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Do Pharmacy Deserts Represent Systemic Racism or Resistance to Gentrification?
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From WLS in Chicago:

Pharmacy deserts in Chicago could make it tough for many to get COVID-19 vaccine

By Chuck Goudie and Barb Markoff, Christine Tressel and Ross Weidner

Thursday, February 4, 2021 8:47PM

CHICAGO (WLS) — Many Chicagoans are already struggling to fill prescriptions because there are no drugstores in their neighborhoods, and that could also make it tougher to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

… The I-Team’s data analysis found fewer pharmacies on the South and West Sides than in North Side neighborhoods. These pharmacy deserts could make it more difficult for tens of thousands of residents to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

“It’s an attack on the poor,” said State Rep. Ford La Shawn Ford, (D) Chicago. …

“My work found that predominantly black and Hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago have fewer pharmacies and are more likely to be pharmacy deserts, and are also more likely to experience closures,” said Associate Professor Dima Mazen Qato, University of Southern California.

I-Team research shows there are 254 pharmacies on the North Side, and 141 south of the Loop.

But from the Washington Post, we learn that not having a chain pharmacy in your neighborhood is good because pharmacies represent gentrification and they are irresistible to the Mostly Peaceful Protesters because of all the stuff on their shelves that is just crying out to be looted:

The Mount Pleasant Miracle
How one D.C. neighborhood quietly became a national model for resisting gentrification

By Jefferson Morley
JANUARY 25, 2021

On Monday afternoon, June 1, the city of Washington was on the brink of a nervous breakdown. Seven days after the killing of George Floyd, scenes of mobs, flames, cops and chaos looped endlessly on screens large and small, interrupted only by images of boarded-up windows and now the spectacle of a phalanx of uniformed soldiers routing peaceful protesters from Lafayette Square across the street from the White House.

I was sitting an 11-minute drive north of the mayhem at the carryout end of the Marx Cafe bar in the neighborhood of Mount Pleasant. The regulars who lined the bar — masked and (sort of) socially distanced — stared up in appalled silence at a TV as the president hoisted a Bible. The country was disintegrating during happy hour. Mayor Muriel Bowser’s 7 p.m. curfew order was fast approaching. The crowd thinned.

Across the street at the Best World supermarket, co-owner Young Pak was closing early. Pak and her husband bought the store a decade ago and have served the neighborhood ever since in economical style. The store’s large, unprotected plate-glass windows looked vulnerable to the worst of intentions floating in the Washington air that night. Pak locked herself in, and I hurried home.

I couldn’t help but think of the Mount Pleasant riot of May 1991. That was the last time Washington had seen widespread civil disorder. A police shooting

By a black woman cop

of a Salvadoran immigrant had triggered several days of window smashing and car burning, a cataclysm that made the neighborhood notorious for years to come. …

By nightfall, the nation’s capital was engulfed in a wave of looting and vandalism, some it of targeting national chains. Across the District, more than 200 businesses were damaged. At least six CVS stores from Capitol Hill to Friendship Heights were looted or burned. The disorder, The Washington Post reported, spread to “normally tranquil residential neighborhoods.”

Not Mount Pleasant. There was no CVS to loot; thanks to neighborhood activists, the pharmacy chain’s plans to open a store on Mount Pleasant Street had recently been thwarted. Where a new CVS might well have stood, the humble Best World supermarket was unscathed.

 
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  1. When you periodically smash the windows and loot any business in your neighborhood, businesses tend not to go near you. QED

    • Agree: Hibernian, James Speaks
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Buzz Mohawk


    When you periodically smash the windows and loot any business in your neighborhood, businesses tend not to go near you. QED
     
    Oh, that’s only the beginning. The customers have less money to spend. Shoplifting rates are high. Armed robbery rates are high. Even the paying customers are annoying and difficult. And I can imagine that finding good employees to begin with is difficult and that employee turnover is insanely high. When you’re talking about pharmacies, those employees also have to be educated. They’re medical professionals, not minimum wage employees just running a cash register.

    But hey, we’re now in the era where the right to anti-racism means the government can force you to hire who they want you to hire, lend money to who they want you to lend money to, and build a business where they tell you to build a business. If customers steal from you then you have no right to object. Right to speech, assembly, and property? Not so much.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @bomag, @Anon7, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Wade Hampton
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Sometimes that's a benefit. Like when they come to your neighborhood with "vaccines" that haven't been successfully tested on animals, let alone humans.

  2. “It’s an attack on the poor,” said State Rep. Ford La Shawn Ford, (D) Chicago. …

    No, it was a retreat, not an attack. First there were the many attacks by your constituents on the candy and cold beer aisles.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Achmed E. Newman


    No, it was a retreat, not an attack. First there were the many attacks by your constituents on the candy and cold beer aisles.
     
    Yeah, Achmed, you don't have to burn the store down to drive off the company. Stores in black regions are looted day-by-day, employees ripping off the store, allowing their friends to come in and shoplift, not to mention your labor pool is very weak there to begin with. It's why where once there were malls all over, black takeover caused their demise for the above reasons. Then of course, they became a gathering place for 'teens' and their gunplay. There's no making a profit for a CVS or grocer in such conditions and so they close up and never come back or never go in the first place. Baltimore has enormous food and drug store deserts. Every single urban setting is a desert.

    It's not an attack on minorities that there are deserts. It's a response, as you inferred. There's a big, big difference, and even these idiots know it. And where they burned their own CVS and grocer and they weren't rebuilt really points up what was done.

    Replies: @Hannah Katz

  3. Seems there’s only one kind of police shooting that ghetto blacks are supportive of these days:

    https://twitter.com/Tsthetruth_24/status/1358082481455591429?s=20

    • LOL: Sean
    • Replies: @Wade Hampton
    @Anonymous

    As much as it pains me to agree with Taiquan, he's right.

    Let's all follow the Rodney King Rule in our daily interactions with the police. "When a cop tells you to sit the hell down, sit the hell down."

    , @Cato
    @Anonymous

    Incredible video. And the ghetto commentary! Anyone know the full story?

    , @Pop Warner
    @Anonymous

    To be fair, a lot of the comments - many from black accounts - aren't celebrating this and calling out the guy filming for being a scumbag. One of the few times you'll see handles like AfricanKang and TradGroyper agreeing on something

    , @edkpyros
    @Anonymous

    If anyone can't see the Twitter video of the black guy cheering on the police shooting of a mentally ill white man, then triumphantly cackling that "he thought his ass was privileged", it's here:

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/CnJTe8NIBCYK/

    Replies: @Anonymous

  4. Are you, too, just reading the press with a morbid curiosity?

    What is the most recent invention to explain away the effects of black crime or leftist mishandling of crime, policing, education, and other policies?

    Reading newspaper not really with intent of learning news, but discovering insanity?

    The root cause is that racist facts must never be told. The solution would be to point out every single falsehood or unproven statement. Did I not just discover another George Floyd “killing” (violation of presumption of innocence and ignoring the Hennepin county coroner’s autopsy)?
    Add a few more dozen factual untruths. What world are we living in? a) Left and b) Right and c) race realists cannot agree on the reality of the world we live in. What insanity.
    Black lives matter for peace nobel prize!

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @Abe
    @TruthRevolution.net


    Did I not just discover another George Floyd “killing” (violation of presumption of innocence and ignoring the Hennepin county coroner’s autopsy)?
     
    When the law definitively proves there was no killing, there was no murder, there was no “torture” (as claimed by our current Vice President during a nationally televised debate) do the 7 figure settlements then start rolling in? Or does a judge in Hawaii step in at that point to invoke the principle of Non Punchus Downus when it comes to a white beat cop being defamed by an intersectional Vice President and an Internet hecto-billionaire through his vanity rag sheet?
  5. The best way to resist gentrification is Dollar General stores. They host gunplay, send the neighborhood into a downward spiral, and are so highly profitable that they multiply as if by magic.

    I said the Oxford vaccine would be crap.

    Good old British know-not.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Sean

    Dollar General stores are usually located close to mobile home parks, so that the residents can walk there on foot to get their cigarettes along with some exercise and fresh air.

  6. @Achmed E. Newman

    “It’s an attack on the poor,” said State Rep. Ford La Shawn Ford, (D) Chicago. …
     
    No, it was a retreat, not an attack. First there were the many attacks by your constituents on the candy and cold beer aisles.

    Replies: @Jim Christian

    No, it was a retreat, not an attack. First there were the many attacks by your constituents on the candy and cold beer aisles.

    Yeah, Achmed, you don’t have to burn the store down to drive off the company. Stores in black regions are looted day-by-day, employees ripping off the store, allowing their friends to come in and shoplift, not to mention your labor pool is very weak there to begin with. It’s why where once there were malls all over, black takeover caused their demise for the above reasons. Then of course, they became a gathering place for ‘teens’ and their gunplay. There’s no making a profit for a CVS or grocer in such conditions and so they close up and never come back or never go in the first place. Baltimore has enormous food and drug store deserts. Every single urban setting is a desert.

    It’s not an attack on minorities that there are deserts. It’s a response, as you inferred. There’s a big, big difference, and even these idiots know it. And where they burned their own CVS and grocer and they weren’t rebuilt really points up what was done.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Hannah Katz
    @Jim Christian

    Amazing that Target has agreed to rebuild the fire gutted store in Minneapolis. Of course they are headquartered nearby, but just plain dumb to keep rebuilding stores in a location where the locals regularly rip you off and you lose your shirt. Virtue signaling at its worst.

  7. Pharmacy deserts … just desserts.

    • LOL: Abe
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @The Alarmist


    Pharmacy deserts … just desserts.
     
    Not just those, or the deserts of just those and grocers, a common complaint. It's a whole range of services, retail and otherwise. Clinics, housing offices, it gets to a point where you cannot get people into those areas to work or support those functions. This is the depravity of high-crime areas. In Ferguson (who could forget?), they even burned their gas stations. In any case, when the smoke cleared, they were complaining about having to drive ten miles for gas because all the stations closer had been burned. And those gas stations are a staple of the community. They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread. Because there are no grocers. Such is the diet of these folks. And they burned even that. What to do?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Abe, @Mike Tre

  8. ‘Pharmacy deserts’ are just desserts for the incorrigibly thievish.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Anonymous


    ‘Pharmacy deserts’ are just desserts for the incorrigibly thievish.
     
    The correct phrases is "just deserts" though.
  9. Anon[814] • Disclaimer says:

    I have an idea. How about founding a black-owned pharmacy, bootstraped with money raised from the community (dipping into their savings), or from minority-targeted VC funds. Or Bill and Melinda Gates. All black staff, black pharmacists. They could expand out to various black neighborhoods. They could carry black hair products and those dark-skinned bandaids. Build black pride.

    Actually, this would make a great reality show. Will blacks patronize a black-owned business? Will pilferage grow out of control. Will there be iron bars separating the pharmacy from the customers? Will a local black councilwoman get a law passed to ban iron bars because it creates a bad image? Will the reality show’s Go-Pros get ripped off the walls and stolen? Will the reality show’s crews be beaten and have their cars ‘jacked? Will they ban-the-box and hire felons?

    This would also make a great comedy-drama series, but you’d never get it aired. Maybe a direct to streaming movie? You’d have to use white actors in blackface however.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Carol
    @Anon

    Are you kidding? Black middle class types wouldn't be caught dead there.

    Whole point is to get away from it.

  10. @The Alarmist
    Pharmacy deserts ... just desserts.

    Replies: @Jim Christian

    Pharmacy deserts … just desserts.

    Not just those, or the deserts of just those and grocers, a common complaint. It’s a whole range of services, retail and otherwise. Clinics, housing offices, it gets to a point where you cannot get people into those areas to work or support those functions. This is the depravity of high-crime areas. In Ferguson (who could forget?), they even burned their gas stations. In any case, when the smoke cleared, they were complaining about having to drive ten miles for gas because all the stations closer had been burned. And those gas stations are a staple of the community. They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread. Because there are no grocers. Such is the diet of these folks. And they burned even that. What to do?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Jim Christian

    I went through old photos the other day, and came across a few I snapped while flying a couple thousand feet over several US cities (circa 1970s & 1980s). I didn’t think much of it at the time, probably because I would have been looking out for traffic, but parts of those cities looked in pictures like the cities of Germany at the end of WW2, except that most of the rubble had been carted away. Entire blocks with shells of buildings or no buildings near the centre of what was otherwise a functioning US city.

    Replies: @Jim Christian

    , @Abe
    @Jim Christian


    In Ferguson (who could forget?), they even burned their gas stations. In any case, when the smoke cleared, they were complaining about having to drive ten miles for gas because all the stations closer had been burned. And those gas stations are a staple of the community. They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread.
     
    https://i1.wp.com/thepeoplesmovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Last-King-Of-Scotland.jpg

    “You should have told me that I would need food, medicine, and energy!”
    “I DID!”
    “But you did not persuade me, Nicholas. You did not persuade me.”

     

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Mike Tre
    @Jim Christian

    “ They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread. ”

    You forgot the most important thing they sell: Newports.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  11. If they had pharmacies in their neighborhoods, black people would have to worry about doctors getting them hooked on drugs, like happens to white people.

  12. @Buzz Mohawk
    When you periodically smash the windows and loot any business in your neighborhood, businesses tend not to go near you. QED

    Replies: @Wilkey, @Wade Hampton

    When you periodically smash the windows and loot any business in your neighborhood, businesses tend not to go near you. QED

    Oh, that’s only the beginning. The customers have less money to spend. Shoplifting rates are high. Armed robbery rates are high. Even the paying customers are annoying and difficult. And I can imagine that finding good employees to begin with is difficult and that employee turnover is insanely high. When you’re talking about pharmacies, those employees also have to be educated. They’re medical professionals, not minimum wage employees just running a cash register.

    But hey, we’re now in the era where the right to anti-racism means the government can force you to hire who they want you to hire, lend money to who they want you to lend money to, and build a business where they tell you to build a business. If customers steal from you then you have no right to object. Right to speech, assembly, and property? Not so much.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Wilkey


    If customers steal from you then you have no right to object.
     
    In deserts, they spin the purchase through a bulletproof carousal, there is no shoplifting, only bulletproof enclosures. Outer walls, customer interface, Koreans behind the glass, armed to the teeth.

    Replies: @Bite Moi, @Colin Wright

    , @bomag
    @Wilkey

    This.

    Our ten thousand years of human activity since the neolithic is not good enough; leftists are always on a crusade to totally remake man in a better way, including forcing him to staff businesses in the ghetto no matter the risk.

    , @Anon7
    @Wilkey

    "not having a chain pharmacy in your neighborhood is good because pharmacies represent gentrification..."

    Maybe we're thinking about this in the wrong way. Looting and burning the CVSs is just a way of maintaining the neighborhood. Think of it as similar to the practice of Native Americans who would periodically set fire to forests to improve them for their use:


    'Fire is medicine': the tribes burning California forests to save them

    This fire will chew out the underbrush and lick the moss off the trees. It will blister the hazel stalks and coax strong new shoots that will be gathered and woven into baskets for babies and caps for traditional dancers, and it will tease the tan oak acorns to drop. It will burn the invasive plants that suck up the rain, letting more clean, cool water flow through the black, into the watershed and down the Klamath river for the salmon.

    Soon all that black will be dotted with bear grass and huckleberries pushing up for the sunlight and down for the water they couldn’t reach when they were crowded out by tall scotch broom and dense twists of blackberries and the ever-encroaching fir trees. Even sooner, animals will flock here to roll in the ash, a California dust bath.

    For more than 13,000 years, the Yurok, Karuk, Hupa, Miwok, Chumash and hundreds of other tribes across California and the world used small intentional burns to renew local food, medicinal and cultural resources, create habitat for animals, and reduce the risk of larger, more dangerous wild fires.

     
    Just think of the hazard posed by a CVS next to a Barnes and Noble next to a Whole Foods next to a Bed Bath and Beyond next to gentrified condos full of furniture. Torch that CVS and the BN full of flammable books goes up; soon, your whole neighborhood is on fire! Better to use strategic burns to prevent catastrophe.

    Native peoples have wisdom, guys. Listen to it.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Wilkey


    When you’re talking about pharmacies, those employees also have to be educated. They’re medical professionals...
     
    Go, Eutectics!

    Go, that is, home to the 'hood, where they need your expertise.


    https://www.eurobasket.com/TeamPhoto/2019-2020slcp.jpg

  13. @Wilkey
    @Buzz Mohawk


    When you periodically smash the windows and loot any business in your neighborhood, businesses tend not to go near you. QED
     
    Oh, that’s only the beginning. The customers have less money to spend. Shoplifting rates are high. Armed robbery rates are high. Even the paying customers are annoying and difficult. And I can imagine that finding good employees to begin with is difficult and that employee turnover is insanely high. When you’re talking about pharmacies, those employees also have to be educated. They’re medical professionals, not minimum wage employees just running a cash register.

    But hey, we’re now in the era where the right to anti-racism means the government can force you to hire who they want you to hire, lend money to who they want you to lend money to, and build a business where they tell you to build a business. If customers steal from you then you have no right to object. Right to speech, assembly, and property? Not so much.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @bomag, @Anon7, @Reg Cæsar

    If customers steal from you then you have no right to object.

    In deserts, they spin the purchase through a bulletproof carousal, there is no shoplifting, only bulletproof enclosures. Outer walls, customer interface, Koreans behind the glass, armed to the teeth.

    • Replies: @Bite Moi
    @Jim Christian

    Jim Christian--------These Koreans invested in a small business.Their customers "invest " in malt liquor,cigarettes and lottery tickets.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Jim Christian

    '...Outer walls, customer interface, Koreans behind the glass, armed to the teeth.'

    Blacks are grateful to Korea, aren't they? After all, where would they be, absent Koreans?

  14. @Wilkey
    @Buzz Mohawk


    When you periodically smash the windows and loot any business in your neighborhood, businesses tend not to go near you. QED
     
    Oh, that’s only the beginning. The customers have less money to spend. Shoplifting rates are high. Armed robbery rates are high. Even the paying customers are annoying and difficult. And I can imagine that finding good employees to begin with is difficult and that employee turnover is insanely high. When you’re talking about pharmacies, those employees also have to be educated. They’re medical professionals, not minimum wage employees just running a cash register.

    But hey, we’re now in the era where the right to anti-racism means the government can force you to hire who they want you to hire, lend money to who they want you to lend money to, and build a business where they tell you to build a business. If customers steal from you then you have no right to object. Right to speech, assembly, and property? Not so much.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @bomag, @Anon7, @Reg Cæsar

    This.

    Our ten thousand years of human activity since the neolithic is not good enough; leftists are always on a crusade to totally remake man in a better way, including forcing him to staff businesses in the ghetto no matter the risk.

  15. The premise is that the economy and population dynamics are some dead physical system with no causal structure and that any deviations from completely gaussian values must have volitional nefarious reasons (white suppressing blacks by creating pharmacy deserts or disproportionately going after “teens”) or revolutionary reasons (economically disadvantaged people successfully keeping pharmacies out of the hood to resist gentrification, “teens” emitting cries for attention by gunning down people on street corners).

    The only one who have the power to deviate from gaussian behaviour are whites (except for international politics). They always err on the side of evil, too.

    Here’s one from the UK

    As more and more black people are jailed in Britain, the so-called ‘fairness’ of the UK legal system is exposed for all to see

    The number of black children cautioned or sentenced has doubled since the year ending March 2010, from six percent to 12 percent. Over a third (36 percent) of all remands involved BAME children. This increases to 49 percent for remands to youth detention accommodation, black children accounting for 29 percent of remands. The government’s figures also reveal that the proportion of all cases in which black children were sentenced for indictable offences has risen from 14 percent to 22 percent in the past five years.

    And the stats go on.

    Having read the Lammy Review in its entirety, and crunched the government’s latest figures for youth crime, it’s clear that establishment bias – subconscious or otherwise – permeates the criminal justice system, particularly around the fetishisation of young black males. [black young males are a fetish]

    And we’ve heard it all before, from the Metropolitan Police’s invention of the ‘Gangs Matrix’ in 2012 – a database of suspected gang members operating in London – to Operation Trident and its focus on ‘black-on-black’ crime, to the MSM’s popularisation of the term ‘county lines,’ the latest in a long line of racialised tabloid ‘folk devil’ descriptors that includes ‘Yardies,’ ‘muggers’ ‘steamers’ (remember them?), ‘gangbangers,’ ‘thugs,’ and ‘hood rats.’

    The “gangs matrix” had to be zeroed out at some time. I guess that improved things in Khan-managed Diversity London. Back to gaussians. Amnesty was on the case:

    What is the Gangs Matrix?

    The Gangs Matrix was part of a highly- politicised response to the 2011 London riots. Individuals are listed as ‘gang nominals’ and given an automated green, amber or red violence ranking. As of October 2017, 3,806 people were on the Matrix. More than three- quarters (78 per cent) of them are black, a disproportionate number given the Met’s own figures show that only 27 per cent of those responsible for serious youth violence are black. The youngest is just 12 years old and 99 per cent are male.

    ‘There is clearly a huge problem with knife crime violence at the moment in London, but the Gangs Matrix is not the answer,’ said Amnesty UK director Kate Allen. ‘It’s part of an unhelpful and racialised focus on the concept of gangs at the expense of concentrating on the most violent offenders. The entire system is racially discriminatory, stigmatising young black men for the type of music they listen to, or their social media behaviour, with potential impacts in all sorts of areas of their lives.

    ‘Some police officers have been acting like they’re in the Wild West, making the false assumptions that they can set up fake profiles and covertly befriend people online to monitor them without needing Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act warrants. The Mayor of London needs to dismantle the Matrix unless he can bring it in line with international human rights standards.’

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @El Dato

    Yup. No matter what the issue affecting blacks is - food deserts, poor health, infant mortality, incarceration rates - SJWs will always talk of it in terms that imply it is deliberately being done to the blacks. They rarely acknowledge that actions by the blacks are contributing to the situation and if they do, it will invariably be excused away as still somehow everyone else's fault.

    It's been a while since I gave Amnesty any money. The way they're going, it's going to be an even longer while.

    , @Anonymous
    @El Dato

    The time will surely come, in the UK, when a clear majority of the adult prisoner population are blacks.
    This is likely already the case in London.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @prosa123

    , @marcavis
    @El Dato


    a disproportionate number given the Met’s own figures show that only 27 per cent of those responsible for serious youth violence are black.
     
    I like that this quote from the Amnesty article you quoted suggests that in the UK it's still possible to talk about crime stats.
    Certainly a sensible left wing position today would be "it turns out that this demographic is more likely to commit crimes, let's charge whoever needs to be charged while also working on reducing that demographic's criminality in the future"
    (Of course, there's only so much you can do)
  16. I thought roving drugstore cowboys created pharmacy deserts.

  17. @Jim Christian
    @The Alarmist


    Pharmacy deserts … just desserts.
     
    Not just those, or the deserts of just those and grocers, a common complaint. It's a whole range of services, retail and otherwise. Clinics, housing offices, it gets to a point where you cannot get people into those areas to work or support those functions. This is the depravity of high-crime areas. In Ferguson (who could forget?), they even burned their gas stations. In any case, when the smoke cleared, they were complaining about having to drive ten miles for gas because all the stations closer had been burned. And those gas stations are a staple of the community. They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread. Because there are no grocers. Such is the diet of these folks. And they burned even that. What to do?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Abe, @Mike Tre

    I went through old photos the other day, and came across a few I snapped while flying a couple thousand feet over several US cities (circa 1970s & 1980s). I didn’t think much of it at the time, probably because I would have been looking out for traffic, but parts of those cities looked in pictures like the cities of Germany at the end of WW2, except that most of the rubble had been carted away. Entire blocks with shells of buildings or no buildings near the centre of what was otherwise a functioning US city.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @The Alarmist


    Entire blocks with shells of buildings or no buildings near the centre of what was otherwise a functioning US city.
     
    Traffic reporter or overhead photo-pro, Alamist? Saw the same thing in Baltimore throughout the 80s with the Bethlehem Steel factories that sat on the Potapsco River. Working at NorTel (big PBX phone systems), piece-by piece over several years we decommissioned the phone system as they dismantled various sections of the factories that used to make car frames and a million other things. By 1988 or so, the last piece of the factory, one that was making conduit was closed down and the offices closed up. We pulled the boards out of the system and walked. In a year's time, the windows were smashed, Bethlehem Steel was long gone and I have no doubt that land is ruined and leaking into the river on out to the ocean. WR Grace chemical was another, although they may still be there. And you're right, forget the view from the air, going by on I95, the remains are still there, looking for all the world like they were bombed from above.

    That we allowed them to scoot without cleaning up the land and water is unforgivable. That we allowed all of them to scoot without cleaning up the human carnage even more so. The Black urban shooters (teens) of today are the sons and grandsons of the factory workers who once had gainful employment. Baltimore is but one and hardly the largest, but is illustrative of the U.S.'s industrial and social decline.
  18. Businesses deserting areas liable to rioting and destruction…now whudathunkit?

  19. There is very little in a modern pharmacy that helps human health anyway. Maybe vitamin D pills and neti pots, but that’s it.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @glib

    No, but dehs got some good shit fo' makin' purple drank.

  20. @El Dato
    The premise is that the economy and population dynamics are some dead physical system with no causal structure and that any deviations from completely gaussian values must have volitional nefarious reasons (white suppressing blacks by creating pharmacy deserts or disproportionately going after "teens") or revolutionary reasons (economically disadvantaged people successfully keeping pharmacies out of the hood to resist gentrification, "teens" emitting cries for attention by gunning down people on street corners).

    The only one who have the power to deviate from gaussian behaviour are whites (except for international politics). They always err on the side of evil, too.

    Here's one from the UK

    As more and more black people are jailed in Britain, the so-called ‘fairness’ of the UK legal system is exposed for all to see


    The number of black children cautioned or sentenced has doubled since the year ending March 2010, from six percent to 12 percent. Over a third (36 percent) of all remands involved BAME children. This increases to 49 percent for remands to youth detention accommodation, black children accounting for 29 percent of remands. The government’s figures also reveal that the proportion of all cases in which black children were sentenced for indictable offences has risen from 14 percent to 22 percent in the past five years.

    And the stats go on.

    Having read the Lammy Review in its entirety, and crunched the government’s latest figures for youth crime, it’s clear that establishment bias – subconscious or otherwise – permeates the criminal justice system, particularly around the fetishisation of young black males. [black young males are a fetish]

    And we’ve heard it all before, from the Metropolitan Police’s invention of the ‘Gangs Matrix’ in 2012 – a database of suspected gang members operating in London – to Operation Trident and its focus on ‘black-on-black’ crime, to the MSM’s popularisation of the term ‘county lines,’ the latest in a long line of racialised tabloid ‘folk devil’ descriptors that includes ‘Yardies,’ ‘muggers’ ‘steamers’ (remember them?), ‘gangbangers,’ ‘thugs,’ and ‘hood rats.’
     

    The "gangs matrix" had to be zeroed out at some time. I guess that improved things in Khan-managed Diversity London. Back to gaussians. Amnesty was on the case:

    What is the Gangs Matrix?


    The Gangs Matrix was part of a highly- politicised response to the 2011 London riots. Individuals are listed as ‘gang nominals’ and given an automated green, amber or red violence ranking. As of October 2017, 3,806 people were on the Matrix. More than three- quarters (78 per cent) of them are black, a disproportionate number given the Met’s own figures show that only 27 per cent of those responsible for serious youth violence are black. The youngest is just 12 years old and 99 per cent are male.

    ‘There is clearly a huge problem with knife crime violence at the moment in London, but the Gangs Matrix is not the answer,’ said Amnesty UK director Kate Allen. ‘It’s part of an unhelpful and racialised focus on the concept of gangs at the expense of concentrating on the most violent offenders. The entire system is racially discriminatory, stigmatising young black men for the type of music they listen to, or their social media behaviour, with potential impacts in all sorts of areas of their lives.

    ‘Some police officers have been acting like they’re in the Wild West, making the false assumptions that they can set up fake profiles and covertly befriend people online to monitor them without needing Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act warrants. The Mayor of London needs to dismantle the Matrix unless he can bring it in line with international human rights standards.’

     

    Replies: @photondancer, @Anonymous, @marcavis

    Yup. No matter what the issue affecting blacks is – food deserts, poor health, infant mortality, incarceration rates – SJWs will always talk of it in terms that imply it is deliberately being done to the blacks. They rarely acknowledge that actions by the blacks are contributing to the situation and if they do, it will invariably be excused away as still somehow everyone else’s fault.

    It’s been a while since I gave Amnesty any money. The way they’re going, it’s going to be an even longer while.

  21. This is complaining that you are an orphan after murdering your parents.

    Government schools struggle so much teaching “cause” that they never get around to “effect.”

    The end game is government pharmacies. Eliminate capitalism. In capitalism, you destroy stores, you get no stores. Well, we just can’t have that. Capitalism is bad! Government must takeover. How can you even imagine no pharmacies?

  22. Pharmacies tend to be more concentrated in areas where there are more Medicare patients, meaning people over the age of 65.

    The big chain pharmacies, for some reason, tend to have huge stores with parking lots and consist of massive overpriced convenience stores combined with tiny pharmacies featuring a drive by window.

    The business plan is apparently to get people to wait for a long time for their medications while the pharmacist calls the doctor to clarify the prescription, and hope that they will buy some of the overpriced garbage on the shelves while they are waiting.

    A large proportion of the prescriptions filled are for various kinds of tranquilizers, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. With a huge obese population there is also a massive market for anti-diabetes drugs.

    They are usually extremely inconveniently placed on corners with traffic lights, making it extremely difficult to get in and out of them safely, especially if you are coming from the wrong direction.

    Here in Ecuador we have a pharmacy about every hundred meters, and they are tiny, but they are never yoked to convenience stores as in the US. Most medications can be bought without a doctor’s prescription, and the pharmacists are fairly helpful at identifying what is available. There does not seem to be much demand for Prozac.

    You will find pharmacies on the ground floor of apartment buildings, in bus terminals, and in every shopping street.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    While in the US there were once upon a time "apothecaries" that mainly dispensed drugs from behind a counter, for a very long time (I'm talking 19th century) "drug stores" in America had multiple functions - quite often the "drug store" was paired with a "soda fountain" or lunch counter. Soda water itself (e.g. Coca-Cola) often was advertised as having medicinal properties. It was natural for drug stores to sell not only prescription type medications but over the counter medications and health related medical items - bandages, etc. Often the drug store doubled as a news stand. The pharmacy as just a drug dispensary was never really a thing in America.

    What is new in recent times is the expansion of the sale of not just snacks but packaged groceries, even including refrigerated and frozen items. As supermarkets have grown in size, pharmacies have become mini-supermarkets, appealing to the elderly and others who don't want to drive to a distant supercenter and march up and down the endless aisles. When I moved into my neighborhood, there was an Acme (early supermarket chain - somehow they are still in business, barely) supermarket about a mile away that had been opened in the 1950s and had a much too small footprint for a modern supermarket. The Acme closed and was replaced by a CVS drugstore (to give you an idea of how small this supermarket was, the store is not big even for a CVS) and over the years they have added more and more food so that what you can buy there now is not that different from what was for sale when it was a supermarket, so in a sense the location has gone full circle.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @ATate
    @Jonathan Mason

    Wow, that sounds heavenly!

    Must be why we never have Equadorians knocking on our door down in Yuma.

  23. @El Dato
    The premise is that the economy and population dynamics are some dead physical system with no causal structure and that any deviations from completely gaussian values must have volitional nefarious reasons (white suppressing blacks by creating pharmacy deserts or disproportionately going after "teens") or revolutionary reasons (economically disadvantaged people successfully keeping pharmacies out of the hood to resist gentrification, "teens" emitting cries for attention by gunning down people on street corners).

    The only one who have the power to deviate from gaussian behaviour are whites (except for international politics). They always err on the side of evil, too.

    Here's one from the UK

    As more and more black people are jailed in Britain, the so-called ‘fairness’ of the UK legal system is exposed for all to see


    The number of black children cautioned or sentenced has doubled since the year ending March 2010, from six percent to 12 percent. Over a third (36 percent) of all remands involved BAME children. This increases to 49 percent for remands to youth detention accommodation, black children accounting for 29 percent of remands. The government’s figures also reveal that the proportion of all cases in which black children were sentenced for indictable offences has risen from 14 percent to 22 percent in the past five years.

    And the stats go on.

    Having read the Lammy Review in its entirety, and crunched the government’s latest figures for youth crime, it’s clear that establishment bias – subconscious or otherwise – permeates the criminal justice system, particularly around the fetishisation of young black males. [black young males are a fetish]

    And we’ve heard it all before, from the Metropolitan Police’s invention of the ‘Gangs Matrix’ in 2012 – a database of suspected gang members operating in London – to Operation Trident and its focus on ‘black-on-black’ crime, to the MSM’s popularisation of the term ‘county lines,’ the latest in a long line of racialised tabloid ‘folk devil’ descriptors that includes ‘Yardies,’ ‘muggers’ ‘steamers’ (remember them?), ‘gangbangers,’ ‘thugs,’ and ‘hood rats.’
     

    The "gangs matrix" had to be zeroed out at some time. I guess that improved things in Khan-managed Diversity London. Back to gaussians. Amnesty was on the case:

    What is the Gangs Matrix?


    The Gangs Matrix was part of a highly- politicised response to the 2011 London riots. Individuals are listed as ‘gang nominals’ and given an automated green, amber or red violence ranking. As of October 2017, 3,806 people were on the Matrix. More than three- quarters (78 per cent) of them are black, a disproportionate number given the Met’s own figures show that only 27 per cent of those responsible for serious youth violence are black. The youngest is just 12 years old and 99 per cent are male.

    ‘There is clearly a huge problem with knife crime violence at the moment in London, but the Gangs Matrix is not the answer,’ said Amnesty UK director Kate Allen. ‘It’s part of an unhelpful and racialised focus on the concept of gangs at the expense of concentrating on the most violent offenders. The entire system is racially discriminatory, stigmatising young black men for the type of music they listen to, or their social media behaviour, with potential impacts in all sorts of areas of their lives.

    ‘Some police officers have been acting like they’re in the Wild West, making the false assumptions that they can set up fake profiles and covertly befriend people online to monitor them without needing Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act warrants. The Mayor of London needs to dismantle the Matrix unless he can bring it in line with international human rights standards.’

     

    Replies: @photondancer, @Anonymous, @marcavis

    The time will surely come, in the UK, when a clear majority of the adult prisoner population are blacks.
    This is likely already the case in London.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Plus ca change, plus la meme chose.

    , @prosa123
    @Anonymous

    The time will surely come, in the UK, when a clear majority of the adult prisoner population are blacks.
    This is likely already the case in London.


    ????
    I thought the Pakistanis commit a very high percentage of crime in Britain.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  24. @Sean
    The best way to resist gentrification is Dollar General stores. They host gunplay, send the neighborhood into a downward spiral, and are so highly profitable that they multiply as if by magic.


    I said the Oxford vaccine would be crap.

    https://youtu.be/QKPnqi_eWNI?t=29

    Good old British know-not.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Dollar General stores are usually located close to mobile home parks, so that the residents can walk there on foot to get their cigarettes along with some exercise and fresh air.

  25. Years ago I noticed urban pharmacies kept the deoderant and black hair care products under lock and key. The lush growth of security cameras was another thing that caught my attention along with a huge family planning aisle that judging from the neighborhood TFR wasn’t having much effect.

  26. Steve,

    The solution is the Diverse community in Chicago can carjack a ride to pharmacies in Oak Lawn, Oak Park, Alsip, Park Ridge, or Elmwood Park. That way they’ll be sure to get their vaccinations.

    Just stay out of Du Page county. They charge and try carjackers. https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/breaking/ct-addison-carjacking-second-arrest-20210201-ivjub4h5czdhlg3nlw3ejys7lq-story.html

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @mmack

    Carjacking: Uber for the oppressed.

  27. People like having a home space, territory. People who don’t have it and begrudge others are messed up in the head. Indeed, how can any collect exist without a place to call home in a practical communal sense.

    I love the line ‘In The Heights’ trailer where the guy speaks about ‘Washington Heights’ with a Spanish accent, implicit in this is his love for that territory and his wish for it always to be of his people. But missing is the implication of the name ‘Washington’, it is an alien name from the before people who built it no matter how much he tries to appropriate it by using Spanish syllables. And he won’t be allowed to express it, but if ever his old neighbourhood was flooded with Arabs or Chinese, Lin-Manuel Miranda would be very sad. But it would never occur him that maybe the people the Dominicans and Puerto Ricans displaced were sad too, no, they were just angry and racist.

    I think most of the college-educated urban Americans probably have decoupled from their home towns for so long they don’t feel like they do.

    • Agree: Polistra
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Altai


    But it would never occur him that maybe the people the Dominicans and Puerto Ricans displaced were sad too, no, they were just angry and racist.
     
    The people displaced from Washington Heights were mostly German Jewish refugees who had come in the '30s and they were not sad or angry for the most part. They were happy to retire to Florida and their kids were happy to move to Scarsdale or the Upper East Side. They were glad to leave behind their aging apartments with the peeling paint and the view of the air shaft and the creaking elevator and the steam pipes that banged when the boiler was working, which was not always.
  28. @Buzz Mohawk
    When you periodically smash the windows and loot any business in your neighborhood, businesses tend not to go near you. QED

    Replies: @Wilkey, @Wade Hampton

    Sometimes that’s a benefit. Like when they come to your neighborhood with “vaccines” that haven’t been successfully tested on animals, let alone humans.

  29. This is the quantum theory of Institutional racism. Like the Schrödinger’s cat, the same fact should be at the same time celebrated as a success of the fight for racial Justice, and deplored as the result of White Supremacy.
    Likewise, the great replacement is at the same time an absurd conspiracy theory and a cause for celebration.

  30. How can I best serve a POC neighborhood? I’ll build a store and fill it with cigarettes, soda pop, chips and candy bars. Then, the icing on the cake: a pharmacy loaded with opiates and ADD stimulants. Just wave a Glock in my direction and they’re yours.

    • LOL: JackOH
  31. @Anonymous
    Seems there’s only one kind of police shooting that ghetto blacks are supportive of these days:

    https://twitter.com/Tsthetruth_24/status/1358082481455591429?s=20

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Cato, @Pop Warner, @edkpyros

    As much as it pains me to agree with Taiquan, he’s right.

    Let’s all follow the Rodney King Rule in our daily interactions with the police. “When a cop tells you to sit the hell down, sit the hell down.”

  32. Mt. Pleasant is a thoroughly gentrified neighborhood, where a 1600 SF row house will set you back at least $1.5M. 20 years ago it definitely had a significant Latino presence, but was fairly quiet, certainly compared to neighboring Adams Morgan and much safer than AM or nearby Columbia Heights and Petworth, which were overwhelmingly black neighborhoods. Thanks to being on the west side of 16th Street and hemmed in by city parks without a Metro station, it’s a bit off the beaten path, very pretty, and now has a minimal cohort of people who don’t make in the mid six figures. This writer is completely delusional about it having resisted gentrification, and it will never have a CVS because a) there is a pharmacy a short walk away in Columbia Heights, and b) the residents would never tolerate something as gauche as a national chain of any sort in their neighborhood.

    • Thanks: Jack D
    • Replies: @cityview
    @Arclight

    I agree that Mount Pleasant has been expensive to buy in for decades. Not only are the large old rowhouses costly, but there is a lot of upkeep and repair on such old properties. Most have these have been extensively renovated for years now. I think the Morley article is referring to some handfuls of low-rise rental buildings, but I don't know how inexpensive these could be--condos in similar buildings are not low-priced. The condos and co-ops in the few elevator buildings have never been low-priced. I agree that it has always been quiet--with some dark, deserted streets at night--but I wouldn't say it was much safer some years ago than Adams-Morgan. I agree that it has less crime than Columbia Heights and Petworth, even right now.

    The neighborhood did have one national chain for some years, though: Payless Shoes. Some Mount Pleasant residents might walk to Columbia Heights or south to Columbia Road for the nearest CVS (not one of their better stores), but my guess is that many never leave their cars at home when shopping. So many people in so many city neighborhoods have always been like this.

    My feeling is that CVS was only mildly interested in locating in Mount Pleasant. If they had been strongly interested, the store would have gone there, but likely in a different building.

  33. I’m always dubious of this deserts thing.

    Years ago blacks in Britain, or those speaking for them, claimed that many lived in food deserts.

    Turned out that there were plenty of food shops but they were run by south asians who the blacks would not do business with.

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @Gordo

    Do you remember why? I should have thought there would be some crossover between Indian food and Caribbean food. Even if it were Nigerian blacks complaining, small shop owners will often try stocking items popular with another community in the hope of gaining a few more customers.

    , @Rob McX
    @Gordo

    And I can understand why South Asians would not be popular with the local blacks. They really believe in vigilante justice for any kind of theft. I recall two separate cases in the English courts from the 80s and 90s where people who stole from Pakistani shops ended up being killed by the owner. One was an armed robber who was run over by the shopkeeper in his van when he was making his getaway. The other was a man who stole a punnet of mushrooms. The owner knelt on his neck until he choked to death.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

  34. @Anonymous
    @El Dato

    The time will surely come, in the UK, when a clear majority of the adult prisoner population are blacks.
    This is likely already the case in London.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @prosa123

    Plus ca change, plus la meme chose.

  35. I begin to get the perception that, in general, the Non-White, Non-Asian portion of the population is actually incapable of understanding that utter street level lawlessness is not conducive to a good business environment.

    Let them reap what they have sown.

  36. In a gentrifying boulevard of Oakland, rioters notably ransacked an established, deep discount grocery store (popular with EBTs) and a newly constructed drug store next door to it.

  37. @Jonathan Mason
    Pharmacies tend to be more concentrated in areas where there are more Medicare patients, meaning people over the age of 65.

    The big chain pharmacies, for some reason, tend to have huge stores with parking lots and consist of massive overpriced convenience stores combined with tiny pharmacies featuring a drive by window.

    The business plan is apparently to get people to wait for a long time for their medications while the pharmacist calls the doctor to clarify the prescription, and hope that they will buy some of the overpriced garbage on the shelves while they are waiting.

    A large proportion of the prescriptions filled are for various kinds of tranquilizers, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. With a huge obese population there is also a massive market for anti-diabetes drugs.

    They are usually extremely inconveniently placed on corners with traffic lights, making it extremely difficult to get in and out of them safely, especially if you are coming from the wrong direction.

    Here in Ecuador we have a pharmacy about every hundred meters, and they are tiny, but they are never yoked to convenience stores as in the US. Most medications can be bought without a doctor's prescription, and the pharmacists are fairly helpful at identifying what is available. There does not seem to be much demand for Prozac.

    You will find pharmacies on the ground floor of apartment buildings, in bus terminals, and in every shopping street.

    Replies: @Jack D, @ATate

    While in the US there were once upon a time “apothecaries” that mainly dispensed drugs from behind a counter, for a very long time (I’m talking 19th century) “drug stores” in America had multiple functions – quite often the “drug store” was paired with a “soda fountain” or lunch counter. Soda water itself (e.g. Coca-Cola) often was advertised as having medicinal properties. It was natural for drug stores to sell not only prescription type medications but over the counter medications and health related medical items – bandages, etc. Often the drug store doubled as a news stand. The pharmacy as just a drug dispensary was never really a thing in America.

    What is new in recent times is the expansion of the sale of not just snacks but packaged groceries, even including refrigerated and frozen items. As supermarkets have grown in size, pharmacies have become mini-supermarkets, appealing to the elderly and others who don’t want to drive to a distant supercenter and march up and down the endless aisles. When I moved into my neighborhood, there was an Acme (early supermarket chain – somehow they are still in business, barely) supermarket about a mile away that had been opened in the 1950s and had a much too small footprint for a modern supermarket. The Acme closed and was replaced by a CVS drugstore (to give you an idea of how small this supermarket was, the store is not big even for a CVS) and over the years they have added more and more food so that what you can buy there now is not that different from what was for sale when it was a supermarket, so in a sense the location has gone full circle.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    Yes but they are still basically convenience stores, that do not have fresh meat, fish, fruit, or vegetables, and where everything is more expensive than supermarkets.

    From the point of view of food they are pretty much the same as Dollar Tree, but with higher prices.

    Incidentally the last time I was in a Dollar tree there were stickers on the glass freezer displays saying "EVERYTHING FRESH", in spite of the obvious truth that nothing was fresh and everything was frozen.

    Even on medical products like simple acetaminophen tablets, the own brand prices in CVS and Walgreens seem to be about double the price of Walmart (which also has pharmacies).

    Dollar tree also has a variety of over-the-counter medications and vitamins which are priced at--you've guessed it--$1 and usually a better deal than CVS or Walgreens, even if the packages are small.

    Another interesting development in the United States is that if you wanted to open a small restaurant or cafe, you would really have to locate it in a gas station as gas stations seem to have replaced diners and cafes, and drugstore soda fountains.

    Some even have outside patio tables where travelers can enjoy the gasoline fumes along with your coffee and sandwich.

    One such chain of bistro-gasolinarias is called Wausau, where you can get a large cup of a most disgusting concoction of coffee flavored with mint and tons of sugar for a small sum.

    The next thing we will be hearing about is areas that are gasoline deserts, where the bones of abandoned safari vehicles are circled by buzzards and picked over by the natives.

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden

  38. Why bother eating right, exercising, and getting proper sleep when you can make up yet another issue to bludgeon YT with?

  39. @Anonymous
    Seems there’s only one kind of police shooting that ghetto blacks are supportive of these days:

    https://twitter.com/Tsthetruth_24/status/1358082481455591429?s=20

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Cato, @Pop Warner, @edkpyros

    Incredible video. And the ghetto commentary! Anyone know the full story?

  40. I watched a CVS store in Baltimore get looted and burned during the Freddie Grey riots a couple of years ago. Local officials pressured CVS to rebuild it and CVS did. This summer I saw a small independent pharmacy get looted in Philadelphia. CVS and Walgreens provide the only refrigerated food supply in many negro areas where people can get milk, eggs, sandwich meats etc. with their EBT cards so they are much more than just a pharmacy to these communities.

    In white areas the pharmacy is the grocery store, the Walmart or the Target. I note Target puts its pharmacy as far from the entrance as possible. I complained to the pharmacist about this but he said it was deliberately done to discourage addicts from robbing their pharmacies.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @unit472

    The Ralph’s Vons and other supermarket chains in California often have pharmacies. You can drop off the prescription, shop for and buy the groceries while waiting for the prescription. It’s convenient. Why not.

    The CVS I use is just a block off the Wilshire corridor high rises. Those buildings have thousands of people working in them. Walk a block to CVS at lunch time . Pick up a sandwich in the deli section. Go to the park across the street and eat it. Walk around a bit get some exercise. That’s probably why that particular CVS has such a big salad and sandwich section.

    There’s a lot less waiting in pharmacy lines nowadays. For the past few years the Drs have just faxed the prescriptions to the pharmacies instead of giving them to the patients. So there’s no drop off line. Plus many pharmacies offer free home delivery. Total convenience

    I just got back from picking up a prescription at CVS. Sunday afternoon and I was the only person in the pharmacy section. With Drs faxing prescriptions and delivery, there’s no need for the customers to go to the pharmacy anymore. I cruised around but didn’t buy anything else.

  41. @Jim Christian
    @The Alarmist


    Pharmacy deserts … just desserts.
     
    Not just those, or the deserts of just those and grocers, a common complaint. It's a whole range of services, retail and otherwise. Clinics, housing offices, it gets to a point where you cannot get people into those areas to work or support those functions. This is the depravity of high-crime areas. In Ferguson (who could forget?), they even burned their gas stations. In any case, when the smoke cleared, they were complaining about having to drive ten miles for gas because all the stations closer had been burned. And those gas stations are a staple of the community. They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread. Because there are no grocers. Such is the diet of these folks. And they burned even that. What to do?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Abe, @Mike Tre

    In Ferguson (who could forget?), they even burned their gas stations. In any case, when the smoke cleared, they were complaining about having to drive ten miles for gas because all the stations closer had been burned. And those gas stations are a staple of the community. They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread.

    “You should have told me that I would need food, medicine, and energy!”
    “I DID!”
    “But you did not persuade me, Nicholas. You did not persuade me.”

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Abe

    A recycled gag from a month or so ago (you used it with respect to getting a second dose of the vaccine, I think), but a good one. Forest Whitaker as a psychopathic dictator without morals or scruples never gets old.

  42. Good grief there are few pharmacies in rural America. Heck there are few doctors as well. Most hospitals are dying there as well. Urban blacks are blocks away from it all. They simply don’t want the vaccine. Why do the clucking class find that so hard to understand?

  43. @Wilkey
    @Buzz Mohawk


    When you periodically smash the windows and loot any business in your neighborhood, businesses tend not to go near you. QED
     
    Oh, that’s only the beginning. The customers have less money to spend. Shoplifting rates are high. Armed robbery rates are high. Even the paying customers are annoying and difficult. And I can imagine that finding good employees to begin with is difficult and that employee turnover is insanely high. When you’re talking about pharmacies, those employees also have to be educated. They’re medical professionals, not minimum wage employees just running a cash register.

    But hey, we’re now in the era where the right to anti-racism means the government can force you to hire who they want you to hire, lend money to who they want you to lend money to, and build a business where they tell you to build a business. If customers steal from you then you have no right to object. Right to speech, assembly, and property? Not so much.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @bomag, @Anon7, @Reg Cæsar

    “not having a chain pharmacy in your neighborhood is good because pharmacies represent gentrification…”

    Maybe we’re thinking about this in the wrong way. Looting and burning the CVSs is just a way of maintaining the neighborhood. Think of it as similar to the practice of Native Americans who would periodically set fire to forests to improve them for their use:

    ‘Fire is medicine’: the tribes burning California forests to save them

    This fire will chew out the underbrush and lick the moss off the trees. It will blister the hazel stalks and coax strong new shoots that will be gathered and woven into baskets for babies and caps for traditional dancers, and it will tease the tan oak acorns to drop. It will burn the invasive plants that suck up the rain, letting more clean, cool water flow through the black, into the watershed and down the Klamath river for the salmon.

    Soon all that black will be dotted with bear grass and huckleberries pushing up for the sunlight and down for the water they couldn’t reach when they were crowded out by tall scotch broom and dense twists of blackberries and the ever-encroaching fir trees. Even sooner, animals will flock here to roll in the ash, a California dust bath.

    For more than 13,000 years, the Yurok, Karuk, Hupa, Miwok, Chumash and hundreds of other tribes across California and the world used small intentional burns to renew local food, medicinal and cultural resources, create habitat for animals, and reduce the risk of larger, more dangerous wild fires.

    Just think of the hazard posed by a CVS next to a Barnes and Noble next to a Whole Foods next to a Bed Bath and Beyond next to gentrified condos full of furniture. Torch that CVS and the BN full of flammable books goes up; soon, your whole neighborhood is on fire! Better to use strategic burns to prevent catastrophe.

    Native peoples have wisdom, guys. Listen to it.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  44. @Altai
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0CL-ZSuCrQ

    People like having a home space, territory. People who don't have it and begrudge others are messed up in the head. Indeed, how can any collect exist without a place to call home in a practical communal sense.

    I love the line 'In The Heights' trailer where the guy speaks about 'Washington Heights' with a Spanish accent, implicit in this is his love for that territory and his wish for it always to be of his people. But missing is the implication of the name 'Washington', it is an alien name from the before people who built it no matter how much he tries to appropriate it by using Spanish syllables. And he won't be allowed to express it, but if ever his old neighbourhood was flooded with Arabs or Chinese, Lin-Manuel Miranda would be very sad. But it would never occur him that maybe the people the Dominicans and Puerto Ricans displaced were sad too, no, they were just angry and racist.

    I think most of the college-educated urban Americans probably have decoupled from their home towns for so long they don't feel like they do.

    Replies: @Jack D

    But it would never occur him that maybe the people the Dominicans and Puerto Ricans displaced were sad too, no, they were just angry and racist.

    The people displaced from Washington Heights were mostly German Jewish refugees who had come in the ’30s and they were not sad or angry for the most part. They were happy to retire to Florida and their kids were happy to move to Scarsdale or the Upper East Side. They were glad to leave behind their aging apartments with the peeling paint and the view of the air shaft and the creaking elevator and the steam pipes that banged when the boiler was working, which was not always.

  45. You can’t drive more then a half mile anywhere in Chicago without passing a Walgreens or CVS.

    Even so, the article is wrong anyway. Pretty much every street corner on the west side of Chicago has an undocumented pharmacist standing by to serve you.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Mike Tre


    Pretty much every street corner on the west side of Chicago has an undocumented pharmacist standing by to serve you.
     
    But just try stealing from them. It would be safer to loot every Walgreens in Illinois.
  46. @Jim Christian
    @The Alarmist


    Pharmacy deserts … just desserts.
     
    Not just those, or the deserts of just those and grocers, a common complaint. It's a whole range of services, retail and otherwise. Clinics, housing offices, it gets to a point where you cannot get people into those areas to work or support those functions. This is the depravity of high-crime areas. In Ferguson (who could forget?), they even burned their gas stations. In any case, when the smoke cleared, they were complaining about having to drive ten miles for gas because all the stations closer had been burned. And those gas stations are a staple of the community. They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread. Because there are no grocers. Such is the diet of these folks. And they burned even that. What to do?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Abe, @Mike Tre

    “ They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread. ”

    You forgot the most important thing they sell: Newports.

    • LOL: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Mike Tre


    You forgot the most important thing they sell: Newports.

     

    CVS won't. They dropped tobacco sales a few years back and took a big short-term hit. But the increased goodwill with the healthcare industry paid off handsomely in the long run. Plus, it made Walgreens and all the others look bad.

    Tobacco-free for five years
  47. @Anonymous
    Seems there’s only one kind of police shooting that ghetto blacks are supportive of these days:

    https://twitter.com/Tsthetruth_24/status/1358082481455591429?s=20

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Cato, @Pop Warner, @edkpyros

    To be fair, a lot of the comments – many from black accounts – aren’t celebrating this and calling out the guy filming for being a scumbag. One of the few times you’ll see handles like AfricanKang and TradGroyper agreeing on something

  48. A down town Walgreen’s has been closed, after repeated looting’s. My local Walgreen’s no longer offers shopping baskets, because they are too easy to fill with loot. So, we have to balance out items in our arms. Yesterday, I went shopping there and the clerk’s were on their knees, busy installing anti-theft devices on every product hanging hook in the store. A friend’s wife works at a CVS, which is constantly looted.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Michelle

    You need to move.

  49. @Jonathan Mason
    Pharmacies tend to be more concentrated in areas where there are more Medicare patients, meaning people over the age of 65.

    The big chain pharmacies, for some reason, tend to have huge stores with parking lots and consist of massive overpriced convenience stores combined with tiny pharmacies featuring a drive by window.

    The business plan is apparently to get people to wait for a long time for their medications while the pharmacist calls the doctor to clarify the prescription, and hope that they will buy some of the overpriced garbage on the shelves while they are waiting.

    A large proportion of the prescriptions filled are for various kinds of tranquilizers, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. With a huge obese population there is also a massive market for anti-diabetes drugs.

    They are usually extremely inconveniently placed on corners with traffic lights, making it extremely difficult to get in and out of them safely, especially if you are coming from the wrong direction.

    Here in Ecuador we have a pharmacy about every hundred meters, and they are tiny, but they are never yoked to convenience stores as in the US. Most medications can be bought without a doctor's prescription, and the pharmacists are fairly helpful at identifying what is available. There does not seem to be much demand for Prozac.

    You will find pharmacies on the ground floor of apartment buildings, in bus terminals, and in every shopping street.

    Replies: @Jack D, @ATate

    Wow, that sounds heavenly!

    Must be why we never have Equadorians knocking on our door down in Yuma.

  50. I work in Venice, CA. The other day, two hipster looking guys pull over in an SUV shouting me down. They’ve got a great deal, they say. A steal. Opens up the trunk and a 4k projector and blue tooth speakers fills the back. It’s from a production shoot. I can have it real cheap they say. I immediately am reminded of the morons marching and looting a few months ago. It was probably a mostly peaceful production but I decline. Apparently, this is pretty common around Venice now.

    • Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost
    @alaska3636

    That sounds like a modern version of the "Speakermen". Guys offer you a super deal on some equipment they need to unload. Looks legit with shrink wrap and printed labels. Get what you think are $2000 high end speakers for 200, then when you get them home you find they're complete junk. Gotcha!

    This has been going on since the 70s. It started in Southern California but has spread as far as Australia I've read.

  51. @TruthRevolution.net
    Are you, too, just reading the press with a morbid curiosity?

    What is the most recent invention to explain away the effects of black crime or leftist mishandling of crime, policing, education, and other policies?

    Reading newspaper not really with intent of learning news, but discovering insanity?

    The root cause is that racist facts must never be told. The solution would be to point out every single falsehood or unproven statement. Did I not just discover another George Floyd "killing" (violation of presumption of innocence and ignoring the Hennepin county coroner's autopsy)?
    Add a few more dozen factual untruths. What world are we living in? a) Left and b) Right and c) race realists cannot agree on the reality of the world we live in. What insanity.
    Black lives matter for peace nobel prize!

    Replies: @Abe

    Did I not just discover another George Floyd “killing” (violation of presumption of innocence and ignoring the Hennepin county coroner’s autopsy)?

    When the law definitively proves there was no killing, there was no murder, there was no “torture” (as claimed by our current Vice President during a nationally televised debate) do the 7 figure settlements then start rolling in? Or does a judge in Hawaii step in at that point to invoke the principle of Non Punchus Downus when it comes to a white beat cop being defamed by an intersectional Vice President and an Internet hecto-billionaire through his vanity rag sheet?

    • Thanks: Charon
  52. @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    While in the US there were once upon a time "apothecaries" that mainly dispensed drugs from behind a counter, for a very long time (I'm talking 19th century) "drug stores" in America had multiple functions - quite often the "drug store" was paired with a "soda fountain" or lunch counter. Soda water itself (e.g. Coca-Cola) often was advertised as having medicinal properties. It was natural for drug stores to sell not only prescription type medications but over the counter medications and health related medical items - bandages, etc. Often the drug store doubled as a news stand. The pharmacy as just a drug dispensary was never really a thing in America.

    What is new in recent times is the expansion of the sale of not just snacks but packaged groceries, even including refrigerated and frozen items. As supermarkets have grown in size, pharmacies have become mini-supermarkets, appealing to the elderly and others who don't want to drive to a distant supercenter and march up and down the endless aisles. When I moved into my neighborhood, there was an Acme (early supermarket chain - somehow they are still in business, barely) supermarket about a mile away that had been opened in the 1950s and had a much too small footprint for a modern supermarket. The Acme closed and was replaced by a CVS drugstore (to give you an idea of how small this supermarket was, the store is not big even for a CVS) and over the years they have added more and more food so that what you can buy there now is not that different from what was for sale when it was a supermarket, so in a sense the location has gone full circle.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Yes but they are still basically convenience stores, that do not have fresh meat, fish, fruit, or vegetables, and where everything is more expensive than supermarkets.

    From the point of view of food they are pretty much the same as Dollar Tree, but with higher prices.

    Incidentally the last time I was in a Dollar tree there were stickers on the glass freezer displays saying “EVERYTHING FRESH”, in spite of the obvious truth that nothing was fresh and everything was frozen.

    Even on medical products like simple acetaminophen tablets, the own brand prices in CVS and Walgreens seem to be about double the price of Walmart (which also has pharmacies).

    Dollar tree also has a variety of over-the-counter medications and vitamins which are priced at–you’ve guessed it–$1 and usually a better deal than CVS or Walgreens, even if the packages are small.

    Another interesting development in the United States is that if you wanted to open a small restaurant or cafe, you would really have to locate it in a gas station as gas stations seem to have replaced diners and cafes, and drugstore soda fountains.

    Some even have outside patio tables where travelers can enjoy the gasoline fumes along with your coffee and sandwich.

    One such chain of bistro-gasolinarias is called Wausau, where you can get a large cup of a most disgusting concoction of coffee flavored with mint and tons of sugar for a small sum.

    The next thing we will be hearing about is areas that are gasoline deserts, where the bones of abandoned safari vehicles are circled by buzzards and picked over by the natives.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jonathan Mason

    CVS and even 7-11 and gas stations have fresh fruit for a snack.

    CVS seems to specialize. Some have a lot of dishes pots pans cooking equipment. Some have big hardware sections; wonderful if you don’t want to drive to and wander around Home Depot for duct tape screws window putty etc. Others have a lot of food including eggs and bacon. Great prices on ice cream Some have big baby clothes sections as well as diapers etc. At Christmas CVS has huge toy sections. 1/3 price the day after Christmas. 8 grandchildren , we always stocked up after Christmas. The one near me has flowers very convenient if there’s no florist nearby. Also magazines and paperbacks.

    Nothing wrong with one stop walking distance short drive shopping. And why not pick up a coloring book for the kid or flowers for the wife at a convenient CVS a block from work or home?

    That’s the advantage of city living; many shops nearby. Who cares if it’s an individually owned hardware store hair barrettes & bows cookware toy florist grocery etc or consolidated into one CVS?

    CVS & Walgreens took the place of all those Woolworth general stores in every city neighborhood that disappeared. They are general stores, same type of stores set up in America when the first European settlers arrived.

    BTW it was the gas companies that forced the franchisees to switch from car repair to food. Even the most overpriced repairs are far less profitable than 1.75 ounce packages of potato chips for $1.99 Pay for gas with credit card, no need to go inside and be tempted by the snack food.

    I really don’t see the problem with conveniently located general stores.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Alden
    @Jonathan Mason

    The food in CVS stores is much less expensive than food in the supermarkets in my Los Angeles neighborhood Depends on where you live.

    The Target in Westwood has a huge real food section including fresh meat and produce. Prices are about 40 percent lower than the Pavilions on the other side of the parking lot and 60 percent lower than the nearby Bristol Farms and Whole Foods supermarkets.

    Target is putting in real food markets all over Beverly Hills Santa Monica West Los Angeles to compete with expensive supermarkets. I assume Target wants to drive Whole Foods Gelsens Bristol Farms Pavilions etc out of business and take over the food business.

    The 99 cent store at Pico and Olympic has an incredible produce section. Red bell peppers $1.00 instead of $6.00 a pound. What’s wrong with that? I don’t like tomatoes. Had houseguests for a week and bought tomatoes at the Pico 99 cent store. They just raved about the 99 cent store tomatoes. So I bought 10 pounds more and they loved them. The Pico WLA 99 cent store produce is as good as the Beverly Hills Farmers Market produce.

    I make several trips to N California every year. I always stop at the San Mateo county farm stands. The orchards vines and bushes are 20 yards away. . Fruit is no better that the Pico Olympic 99cent store fruit.

    You’re just another expat nitpicking about anything and everything about America to display how superior you are compared to those of us stuck here in anti White America.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @prosa123, @cityview

  53. OT: From MinniStarTrib:

    Minneapolis violent crimes soared in 2020 amid pandemic, protests
    Pandemic, shutdowns, unrest triggered a domino effect, leaders say.

    By Libor Jany (has a good tweeter feed)
    Minneapolis Star Tribune
    Feb 6, 2021 — 5:30PM

    Blah, blah, blah, redlining, blah, blah, blah, systemic, blah, blah, blah, education, blah, blah, blah, strategic …

    [21st paragraph] Although violent crime was trending upward through the first half of the 2020, it really took off after May 25, when Floyd died, MPD data show. Experts said that other cities experienced similar surges in violent crime in the wake of a controversial police killing, including Baltimore after the in-custody death of Freddie Gray in 2015. Protests also consumed that city; its embattled police force went under federal investigation, and the city ended that year with 342 homicides.

    https://www.startribune.com/minneapolis-violent-crimes-soared-in-2020-amid-pandemic-protests/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jack Armstrong

    Thanks.

    Replies: @Jim Christian

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack Armstrong


    By Libor Jany (has a good tweeter feed)
     
    https://st-chorus-base.imgix.net/author_profile_images/194322/LiborJany..0.jpg?w=150&h=200&crop=faces

    He was born in Czechoslovakia, and has lived in Gabon, France and seven U.S. states.

    https://www.startribune.com/libor-jany/6134700/
     
    So no (close) relation to Pavel, the other notable Jany in the Twin Cities. They sure look different.

    https://www.pjanymusic.com/


    https://www.pjanymusic.com/Pavel-Jany-acoustic-guitar.jpg
  54. @Abe
    @Jim Christian


    In Ferguson (who could forget?), they even burned their gas stations. In any case, when the smoke cleared, they were complaining about having to drive ten miles for gas because all the stations closer had been burned. And those gas stations are a staple of the community. They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread.
     
    https://i1.wp.com/thepeoplesmovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Last-King-Of-Scotland.jpg

    “You should have told me that I would need food, medicine, and energy!”
    “I DID!”
    “But you did not persuade me, Nicholas. You did not persuade me.”

     

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    A recycled gag from a month or so ago (you used it with respect to getting a second dose of the vaccine, I think), but a good one. Forest Whitaker as a psychopathic dictator without morals or scruples never gets old.

  55. Another Crypto-Limerick

    Black districts are pharmacological deserts due to biological differences; blacks, per statistical facts, having tendencies criminological.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @the one they call Desanex


    per statistical facts
     
    Do you even hear yourself. So racist.
  56. @Jim Christian
    @Wilkey


    If customers steal from you then you have no right to object.
     
    In deserts, they spin the purchase through a bulletproof carousal, there is no shoplifting, only bulletproof enclosures. Outer walls, customer interface, Koreans behind the glass, armed to the teeth.

    Replies: @Bite Moi, @Colin Wright

    Jim Christian——–These Koreans invested in a small business.Their customers “invest ” in malt liquor,cigarettes and lottery tickets.

  57. @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    Yes but they are still basically convenience stores, that do not have fresh meat, fish, fruit, or vegetables, and where everything is more expensive than supermarkets.

    From the point of view of food they are pretty much the same as Dollar Tree, but with higher prices.

    Incidentally the last time I was in a Dollar tree there were stickers on the glass freezer displays saying "EVERYTHING FRESH", in spite of the obvious truth that nothing was fresh and everything was frozen.

    Even on medical products like simple acetaminophen tablets, the own brand prices in CVS and Walgreens seem to be about double the price of Walmart (which also has pharmacies).

    Dollar tree also has a variety of over-the-counter medications and vitamins which are priced at--you've guessed it--$1 and usually a better deal than CVS or Walgreens, even if the packages are small.

    Another interesting development in the United States is that if you wanted to open a small restaurant or cafe, you would really have to locate it in a gas station as gas stations seem to have replaced diners and cafes, and drugstore soda fountains.

    Some even have outside patio tables where travelers can enjoy the gasoline fumes along with your coffee and sandwich.

    One such chain of bistro-gasolinarias is called Wausau, where you can get a large cup of a most disgusting concoction of coffee flavored with mint and tons of sugar for a small sum.

    The next thing we will be hearing about is areas that are gasoline deserts, where the bones of abandoned safari vehicles are circled by buzzards and picked over by the natives.

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden

    CVS and even 7-11 and gas stations have fresh fruit for a snack.

    CVS seems to specialize. Some have a lot of dishes pots pans cooking equipment. Some have big hardware sections; wonderful if you don’t want to drive to and wander around Home Depot for duct tape screws window putty etc. Others have a lot of food including eggs and bacon. Great prices on ice cream Some have big baby clothes sections as well as diapers etc. At Christmas CVS has huge toy sections. 1/3 price the day after Christmas. 8 grandchildren , we always stocked up after Christmas. The one near me has flowers very convenient if there’s no florist nearby. Also magazines and paperbacks.

    Nothing wrong with one stop walking distance short drive shopping. And why not pick up a coloring book for the kid or flowers for the wife at a convenient CVS a block from work or home?

    That’s the advantage of city living; many shops nearby. Who cares if it’s an individually owned hardware store hair barrettes & bows cookware toy florist grocery etc or consolidated into one CVS?

    CVS & Walgreens took the place of all those Woolworth general stores in every city neighborhood that disappeared. They are general stores, same type of stores set up in America when the first European settlers arrived.

    BTW it was the gas companies that forced the franchisees to switch from car repair to food. Even the most overpriced repairs are far less profitable than 1.75 ounce packages of potato chips for $1.99 Pay for gas with credit card, no need to go inside and be tempted by the snack food.

    I really don’t see the problem with conveniently located general stores.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Alden


    I really don’t see the problem with conveniently located general stores.
     
    The only problem is that gas station seem to have driven small cafes and restaurants out of business.
  58. @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    Yes but they are still basically convenience stores, that do not have fresh meat, fish, fruit, or vegetables, and where everything is more expensive than supermarkets.

    From the point of view of food they are pretty much the same as Dollar Tree, but with higher prices.

    Incidentally the last time I was in a Dollar tree there were stickers on the glass freezer displays saying "EVERYTHING FRESH", in spite of the obvious truth that nothing was fresh and everything was frozen.

    Even on medical products like simple acetaminophen tablets, the own brand prices in CVS and Walgreens seem to be about double the price of Walmart (which also has pharmacies).

    Dollar tree also has a variety of over-the-counter medications and vitamins which are priced at--you've guessed it--$1 and usually a better deal than CVS or Walgreens, even if the packages are small.

    Another interesting development in the United States is that if you wanted to open a small restaurant or cafe, you would really have to locate it in a gas station as gas stations seem to have replaced diners and cafes, and drugstore soda fountains.

    Some even have outside patio tables where travelers can enjoy the gasoline fumes along with your coffee and sandwich.

    One such chain of bistro-gasolinarias is called Wausau, where you can get a large cup of a most disgusting concoction of coffee flavored with mint and tons of sugar for a small sum.

    The next thing we will be hearing about is areas that are gasoline deserts, where the bones of abandoned safari vehicles are circled by buzzards and picked over by the natives.

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden

    The food in CVS stores is much less expensive than food in the supermarkets in my Los Angeles neighborhood Depends on where you live.

    The Target in Westwood has a huge real food section including fresh meat and produce. Prices are about 40 percent lower than the Pavilions on the other side of the parking lot and 60 percent lower than the nearby Bristol Farms and Whole Foods supermarkets.

    Target is putting in real food markets all over Beverly Hills Santa Monica West Los Angeles to compete with expensive supermarkets. I assume Target wants to drive Whole Foods Gelsens Bristol Farms Pavilions etc out of business and take over the food business.

    The 99 cent store at Pico and Olympic has an incredible produce section. Red bell peppers $1.00 instead of $6.00 a pound. What’s wrong with that? I don’t like tomatoes. Had houseguests for a week and bought tomatoes at the Pico 99 cent store. They just raved about the 99 cent store tomatoes. So I bought 10 pounds more and they loved them. The Pico WLA 99 cent store produce is as good as the Beverly Hills Farmers Market produce.

    I make several trips to N California every year. I always stop at the San Mateo county farm stands. The orchards vines and bushes are 20 yards away. . Fruit is no better that the Pico Olympic 99cent store fruit.

    You’re just another expat nitpicking about anything and everything about America to display how superior you are compared to those of us stuck here in anti White America.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Alden

    Interesting. CVS is very expensive in Florida, but apparently much cheaper and better for food in California. That's the advantage of having stores from sea to shining sea.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @prosa123
    @Alden

    The Target in Westwood has a huge real food section including fresh meat and produce. Prices are about 40 percent lower than the Pavilions on the other side of the parking lot and 60 percent lower than the nearby Bristol Farms and Whole Foods supermarkets.

    About a year and a half ago the Target near me greatly expanded its food department to the point that it's as large as a small supermarket. Unfortunately, the shelves are usually so barren that you'd think there's a Category 5 hurricane on the way, or that you're in Pyongyang People's Food Market #31 minus the portrait of Kim Il-Sung.
    It's not because the prices are such a bargain, they're decent but nothing unusual, as far as I can tell it's because the employees do not do much restocking during store hours and the store doesn't use outside merchandisers.
    One thing you'll notice in most Targets and Walmarts and even some actual supermarkets is that the meat comes pre-packaged rather than cut by in-store meat cutters. Supermarkets don't like having meat cutters because they're unionized, highly paid (often far outearning the store managers), and militant. A few years ago the major Stop& Shop chain was having so much trouble with the meat cutters in its New Hampshire stores that it sold off the stores and pulled out of the state.

    Replies: @Alden, @Jack D

    , @cityview
    @Alden

    Every CVS, every Walgreens (not my preferred store), every Target I've been to is slightly different. I love the CVS stores that are well-stocked with greeting cards, office supplies, groceries, fresh flowers, household appliances, and gift items. I find CVS prices on food to be high, but the sales prices can be much lower.

    Every Target I've ever been to has a real grocery department, and a good one. They don't have everything, but you are guaranteed to find something you can eat. I am a vegetarian and selective, and I can find quite a bit. Prices are good (I live in Chicago, where everything is expensive and everything except newspapers is taxed) for the most part.

  59. @Jim Christian
    @Achmed E. Newman


    No, it was a retreat, not an attack. First there were the many attacks by your constituents on the candy and cold beer aisles.
     
    Yeah, Achmed, you don't have to burn the store down to drive off the company. Stores in black regions are looted day-by-day, employees ripping off the store, allowing their friends to come in and shoplift, not to mention your labor pool is very weak there to begin with. It's why where once there were malls all over, black takeover caused their demise for the above reasons. Then of course, they became a gathering place for 'teens' and their gunplay. There's no making a profit for a CVS or grocer in such conditions and so they close up and never come back or never go in the first place. Baltimore has enormous food and drug store deserts. Every single urban setting is a desert.

    It's not an attack on minorities that there are deserts. It's a response, as you inferred. There's a big, big difference, and even these idiots know it. And where they burned their own CVS and grocer and they weren't rebuilt really points up what was done.

    Replies: @Hannah Katz

    Amazing that Target has agreed to rebuild the fire gutted store in Minneapolis. Of course they are headquartered nearby, but just plain dumb to keep rebuilding stores in a location where the locals regularly rip you off and you lose your shirt. Virtue signaling at its worst.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
  60. @Anonymous
    Seems there’s only one kind of police shooting that ghetto blacks are supportive of these days:

    https://twitter.com/Tsthetruth_24/status/1358082481455591429?s=20

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @Cato, @Pop Warner, @edkpyros

    If anyone can’t see the Twitter video of the black guy cheering on the police shooting of a mentally ill white man, then triumphantly cackling that “he thought his ass was privileged”, it’s here:


    • Thanks: Rob McX, Cato
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @edkpyros

    This is what whites who say 'all lives matter' don't understand. Blacks don't care about police shootings of white people, or of non-blacks generally. Attempts by white victims of police violence to make common cause with black victims will always be indignantly rebuffed. No white person who understands the black mentality will be surprised by this.

  61. Drug store looting in SF is very strange to me. Very safe and casual. I believe the drug stores are moving out as a result.

    • Thanks: Cato
    • Replies: @John Up North
    @Anonymous

    I recently stumbled upon shoplifters a couple of times in Chicago. Once at a CVS and another time at a Walgreens. Both theives had large bags they were stuffing.

    I briefly worked store security for Jewel - Osco in the mid 80s. I recall the company being very serious about catching shoplifters and making sure the lifters were prosecuted. It seems like the merchants just through in the towel.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Jack D

    , @Polistra
    @Anonymous

    It looks like privilege and entitlement, but it can't be. Just can't be.

    This goes on all the time in the east coast city where I live. Everyone just looks the other way. Safer. I used to post videos of it but YouTube took every one down for TOS violations, but they never said which terms were being violated.

    , @Kaz
    @Anonymous

    Can't do anything either even if the cops catch them if the theft is under 1k.. Catch and release

  62. But from the Washington Post, we learn that not having a chain pharmacy in your neighborhood is good because pharmacies represent gentrification and they are irresistible to the Mostly Peaceful Protesters because of all the stuff on their shelves that is just crying out to be looted:

    At first glance, stocking up on narcotics might not seem an appropriate way to honour the memory of someone who died by fentanyl.

  63. @Jim Christian
    @Wilkey


    If customers steal from you then you have no right to object.
     
    In deserts, they spin the purchase through a bulletproof carousal, there is no shoplifting, only bulletproof enclosures. Outer walls, customer interface, Koreans behind the glass, armed to the teeth.

    Replies: @Bite Moi, @Colin Wright

    ‘…Outer walls, customer interface, Koreans behind the glass, armed to the teeth.’

    Blacks are grateful to Korea, aren’t they? After all, where would they be, absent Koreans?

    • LOL: Jim Christian
  64. Remember the Karen during the riots who was taping the CVS employee for daring to call the police on the two enterprising young men who were liberating the store of its merchandise?

    She probably is reading this story right now, nodding at the savagery of our society because of all the food and pharmacy deserts in inner cities.

  65. “My work found that predominantly black and Hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago have fewer pharmacies and are more likely to be pharmacy deserts, and are also more likely to experience closures,” said Associate Professor Dima Mazen Qato, University of Southern California.

    There are two blocs of neighborhoods of interest here. One on the South Side with a population of 650,000 and one on the west side with a population of about 350,000. Chicago did not, pre-Ferguson, have an understaffed police force. Nevertheless, they tolerated a homicide rate at that time of around 47 per 100,000 in these two blocks of neighborhoods. The homicide rate in the rest of Chicago was about 5.5 per 100,000 at that time. Outside of a few hotspots (Gary, East Chicago, and Hammond, Indiana; Harvey, Illinois), the homicide rate in Chicago’s suburbs at that time was around 2.3 per 100,000. Note, at that time, the most violent neighborhood in New York City (Bed-Stuy) had a homicide rate of 15 per 100,000 (while Harlem had a rate of 8.5 per 100,000). Understanding what happened to your retail trade isn’t that difficult. Coming up with a specious argument assigning blame to CVS, Rite-Aid, and Walgreen one might wager isn’t that difficult, either, though coming up with one that will persuade someone who isn’t a woke-tard would be.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Art Deco

    University of S California is located in one of the highest crime black ghettos in the country. It’s becoming gentrified by civilized Hispanics. The pharmacies around USC have big signs on the doors. “ This store does not carry Vicodin and a list of other drugs the store doesn’t carry”. The sign is to deter robbers looking for pain killers.

  66. the presence and/or absence of white people is truly a pox on black and brown communities.

    • Agree: Charon
  67. The Chicago media is a satellite of the DC media. They’ve been pushing pandemic porn 24/7 while the city is dying on the vine.

    Sad to say that even middle class black neighborhoods have high crime rates along with moribund business districts. I recently drove through the business district of the Chicago neighborhood I was ethnically cleansed from. I couldn’t help but notice the many shuttered store fronts that were once hardware stores, pizza parlors, pharmacies, hamburger joints. All gone.

  68. Blacks or decent retail outlets, pick one.

  69. @Jack Armstrong
    OT: From MinniStarTrib:

    Minneapolis violent crimes soared in 2020 amid pandemic, protests
    Pandemic, shutdowns, unrest triggered a domino effect, leaders say.

    By Libor Jany (has a good tweeter feed)
    Minneapolis Star Tribune
    Feb 6, 2021 — 5:30PM
     
    Blah, blah, blah, redlining, blah, blah, blah, systemic, blah, blah, blah, education, blah, blah, blah, strategic …

    [21st paragraph] Although violent crime was trending upward through the first half of the 2020, it really took off after May 25, when Floyd died, MPD data show. Experts said that other cities experienced similar surges in violent crime in the wake of a controversial police killing, including Baltimore after the in-custody death of Freddie Gray in 2015. Protests also consumed that city; its embattled police force went under federal investigation, and the city ended that year with 342 homicides.
     
    https://www.startribune.com/minneapolis-violent-crimes-soared-in-2020-amid-pandemic-protests/

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, no Super Bowl posting in your list?

    Bucs 38, Chiefs 24. For lots of reasons. You heard it here first.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Jim Christian

  70. The regulars who lined the bar — masked and (sort of) socially distanced — stared up in appalled silence at a TV as the president hoisted a Bible. The country was disintegrating during happy hour. Mayor Muriel Bowser’s 7 p.m. curfew order was fast approaching. The crowd thinned.

    And they expect us to make this a state? But the gentrifiers have given us a most useful argument.

    While we can’t say “It’s too black to be a state”, now “It’s too white to be a state!” The three electors were a sop to the civil rights movement, as was the promise of statehood. But now that annoying LGBTSJWSs outnumber blacks, that case collapses. Never mind statehood, repeal the 23rd.

    State Rep. Ford La Shawn Ford, (D) Chicago.

    Not to be confused with Ford Madox Ford (E) Avignon and Olivet.

    …said Associate Professor Dima Mazen Qato, University of Southern California…

    …and founder and chairman of the Qato Institute.

    the Marx Cafe bar

    Baristas of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but your opiates!

    Marx Cafe = Max farce.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Reg Cæsar

    I agree, put DC back in Maryland.

  71. @Reg Cæsar

    The regulars who lined the bar — masked and (sort of) socially distanced — stared up in appalled silence at a TV as the president hoisted a Bible. The country was disintegrating during happy hour. Mayor Muriel Bowser’s 7 p.m. curfew order was fast approaching. The crowd thinned.
     
    And they expect us to make this a state? But the gentrifiers have given us a most useful argument.

    While we can't say "It's too black to be a state", now "It's too white to be a state!" The three electors were a sop to the civil rights movement, as was the promise of statehood. But now that annoying LGBTSJWSs outnumber blacks, that case collapses. Never mind statehood, repeal the 23rd.

    State Rep. Ford La Shawn Ford, (D) Chicago.

     

    Not to be confused with Ford Madox Ford (E) Avignon and Olivet.

    ...said Associate Professor Dima Mazen Qato, University of Southern California...

     

    ...and founder and chairman of the Qato Institute.

    the Marx Cafe bar

     

    Baristas of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but your opiates!


    Marx Cafe = Max farce.


    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/664911687871389696/ZeV8wlOF_400x400.jpg

    Replies: @JMcG

    I agree, put DC back in Maryland.

  72. @Jack Armstrong
    OT: From MinniStarTrib:

    Minneapolis violent crimes soared in 2020 amid pandemic, protests
    Pandemic, shutdowns, unrest triggered a domino effect, leaders say.

    By Libor Jany (has a good tweeter feed)
    Minneapolis Star Tribune
    Feb 6, 2021 — 5:30PM
     
    Blah, blah, blah, redlining, blah, blah, blah, systemic, blah, blah, blah, education, blah, blah, blah, strategic …

    [21st paragraph] Although violent crime was trending upward through the first half of the 2020, it really took off after May 25, when Floyd died, MPD data show. Experts said that other cities experienced similar surges in violent crime in the wake of a controversial police killing, including Baltimore after the in-custody death of Freddie Gray in 2015. Protests also consumed that city; its embattled police force went under federal investigation, and the city ended that year with 342 homicides.
     
    https://www.startribune.com/minneapolis-violent-crimes-soared-in-2020-amid-pandemic-protests/

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Reg Cæsar

    By Libor Jany (has a good tweeter feed)

    He was born in Czechoslovakia, and has lived in Gabon, France and seven U.S. states.

    https://www.startribune.com/libor-jany/6134700/

    So no (close) relation to Pavel, the other notable Jany in the Twin Cities. They sure look different.

    https://www.pjanymusic.com/

  73. @Anonymous
    Drug store looting in SF is very strange to me. Very safe and casual. I believe the drug stores are moving out as a result.

    https://youtu.be/arss9V3A1VA


    https://youtu.be/CLbvtRIo3i8


    https://youtu.be/PZfcOuRAwzI

    Replies: @John Up North, @Polistra, @Kaz

    I recently stumbled upon shoplifters a couple of times in Chicago. Once at a CVS and another time at a Walgreens. Both theives had large bags they were stuffing.

    I briefly worked store security for Jewel – Osco in the mid 80s. I recall the company being very serious about catching shoplifters and making sure the lifters were prosecuted. It seems like the merchants just through in the towel.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @John Up North

    Some supermarket chains have mystery shops where you put something down on that bottom shelf in your shopping cart, and see if the cashier notices it.

    But most of the anti-theft projects I was in on focused on sticky-fingered employees, not customers. There were wallet drops and other scenarios to see if department store cashiers were on the up-and up -- the stores had specific employees they were keeping an eye on. And upscale hotel buffets seem to have a problem with cash payments disappearing, based on some of the scenarios I was sent out on.

    , @Jack D
    @John Up North

    The [black] shoplifters have become much more violent. Store personnel are instructed not to try to detain them lest they get hurt and then the chain is facing some kind of worker's comp or personal injury claim plus maybe the "community" comes and burns the store down. Much easier to count "shrinkage" as a cost and add it to the price of the item. In Leftist controlled cities they no longer prosecute crimes like shoplifting anyway. There are large professional shoplifting gangs that go for high value items that are easily resold to inner city bodegas (which are increasingly locked up) - baby formula, razor blades, etc.

    Replies: @prosa123

  74. This is a typical Ghetto Whine story. One recent version had a woman complaining because she has to travel 15 minute to a pharmacy and 30 minutes to a grocery store. I travel 20 minutes to a pharmacy and 40 minutes to a grocery store.I do not consider this a problem. Hell with them.

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @flyingtiger

    Back when I was subscribed to a health newsletter, before it degenerated into woke whining, it regularly ran articles decrying food deserts which it defined as any area where a proper supermarket was a mile or more away. I remember thinking this definition must cover most of the USA, even though the authors only ever claimed it was a problem for the fabled 'low income earners'.

  75. @Steve Sailer
    @Jack Armstrong

    Thanks.

    Replies: @Jim Christian

    Steve, no Super Bowl posting in your list?

    Bucs 38, Chiefs 24. For lots of reasons. You heard it here first.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Jim Christian


    Bucs 38, Chiefs 24. For lots of reasons. You heard it here first.

     

    Ok, ok,
    Bucs 31, KC 9.
    , @Jim Christian
    @Jim Christian


    Bucs 38, Chiefs 24. For lots of reasons. You heard it here first.

     

    Ok, ok,
    Bucs 31, KC 9.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  76. OT: reposting a PSA i made a bit too late in the comments of an earlier isteve post:

    is anyone gonna tell these boomer retards that they can read literally any paywalled article on the internet using https://archive.is/ ?

    i love you guys but you are an awfully goofy group of copyright worshipping geriatrics who need to be apprised of the utility of the aforesaid circumvention as well as http://www.outline.com which also works for most paywalled articles but with better formatting (notably not for wapo, nyt, wsj tho).

    (you should also be given a tutorial on the use of torrents but thats beyond the scope of my giving a shit.)

    information wants to be free.
    piracy is a moral duty.
    pay content creaters you like directly and eff the intermediary.

    • LOL: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Drunk Millenial

    If you weren't quite so full of yourself you might have spent 15 seconds searching and found out that we've discussed this matter to death weeks, months, and years ago and have far superior solutions. Maybe you'll figure it out eventually but meanwhile it's fun watching you clown yourself.

  77. @Alden
    @Jonathan Mason

    The food in CVS stores is much less expensive than food in the supermarkets in my Los Angeles neighborhood Depends on where you live.

    The Target in Westwood has a huge real food section including fresh meat and produce. Prices are about 40 percent lower than the Pavilions on the other side of the parking lot and 60 percent lower than the nearby Bristol Farms and Whole Foods supermarkets.

    Target is putting in real food markets all over Beverly Hills Santa Monica West Los Angeles to compete with expensive supermarkets. I assume Target wants to drive Whole Foods Gelsens Bristol Farms Pavilions etc out of business and take over the food business.

    The 99 cent store at Pico and Olympic has an incredible produce section. Red bell peppers $1.00 instead of $6.00 a pound. What’s wrong with that? I don’t like tomatoes. Had houseguests for a week and bought tomatoes at the Pico 99 cent store. They just raved about the 99 cent store tomatoes. So I bought 10 pounds more and they loved them. The Pico WLA 99 cent store produce is as good as the Beverly Hills Farmers Market produce.

    I make several trips to N California every year. I always stop at the San Mateo county farm stands. The orchards vines and bushes are 20 yards away. . Fruit is no better that the Pico Olympic 99cent store fruit.

    You’re just another expat nitpicking about anything and everything about America to display how superior you are compared to those of us stuck here in anti White America.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @prosa123, @cityview

    Interesting. CVS is very expensive in Florida, but apparently much cheaper and better for food in California. That’s the advantage of having stores from sea to shining sea.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jonathan Mason

    Depends on the neighborhood. The pretentious supermarkets in my neighborhood cater to Bel Air Holmby Hills and Westwood neighborhoods of Los Angeles . So CVS and Target food is cheaper.

  78. @Alden
    @Jonathan Mason

    CVS and even 7-11 and gas stations have fresh fruit for a snack.

    CVS seems to specialize. Some have a lot of dishes pots pans cooking equipment. Some have big hardware sections; wonderful if you don’t want to drive to and wander around Home Depot for duct tape screws window putty etc. Others have a lot of food including eggs and bacon. Great prices on ice cream Some have big baby clothes sections as well as diapers etc. At Christmas CVS has huge toy sections. 1/3 price the day after Christmas. 8 grandchildren , we always stocked up after Christmas. The one near me has flowers very convenient if there’s no florist nearby. Also magazines and paperbacks.

    Nothing wrong with one stop walking distance short drive shopping. And why not pick up a coloring book for the kid or flowers for the wife at a convenient CVS a block from work or home?

    That’s the advantage of city living; many shops nearby. Who cares if it’s an individually owned hardware store hair barrettes & bows cookware toy florist grocery etc or consolidated into one CVS?

    CVS & Walgreens took the place of all those Woolworth general stores in every city neighborhood that disappeared. They are general stores, same type of stores set up in America when the first European settlers arrived.

    BTW it was the gas companies that forced the franchisees to switch from car repair to food. Even the most overpriced repairs are far less profitable than 1.75 ounce packages of potato chips for $1.99 Pay for gas with credit card, no need to go inside and be tempted by the snack food.

    I really don’t see the problem with conveniently located general stores.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I really don’t see the problem with conveniently located general stores.

    The only problem is that gas station seem to have driven small cafes and restaurants out of business.

  79. @John Up North
    @Anonymous

    I recently stumbled upon shoplifters a couple of times in Chicago. Once at a CVS and another time at a Walgreens. Both theives had large bags they were stuffing.

    I briefly worked store security for Jewel - Osco in the mid 80s. I recall the company being very serious about catching shoplifters and making sure the lifters were prosecuted. It seems like the merchants just through in the towel.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Jack D

    Some supermarket chains have mystery shops where you put something down on that bottom shelf in your shopping cart, and see if the cashier notices it.

    But most of the anti-theft projects I was in on focused on sticky-fingered employees, not customers. There were wallet drops and other scenarios to see if department store cashiers were on the up-and up — the stores had specific employees they were keeping an eye on. And upscale hotel buffets seem to have a problem with cash payments disappearing, based on some of the scenarios I was sent out on.

  80. @Mike Tre
    @Jim Christian

    “ They sell milk and candy bars and chips and soda and Wonder Bread. ”

    You forgot the most important thing they sell: Newports.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    You forgot the most important thing they sell: Newports.

    CVS won’t. They dropped tobacco sales a few years back and took a big short-term hit. But the increased goodwill with the healthcare industry paid off handsomely in the long run. Plus, it made Walgreens and all the others look bad.

    Tobacco-free for five years

  81. @Wilkey
    @Buzz Mohawk


    When you periodically smash the windows and loot any business in your neighborhood, businesses tend not to go near you. QED
     
    Oh, that’s only the beginning. The customers have less money to spend. Shoplifting rates are high. Armed robbery rates are high. Even the paying customers are annoying and difficult. And I can imagine that finding good employees to begin with is difficult and that employee turnover is insanely high. When you’re talking about pharmacies, those employees also have to be educated. They’re medical professionals, not minimum wage employees just running a cash register.

    But hey, we’re now in the era where the right to anti-racism means the government can force you to hire who they want you to hire, lend money to who they want you to lend money to, and build a business where they tell you to build a business. If customers steal from you then you have no right to object. Right to speech, assembly, and property? Not so much.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @bomag, @Anon7, @Reg Cæsar

    When you’re talking about pharmacies, those employees also have to be educated. They’re medical professionals…

    Go, Eutectics!

    Go, that is, home to the ‘hood, where they need your expertise.

  82. @Gordo
    I'm always dubious of this deserts thing.

    Years ago blacks in Britain, or those speaking for them, claimed that many lived in food deserts.

    Turned out that there were plenty of food shops but they were run by south asians who the blacks would not do business with.

    Replies: @photondancer, @Rob McX

    Do you remember why? I should have thought there would be some crossover between Indian food and Caribbean food. Even if it were Nigerian blacks complaining, small shop owners will often try stocking items popular with another community in the hope of gaining a few more customers.

  83. @Anon
    I have an idea. How about founding a black-owned pharmacy, bootstraped with money raised from the community (dipping into their savings), or from minority-targeted VC funds. Or Bill and Melinda Gates. All black staff, black pharmacists. They could expand out to various black neighborhoods. They could carry black hair products and those dark-skinned bandaids. Build black pride.

    Actually, this would make a great reality show. Will blacks patronize a black-owned business? Will pilferage grow out of control. Will there be iron bars separating the pharmacy from the customers? Will a local black councilwoman get a law passed to ban iron bars because it creates a bad image? Will the reality show's Go-Pros get ripped off the walls and stolen? Will the reality show's crews be beaten and have their cars 'jacked? Will they ban-the-box and hire felons?

    This would also make a great comedy-drama series, but you'd never get it aired. Maybe a direct to streaming movie? You'd have to use white actors in blackface however.

    Replies: @Carol

    Are you kidding? Black middle class types wouldn’t be caught dead there.

    Whole point is to get away from it.

  84. @Anonymous
    @El Dato

    The time will surely come, in the UK, when a clear majority of the adult prisoner population are blacks.
    This is likely already the case in London.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @prosa123

    The time will surely come, in the UK, when a clear majority of the adult prisoner population are blacks.
    This is likely already the case in London.

    ????
    I thought the Pakistanis commit a very high percentage of crime in Britain.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @prosa123

    Robbery, thievery, stabbings, drug dealing etc are pretty much a black monopoly in London.
    Also, there's a huge amount of fraud and embezzlement perpetrated by blacks in official capacities.
    Pakistanis, compared to whites, are overly expressed in criminal proclivities - big time drug dealing, various frauds and scams etc, but generally are non violent.

  85. @flyingtiger
    This is a typical Ghetto Whine story. One recent version had a woman complaining because she has to travel 15 minute to a pharmacy and 30 minutes to a grocery store. I travel 20 minutes to a pharmacy and 40 minutes to a grocery store.I do not consider this a problem. Hell with them.

    Replies: @photondancer

    Back when I was subscribed to a health newsletter, before it degenerated into woke whining, it regularly ran articles decrying food deserts which it defined as any area where a proper supermarket was a mile or more away. I remember thinking this definition must cover most of the USA, even though the authors only ever claimed it was a problem for the fabled ‘low income earners’.

  86. And that was a really confusing headline for me but mostly that’s because I always forget dessert is is spelled with two s’s

  87. @Alden
    @Jonathan Mason

    The food in CVS stores is much less expensive than food in the supermarkets in my Los Angeles neighborhood Depends on where you live.

    The Target in Westwood has a huge real food section including fresh meat and produce. Prices are about 40 percent lower than the Pavilions on the other side of the parking lot and 60 percent lower than the nearby Bristol Farms and Whole Foods supermarkets.

    Target is putting in real food markets all over Beverly Hills Santa Monica West Los Angeles to compete with expensive supermarkets. I assume Target wants to drive Whole Foods Gelsens Bristol Farms Pavilions etc out of business and take over the food business.

    The 99 cent store at Pico and Olympic has an incredible produce section. Red bell peppers $1.00 instead of $6.00 a pound. What’s wrong with that? I don’t like tomatoes. Had houseguests for a week and bought tomatoes at the Pico 99 cent store. They just raved about the 99 cent store tomatoes. So I bought 10 pounds more and they loved them. The Pico WLA 99 cent store produce is as good as the Beverly Hills Farmers Market produce.

    I make several trips to N California every year. I always stop at the San Mateo county farm stands. The orchards vines and bushes are 20 yards away. . Fruit is no better that the Pico Olympic 99cent store fruit.

    You’re just another expat nitpicking about anything and everything about America to display how superior you are compared to those of us stuck here in anti White America.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @prosa123, @cityview

    The Target in Westwood has a huge real food section including fresh meat and produce. Prices are about 40 percent lower than the Pavilions on the other side of the parking lot and 60 percent lower than the nearby Bristol Farms and Whole Foods supermarkets.

    About a year and a half ago the Target near me greatly expanded its food department to the point that it’s as large as a small supermarket. Unfortunately, the shelves are usually so barren that you’d think there’s a Category 5 hurricane on the way, or that you’re in Pyongyang People’s Food Market #31 minus the portrait of Kim Il-Sung.
    It’s not because the prices are such a bargain, they’re decent but nothing unusual, as far as I can tell it’s because the employees do not do much restocking during store hours and the store doesn’t use outside merchandisers.
    One thing you’ll notice in most Targets and Walmarts and even some actual supermarkets is that the meat comes pre-packaged rather than cut by in-store meat cutters. Supermarkets don’t like having meat cutters because they’re unionized, highly paid (often far outearning the store managers), and militant. A few years ago the major Stop& Shop chain was having so much trouble with the meat cutters in its New Hampshire stores that it sold off the stores and pulled out of the state.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @prosa123

    We can’t have well paid supermarket workers can we? The supermarkets in my neighborhood are pretentious overpriced Whole Foods Bristol Farms Pavilions. It’s obvious what the Targets are trying to do, drive them out of business with significantly lower prices.

    Target meat. I only bought meat at Target once. I was going to buy a small turkey. Label said 18 percent water injected. So I didn’t buy it. I bought a package of 8 thick cut pork chops for 5 people. One apiece and 3 extra.

    I put the chops in the frying pan and water just poured out of the meat. They were actually boiled instead of fried or pan broiled as pretentious liberals say. By the time they were cooked they were just tiny. And pale gray because they were so full of water couldn’t be browned. They tasted good though.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Jack D
    @prosa123

    There have been some innovations in meat packaging such as vacuum packaging of small cuts such that the shelf life is increased and there's no need for an in store butchering staff. The industry decades ago switched to "boxed beef" whereby beef no longer arrives in a store as a hanging side but is rather broken down into vacuum packed primal cuts. The recent innovations just take this a step further such that the vacuum pack is taken down to the retail level so that the shelf life is long enough to treat meat the same way that you treat dairy.

    Yes there has been a counter-trend where tattooed hipsters open artisanal butcher shops in Brooklyn but these guys and gals account for less that 1% of meat sales. The overall trend in the meatpacking industry for the last 100 year at least has been toward more and more assembly line style mass production using unskilled labor that brings costs down vs paying highly skilled unionized butchers in each supermarket. Completely getting rid of the in store butcher is the last step.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  88. @El Dato
    The premise is that the economy and population dynamics are some dead physical system with no causal structure and that any deviations from completely gaussian values must have volitional nefarious reasons (white suppressing blacks by creating pharmacy deserts or disproportionately going after "teens") or revolutionary reasons (economically disadvantaged people successfully keeping pharmacies out of the hood to resist gentrification, "teens" emitting cries for attention by gunning down people on street corners).

    The only one who have the power to deviate from gaussian behaviour are whites (except for international politics). They always err on the side of evil, too.

    Here's one from the UK

    As more and more black people are jailed in Britain, the so-called ‘fairness’ of the UK legal system is exposed for all to see


    The number of black children cautioned or sentenced has doubled since the year ending March 2010, from six percent to 12 percent. Over a third (36 percent) of all remands involved BAME children. This increases to 49 percent for remands to youth detention accommodation, black children accounting for 29 percent of remands. The government’s figures also reveal that the proportion of all cases in which black children were sentenced for indictable offences has risen from 14 percent to 22 percent in the past five years.

    And the stats go on.

    Having read the Lammy Review in its entirety, and crunched the government’s latest figures for youth crime, it’s clear that establishment bias – subconscious or otherwise – permeates the criminal justice system, particularly around the fetishisation of young black males. [black young males are a fetish]

    And we’ve heard it all before, from the Metropolitan Police’s invention of the ‘Gangs Matrix’ in 2012 – a database of suspected gang members operating in London – to Operation Trident and its focus on ‘black-on-black’ crime, to the MSM’s popularisation of the term ‘county lines,’ the latest in a long line of racialised tabloid ‘folk devil’ descriptors that includes ‘Yardies,’ ‘muggers’ ‘steamers’ (remember them?), ‘gangbangers,’ ‘thugs,’ and ‘hood rats.’
     

    The "gangs matrix" had to be zeroed out at some time. I guess that improved things in Khan-managed Diversity London. Back to gaussians. Amnesty was on the case:

    What is the Gangs Matrix?


    The Gangs Matrix was part of a highly- politicised response to the 2011 London riots. Individuals are listed as ‘gang nominals’ and given an automated green, amber or red violence ranking. As of October 2017, 3,806 people were on the Matrix. More than three- quarters (78 per cent) of them are black, a disproportionate number given the Met’s own figures show that only 27 per cent of those responsible for serious youth violence are black. The youngest is just 12 years old and 99 per cent are male.

    ‘There is clearly a huge problem with knife crime violence at the moment in London, but the Gangs Matrix is not the answer,’ said Amnesty UK director Kate Allen. ‘It’s part of an unhelpful and racialised focus on the concept of gangs at the expense of concentrating on the most violent offenders. The entire system is racially discriminatory, stigmatising young black men for the type of music they listen to, or their social media behaviour, with potential impacts in all sorts of areas of their lives.

    ‘Some police officers have been acting like they’re in the Wild West, making the false assumptions that they can set up fake profiles and covertly befriend people online to monitor them without needing Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act warrants. The Mayor of London needs to dismantle the Matrix unless he can bring it in line with international human rights standards.’

     

    Replies: @photondancer, @Anonymous, @marcavis

    a disproportionate number given the Met’s own figures show that only 27 per cent of those responsible for serious youth violence are black.

    I like that this quote from the Amnesty article you quoted suggests that in the UK it’s still possible to talk about crime stats.
    Certainly a sensible left wing position today would be “it turns out that this demographic is more likely to commit crimes, let’s charge whoever needs to be charged while also working on reducing that demographic’s criminality in the future”
    (Of course, there’s only so much you can do)

  89. @unit472
    I watched a CVS store in Baltimore get looted and burned during the Freddie Grey riots a couple of years ago. Local officials pressured CVS to rebuild it and CVS did. This summer I saw a small independent pharmacy get looted in Philadelphia. CVS and Walgreens provide the only refrigerated food supply in many negro areas where people can get milk, eggs, sandwich meats etc. with their EBT cards so they are much more than just a pharmacy to these communities.

    In white areas the pharmacy is the grocery store, the Walmart or the Target. I note Target puts its pharmacy as far from the entrance as possible. I complained to the pharmacist about this but he said it was deliberately done to discourage addicts from robbing their pharmacies.

    Replies: @Alden

    The Ralph’s Vons and other supermarket chains in California often have pharmacies. You can drop off the prescription, shop for and buy the groceries while waiting for the prescription. It’s convenient. Why not.

    The CVS I use is just a block off the Wilshire corridor high rises. Those buildings have thousands of people working in them. Walk a block to CVS at lunch time . Pick up a sandwich in the deli section. Go to the park across the street and eat it. Walk around a bit get some exercise. That’s probably why that particular CVS has such a big salad and sandwich section.

    There’s a lot less waiting in pharmacy lines nowadays. For the past few years the Drs have just faxed the prescriptions to the pharmacies instead of giving them to the patients. So there’s no drop off line. Plus many pharmacies offer free home delivery. Total convenience

    I just got back from picking up a prescription at CVS. Sunday afternoon and I was the only person in the pharmacy section. With Drs faxing prescriptions and delivery, there’s no need for the customers to go to the pharmacy anymore. I cruised around but didn’t buy anything else.

  90. @prosa123
    @Alden

    The Target in Westwood has a huge real food section including fresh meat and produce. Prices are about 40 percent lower than the Pavilions on the other side of the parking lot and 60 percent lower than the nearby Bristol Farms and Whole Foods supermarkets.

    About a year and a half ago the Target near me greatly expanded its food department to the point that it's as large as a small supermarket. Unfortunately, the shelves are usually so barren that you'd think there's a Category 5 hurricane on the way, or that you're in Pyongyang People's Food Market #31 minus the portrait of Kim Il-Sung.
    It's not because the prices are such a bargain, they're decent but nothing unusual, as far as I can tell it's because the employees do not do much restocking during store hours and the store doesn't use outside merchandisers.
    One thing you'll notice in most Targets and Walmarts and even some actual supermarkets is that the meat comes pre-packaged rather than cut by in-store meat cutters. Supermarkets don't like having meat cutters because they're unionized, highly paid (often far outearning the store managers), and militant. A few years ago the major Stop& Shop chain was having so much trouble with the meat cutters in its New Hampshire stores that it sold off the stores and pulled out of the state.

    Replies: @Alden, @Jack D

    We can’t have well paid supermarket workers can we? The supermarkets in my neighborhood are pretentious overpriced Whole Foods Bristol Farms Pavilions. It’s obvious what the Targets are trying to do, drive them out of business with significantly lower prices.

    Target meat. I only bought meat at Target once. I was going to buy a small turkey. Label said 18 percent water injected. So I didn’t buy it. I bought a package of 8 thick cut pork chops for 5 people. One apiece and 3 extra.

    I put the chops in the frying pan and water just poured out of the meat. They were actually boiled instead of fried or pan broiled as pretentious liberals say. By the time they were cooked they were just tiny. And pale gray because they were so full of water couldn’t be browned. They tasted good though.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Alden

    Whatever water you can add you can sell for the same price as meat. This creates a really hefty markup since tap water costs maybe 1/4 of 1 cent per lb. and meat sells for several $/lb.

    If you buy a chicken in Europe it is completely dry vs. in America where every package of chicken has a cupful of water that pours out when you open the bag. This bloody water is very good for markups but it's usually just swimming with bacteria - they throw the freshly slaughtered chickens into a vat to soak up water where they are commingled with thousands of other dead birds so if 1 bird has salmonella now they all do. Having the chicken soaking in a bag full of water is not really good for the quality of the product - good luck getting waterlogged chicken to brown. But profit is more important than quality.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Alden, @Reg Cæsar

  91. @John Up North
    @Anonymous

    I recently stumbled upon shoplifters a couple of times in Chicago. Once at a CVS and another time at a Walgreens. Both theives had large bags they were stuffing.

    I briefly worked store security for Jewel - Osco in the mid 80s. I recall the company being very serious about catching shoplifters and making sure the lifters were prosecuted. It seems like the merchants just through in the towel.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Jack D

    The [black] shoplifters have become much more violent. Store personnel are instructed not to try to detain them lest they get hurt and then the chain is facing some kind of worker’s comp or personal injury claim plus maybe the “community” comes and burns the store down. Much easier to count “shrinkage” as a cost and add it to the price of the item. In Leftist controlled cities they no longer prosecute crimes like shoplifting anyway. There are large professional shoplifting gangs that go for high value items that are easily resold to inner city bodegas (which are increasingly locked up) – baby formula, razor blades, etc.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Jack D

    There are large professional shoplifting gangs that go for high value items that are easily resold to inner city bodegas (which are increasingly locked up) – baby formula, razor blades, etc.

    Powdered baby formula is a major shoplifting target because drug dealers mix it with cocaine as an extender.
    Oil of Olay skin lotion is another commonly shoplifted item. No one knows why.

  92. @prosa123
    @Alden

    The Target in Westwood has a huge real food section including fresh meat and produce. Prices are about 40 percent lower than the Pavilions on the other side of the parking lot and 60 percent lower than the nearby Bristol Farms and Whole Foods supermarkets.

    About a year and a half ago the Target near me greatly expanded its food department to the point that it's as large as a small supermarket. Unfortunately, the shelves are usually so barren that you'd think there's a Category 5 hurricane on the way, or that you're in Pyongyang People's Food Market #31 minus the portrait of Kim Il-Sung.
    It's not because the prices are such a bargain, they're decent but nothing unusual, as far as I can tell it's because the employees do not do much restocking during store hours and the store doesn't use outside merchandisers.
    One thing you'll notice in most Targets and Walmarts and even some actual supermarkets is that the meat comes pre-packaged rather than cut by in-store meat cutters. Supermarkets don't like having meat cutters because they're unionized, highly paid (often far outearning the store managers), and militant. A few years ago the major Stop& Shop chain was having so much trouble with the meat cutters in its New Hampshire stores that it sold off the stores and pulled out of the state.

    Replies: @Alden, @Jack D

    There have been some innovations in meat packaging such as vacuum packaging of small cuts such that the shelf life is increased and there’s no need for an in store butchering staff. The industry decades ago switched to “boxed beef” whereby beef no longer arrives in a store as a hanging side but is rather broken down into vacuum packed primal cuts. The recent innovations just take this a step further such that the vacuum pack is taken down to the retail level so that the shelf life is long enough to treat meat the same way that you treat dairy.

    Yes there has been a counter-trend where tattooed hipsters open artisanal butcher shops in Brooklyn but these guys and gals account for less that 1% of meat sales. The overall trend in the meatpacking industry for the last 100 year at least has been toward more and more assembly line style mass production using unskilled labor that brings costs down vs paying highly skilled unionized butchers in each supermarket. Completely getting rid of the in store butcher is the last step.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Jack D

    In places where there are lots of Dominicans (and, I think, Mexicans) there are stores where you can buy fresh-killed chickens. I don't know whether they're legal, but I've seen them. I haven't been inside but I guess they slaughter the bird while you wait. I've always been tempted but I'm a little leery of the germ factor.

    Replies: @Jack D

  93. @Alden
    @prosa123

    We can’t have well paid supermarket workers can we? The supermarkets in my neighborhood are pretentious overpriced Whole Foods Bristol Farms Pavilions. It’s obvious what the Targets are trying to do, drive them out of business with significantly lower prices.

    Target meat. I only bought meat at Target once. I was going to buy a small turkey. Label said 18 percent water injected. So I didn’t buy it. I bought a package of 8 thick cut pork chops for 5 people. One apiece and 3 extra.

    I put the chops in the frying pan and water just poured out of the meat. They were actually boiled instead of fried or pan broiled as pretentious liberals say. By the time they were cooked they were just tiny. And pale gray because they were so full of water couldn’t be browned. They tasted good though.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Whatever water you can add you can sell for the same price as meat. This creates a really hefty markup since tap water costs maybe 1/4 of 1 cent per lb. and meat sells for several $/lb.

    If you buy a chicken in Europe it is completely dry vs. in America where every package of chicken has a cupful of water that pours out when you open the bag. This bloody water is very good for markups but it’s usually just swimming with bacteria – they throw the freshly slaughtered chickens into a vat to soak up water where they are commingled with thousands of other dead birds so if 1 bird has salmonella now they all do. Having the chicken soaking in a bag full of water is not really good for the quality of the product – good luck getting waterlogged chicken to brown. But profit is more important than quality.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Jack D

    Very true Jack. Supermarket meat is awful stuff. I buy a quarter of beef every year and have it butchered. Well worth the hassle. I was in North Carolina a few weeks ago and bought 20 pounds of shrimp straight off the boat. It was as different from the supermarket stuff as chalk from cheese. It’s strange how the quality and availability of produce has generally improved over the years while that of meat and seafood has declined dramatically.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Alden
    @Jack D

    I used to like chicken but it’s just nasty now days. Fit only for drowning in barbecue curry teriyak Hunter and other sauces. I’ve gone back to beef and pork with a lot of pan sauces. But those target pork chops didn’t even brown enough to make a sauce. I buy meat and fish at a small independent market. Delicious. These so called upscale supermarkets meat and fish isn’t worth the price. Costco has Smithfield hams sometimes. Yummy.

    The remaining butcher and fish stores are great but expensive and often too far away

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    This creates a really hefty markup since tap water costs maybe 1/4 of 1 cent per lb. and meat sells for several $/lb.
     
    Yeah, but does meat have sodium fluoride?


    https://news4sanantonio.com/resources/media/fc146fbd-ba16-4946-b044-8ed391de190c-medium16x9_HAZMATINCIDENT_frame_0.jpg?1553874273022


    In other news, this is how they celebrate Beethoven's birthday in San Antone-- and yes, that's a guy:

    Woman dismembered while alive, then killed after 'disrespecting' fiancé's 'name'

    POLICE: 'Problematic trespasser' threatens, sexually assaults friend in apartment



    https://news4sanantonio.com/resources/media/2f134160-0810-485c-8249-aebf13771735-medium16x9_dario2.JPG?1608143562769

    More recently:


    POLICE: Man arrested for violation of parole later defecated in van on way to jail


    Police: Man killed after cannon misfires at baby shower
  94. @Jack D
    @Alden

    Whatever water you can add you can sell for the same price as meat. This creates a really hefty markup since tap water costs maybe 1/4 of 1 cent per lb. and meat sells for several $/lb.

    If you buy a chicken in Europe it is completely dry vs. in America where every package of chicken has a cupful of water that pours out when you open the bag. This bloody water is very good for markups but it's usually just swimming with bacteria - they throw the freshly slaughtered chickens into a vat to soak up water where they are commingled with thousands of other dead birds so if 1 bird has salmonella now they all do. Having the chicken soaking in a bag full of water is not really good for the quality of the product - good luck getting waterlogged chicken to brown. But profit is more important than quality.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Alden, @Reg Cæsar

    Very true Jack. Supermarket meat is awful stuff. I buy a quarter of beef every year and have it butchered. Well worth the hassle. I was in North Carolina a few weeks ago and bought 20 pounds of shrimp straight off the boat. It was as different from the supermarket stuff as chalk from cheese. It’s strange how the quality and availability of produce has generally improved over the years while that of meat and seafood has declined dramatically.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @JMcG

    Shrimp, another thing I just can’t eat any more. We have the entire Gulf of Mexico full of shrimp to harvest. But the markets buy that nasty Asian shrimp raised in barrels of sewage or something.

    Shrimp recipe for shelled shrimps should be large. Minced onion fried in butter till soft. Add white wine lemon juice and sour cream heat to simmer. Chop up a lot of parsley Add shrimp
    cook till hot. Add salt and red pepper sauce to taste. Or a little curry powder. Or dill preferably fresh but not both. Mix in the parsley. Serve on top of rice. Why I hate spell check. I kept typing the name of a popular red pepper sauce. Spell check turned it into tobacco.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  95. @mmack
    Steve,

    The solution is the Diverse community in Chicago can carjack a ride to pharmacies in Oak Lawn, Oak Park, Alsip, Park Ridge, or Elmwood Park. That way they'll be sure to get their vaccinations.

    Just stay out of Du Page county. They charge and try carjackers. https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/breaking/ct-addison-carjacking-second-arrest-20210201-ivjub4h5czdhlg3nlw3ejys7lq-story.html

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Carjacking: Uber for the oppressed.

  96. @Gordo
    I'm always dubious of this deserts thing.

    Years ago blacks in Britain, or those speaking for them, claimed that many lived in food deserts.

    Turned out that there were plenty of food shops but they were run by south asians who the blacks would not do business with.

    Replies: @photondancer, @Rob McX

    And I can understand why South Asians would not be popular with the local blacks. They really believe in vigilante justice for any kind of theft. I recall two separate cases in the English courts from the 80s and 90s where people who stole from Pakistani shops ended up being killed by the owner. One was an armed robber who was run over by the shopkeeper in his van when he was making his getaway. The other was a man who stole a punnet of mushrooms. The owner knelt on his neck until he choked to death.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Rob McX

    So the guy who stole the mushrooms was on fentanyl then?

    I ask because we all know that it's impossible to asphyxiate from having someone kneel on your neck - all the little piggie-advocates in these very pages will bray the same shit at every opportunity.

    If only they would spent 9 minutes or so with a 170lb adult male kneeling on their necks, just to show us all how it's no biggie. That'd be great.

  97. @Mike Tre
    You can’t drive more then a half mile anywhere in Chicago without passing a Walgreens or CVS.

    Even so, the article is wrong anyway. Pretty much every street corner on the west side of Chicago has an undocumented pharmacist standing by to serve you.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Pretty much every street corner on the west side of Chicago has an undocumented pharmacist standing by to serve you.

    But just try stealing from them. It would be safer to loot every Walgreens in Illinois.

  98. @Jack D
    @John Up North

    The [black] shoplifters have become much more violent. Store personnel are instructed not to try to detain them lest they get hurt and then the chain is facing some kind of worker's comp or personal injury claim plus maybe the "community" comes and burns the store down. Much easier to count "shrinkage" as a cost and add it to the price of the item. In Leftist controlled cities they no longer prosecute crimes like shoplifting anyway. There are large professional shoplifting gangs that go for high value items that are easily resold to inner city bodegas (which are increasingly locked up) - baby formula, razor blades, etc.

    Replies: @prosa123

    There are large professional shoplifting gangs that go for high value items that are easily resold to inner city bodegas (which are increasingly locked up) – baby formula, razor blades, etc.

    Powdered baby formula is a major shoplifting target because drug dealers mix it with cocaine as an extender.
    Oil of Olay skin lotion is another commonly shoplifted item. No one knows why.

  99. I remember reading in Blue Blood, ex-NYPD cop Edward Conlon’s memoir, that ghetto blacks would often call 911 for an ambulance when they needed medication. This way they could get their meds at the hospital and bypass the hassle of going to the doctor for a prescription and then to the pharmacy.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Rob McX

    Not to mention paying. Also, these are people who call 911 when McDonald's runs out of cheeseburgers.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    , @Detroit Refugee
    @Rob McX

    Real lazy mfr’s. Doesn’t surprise me one bit though.

  100. The pharmacies that have been really beneficial lately have been the Mom & Pops in West Virginia.

  101. @the one they call Desanex
    Another Crypto-Limerick

    Black districts are pharmacological deserts due to biological differences; blacks, per statistical facts, having tendencies criminological.

    Replies: @Polistra

    per statistical facts

    Do you even hear yourself. So racist.

    • LOL: Kratoklastes
  102. @Rob McX
    I remember reading in Blue Blood, ex-NYPD cop Edward Conlon's memoir, that ghetto blacks would often call 911 for an ambulance when they needed medication. This way they could get their meds at the hospital and bypass the hassle of going to the doctor for a prescription and then to the pharmacy.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Detroit Refugee

    Not to mention paying. Also, these are people who call 911 when McDonald’s runs out of cheeseburgers.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Polistra

    Not cheeseburgers but fish sammiches.

  103. @Jim Christian
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, no Super Bowl posting in your list?

    Bucs 38, Chiefs 24. For lots of reasons. You heard it here first.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Jim Christian

    Bucs 38, Chiefs 24. For lots of reasons. You heard it here first.

    Ok, ok,
    Bucs 31, KC 9.

  104. @Jim Christian
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, no Super Bowl posting in your list?

    Bucs 38, Chiefs 24. For lots of reasons. You heard it here first.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Jim Christian

    Bucs 38, Chiefs 24. For lots of reasons. You heard it here first.

    Ok, ok,
    Bucs 31, KC 9.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Jim Christian

    Something must be happening to me. I normally hate Brady but yesterday I was rooting for the SOB. And he didn't let me down.

    Hail Brady, no reservations.

  105. @Anonymous
    Drug store looting in SF is very strange to me. Very safe and casual. I believe the drug stores are moving out as a result.

    https://youtu.be/arss9V3A1VA


    https://youtu.be/CLbvtRIo3i8


    https://youtu.be/PZfcOuRAwzI

    Replies: @John Up North, @Polistra, @Kaz

    It looks like privilege and entitlement, but it can’t be. Just can’t be.

    This goes on all the time in the east coast city where I live. Everyone just looks the other way. Safer. I used to post videos of it but YouTube took every one down for TOS violations, but they never said which terms were being violated.

  106. @Jack D
    @Alden

    Whatever water you can add you can sell for the same price as meat. This creates a really hefty markup since tap water costs maybe 1/4 of 1 cent per lb. and meat sells for several $/lb.

    If you buy a chicken in Europe it is completely dry vs. in America where every package of chicken has a cupful of water that pours out when you open the bag. This bloody water is very good for markups but it's usually just swimming with bacteria - they throw the freshly slaughtered chickens into a vat to soak up water where they are commingled with thousands of other dead birds so if 1 bird has salmonella now they all do. Having the chicken soaking in a bag full of water is not really good for the quality of the product - good luck getting waterlogged chicken to brown. But profit is more important than quality.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Alden, @Reg Cæsar

    I used to like chicken but it’s just nasty now days. Fit only for drowning in barbecue curry teriyak Hunter and other sauces. I’ve gone back to beef and pork with a lot of pan sauces. But those target pork chops didn’t even brown enough to make a sauce. I buy meat and fish at a small independent market. Delicious. These so called upscale supermarkets meat and fish isn’t worth the price. Costco has Smithfield hams sometimes. Yummy.

    The remaining butcher and fish stores are great but expensive and often too far away

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Alden

    I have found it almost impossible to buy any decent ham in North Florida. It is just nasty sloppy wet stuff that is soaked in brine.

    A somewhat better alternative is what is called "tavern style" ham in the deli section, but that is still really lacking in flavor.

    Replies: @Alden

  107. @Art Deco
    “My work found that predominantly black and Hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago have fewer pharmacies and are more likely to be pharmacy deserts, and are also more likely to experience closures,” said Associate Professor Dima Mazen Qato, University of Southern California.

    There are two blocs of neighborhoods of interest here. One on the South Side with a population of 650,000 and one on the west side with a population of about 350,000. Chicago did not, pre-Ferguson, have an understaffed police force. Nevertheless, they tolerated a homicide rate at that time of around 47 per 100,000 in these two blocks of neighborhoods. The homicide rate in the rest of Chicago was about 5.5 per 100,000 at that time. Outside of a few hotspots (Gary, East Chicago, and Hammond, Indiana; Harvey, Illinois), the homicide rate in Chicago's suburbs at that time was around 2.3 per 100,000. Note, at that time, the most violent neighborhood in New York City (Bed-Stuy) had a homicide rate of 15 per 100,000 (while Harlem had a rate of 8.5 per 100,000). Understanding what happened to your retail trade isn't that difficult. Coming up with a specious argument assigning blame to CVS, Rite-Aid, and Walgreen one might wager isn't that difficult, either, though coming up with one that will persuade someone who isn't a woke-tard would be.

    Replies: @Alden

    University of S California is located in one of the highest crime black ghettos in the country. It’s becoming gentrified by civilized Hispanics. The pharmacies around USC have big signs on the doors. “ This store does not carry Vicodin and a list of other drugs the store doesn’t carry”. The sign is to deter robbers looking for pain killers.

  108. @JMcG
    @Jack D

    Very true Jack. Supermarket meat is awful stuff. I buy a quarter of beef every year and have it butchered. Well worth the hassle. I was in North Carolina a few weeks ago and bought 20 pounds of shrimp straight off the boat. It was as different from the supermarket stuff as chalk from cheese. It’s strange how the quality and availability of produce has generally improved over the years while that of meat and seafood has declined dramatically.

    Replies: @Alden

    Shrimp, another thing I just can’t eat any more. We have the entire Gulf of Mexico full of shrimp to harvest. But the markets buy that nasty Asian shrimp raised in barrels of sewage or something.

    Shrimp recipe for shelled shrimps should be large. Minced onion fried in butter till soft. Add white wine lemon juice and sour cream heat to simmer. Chop up a lot of parsley Add shrimp
    cook till hot. Add salt and red pepper sauce to taste. Or a little curry powder. Or dill preferably fresh but not both. Mix in the parsley. Serve on top of rice. Why I hate spell check. I kept typing the name of a popular red pepper sauce. Spell check turned it into tobacco.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Alden

    I used to love dishes made with prawns until I read an article about how most of them are farmed in filthy puddles in Vietnam or Thailand and pumped full of antibiotics.

    Replies: @black sea, @Alden

  109. @Jack D
    @prosa123

    There have been some innovations in meat packaging such as vacuum packaging of small cuts such that the shelf life is increased and there's no need for an in store butchering staff. The industry decades ago switched to "boxed beef" whereby beef no longer arrives in a store as a hanging side but is rather broken down into vacuum packed primal cuts. The recent innovations just take this a step further such that the vacuum pack is taken down to the retail level so that the shelf life is long enough to treat meat the same way that you treat dairy.

    Yes there has been a counter-trend where tattooed hipsters open artisanal butcher shops in Brooklyn but these guys and gals account for less that 1% of meat sales. The overall trend in the meatpacking industry for the last 100 year at least has been toward more and more assembly line style mass production using unskilled labor that brings costs down vs paying highly skilled unionized butchers in each supermarket. Completely getting rid of the in store butcher is the last step.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    In places where there are lots of Dominicans (and, I think, Mexicans) there are stores where you can buy fresh-killed chickens. I don’t know whether they’re legal, but I’ve seen them. I haven’t been inside but I guess they slaughter the bird while you wait. I’ve always been tempted but I’m a little leery of the germ factor.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Paperback Writer

    If you look hard enough, there are still a few live poultry markets in ethnic neighborhoods of big cities (Chinese like them too.) Honestly there are a lot fewer germs than in a big slaughtering plant. Have no fear. It's worth it for the experience. Keep in mind that you shouldn't take fresh killed too far. You need to keep the bird in your fridge for a day or two for rigor mortis to relax or your bird will be tough. (Also make sure that you are getting a young chicken and not a mature hen unless you are making stew.) They often have things like guinea hens which are hard to find in the supermarket. They are going to give you the whole bird including the head and the feet.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer, @Rob McX

  110. @Anonymous
    Drug store looting in SF is very strange to me. Very safe and casual. I believe the drug stores are moving out as a result.

    https://youtu.be/arss9V3A1VA


    https://youtu.be/CLbvtRIo3i8


    https://youtu.be/PZfcOuRAwzI

    Replies: @John Up North, @Polistra, @Kaz

    Can’t do anything either even if the cops catch them if the theft is under 1k.. Catch and release

  111. Anonymous[733] • Disclaimer says:
    @edkpyros
    @Anonymous

    If anyone can't see the Twitter video of the black guy cheering on the police shooting of a mentally ill white man, then triumphantly cackling that "he thought his ass was privileged", it's here:

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/CnJTe8NIBCYK/

    Replies: @Anonymous

    This is what whites who say ‘all lives matter’ don’t understand. Blacks don’t care about police shootings of white people, or of non-blacks generally. Attempts by white victims of police violence to make common cause with black victims will always be indignantly rebuffed. No white person who understands the black mentality will be surprised by this.

  112. @Alden
    @JMcG

    Shrimp, another thing I just can’t eat any more. We have the entire Gulf of Mexico full of shrimp to harvest. But the markets buy that nasty Asian shrimp raised in barrels of sewage or something.

    Shrimp recipe for shelled shrimps should be large. Minced onion fried in butter till soft. Add white wine lemon juice and sour cream heat to simmer. Chop up a lot of parsley Add shrimp
    cook till hot. Add salt and red pepper sauce to taste. Or a little curry powder. Or dill preferably fresh but not both. Mix in the parsley. Serve on top of rice. Why I hate spell check. I kept typing the name of a popular red pepper sauce. Spell check turned it into tobacco.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    I used to love dishes made with prawns until I read an article about how most of them are farmed in filthy puddles in Vietnam or Thailand and pumped full of antibiotics.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Rob McX

    You might want to avoid farmed salmon as well. Particularly Norwegian.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Alden
    @Rob McX

    I don’t see why American supermarkets can’t sell our own shrimp. They used to.

  113. @Drunk Millenial
    OT: reposting a PSA i made a bit too late in the comments of an earlier isteve post:

    is anyone gonna tell these boomer retards that they can read literally any paywalled article on the internet using https://archive.is/ ?

    i love you guys but you are an awfully goofy group of copyright worshipping geriatrics who need to be apprised of the utility of the aforesaid circumvention as well as http://www.outline.com which also works for most paywalled articles but with better formatting (notably not for wapo, nyt, wsj tho).

    (you should also be given a tutorial on the use of torrents but thats beyond the scope of my giving a shit.)

    information wants to be free.
    piracy is a moral duty.
    pay content creaters you like directly and eff the intermediary.

    Replies: @Polistra

    If you weren’t quite so full of yourself you might have spent 15 seconds searching and found out that we’ve discussed this matter to death weeks, months, and years ago and have far superior solutions. Maybe you’ll figure it out eventually but meanwhile it’s fun watching you clown yourself.

  114. @Alden
    @Jack D

    I used to like chicken but it’s just nasty now days. Fit only for drowning in barbecue curry teriyak Hunter and other sauces. I’ve gone back to beef and pork with a lot of pan sauces. But those target pork chops didn’t even brown enough to make a sauce. I buy meat and fish at a small independent market. Delicious. These so called upscale supermarkets meat and fish isn’t worth the price. Costco has Smithfield hams sometimes. Yummy.

    The remaining butcher and fish stores are great but expensive and often too far away

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I have found it almost impossible to buy any decent ham in North Florida. It is just nasty sloppy wet stuff that is soaked in brine.

    A somewhat better alternative is what is called “tavern style” ham in the deli section, but that is still really lacking in flavor.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jonathan Mason

    Packaged ham is iffy and nasty . A great supermarket bone in whole ham you need to bake is Farmer John brand. Excellent. It’s slaughtered and processed in S California. If it’s sold in Florida try it. Costco sells Smithfield

  115. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:
    @prosa123
    @Anonymous

    The time will surely come, in the UK, when a clear majority of the adult prisoner population are blacks.
    This is likely already the case in London.


    ????
    I thought the Pakistanis commit a very high percentage of crime in Britain.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Robbery, thievery, stabbings, drug dealing etc are pretty much a black monopoly in London.
    Also, there’s a huge amount of fraud and embezzlement perpetrated by blacks in official capacities.
    Pakistanis, compared to whites, are overly expressed in criminal proclivities – big time drug dealing, various frauds and scams etc, but generally are non violent.

  116. @Arclight
    Mt. Pleasant is a thoroughly gentrified neighborhood, where a 1600 SF row house will set you back at least $1.5M. 20 years ago it definitely had a significant Latino presence, but was fairly quiet, certainly compared to neighboring Adams Morgan and much safer than AM or nearby Columbia Heights and Petworth, which were overwhelmingly black neighborhoods. Thanks to being on the west side of 16th Street and hemmed in by city parks without a Metro station, it's a bit off the beaten path, very pretty, and now has a minimal cohort of people who don't make in the mid six figures. This writer is completely delusional about it having resisted gentrification, and it will never have a CVS because a) there is a pharmacy a short walk away in Columbia Heights, and b) the residents would never tolerate something as gauche as a national chain of any sort in their neighborhood.

    Replies: @cityview

    I agree that Mount Pleasant has been expensive to buy in for decades. Not only are the large old rowhouses costly, but there is a lot of upkeep and repair on such old properties. Most have these have been extensively renovated for years now. I think the Morley article is referring to some handfuls of low-rise rental buildings, but I don’t know how inexpensive these could be–condos in similar buildings are not low-priced. The condos and co-ops in the few elevator buildings have never been low-priced. I agree that it has always been quiet–with some dark, deserted streets at night–but I wouldn’t say it was much safer some years ago than Adams-Morgan. I agree that it has less crime than Columbia Heights and Petworth, even right now.

    The neighborhood did have one national chain for some years, though: Payless Shoes. Some Mount Pleasant residents might walk to Columbia Heights or south to Columbia Road for the nearest CVS (not one of their better stores), but my guess is that many never leave their cars at home when shopping. So many people in so many city neighborhoods have always been like this.

    My feeling is that CVS was only mildly interested in locating in Mount Pleasant. If they had been strongly interested, the store would have gone there, but likely in a different building.

  117. Post, we learn that not having a chain pharmacy in your neighborhood is good because pharmacies represent gentrification and they are irresistible to the Mostly Peaceful Protesters because of all the stuff on their shelves that is just crying out to be looted:

    Come come Steve; you should know by now, the term is affirmatively shopped.

  118. @Alden
    @Jonathan Mason

    The food in CVS stores is much less expensive than food in the supermarkets in my Los Angeles neighborhood Depends on where you live.

    The Target in Westwood has a huge real food section including fresh meat and produce. Prices are about 40 percent lower than the Pavilions on the other side of the parking lot and 60 percent lower than the nearby Bristol Farms and Whole Foods supermarkets.

    Target is putting in real food markets all over Beverly Hills Santa Monica West Los Angeles to compete with expensive supermarkets. I assume Target wants to drive Whole Foods Gelsens Bristol Farms Pavilions etc out of business and take over the food business.

    The 99 cent store at Pico and Olympic has an incredible produce section. Red bell peppers $1.00 instead of $6.00 a pound. What’s wrong with that? I don’t like tomatoes. Had houseguests for a week and bought tomatoes at the Pico 99 cent store. They just raved about the 99 cent store tomatoes. So I bought 10 pounds more and they loved them. The Pico WLA 99 cent store produce is as good as the Beverly Hills Farmers Market produce.

    I make several trips to N California every year. I always stop at the San Mateo county farm stands. The orchards vines and bushes are 20 yards away. . Fruit is no better that the Pico Olympic 99cent store fruit.

    You’re just another expat nitpicking about anything and everything about America to display how superior you are compared to those of us stuck here in anti White America.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @prosa123, @cityview

    Every CVS, every Walgreens (not my preferred store), every Target I’ve been to is slightly different. I love the CVS stores that are well-stocked with greeting cards, office supplies, groceries, fresh flowers, household appliances, and gift items. I find CVS prices on food to be high, but the sales prices can be much lower.

    Every Target I’ve ever been to has a real grocery department, and a good one. They don’t have everything, but you are guaranteed to find something you can eat. I am a vegetarian and selective, and I can find quite a bit. Prices are good (I live in Chicago, where everything is expensive and everything except newspapers is taxed) for the most part.

  119. @Michelle
    A down town Walgreen's has been closed, after repeated looting's. My local Walgreen's no longer offers shopping baskets, because they are too easy to fill with loot. So, we have to balance out items in our arms. Yesterday, I went shopping there and the clerk's were on their knees, busy installing anti-theft devices on every product hanging hook in the store. A friend's wife works at a CVS, which is constantly looted.

    Replies: @black sea

    You need to move.

  120. @Rob McX
    @Alden

    I used to love dishes made with prawns until I read an article about how most of them are farmed in filthy puddles in Vietnam or Thailand and pumped full of antibiotics.

    Replies: @black sea, @Alden

    You might want to avoid farmed salmon as well. Particularly Norwegian.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @black sea

    Actually the Chilean is worse than the Norwegian. Norway has to comply with all sorts of EU regulations.

    Replies: @Yngvar

  121. @Rob McX
    @Alden

    I used to love dishes made with prawns until I read an article about how most of them are farmed in filthy puddles in Vietnam or Thailand and pumped full of antibiotics.

    Replies: @black sea, @Alden

    I don’t see why American supermarkets can’t sell our own shrimp. They used to.

  122. @Jonathan Mason
    @Alden

    I have found it almost impossible to buy any decent ham in North Florida. It is just nasty sloppy wet stuff that is soaked in brine.

    A somewhat better alternative is what is called "tavern style" ham in the deli section, but that is still really lacking in flavor.

    Replies: @Alden

    Packaged ham is iffy and nasty . A great supermarket bone in whole ham you need to bake is Farmer John brand. Excellent. It’s slaughtered and processed in S California. If it’s sold in Florida try it. Costco sells Smithfield

  123. @Jonathan Mason
    @Alden

    Interesting. CVS is very expensive in Florida, but apparently much cheaper and better for food in California. That's the advantage of having stores from sea to shining sea.

    Replies: @Alden

    Depends on the neighborhood. The pretentious supermarkets in my neighborhood cater to Bel Air Holmby Hills and Westwood neighborhoods of Los Angeles . So CVS and Target food is cheaper.

  124. @Anonymous
    'Pharmacy deserts' are just desserts for the incorrigibly thievish.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    ‘Pharmacy deserts’ are just desserts for the incorrigibly thievish.

    The correct phrases is “just deserts” though.

  125. @Paperback Writer
    @Jack D

    In places where there are lots of Dominicans (and, I think, Mexicans) there are stores where you can buy fresh-killed chickens. I don't know whether they're legal, but I've seen them. I haven't been inside but I guess they slaughter the bird while you wait. I've always been tempted but I'm a little leery of the germ factor.

    Replies: @Jack D

    If you look hard enough, there are still a few live poultry markets in ethnic neighborhoods of big cities (Chinese like them too.) Honestly there are a lot fewer germs than in a big slaughtering plant. Have no fear. It’s worth it for the experience. Keep in mind that you shouldn’t take fresh killed too far. You need to keep the bird in your fridge for a day or two for rigor mortis to relax or your bird will be tough. (Also make sure that you are getting a young chicken and not a mature hen unless you are making stew.) They often have things like guinea hens which are hard to find in the supermarket. They are going to give you the whole bird including the head and the feet.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Jack D


    Also make sure that you are getting a young chicken and not a mature hen unless you are making stew.
     
    Thanks for the advice!

    Also thanks for the advice about the poultry.

    (Sorry, Rosie.)
    , @Rob McX
    @Jack D

    It sure beats this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWsWhypMjYM

  126. @black sea
    @Rob McX

    You might want to avoid farmed salmon as well. Particularly Norwegian.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Actually the Chilean is worse than the Norwegian. Norway has to comply with all sorts of EU regulations.

    • Replies: @Yngvar
    @Jack D

    Codex Alimentarius is the same for everyone, but enforcement maybe not.

  127. @Rob McX
    I remember reading in Blue Blood, ex-NYPD cop Edward Conlon's memoir, that ghetto blacks would often call 911 for an ambulance when they needed medication. This way they could get their meds at the hospital and bypass the hassle of going to the doctor for a prescription and then to the pharmacy.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Detroit Refugee

    Real lazy mfr’s. Doesn’t surprise me one bit though.

  128. @glib
    There is very little in a modern pharmacy that helps human health anyway. Maybe vitamin D pills and neti pots, but that's it.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    No, but dehs got some good shit fo’ makin’ purple drank.

  129. @Polistra
    @Rob McX

    Not to mention paying. Also, these are people who call 911 when McDonald's runs out of cheeseburgers.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Not cheeseburgers but fish sammiches.

  130. @Jack D
    @Paperback Writer

    If you look hard enough, there are still a few live poultry markets in ethnic neighborhoods of big cities (Chinese like them too.) Honestly there are a lot fewer germs than in a big slaughtering plant. Have no fear. It's worth it for the experience. Keep in mind that you shouldn't take fresh killed too far. You need to keep the bird in your fridge for a day or two for rigor mortis to relax or your bird will be tough. (Also make sure that you are getting a young chicken and not a mature hen unless you are making stew.) They often have things like guinea hens which are hard to find in the supermarket. They are going to give you the whole bird including the head and the feet.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer, @Rob McX

    Also make sure that you are getting a young chicken and not a mature hen unless you are making stew.

    Thanks for the advice!

    Also thanks for the advice about the poultry.

    (Sorry, Rosie.)

  131. @Jim Christian
    @Jim Christian


    Bucs 38, Chiefs 24. For lots of reasons. You heard it here first.

     

    Ok, ok,
    Bucs 31, KC 9.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Something must be happening to me. I normally hate Brady but yesterday I was rooting for the SOB. And he didn’t let me down.

    Hail Brady, no reservations.

  132. @Jack D
    @Paperback Writer

    If you look hard enough, there are still a few live poultry markets in ethnic neighborhoods of big cities (Chinese like them too.) Honestly there are a lot fewer germs than in a big slaughtering plant. Have no fear. It's worth it for the experience. Keep in mind that you shouldn't take fresh killed too far. You need to keep the bird in your fridge for a day or two for rigor mortis to relax or your bird will be tough. (Also make sure that you are getting a young chicken and not a mature hen unless you are making stew.) They often have things like guinea hens which are hard to find in the supermarket. They are going to give you the whole bird including the head and the feet.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer, @Rob McX

    It sure beats this.

  133. @Jack D
    @Alden

    Whatever water you can add you can sell for the same price as meat. This creates a really hefty markup since tap water costs maybe 1/4 of 1 cent per lb. and meat sells for several $/lb.

    If you buy a chicken in Europe it is completely dry vs. in America where every package of chicken has a cupful of water that pours out when you open the bag. This bloody water is very good for markups but it's usually just swimming with bacteria - they throw the freshly slaughtered chickens into a vat to soak up water where they are commingled with thousands of other dead birds so if 1 bird has salmonella now they all do. Having the chicken soaking in a bag full of water is not really good for the quality of the product - good luck getting waterlogged chicken to brown. But profit is more important than quality.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Alden, @Reg Cæsar

    This creates a really hefty markup since tap water costs maybe 1/4 of 1 cent per lb. and meat sells for several $/lb.

    Yeah, but does meat have sodium fluoride?

    In other news, this is how they celebrate Beethoven’s birthday in San Antone– and yes, that’s a guy:

    Woman dismembered while alive, then killed after ‘disrespecting’ fiancé’s ‘name’

    POLICE: ‘Problematic trespasser’ threatens, sexually assaults friend in apartment

    More recently:

    POLICE: Man arrested for violation of parole later defecated in van on way to jail

    Police: Man killed after cannon misfires at baby shower

  134. @alaska3636
    I work in Venice, CA. The other day, two hipster looking guys pull over in an SUV shouting me down. They've got a great deal, they say. A steal. Opens up the trunk and a 4k projector and blue tooth speakers fills the back. It's from a production shoot. I can have it real cheap they say. I immediately am reminded of the morons marching and looting a few months ago. It was probably a mostly peaceful production but I decline. Apparently, this is pretty common around Venice now.

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost

    That sounds like a modern version of the “Speakermen”. Guys offer you a super deal on some equipment they need to unload. Looks legit with shrink wrap and printed labels. Get what you think are $2000 high end speakers for 200, then when you get them home you find they’re complete junk. Gotcha!

    This has been going on since the 70s. It started in Southern California but has spread as far as Australia I’ve read.

    • Agree: JMcG
  135. @Jack D
    @black sea

    Actually the Chilean is worse than the Norwegian. Norway has to comply with all sorts of EU regulations.

    Replies: @Yngvar

    Codex Alimentarius is the same for everyone, but enforcement maybe not.

  136. @The Alarmist
    @Jim Christian

    I went through old photos the other day, and came across a few I snapped while flying a couple thousand feet over several US cities (circa 1970s & 1980s). I didn’t think much of it at the time, probably because I would have been looking out for traffic, but parts of those cities looked in pictures like the cities of Germany at the end of WW2, except that most of the rubble had been carted away. Entire blocks with shells of buildings or no buildings near the centre of what was otherwise a functioning US city.

    Replies: @Jim Christian

    Entire blocks with shells of buildings or no buildings near the centre of what was otherwise a functioning US city.

    Traffic reporter or overhead photo-pro, Alamist? Saw the same thing in Baltimore throughout the 80s with the Bethlehem Steel factories that sat on the Potapsco River. Working at NorTel (big PBX phone systems), piece-by piece over several years we decommissioned the phone system as they dismantled various sections of the factories that used to make car frames and a million other things. By 1988 or so, the last piece of the factory, one that was making conduit was closed down and the offices closed up. We pulled the boards out of the system and walked. In a year’s time, the windows were smashed, Bethlehem Steel was long gone and I have no doubt that land is ruined and leaking into the river on out to the ocean. WR Grace chemical was another, although they may still be there. And you’re right, forget the view from the air, going by on I95, the remains are still there, looking for all the world like they were bombed from above.

    That we allowed them to scoot without cleaning up the land and water is unforgivable. That we allowed all of them to scoot without cleaning up the human carnage even more so. The Black urban shooters (teens) of today are the sons and grandsons of the factory workers who once had gainful employment. Baltimore is but one and hardly the largest, but is illustrative of the U.S.’s industrial and social decline.

  137. @Rob McX
    @Gordo

    And I can understand why South Asians would not be popular with the local blacks. They really believe in vigilante justice for any kind of theft. I recall two separate cases in the English courts from the 80s and 90s where people who stole from Pakistani shops ended up being killed by the owner. One was an armed robber who was run over by the shopkeeper in his van when he was making his getaway. The other was a man who stole a punnet of mushrooms. The owner knelt on his neck until he choked to death.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    So the guy who stole the mushrooms was on fentanyl then?

    I ask because we all know that it’s impossible to asphyxiate from having someone kneel on your neck – all the little piggie-advocates in these very pages will bray the same shit at every opportunity.

    If only they would spent 9 minutes or so with a 170lb adult male kneeling on their necks, just to show us all how it’s no biggie. That’d be great.

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