society.

    If as a girl, she’d gotten up with the sun to milk the cows, collect some eggs, stoke the stove and start breakfast… i think she might well have been ok. Fit to marry at 22 or so and would have three or four or five kids now and be … happy.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @AnotherDad

    Long before that "bullshit jobs" guy, I would occasionally observe to a co-worker than most people would be a lot happier if they were out hoeing rutabagas instead of pursuing bullshit degrees and jobs, but never got much support.

    After the last election, (I mean, the most recent one, but it's likely the last one as well) I could add "voting" to that list of activities that are supposed to promote an ever more intense sense of individual achievement within our progressive liberal utopia yet do nothing of the sort.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Altai
    @AnotherDad

    What's odd is that she did this aged 33. Prior she had no issue identifying as lesbian. Maybe the lockdown has caused older age demographics of susceptible people to spend more time on social media, particularly actors and performers since they can't work at all. Teenage girls, particularly gen Z have the highest exposure and social use from social media and psychological need for acceptance and 'okayness' and are thus the power users of social media and principal vectors for viral spreading of SJWism. But some of these cluster Bs who missed out on adolescence in the age of smart phones are seemingly exposing themselves later in life.

    Like with Taylor Swift posting pictures of a US mail truck being driven on the back of a transporter and proclaiming that Drumpf is stealing all the mail vans to impede absentee ballots. If she had a lot of recording sessions and practice for live performances, she might not have been swept along for that wave.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @Nathan
    @AnotherDad

    For a "nature" guy, those are all nurture arguments. As a 50/50 guy, I think it's important to remember that over time you get the nature that you nurture. That's the theory of natural selection in broad strokes- the environment creates the traits that survive according to its own demands.

    Personally, I don't think much modern flakery is baked in. Toss "Elliot" Paige on a desert island with a dude, and by years end there would probably be a natural pregnancy.

  42. Thank you, Steve, for this new article.

    I remember commenting here recently that I don’t like the Godfather movies. Maybe now I know why. I’ve written favorably about 2001, and I even wrote a review of First Man that included references to 2001 (because Chazelle inserted them into his film) so I see the differences. I see the reasons for my preferences.

    One interesting fact is that, as I pointed out in my review, my wife liked First Man more than I did. She likes stuff women like: Pretty Woman, the Twilight films. She also likes the Mission Impossible movies, which I find tiresome and formulaic.

    I haven’t even bothered to show her Blue Velvet.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Buzz Mohawk


    She also likes the Mission Impossible movies, which I find tiresome and formulaic.
     
    Lots of people who watch lots of movies (like critics) decry "formulaic" movies because they keep seeing the same pattern over and over.

    But most people (at least pre-pandemic) don't watch near as many movies as critics. So the "formula" isn't boring or obvious to them. Many critics who get "shocked" that certain movies are hits should reevaluate how their lived experience watching 3-4 movies a day affects their ability to enjoy the fi;ms.

    Also, formula is fine if you relax about it. As I've said with horror movies, if you can see the formula but relax about it the ride can be fun. Critics who get wee-weed about not being surprised at what happens are annoying.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @prosa123
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I remember commenting here recently that I don’t like the Godfather movies. Maybe now I know why.

    Real-life mobsters never had lifestyles as remotely extravagant as the Corleone Family's.
    John Gotti's house:
    https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/home-of-john-gotti-at-160-11-85th-street-howard-beach-news-photo/97258642

  43. If people are what they watch, most people are crap.

  44. Wow football is the only sport? I can’t stand football or basketball, but when I was a kid I liked trucking movies, car movies, yacht racing and evil knievel, oh and Rocky, wrestling and figure skating (I am female). I now enjoy motorcycle racing and wouldn’t mind car racing but I’m not a fan of drag racing. I just can’t stand football or basketball and can’t stand the movies of it either, those activities are just a pipeline to jail. Bring on Wynona, if football is all there is.

  45. @Buzz Mohawk
    Thank you, Steve, for this new article.

    I remember commenting here recently that I don't like the Godfather movies. Maybe now I know why. I've written favorably about 2001, and I even wrote a review of First Man that included references to 2001 (because Chazelle inserted them into his film) so I see the differences. I see the reasons for my preferences.

    One interesting fact is that, as I pointed out in my review, my wife liked First Man more than I did. She likes stuff women like: Pretty Woman, the Twilight films. She also likes the Mission Impossible movies, which I find tiresome and formulaic.

    I haven't even bothered to show her Blue Velvet.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @prosa123

    She also likes the Mission Impossible movies, which I find tiresome and formulaic.

    Lots of people who watch lots of movies (like critics) decry “formulaic” movies because they keep seeing the same pattern over and over.

    But most people (at least pre-pandemic) don’t watch near as many movies as critics. So the “formula” isn’t boring or obvious to them. Many critics who get “shocked” that certain movies are hits should reevaluate how their lived experience watching 3-4 movies a day affects their ability to enjoy the fi;ms.

    Also, formula is fine if you relax about it. As I’ve said with horror movies, if you can see the formula but relax about it the ride can be fun. Critics who get wee-weed about not being surprised at what happens are annoying.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @R.G. Camara

    I watch very few movies and TV shows, so I am not like the critics to whom you refer. Maybe I just get tired of a formula after seeing it repeated once -- or more likely I just can't stand it when it is so comic-book fantastic and pointlessly unreal.

    Honestly, what is the point of the Mission Impossible movies? They are an adaptation of a TV show I liked when I was a boy, and that's it.

    Unlike the critics, I'm not telling anyone else what to like. I'm glad my wife enjoys these things, and I am very good-natured when I watch with her. I think most good husbands are.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ozymandias

  46. Winona Ryder is of course the poster child for the ditzy neurotically crazed modern female. Drugs, shoplifting, wrestling with the Jewish thing while being a hot female — it’s a positive cornucopia of warped mental agony and craziness that makes it easy and convincing to act to type.

    Approaching 50, and childless. Some girls need to have kids, if only to put a clamp on their mental derangement.

    Rumors floated around that at one point she dated the now cancelled alt-country singer songwriter Ryan Adams, another victim of the #metoo movement, though he also has significant neurotic issues as well. Birds of a feather.

    Anyway he wrote this great song, “Harder Now That It’s Over” which is supposedly about Winona, with the great line, “You’re free…free with a history.” This raw live version captures the essence nicely.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    https://twitter.com/christinalee93/status/866833375285440513

    , @R.G. Camara
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Winona Ryder was apparently the world's greatest Manic Pixie Dream Girl eva.

    Johnny Depp, Matt Damon, and a host of other Hollywood celebs of the 1990s and early 2000s became little puppies to her, following her around till she broke their hearts. Johnny even got a tattoo with her name on it, he was so smitten, and had to famously alter it to "Wino Forever" after she broke up with him.

    I'm guessing she must've been extremely fantastic in bed, and, coupled with her girlish looks and Manic Pixie Dream Girl craziness, must've taken those insecure actor/singer boys for a wild ride until her BPD kicked in and she icily cut them out when she got bored.

    All the hipster Manic Pixie Dream Girl movies that came out later were basically pale imitations of Ryder.

    Winona having a child would've been awful. Munchausen by proxy likely would've occurred.

    Replies: @Abe, @The Wild Geese Howard

    , @njguy73
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Read about Ryder's upbringing. It was unconventional to say the least.

    And no, I was not obsessed with her back in the day. I didn't watch every movie she was in, and I certainly didn't have her Rolling Stone cover pinned to my dorm wall.

    Not me. No way.

  47. Why remain silent about the stolen election? Millions of stolen votes.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @anonymous

    It's too big. The results too painful. He'll come at it sideways as always finding some angle he finds interesting but ultimately non-threatening to the status quo.

    Replies: @anonymous

  48. This also comes down to the way anything you show in art benefits from it or becomes popularized by it. If you show it, you are tacitly endorsing it. At least that is the arm chair psychology.

    In film history class (woo hoo!) our professor used The Wild One as an example of this. Ostensibly, that movie was supposed to show a bad boy and a bunch of losers. Instead it romanticized motorcycle gangs to the point that they got bigger and more prevalent after that.

    The producers and director had to know they were making the whole thing sexy.


    BAD boy Steve Sailer and his commenters

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "The producers and director had to know they were making the whole thing sexy."

    My favorite example is Kiss Me Deadly; the commie director (Robert Aldrich) and commie screenwriter hated Mike Hammer and Mickey Spillane, and wanted to "expose" them by making Hammer a sadistic dumbass who winds up setting off a nuke through sheer "he breaks the rules but gets results" idiocy.

    Instead, they made a film so sleazy and sadistic that the Catholic League gave it a "C" for Condemned rating for sleaze and sadism.

    It's actually a great film, arguably the last of the films noir. The screenwriter said that “I wrote it fast because I had contempt for it. It was automatic writing. Things were in the air and I put them in it.” That, to get back to your comment, is how such films wind up glorifying what they set out to condemn. The sleep of reason breeds monsters.

    https://counter-currents.com/2014/02/mike-hammer-occult-dick-kiss-me-deadly-as-lovecraftian-tale/

    Spillane did, in fact, hate the film, and scrapped up the money to make his own film, The Girl Hunters, in the UK, with location shots in NYC. Since no one could possibly play Hammer correctly, Spillane does it himself. Also starring Shirley Eaton, right before Goldfinger.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @dfordoom

    , @TWS
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Your theory makes sense.

    I don't remember a lot of kung fu schools closing in the wake of the explosion of movies.

    In fact I remember a couple of karate schools that were really Kung Fu in disguise rebrand then a kickboxing school rebranded itself as ninjitsu a decade later.

  49. @AnotherDad
    @Altai

    Even in just a quickie scan of paragraph leads, she doesn't sound remotely like a guy.

    No idea who this BPD head case is--apparently an "actress".

    I'm a "nature" guy and a lot of flakey is baked in. But this girl needed better parents. More hard work. A spanking or two.

    We aren't adapted yet, and modern life enables all sorts of mental weakness. (I'm not as strong, touch as i should be.) But the feminine personality seems to be particularly ill-adapted, "loose", "flakey", without the base of the normal work in an agricultural society.

    If as a girl, she'd gotten up with the sun to milk the cows, collect some eggs, stoke the stove and start breakfast... i think she might well have been ok. Fit to marry at 22 or so and would have three or four or five kids now and be ... happy.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Altai, @Nathan

    Long before that “bullshit jobs” guy, I would occasionally observe to a co-worker than most people would be a lot happier if they were out hoeing rutabagas instead of pursuing bullshit degrees and jobs, but never got much support.

    After the last election, (I mean, the most recent one, but it’s likely the last one as well) I could add “voting” to that list of activities that are supposed to promote an ever more intense sense of individual achievement within our progressive liberal utopia yet do nothing of the sort.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @James O'Meara

    I think it is a common sense observation. Why? Because simple me was making it to co-workers and such right before I started college. Basically I observed that only about 10% of people in our modern country do work that is necessary, while the rest of us "tap dance for our meals," as I put it.

    We are so productive that the challenge is finding productive things for everyone to do so they can all buy pieces of the pie that is produced.

    Of course, because I was simple, I overlooked the very important role that innovation, creation and invention play in making progress. We need to be in search of proving ourselves, in order to come up with new proofs of why we are worthy of any pie at all. So, we invent things like airplanes and jazz and bubble gum.

    Pretty cool actually.

  50. @AnotherDad
    @Altai

    Even in just a quickie scan of paragraph leads, she doesn't sound remotely like a guy.

    No idea who this BPD head case is--apparently an "actress".

    I'm a "nature" guy and a lot of flakey is baked in. But this girl needed better parents. More hard work. A spanking or two.

    We aren't adapted yet, and modern life enables all sorts of mental weakness. (I'm not as strong, touch as i should be.) But the feminine personality seems to be particularly ill-adapted, "loose", "flakey", without the base of the normal work in an agricultural society.

    If as a girl, she'd gotten up with the sun to milk the cows, collect some eggs, stoke the stove and start breakfast... i think she might well have been ok. Fit to marry at 22 or so and would have three or four or five kids now and be ... happy.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Altai, @Nathan

    What’s odd is that she did this aged 33. Prior she had no issue identifying as lesbian. Maybe the lockdown has caused older age demographics of susceptible people to spend more time on social media, particularly actors and performers since they can’t work at all. Teenage girls, particularly gen Z have the highest exposure and social use from social media and psychological need for acceptance and ‘okayness’ and are thus the power users of social media and principal vectors for viral spreading of SJWism. But some of these cluster Bs who missed out on adolescence in the age of smart phones are seemingly exposing themselves later in life.

    Like with Taylor Swift posting pictures of a US mail truck being driven on the back of a transporter and proclaiming that Drumpf is stealing all the mail vans to impede absentee ballots. If she had a lot of recording sessions and practice for live performances, she might not have been swept along for that wave.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Altai

    Ellen Page believed Jussie Smollett:

    Ellen Page Calls Out Hateful Leadership
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ec12JKkrhOo


    'The Umbrella Academy' star Ellen Page puts it pretty simply: 'This needs to f***ing stop.'
     

    Ellen Page opens up about her late-night anti-hate speech
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mZ9-1N37Xc

    Ellen Page addresses her recent late-night appearance where she called out the Trump administration in an anti-hate speech. The Canadian actress made headlines following an emotional appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.
     
  51. @Altai
    OT: It looks like with Biden comes not just the neocons but a new push for World War T. Ellen Page is now Elliot Page.

    https://twitter.com/TheElliotPage/status/1333820783655837701

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jon, @YetAnotherAnon, @Justvisiting, @Malcolm X-Lax, @AnotherDad, @MEH 0910, @Bugg

    In June 2019, the couple proudly showed their love for one another by posing topless together while kissing for a Pride Month photoshoot.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @MEH 0910

    Odd that "Elliot's/Ellen's" wife is the butch looking one, but he/she is the one who now says she is a trans man.

    No plumbing work yet, I assume. Also no hormones or visible facial surgery.

    So how does this "trans" work then? Is she on a waiting list for the physical upgrades? Or just trying to pose as a feminine looking gay "male."

    You have to wonder how she can pass a psych evaluation like this. Though you can probably buy one from some quack.

    This is just another mental meltdown of some kind. And a tragedy in the making. Read about the suicide update in a year or two. Very sad. She has no idea of what being a man is all about.

    Naturally though, this "news" is lauded by all of the usual suspects.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    , @Rob McX
    @MEH 0910


    In June 2019, the couple proudly showed their love for one another by posing topless together while kissing for a Pride Month photoshoot.
     
    Thus extending their fan base to millions of pasty-faced housebound onanists.
  52. @Buzz Mohawk
    This also comes down to the way anything you show in art benefits from it or becomes popularized by it. If you show it, you are tacitly endorsing it. At least that is the arm chair psychology.

    In film history class (woo hoo!) our professor used The Wild One as an example of this. Ostensibly, that movie was supposed to show a bad boy and a bunch of losers. Instead it romanticized motorcycle gangs to the point that they got bigger and more prevalent after that.

    The producers and director had to know they were making the whole thing sexy.

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/87/c5/a8/87c5a84b9e233529ec4bd38b8fcf0b7a.jpg
    BAD boy Steve Sailer and his commenters

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @TWS

    “The producers and director had to know they were making the whole thing sexy.”

    My favorite example is Kiss Me Deadly; the commie director (Robert Aldrich) and commie screenwriter hated Mike Hammer and Mickey Spillane, and wanted to “expose” them by making Hammer a sadistic dumbass who winds up setting off a nuke through sheer “he breaks the rules but gets results” idiocy.

    Instead, they made a film so sleazy and sadistic that the Catholic League gave it a “C” for Condemned rating for sleaze and sadism.

    It’s actually a great film, arguably the last of the films noir. The screenwriter said that “I wrote it fast because I had contempt for it. It was automatic writing. Things were in the air and I put them in it.” That, to get back to your comment, is how such films wind up glorifying what they set out to condemn. The sleep of reason breeds monsters.

    https://counter-currents.com/2014/02/mike-hammer-occult-dick-kiss-me-deadly-as-lovecraftian-tale/

    Spillane did, in fact, hate the film, and scrapped up the money to make his own film, The Girl Hunters, in the UK, with location shots in NYC. Since no one could possibly play Hammer correctly, Spillane does it himself. Also starring Shirley Eaton, right before Goldfinger.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @James O'Meara

    Ashes and Diamonds (if you only see one Polish film ...) kind of does this: the Communist target is stodgy and boring, but in exactly the way that would be invisible to the type of guy the character is satirizing (in one scene he verbally lists various Communist battles as if writing aloud a composition on "struggle"), whereas his anti-Communist assassin (who may also be his son) is slick, wears Western sunglasses, and dies in a sort of Kurosawa-inspired sequence with bloodied laundry.

    , @dfordoom
    @James O'Meara


    Spillane did, in fact, hate the film, and scrapped up the money to make his own film, The Girl Hunters, in the UK, with location shots in NYC. Since no one could possibly play Hammer correctly, Spillane does it himself. Also starring Shirley Eaton, right before Goldfinger.
     
    The Girl Hunters is a good movie. Worth seeing and if you're a Mike Hammer fan I'd even go so far as to say it's a must-see.

    Spillane wasn't the world's greatest actor but he sure as hell knew how to play Mike Hammer. And as an actor he's quite competent.

    Spillane also has an acting role in the very underrated John Wayne-produced circus mystery Ring of Fear (he plays a crime writer named Mickey Spillane). He was also a Columbo guest star.

    Oddly enough the other actor who played Mike Hammer extremely well was Darren McGavin in the excellent late 50s Mike Hammer TV series. For late 50s American TV it's extraordinarily violent and hardboiled. There are some unexpected moments of gratuitous brutality by Hammer - if you have the bad guy down on the ground the smart thing is to put the boot in. If the bad guy doesn't loo0k like he's going to get up, put the boot in anyway.
  53. anon[408] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    Are We What We Watch?
     
    Just seeing the headline--i guess the state of mind i was in--i thought you were going somewhere else.

    I think the current crisis in the West simply would not exist without Hollyweird. Movies and TV allowed minoritarians to inject their lies directly in people's heads.

    Moving pictures bypass most of the critical "reality-check" skepticism we have toward people telling us stuff. People "see" it and process it as "observed reality" rather than "someone told me". So people tend to believe it's real, "how things are".

    If this technology had never been developed, minoritarians could never have created their false reality inside the brains of so many people in the West, white peoples' reality would still be what we actually experience, and we would not be in our present crisis.

    Replies: @anon, @dfordoom

    Moving pictures bypass most of the critical “reality-check” skepticism we have toward people telling us stuff.

    That’s because actual moving pictures do not exist. Video is a form of hypnosis. No reference handy but brain wave studies on people viewing older video showed there brain activity was closer to that of someone sleeping than someone awake. It has to do with the frame rate.

    Film movie projectors flash a series of still images on the screen, relying on the lag time of the retina / visual cortex to create the illusion of movement. Early movie projectors showed 28 frames per second, people with acute vision could actually see this. Television in the US projected 30 images per second, with interlacing to make it look like 60 frames per second.

    High def / high res video has much higher frame rates, but we still are looking at a series of still images flashed on our retinas quickly enough to give the illusion of movement. Movies even using HD projection equipment are even more conducive to semi-hypnotic states, due to the dim lighting, comfy chair, surround sound and controlled temperature.

    I’m not the first person to notice that modern video is a version of Plato’s ‘shadows on the cave wall’, but it’s worth pointing out.

    Video is hypnosis to varying degrees. Maybe shallow, maybe deep but always messing with the mind. It’s worth noting that Millennials and especially genZ pretty much live on the phone, with the earbuds or Beats, continuously swimming in vid.

    • Agree: Dissident
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @anon

    "Video is hypnosis to varying degrees."

    That's what Brian O'Blivion said before he dematerialized in 1983.

  54. @Altai
    OT: It looks like with Biden comes not just the neocons but a new push for World War T. Ellen Page is now Elliot Page.

    https://twitter.com/TheElliotPage/status/1333820783655837701

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jon, @YetAnotherAnon, @Justvisiting, @Malcolm X-Lax, @AnotherDad, @MEH 0910, @Bugg

    If you’re gonna be this silly, wouldn’t you at least take a cooler name than Elliot?

  55. @Grumpy
    I enjoyed reading your 2003 review of Spirited Away.

    It seems to me that I have been reading your blog since at least 2003. For how long did your blogging and writing for UPI overlap? Were those halcyon days of free speech really such a short time ago?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I worked for UPI when John O’Sullivan was in charge in 2000-2003. I started this blog at the end of 2002. I started writing for VDARE at the beginning of 2000.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Steve Sailer

    On second thought, I think I started this blog at the end of 2001.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  56. @Altai
    @AnotherDad

    What's odd is that she did this aged 33. Prior she had no issue identifying as lesbian. Maybe the lockdown has caused older age demographics of susceptible people to spend more time on social media, particularly actors and performers since they can't work at all. Teenage girls, particularly gen Z have the highest exposure and social use from social media and psychological need for acceptance and 'okayness' and are thus the power users of social media and principal vectors for viral spreading of SJWism. But some of these cluster Bs who missed out on adolescence in the age of smart phones are seemingly exposing themselves later in life.

    Like with Taylor Swift posting pictures of a US mail truck being driven on the back of a transporter and proclaiming that Drumpf is stealing all the mail vans to impede absentee ballots. If she had a lot of recording sessions and practice for live performances, she might not have been swept along for that wave.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Ellen Page believed Jussie Smollett:

    Ellen Page Calls Out Hateful Leadership

    ‘The Umbrella Academy’ star Ellen Page puts it pretty simply: ‘This needs to f***ing stop.’

    [MORE]

    Ellen Page opens up about her late-night anti-hate speech

    Ellen Page addresses her recent late-night appearance where she called out the Trump administration in an anti-hate speech. The Canadian actress made headlines following an emotional appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

  57. @R.G. Camara
    @Buzz Mohawk


    She also likes the Mission Impossible movies, which I find tiresome and formulaic.
     
    Lots of people who watch lots of movies (like critics) decry "formulaic" movies because they keep seeing the same pattern over and over.

    But most people (at least pre-pandemic) don't watch near as many movies as critics. So the "formula" isn't boring or obvious to them. Many critics who get "shocked" that certain movies are hits should reevaluate how their lived experience watching 3-4 movies a day affects their ability to enjoy the fi;ms.

    Also, formula is fine if you relax about it. As I've said with horror movies, if you can see the formula but relax about it the ride can be fun. Critics who get wee-weed about not being surprised at what happens are annoying.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I watch very few movies and TV shows, so I am not like the critics to whom you refer. Maybe I just get tired of a formula after seeing it repeated once — or more likely I just can’t stand it when it is so comic-book fantastic and pointlessly unreal.

    Honestly, what is the point of the Mission Impossible movies? They are an adaptation of a TV show I liked when I was a boy, and that’s it.

    Unlike the critics, I’m not telling anyone else what to like. I’m glad my wife enjoys these things, and I am very good-natured when I watch with her. I think most good husbands are.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The point of the movies is to make Tom Cruise into an American James Bond, but more actiony and less suave ladykiller.

    , @Ozymandias
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Maybe I just get tired of a formula after seeing it repeated once
     
    Try to name a movie that doesn't follow the three act structure.
  58. @Bardon Kaldian
    I haven't seen most of the "newer" films; just, I wouldn't say this analysis makes much sense.

    For instance, other characteristics like generation, taste, education and mental maturity are more important than the big 5 traits in assessing the liking of a movie (by the way- do Poland, Lithuania & Russia belong to WEIRD?).

    Generation- most people from 15 to 30 years old didn't see any "classics", even American films. They don't know about movies made until, say, 1990.

    Taste- it comes with culture, knowledge etc. Or not.

    Education- which kind of education? Anyway, you can't expect average film goers to appreciate an ambitious film, Terrence Malick type.

    Sex/gender- no need to explicate.

    Also, it is not fair to compare Pretty Woman with 2001. The first one is easy to watch & understand; the other is barely understandable.

    I could write tons & tons about other Steve's comments, but I'll offer just one example: two movies about OK Corral, Wyatt Earp & Tombstone, 1993/1994. I've seen them both; also, I know history of these events.

    If you go to IMDB, you'll see that Tombstone has rating 7.8, while Costner's Wyatt Earp - 6.7. If we accept that "cinephiles" are those who rate those movies- well then, "cinephiles" are complete idiots.

    Wyatt Earp is an epic history film, sometimes slow-going, ca. 80% historically accurate. It is a good realist film, with some great acting, well paced, including a few memorable quotes & generally- "real".

    Tombstone is an absurdist idiocy, actually a screaming nonsense containing a few so ridiculous scenes that could fall into "so bad it is actually good" category. It has nothing to do with reality in any sense- historical, physical, mental, emotional,.... It can be enjoyed only as a parody of the genre, a deliberate effort to undermine any credibility of anything. Now, as an awful nonsense- it works. But, judging from reviews- most of the likes come from people who consider it to be "real". Which poses an interesting question: what "reality" actually means for so many people. What is real? What is convincing? What is acceptable as a representation of a historical event?

    So, if your cinephiles are, to such an extent- tasteless morons who can't distinguish fantasy from reality- what can be said of the Facebook crowd & their "likes"?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @TWS, @syonredux

    “Also, it is not fair to compare Pretty Woman with 2001. The first one is easy to watch & understand; the other is barely understandable.”

    Fair’s got nothing to do with it.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Steve Sailer

    You may use any word you wish, but to compare the incomparable does not give any new knowledge. Easy to digest Pretty Woman is to difficult & barely comprehensible 2001 is what, in another cinematic culture, is Chabrol's Unfaithful Wife compared with Bunuel's The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (the parallel is not quite fair, because Chabrol's movie was great, unlike the American rom-com).

    Bunuel's film needs at least 2-3 viewings to get what it is all about. A normal person cannot, unlike Chabrol's film, decipher what he is watching. And it has nothing to do with sex/gender, neuroticism, extroversion or openness: in one case, you understand what you're watching; in another- not.

    I would, after one viewing, always choose like for Pretty Woman simply because I would know what I'd been watching; in the case of 2001- I'm not sure. Simply because I would say: this is an ambitious film on many levels & I don't know whether I like it or not. Just, I don't get it, a very big chunk of it. And the film is, actually, rather boring- perhaps 30% of it. While Pretty Woman is easy to understand, like; it's a good entertainment & most of all- it is not boring. It is an amusing lightweight.

    It just isn't fair to put in a fight a bantam weight boxer with a heavy weight.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  59. @Stan Adams
    I love Heathers. Never watched Friday Night Lights - no interest. Haven't seen the other two movies you mentioned - again, no interest.

    My taste in movies is fairly lowbrow. My all-time favorite movie is the Arnold Schwarzenegger schlockfest Commando. Other Schwarzenegger flicks in my personal Top 100 are the first Terminator and Total Recall.

    Another favorite is Michael Mann's Manhunter. "We don't invent our natures; they're issued to us along with our lungs and pancreas and everything else. Why fight it?"

    Being a millennial, I tend to think of favorite scenes rather than favorite movies. For example, I love the scene in Alien where Ripley escapes from the Nostromo. But the rest of the movie leaves me cold.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @syonredux

    The screenwriter of “Heathers” went on to write “Demolition Man” for Stallone, Bullock, and Snipes, one of the better dystopian satires.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Steve Sailer

    Yet another one of my favorite movies. "What seems to be your boggle?"

    Daniel Waters is one of only two screenwriters who have received multiple Razzie awards. He wrote two of the biggest flops of the early '90s (The Adventures of Ford Fairlane and Hudson Hawk).

  60. @Redneck farmer
    The jocks won't argue for really trying to change higher education because they rank to high in agreeableness.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Abe

    The jocks won’t argue for really trying to change higher education because they rank to high in agreeableness.

    I know a lot of us give Steve crap for not properly ending some of his TAKI’S essays (not me personally, cuz I’m too [email protected]’ classy, but there are these guys I know…,) but that was a really good conclusion this time. Short, meaningful, integrally related to the body of the essay, yet totally out of let field and surprising, a sort of SIXTH SENSE type ending. I feel like a hipster douche reviewing some rap album (with all the disgusting literal and metaphorical yearning for a polar bear-ing all such sad exercises imply) in writing this, but that conclusion was “like a sucker punch that sent me to concrete. And I loved it!”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Abe

    Thanks.

    Most pundit's columns consist of: "Here's a thought I had about a well-trod topic." So the last line is pretty much the Thought, and the rest of the column is the setup for the Thought.

    Some of my columns are like that, but others are like: Here's a new database that practically nobody has thought about before. Here are some thoughts I have had looking at this new source of information, but don't expect them to exhaust the topic. Feel free to look at the data and come up with your own ideas.

  61. @jb
    I'm puzzled by some of those statistics. 99% Openness for 2001? What does that mean? That if you average the Openness score of the people who liked 2001 you get 99%? That seems really implausible, since even a small number of low scorers would pull the average down significantly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @SunBakedSuburb

    It means that if you rank the average Openness score for each group of Facebook users who liked movies on the list of 846, then those who Liked 2001 are in the 99th Percentile of the 846 different groups of fans: “2001” fans were 11th in average Openness, behind only the 10 movies we discussed over the weekend, such as Mulholland Drive and some of the more obscure works of Wes Anderson, Richard Linklater, Darren Aronofsky, and Michel Gondry. I chose “2001” to illustrate Openness because it’s immensely more famous than the ten movies that rate higher on Openness.

    all

  62. @James O'Meara
    @AnotherDad

    Long before that "bullshit jobs" guy, I would occasionally observe to a co-worker than most people would be a lot happier if they were out hoeing rutabagas instead of pursuing bullshit degrees and jobs, but never got much support.

    After the last election, (I mean, the most recent one, but it's likely the last one as well) I could add "voting" to that list of activities that are supposed to promote an ever more intense sense of individual achievement within our progressive liberal utopia yet do nothing of the sort.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I think it is a common sense observation. Why? Because simple me was making it to co-workers and such right before I started college. Basically I observed that only about 10% of people in our modern country do work that is necessary, while the rest of us “tap dance for our meals,” as I put it.

    We are so productive that the challenge is finding productive things for everyone to do so they can all buy pieces of the pie that is produced.

    Of course, because I was simple, I overlooked the very important role that innovation, creation and invention play in making progress. We need to be in search of proving ourselves, in order to come up with new proofs of why we are worthy of any pie at all. So, we invent things like airplanes and jazz and bubble gum.

    Pretty cool actually.

  63. @Joe Stalin
    So based on this, if I liked Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, I would probably like Koyaanisqatsi too, I guess.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6-K-arVl-U

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    If you like 20th Century classical music in general, rather than, say, loving Richard Strauss and hating Philip Glass, you should give Koyaanisqatsi a try. Keep in mind that Koyaanisqatsi was revolutionary in 1983, but TV commercials quickly imitated a number of its gimmicks, such as fast and slow speed aerial shots of traffic and pedestrians at rush hour. So it may remind you of the kind of TV commercials that played on golf broadcasts around 1990 for high end corporate image advertising for consulting firms and the like.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer


    Keep in mind that Koyaanisqatsi was revolutionary in 1983, but TV commercials quickly imitated a number of its gimmicks
     
    Mr Plow Commercial
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gArU-BAO7Kw

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @prosa123
    @Steve Sailer

    If you like 20th Century classical music in general, rather than, say, loving Richard Strauss and hating Philip Glass, you should give Koyaanisqatsi a try.

    Its director Godfrey Reggio is 6'11" or possibly 7', though at 80 he might have lost some height..

    , @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    Public Service Messages from The New Mexico Civil Liberties Union (Godfrey Reggio)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yah54al6Cks


    1970s, Reggio et al.
     
  64. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    Winona Ryder is of course the poster child for the ditzy neurotically crazed modern female. Drugs, shoplifting, wrestling with the Jewish thing while being a hot female -- it's a positive cornucopia of warped mental agony and craziness that makes it easy and convincing to act to type.

    Approaching 50, and childless. Some girls need to have kids, if only to put a clamp on their mental derangement.

    Rumors floated around that at one point she dated the now cancelled alt-country singer songwriter Ryan Adams, another victim of the #metoo movement, though he also has significant neurotic issues as well. Birds of a feather.

    Anyway he wrote this great song, "Harder Now That It's Over" which is supposedly about Winona, with the great line, "You're free...free with a history." This raw live version captures the essence nicely.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @R.G. Camara, @njguy73

  65. @Charles
    @slumber_j

    Thank you for referencing TLP. I had never heard of or seen that (I suppose now-defunct) blog. The Dove commercials entry was interesting in-and-of itself, plus there were the asides to "House of Games". Much of his stuff made for good reading, if now a bit dated, though it was only six or seven years ago.

    Replies: @Moral Stone, @slumber_j

    It’s really a great blog, although as you said a bit dated. It’s central theme, which I think is that ad men are so good at psychology that the messages they try to send can be analyzed to tell you about yourself and your place in society, is unique.

    I do however find it a bit at odds with say Steve’s stories about working in marketing where a lot of the value of ad spends is illusory, and most ad value is created by promoting new products as one might expect. Are ad men cunning manipulative psychonauts hacking our collective psyche, or huxters who flatter executives for ad dollars that don’t move the needle much? Or some combination thereof?

    • Replies: @Charles
    @Moral Stone

    His Dove commercials interpretation reminded me of the late Dr. Wilson Bryan Key and his theories of the use of subliminal imagery in print ads; his first book was published in or around 1971. I've read most or perhaps all of his books and have several. I don't necessarily believe exactly what he believed, but the fact of the use of those techniques is really beyond reasonable doubt. Whether they work like he claimed is arguable, but their existence is not. Unfortunately his books tend to have titles like "Media Sexploitation"; that one was his second or third book and has outstanding analysis of then-current pop songs and basically an entire chapter on "The Exorcist" film. That book in particular can be had cheaply and would be of interest to any thinking person.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @njguy73

  66. @Justvisiting
    @Altai

    In the good old days, this "Trans announcement" would have been followed by men in the white coats coming to take the crazy "it" away to the funny farm.

    Today it is followed by a mass media celebration of perversity for perversity's sake.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    mass media celebration of perversity for perversity’s sake

    No, it’s to rub your face in it and dare you to say anything negative about it.

  67. @kaganovitch
    This "openness" seems perilously close to psychopathy.

    Replies: @Some Guy, @Elsewhere, @jamie b.

    Openness * low conscientiousness creates problems (eg. drug abuse). Openness * high conscientiousness is the stuff of science and exploration, and is what built the world that we live in.

  68. @Bardon Kaldian
    I haven't seen most of the "newer" films; just, I wouldn't say this analysis makes much sense.

    For instance, other characteristics like generation, taste, education and mental maturity are more important than the big 5 traits in assessing the liking of a movie (by the way- do Poland, Lithuania & Russia belong to WEIRD?).

    Generation- most people from 15 to 30 years old didn't see any "classics", even American films. They don't know about movies made until, say, 1990.

    Taste- it comes with culture, knowledge etc. Or not.

    Education- which kind of education? Anyway, you can't expect average film goers to appreciate an ambitious film, Terrence Malick type.

    Sex/gender- no need to explicate.

    Also, it is not fair to compare Pretty Woman with 2001. The first one is easy to watch & understand; the other is barely understandable.

    I could write tons & tons about other Steve's comments, but I'll offer just one example: two movies about OK Corral, Wyatt Earp & Tombstone, 1993/1994. I've seen them both; also, I know history of these events.

    If you go to IMDB, you'll see that Tombstone has rating 7.8, while Costner's Wyatt Earp - 6.7. If we accept that "cinephiles" are those who rate those movies- well then, "cinephiles" are complete idiots.

    Wyatt Earp is an epic history film, sometimes slow-going, ca. 80% historically accurate. It is a good realist film, with some great acting, well paced, including a few memorable quotes & generally- "real".

    Tombstone is an absurdist idiocy, actually a screaming nonsense containing a few so ridiculous scenes that could fall into "so bad it is actually good" category. It has nothing to do with reality in any sense- historical, physical, mental, emotional,.... It can be enjoyed only as a parody of the genre, a deliberate effort to undermine any credibility of anything. Now, as an awful nonsense- it works. But, judging from reviews- most of the likes come from people who consider it to be "real". Which poses an interesting question: what "reality" actually means for so many people. What is real? What is convincing? What is acceptable as a representation of a historical event?

    So, if your cinephiles are, to such an extent- tasteless morons who can't distinguish fantasy from reality- what can be said of the Facebook crowd & their "likes"?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @TWS, @syonredux

    Tombstone is not real it’s good.

    Who cares whether a movie is real or historically accurate? Being accurate does not make it entertaining nor interesting. Wyatt Earp was a failed gambler and referee better known for the questionable call he made in an illegal boxing match. The cinema Wyatt Earp who fought the Cowboys at OK Corral will live long past the part-time lawman and grifter.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @TWS


    Tombstone is not real it’s good.
     
    Tombstone is good only in the sense "so bad it's actually good". It is ridiculous on every level & it has a bunch of hilarious scenes no one in his right mind can take seriously. Most classic, "canonical" westerns were, of course, stylized & not convincing as depiction of real life in the West for the modern public; just, the best of Ford, Hawkes etc. were acceptable as a representation of reality & were, by their creators, taken as, more or less, slightly modified narrative of some events. And this genre evolved, in its realism & artfulness over time, until is virtually vanished.

    Tombstone, on the other hand, is simply absurd. For instance, the chase scene with acrobatic shooting cannot be taken seriously. It is not whether it is historically accurate or not. It is just comically unreal.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IetGBX7Fv2Q

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @TWS

  69. @anonymous
    Why remain silent about the stolen election? Millions of stolen votes.

    Replies: @TWS

    It’s too big. The results too painful. He’ll come at it sideways as always finding some angle he finds interesting but ultimately non-threatening to the status quo.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @TWS

    It's really lame for Steve not to engage. Is there something more important current affairs wise going on in this world to us?

  70. Matty Yglesias is very careful when it comes to picking images of White billionaires….

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Dissident
    @syonredux


    Matty Yglesias is very careful when it comes to picking images of White billionaires….

     

    The three individuals pictured-- Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk, and Bill Gates-- match the three that are top-ranked on Wikipedia's List of Americans by net worth (As of this writing at least.)
    Is it not entirely plausible and even likely that was the basis for the choice in Yglesias's graphic?

    The above-linked Wikipedia list, however, cites as its source The Forbes 400: The Definitive Ranking Of The Wealthiest Americans In 2020, where, as of this writing at least, the ranking is different:
    Jeff Bezos is ranked #1, followed by Bill Gates at #2, Mark Zuckerberg at #3, Warren Buffett at #4; #5 is Larry Ellison; #6 is Steve Ballmer; and Elon Musk is #7.

    What accounts for the discrepancy? At least several possible explanations readily come to mind, none of them involving bad faith, seem entirely plausible.

  71. @David
    Why is it percentile for the first four personality traits but 1 minus percentile for neuroticism?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Good question. Because I’m pretty sure the data the paper’s authors posted online gets the neuroticism column backwards. I kept coming up with the exact opposite of the results cited in the paper for neuroticism: e.g., in their paper, women tend to be more neurotic than men, and horror movies have neurotic audiences. In their data, however, the highest Neuroticism films are war movies, fraternity movies, sports movies, rap movies, and secret agent movies: i.e., movies about brave men.

    So, I wound up reversing the database’s Neuroticism column.

  72. @Stan Adams
    I love Heathers. Never watched Friday Night Lights - no interest. Haven't seen the other two movies you mentioned - again, no interest.

    My taste in movies is fairly lowbrow. My all-time favorite movie is the Arnold Schwarzenegger schlockfest Commando. Other Schwarzenegger flicks in my personal Top 100 are the first Terminator and Total Recall.

    Another favorite is Michael Mann's Manhunter. "We don't invent our natures; they're issued to us along with our lungs and pancreas and everything else. Why fight it?"

    Being a millennial, I tend to think of favorite scenes rather than favorite movies. For example, I love the scene in Alien where Ripley escapes from the Nostromo. But the rest of the movie leaves me cold.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @syonredux

    Another favorite is Michael Mann’s Manhunter. “We don’t invent our natures; they’re issued to us along with our lungs and pancreas and everything else. Why fight it?”

    Manhunter is a sadly neglected film. Brian Cox’s Lector (bored, lounging about) is infinitely superior to Anthony Hopkin’s OTT version.

    • Agree: Nathan
    • Replies: @Feryl
    @syonredux

    Manhunter is great, but it is VERY 80's. A sort of feature length art house MTV video, with surprisingly low key acting, which is part of the reason the movie bombed. Peterson seems to be in a daze throughout the movie, the villians don't raise their voices, etc. It's an odd movie that gets better on repeat viewings. Silence of the lambs looks like a generic wannabe "edgy"early 90's police procedural in comparison, though most the acting is quite good (Anthony Hopkins being the only exception, he chokes on the scenery).

    , @Stan Adams
    @syonredux

    Red Dragon was a slog, in no small part due to Hopkins' hammy performance.

  73. @Buzz Mohawk
    This also comes down to the way anything you show in art benefits from it or becomes popularized by it. If you show it, you are tacitly endorsing it. At least that is the arm chair psychology.

    In film history class (woo hoo!) our professor used The Wild One as an example of this. Ostensibly, that movie was supposed to show a bad boy and a bunch of losers. Instead it romanticized motorcycle gangs to the point that they got bigger and more prevalent after that.

    The producers and director had to know they were making the whole thing sexy.

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/87/c5/a8/87c5a84b9e233529ec4bd38b8fcf0b7a.jpg
    BAD boy Steve Sailer and his commenters

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @TWS

    Your theory makes sense.

    I don’t remember a lot of kung fu schools closing in the wake of the explosion of movies.

    In fact I remember a couple of karate schools that were really Kung Fu in disguise rebrand then a kickboxing school rebranded itself as ninjitsu a decade later.

  74. @Steve Sailer
    @Grumpy

    I worked for UPI when John O'Sullivan was in charge in 2000-2003. I started this blog at the end of 2002. I started writing for VDARE at the beginning of 2000.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    On second thought, I think I started this blog at the end of 2001.

    • LOL: Cortes
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer


    On second thought, I think I started this blog at the end of 2001.
     
    2001 A Space Odyssey - ending
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXS8P0HksQo

    2001 ending The Simpsons
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcD2clC2cQE
  75. I liked Heathers but don’t get me started on the Mission Impossible movies.

    The whole point of the TV series was that action stunts and derring-do were not needed, because their sting operations were so meticulously planned, the gadgets were so clever and the bad guys were so ripe for the taking due to their greed, ambition and other personality quirks.

    The main “derring-do” for Phelps, Rollin, Cinnamon etc. was being able to lie through their teeth with a straight face. Not sure what that says about us fans of the show

  76. Let’s see, Openness Top 10:

    WAKING LFE: Pretty good.

    PI: Perfect for a high IQ 18-year old (I was 18 when I saw it; I liked it, but I’ve never felt the urge to watch it again).

    A SCANNER DARKLY: Maybe the most faithful PKD adaptation. Not as good as the book, though.

    THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP: Makes a good double bill with WAKING LIFE.

    THE FOUNTAIN: Maybe Aronofsky’s best film. It’s certainly the one that I’ve re-watched the most often.

    MULHOLLAND DRIVE: Lynch’s masterpiece.

    DARJEELING LIMITED: Meh. Nowhere near as good as GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL….And GBH is not as good as the film that inspired it, Lubitsch’s magnificent THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER.

    BEING JOHN MALKOVITCH: Extremely good…But I prefer ADAPTATION

    THE BUDDHA: Never seen it.

    THE LIFE AQUATIC WITH STEVE ZISSOU: I like it better than DARJEELING…but it’s still not as good as GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL.

    High Openness Bottom ten:

    Haven’t seen any of them.

    I guess I must have a really high “Openness” score….

  77. @Steve Sailer
    @Joe Stalin

    If you like 20th Century classical music in general, rather than, say, loving Richard Strauss and hating Philip Glass, you should give Koyaanisqatsi a try. Keep in mind that Koyaanisqatsi was revolutionary in 1983, but TV commercials quickly imitated a number of its gimmicks, such as fast and slow speed aerial shots of traffic and pedestrians at rush hour. So it may remind you of the kind of TV commercials that played on golf broadcasts around 1990 for high end corporate image advertising for consulting firms and the like.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @prosa123, @MEH 0910

    Keep in mind that Koyaanisqatsi was revolutionary in 1983, but TV commercials quickly imitated a number of its gimmicks

    Mr Plow Commercial

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @MEH 0910

    Yeah, I think the fast-motion skyline shot of clouds passing was close to being invented for Koyaanisqatsi but quickly became a cliche in upscale TV commercials.

    Replies: @Known Fact

  78. @Abe
    @Redneck farmer


    The jocks won’t argue for really trying to change higher education because they rank to high in agreeableness.
     
    I know a lot of us give Steve crap for not properly ending some of his TAKI’S essays (not me personally, cuz I’m too [email protected]’ classy, but there are these guys I know...,) but that was a really good conclusion this time. Short, meaningful, integrally related to the body of the essay, yet totally out of let field and surprising, a sort of SIXTH SENSE type ending. I feel like a hipster douche reviewing some rap album (with all the disgusting literal and metaphorical yearning for a polar bear-ing all such sad exercises imply) in writing this, but that conclusion was “like a sucker punch that sent me to concrete. And I loved it!”

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks.

    Most pundit’s columns consist of: “Here’s a thought I had about a well-trod topic.” So the last line is pretty much the Thought, and the rest of the column is the setup for the Thought.

    Some of my columns are like that, but others are like: Here’s a new database that practically nobody has thought about before. Here are some thoughts I have had looking at this new source of information, but don’t expect them to exhaust the topic. Feel free to look at the data and come up with your own ideas.

  79. @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer


    Keep in mind that Koyaanisqatsi was revolutionary in 1983, but TV commercials quickly imitated a number of its gimmicks
     
    Mr Plow Commercial
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gArU-BAO7Kw

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, I think the fast-motion skyline shot of clouds passing was close to being invented for Koyaanisqatsi but quickly became a cliche in upscale TV commercials.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Steve Sailer

    And every rock vid!

  80. @Steve Sailer
    @Steve Sailer

    On second thought, I think I started this blog at the end of 2001.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    On second thought, I think I started this blog at the end of 2001.

    2001 A Space Odyssey – ending

    [MORE]

    2001 ending The Simpsons

  81. @R.G. Camara
    People usually like the movies that reflect their world view, unless the movie has become a "classic" and/or the people feel socially pressured to like it.

    As I stated previously , I was far too jumpy and easily grossed out for horror movies, but a film major girlfriend and the Scream franchise flotsom and jetsom commentaries about final girl and the slasher formula helped to put pressure on me to watch a bunch and break them down and enjoy them on some level, which I wouldn't have done otherwise.

    I'm sure back in the 80s tons of jocks hated things like The Karate Kid or Sixteen Candles, but social pressure these days means most jocks today will claim those films are great.

    As for Tom Cruise in particular:

    I think Tom Cruise works very, very hard to make sure his movies appeal to the most people, which is why we're here nearly 40 years after he first hit the big screen and his movies are still among the top grossing films of the year and he's still a leading man megastar. Ask Douglas Fairbanks or Cary Grant or any other once-huge Hollywood male star who ended up second rate by the end of their career about that.

    In short, Cruise's plan works. I've never not been excited by a Tom Cruise movie trailer, even though I'm not a huge fan, and I instantly forget his film five minutes after I watch it (except maybe Top Gun or Eyes Wide Shut).

    However, to maintain his superstar status, Cruise's plan means chucking a good portion of his character's personality/worldview/quirks/ that might turn off some viewers, which means the vast majority of his roles are, more or less, "Movie Star Tom Cruise doing cool things and action stunts".

    But you can't really fault him for choosing Being a Star over Acting, his success rate is unbelievable. And he'll always have Eyes Wide Shut and Born on the Fourth of July if anyone ever dares question his acting chops.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Buzz Mohawk

    I think Tom Cruise works very, very hard to make sure his movies appeal to the most people, which is why we’re here nearly 40 years after he first hit the big screen and his movies are still among the top grossing films of the year and he’s still a leading man megastar. Ask Douglas Fairbanks or Cary Grant or any other once-huge Hollywood male star who ended up second rate by the end of their career about that.

    It remains to be seen if Tom Cruise’s career will last all that much longer than Cary Grant’s career. Grant’s last big hit was Father Goose in 1964, when he was 60 years old, two years older than Cruise is now. He could have kept going, but within a couple of years decided to retire from acting.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @prosa123

    Yes, but Grant was not playing a hard-ass action roles Cruise is. Cruise might be churning out Mission Impossibles in his 70s, and I'm not even joking.

    And, to be fair, Cruise has a lot more modern steroids/ plastic/surgery/diet/weightlifting going for him today than Grant did back in the 50s and 60s. Grant might have gotten 10-20 years more out of his career were he alive today.

    Plus Grant and Cruise had different personalities and approaches to fame.

    Grant had an ironic, detached comedic wit to fame, as per his famous line, "Everyone wants to be Cary Grant. Even I do sometimes." Grant also loved acting as an art form and took pride in his varied roles and critical acclaim. He was perfectly content late in life doing tours of the Midwest where he just gave career retrospectives, signed autographs, and was a star-in-retirement.

    Cruise, in contrast, seems psychotically obsessed with always being the #1 box office action star, period, no matter what. He knows he can act, and has proven it, but just wants to be the Big Name Star until the day Xenu comes and he drops dead. He'll do one movie every 3-5 years to show he can still act, but after that he's dropping himself out of a helicopter again. Tom Cruise will only cease being Tom Cruise when he has a life-ended heart attack on set.

  82. @Steve Sailer
    @Joe Stalin

    If you like 20th Century classical music in general, rather than, say, loving Richard Strauss and hating Philip Glass, you should give Koyaanisqatsi a try. Keep in mind that Koyaanisqatsi was revolutionary in 1983, but TV commercials quickly imitated a number of its gimmicks, such as fast and slow speed aerial shots of traffic and pedestrians at rush hour. So it may remind you of the kind of TV commercials that played on golf broadcasts around 1990 for high end corporate image advertising for consulting firms and the like.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @prosa123, @MEH 0910

    If you like 20th Century classical music in general, rather than, say, loving Richard Strauss and hating Philip Glass, you should give Koyaanisqatsi a try.

    Its director Godfrey Reggio is 6’11” or possibly 7′, though at 80 he might have lost some height..

  83. @Buzz Mohawk
    Thank you, Steve, for this new article.

    I remember commenting here recently that I don't like the Godfather movies. Maybe now I know why. I've written favorably about 2001, and I even wrote a review of First Man that included references to 2001 (because Chazelle inserted them into his film) so I see the differences. I see the reasons for my preferences.

    One interesting fact is that, as I pointed out in my review, my wife liked First Man more than I did. She likes stuff women like: Pretty Woman, the Twilight films. She also likes the Mission Impossible movies, which I find tiresome and formulaic.

    I haven't even bothered to show her Blue Velvet.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @prosa123

    I remember commenting here recently that I don’t like the Godfather movies. Maybe now I know why.

    Real-life mobsters never had lifestyles as remotely extravagant as the Corleone Family’s.
    John Gotti’s house:
    https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/home-of-john-gotti-at-160-11-85th-street-howard-beach-news-photo/97258642

  84. @Buzz Mohawk
    @R.G. Camara

    I watch very few movies and TV shows, so I am not like the critics to whom you refer. Maybe I just get tired of a formula after seeing it repeated once -- or more likely I just can't stand it when it is so comic-book fantastic and pointlessly unreal.

    Honestly, what is the point of the Mission Impossible movies? They are an adaptation of a TV show I liked when I was a boy, and that's it.

    Unlike the critics, I'm not telling anyone else what to like. I'm glad my wife enjoys these things, and I am very good-natured when I watch with her. I think most good husbands are.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ozymandias

    The point of the movies is to make Tom Cruise into an American James Bond, but more actiony and less suave ladykiller.

  85. I feel like the 1947 film The Secret Life of Walter Mitty was an uncomfortably Jewish film. With some but not all of the humor being exclusively Jewish humor, without appeal to normal Americans.

    It kind of shows idealized American urban life before the Great Migration changed cities The department store scenes are very beautiful, even the hectic commute scenes have a sort of charm. And the houses are beautiful – but it doesn’t seem like a very American movie, overall.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @songbird

    The film version of The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is rather meh. The miniaturist perfection of Thurber's short story was lost amidst cinematic bloat. Perhaps more importantly, the film turns Mitty's wife into his mother......


    We’re going through!” The Commander’s voice was like thin ice breaking. He wore his full-dress uniform, with the heavily braided white cap pulled down rakishly over one cold gray eye. “We can’t make it, sir. It’s spoiling for a hurricane, if you ask me.” “I’m not asking you, Lieutenant Berg,” said the Commander. “Throw on the power lights! Rev her up to 8,500! We’re going through!” The pounding of the cylinders increased: ta-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa. The Commander stared at the ice forming on the pilot window. He walked over and twisted a row of complicated dials. “Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!” he shouted. “Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!” repeated Lieutenant Berg. “Full strength in No. 3 turret!” shouted the Commander. “Full strength in No. 3 turret!” The crew, bending to their various tasks in the huge, hurtling eight-engined Navy hydroplane, looked at each other and grinned. “The Old Man’ll get us through,” they said to one another. “The Old Man ain’t afraid of Hell!” . . .


    "Not so fast! You’re driving too fast!” said Mrs. Mitty. “What are you driving so fast for?”



    “Hmm?” said Walter Mitty. He looked at his wife, in the seat beside him, with shocked astonishment. She seemed grossly unfamiliar, like a strange woman who had yelled at him in a crowd. “You were up to fifty-five,” she said. “You know I don’t like to go more than forty. You were up to fifty-five.” Walter Mitty drove on toward Waterbury in silence, the roaring of the SN202 through the worst storm in twenty years of Navy flying fading in the remote, intimate airways of his mind. “You’re tensed up again,” said Mrs. Mitty. “It’s one of your days. I wish you’d let Dr. Renshaw look you over.”






    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1939/03/18/the-secret-life-of-walter-james-thurber

  86. @prosa123
    @R.G. Camara

    I think Tom Cruise works very, very hard to make sure his movies appeal to the most people, which is why we’re here nearly 40 years after he first hit the big screen and his movies are still among the top grossing films of the year and he’s still a leading man megastar. Ask Douglas Fairbanks or Cary Grant or any other once-huge Hollywood male star who ended up second rate by the end of their career about that.

    It remains to be seen if Tom Cruise's career will last all that much longer than Cary Grant's career. Grant's last big hit was Father Goose in 1964, when he was 60 years old, two years older than Cruise is now. He could have kept going, but within a couple of years decided to retire from acting.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    Yes, but Grant was not playing a hard-ass action roles Cruise is. Cruise might be churning out Mission Impossibles in his 70s, and I’m not even joking.

    And, to be fair, Cruise has a lot more modern steroids/ plastic/surgery/diet/weightlifting going for him today than Grant did back in the 50s and 60s. Grant might have gotten 10-20 years more out of his career were he alive today.

    Plus Grant and Cruise had different personalities and approaches to fame.

    Grant had an ironic, detached comedic wit to fame, as per his famous line, “Everyone wants to be Cary Grant. Even I do sometimes.” Grant also loved acting as an art form and took pride in his varied roles and critical acclaim. He was perfectly content late in life doing tours of the Midwest where he just gave career retrospectives, signed autographs, and was a star-in-retirement.

    Cruise, in contrast, seems psychotically obsessed with always being the #1 box office action star, period, no matter what. He knows he can act, and has proven it, but just wants to be the Big Name Star until the day Xenu comes and he drops dead. He’ll do one movie every 3-5 years to show he can still act, but after that he’s dropping himself out of a helicopter again. Tom Cruise will only cease being Tom Cruise when he has a life-ended heart attack on set.

  87. Steve, if I may with all due humbleness suggest not following the Hollywood PR machine like such a normie, but going off the beaten path once in a while, I think you will find there are a lot of fascinating cinema-related noticeable patterns ripe for the pattern-noticing.

    For example, browsing VUDU earlier this year I ran across this title- DRAGON BLADE (2015):

    When corrupt Roman leader (Adrien Brody) arrives with a giant army to claim the Silk Road, Huo An (Jackie Chan) and his group of trained warriors teams up with an elite legion of defected Roman soldiers led by General Lucius (John Cusack) to maintain the balance of power in the region.

    Adrien Brody is the ugliest man, and likely will forever remain the ugliest man, ever to win a Best Actor Oscar (I’m too [email protected]’ classy to call him ugly, but these guys I know…). Given that, it’s not surprising his career has foundered since his 00’s decade peak. Still, he is a flippin’ Best Actor winner, and now he’s starring in a schlock Chinese historical epic/martial-arts action’er with perennial A-minus-lister John Cusack (that may sound like faint praise, but to be on Hollywood’s A-minus list for four straight decades and counting is pretty impressive)? What- is- the- deal?

    Personally, at least 1 joke immediately suggests itself- that of the brutally blunt Chinese casting lady (“Wah, Adrien Brody! You really ugly but you big Oscar-winning actor, you get lead villain role!”) as well as more serious musings on the continued inability of China to exert any sort of discernible cultural influence in the West, as embodied in the utter failure of movies like DRAGON BLADE or the Matt Damon-starring GREAT WALL to make even the slightest impression. Is it the self-defeating reliance on obscure incidents from Chinese history as plot crutches? Is it the Chinese tendency to consider return to the status quo ante (e.g. the heroes’ fight to restore mere “balance of power” to the Silk Road in DRAGON BLADE) as the epitome of the happy ending, instead of some more decisive resolution (a wedding, a death, a victory over the forces of evil) as is more typical in Western storytelling? And does the fact that American hunger for cheap Chines goods and the resultant trade imbalances they cause ultimately resolves themselves through the repatriation of U.S. dollars back into the pockets of Messieurs Brody and Cusack with the side-effect of a movie being created that no one sees, is influenced by, or probably makes any money off of (the equivalent of paying people to fill a whole you earlier paid other people to dig) prove the ultimate entropic fate of the universe to be one of heat death?

  88. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    Winona Ryder is of course the poster child for the ditzy neurotically crazed modern female. Drugs, shoplifting, wrestling with the Jewish thing while being a hot female -- it's a positive cornucopia of warped mental agony and craziness that makes it easy and convincing to act to type.

    Approaching 50, and childless. Some girls need to have kids, if only to put a clamp on their mental derangement.

    Rumors floated around that at one point she dated the now cancelled alt-country singer songwriter Ryan Adams, another victim of the #metoo movement, though he also has significant neurotic issues as well. Birds of a feather.

    Anyway he wrote this great song, "Harder Now That It's Over" which is supposedly about Winona, with the great line, "You're free...free with a history." This raw live version captures the essence nicely.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @R.G. Camara, @njguy73

    Winona Ryder was apparently the world’s greatest Manic Pixie Dream Girl eva.

    Johnny Depp, Matt Damon, and a host of other Hollywood celebs of the 1990s and early 2000s became little puppies to her, following her around till she broke their hearts. Johnny even got a tattoo with her name on it, he was so smitten, and had to famously alter it to “Wino Forever” after she broke up with him.

    I’m guessing she must’ve been extremely fantastic in bed, and, coupled with her girlish looks and Manic Pixie Dream Girl craziness, must’ve taken those insecure actor/singer boys for a wild ride until her BPD kicked in and she icily cut them out when she got bored.

    All the hipster Manic Pixie Dream Girl movies that came out later were basically pale imitations of Ryder.

    Winona having a child would’ve been awful. Munchausen by proxy likely would’ve occurred.

    • Replies: @Abe
    @R.G. Camara


    Winona Ryder was apparently the world’s greatest Manic Pixie Dream Girl eva.

    Johnny Depp, Matt Damon, and a host of other Hollywood celebs of the 1990s and early 2000s became little puppies to her, following her around till she broke their hearts.
     

    Well said! I’d say the only actress to challenge her for (Dark/Emo) Pixie Dream Girl status would be Helena Bonham Carter. To her credit HBC appeared in a lot of top-shelf Merchant-Ivory productions back when there was an avalanche of those in the early 90’s- we watched HOWARD’S END recently and after it suddenly kicked in for me at the 40 minute mark, I was like- damn!, when did they stop making adult movies like this? Add to that edgy performances like in FIGHT CLUB, marriage to and bearing the demon-seed of ultimate Hollywood emo Tim Burton, and that’s quite the persona. Oh, and she’s the great-granddaughter of the man who led Britain into WWI (H.H. Asquith).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @R.G. Camara


    Manic Pixie Dream Girl
     
    Posted as a public service for those who don't know the reference:

    https://youtu.be/HhMpM0Dv2Yg

    https://youtu.be/oxHVqON2xQ0
  89. @Bardon Kaldian
    And just one thing about Pretty Woman.

    Unfortunately, Molyeneux's video was watsoned (as he was, I think, from YouTube), so I cannot present the case.
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9362786/?ref_=tt_ch

    Anyway.

    Stefan Molyneux, whatever he may be, has recorded a rather good video where a sugar daddy, some confused guy in his 60s, confesses about his experiences with good, sometimes even great looking & affluent girls, 18-25 years age range, who went with him to spend some time out & eventually screw for no reason at all (no gerontophilia, no real financial reasons, no nothing except emptiness of soul & boredom with life). There were perhaps 10-15 such girls; most of them rich & good-to-great looking & going to college.

    These girls do it just for fun. They don’t have gerontophilic fetish. They are not nymphomaniacs. They don’t need money (at least, most of them). They just are empty & like being sluts.

    Most of them were incessantly talking about finding their "Richard Gere", referring to the position of Julia Roberts character in Pretty Woman. Those aspiring whores were, it seems, fascinated by the situation of becoming kept women by a good-looking affluent man & finding "romance" in such circumstances.

    How stupid can you get?

    Replies: @Ray P

    You just gave a lot of the older guys reading this blog hope. God bless you sir.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Ray P

    Just don't be disgustingly fat & try reliable sugar channels.

  90. Anon[240] • Disclaimer says:

    Liking a movie is one thing, but understanding it is another. Screenwriters, directors, and cinematographers put a lot of clever touches into movies. (More so, decades ago.) These add to the viewer’s movie experience. Many years ago, I read the hardcopy books that compile all of Roger Ebert’s reviews. I had been oblivious to much that goes on in movies, but the Ebert books helped me get better at it.

  91. @TWS
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Tombstone is not real it's good.

    Who cares whether a movie is real or historically accurate? Being accurate does not make it entertaining nor interesting. Wyatt Earp was a failed gambler and referee better known for the questionable call he made in an illegal boxing match. The cinema Wyatt Earp who fought the Cowboys at OK Corral will live long past the part-time lawman and grifter.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Tombstone is not real it’s good.

    Tombstone is good only in the sense “so bad it’s actually good”. It is ridiculous on every level & it has a bunch of hilarious scenes no one in his right mind can take seriously. Most classic, “canonical” westerns were, of course, stylized & not convincing as depiction of real life in the West for the modern public; just, the best of Ford, Hawkes etc. were acceptable as a representation of reality & were, by their creators, taken as, more or less, slightly modified narrative of some events. And this genre evolved, in its realism & artfulness over time, until is virtually vanished.

    Tombstone, on the other hand, is simply absurd. For instance, the chase scene with acrobatic shooting cannot be taken seriously. It is not whether it is historically accurate or not. It is just comically unreal.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "Tombstone ... is simply absurd."

    It's a movie. An entertaining retelling of white man lore. It's been watched and enjoyed by millions. Do you remember your last erection? Probably not.

    , @TWS
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Someday you'll have to regal us with the story of how Kurt Russell hit on your wife or whatever he did to piss in your Wheaties.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  92. @TelfoedJohn

    Winona Ryder movies are strong in Neuroticism, with the most neurotic movie of the 846 being her hot-chicks-in-a-mental-institution Girl, Interrupted with Angelina Jolie.
     
    It's amusing how 90% of mental health issues are rich girls following fads - social contagion. All the teen girls wanted to be depressed around the time of Prozac Nation. I read somewhere about a school where half the girls were experiencing 'gender dysphoria', and after school closure (because of the lockdown) all the symptoms disappeared.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @njguy73

    Correlating movie preference with personality type is a really interesting idea and is good fun. But as our presumptive (presumptuous?) president-elect, might say: “C’mon man, you ain’t science.”

    The participants in this study are a totally non-random sample who: (a) are all on facebook to begin with. (b) are whatever type of person it is that clicks “like” on a movie. (And seriously who does this? And and what does that act mean anyway? That they actually saw and enjoyed the movie? that it’s the kind of movie they think they are supposed to like? That it’s the type of movie they wished they actually liked? Or that it’s the type of movie they want to support and make other people like?) In addition, they (c) are the type of people who affirmatively decide to take on-line personality test and give their results to researchers.

    I am not sure who fits this profile but I bet you wouldn’t want to take a long car ride or be stuck in an elevator with one of them. They are probably far from the average American (in fact, most of them may not even be American).

    However, someone should absolutely do a legit. scientific study on this topic. For example, if you gave the personality test and got consent from a random sample of Netflix or Amazon video subscribers, perhaps you could persuade the services to correlate the results with whatever movies they actually have been watching on the services.

    Come to think of it, why just the Big Five personality test. You could give them the full Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), and then use their movie preferences to diagnose their mental health. Find a way to get this “cinematic personality assessment” insurance covered and cha-ching!

    With his marketing background, interest in movies, and interest in HBD, I’d say Steve is the perfect person to get this project off the ground, if he was looking for a potentially lucrative side-hustle.

  93. @The Alarmist
    How about Grosse Point Blank vs. Four Weddings and a Funeral?

    https://youtu.be/p9YjOweDcUw?t=0m35s

    Replies: @HFR

    Is it OK to love both “Grosse Point Blank” and “Four Weddings and a Funeral”?

  94. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    "Also, it is not fair to compare Pretty Woman with 2001. The first one is easy to watch & understand; the other is barely understandable."

    Fair's got nothing to do with it.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    You may use any word you wish, but to compare the incomparable does not give any new knowledge. Easy to digest Pretty Woman is to difficult & barely comprehensible 2001 is what, in another cinematic culture, is Chabrol’s Unfaithful Wife compared with Bunuel’s The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (the parallel is not quite fair, because Chabrol’s movie was great, unlike the American rom-com).

    Bunuel’s film needs at least 2-3 viewings to get what it is all about. A normal person cannot, unlike Chabrol’s film, decipher what he is watching. And it has nothing to do with sex/gender, neuroticism, extroversion or openness: in one case, you understand what you’re watching; in another- not.

    I would, after one viewing, always choose like for Pretty Woman simply because I would know what I’d been watching; in the case of 2001– I’m not sure. Simply because I would say: this is an ambitious film on many levels & I don’t know whether I like it or not. Just, I don’t get it, a very big chunk of it. And the film is, actually, rather boring- perhaps 30% of it. While Pretty Woman is easy to understand, like; it’s a good entertainment & most of all- it is not boring. It is an amusing lightweight.

    It just isn’t fair to put in a fight a bantam weight boxer with a heavy weight.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The point of comparing two highly dissimilar movies is that the study finds they have, as expected, highly dissimilar audiences. If the study failed to distinguish 2001 from Pretty Woman, it wouldn't be very useful.

    I move on later to somewhat less dissimilar movies like Citizen Kane versus It's a Wonderful Life, and Taxi Driver vs Rocky.

    I also looked at The Godfather vs. Goodfellas. Although the movies are different in style and era, their audiences are quite similar, so much so that it's hard to notice any difference in personalities. Interestingly, Godfather II might standout more from Godfather than does Goodfellas.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  95. @MEH 0910
    @Altai

    https://twitter.com/PageSix/status/1333844530437779456


    In June 2019, the couple proudly showed their love for one another by posing topless together while kissing for a Pride Month photoshoot.
     
    https://twitter.com/PageSix/status/1333895829535526915

    Replies: @Muggles, @Rob McX

    Odd that “Elliot’s/Ellen’s” wife is the butch looking one, but he/she is the one who now says she is a trans man.

    No plumbing work yet, I assume. Also no hormones or visible facial surgery.

    So how does this “trans” work then? Is she on a waiting list for the physical upgrades? Or just trying to pose as a feminine looking gay “male.”

    You have to wonder how she can pass a psych evaluation like this. Though you can probably buy one from some quack.

    This is just another mental meltdown of some kind. And a tragedy in the making. Read about the suicide update in a year or two. Very sad. She has no idea of what being a man is all about.

    Naturally though, this “news” is lauded by all of the usual suspects.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Muggles

    Ellen's page continues to deadname her:

    https://ellen.page/

    , @MEH 0910
    @Muggles

    Ellen's page continues to deadname her:

    https://ellen.page/

  96. @Steve Sailer
    @MEH 0910

    Yeah, I think the fast-motion skyline shot of clouds passing was close to being invented for Koyaanisqatsi but quickly became a cliche in upscale TV commercials.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    And every rock vid!

  97. @J.Ross
    Hugh Hewitt currently confirming what I had feared, which is that, despite abundant election fraud proof in almost every reasonable sense of the word, there is no evidence in the law talker understanding, which apparently requires a voluntary signed confession from the guilty party. This means that, as with the decision to not indict Hillary Clinton, Democrats will be "not guilty" but the legal institution and its destroyers will be. The crisis of authority intensifies. Good thing Republicans did everything they could to help Democrats because now they'll all be thrown out and replaced with Chinese assets and Zuckerberg drones.

    Replies: @Catdog, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @anonymous

    If Republicans really believe that the election was stolen (rather than merely hoping it was stolen, or pretending that they believe it was because it’s politically advantageous)- then we need to stop talking about winning elections.

    It’s baffling to hear somebody talk with one side of their mouth about massive election fraud and then with the other start talking about 2022 or 24.

  98. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Steve Sailer

    You may use any word you wish, but to compare the incomparable does not give any new knowledge. Easy to digest Pretty Woman is to difficult & barely comprehensible 2001 is what, in another cinematic culture, is Chabrol's Unfaithful Wife compared with Bunuel's The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (the parallel is not quite fair, because Chabrol's movie was great, unlike the American rom-com).

    Bunuel's film needs at least 2-3 viewings to get what it is all about. A normal person cannot, unlike Chabrol's film, decipher what he is watching. And it has nothing to do with sex/gender, neuroticism, extroversion or openness: in one case, you understand what you're watching; in another- not.

    I would, after one viewing, always choose like for Pretty Woman simply because I would know what I'd been watching; in the case of 2001- I'm not sure. Simply because I would say: this is an ambitious film on many levels & I don't know whether I like it or not. Just, I don't get it, a very big chunk of it. And the film is, actually, rather boring- perhaps 30% of it. While Pretty Woman is easy to understand, like; it's a good entertainment & most of all- it is not boring. It is an amusing lightweight.

    It just isn't fair to put in a fight a bantam weight boxer with a heavy weight.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The point of comparing two highly dissimilar movies is that the study finds they have, as expected, highly dissimilar audiences. If the study failed to distinguish 2001 from Pretty Woman, it wouldn’t be very useful.

    I move on later to somewhat less dissimilar movies like Citizen Kane versus It’s a Wonderful Life, and Taxi Driver vs Rocky.

    I also looked at The Godfather vs. Goodfellas. Although the movies are different in style and era, their audiences are quite similar, so much so that it’s hard to notice any difference in personalities. Interestingly, Godfather II might standout more from Godfather than does Goodfellas.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Steve Sailer


    The point of comparing two highly dissimilar movies is that the study finds they have, as expected, highly dissimilar audiences. If the study failed to distinguish 2001 from Pretty Woman, it wouldn’t be very useful.
     
    I get it. But, I doubt one can disagree that Agatha Christie readers are different from Irvin Shaw readers; or, at higher level, Sterne from Tolstoy.

    It is evident.

    What I fail to see is that my not liking of Agatha Christie reveals anything about my agreeableness, neuroticism or openness. Poor Agatha is simply boring, but even a small piece of Sherlock- not. Or even that Barbara Cartland production is virtually unreadable to any male reader.

    It just gives us what we knew already: men & women differ; tastes and culture are much important than big 5.
  99. @AKAHorace
    How much of the difference between men and women's taste in movies is down to personality differences ? So if you have a man and a woman who have similar scores on the "Big Five" will they have similar taste in movies ?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @theMann

    So if you have a man and a woman who have similar scores on the “Big Five” will they have similar taste in movies ?

    No. Education, taste, culture, refinement, erudition …I recall when I watcting the US 90s series Northern Exposure.

    Those, mostly educated people could not get the following: how Twin Peaks differs from Northern Exposure.

    Lynch and NE creators Brand & Falsey have virtually nothing in common. B & F are educated intellectuals who have been working in TV industry; Lynch is a genuine filmmaker with little “high & broad” education.

    B & F vision is, as far as the NE is concerned, Joseph Campbell put into TV show. They both had undergone Esalen Institute experience & they tried, in this series, to merge three different strands: visionary fantasy that owes, probably, something to Castaneda & similar authors; satirical-comical comments on American society (for instance, treatment of homosexuality & race); and wisdom married to high culture, having roots in Jung & Joseph Campbell.

    I’ve seen that show 2-3 times & can vouchsafe that there is nothing similar in the entire history of TV. Where else could you find readings from Dostoevsky, Joe Campbell, Shakespeare, Melville, …; references to Mrs. Sartre (Simone de Beauvoir); Indian shamans in training quoting St. John’s Epistle; experienced Native American shaman trying to locate white people’s Jungian Collective Unconscious; music from Mahler & small talk about Melville, French painter Ingres or Michelangelo in the Sistine chapel, Meister Eckhart etc.

    So, it has nothing to do with TP.

    TP, and I’ve seen just a part of it- so I am not too qualified to comment- seems to me a typically Lynchean surrealist experiment, superior in imaginative boldness. But- NE characters, even if we include all fantasy trips, are “real”. Most of characters’ dilemmas are convincing human experiences: envy, jealousy, love, aging, illness, snobbery, magnanimity, boredom, …. On the other hand, TP characters & situations are not “real”. They are interesting & frequently impressive, but the entire atmosphere is surrealist & ineluctably a fantasy. There is no high culture content in TP; Lynch’s work is that of a professional, master, but- he has no vision of life in TP. All supposed Evil is a surrealist play: villains are not villains, psychos are not psychos; victims are not victims.

    TP is an orgy of visual mastery combined with low-level plotting. But it is a play to enjoy, not something deeper to absorb.

    And people definitely differ in their temperament & world-view how would they rate NE to TP. But temperament would not be enough; you’ll have to put erudition, familiarity with cultural codes & knowledge of the Western culture.

    • Replies: @jamie b.
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Those, mostly educated people could not get the following: how Twin Peaks differs from Northern Exposure.

    Lynch and NE creators Brand & Falsey have virtually nothing in common.
     

    That the creators had nothing on common doesn't change the fact that NE was a rather obvious rip off of TP's superficial form (which NE more or less admitted).

    Replies: @Whiskey, @obwandiyag, @Bardon Kaldian

  100. For some good holiday reading, or even to put on some of your Christmas lists:

    Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television by Jerry Mander

    Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business by Neil Postman

    Both are old, perhaps, but both are right in the way truly right is always ageless.

    And about the OTHER THING:

    Ellen/Elliot Page is just replacing Harlan Ellison as the crabby, ugly, loud turd after she gets her hormones jacked up. Harlan is dead. I heard Ellen Page go on about what a jerk Trump was after the Smollet thing and I thought, who does that whiner sound like?

    Ellison’s replacement has entered the building. Since it never could act as “Ellen”, she/he can now fill in as grumpy chat show guest.

  101. @R.G. Camara
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Winona Ryder was apparently the world's greatest Manic Pixie Dream Girl eva.

    Johnny Depp, Matt Damon, and a host of other Hollywood celebs of the 1990s and early 2000s became little puppies to her, following her around till she broke their hearts. Johnny even got a tattoo with her name on it, he was so smitten, and had to famously alter it to "Wino Forever" after she broke up with him.

    I'm guessing she must've been extremely fantastic in bed, and, coupled with her girlish looks and Manic Pixie Dream Girl craziness, must've taken those insecure actor/singer boys for a wild ride until her BPD kicked in and she icily cut them out when she got bored.

    All the hipster Manic Pixie Dream Girl movies that came out later were basically pale imitations of Ryder.

    Winona having a child would've been awful. Munchausen by proxy likely would've occurred.

    Replies: @Abe, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Winona Ryder was apparently the world’s greatest Manic Pixie Dream Girl eva.

    Johnny Depp, Matt Damon, and a host of other Hollywood celebs of the 1990s and early 2000s became little puppies to her, following her around till she broke their hearts.

    Well said! I’d say the only actress to challenge her for (Dark/Emo) Pixie Dream Girl status would be Helena Bonham Carter. To her credit HBC appeared in a lot of top-shelf Merchant-Ivory productions back when there was an avalanche of those in the early 90’s- we watched HOWARD’S END recently and after it suddenly kicked in for me at the 40 minute mark, I was like- damn!, when did they stop making adult movies like this? Add to that edgy performances like in FIGHT CLUB, marriage to and bearing the demon-seed of ultimate Hollywood emo Tim Burton, and that’s quite the persona. Oh, and she’s the great-granddaughter of the man who led Britain into WWI (H.H. Asquith).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Abe

    Helena Bonham-Carter's famous grandmother, Viola Asquith, fell (jumped?) off a cliff after Winston Churchill announced he was marrying someone else. Fortunately, she bounced several times on the way down and was found unhurt on the beach below and lived to a grand agee. She was Churchill's closest female friend for the rest of their lives.

    Replies: @njguy73

  102. @Charles
    @slumber_j

    Thank you for referencing TLP. I had never heard of or seen that (I suppose now-defunct) blog. The Dove commercials entry was interesting in-and-of itself, plus there were the asides to "House of Games". Much of his stuff made for good reading, if now a bit dated, though it was only six or seven years ago.

    Replies: @Moral Stone, @slumber_j

    I’m sure it’s dated, but I think the writing and his central concerns both hold up very well. Glad you like it.

    • Replies: @Charles
    @slumber_j

    I always appreciate people who can lead me to something interesting to read; that's my main interest in The Unz.

  103. @J.Ross
    Hugh Hewitt currently confirming what I had feared, which is that, despite abundant election fraud proof in almost every reasonable sense of the word, there is no evidence in the law talker understanding, which apparently requires a voluntary signed confession from the guilty party. This means that, as with the decision to not indict Hillary Clinton, Democrats will be "not guilty" but the legal institution and its destroyers will be. The crisis of authority intensifies. Good thing Republicans did everything they could to help Democrats because now they'll all be thrown out and replaced with Chinese assets and Zuckerberg drones.

    Replies: @Catdog, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @anonymous

    Hugh is a pretty smart guy for a cuck, but this is all very simple.

    The Republican state legislatures in Georgia, PA, Michigan,and Wisconsin have to have the balls to say, “‘We’re not going to let you steal this election, so we’re sending a Trump slate of electors to the EC.”

    That’s it. It’s the only way out.

    Because they will steal the Georgia senate runoff too. They won’t stop. They are soulless and without conscience. And mail in ballots and compromised hackable voting machines will be the norm.

    Otherwise, it’s the Harris administration and an attempt to institute their long list of horribles that we know all too well.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    >legislatures have the balls

    I Want To Believe.
    [blurry photograph of a hubcap]

  104. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The point of comparing two highly dissimilar movies is that the study finds they have, as expected, highly dissimilar audiences. If the study failed to distinguish 2001 from Pretty Woman, it wouldn't be very useful.

    I move on later to somewhat less dissimilar movies like Citizen Kane versus It's a Wonderful Life, and Taxi Driver vs Rocky.

    I also looked at The Godfather vs. Goodfellas. Although the movies are different in style and era, their audiences are quite similar, so much so that it's hard to notice any difference in personalities. Interestingly, Godfather II might standout more from Godfather than does Goodfellas.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    The point of comparing two highly dissimilar movies is that the study finds they have, as expected, highly dissimilar audiences. If the study failed to distinguish 2001 from Pretty Woman, it wouldn’t be very useful.

    I get it. But, I doubt one can disagree that Agatha Christie readers are different from Irvin Shaw readers; or, at higher level, Sterne from Tolstoy.

    It is evident.

    What I fail to see is that my not liking of Agatha Christie reveals anything about my agreeableness, neuroticism or openness. Poor Agatha is simply boring, but even a small piece of Sherlock- not. Or even that Barbara Cartland production is virtually unreadable to any male reader.

    It just gives us what we knew already: men & women differ; tastes and culture are much important than big 5.

  105. @AKAHorace
    How much of the difference between men and women's taste in movies is down to personality differences ? So if you have a man and a woman who have similar scores on the "Big Five" will they have similar taste in movies ?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @theMann

    That is an excellent question!

    My guess is not even close, but I am curious to see an accurate answer.

  106. @Ray P
    @Bardon Kaldian

    You just gave a lot of the older guys reading this blog hope. God bless you sir.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Just don’t be disgustingly fat & try reliable sugar channels.

  107. @Almost Missouri

    this raises the question of whether Facebook “likes” translates directly to ticket sales.
     
    What about the reverse: whether ticket sales (seeing a movie) translates directly into real world action? (Speaking of "We Are What We Watch".)

    For instance, growing up around a certain demographic, I can vividly recall coming out of movie theaters that had just been showing, say, a kung fu movie, and—wouldn'tcha know it—kung fu fights immediately erupted on the street among exiting theater goers.

    "Heckuva coincidence, Brownie."

    I seem to recall that it is accepted lore in Hollywood that when Clark Gable appeared undershirt-less in It Happened One Night, that undershirt sales immediately fell across the country.

    But maybe this type of correlation magically doesn't apply to Hollywood's relentless antiwhite incitement. When antiwhite violence goes up, it's just a priori—a mystery, no one could have foreseen it, lone wolves, etc. ...

    Replies: @slumber_j, @YetAnotherAnon, @njguy73

    “E.T.” caused sales of Reese’s Pieces to skyrocket. “Splash” caused legions of parents to name their daughters “Madison.” And those are two examples off the top of my head.

  108. @AnotherDad
    @Altai

    Even in just a quickie scan of paragraph leads, she doesn't sound remotely like a guy.

    No idea who this BPD head case is--apparently an "actress".

    I'm a "nature" guy and a lot of flakey is baked in. But this girl needed better parents. More hard work. A spanking or two.

    We aren't adapted yet, and modern life enables all sorts of mental weakness. (I'm not as strong, touch as i should be.) But the feminine personality seems to be particularly ill-adapted, "loose", "flakey", without the base of the normal work in an agricultural society.

    If as a girl, she'd gotten up with the sun to milk the cows, collect some eggs, stoke the stove and start breakfast... i think she might well have been ok. Fit to marry at 22 or so and would have three or four or five kids now and be ... happy.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Altai, @Nathan

    For a “nature” guy, those are all nurture arguments. As a 50/50 guy, I think it’s important to remember that over time you get the nature that you nurture. That’s the theory of natural selection in broad strokes- the environment creates the traits that survive according to its own demands.

    Personally, I don’t think much modern flakery is baked in. Toss “Elliot” Paige on a desert island with a dude, and by years end there would probably be a natural pregnancy.

  109. @Abe
    @R.G. Camara


    Winona Ryder was apparently the world’s greatest Manic Pixie Dream Girl eva.

    Johnny Depp, Matt Damon, and a host of other Hollywood celebs of the 1990s and early 2000s became little puppies to her, following her around till she broke their hearts.
     

    Well said! I’d say the only actress to challenge her for (Dark/Emo) Pixie Dream Girl status would be Helena Bonham Carter. To her credit HBC appeared in a lot of top-shelf Merchant-Ivory productions back when there was an avalanche of those in the early 90’s- we watched HOWARD’S END recently and after it suddenly kicked in for me at the 40 minute mark, I was like- damn!, when did they stop making adult movies like this? Add to that edgy performances like in FIGHT CLUB, marriage to and bearing the demon-seed of ultimate Hollywood emo Tim Burton, and that’s quite the persona. Oh, and she’s the great-granddaughter of the man who led Britain into WWI (H.H. Asquith).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Helena Bonham-Carter’s famous grandmother, Viola Asquith, fell (jumped?) off a cliff after Winston Churchill announced he was marrying someone else. Fortunately, she bounced several times on the way down and was found unhurt on the beach below and lived to a grand agee. She was Churchill’s closest female friend for the rest of their lives.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @Steve Sailer

    And another of Asquith's great-granddaughters is Emma Clark, a landscape artist and Islamic convert.

  110. @Steve Sailer
    @Joe Stalin

    If you like 20th Century classical music in general, rather than, say, loving Richard Strauss and hating Philip Glass, you should give Koyaanisqatsi a try. Keep in mind that Koyaanisqatsi was revolutionary in 1983, but TV commercials quickly imitated a number of its gimmicks, such as fast and slow speed aerial shots of traffic and pedestrians at rush hour. So it may remind you of the kind of TV commercials that played on golf broadcasts around 1990 for high end corporate image advertising for consulting firms and the like.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @prosa123, @MEH 0910

    Public Service Messages from The New Mexico Civil Liberties Union (Godfrey Reggio)

    1970s, Reggio et al.

  111. @jb
    I'm puzzled by some of those statistics. 99% Openness for 2001? What does that mean? That if you average the Openness score of the people who liked 2001 you get 99%? That seems really implausible, since even a small number of low scorers would pull the average down significantly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @SunBakedSuburb

    “What does that mean?”

    It means Steve is using statistics to ruin movies.

    • LOL: TWS
  112. @James O'Meara
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "The producers and director had to know they were making the whole thing sexy."

    My favorite example is Kiss Me Deadly; the commie director (Robert Aldrich) and commie screenwriter hated Mike Hammer and Mickey Spillane, and wanted to "expose" them by making Hammer a sadistic dumbass who winds up setting off a nuke through sheer "he breaks the rules but gets results" idiocy.

    Instead, they made a film so sleazy and sadistic that the Catholic League gave it a "C" for Condemned rating for sleaze and sadism.

    It's actually a great film, arguably the last of the films noir. The screenwriter said that “I wrote it fast because I had contempt for it. It was automatic writing. Things were in the air and I put them in it.” That, to get back to your comment, is how such films wind up glorifying what they set out to condemn. The sleep of reason breeds monsters.

    https://counter-currents.com/2014/02/mike-hammer-occult-dick-kiss-me-deadly-as-lovecraftian-tale/

    Spillane did, in fact, hate the film, and scrapped up the money to make his own film, The Girl Hunters, in the UK, with location shots in NYC. Since no one could possibly play Hammer correctly, Spillane does it himself. Also starring Shirley Eaton, right before Goldfinger.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @dfordoom

    Ashes and Diamonds (if you only see one Polish film …) kind of does this: the Communist target is stodgy and boring, but in exactly the way that would be invisible to the type of guy the character is satirizing (in one scene he verbally lists various Communist battles as if writing aloud a composition on “struggle”), whereas his anti-Communist assassin (who may also be his son) is slick, wears Western sunglasses, and dies in a sort of Kurosawa-inspired sequence with bloodied laundry.

  113. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @J.Ross

    Hugh is a pretty smart guy for a cuck, but this is all very simple.

    The Republican state legislatures in Georgia, PA, Michigan,and Wisconsin have to have the balls to say, "'We're not going to let you steal this election, so we're sending a Trump slate of electors to the EC."

    That's it. It's the only way out.

    Because they will steal the Georgia senate runoff too. They won't stop. They are soulless and without conscience. And mail in ballots and compromised hackable voting machines will be the norm.

    Otherwise, it's the Harris administration and an attempt to institute their long list of horribles that we know all too well.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    >legislatures have the balls

    I Want To Believe.
    [blurry photograph of a hubcap]

  114. @Bardon Kaldian
    @TWS


    Tombstone is not real it’s good.
     
    Tombstone is good only in the sense "so bad it's actually good". It is ridiculous on every level & it has a bunch of hilarious scenes no one in his right mind can take seriously. Most classic, "canonical" westerns were, of course, stylized & not convincing as depiction of real life in the West for the modern public; just, the best of Ford, Hawkes etc. were acceptable as a representation of reality & were, by their creators, taken as, more or less, slightly modified narrative of some events. And this genre evolved, in its realism & artfulness over time, until is virtually vanished.

    Tombstone, on the other hand, is simply absurd. For instance, the chase scene with acrobatic shooting cannot be taken seriously. It is not whether it is historically accurate or not. It is just comically unreal.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IetGBX7Fv2Q

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @TWS

    “Tombstone … is simply absurd.”

    It’s a movie. An entertaining retelling of white man lore. It’s been watched and enjoyed by millions. Do you remember your last erection? Probably not.

    • LOL: TWS
  115. Patrick Swayze’s magnum opus, Road House, is so sublimely terrible that it is the greatest movie of all time:

    • Replies: @Feryl
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Roadhouse is too fun to be "bad". And everybody except Swayze seems to be in on the joke. It also is in the spirit of the rough sleaze fests of the 70's (constant fights and macho standoffs, gratuitous T & A, etc) which is often overlooked because of the 80's aesthetics.

    For some reason, certain people feel like every movie has be judged on artistic merit and cerebral heft rather than just appreciating a good low brow movie. Sam Elliott pulling up on a Harley and saying "the double douche" ought to clue you in.

    Replies: @Known Fact

  116. @R.G. Camara
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Winona Ryder was apparently the world's greatest Manic Pixie Dream Girl eva.

    Johnny Depp, Matt Damon, and a host of other Hollywood celebs of the 1990s and early 2000s became little puppies to her, following her around till she broke their hearts. Johnny even got a tattoo with her name on it, he was so smitten, and had to famously alter it to "Wino Forever" after she broke up with him.

    I'm guessing she must've been extremely fantastic in bed, and, coupled with her girlish looks and Manic Pixie Dream Girl craziness, must've taken those insecure actor/singer boys for a wild ride until her BPD kicked in and she icily cut them out when she got bored.

    All the hipster Manic Pixie Dream Girl movies that came out later were basically pale imitations of Ryder.

    Winona having a child would've been awful. Munchausen by proxy likely would've occurred.

    Replies: @Abe, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Manic Pixie Dream Girl

    Posted as a public service for those who don’t know the reference:

  117. @TelfoedJohn

    Winona Ryder movies are strong in Neuroticism, with the most neurotic movie of the 846 being her hot-chicks-in-a-mental-institution Girl, Interrupted with Angelina Jolie.
     
    It's amusing how 90% of mental health issues are rich girls following fads - social contagion. All the teen girls wanted to be depressed around the time of Prozac Nation. I read somewhere about a school where half the girls were experiencing 'gender dysphoria', and after school closure (because of the lockdown) all the symptoms disappeared.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @njguy73

    In the book “Prozac Nation” Elizabeth Wurtzel wrote about how as a depressed teen she identified with the music of Bruce Springsteen and how she wished to be a boy from New Jersey. If she had been birn a few decades later she’d be Elliot Wurtzel.

  118. @anon
    @AnotherDad

    Moving pictures bypass most of the critical “reality-check” skepticism we have toward people telling us stuff.

    That's because actual moving pictures do not exist. Video is a form of hypnosis. No reference handy but brain wave studies on people viewing older video showed there brain activity was closer to that of someone sleeping than someone awake. It has to do with the frame rate.

    Film movie projectors flash a series of still images on the screen, relying on the lag time of the retina / visual cortex to create the illusion of movement. Early movie projectors showed 28 frames per second, people with acute vision could actually see this. Television in the US projected 30 images per second, with interlacing to make it look like 60 frames per second.

    High def / high res video has much higher frame rates, but we still are looking at a series of still images flashed on our retinas quickly enough to give the illusion of movement. Movies even using HD projection equipment are even more conducive to semi-hypnotic states, due to the dim lighting, comfy chair, surround sound and controlled temperature.

    I'm not the first person to notice that modern video is a version of Plato's 'shadows on the cave wall', but it's worth pointing out.

    Video is hypnosis to varying degrees. Maybe shallow, maybe deep but always messing with the mind. It's worth noting that Millennials and especially genZ pretty much live on the phone, with the earbuds or Beats, continuously swimming in vid.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “Video is hypnosis to varying degrees.”

    That’s what Brian O’Blivion said before he dematerialized in 1983.

  119. Maybe I’m just too tough on movie fans. This atrocious scene- at the end of the movie, Wyatt comes to his beloved, a prostitute Josephine Marcus (actually, there was some truth in it- her modestly rich parents were the chief source of income for them, her being incurable gambling addict) and… they dance. At the snow. The fake Hollywood snow.

    Just, one commenter has written: No matter how many times I watch this movie, this scene always kills me. I wish I could find someone like Josie. I am the way Wyatt was then.. I have been divorced, I have been in bad relationships, In the end, there is no girl out there who will accept a man who has nothing to give. Who is disabled, who has a horrible past, and has nothing no dignity, no money, nothing to give. It simply will not happen.

    Who are we to interfere with other people’s drams?

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Interfering with people's drams can have severe consequences.

    Replies: @Cortes

  120. Apparently, some Gen Z still finds Ms. Ryder’s manic-pixism alluring. Also, Weezer. I get the feeling some of them are catching on how much has been lost. Sooner rather than later, youtube will have to pull down anything PW (pre-woke), not just really just because of the bad think, but because it captures a world that was objectively less sucky.

  121. @Bardon Kaldian
    I haven't seen most of the "newer" films; just, I wouldn't say this analysis makes much sense.

    For instance, other characteristics like generation, taste, education and mental maturity are more important than the big 5 traits in assessing the liking of a movie (by the way- do Poland, Lithuania & Russia belong to WEIRD?).

    Generation- most people from 15 to 30 years old didn't see any "classics", even American films. They don't know about movies made until, say, 1990.

    Taste- it comes with culture, knowledge etc. Or not.

    Education- which kind of education? Anyway, you can't expect average film goers to appreciate an ambitious film, Terrence Malick type.

    Sex/gender- no need to explicate.

    Also, it is not fair to compare Pretty Woman with 2001. The first one is easy to watch & understand; the other is barely understandable.

    I could write tons & tons about other Steve's comments, but I'll offer just one example: two movies about OK Corral, Wyatt Earp & Tombstone, 1993/1994. I've seen them both; also, I know history of these events.

    If you go to IMDB, you'll see that Tombstone has rating 7.8, while Costner's Wyatt Earp - 6.7. If we accept that "cinephiles" are those who rate those movies- well then, "cinephiles" are complete idiots.

    Wyatt Earp is an epic history film, sometimes slow-going, ca. 80% historically accurate. It is a good realist film, with some great acting, well paced, including a few memorable quotes & generally- "real".

    Tombstone is an absurdist idiocy, actually a screaming nonsense containing a few so ridiculous scenes that could fall into "so bad it is actually good" category. It has nothing to do with reality in any sense- historical, physical, mental, emotional,.... It can be enjoyed only as a parody of the genre, a deliberate effort to undermine any credibility of anything. Now, as an awful nonsense- it works. But, judging from reviews- most of the likes come from people who consider it to be "real". Which poses an interesting question: what "reality" actually means for so many people. What is real? What is convincing? What is acceptable as a representation of a historical event?

    So, if your cinephiles are, to such an extent- tasteless morons who can't distinguish fantasy from reality- what can be said of the Facebook crowd & their "likes"?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @TWS, @syonredux

    Eh. John Ford’s poetic and poignant MY DARLING CLEMENTINE is the best movie about the gunfight at the OK Corral, and it only loosely resembles the actual events.

    For that matter, Ford’s FORT APACHE also stands as the best treatment of the Custer legend.

    Art transcends historicity.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @syonredux

    "Eh. John Ford’s poetic and poignant MY DARLING CLEMENTINE is the best movie about the gunfight at the OK Corral, and it only loosely resembles the actual events."

    Thank you! I should have known someone would mention that movie and that someone would be you. Love it! Great cast--Victor Mature gets to act for a change, Alan Mowbray (a personal favorite) is marvelous as the washed-up Shakespearean and Walter Brennan is truly menacing. The cinematography is gorgeous. The showdown at the O.K. Corral is pure Ford and, I imagine, bears little if any resemblance to the actual event. Great example of the legend becoming fact.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @syonredux

    Ford's film is great; just, it is a classical western. Costner's, while done in different era, is not as emotional & is probably a lesser work of art. But, it satisfies different criteria for reliability, because tastes has changed, and the range of licentia poetica is not what it used to be.

    A film/book on well-known events- unlike about some legendary, nonhistorical or "exotic" topic needs to be treated differently now than 50 years ago to retain its impact. For instance, virtually all movies, American, British, Soviet.... about WW2 & Germans, filmed ca. 50-70 years ago, are, to a discerning public, a laughable cartoon propaganda simply because knowledge of these things has grown in the public consciousness & these films have, to a great extent, lost much of their value (never mind the level of professionalism they could have been made with). Criteria are higher & what was an achievement frequently becomes a schlock, just with the passage of time & growth of knowledge.

  122. @Bardon Kaldian
    @AKAHorace


    So if you have a man and a woman who have similar scores on the “Big Five” will they have similar taste in movies ?
     
    No. Education, taste, culture, refinement, erudition ...I recall when I watcting the US 90s series Northern Exposure.


    Those, mostly educated people could not get the following: how Twin Peaks differs from Northern Exposure.

    Lynch and NE creators Brand & Falsey have virtually nothing in common. B & F are educated intellectuals who have been working in TV industry; Lynch is a genuine filmmaker with little “high & broad” education.

    B & F vision is, as far as the NE is concerned, Joseph Campbell put into TV show. They both had undergone Esalen Institute experience & they tried, in this series, to merge three different strands: visionary fantasy that owes, probably, something to Castaneda & similar authors; satirical-comical comments on American society (for instance, treatment of homosexuality & race); and wisdom married to high culture, having roots in Jung & Joseph Campbell.

    I’ve seen that show 2-3 times & can vouchsafe that there is nothing similar in the entire history of TV. Where else could you find readings from Dostoevsky, Joe Campbell, Shakespeare, Melville, …; references to Mrs. Sartre (Simone de Beauvoir); Indian shamans in training quoting St. John’s Epistle; experienced Native American shaman trying to locate white people’s Jungian Collective Unconscious; music from Mahler & small talk about Melville, French painter Ingres or Michelangelo in the Sistine chapel, Meister Eckhart etc.

    So, it has nothing to do with TP.

    TP, and I’ve seen just a part of it- so I am not too qualified to comment- seems to me a typically Lynchean surrealist experiment, superior in imaginative boldness. But- NE characters, even if we include all fantasy trips, are “real”. Most of characters’ dilemmas are convincing human experiences: envy, jealousy, love, aging, illness, snobbery, magnanimity, boredom, …. On the other hand, TP characters & situations are not “real”. They are interesting & frequently impressive, but the entire atmosphere is surrealist & ineluctably a fantasy. There is no high culture content in TP; Lynch’s work is that of a professional, master, but- he has no vision of life in TP. All supposed Evil is a surrealist play: villains are not villains, psychos are not psychos; victims are not victims.

    TP is an orgy of visual mastery combined with low-level plotting. But it is a play to enjoy, not something deeper to absorb.

    And people definitely differ in their temperament & world-view how would they rate NE to TP. But temperament would not be enough; you'll have to put erudition, familiarity with cultural codes & knowledge of the Western culture.

    Replies: @jamie b.

    Those, mostly educated people could not get the following: how Twin Peaks differs from Northern Exposure.

    Lynch and NE creators Brand & Falsey have virtually nothing in common.

    That the creators had nothing on common doesn’t change the fact that NE was a rather obvious rip off of TP’s superficial form (which NE more or less admitted).

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @jamie b.

    I just keep thinking, how much more awesome it would have been for Stallone, Crenna, and Dennehy to re-create their characters in Twin Peaks as Rambo revisits the area and wreaks Rambo-esque havoc on Bad Bob and the various demons in Twin Peaks. With Crenna wise-cracking and Dennehy the man outmatched.

    Call it Rambo Peaks. It would have been awesome. There is no situation that can't be improved with Stallone. Imagine Friends with John Rambo (or Travis Bickle) next door. Seinfeld with Stallone as Kramer.

    Replies: @jamie b., @Ray P

    , @obwandiyag
    @jamie b.

    Both suck but Lynch always sucks worst.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @jamie b.

    Sure. In the same vein, Dostoevsky is a rip-off of Eugene Sue, and Marx of Hegel, Feuerbach & Hess.

    Replies: @jamie b.

  123. @songbird
    I feel like the 1947 film The Secret Life of Walter Mitty was an uncomfortably Jewish film. With some but not all of the humor being exclusively Jewish humor, without appeal to normal Americans.

    It kind of shows idealized American urban life before the Great Migration changed cities The department store scenes are very beautiful, even the hectic commute scenes have a sort of charm. And the houses are beautiful - but it doesn't seem like a very American movie, overall.

    Replies: @syonredux

    The film version of The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is rather meh. The miniaturist perfection of Thurber’s short story was lost amidst cinematic bloat. Perhaps more importantly, the film turns Mitty’s wife into his mother……

    We’re going through!” The Commander’s voice was like thin ice breaking. He wore his full-dress uniform, with the heavily braided white cap pulled down rakishly over one cold gray eye. “We can’t make it, sir. It’s spoiling for a hurricane, if you ask me.” “I’m not asking you, Lieutenant Berg,” said the Commander. “Throw on the power lights! Rev her up to 8,500! We’re going through!” The pounding of the cylinders increased: ta-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa. The Commander stared at the ice forming on the pilot window. He walked over and twisted a row of complicated dials. “Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!” he shouted. “Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!” repeated Lieutenant Berg. “Full strength in No. 3 turret!” shouted the Commander. “Full strength in No. 3 turret!” The crew, bending to their various tasks in the huge, hurtling eight-engined Navy hydroplane, looked at each other and grinned. “The Old Man’ll get us through,” they said to one another. “The Old Man ain’t afraid of Hell!” . . .

    “Not so fast! You’re driving too fast!” said Mrs. Mitty. “What are you driving so fast for?”

    “Hmm?” said Walter Mitty. He looked at his wife, in the seat beside him, with shocked astonishment. She seemed grossly unfamiliar, like a strange woman who had yelled at him in a crowd. “You were up to fifty-five,” she said. “You know I don’t like to go more than forty. You were up to fifty-five.” Walter Mitty drove on toward Waterbury in silence, the roaring of the SN202 through the worst storm in twenty years of Navy flying fading in the remote, intimate airways of his mind. “You’re tensed up again,” said Mrs. Mitty. “It’s one of your days. I wish you’d let Dr. Renshaw look you over.”

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1939/03/18/the-secret-life-of-walter-james-thurber

  124. @jamie b.
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Those, mostly educated people could not get the following: how Twin Peaks differs from Northern Exposure.

    Lynch and NE creators Brand & Falsey have virtually nothing in common.
     

    That the creators had nothing on common doesn't change the fact that NE was a rather obvious rip off of TP's superficial form (which NE more or less admitted).

    Replies: @Whiskey, @obwandiyag, @Bardon Kaldian

    I just keep thinking, how much more awesome it would have been for Stallone, Crenna, and Dennehy to re-create their characters in Twin Peaks as Rambo revisits the area and wreaks Rambo-esque havoc on Bad Bob and the various demons in Twin Peaks. With Crenna wise-cracking and Dennehy the man outmatched.

    Call it Rambo Peaks. It would have been awesome. There is no situation that can’t be improved with Stallone. Imagine Friends with John Rambo (or Travis Bickle) next door. Seinfeld with Stallone as Kramer.

    • LOL: TWS
    • Replies: @jamie b.
    @Whiskey

    Why are there no little old ladies in action movies? Something like Rambo would have been far more entertaining if played by eg. Clara Peller.

    Replies: @anon, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Ray P
    @Whiskey

    Much as this idea has its appeal, I quite liked Sheriff Harry Truman and his deputy Andy so no. Stallone in Friends could have played to type and appeared as a Manhattan art gallery proprietor or a painter. Phoebe could have been his masseuse or girlfriend.

  125. @Muggles
    @MEH 0910

    Odd that "Elliot's/Ellen's" wife is the butch looking one, but he/she is the one who now says she is a trans man.

    No plumbing work yet, I assume. Also no hormones or visible facial surgery.

    So how does this "trans" work then? Is she on a waiting list for the physical upgrades? Or just trying to pose as a feminine looking gay "male."

    You have to wonder how she can pass a psych evaluation like this. Though you can probably buy one from some quack.

    This is just another mental meltdown of some kind. And a tragedy in the making. Read about the suicide update in a year or two. Very sad. She has no idea of what being a man is all about.

    Naturally though, this "news" is lauded by all of the usual suspects.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    Ellen’s page continues to deadname her:

    https://ellen.page/

  126. @Muggles
    @MEH 0910

    Odd that "Elliot's/Ellen's" wife is the butch looking one, but he/she is the one who now says she is a trans man.

    No plumbing work yet, I assume. Also no hormones or visible facial surgery.

    So how does this "trans" work then? Is she on a waiting list for the physical upgrades? Or just trying to pose as a feminine looking gay "male."

    You have to wonder how she can pass a psych evaluation like this. Though you can probably buy one from some quack.

    This is just another mental meltdown of some kind. And a tragedy in the making. Read about the suicide update in a year or two. Very sad. She has no idea of what being a man is all about.

    Naturally though, this "news" is lauded by all of the usual suspects.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    Ellen’s page continues to deadname her:

    https://ellen.page/

  127. @Bardon Kaldian
    Maybe I'm just too tough on movie fans. This atrocious scene- at the end of the movie, Wyatt comes to his beloved, a prostitute Josephine Marcus (actually, there was some truth in it- her modestly rich parents were the chief source of income for them, her being incurable gambling addict) and... they dance. At the snow. The fake Hollywood snow.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpzLQ8Fg1CE

    Just, one commenter has written: No matter how many times I watch this movie, this scene always kills me. I wish I could find someone like Josie. I am the way Wyatt was then.. I have been divorced, I have been in bad relationships, In the end, there is no girl out there who will accept a man who has nothing to give. Who is disabled, who has a horrible past, and has nothing no dignity, no money, nothing to give. It simply will not happen.

    Who are we to interfere with other people's drams?

    Replies: @Ray P

    Interfering with people’s drams can have severe consequences.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Ray P

    Whiskey should’ve said that.

    Or

    Tread softly, for you tread on my drams.

  128. @Bardon Kaldian
    @TWS


    Tombstone is not real it’s good.
     
    Tombstone is good only in the sense "so bad it's actually good". It is ridiculous on every level & it has a bunch of hilarious scenes no one in his right mind can take seriously. Most classic, "canonical" westerns were, of course, stylized & not convincing as depiction of real life in the West for the modern public; just, the best of Ford, Hawkes etc. were acceptable as a representation of reality & were, by their creators, taken as, more or less, slightly modified narrative of some events. And this genre evolved, in its realism & artfulness over time, until is virtually vanished.

    Tombstone, on the other hand, is simply absurd. For instance, the chase scene with acrobatic shooting cannot be taken seriously. It is not whether it is historically accurate or not. It is just comically unreal.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IetGBX7Fv2Q

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @TWS

    Someday you’ll have to regal us with the story of how Kurt Russell hit on your wife or whatever he did to piss in your Wheaties.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @TWS

    It is long since established that inferior people -in a Confucian sense- take everything personally.

  129. @syonredux
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Eh. John Ford's poetic and poignant MY DARLING CLEMENTINE is the best movie about the gunfight at the OK Corral, and it only loosely resembles the actual events.

    For that matter, Ford's FORT APACHE also stands as the best treatment of the Custer legend.

    Art transcends historicity.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Bardon Kaldian

    “Eh. John Ford’s poetic and poignant MY DARLING CLEMENTINE is the best movie about the gunfight at the OK Corral, and it only loosely resembles the actual events.”

    Thank you! I should have known someone would mention that movie and that someone would be you. Love it! Great cast–Victor Mature gets to act for a change, Alan Mowbray (a personal favorite) is marvelous as the washed-up Shakespearean and Walter Brennan is truly menacing. The cinematography is gorgeous. The showdown at the O.K. Corral is pure Ford and, I imagine, bears little if any resemblance to the actual event. Great example of the legend becoming fact.

  130. @Ray P
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Interfering with people's drams can have severe consequences.

    Replies: @Cortes

    Whiskey should’ve said that.

    Or

    Tread softly, for you tread on my drams.

  131. @Steve Sailer
    @Abe

    Helena Bonham-Carter's famous grandmother, Viola Asquith, fell (jumped?) off a cliff after Winston Churchill announced he was marrying someone else. Fortunately, she bounced several times on the way down and was found unhurt on the beach below and lived to a grand agee. She was Churchill's closest female friend for the rest of their lives.

    Replies: @njguy73

    And another of Asquith’s great-granddaughters is Emma Clark, a landscape artist and Islamic convert.

  132. Anon[819] • Disclaimer says:

    In the Taki article you seem to think of the Big Five as the result of a cluster analysis, such as the statistical process that looks at genetic data and gives us three, five, or seven races, but not four or six.

    But it’s my impression that the Big Five emerged from a factor analysis, a completely different statistical process, which in this case is iteraratively applied to personality trait data (leadership, creativity, conformity, etc.) to come up with a minimum number of orthogonal factors (which are given five umbrella names depending on the traits they encompass). In other words, Big Five is a scientific result, like g, not a flexible socially defined result, like the number of races or planets or continents.

  133. @Whiskey
    @jamie b.

    I just keep thinking, how much more awesome it would have been for Stallone, Crenna, and Dennehy to re-create their characters in Twin Peaks as Rambo revisits the area and wreaks Rambo-esque havoc on Bad Bob and the various demons in Twin Peaks. With Crenna wise-cracking and Dennehy the man outmatched.

    Call it Rambo Peaks. It would have been awesome. There is no situation that can't be improved with Stallone. Imagine Friends with John Rambo (or Travis Bickle) next door. Seinfeld with Stallone as Kramer.

    Replies: @jamie b., @Ray P

    Why are there no little old ladies in action movies? Something like Rambo would have been far more entertaining if played by eg. Clara Peller.

    • Replies: @anon
    @jamie b.

    Why are there no little old ladies in action movies?

    Because it's not the 1970's anymore?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anmAvGrgzgQ

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @jamie b.


    Why are there no little old ladies in action movies?
     
    They don't look good in the nude?
  134. @theMann
    @ScarletNumber

    People who sit around watching TV all day are the definition of useless eaters.( FWIW, I got rid of cable years ago, and Netflix months ago. So I guess I am really looking forward to Season 5 of The Expanse. ) TV watching should be severely limited, or ended, as the shows are puerile and the advertisements filth.


    Film, in Hollywood anyway, goes out of its way to insult my sex, race, and religion so I am done with them as well. For now, there are always Asian Martial Arts movies.


    When a society has 10's of millions of utterly passive creatures expecting to be ""entertained" with no input or effort on their part, it is already circling the drain. Normal people read a book, join a club, learn to play music, go for walks, in short, live. Blobs watch TV and obsess over films. It is the difference between Civilization and Degeneracy.

    Replies: @Feryl

    Boomers having endless narcissistic arguments about the rock music of ther youth (much of ironically created by the Silent Generation) is what I find to be dreary and played out. Get over yourselves, people.

    Also, serialized entertainment sucks. It shouldn’t take 50 hours (or 200 comic book issues) to tell a story.

  135. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Patrick Swayze's magnum opus, Road House, is so sublimely terrible that it is the greatest movie of all time:

    https://youtu.be/SeKVwumCmBE

    Replies: @Feryl

    Roadhouse is too fun to be “bad”. And everybody except Swayze seems to be in on the joke. It also is in the spirit of the rough sleaze fests of the 70’s (constant fights and macho standoffs, gratuitous T & A, etc) which is often overlooked because of the 80’s aesthetics.

    For some reason, certain people feel like every movie has be judged on artistic merit and cerebral heft rather than just appreciating a good low brow movie. Sam Elliott pulling up on a Harley and saying “the double douche” ought to clue you in.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Feryl

    Sam Elliott is an interesting case study. As a young handsome normal-looking dude no actor was more colorless and boring, right there with, say, Chad Everett. How did he manage to craft this memorable persona?

  136. Fans of horror movies are perverts who get sexual kicks out of watching people eat people’s brains.

  137. @jamie b.
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Those, mostly educated people could not get the following: how Twin Peaks differs from Northern Exposure.

    Lynch and NE creators Brand & Falsey have virtually nothing in common.
     

    That the creators had nothing on common doesn't change the fact that NE was a rather obvious rip off of TP's superficial form (which NE more or less admitted).

    Replies: @Whiskey, @obwandiyag, @Bardon Kaldian

    Both suck but Lynch always sucks worst.

  138. @TWS
    @anonymous

    It's too big. The results too painful. He'll come at it sideways as always finding some angle he finds interesting but ultimately non-threatening to the status quo.

    Replies: @anonymous

    It’s really lame for Steve not to engage. Is there something more important current affairs wise going on in this world to us?

  139. @syonredux
    @Stan Adams


    Another favorite is Michael Mann’s Manhunter. “We don’t invent our natures; they’re issued to us along with our lungs and pancreas and everything else. Why fight it?”
     
    Manhunter is a sadly neglected film. Brian Cox's Lector (bored, lounging about) is infinitely superior to Anthony Hopkin's OTT version.

    Replies: @Feryl, @Stan Adams

    Manhunter is great, but it is VERY 80’s. A sort of feature length art house MTV video, with surprisingly low key acting, which is part of the reason the movie bombed. Peterson seems to be in a daze throughout the movie, the villians don’t raise their voices, etc. It’s an odd movie that gets better on repeat viewings. Silence of the lambs looks like a generic wannabe “edgy”early 90’s police procedural in comparison, though most the acting is quite good (Anthony Hopkins being the only exception, he chokes on the scenery).

  140. @J.Ross
    Hugh Hewitt currently confirming what I had feared, which is that, despite abundant election fraud proof in almost every reasonable sense of the word, there is no evidence in the law talker understanding, which apparently requires a voluntary signed confession from the guilty party. This means that, as with the decision to not indict Hillary Clinton, Democrats will be "not guilty" but the legal institution and its destroyers will be. The crisis of authority intensifies. Good thing Republicans did everything they could to help Democrats because now they'll all be thrown out and replaced with Chinese assets and Zuckerberg drones.

    Replies: @Catdog, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia, @anonymous

    despite abundant election fraud proof in almost every reasonable sense of the word

    If this were true then there would be massive civil disobedience. But something is obviously lacking for this to happen. People don’t truly believe the election was stolen.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @anonymous

    Why would there be massive civil disobedience? From the same people accepting the lockdown and the blue city riots? There should have been civil disobedience to stop out of control Democrat mayors and city councils eight months ago.

    , @JoeJoe
    @anonymous

    They don't WANT to believe! We were all indoctrinated in grade school about how democracy and elections are the most American thing ever. To face the reality that there is blatant vote fraud and corruption every election would disrupt the Matrix

  141. @slumber_j
    @Charles

    I'm sure it's dated, but I think the writing and his central concerns both hold up very well. Glad you like it.

    Replies: @Charles

    I always appreciate people who can lead me to something interesting to read; that’s my main interest in The Unz.

  142. @jamie b.
    @Whiskey

    Why are there no little old ladies in action movies? Something like Rambo would have been far more entertaining if played by eg. Clara Peller.

    Replies: @anon, @Reg Cæsar

    Why are there no little old ladies in action movies?

    Because it’s not the 1970’s anymore?

  143. @Moral Stone
    @Charles

    It’s really a great blog, although as you said a bit dated. It’s central theme, which I think is that ad men are so good at psychology that the messages they try to send can be analyzed to tell you about yourself and your place in society, is unique.

    I do however find it a bit at odds with say Steve’s stories about working in marketing where a lot of the value of ad spends is illusory, and most ad value is created by promoting new products as one might expect. Are ad men cunning manipulative psychonauts hacking our collective psyche, or huxters who flatter executives for ad dollars that don’t move the needle much? Or some combination thereof?

    Replies: @Charles

    His Dove commercials interpretation reminded me of the late Dr. Wilson Bryan Key and his theories of the use of subliminal imagery in print ads; his first book was published in or around 1971. I’ve read most or perhaps all of his books and have several. I don’t necessarily believe exactly what he believed, but the fact of the use of those techniques is really beyond reasonable doubt. Whether they work like he claimed is arguable, but their existence is not. Unfortunately his books tend to have titles like “Media Sexploitation”; that one was his second or third book and has outstanding analysis of then-current pop songs and basically an entire chapter on “The Exorcist” film. That book in particular can be had cheaply and would be of interest to any thinking person.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Charles


    ...the late Dr. Wilson Bryan Key and his theories of the use of subliminal imagery in print ads; his first book was published in or around 1971.
     
    Vance Packard did the same about 15 years earlier.


    Before that, there was this:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_of_Vipers

    Years later, the author's niece was a victim in these obsoletely-named crimes:


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Career_Girls_Murders
    , @njguy73
    @Charles

    Oh, yeah. Wilson Bryant Key. I read him. The guy who wrote that Camel cigarettes used that mascot because the hump represented a pregnant belly, and the ads subliminally suggested that if you smoke Camels you'll get your woman pregnant and prove your masculinity.

    And something about flashing "Drink Coca-Cola" during movies increases sales.

    Wasn't he debunked?

  144. Anonymous[162] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve Sailer:

    “It’s almost as if the nation’s more conservative personalities could have more influence over liberal institutions than they currently exercise.”

    Aha! And here we arrive at the crux of what you wanted to say, with all the preceeding paragraphs as nothing more than a buildup to this: you are upset that most elite insitutuons, that ultimately determine where the culture and politics go, are dominated by liberals, and that it would be mcuh easier to implement the conservative policies you want if those insitutions were controlled by conservatives.

    But you are forgetting something very important: intelligence and intellectual inclination. Elites tend to be more intelligent and intellectually inclined than the average person, and liberals tend to be more intelligent and also more intellectually inclined than social conservatives. So therefore, liberals will be inevitably overrepresented among elites.

    All the evidence that we have from IQ, tests, professional occupation and income, is that liberals tend to be more intelligent, more educated and to earn more than social conservatives. If you don’t believe me, just check the statistics for education and income, and you’ll see that, the more you climb the social and economic ladder, the more and more liberal it becomes. The upper-middle and upper classes tend to be liberal. while the lower and lower-middle classes tend to be more conservative.

    You claim that conservative jocks climb the managerial ladder higher than those kale-eating liberal dweebs you despise. That might be true for some specific individuals in certain types of businesses like retail, construction and to a minor degree in Wall Street. But the truly rich people, the super-rich people, tend to almost invariably be liberal. Both Bill Gates and Warren Buffet are huge Democrat supporters. Sillicon Valley CEOs are mostly liberals as well. Academia and doctored professors tend to be liberals, too. For every conservative(or at least not extremely liberal) jock that made it to the top in business like Jack Welsh, you have 100 liberal dweebs and nerds that you despise, with their pro-gay, pro-feminist, cosmopolitan, pro-immigration views. And what is impressive is that those top corporate dogs are even MORE liberal than that. Because the Conservative Party actually gives tax breaks to the super-rich, but they hate conservatism so much that they still prefer to be overtaxed by the Democrats than to pay lower taxes in a conservative society. Think about that.

    The problem that conservatives have in breaking into the elite ranks is is that being elite correlates very strongly with intelligence, and intelligence correlates very strongly with empathy. *That* is the fundamental problem for conservatives, and why elites will always be liberal. A requirement for reaching the level of elite is to be very intelligent, and very intelligent people tend to be more empathetic, so they naturally are more liberal. Elites find sexism, racism and excessive xenophobia and nationalism deplorable. They tend to be civilized people, and they don’t like it. Just look at a skinhead rally yelling insult at immigrants. Most tend to be working-class, violent people that you most likely won’t meet at the concert hall during a Beethoven concerto. Intelligent people deplore discrimination, especially based on things that one lacks volitional control over, like the race that you are born into, or the nation that you were born in, or the gender that you were born, or your sexuality. It strikes them as cruel and unfair to restrict a person’s pursuit of happiness based on these biased, anachronistic and innate traits one cannot control. Hence, liberal views.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @Anonymous

    Other than the obviously far-higher levels of intelligence, writing ability, and education that are exhibited in this comment by Anonymous[162], its content sounds remarkably like our old friend Tiny Duck. No complaints, though, for even a troll* as obvious and (affectedly) lowbrow as the charmingly diminutive, beloved decoy can provide some welcome comic relief, if nothing else. And there is something else. For any position that cannot withstand a challenge as weak as those found within this Tiny Duck-like comment that I am replying-to here, is a very weak position indeed. With that preface, I shall proceed to my detailed rebuttal.
    (*as distinct from a shill)


    All the evidence that we have from IQ, tests, professional occupation and income, is that liberals tend to be more intelligent, more educated and to earn more than social conservatives.
     
    Re: Intelligence and Education:

    Both are at least as likely to pervert (the mind, and especially the conscience, on the individual level; society and its institutions on the collective level) and be used for ill, as they are to enlighten (in a benign, positive sense), refine, and be utilized toward good. The more intelligent and educated the man, the more potentially dangerous[1]

    Re: Income, wealth and "earning":

    These are distinct from and do not necessarily align with inherent value and worth. Anything limited to the material; the physical; the carnal; to our mortal existence, cannot transcend it and therefore cannot, ultimately, be other than ephemeral.

    they hate conservatism so much that they still prefer to be overtaxed by the Democrats than to pay lower taxes in a conservative society.
     
    Firstly, how often do the advantages that a socially conservative candidate offers to a wealthy individual in the area of tax policy clearly outweigh all of the concrete and considerable advantages that he is currently enjoying from the continued importation of what is essentially near-slave-labor from the third-world?

    Secondly, have you considered all of the other advantages that expressing support for "pro-gay, pro-feminist, cosmopolitan, pro-immigration views" offers wealthy elites? Or, perhaps more to the point, the consequences suffered by those who dare to express any criticism of said views (or of any group or individual member thereof for whom said views afford protected victim status)?

    Thirdly and finally, is there a not a vast discrepancy between the de jure tax rates at any given time (whatever they may be), and the far-lower de facto rates that the wealthiest individuals and corporations inevitably manage to get away with paying?

    very intelligent people tend to be more empathetic, so they naturally are more liberal.
     
    Is empathy really the primary motivation for most of the individuals-in-question here? Do you not find any number of self-serving, aesthetic motivations at least as plausible? Motivations, primarily, related to achieving and maintaining social status? The desire to feel righteous, and superior to others; virtue-signaling?

    Elites find sexism, racism and excessive xenophobia and nationalism deplorable.
     
    Excessive xenophobia? Is xenophobia ever, in any form or to any degree, less-than deplorable?!

    And haven't you made at least one rather conspicuous omission there? (Homophobia [sic], at least, you did go on to cover just a little farther down...[2])

    Just look at a skinhead rally yelling insult at immigrants. Most tend to be working-class, violent people that you most likely won’t meet at the concert hall during a Beethoven concerto.
     
    Well, I suppose I have to grant you that much. I mean, just look at all the rioting, looting, arson and other violence we've been seeing from all those skinheads and other MAGA types since the election that their Führer, like the totalitarian fascist he is, still refuses to concede. If only all protesters could be as peaceful and loving as those of the BLM and ANTIFA variety.

    Intelligent people deplore discrimination, especially based on things that one lacks volitional control over, like the race that you are born into,
     
    1.) Except when directed against whites, right?

    2.) Ignoring key racial realities in areas such as crime, intelligence and educational ability, or ascribing them to the malice of whites, helps no one-- least of all blacks and other nonwhites. Consider, for example, the Ferguson Effect and similar. Or under/unqualified affirmative action hires, be they physicians or other medical personnel, police, firefighters, lawyers, etc. Who do you think, ultimately, are the most harmed by such lowering of standards?

    3.) Where, if I may be so bold as to inquire, do you reside? Surely, if you are white, you would want to help diversify a predominately nonwhite neighborhood by gracing it with your presence. And if you have any school-age children, they must surely be enrolled in a school for which their mere presence would similarly diversify and desegregate.

    or the nation that you were born in,
     
    1.) Why is it only white countries who are demanded to open their borders to any and all?

    2.) Do you keep the doors to your home wide open, inviting anyone who may ever wish to come into it, to do so? To stay indefinitely?

    or the gender that you were born
     
    No one can be born as any gender, as it is but a linguistic construct. The vast, overwhelmingly majority of people are born as one of two clearly distinct sexes: male or female. There are, tragically, a certain number of individuals born inter-sexed or whose of indeterminate sex. Thankfully, these have never amounted-to more than a tiny fraction of the total number of individuals born or alive at any given moment.

    The overwhelming majority of those called transgender are individuals who are either unable or unwilling to accept objective reality. Such individuals have always existed. But whether a man is convinced he is a woman, or that he is Napoleon, Elvis, or a turtle, the sane and humane approach is not to indulge the delusions of the afflicted individual. Certainly not to any point of facilitating, much less directly inflicting drastic, irreversible harm. There is, perhaps, a libertarian argument that could be made for permitting an adult to make an informed choice to indulge his delusions or fantasies to such an extreme. But to allow a young, immature, confused child to make such a decision-- one with such severe, even irreversible consequences?! A decision that the child will, in all likelihood, grow-up to deeply regret and experience misery as a result of?!

    , or your sexuality. It strikes them as cruel and unfair to restrict a person’s pursuit of happiness based on these biased, anachronistic and innate traits one cannot control.
     
    Here you completely conflate involuntary feelings with voluntary behavior. And parrot the assertions-- key tenets of LGBTQ doctrine-- that (a) homoeroticism is always, without exception, both innate as well as immutable; (b) that only through embracing and fully indulging them can an individual with exclusively homoerotic sexual proclivities achieve fulfillment or happiness.

    These assertions are neither proven nor harmless. And, yet again, guess who the harm the most?

    For further elaboration on this topic, including an outline for a comprehensive, humane response to individuals afflicted with exclusive same-sex attraction, the interested reader is referred to this comment of mine from October.

    NOTES
    [1] The greater one's intelligence and knowledge, the greater one's ability to pursue one's basest, darkest, most destructive and least redeeming instincts, lusts and desires with the most efficacy and efficiency.

    Even more pernicious than that, though, is the ability to rationalize and justify said impulses and drives (sometimes deluding only oneself, more often deluding only others, and perhaps most often doing some mixture of both). The ability to couch practically any and all manner of weakness, vice, depravity, villainy, degeneracy, predation and iniquity in expediently moralistic, self-righteous terms.

    And thereby to not merely indulge in what remains wholly unjust, unjustified, reprehensible and utterly reprobate, but also to advance, promote and indoctrinate , recruit, condition and initiate others into it--i.e., into any one of what are, at best, countless ultimate dead-ends, at worst, descents into the abyss. It is this-- the ability to concoct compelling illusions of moral inversion and to then successfully leverage them in selling vice as virtue--- that makes the highly intelligent and knowledgeable man most dangerous and destructive; most insidious.
  145. @TWS
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Someday you'll have to regal us with the story of how Kurt Russell hit on your wife or whatever he did to piss in your Wheaties.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    It is long since established that inferior people -in a Confucian sense- take everything personally.

  146. Are We What We Watch?

    Are we what we are allowed to watch?

    Praveen Mohan makes popular videos about subcontinental archaeology. Facebook banned him in August. YouTube is demonetizing him now. (BTW, Kindle Fire doesn’t recognize the word demonetizing.)

    “Mohan” is a common name in Nepal. I wonder if there is some H-1b Indo-clique in SiliKKKon Valley targeting him. He discovered that his censors at YouTube were not automated, but “human beings”.

    He doesn’t say, and may not know, what kind of human beings. Another example of Old World rivalries transported to the New?

    IMDb: Praveen Mohan biography

    Facebook BANS me – How Social Media Suppresses Truth | Praveen Mohan

    Praveen Mohan – This is my second Twitter account as my first one was deleted without any reason. I explore ancient sites and post my findings on YouTube.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/IamPraveenMohan/status/1333769628795817985

  147. @syonredux
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Eh. John Ford's poetic and poignant MY DARLING CLEMENTINE is the best movie about the gunfight at the OK Corral, and it only loosely resembles the actual events.

    For that matter, Ford's FORT APACHE also stands as the best treatment of the Custer legend.

    Art transcends historicity.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Bardon Kaldian

    Ford’s film is great; just, it is a classical western. Costner’s, while done in different era, is not as emotional & is probably a lesser work of art. But, it satisfies different criteria for reliability, because tastes has changed, and the range of licentia poetica is not what it used to be.

    A film/book on well-known events- unlike about some legendary, nonhistorical or “exotic” topic needs to be treated differently now than 50 years ago to retain its impact. For instance, virtually all movies, American, British, Soviet…. about WW2 & Germans, filmed ca. 50-70 years ago, are, to a discerning public, a laughable cartoon propaganda simply because knowledge of these things has grown in the public consciousness & these films have, to a great extent, lost much of their value (never mind the level of professionalism they could have been made with). Criteria are higher & what was an achievement frequently becomes a schlock, just with the passage of time & growth of knowledge.

  148. @Charles
    @Moral Stone

    His Dove commercials interpretation reminded me of the late Dr. Wilson Bryan Key and his theories of the use of subliminal imagery in print ads; his first book was published in or around 1971. I've read most or perhaps all of his books and have several. I don't necessarily believe exactly what he believed, but the fact of the use of those techniques is really beyond reasonable doubt. Whether they work like he claimed is arguable, but their existence is not. Unfortunately his books tend to have titles like "Media Sexploitation"; that one was his second or third book and has outstanding analysis of then-current pop songs and basically an entire chapter on "The Exorcist" film. That book in particular can be had cheaply and would be of interest to any thinking person.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @njguy73

    …the late Dr. Wilson Bryan Key and his theories of the use of subliminal imagery in print ads; his first book was published in or around 1971.

    Vance Packard did the same about 15 years earlier.

    Before that, there was this:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_of_Vipers

    Years later, the author’s niece was a victim in these obsoletely-named crimes:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Career_Girls_Murders

  149. @jamie b.
    @Whiskey

    Why are there no little old ladies in action movies? Something like Rambo would have been far more entertaining if played by eg. Clara Peller.

    Replies: @anon, @Reg Cæsar

    Why are there no little old ladies in action movies?

    They don’t look good in the nude?

  150. @Buzz Mohawk
    @R.G. Camara

    I watch very few movies and TV shows, so I am not like the critics to whom you refer. Maybe I just get tired of a formula after seeing it repeated once -- or more likely I just can't stand it when it is so comic-book fantastic and pointlessly unreal.

    Honestly, what is the point of the Mission Impossible movies? They are an adaptation of a TV show I liked when I was a boy, and that's it.

    Unlike the critics, I'm not telling anyone else what to like. I'm glad my wife enjoys these things, and I am very good-natured when I watch with her. I think most good husbands are.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Ozymandias

    Maybe I just get tired of a formula after seeing it repeated once

    Try to name a movie that doesn’t follow the three act structure.

  151. @AnotherDad

    Are We What We Watch?
     
    Just seeing the headline--i guess the state of mind i was in--i thought you were going somewhere else.

    I think the current crisis in the West simply would not exist without Hollyweird. Movies and TV allowed minoritarians to inject their lies directly in people's heads.

    Moving pictures bypass most of the critical "reality-check" skepticism we have toward people telling us stuff. People "see" it and process it as "observed reality" rather than "someone told me". So people tend to believe it's real, "how things are".

    If this technology had never been developed, minoritarians could never have created their false reality inside the brains of so many people in the West, white peoples' reality would still be what we actually experience, and we would not be in our present crisis.

    Replies: @anon, @dfordoom

    Moving pictures bypass most of the critical “reality-check” skepticism we have toward people telling us stuff. People “see” it and process it as “observed reality” rather than “someone told me”. So people tend to believe it’s real, “how things are”.

    Yes. And it works to a certain extent even on people who are aware of it. We just can’t help believing things that we’ve seen with our own eyes.

    It’s not just that movies are regarded as reality. Movies are more real than reality. Because they make things more emotionally intense and more dramatic. Something you saw in a movie is much more real than something you read in a history book.

    • Agree: Dissident
  152. @James O'Meara
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "The producers and director had to know they were making the whole thing sexy."

    My favorite example is Kiss Me Deadly; the commie director (Robert Aldrich) and commie screenwriter hated Mike Hammer and Mickey Spillane, and wanted to "expose" them by making Hammer a sadistic dumbass who winds up setting off a nuke through sheer "he breaks the rules but gets results" idiocy.

    Instead, they made a film so sleazy and sadistic that the Catholic League gave it a "C" for Condemned rating for sleaze and sadism.

    It's actually a great film, arguably the last of the films noir. The screenwriter said that “I wrote it fast because I had contempt for it. It was automatic writing. Things were in the air and I put them in it.” That, to get back to your comment, is how such films wind up glorifying what they set out to condemn. The sleep of reason breeds monsters.

    https://counter-currents.com/2014/02/mike-hammer-occult-dick-kiss-me-deadly-as-lovecraftian-tale/

    Spillane did, in fact, hate the film, and scrapped up the money to make his own film, The Girl Hunters, in the UK, with location shots in NYC. Since no one could possibly play Hammer correctly, Spillane does it himself. Also starring Shirley Eaton, right before Goldfinger.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @dfordoom

    Spillane did, in fact, hate the film, and scrapped up the money to make his own film, The Girl Hunters, in the UK, with location shots in NYC. Since no one could possibly play Hammer correctly, Spillane does it himself. Also starring Shirley Eaton, right before Goldfinger.

    The Girl Hunters is a good movie. Worth seeing and if you’re a Mike Hammer fan I’d even go so far as to say it’s a must-see.

    Spillane wasn’t the world’s greatest actor but he sure as hell knew how to play Mike Hammer. And as an actor he’s quite competent.

    Spillane also has an acting role in the very underrated John Wayne-produced circus mystery Ring of Fear (he plays a crime writer named Mickey Spillane). He was also a Columbo guest star.

    Oddly enough the other actor who played Mike Hammer extremely well was Darren McGavin in the excellent late 50s Mike Hammer TV series. For late 50s American TV it’s extraordinarily violent and hardboiled. There are some unexpected moments of gratuitous brutality by Hammer – if you have the bad guy down on the ground the smart thing is to put the boot in. If the bad guy doesn’t loo0k like he’s going to get up, put the boot in anyway.

  153. I wonder if fans of “Girl, Interrupted” have a higher age-and-sex-adjusted suicide rate than other women. Having a low A high N combo is a major risk factor for suicide.

  154. @MEH 0910
    @Altai

    https://twitter.com/PageSix/status/1333844530437779456


    In June 2019, the couple proudly showed their love for one another by posing topless together while kissing for a Pride Month photoshoot.
     
    https://twitter.com/PageSix/status/1333895829535526915

    Replies: @Muggles, @Rob McX

    In June 2019, the couple proudly showed their love for one another by posing topless together while kissing for a Pride Month photoshoot.

    Thus extending their fan base to millions of pasty-faced housebound onanists.

  155. @Steve Sailer
    @Stan Adams

    The screenwriter of "Heathers" went on to write "Demolition Man" for Stallone, Bullock, and Snipes, one of the better dystopian satires.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    Yet another one of my favorite movies. “What seems to be your boggle?”

    Daniel Waters is one of only two screenwriters who have received multiple Razzie awards. He wrote two of the biggest flops of the early ’90s (The Adventures of Ford Fairlane and Hudson Hawk).

  156. @syonredux
    @Stan Adams


    Another favorite is Michael Mann’s Manhunter. “We don’t invent our natures; they’re issued to us along with our lungs and pancreas and everything else. Why fight it?”
     
    Manhunter is a sadly neglected film. Brian Cox's Lector (bored, lounging about) is infinitely superior to Anthony Hopkin's OTT version.

    Replies: @Feryl, @Stan Adams

    Red Dragon was a slog, in no small part due to Hopkins’ hammy performance.

  157. @jamie b.
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Those, mostly educated people could not get the following: how Twin Peaks differs from Northern Exposure.

    Lynch and NE creators Brand & Falsey have virtually nothing in common.
     

    That the creators had nothing on common doesn't change the fact that NE was a rather obvious rip off of TP's superficial form (which NE more or less admitted).

    Replies: @Whiskey, @obwandiyag, @Bardon Kaldian

    Sure. In the same vein, Dostoevsky is a rip-off of Eugene Sue, and Marx of Hegel, Feuerbach & Hess.

    • Replies: @jamie b.
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Did one of these writers lift an entirely idiosyncratic premise and setting from another? If not, then the comparison is no more apt than when you compared entire genres. (And who would argue that Marx is not derived from Hegel?)

    Again: A somewhat humorous account of a displaced big city character who finds himself surrounded by quirky people in a small Northwest town with a vaguely supernatural background.

    There's no possible way that that resemblance was the result of a conscious decision, least of all when the writers basically admitted as much?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  158. @slumber_j
    @Almost Missouri

    It's pre-coffee early in here, but in my mind the whole thing devolves into a chicken/egg problem: as The Last Psychiatrist was fond of saying, "If you're watching it, it's for you."

    A favorite example about soap advertising below the fold:


    That Dove wants you to think of it as the authority on beauty so it can sell you stuff makes sense, there's nothing underhanded about it and hardly worth the exposition. The question is, why do they think this will work? What do they know about us that makes them think we want an authority on beauty-- especially in an age where we loudly proclaim that we don't want an authority on beauty, we don't like authorities of any kind, we resist and resent being told what's beautiful (or good or moral or worthwhile) and what's not?

    You may feel your brain start trying to piece this together, but you should stop, there's a twist: where did you see this ad? It wasn't during an episode of The Mentalist on the assumption that you're a 55 year old woman whose husband is "working late." In fact... it's not even playing anywhere. You didn't stumble on it, you were sent to it, it was sent to you-- it was selected for you to see. How did they know? Because if you're watching it, it's for you.
     

    https://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2013/05/dove.html

    Replies: @Guest007, @Charles, @Almost Missouri

    Some say “chicken”, Ken Burns says “egg”.

    After Ken Burns’s Civil War documentary, Civil War battlefields had a large and sustained increase in visitors. After his National Parks documentary, there was a large and sustained increase in National Park attendance. It defies plausibility to believe that all those people were going to go there anyway when Burns’ docs just happened to come out.

    I’m not especially a Ken Burns fan, but I mention him because he likes to talk about himself, and there was a PBS interview with him (can’t find on YouTube, sorry) where he wrestles with the question you raise in his open if slightly solipsistic way. He professes to be unsure of whether he is leader or led, but there’s no denying his films have generated real world actions, and more or less the ones intended by the filmmaker.

  159. @syonredux
    Matty Yglesias is very careful when it comes to picking images of White billionaires....


    https://twitter.com/mattyglesias/status/1334099401128759299

    Replies: @Dissident

    Matty Yglesias is very careful when it comes to picking images of White billionaires….

    The three individuals pictured– Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk, and Bill Gates– match the three that are top-ranked on Wikipedia’s List of Americans by net worth (As of this writing at least.)
    Is it not entirely plausible and even likely that was the basis for the choice in Yglesias’s graphic?

    The above-linked Wikipedia list, however, cites as its source The Forbes 400: The Definitive Ranking Of The Wealthiest Americans In 2020, where, as of this writing at least, the ranking is different:
    Jeff Bezos is ranked #1, followed by Bill Gates at #2, Mark Zuckerberg at #3, Warren Buffett at #4; #5 is Larry Ellison; #6 is Steve Ballmer; and Elon Musk is #7.

    What accounts for the discrepancy? At least several possible explanations readily come to mind, none of them involving bad faith, seem entirely plausible.

  160. @Whiskey
    @jamie b.

    I just keep thinking, how much more awesome it would have been for Stallone, Crenna, and Dennehy to re-create their characters in Twin Peaks as Rambo revisits the area and wreaks Rambo-esque havoc on Bad Bob and the various demons in Twin Peaks. With Crenna wise-cracking and Dennehy the man outmatched.

    Call it Rambo Peaks. It would have been awesome. There is no situation that can't be improved with Stallone. Imagine Friends with John Rambo (or Travis Bickle) next door. Seinfeld with Stallone as Kramer.

    Replies: @jamie b., @Ray P

    Much as this idea has its appeal, I quite liked Sheriff Harry Truman and his deputy Andy so no. Stallone in Friends could have played to type and appeared as a Manhattan art gallery proprietor or a painter. Phoebe could have been his masseuse or girlfriend.

  161. @Feryl
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Roadhouse is too fun to be "bad". And everybody except Swayze seems to be in on the joke. It also is in the spirit of the rough sleaze fests of the 70's (constant fights and macho standoffs, gratuitous T & A, etc) which is often overlooked because of the 80's aesthetics.

    For some reason, certain people feel like every movie has be judged on artistic merit and cerebral heft rather than just appreciating a good low brow movie. Sam Elliott pulling up on a Harley and saying "the double douche" ought to clue you in.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    Sam Elliott is an interesting case study. As a young handsome normal-looking dude no actor was more colorless and boring, right there with, say, Chad Everett. How did he manage to craft this memorable persona?

  162. @anonymous
    @J.Ross


    despite abundant election fraud proof in almost every reasonable sense of the word
     
    If this were true then there would be massive civil disobedience. But something is obviously lacking for this to happen. People don't truly believe the election was stolen.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @JoeJoe

    Why would there be massive civil disobedience? From the same people accepting the lockdown and the blue city riots? There should have been civil disobedience to stop out of control Democrat mayors and city councils eight months ago.

  163. @anonymous
    @J.Ross


    despite abundant election fraud proof in almost every reasonable sense of the word
     
    If this were true then there would be massive civil disobedience. But something is obviously lacking for this to happen. People don't truly believe the election was stolen.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @JoeJoe

    They don’t WANT to believe! We were all indoctrinated in grade school about how democracy and elections are the most American thing ever. To face the reality that there is blatant vote fraud and corruption every election would disrupt the Matrix

  164. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    Winona Ryder is of course the poster child for the ditzy neurotically crazed modern female. Drugs, shoplifting, wrestling with the Jewish thing while being a hot female -- it's a positive cornucopia of warped mental agony and craziness that makes it easy and convincing to act to type.

    Approaching 50, and childless. Some girls need to have kids, if only to put a clamp on their mental derangement.

    Rumors floated around that at one point she dated the now cancelled alt-country singer songwriter Ryan Adams, another victim of the #metoo movement, though he also has significant neurotic issues as well. Birds of a feather.

    Anyway he wrote this great song, "Harder Now That It's Over" which is supposedly about Winona, with the great line, "You're free...free with a history." This raw live version captures the essence nicely.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @R.G. Camara, @njguy73

    Read about Ryder’s upbringing. It was unconventional to say the least.

    And no, I was not obsessed with her back in the day. I didn’t watch every movie she was in, and I certainly didn’t have her Rolling Stone cover pinned to my dorm wall.

    Not me. No way.

  165. Maybe boys never really grow up. After all, don’t many of us have a bit of Walter Mitty inside us, that wants to be the James Bond driving fast cars and bedding hot women?
    Wonder what the gender distribution of the “Mission Impossible” and Bond franchises is.

  166. @Charles
    @Moral Stone

    His Dove commercials interpretation reminded me of the late Dr. Wilson Bryan Key and his theories of the use of subliminal imagery in print ads; his first book was published in or around 1971. I've read most or perhaps all of his books and have several. I don't necessarily believe exactly what he believed, but the fact of the use of those techniques is really beyond reasonable doubt. Whether they work like he claimed is arguable, but their existence is not. Unfortunately his books tend to have titles like "Media Sexploitation"; that one was his second or third book and has outstanding analysis of then-current pop songs and basically an entire chapter on "The Exorcist" film. That book in particular can be had cheaply and would be of interest to any thinking person.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @njguy73

    Oh, yeah. Wilson Bryant Key. I read him. The guy who wrote that Camel cigarettes used that mascot because the hump represented a pregnant belly, and the ads subliminally suggested that if you smoke Camels you’ll get your woman pregnant and prove your masculinity.

    And something about flashing “Drink Coca-Cola” during movies increases sales.

    Wasn’t he debunked?

  167. @Bardon Kaldian
    @jamie b.

    Sure. In the same vein, Dostoevsky is a rip-off of Eugene Sue, and Marx of Hegel, Feuerbach & Hess.

    Replies: @jamie b.

    Did one of these writers lift an entirely idiosyncratic premise and setting from another? If not, then the comparison is no more apt than when you compared entire genres. (And who would argue that Marx is not derived from Hegel?)

    Again: A somewhat humorous account of a displaced big city character who finds himself surrounded by quirky people in a small Northwest town with a vaguely supernatural background.

    There’s no possible way that that resemblance was the result of a conscious decision, least of all when the writers basically admitted as much?

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @jamie b.

    You got a much better analogy in a movie Doc Hollywood.

    Replies: @jamie b.

  168. @R.G. Camara
    People usually like the movies that reflect their world view, unless the movie has become a "classic" and/or the people feel socially pressured to like it.

    As I stated previously , I was far too jumpy and easily grossed out for horror movies, but a film major girlfriend and the Scream franchise flotsom and jetsom commentaries about final girl and the slasher formula helped to put pressure on me to watch a bunch and break them down and enjoy them on some level, which I wouldn't have done otherwise.

    I'm sure back in the 80s tons of jocks hated things like The Karate Kid or Sixteen Candles, but social pressure these days means most jocks today will claim those films are great.

    As for Tom Cruise in particular:

    I think Tom Cruise works very, very hard to make sure his movies appeal to the most people, which is why we're here nearly 40 years after he first hit the big screen and his movies are still among the top grossing films of the year and he's still a leading man megastar. Ask Douglas Fairbanks or Cary Grant or any other once-huge Hollywood male star who ended up second rate by the end of their career about that.

    In short, Cruise's plan works. I've never not been excited by a Tom Cruise movie trailer, even though I'm not a huge fan, and I instantly forget his film five minutes after I watch it (except maybe Top Gun or Eyes Wide Shut).

    However, to maintain his superstar status, Cruise's plan means chucking a good portion of his character's personality/worldview/quirks/ that might turn off some viewers, which means the vast majority of his roles are, more or less, "Movie Star Tom Cruise doing cool things and action stunts".

    But you can't really fault him for choosing Being a Star over Acting, his success rate is unbelievable. And he'll always have Eyes Wide Shut and Born on the Fourth of July if anyone ever dares question his acting chops.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Buzz Mohawk

    You say Tom Cruise will always have Eyes Wide Shut to show his acting, but are you sure you’re not just assuming something great happened there because it was a Stanley Kubrick thing?

    Not that it matters, but I was disappointed with that movie when it was released. Not much happened, and Cruise’s affect was flat. His chemistry on screen with his then wife, Nicole Kidman, was featureless.

    Granted, all this could have been at the direction Kubrick. Maybe he thought he was directing 2001 again.

    A noble effort, perhaps, but in the end just hype about nothing.

  169. @Anonymous
    Steve Sailer:

    "It’s almost as if the nation’s more conservative personalities could have more influence over liberal institutions than they currently exercise."

    Aha! And here we arrive at the crux of what you wanted to say, with all the preceeding paragraphs as nothing more than a buildup to this: you are upset that most elite insitutuons, that ultimately determine where the culture and politics go, are dominated by liberals, and that it would be mcuh easier to implement the conservative policies you want if those insitutions were controlled by conservatives.

    But you are forgetting something very important: intelligence and intellectual inclination. Elites tend to be more intelligent and intellectually inclined than the average person, and liberals tend to be more intelligent and also more intellectually inclined than social conservatives. So therefore, liberals will be inevitably overrepresented among elites.

    All the evidence that we have from IQ, tests, professional occupation and income, is that liberals tend to be more intelligent, more educated and to earn more than social conservatives. If you don't believe me, just check the statistics for education and income, and you'll see that, the more you climb the social and economic ladder, the more and more liberal it becomes. The upper-middle and upper classes tend to be liberal. while the lower and lower-middle classes tend to be more conservative.

    You claim that conservative jocks climb the managerial ladder higher than those kale-eating liberal dweebs you despise. That might be true for some specific individuals in certain types of businesses like retail, construction and to a minor degree in Wall Street. But the truly rich people, the super-rich people, tend to almost invariably be liberal. Both Bill Gates and Warren Buffet are huge Democrat supporters. Sillicon Valley CEOs are mostly liberals as well. Academia and doctored professors tend to be liberals, too. For every conservative(or at least not extremely liberal) jock that made it to the top in business like Jack Welsh, you have 100 liberal dweebs and nerds that you despise, with their pro-gay, pro-feminist, cosmopolitan, pro-immigration views. And what is impressive is that those top corporate dogs are even MORE liberal than that. Because the Conservative Party actually gives tax breaks to the super-rich, but they hate conservatism so much that they still prefer to be overtaxed by the Democrats than to pay lower taxes in a conservative society. Think about that.

    The problem that conservatives have in breaking into the elite ranks is is that being elite correlates very strongly with intelligence, and intelligence correlates very strongly with empathy. *That* is the fundamental problem for conservatives, and why elites will always be liberal. A requirement for reaching the level of elite is to be very intelligent, and very intelligent people tend to be more empathetic, so they naturally are more liberal. Elites find sexism, racism and excessive xenophobia and nationalism deplorable. They tend to be civilized people, and they don't like it. Just look at a skinhead rally yelling insult at immigrants. Most tend to be working-class, violent people that you most likely won't meet at the concert hall during a Beethoven concerto. Intelligent people deplore discrimination, especially based on things that one lacks volitional control over, like the race that you are born into, or the nation that you were born in, or the gender that you were born, or your sexuality. It strikes them as cruel and unfair to restrict a person's pursuit of happiness based on these biased, anachronistic and innate traits one cannot control. Hence, liberal views.

    Replies: @Dissident

    Other than the obviously far-higher levels of intelligence, writing ability, and education that are exhibited in this comment by Anonymous[162], its content sounds remarkably like our old friend Tiny Duck. No complaints, though, for even a troll* as obvious and (affectedly) lowbrow as the charmingly diminutive, beloved decoy can provide some welcome comic relief, if nothing else. And there is something else. For any position that cannot withstand a challenge as weak as those found within this Tiny Duck-like comment that I am replying-to here, is a very weak position indeed. With that preface, I shall proceed to my detailed rebuttal.
    (*as distinct from a shill)

    All the evidence that we have from IQ, tests, professional occupation and income, is that liberals tend to be more intelligent, more educated and to earn more than social conservatives.

    Re: Intelligence and Education:

    Both are at least as likely to pervert (the mind, and especially the conscience, on the individual level; society and its institutions on the collective level) and be used for ill, as they are to enlighten (in a benign, positive sense), refine, and be utilized toward good. The more intelligent and educated the man, the more potentially dangerous[1]

    Re: Income, wealth and “earning”:

    These are distinct from and do not necessarily align with inherent value and worth. Anything limited to the material; the physical; the carnal; to our mortal existence, cannot transcend it and therefore cannot, ultimately, be other than ephemeral.

    [MORE]

    they hate conservatism so much that they still prefer to be overtaxed by the Democrats than to pay lower taxes in a conservative society.

    Firstly, how often do the advantages that a socially conservative candidate offers to a wealthy individual in the area of tax policy clearly outweigh all of the concrete and considerable advantages that he is currently enjoying from the continued importation of what is essentially near-slave-labor from the third-world?

    Secondly, have you considered all of the other advantages that expressing support for “pro-gay, pro-feminist, cosmopolitan, pro-immigration views” offers wealthy elites? Or, perhaps more to the point, the consequences suffered by those who dare to express any criticism of said views (or of any group or individual member thereof for whom said views afford protected victim status)?

    Thirdly and finally, is there a not a vast discrepancy between the de jure tax rates at any given time (whatever they may be), and the far-lower de facto rates that the wealthiest individuals and corporations inevitably manage to get away with paying?

    very intelligent people tend to be more empathetic, so they naturally are more liberal.

    Is empathy really the primary motivation for most of the individuals-in-question here? Do you not find any number of self-serving, aesthetic motivations at least as plausible? Motivations, primarily, related to achieving and maintaining social status? The desire to feel righteous, and superior to others; virtue-signaling?

    Elites find sexism, racism and excessive xenophobia and nationalism deplorable.

    Excessive xenophobia? Is xenophobia ever, in any form or to any degree, less-than deplorable?!

    And haven’t you made at least one rather conspicuous omission there? (Homophobia [sic], at least, you did go on to cover just a little farther down…[2])

    Just look at a skinhead rally yelling insult at immigrants. Most tend to be working-class, violent people that you most likely won’t meet at the concert hall during a Beethoven concerto.

    Well, I suppose I have to grant you that much. I mean, just look at all the rioting, looting, arson and other violence we’ve been seeing from all those skinheads and other MAGA types since the election that their Führer, like the totalitarian fascist he is, still refuses to concede. If only all protesters could be as peaceful and loving as those of the BLM and ANTIFA variety.

    Intelligent people deplore discrimination, especially based on things that one lacks volitional control over, like the race that you are born into,

    1.) Except when directed against whites, right?

    2.) Ignoring key racial realities in areas such as crime, intelligence and educational ability, or ascribing them to the malice of whites, helps no one– least of all blacks and other nonwhites. Consider, for example, the Ferguson Effect and similar. Or under/unqualified affirmative action hires, be they physicians or other medical personnel, police, firefighters, lawyers, etc. Who do you think, ultimately, are the most harmed by such lowering of standards?

    3.) Where, if I may be so bold as to inquire, do you reside? Surely, if you are white, you would want to help diversify a predominately nonwhite neighborhood by gracing it with your presence. And if you have any school-age children, they must surely be enrolled in a school for which their mere presence would similarly diversify and desegregate.

    or the nation that you were born in,

    1.) Why is it only white countries who are demanded to open their borders to any and all?

    2.) Do you keep the doors to your home wide open, inviting anyone who may ever wish to come into it, to do so? To stay indefinitely?

    or the gender that you were born

    No one can be born as any gender, as it is but a linguistic construct. The vast, overwhelmingly majority of people are born as one of two clearly distinct sexes: male or female. There are, tragically, a certain number of individuals born inter-sexed or whose of indeterminate sex. Thankfully, these have never amounted-to more than a tiny fraction of the total number of individuals born or alive at any given moment.

    The overwhelming majority of those called transgender are individuals who are either unable or unwilling to accept objective reality. Such individuals have always existed. But whether a man is convinced he is a woman, or that he is Napoleon, Elvis, or a turtle, the sane and humane approach is not to indulge the delusions of the afflicted individual. Certainly not to any point of facilitating, much less directly inflicting drastic, irreversible harm. There is, perhaps, a libertarian argument that could be made for permitting an adult to make an informed choice to indulge his delusions or fantasies to such an extreme. But to allow a young, immature, confused child to make such a decision– one with such severe, even irreversible consequences?! A decision that the child will, in all likelihood, grow-up to deeply regret and experience misery as a result of?!

    , or your sexuality. It strikes them as cruel and unfair to restrict a person’s pursuit of happiness based on these biased, anachronistic and innate traits one cannot control.

    Here you completely conflate involuntary feelings with voluntary behavior. And parrot the assertions– key tenets of LGBTQ doctrine– that (a) homoeroticism is always, without exception, both innate as well as immutable; (b) that only through embracing and fully indulging them can an individual with exclusively homoerotic sexual proclivities achieve fulfillment or happiness.

    These assertions are neither proven nor harmless. And, yet again, guess who the harm the most?

    For further elaboration on this topic, including an outline for a comprehensive, humane response to individuals afflicted with exclusive same-sex attraction, the interested reader is referred to this comment of mine from October.

    NOTES
    [1] The greater one’s intelligence and knowledge, the greater one’s ability to pursue one’s basest, darkest, most destructive and least redeeming instincts, lusts and desires with the most efficacy and efficiency.

    Even more pernicious than that, though, is the ability to rationalize and justify said impulses and drives (sometimes deluding only oneself, more often deluding only others, and perhaps most often doing some mixture of both). The ability to couch practically any and all manner of weakness, vice, depravity, villainy, degeneracy, predation and iniquity in expediently moralistic, self-righteous terms.

    And thereby to not merely indulge in what remains wholly unjust, unjustified, reprehensible and utterly reprobate, but also to advance, promote and indoctrinate , recruit, condition and initiate others into it–i.e., into any one of what are, at best, countless ultimate dead-ends, at worst, descents into the abyss. It is this— the ability to concoct compelling illusions of moral inversion and to then successfully leverage them in selling vice as virtue— that makes the highly intelligent and knowledgeable man most dangerous and destructive; most insidious.

  170. @jamie b.
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Did one of these writers lift an entirely idiosyncratic premise and setting from another? If not, then the comparison is no more apt than when you compared entire genres. (And who would argue that Marx is not derived from Hegel?)

    Again: A somewhat humorous account of a displaced big city character who finds himself surrounded by quirky people in a small Northwest town with a vaguely supernatural background.

    There's no possible way that that resemblance was the result of a conscious decision, least of all when the writers basically admitted as much?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    You got a much better analogy in a movie Doc Hollywood.

    • Replies: @jamie b.
    @Bardon Kaldian

    (My response didn't come up as a direct reply. See above.)

    It should also be noted that TP (and NE) came out the year before Doc Hollywood. Not that it matters: NE was rather clearly designed to attract a part of TP’s audience, even down to the series' geographic name. Really quite blatant.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  171. …a much better analogy…

    Sure, to the degree that TP, NE, and Cars were all rip offs of Doc Hollywood. So I guess by ‘better’ you mean ‘weaker.’

    Again, NE itself acknowledged its debt…

    And in fact, many different TV shows and movies have been influenced by Twin Peaks

    https://www.looper.com/216742/tv-shows-to-watch-if-you-like-twin-peaks/

    Though you dislike TP (despite never having seen it), its influence can’t be denied.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @jamie b.

    I like both in different ways. Not that anyone cares.

    The Northern Exposure episode where Maggie's latest boyfriend dies (like all the ones before him) when a Russian satellite lands on him is my favourite one.

  172. Winona Ryder movies are strong in Neuroticism, with the most neurotic movie of the 846 being her hot-chicks-in-a-mental-institution Girl, Interrupted with Angelina Jolie.

    Gorilla Interrupted – Remastered Trailer

    http://www.redlettermedia.com/store/ – Dex is a nerdy scientist. Sid is an angry punk rock idiot. Ray is an alcoholic with anger management issues. And Jacob is a crazy person who thinks he’s a safari hunter. Together, these four hacks are forced to team up to save the world…while hating themselves and each other.

    Gorilla Interrupted was the first major collaboration between the people that would go on to form Red Letter Media. Shot in 2002 and remastered in 2013, this updated version of the rarely-seen film features newly shot special effects and a new score.

    [MORE]

    New Red Letter Media DVD! Gorilla Interrupted!

    How Not to Make a Movie CLIP

    http://www.redlettermedia.com/store – Here’s a clip from our documentary How Not to Make a Movie, which is currently available on our Gorilla Interrupted DVD and digital release. You can get a copy from our website’s store page to learn exactly how many mistakes can be made when trying to shoot an amateur feature film in less than a week.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @MEH 0910


    Ray is an alcoholic with anger management issues.
     
    Er ...
  173. @Bardon Kaldian
    @jamie b.

    You got a much better analogy in a movie Doc Hollywood.

    Replies: @jamie b.

    (My response didn’t come up as a direct reply. See above.)

    It should also be noted that TP (and NE) came out the year before Doc Hollywood. Not that it matters: NE was rather clearly designed to attract a part of TP’s audience, even down to the series’ geographic name. Really quite blatant.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @jamie b.

    We seem to communicate at different levels.

    I don't think that Doc Hollywood was an isolated incident, and I would say that NE was definitely influenced by the idea of it (although I can't prove that B & F had a direct access to it, but ideas float around in this, as well as in others, milieux). When you juxtapose NE & Doc Hollywood, you have:

    + doctor from big city, unwillingly, in a small rural community
    + quirky dwellers
    + dwellers are ethnically diverse
    + doc, who is materialistically oriented, falls in love with a female in the community & begins to change, but..
    + generally benign universe
    - no supernatural stuff

    With TP, you got:

    +/- detective ousider in a rural community
    + quirky dwellers
    - crime
    - Evil
    + supernatural stuff

    What you wrote about TP & NE I know already, but it is an intersection of similarities, not a template of one show for another. And differences are crucial, as I have written (NE is a product of Esalen New Age culture, a show molded by strong authorial personalities of its producers who have Joseph Campbell's work, generally speaking, as a dominant world-view template. NE is a series with a few theses, but clearly grounded in a specific world-view, which is of more importance than superficial similarities of plot & approach). TP is, as I've said, Lynch's surrealist experiment with Evil- which is quite another matter. That both shows have fantasy element & fish-out-of-water character is interesting, but of tertiary importance.

  174. @jamie b.
    @Bardon Kaldian

    (My response didn't come up as a direct reply. See above.)

    It should also be noted that TP (and NE) came out the year before Doc Hollywood. Not that it matters: NE was rather clearly designed to attract a part of TP’s audience, even down to the series' geographic name. Really quite blatant.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    We seem to communicate at different levels.

    I don’t think that Doc Hollywood was an isolated incident, and I would say that NE was definitely influenced by the idea of it (although I can’t prove that B & F had a direct access to it, but ideas float around in this, as well as in others, milieux). When you juxtapose NE & Doc Hollywood, you have:

    + doctor from big city, unwillingly, in a small rural community
    + quirky dwellers
    + dwellers are ethnically diverse
    + doc, who is materialistically oriented, falls in love with a female in the community & begins to change, but..
    + generally benign universe
    – no supernatural stuff

    With TP, you got:

    +/- detective ousider in a rural community
    + quirky dwellers
    – crime
    – Evil
    + supernatural stuff

    What you wrote about TP & NE I know already, but it is an intersection of similarities, not a template of one show for another. And differences are crucial, as I have written (NE is a product of Esalen New Age culture, a show molded by strong authorial personalities of its producers who have Joseph Campbell’s work, generally speaking, as a dominant world-view template. NE is a series with a few theses, but clearly grounded in a specific world-view, which is of more importance than superficial similarities of plot & approach). TP is, as I’ve said, Lynch’s surrealist experiment with Evil- which is quite another matter. That both shows have fantasy element & fish-out-of-water character is interesting, but of tertiary importance.

  175. ….but it is an intersection of similarities, not a template of one show for another.

    A slightly prolix way of asserting that similarities cannot be taken as evidence of imitation. Why exactly?

    You’re response is, in short, to…

    -ignore the temporal sequence (TP then NE then DH)
    -ignore motives (TP was initially a spectacular success)
    -ignore locale (Roslyn / North Bend / Pacific NW)
    -downplay similarities (Dreams/New-age/magical-realism ≠ supernatural/Lynchian-surrealism)
    -dismissing similarities (fish-out-of-water element is superficial)
    -exaggerate differences (ethnic diversity / different professions)
    -employ non sequiturs (NE is allegedly ‘deep’)
    -ignore NE’s admission to its debt (if you didn’t understand the references, I can explain them to you)

    The main difference then is “generally benign universe” vs. evil/crime. But then everybody already knew that NE was mostly just a light-hearted version of TP (a thousand quotes to that effect are easy enough to find).

    It’s really odd: You keep bringing up the comparison, only to immediately say that it’s obviously false (despite never having seen TP). Why?

  176. @jamie b.

    ...a much better analogy...
     
    Sure, to the degree that TP, NE, and Cars were all rip offs of Doc Hollywood. So I guess by 'better' you mean 'weaker.'

    Again, NE itself acknowledged its debt...

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x54jt0o

    And in fact, many different TV shows and movies have been influenced by Twin Peaks...

    https://www.looper.com/216742/tv-shows-to-watch-if-you-like-twin-peaks/

    Though you dislike TP (despite never having seen it), its influence can't be denied.

    Replies: @Ray P

    I like both in different ways. Not that anyone cares.

    The Northern Exposure episode where Maggie’s latest boyfriend dies (like all the ones before him) when a Russian satellite lands on him is my favourite one.

  177. @MEH 0910

    Winona Ryder movies are strong in Neuroticism, with the most neurotic movie of the 846 being her hot-chicks-in-a-mental-institution Girl, Interrupted with Angelina Jolie.
     
    Gorilla Interrupted - Remastered Trailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oa2Xu11DfUo

    http://www.redlettermedia.com/store/ - Dex is a nerdy scientist. Sid is an angry punk rock idiot. Ray is an alcoholic with anger management issues. And Jacob is a crazy person who thinks he's a safari hunter. Together, these four hacks are forced to team up to save the world...while hating themselves and each other.

    Gorilla Interrupted was the first major collaboration between the people that would go on to form Red Letter Media. Shot in 2002 and remastered in 2013, this updated version of the rarely-seen film features newly shot special effects and a new score.
     

    New Red Letter Media DVD! Gorilla Interrupted!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKdlVrrbGoM

    How Not to Make a Movie CLIP
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeXQFj2asqg

    http://www.redlettermedia.com/store - Here's a clip from our documentary How Not to Make a Movie, which is currently available on our Gorilla Interrupted DVD and digital release. You can get a copy from our website's store page to learn exactly how many mistakes can be made when trying to shoot an amateur feature film in less than a week.
     

    Replies: @Ray P

    Ray is an alcoholic with anger management issues.

    Er …

  178. Half in the Bag: Quarantine Catch-up (part 4 of 2)

    00:00 – Intro
    04:09 – Unhinged
    06:46 – Greyhound
    11:18 – Streaming TV Shows
    17:05 – Antebellum
    20:55 – Uncle Frank
    26:11 – Belushi
    30:00 – Beastie Boys Story
    37:03 – Warner Bros 2021 Movies Going to HBO Max

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    Half in the Bag: Quarantine Catch-up (part 5 of 2)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yQ-4EPXVrM


    00:00 - Intro
    00:54 - I'm Thinking of Ending Things
    08:28 - On The Rocks
    13:19 - The New Mutants
    15:58 - Moonbase 8
    20:14 - The Queen's Gambit
    23:08 - Possessor
     
  179. @MEH 0910
    Half in the Bag: Quarantine Catch-up (part 4 of 2)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pe03wFRySok

    00:00 - Intro
    04:09 - Unhinged
    06:46 - Greyhound
    11:18 - Streaming TV Shows
    17:05 - Antebellum
    20:55 - Uncle Frank
    26:11 - Belushi
    30:00 - Beastie Boys Story
    37:03 - Warner Bros 2021 Movies Going to HBO Max
     

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Half in the Bag: Quarantine Catch-up (part 5 of 2)

    00:00 – Intro
    00:54 – I’m Thinking of Ending Things
    08:28 – On The Rocks
    13:19 – The New Mutants
    15:58 – Moonbase 8
    20:14 – The Queen’s Gambit
    23:08 – Possessor

  180. Trailer Park Boys Season 1 Deleted Scene: Ellen Page as Treena Lahey

    Many fans know that Ellen Page played Treena Lahey in the second season, but did you know Ellen played Treena in the very first episode? Unfortunately, the scene was deleted. Here is that deleted scene from that very first episode “Take Your Little Gun and Get Out of My Trailer Park” (2001). Some affectionately call this scene “Chinese Dinosaurs”.

    Ellen Page on Trailer Park Boys

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