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From the AP:

Texas companies tie worker shortages to immigration fears

Meredith Hoffman, Associated Press, June 17, 2017

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Though construction is in high demand in Texas’ booming capital city, Oscar Martinez’s drywall company is suddenly struggling.

One-third of the approximately 20 employees Martinez uses to build new homes and commercial spaces have recently fled the state, spooked by a combination of a federal immigration crackdown by the Trump administration and a tough anti-“sanctuary cities” law approved last month by Texas’ Republican-controlled Legislature.

“The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …

The biggest industry to take a hit from the immigration crackdown is construction. About half of that industry’s workers are in the U.S. illegally, according to the immigrant rights organization Workers Defense Project.

“Projects are coming in late because we don’t have enough labor,” said Frank Fuentes, chairman of the U.S. Hispanic Contractors Association, based in Austin. …

“It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation,” said Martinez, whose employees typically work 15-hour days and six or seven days a week.

Who doesn’t want to pour their life savings into the purchase of a house assembled by illegal aliens working 90 to 105 hours per week? My father told me that the government did a study at Lockheed during World War II to discover the optimal long-term number of hours per work week before quality fell off so badly that overall output declined. He said they found 52 hours per week was the optimum for winning the Big One.

But you have to understand, those were pathetic, deplorable, deportable American workers who won World War II, not illegal alien supermen. You should be proud to be able to buy a high quality new house built by illegal aliens working twice the optimum number of hours.

Americans lasting only half a day might have something to do with Mr. Martinez working his employees 15 hours per day.

In Marx’s Capital, Karl’s theory is that capitalists pay workers for only six hours of work per day but make them work for twelve hours per day, appropriating the other six hours of their labor.

But Marx hadn’t run into Mr. Martinez, who boasts of working his illegal workers not 12 hours, like in the era of Marx and Dickens, but 15 hours per day. To most of today’s Marxists, however, Mr. Martinez deserves to be a Who instead of a Whom because his name ends in a Z.

 
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  1. It is disgusting.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    It is disgusting.
     
    Your assessment is generous.
  2. Off topic:

    Enterprise is shutting down its Chicago-based car share program (similar to Zipcar) as 40% of their vehicles have either been stolen or damaged.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/bluesky/originals/ct-bsi-enterprise-carshare-leaves-chicago-20170614-story.html

    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles. Or Stephen Moore saying that what’s really needed for economic growth is a large tax cut. This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.

    NB: The article states that Zipcar hasn’t experienced similar vehicle security challenges in Chicago. However, as a Chicago Zipcar customer, I once misplaced my Zipcar card and one of the features Zipcar has is that it can open cars remotely through an app or by calling customer service. The customer rep wasn’t able to remote me in and saidthe company had disabled it due to high thefts/vandalism (not sure I get the logic). So I had to cancel my reservation.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles.
     
    Uh, excuse me, Enterprise is applying free-market principles here, voting with their feet. Or tires, as it were.

    Or Stephen Moore saying that what’s really needed for economic growth is a large tax cut. This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.
     
    As if the "Chicago Way" were Moore-and-friends' fault, not Chicagoans' themselves. That would be blaming the victim. That victim who stole your Zipcar.
    , @Marty
    Seems fitting in that Enterprise is largely a black operation. They're the only car rental outfit with black announcers on their commercials, and blacks often man their satellite offices inside repair shops.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson

    This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.
     
    Okay, but you don't mention Democrats. Do you loathe them?
    , @Anonym
    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles.

    The problem isn't too much free market; it's not enough. Southern Italy has a well developed private security and enforcement infrastructure. The Sicilian model could be complemented by roving groups of Somali style security provided by 50cals mounted on Toyota Hiluxes.
  3. George Borjas noticed the changing argument. I think Sailer retweeted it.

    https://gborjas.org/2017/06/19/the-new-narrative-less-immigration-is-bad/

    Despite being a Harvard professor, Borjas gets it…

    PS: I posted too quickly–it’s not quite the same issue–though it is immigration and wages.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    Interesting seeing him becoming so passionate, since he's always been pretty academic and wonky presenting his arguments.
    , @Phelps
    Here's another recent example of the trend. While he doesn't advocate full on immigration restriction he points out economic damages from it and how extreme Democrats have moved left in such a short period. Towards the end, he also puts in Sailer's big takeaway from Punam's Bowling Alone to boot.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/amp/article/528678/
  4. This guy should be in jail. Where are Trump and Sessions with the employer sanctions? That’s why he got elected.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Where is Trump regarding a single thing he was elected to do? I believe the concensus is that his daughter vetoed the electorate.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    You do understand that a ship changing course is a complex operation. And changing the course of a ship of state is exponentially more complicated.

    If you want everything now, you will get nothing forever.
    , @Guy De Champlaigne
    Trump made it crystal clear with all his terrible corporatist appointments that he's not going after businesses for anything: not environmental abuses, not worker abuses, not financial crimes, not anything.

    As far as I can tell the plan is just to go after a trivial number of immigrants in really stupid public ways and use the over the top media attention to trick his supporters into thinking he's actually tackling the issue.

    If Trump were serious he would be saturating the airwaves with ads about the rewards to people offering tips on the employees and landlords of illegals and the whole anti immigration apparatus would be paying for itself with the massive number of fines being issued.

  5. ” whose employees typically work 15- hour days and six or seven days a week ”
    Credit to the AP hack who manages to completely undermine the globalist argument demanded by his/her employer.
    PS, in late 19th Century Britain, manufacturing workers typically worked a 12 hour day, but with 2 hours for lunch and 2 x 30 minute teabreaks. Saturday was typically a half-day. Many employers treated workers in a paternalistic and beneficial way.
    Please do not compare horrible s***s like Martinez with your average Victorian employer.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @Guy De Champlaigne
    Even if many treated them well that doesn't mean the average employer did. And the fact that so many of the paternalistic employers like Robert Owen (who didn't himself think that paternalistic capitalism was the answer and went on to embrace utopian socialism) were so noteworthy shows just what a rarity they were.
    , @Hail
    I wonder if British employers ever included a "tea-break clause" in a work contract.

    I don't expect "19th century manufacturing workers" had formal contracts as such, though.
  6. “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said…

    I was going to suggest treating them like Americans. But that might be hard for Señor Martinez to grasp, not being an American himself.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Alden
    I doubt very, very much he hired any Americans. That's the latest propaganda employers spout, Americans are lazy drug addicts who expect all sorts of pampering such as the 8 hour day, 3o minute lunch break, paid overtime, safe working conditions etc.

    There's a big Tesla factory in Ca. Most of the workers are from Eastern Europe. So when I read about companies opening new facilities with 500 jobs I wonder if those jobs will go to Americans or immigrants. I'm beginning to assume the jobs will go to immigrants.
    , @MBlanc46
    Americans used to hang drywall. They used to do roofing. Now, in the Chicago area, both those trades are entirely Mexican. I doubt that it's because Americans ca no longer do those jobs.
  7. “We’re more concerned about the buying power of this population,” she said, pointing to the estimated 1.1 million people in Texas who are living in the U.S. illegally, second only to California. “When you have over a million people not feeling welcome they’ll move somewhere they are welcome.”

    Over a million illegal alien invaders in Texas? There are only 1.3 million people in New Hampshire. The Chamber of Commerce types who support mass immigration really do only think of cheap labor and toilet paper.

    Texas is moving away from open borders free trade and open borders mass immigration. The battle to control the Texas GOP between the open borders globalizers and the pro-sovereignty patriots is going to be bloody. How can the cheap labor crowd win this fight to control the Texas GOP? It seems that the cheap labor crowd in the Texas Chamber of Commerce will be wiped out.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    Over a million illegal alien invaders in Texas? There are only 1.3 million people in New Hampshire. The Chamber of Commerce types who support mass immigration really do only think of cheap labor and toilet paper.
     
    We are still a manufacturing super power when it comes to disposable plastic diapers and toilet paper. To keep it real the messy soiled diapers must be tossed in the parking lot of the store where you (illegal alien) just bought groceries with your wiped EBT card. Illegal aliens boost those two manufacturing sectors and real estate prices in certain states/areas.
    , @Henry Bowman
    As they fucking well should....They get to pocket money, passing off the costs/burdens on to you and me, "the little people".

    They get to live in massive, newly build mansions, in gated suburbs, drive the newest cars, have the greatest healthcare plans, send their kids to the best private schools, and if you dare try to climb the ladder via hard work you are some how "less then noting", if you oppose the continuation of their rack, the theft of our nation and the end of our people we are some how "trash"....

    The base has show its naked hate for us, wish us to "just die" as they can not justifying our existence if it means one less Yacht for them.

    The GOPe/Neo Cons are finished.
  8. @gman
    Off topic:

    Enterprise is shutting down its Chicago-based car share program (similar to Zipcar) as 40% of their vehicles have either been stolen or damaged.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/bluesky/originals/ct-bsi-enterprise-carshare-leaves-chicago-20170614-story.html

    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles. Or Stephen Moore saying that what’s really needed for economic growth is a large tax cut. This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.


    NB: The article states that Zipcar hasn’t experienced similar vehicle security challenges in Chicago. However, as a Chicago Zipcar customer, I once misplaced my Zipcar card and one of the features Zipcar has is that it can open cars remotely through an app or by calling customer service. The customer rep wasn’t able to remote me in and saidthe company had disabled it due to high thefts/vandalism (not sure I get the logic). So I had to cancel my reservation.

    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles.

    Uh, excuse me, Enterprise is applying free-market principles here, voting with their feet. Or tires, as it were.

    Or Stephen Moore saying that what’s really needed for economic growth is a large tax cut. This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.

    As if the “Chicago Way” were Moore-and-friends’ fault, not Chicagoans’ themselves. That would be blaming the victim. That victim who stole your Zipcar.

    • Replies: @gman
    No, I agree with you that it's not Moore-and friends' fault

    What I was trying to convey was how silly it is that to Establishment Republicans, every problem can be solved through deregulation/tax cuts

    Example (from the Washington Post)

    "In 2004, Ryan did try to revive Kemp’s “enterprise zone” plan, proposing a bill that would let businesses and individuals deduct all capital gains, savings and investing-related expenditures in high-poverty areas."

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2012/08/31/what-paul-ryan-learned-from-jack-kemp/?utm_term=.cb78ce771af6
  9. “It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation,” said Martinez…

    Let’s take up a collection so Señor Martinez can mend his heart and follow his staff home. It would be the compassionate thing to do.

    • Agree: MBlanc46
  10. What else do you expect from a journalist named Meredith HOFFMAN? Like the NYT article today on Dallas School integration by Dana GOLDSTEIN…the Jew World Order is in full effect. These people will not stop until they completely wreck the west with “multiculturalism” and “diversity” aka the black and brown horde.

    This is the real story behind the real estate boom in America – bring in unlimited number of Central Americans to build new homes for the unlimited number of Indians and Chinese who came in on H1B, EB5, F1, OPT, completely wreck the environment while the Jewish realtors and immigration lawyers collect all the fat fees from everybody.

    • Replies: @2Mintzin1
    Time to go...I think you must be late for your Bund meeting.
  11. Wasn’t there a certain Mexican-American labor leader who opposed illegal immigration because it would undercut his workers? Aren’t there streets named after this guy?

    • Replies: @Forbes
    Yeah, but that was in the 20th century. You'd have to know about, or study, history--a practice long unfashionable. And those streets named after him? As if anyone can point to a policy behind the newly re-named RFK Bridge in NYC (replacing the Tri-Boro Bridge), or the long ago named Adam Clayton Powell, Jr Blvd (Seventh Ave.) in Harlem.
  12. @Reg Cæsar

    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles.
     
    Uh, excuse me, Enterprise is applying free-market principles here, voting with their feet. Or tires, as it were.

    Or Stephen Moore saying that what’s really needed for economic growth is a large tax cut. This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.
     
    As if the "Chicago Way" were Moore-and-friends' fault, not Chicagoans' themselves. That would be blaming the victim. That victim who stole your Zipcar.

    No, I agree with you that it’s not Moore-and friends’ fault

    What I was trying to convey was how silly it is that to Establishment Republicans, every problem can be solved through deregulation/tax cuts

    Example (from the Washington Post)

    “In 2004, Ryan did try to revive Kemp’s “enterprise zone” plan, proposing a bill that would let businesses and individuals deduct all capital gains, savings and investing-related expenditures in high-poverty areas.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2012/08/31/what-paul-ryan-learned-from-jack-kemp/?utm_term=.cb78ce771af6

  13. @Forbes
    George Borjas noticed the changing argument. I think Sailer retweeted it.

    https://gborjas.org/2017/06/19/the-new-narrative-less-immigration-is-bad/

    Despite being a Harvard professor, Borjas gets it...

    PS: I posted too quickly--it's not quite the same issue--though it is immigration and wages.

    Interesting seeing him becoming so passionate, since he’s always been pretty academic and wonky presenting his arguments.

  14. @Forbes
    George Borjas noticed the changing argument. I think Sailer retweeted it.

    https://gborjas.org/2017/06/19/the-new-narrative-less-immigration-is-bad/

    Despite being a Harvard professor, Borjas gets it...

    PS: I posted too quickly--it's not quite the same issue--though it is immigration and wages.

    Here’s another recent example of the trend. While he doesn’t advocate full on immigration restriction he points out economic damages from it and how extreme Democrats have moved left in such a short period. Towards the end, he also puts in Sailer’s big takeaway from Punam’s Bowling Alone to boot.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/amp/article/528678/

  15. I have come across “indivisible” labor at construction sites peeing at random places, or peeing in lidless cups and then accidentally knocking them over. This was at sites where portajohns were provided, at the expense of the client, and known to the workers. Every supervisor will tell you they forget how to understand English whenever convenient. In one case the source of the boundless energy of the 15-hr/day worker was not belief in America but powder cocaine. To be fair some I assumed were good people.
    But how does it happen that liberals want every last molecule and hand-washing regulated, until it comes to their own immediate personal projects (which will presumably affect them most directly), and then they’re cool with sleep deprivation and narcotically-enabled overwork? Have they never seen what happens when a semi driver misses sleep? Do they think an elecrician or a millwright would be more naturally alert?
    Do liberals only understand regulation as a pseudo-moral, passive-aggressive attack on competition?

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    I doubt the Dems even thought that far, or even thought of ethics at all.

    Their thinking stopped at "Enough Latinos in the population" = permanent Dem majorities.
  16. Speaking of encouraging dispossession and invasion: Tucker Carlson and Mark Steyn are on fire tonight.

    For the first time in my life I am seeing on a mainstream, broadcast network and watched by millions a questioning of how come so-called multiculturalism is always only and ever meant to dispossess Western civilisation.

    As grim as things remain, I am starting to reckon the wrath of the Saxon may yet begin – or at least that his forbearance for bullshit and suffering of fools is ending.

  17. The international bankster cartel won WWII.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    They also started it.

    In Wilson's time.

    And for anyone who cringes from that as hitlernazihitler altright darkweb doom froggery...I was taught that by my grandfather, schooled at West Point and having served in the Spanish-American War.

    He also lost a good chunk of life savings to Executive Order 6102. The aureate bailout of the central banks engineered IIRC by Henry Morgenthau, Jr. You know, Barbara Tuchman's uncle.

    That's the problem with this cartel. Periodically they demand you hand everything over to them.

    Which still isn't enough, they then want all your sons and by extension their families and sons and daughters. Just to level the genetic playing field numbers. While cleaning up on the hemoclysm.
  18. I think it would be far more heartbreaking if Senor Martinez had enough of these fellows to reconstruct America into the low rent shanty town living that is their authentic culture. Sure it may be profitable, but so was slavery. I suppose the wonderful results of high crime and prostitution prevalence accompanying the Indian Casino Movement is another Capitalist Success Story that focuses entirely on the bottom line and ignores the Pottersville social disasters inflicted by Laissez Faire Capitalism. Its easy to not want walls on your border if you’re Mayda Munny and have a giant wall with barbed wire and broken glass on top with armed security guarding the gates. However its the people who have to live with the looting and rapine that will build the siege engines and guillotines that make this a bad idea in the long run. Libertarians talk about rugged individualism and how worrying about other peoples’ needs is not a necessary part of life. I think somebody should round up these city dudes who have hot and cold running water and utilities and give them a taste of rugged individualism by dropping them deep in the woods with nothing but a knife and a compass. Good Luck Grizzly Addams Family.

  19. @Flip
    This guy should be in jail. Where are Trump and Sessions with the employer sanctions? That's why he got elected.

    Where is Trump regarding a single thing he was elected to do? I believe the concensus is that his daughter vetoed the electorate.

  20. Next thing, everyone is going to start talking about how unions maybe didn’t ruin America after all, and might have been a good thing.

    • Replies: @Steve Johnson

    Next thing, everyone is going to start talking about how unions maybe didn’t ruin America after all, and might have been a good thing.
     
    You don't get how it works do you?

    Unions were the exact same con - "vote for us and we'll loot your employer and give it to you in the form of 'wages' that you don't earn - they're rich anyway and the rich don't do anything". Unfortunately that con ended because everyone ends up poor and miserable. Now they're much smarter - they just import voters who don't care about poverty because it's a step up from what they're used to but make no mistake - it's the exact same con.
  21. “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …

    Unsaid a “Half a day” is 10 hours without breaks.

    • Replies: @Joe Schmoe



    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …

     

    Unsaid a “Half a day” is 10 hours without breaks.
     
    Employer also ignores workplace safety regulations and doesn't pay overtime. Workers must be complicit in various false reporting activities as well. Not too hard when workers don't know building codes, employment regulations, or even the language. The only reason he wants to hire these people is that they are entirely powerless. They can't complain or expect legal treatment.

    It is disgusting. And the establishment Republicans support and facilitate it.

    This reminds me of the journalist who kept an old woman as a slave in Seattle (or Portland). You would think that a guy wouldn't be advertising that he violates all manner of employment regulations far beyond hiring illegal aliens. You would think the journalist might be appalled at the employer's wanton violations of employee rights, but no, scum "progressive" lackeys don't care how badly anyone else is treated. And we thought they were just insensitive to their enemies. Nah, they couldn't care less about those they hope will create permanent Democrat rule and fags über alles.
  22. This is spot on until the last sentence. The liberals (and the Dems generally) who care about Martinez’s ancestry are not Marxists. They haven’t read Marx. They don’t use Marxist analysis. They don’t want workers seizing the means of production, they don’t want democracy at the workplace. They don’t talk about class since they don’t think about the working class and they don’t think class struggle is real. (As an aside, it seems mainstream liberals and mainstream conservatives have much the same reaction to class and race: if we pretend they don’t exist long enough hopefully they’ll go away.)

    Here’s a handy test for detecting actual Marxists: an actual Marxist would advocate for seizing the means of production.

  23. I am going to need a new roof in a few years. All the roofing crews I see here are Central Americans or Mexicans. Can anyone comment on how good or bad their work quality is? Personal experiences with these crews work? Thanks/

    • Replies: @KM32
    The main problem I have with work done by illegals is not the workers themselves. Those guys work hard, and can certainly learn skills. But the type of guy who hires illegals, doesn't care about the law, and is likely to cheat you with crappy materials and other ways of cheating you.

    The guys coming up from Guatemala or Mexico aren't the problem here. They're just following the work, and responding to an obvious situation that doesn't punish illegally crossing the borders.
    , @E. Rekshun
    Last month I had a new metal roof put on my 2000 sf two-story home. While the estimator was a regular White guy, the job foreman and entire crew were Mexicans (and there's really not all that many Mexicans in FL). These guys worked their butts off in the sun and 80 degree heat. They finished in two 12-hour days and the job is high-quality and perfect!
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Who cares? If all the roofing crews are from down there, it doesn't matter how competent they are. On the other hand, if not all the crews are from down there, then you have a patriotic duty to "buy American" regardless of work quality. So, it doesn't matter.
    , @Karl
    23 Clyde > I am going to need a new roof in a few years.


    A properly done roof will last until your great-great-great grandchildren sell the place.

    The best investment is in learning how to do it yourself. I bet your local public library and youtube can teach you everything you need to know.

    If you REALLY want to help your kids.... teach THEM to do it.
  24. Nice takedown of the left again , Steve . They’re all about identity politics to the point where economic issues and actual exploitation of workers is forgotten about completely – or even defended . Also , like many others I’ve put up drywall both at home and for pay with a contractor friend. Very hard work . Martinez is a real lowlife to work any man like that .

  25. “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …

    This is confusing. I seem to recall Mencius Moldbug drawing fire for suggesting some groups of people might be better suited for grueling manual labor than others, but this Martinez guy is brown and he agrees. If I understand the situation correctly, this idea is wrong and immoral if a racist cishet white brogrammer uses it in his blog to try to get people on the wrong side of history, but is good and virtuous if a suitably melanated individual uses it to justify working his co-ethnics for 15 hours a day in the Texas heat.

    “It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation,” said Martinez, whose employees typically work 15-hour days and six or seven days a week.

    I remember reading similar quotes from plantation owners when I was learning about the 13th Amendment in school. Heart-wrenching stuff.

  26. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    In a country run by people who care about the country, that Martinez guy would be in jail long ago.

    This is how the entire illegal immigration problem can be solved in no time: Start jailing employers who hire illegals. Not the laughable fines but a very real time in the slammer. Will only take less than a year and a few high profile cases.

    • Agree: Frau Katze, E. Rekshun
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Jailing them is definitely the answer. And it will happen only after a popular revolt.
  27. “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …”

    So roughly half a work day in his world is about 8hrs per day.

    To be fair, I think in the era of Dickens and Andrew Carnegie the average US industrial worker did work about 14hrs per day, oftentimes six days a week. So Martinez is just returning to historical norms of 19th century.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    MA19thcGA.
  28. Why not just work the men to death like the Romans did with Germanic slaves? Put them in the forests with axes, don’t feed them, put them under the whip and work them until they die. Rome gets its timber and the economy grows to its very last sestertius held by its very richest man.

  29. @gman
    Off topic:

    Enterprise is shutting down its Chicago-based car share program (similar to Zipcar) as 40% of their vehicles have either been stolen or damaged.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/bluesky/originals/ct-bsi-enterprise-carshare-leaves-chicago-20170614-story.html

    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles. Or Stephen Moore saying that what’s really needed for economic growth is a large tax cut. This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.


    NB: The article states that Zipcar hasn’t experienced similar vehicle security challenges in Chicago. However, as a Chicago Zipcar customer, I once misplaced my Zipcar card and one of the features Zipcar has is that it can open cars remotely through an app or by calling customer service. The customer rep wasn’t able to remote me in and saidthe company had disabled it due to high thefts/vandalism (not sure I get the logic). So I had to cancel my reservation.

    Seems fitting in that Enterprise is largely a black operation. They’re the only car rental outfit with black announcers on their commercials, and blacks often man their satellite offices inside repair shops.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Blacks seem to gravitate toward travel related industries, like working at airports. Early jets were extremely loud so they probably pushed a lot of neighborhoods under flight paths black, like Inglewood under the Los Angeles International descent path.

    But I think blacks and the travel industry go back further, such as to Pullman sleeping car porters in the late 19th Century. Pullman porters formed an elite among African Americans of well-paid, urbane men who traveled the country and saw how things were different in some places.

    , @kaganovitch
    Enterprise hires almost exclusively college jocks. Back when I was a district manager,I used to rent from Enterprise around sixty times a year over a 3 state area. In that time I met 2 Enterprise employees who were not college jocks of one sort or another. Some were baseball players, some were female golfers etc. If you hire from that cohort you are going to end up with lots of blacks, unless you have a corporate deathwish and wish to engage in protracted litigation with EEOC and DOJ with the attendant negative publicity etc.
    , @Hanoi Paris Hilton
    Those rare times I need a rental vehicle, I invariably deal with Enterprise out here in the Chicago far exurbs, and it's definitely staffed by high-responsibility, high-motivation black entrepreneurial (or pre-entrepreneurial) types. Have always been treated very professionally and respectfully. Definitely antidotal to hair-up-as* over dindu outrageousness.
  30. “It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation,” said Martinez, whose employees typically work 15-hour days and six or seven days a week.

    I’m sure this has nothing to do with expecting Señor Martinez to comply with Federal Wage and Hour Laws and pay overtime wages for the 50-65 hours per week they’d be working in excess of the 40 hour standard? Perhaps he counts every Carlos and Jose as and “independent contractor” and entrepreneur like the liars who keep stats on “immigrant businesses” do. That means when one of his wage slaves falls off a ladder, Martinez can throw him into a wheelbarrow and dump him in the nearest emergency room so you get to pay – indirectly – for the poor fellow’s medical care.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Those laws are only for American citizens. Can't have the Martinez's getting deported on trumped up charges.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    I’m sure this has nothing to do with expecting Señor Martinez to comply with Federal Wage and Hour Laws and pay overtime wages for the 50-65 hours per week they’d be working in excess of the 40 hour standard?
     
    Why the wimp-out?

    Foreigners should be paid overtime starting with the very first hour. See how popular they'll be with employers then.

    , @Anonymous
    That means when one of his wage slaves falls off a ladder, Martinez can throw him into a wheelbarrow and dump him in the nearest emergency room so you get to pay – indirectly – for the poor fellow’s medical care.

    When my roof was being replaced, one of the Mexicans working on it fell off a one-story area of my roof (rolled down a bit and then landed on my wooden deck). The other workers helped him a little and then went back to work. I called the company to tell them what happened. I'm not sure anyone cared too much. It was all quite odd to witness.
  31. ““The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …”

    American cotton pickers had similar bad habits.

  32. Sweet OT:

    Echo Chambering Tribalists Burn $21.000.000 on Their People’s Candidate:

    Yet, Evil Vlad, just like his predecessor, establishes a full control over Tovarish Koba’s Home State:

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    Echo Chambering Tribalists Burn $21.000.000 on Their People’s Candidate:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user230519/imageroot/2017/06/20/2017.06.20%20-%20GA%2018_0.JPG
     
    Funniest take on the Quixotic Ossoff candidacy from last night:

    Georgia woman devises elaborate $23 million hoax to convince her boyfriend to propose— PoliMath (@politicalmath) June 21, 2017
     
    , @res
    Nate Silver's pre-election take is interesting (and highlights his current fallibility, it looks like much of his "genius" was events lining up with his biases): https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/why-the-georgia-special-election-matters/
  33. Amazing how the Japanese don’t have any shortage of workers willing to build houses.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    There's not even a shortage in the largely white Vancouver Island.

    (Why is the island still so white? My theory is that the 1 ½ hour ferry ride to Vancouver discourages immigrants).

    I'm not sure how things work in Vancouver itself. Lots of legal immigrants, not many illegals.

    I have a nephew living there who is currently installing gutters for a living. But he would be working only an 8 hour day.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Actually, I believe Chinese are being brought in to do some construction work. E.g., in preparation for the 2020 Olympics (which, by the way, needs to be outstanding in every way, or it will ruin brand Japan, which they can't afford).

    You have to remember that while Abe and Japanese politicians are subject to idiosyncracies of being Japanese, Japan is highly integrated with the world economy and therefore the elites are subject to influence from outside too.

    Japan's loosening visa standards and attempts to change Article 9 point to the current gov't being the Jap version of invade/invite.
  34. @Luke Lea
    It is disgusting.

    It is disgusting.

    Your assessment is generous.

  35. @gman
    Off topic:

    Enterprise is shutting down its Chicago-based car share program (similar to Zipcar) as 40% of their vehicles have either been stolen or damaged.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/bluesky/originals/ct-bsi-enterprise-carshare-leaves-chicago-20170614-story.html

    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles. Or Stephen Moore saying that what’s really needed for economic growth is a large tax cut. This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.


    NB: The article states that Zipcar hasn’t experienced similar vehicle security challenges in Chicago. However, as a Chicago Zipcar customer, I once misplaced my Zipcar card and one of the features Zipcar has is that it can open cars remotely through an app or by calling customer service. The customer rep wasn’t able to remote me in and saidthe company had disabled it due to high thefts/vandalism (not sure I get the logic). So I had to cancel my reservation.

    This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.

    Okay, but you don’t mention Democrats. Do you loathe them?

  36. Meanwhile in Japan…

    And in Hong Kong…

    And the back lot at Paramount…

    • Replies: @neutral
    Strange that those Chinese designers picked a white to be their robot.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Trelane, You know you have a top notch robot when they can learn to speak Japanese...right?
    , @Chrisnonymous
    If engineering nerds had a better sense of humor/irony and were more self-aware, they would make Schwarzenegger 'bots and be embarassed to be pursuing escort 'bots.

    On the other hand, maybe the rise of escort 'bots will prevent western-style feminist entitlement from spreading to Asia.
  37. @Flip
    This guy should be in jail. Where are Trump and Sessions with the employer sanctions? That's why he got elected.

    You do understand that a ship changing course is a complex operation. And changing the course of a ship of state is exponentially more complicated.

    If you want everything now, you will get nothing forever.

  38. Mr. Martinez, who boasts of working his illegal workers not 12 hours, like in the era of Marx and Dickens, but 15 hours per day.

    What’s he paying them… $11 an hour with no benefits, no sick time, and no paid days off?

    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said.

    Maybe Americans are smart enough to figure out in half a day that their employer is a ripoff artist and an asshole.

    When I was an undergraduate, I got a summer job with a professional painter. The guy couldn’t figure out why he couldn’t keep help.

    On Day One the guy threatened to throw me off a roof — before lunchtime. The then intentionally sprayed paint in my face and then told me if I dropped the ladder I was holding he’d kill me.

    At the end of the day he said he hoped I’d come back and not quit.

    I quit.

    Fuck Martinez and every creep out there like him.

    • Replies: @dcthrowback
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQBjQs07wbw
    , @Anonymous
    I'm going to have to defend your asshole boss here. That's dangerous work. You don't want snowflakes, slackers or idiots working with you because they could get you killed. Any new guy is going to catch hell from the old hands just as a test of character. You'd do the same in their position.
  39. The American Left blames whitey for slavery, and then is more than proud to import hordes of blacks, browns, and yellows that work people to death, because they do not even have to worry about buying a new slave – they just call for more illegal immigration.

    Liberals are both evil and stupid.

  40. There’s a call the bluff problem with Steve’s underlying thesis. It’s like the pick your own damn cotton instead of having the slaves do it. The plantation owners may be wrong and evil but the vacuum left in their in absence will be something to behold.

    You and I could pick strawberries in Oxnard, CA tomorrow morning starting at 6 am. There are still a few whites and blacks who do just that. This is not minimum wage work. A picker with a steady rhythm and strong back can earn $30 to $40 an hour with a bit less skill required than putting up drywall.

    The Mexican immigrants are not here to make minimum wage or a just few dollars more. I am not sure that sinks through.

    • Replies: @jim jones
    I made some money picking strawberries in the North of England while at University, the bloody wasps follow you around all day,
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "This is not minimum wage work. A picker with a steady rhythm and strong back can earn $30 to $40 an hour with a bit less skill required than putting up drywall."

    I call your bluff. $30-40 an hr jobs ALSO will have benefits, pension, medical, etc. for US workers. ILLEGAL workers, are not required to be paid medical, pension, and competitive wages per union wages in the state. IF the business owner decided to hire only US workers, he'd have to pay competitive wages, benefits, etc. which he doesn't have to by hiring illegals. If it's $30-40 per hr, he's probably paying the illegals $17-19 per hr, and no benefits either.

    What part of 'you can't pay Americans 1950's wages for 2017 work' don't you understand? Americans will do the work, any work out there, but not at 1950's wages for 2017 work.


    "The Mexican immigrants are not here to make minimum wage or a just few dollars more.

    Sure they are. What is considered just a few bucks more goes a lot farther in Mexico.

    You think they're making $30-40 an hr with full benefits/pension/etc? Why would businesses want so many illegals to work in their jobs and pay them the same rate they're requied to pay US born workers? That doesn't make any sense.


    "I am not sure that sinks through."

    What sinks in, is that you actually think that business owners are flouting the immigration laws to bring in illegals to do the work at the same full rate and paid benefits that they're required by law to pay native born US workers. Please, child. That makes no sense at all.

    Why are they going to great lengths to get Congress to increase the number of illegal workers? Maybe, just maybe, because of the great profits and savings (not paying benefits, lower wages, etc) that they get when they don't hire US native born workers.

    What's slowly been dawning on me is that the GOP has been hornswaggling conservatives into going for social issues like abortion, rather than holding them accountable for HB-1 Visas and other types of immigration-related legislation.

    Prolly why GOP doesn't back Trump on immigration the way that they should. Too many sacred cows being gored.

  41. @Alec Leamas

    “It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation,” said Martinez, whose employees typically work 15-hour days and six or seven days a week.
     
    I'm sure this has nothing to do with expecting Señor Martinez to comply with Federal Wage and Hour Laws and pay overtime wages for the 50-65 hours per week they'd be working in excess of the 40 hour standard? Perhaps he counts every Carlos and Jose as and "independent contractor" and entrepreneur like the liars who keep stats on "immigrant businesses" do. That means when one of his wage slaves falls off a ladder, Martinez can throw him into a wheelbarrow and dump him in the nearest emergency room so you get to pay - indirectly - for the poor fellow's medical care.

    Those laws are only for American citizens. Can’t have the Martinez’s getting deported on trumped up charges.

  42. One-third of the approximately 20 employees Martinez uses to build new homes and commercial spaces have recently fled the state, spooked by a combination of a federal immigration crackdown by the Trump administration and a tough anti-”sanctuary cities” law

    Funny how incentives work, ain’t it?

  43. OT Ossoff lost the congressional race in Georgia.

    Kellyanne Conway just tweeted “Laughing my Ossoff.”

    The name “Ossoff” sounds Russian Jewish. What
    an unfortunate name for a U.S. politician to have, almost as
    bad as Weiner.

    • Replies: @peterike

    The name “Ossoff” sounds Russian Jewish.

     

    I believe Ossoff is the Russian word for "carpetbagger."
  44. • Replies: @res
    That was a surprisingly reasonable article. The first paragraph:

    The myth, which liberals like myself find tempting, is that only the right has changed. In June 2015, we tell ourselves, Donald Trump rode down his golden escalator and pretty soon nativism, long a feature of conservative politics, had engulfed it. But that’s not the full story. If the right has grown more nationalistic, the left has grown less so. A decade ago, liberals publicly questioned immigration in ways that would shock many progressives today.
     
    And this:

    Democrats should put immigrants’ learning English at the center of their immigration agenda. If more immigrants speak English fluently, native-born whites may well feel a stronger connection to them, and be more likely to support government policies that help them. Promoting English will also give Democrats a greater chance of attracting those native-born whites who consider growing diversity a threat. According to a preelection study by Adam Bonica, a Stanford political scientist, the single best predictor of whether a voter supported Trump was whether he or she agreed with the statement “People living in the U.S. should follow American customs and traditions.”
     
    Compare that to the spin given the same point in this post election NYT oped: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/10/opinion/presidential-small-ball.html

    Bonica said in an email that many of the responses suggested that Trump loyalists could be described as “authoritarian/nationalists.” Nearly nine out of ten Trump supporters agreed that “people living in the U.S. should follow American customs and learn English,” the single strongest predictor of Trump support. One out of four Clinton supporters shared this view.
     
    , @gregor
    I can't believe the Atlantic published this. Steve should do a post on it. It's about time someone on the left pointed out how extreme they've moved on the issue just within the last 10 years, and their impure motives for doing so (dilution of the franchise of whites and corporate interests).

    When liberals do attempt to compromise on immigration, invariably they suggest amnesty plus an insincere promise for future enforcement. But that is a sucker offer because they get something big and irreversible right away in exchange for an easily broken future commitment.

  45. A surprisingly good article in immigration in the Atlantic

    Prominent liberals didn’t oppose immigration a decade ago. Most acknowledged its benefits to America’s economy and culture. They supported a path to citizenship for the undocumented. Still, they routinely asserted that low-skilled immigrants depressed the wages of low-skilled American workers and strained America’s welfare state. And they were far more likely than liberals today are to acknowledge that, as Krugman put it, “immigration is an intensely painful topic … because it places basic principles in conflict.”

    Today, little of that ambivalence remains. In 2008, the Democratic platform called undocumented immigrants “our neighbors.” But it also warned, “We cannot continue to allow people to enter the United States undetected, undocumented, and unchecked,” adding that “those who enter our country’s borders illegally, and those who employ them, disrespect the rule of the law.” By 2016, such language was gone. The party’s platform described America’s immigration system as a problem, but not illegal immigration itself. And it focused almost entirely on the forms of immigration enforcement that Democrats opposed. In its immigration section, the 2008 platform referred three times to people entering the country “illegally.” The immigration section of the 2016 platform didn’t use the word illegal, or any variation of it, at all.

    “A decade or two ago,” says Jason Furman, a former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, “Democrats were divided on immigration. Now everyone agrees and is passionate and thinks very little about any potential downsides.” How did this come to be?

    A larger explanation is political. Between 2008 and 2016, Democrats became more and more confident that the country’s growing Latino population gave the party an electoral edge. To win the presidency, Democrats convinced themselves, they didn’t need to reassure white people skeptical of immigration so long as they turned out their Latino base. “The fastest-growing sector of the American electorate stampeded toward the Democrats this November,” Salon declared after Obama’s 2008 win. “If that pattern continues, the GOP is doomed to 40 years of wandering in a desert.”

    This combination of Latino and corporate activism made it perilous for Democrats to discuss immigration’s costs, as Bernie Sanders learned the hard way. In July 2015, two months after officially announcing his candidacy for president, Sanders was interviewed by Ezra Klein, the editor in chief of Vox. Klein asked whether, in order to fight global poverty, the U.S. should consider “sharply raising the level of immigration we permit, even up to a level of open borders.” Sanders reacted with horror. “That’s a Koch brothers proposal,” he scoffed. He went on to insist that “right-wing people in this country would love … an open-border policy. Bring in all kinds of people, work for $2 or $3 an hour, that would be great for them. I don’t believe in that. I think we have to raise wages in this country.”

    Sanders came under immediate attack. Vox’s Dylan Matthews declared that his “fear of immigrant labor is ugly—and wrongheaded.” The president of FWD.us accused Sanders of “the sort of backward-looking thinking that progressives have rightly moved away from in the past years.” ThinkProgress published a blog post titled “Why Immigration Is the Hole in Bernie Sanders’ Progressive Agenda.” The senator, it argued, was supporting “the idea that immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs and hurting the economy, a theory that has been proven incorrect.”

    Sanders stopped emphasizing immigration’s costs. By January 2016, FWD.us’s policy director noted with satisfaction that he had “evolved on this issue.”

    But has the claim that “immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs” actually been proved “incorrect”? A decade ago, liberals weren’t so sure. In 2006, Krugman wrote that America was experiencing “large increases in the number of low-skill workers relative to other inputs into production, so it’s inevitable that this means a fall in wages.”

    It’s hard to imagine a prominent liberal columnist writing that sentence today. To the contrary, progressive commentators now routinely claim that there’s a near-consensus among economists on immigration’s benefits.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    • Replies: @syonredux

    In her 2005 book, The Authoritarian Dynamic, which has been heralded for identifying the forces that powered Trump’s campaign, Karen Stenner, then a professor of politics at Princeton, wrote:

    Exposure to difference, talking about difference, and applauding difference—the hallmarks of liberal democracy—are the surest ways to aggravate those who are innately intolerant, and to guarantee the increased expression of their predispositions in manifestly intolerant attitudes and behaviors. Paradoxically, then, it would seem that we can best limit intolerance of difference by parading, talking about, and applauding our sameness.
     

    In 2014, the University of California listed melting pot as a term it considered a “microaggression.” What if Hillary Clinton had traveled to one of its campuses and called that absurd? What if she had challenged elite universities to celebrate not merely multiculturalism and globalization but Americanness? What if she had said more boldly that the slowing rate of English-language acquisition was a problem she was determined to solve? What if she had acknowledged the challenges that mass immigration brings, and then insisted that Americans could overcome those challenges by focusing not on what makes them different but on what makes them the same?

    Some on the left would have howled. But I suspect that Clinton would be president today.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/
    , @Stealth
    LOL. Damn you for posting that before I did!!!!
    , @Twinkie
    You missed the juicy part at the beginning:

    In 2005, a left-leaning blogger wrote, “Illegal immigration wreaks havoc economically, socially, and culturally; makes a mockery of the rule of law; and is disgraceful just on basic fairness grounds alone.” In 2006, a liberal columnist wrote that “immigration reduces the wages of domestic workers who compete with immigrants” and that “the fiscal burden of low-wage immigrants is also pretty clear.” His conclusion: “We’ll need to reduce the inflow of low-skill immigrants.” That same year, a Democratic senator wrote, “When I see Mexican flags waved at proimmigration demonstrations, I sometimes feel a flush of patriotic resentment. When I’m forced to use a translator to communicate with the guy fixing my car, I feel a certain frustration.”

    The blogger was Glenn Greenwald. The columnist was Paul Krugman. The senator was Barack Obama. [Boldface mine.]
     
    It is a good, and rather honest, article given the source, but unsurprisingly still comes to the wrong conclusion. We all know what the right conclusion is - to reduce immigration, both legal and illegal, dramatically. All the recommendations in this article are fine and dandy, but are marginal at best in the end.
    , @David
    It's depressing though, because they start off acknowledging that there are two legitimate sides and then, starting with a Columbia professor's grudging and incoherent admission of bias in the field of immigration research, we get the Atlantic laying out to the simple truth, ie complete BS. But the good reader will understand that there are not two sides, there's just a need for more training of the displaced ignorant honkies who don't get it.

    “George [Borjas] and I come out on different sides of policy on immigration,” Davis said, “but I agree that there are aspects of discussion in academia that don’t get sort of full view if you come to the wrong conclusion.”

    None of this means that liberals should oppose immigration. Entry to the United States is, for starters, a boon to immigrants and to the family members back home to whom they send money. It should be valued on these moral grounds alone. But immigration benefits the economy, too.
     

    The real question is what to do with our unfit.
    , @Mr. Blank
    I was just checking to see if anybody here had referenced the article. It's pretty funny to read it with Sailer Goggles on.

    A condensed version: "Hey, guys, it turns out immigration actually SUCKS for most citizens! Except, well...shit. We've kind of painted ourselves into a corner. Hmmmm. Maybe we should try some tougher-sounding slogans — not that we really mean them! But it's become clear that The Multicultural Future is not arriving on the expected timetable, so we're gonna have to slap something together here to get us through the last stretch."

  46. anon • Disclaimer says:

    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …

    You know, that’s really interesting. Because I live in a place pretty far from Mexico, where there were hardly any illegal immigrants a generation ago, but every place I go, there are buildings as far as the eye can see.

    Who built them all, I frequently wonder. Some lost civilization? Extraterrestrials from the Planet Nibiru?

    It is a mystery. That’s all I can say. A mystery.

    Another mystery is what exactly the rules are for hiring illegals. Is it like marijuana, a law you can just admit breaking, under your own name, in national publications, without having to worry about being prosecuted?

  47. @syonredux
    A surprisingly good article in immigration in the Atlantic

    Prominent liberals didn’t oppose immigration a decade ago. Most acknowledged its benefits to America’s economy and culture. They supported a path to citizenship for the undocumented. Still, they routinely asserted that low-skilled immigrants depressed the wages of low-skilled American workers and strained America’s welfare state. And they were far more likely than liberals today are to acknowledge that, as Krugman put it, “immigration is an intensely painful topic … because it places basic principles in conflict.”
     

    Today, little of that ambivalence remains. In 2008, the Democratic platform called undocumented immigrants “our neighbors.” But it also warned, “We cannot continue to allow people to enter the United States undetected, undocumented, and unchecked,” adding that “those who enter our country’s borders illegally, and those who employ them, disrespect the rule of the law.” By 2016, such language was gone. The party’s platform described America’s immigration system as a problem, but not illegal immigration itself. And it focused almost entirely on the forms of immigration enforcement that Democrats opposed. In its immigration section, the 2008 platform referred three times to people entering the country “illegally.” The immigration section of the 2016 platform didn’t use the word illegal, or any variation of it, at all.
     

    “A decade or two ago,” says Jason Furman, a former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, “Democrats were divided on immigration. Now everyone agrees and is passionate and thinks very little about any potential downsides.” How did this come to be?
     

    A larger explanation is political. Between 2008 and 2016, Democrats became more and more confident that the country’s growing Latino population gave the party an electoral edge. To win the presidency, Democrats convinced themselves, they didn’t need to reassure white people skeptical of immigration so long as they turned out their Latino base. “The fastest-growing sector of the American electorate stampeded toward the Democrats this November,” Salon declared after Obama’s 2008 win. “If that pattern continues, the GOP is doomed to 40 years of wandering in a desert.”
     

    This combination of Latino and corporate activism made it perilous for Democrats to discuss immigration’s costs, as Bernie Sanders learned the hard way. In July 2015, two months after officially announcing his candidacy for president, Sanders was interviewed by Ezra Klein, the editor in chief of Vox. Klein asked whether, in order to fight global poverty, the U.S. should consider “sharply raising the level of immigration we permit, even up to a level of open borders.” Sanders reacted with horror. “That’s a Koch brothers proposal,” he scoffed. He went on to insist that “right-wing people in this country would love … an open-border policy. Bring in all kinds of people, work for $2 or $3 an hour, that would be great for them. I don’t believe in that. I think we have to raise wages in this country.”
     

    Sanders came under immediate attack. Vox’s Dylan Matthews declared that his “fear of immigrant labor is ugly—and wrongheaded.” The president of FWD.us accused Sanders of “the sort of backward-looking thinking that progressives have rightly moved away from in the past years.” ThinkProgress published a blog post titled “Why Immigration Is the Hole in Bernie Sanders’ Progressive Agenda.” The senator, it argued, was supporting “the idea that immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs and hurting the economy, a theory that has been proven incorrect.”
     

    Sanders stopped emphasizing immigration’s costs. By January 2016, FWD.us’s policy director noted with satisfaction that he had “evolved on this issue.”

    But has the claim that “immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs” actually been proved “incorrect”? A decade ago, liberals weren’t so sure. In 2006, Krugman wrote that America was experiencing “large increases in the number of low-skill workers relative to other inputs into production, so it’s inevitable that this means a fall in wages.”

    It’s hard to imagine a prominent liberal columnist writing that sentence today. To the contrary, progressive commentators now routinely claim that there’s a near-consensus among economists on immigration’s benefits.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    In her 2005 book, The Authoritarian Dynamic, which has been heralded for identifying the forces that powered Trump’s campaign, Karen Stenner, then a professor of politics at Princeton, wrote:

    Exposure to difference, talking about difference, and applauding difference—the hallmarks of liberal democracy—are the surest ways to aggravate those who are innately intolerant, and to guarantee the increased expression of their predispositions in manifestly intolerant attitudes and behaviors. Paradoxically, then, it would seem that we can best limit intolerance of difference by parading, talking about, and applauding our sameness.

    In 2014, the University of California listed melting pot as a term it considered a “microaggression.” What if Hillary Clinton had traveled to one of its campuses and called that absurd? What if she had challenged elite universities to celebrate not merely multiculturalism and globalization but Americanness? What if she had said more boldly that the slowing rate of English-language acquisition was a problem she was determined to solve? What if she had acknowledged the challenges that mass immigration brings, and then insisted that Americans could overcome those challenges by focusing not on what makes them different but on what makes them the same?

    Some on the left would have howled. But I suspect that Clinton would be president today.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    • Replies: @Stealth
    What surprises me is that one of these liberals actually remembers something important about how things were in the past. He noticed a difference between what liberals thought then and what they think now. I never thought I would see the day.

    The myth, which liberals like myself find tempting, is that only the right has changed.
     
    Don't know where he gets that idea. Liberals change what they believe all the time. It's the one constant aobut them. How many of them thought gay marriage was important twenty years ago?
  48. Anonymous [AKA "Diversity is a sham"] says:

    This is how you keep the economy going: hire an unlimited stream of illegal immigrants to build homes for an unlimited stream of legal immigrants. Who benefit? The immigrants themselves of course, both legal and illegal, they get to escape the third world hell holes that they helped create, plus a few Americans — the real estate developers, real estate agents, mortgage brokers, bankers, immigration lawyers, new teachers, administrators, social workers, Democratic party…what a coincidence, all professions dominated by a certain tribe, while other members of the tribe pretend to be journalists and write flat out false stories such as this pointing to fake “studies” of how immigration and multiculturalism benefit the country, to keep the scam going.

    Who loses? Everyone else. We get to see the destruction of our country and our lifestyle in slowmo, lose ever more jobs to cheap foreign labor, watch all the trees in our neighborhood get cut down to make way for more development, get stuck in traffic wherever we go, see our neighborhood go to the dogs with newcomers who don’t bother taking care of the yard or the house, live with unpleasant neighbors who don’t speak English, don’t even say hi, send our kids to schools overcrowded with immigrant kids who don’t speak English, have horrible manners and are in gangs, pay ever higher taxes for social services that we don’t benefit from and face ever higher crime rate. All while the tribe lords over us telling us this is why diversity is good for us.

    • Replies: @poolside

    watch all the trees in our neighborhood get cut down to make way for more development, get stuck in traffic wherever we go, see our neighborhood go to the dogs with newcomers who don’t bother taking care of the yard or the house, live with unpleasant neighbors who don’t speak English, don’t even say hi, send our kids to schools overcrowded with immigrant kids who don’t speak English, have horrible manners and are in gangs, pay ever higher taxes for social services that we don’t benefit from and face ever higher crime rate.
     
    It's almost like you and I live in the same community.

    And it's not just immigrants from Mexico or Central America. My area has been completely transformed by immigrants from China, India, the Middle East and Africa.

    I am a stranger in my home town.

    I've mentioned it here before, but my wife and I speak often of what we call the "immigrant tax;" that is, the irritations and added time required to conduct daily life in a community filled with people who barely speak English and share no cultural traits with one another.

    Try completing even the simplest task at the pharmacy or bank when the person helping you was hired because she can speak Hindi (but not English).
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Drywall rotting in the fields . . .
  49. @Flip
    This guy should be in jail. Where are Trump and Sessions with the employer sanctions? That's why he got elected.

    Trump made it crystal clear with all his terrible corporatist appointments that he’s not going after businesses for anything: not environmental abuses, not worker abuses, not financial crimes, not anything.

    As far as I can tell the plan is just to go after a trivial number of immigrants in really stupid public ways and use the over the top media attention to trick his supporters into thinking he’s actually tackling the issue.

    If Trump were serious he would be saturating the airwaves with ads about the rewards to people offering tips on the employees and landlords of illegals and the whole anti immigration apparatus would be paying for itself with the massive number of fines being issued.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Trump is certainly not anti-immigration. Perhaps it was deluded to expect that a billionnaire developer would be. Both of the political parties are full-bore pro-immigration. It appears that a real nationalist movement will have to develop outside of electoral politics.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Actually, Trump doesn't have to do it. Good enough if he just lets us do it.
  50. A telemarketing call center here (West Corporation?) used to routinely offer “opportunities” for its workers to work 16 hour days. Some random performance auditing of phone calls was done by its managers in the Philippines. To sound a bit old-fashioned, there’s something unsavory about this, something like an inverted colonialism.

    I gather those who declined those “opportunities” could be thought of as slackers, as in that old management tripe, “Those people just don’t want to work.” Has me thinking of Southern apologists for slavery who noted that Northerners had the “thing”, wage slavery, just not the name.

    • Replies: @Dr. X

    A telemarketing call center here (West Corporation?) used to routinely offer “opportunities” for its workers to work 16 hour days. Some random performance auditing of phone calls was done by its managers in the Philippines. To sound a bit old-fashioned, there’s something unsavory about this, something like an inverted colonialism.

     

    I recently needed to contact Verizon customer service... they were all subcontinental Indians, with obvious accents -- in India.

    Wonder what they're getting paid, and how many hours they're working, while Verizon rips me off?
  51. I read the entire linked article twice and didn’t see anything which stated that Martinez’s workers typically worked 15 hours per day, six or seven days a week. Where does that come from?

    • Troll: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @PM
    Paragraph 14.
    , @Paco Wové
    Fifth paragraph from the bottom. It's a direct quote.
    , @Seamus Padraig
    Reread the article. That passage is in paragraph 14.
    , @Tex
    Paragraph 14, below the jump.
    , @Amigo
    Really? Sure it's in the 14th paragraph but it was pretty easy to spot. I didn't even use the search feature. Here's the quote:

    "It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation," said Martinez, whose employees typically work 15-hour days and six or seven days a week. "It's not fair."
  52. @Verymuchalive
    " whose employees typically work 15- hour days and six or seven days a week "
    Credit to the AP hack who manages to completely undermine the globalist argument demanded by his/her employer.
    PS, in late 19th Century Britain, manufacturing workers typically worked a 12 hour day, but with 2 hours for lunch and 2 x 30 minute teabreaks. Saturday was typically a half-day. Many employers treated workers in a paternalistic and beneficial way.
    Please do not compare horrible s***s like Martinez with your average Victorian employer.

    Even if many treated them well that doesn’t mean the average employer did. And the fact that so many of the paternalistic employers like Robert Owen (who didn’t himself think that paternalistic capitalism was the answer and went on to embrace utopian socialism) were so noteworthy shows just what a rarity they were.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Even the average employer gave people Sunday off - Victorian Britain was uber-Christian, Sunday work was just not done and there was opposition even to railways running on a Sunday.

    It was only in the Thatcher years that Sunday started to become just another day for getting and spending in the UK, and even now it's only retail that is really a 7 day thing.
    , @Verymuchalive
    Actually Utopian settlements were quite common in early 19th Century North America. Southey and Coleridge, hardly socialists, planned one themselves.
    Modern research does not support the thesis that Owen advocated a Utopian Socialist solution to the problems of 19th Century Society. He certainly was a strong proponent of Cooperatism.
    The Cooperative movement was a strong influence on the early British Labour Party for the good: social aims should be attained by voluntary cooperation of members of society, not by compulsion by the state. Clause 4 ended that and the Labour Party became another State Socialist Party.
    Actually, the paternalistic employer was ten-a-penny during the late Victorian period. Often, it is only the most prominent that are now remembered. Sir Titus Salt at Saltaire, and Lord Lever at Port Sunlight outshone ( if you pardon the pun ) anything that Owen did at New Lanark. One thinks of Lord Armstrong and others as well.
  53. Hail says: • Website

    they found 52 hours per week was the optimum for winning the Big One.

    If so, I wonder how much “days plus hours” per week matters.

    52 hours per week can mean:

    8 hours 40 minutes “on the clock,” six days a week.
    10 hours 24 minutes a day, five days a week.
    13 hours per day, four days a week.

  54. anon • Disclaimer says:

    Someday, I would like to see a Venn diagram of the people who say “We need a whole bunch more illegals, because illegals are willing to work for like eighty hours a week, for basically no money.” and the people who say “What America really needs is European-style labor laws, where you get six weeks of vacation time, and a mandatory living wage, and all that other crap.”. I bet the overlap is like 80%.

    • Agree: snorlax, Opinionator
  55. @Verymuchalive
    " whose employees typically work 15- hour days and six or seven days a week "
    Credit to the AP hack who manages to completely undermine the globalist argument demanded by his/her employer.
    PS, in late 19th Century Britain, manufacturing workers typically worked a 12 hour day, but with 2 hours for lunch and 2 x 30 minute teabreaks. Saturday was typically a half-day. Many employers treated workers in a paternalistic and beneficial way.
    Please do not compare horrible s***s like Martinez with your average Victorian employer.

    I wonder if British employers ever included a “tea-break clause” in a work contract.

    I don’t expect “19th century manufacturing workers” had formal contracts as such, though.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    You're probably right about 19th Century manufacturing workers as a whole. But late Victorian skilled manufacturing workers could read and write and had skills very much in demand, so it made sense that employers would want to tie them down with a written contract. Don't know about a "tea break" clause, but you never can say never.
    , @HA
    "I don’t expect “19th century manufacturing workers” had formal contracts as such, though."

    I think you're wrong about that. We now know that as far back as the Pyramids, expectations between labor and employers were committed to writing. For example, in Bill Bryson's At Home, he notes that


    ...lobsters were once so abundant in Britain that servants sought agreements from their employers that they would not be served them more than twice a week.
     
    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/jun/06/bryson-at-home-book-review

    Nothing worse than scumbag employers trying to feed me lobster more than twice a week. I say they need to feed that stuff to foreigners and immigrants, not me. I'm still holding out for some of that cake they're always telling me I should try.

    , @Anonymous
    Stanley Kubrick dealing with British teabreaks

    https://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=0JwAnMUavzA
  56. @syonredux
    A surprisingly good article in immigration in the Atlantic

    Prominent liberals didn’t oppose immigration a decade ago. Most acknowledged its benefits to America’s economy and culture. They supported a path to citizenship for the undocumented. Still, they routinely asserted that low-skilled immigrants depressed the wages of low-skilled American workers and strained America’s welfare state. And they were far more likely than liberals today are to acknowledge that, as Krugman put it, “immigration is an intensely painful topic … because it places basic principles in conflict.”
     

    Today, little of that ambivalence remains. In 2008, the Democratic platform called undocumented immigrants “our neighbors.” But it also warned, “We cannot continue to allow people to enter the United States undetected, undocumented, and unchecked,” adding that “those who enter our country’s borders illegally, and those who employ them, disrespect the rule of the law.” By 2016, such language was gone. The party’s platform described America’s immigration system as a problem, but not illegal immigration itself. And it focused almost entirely on the forms of immigration enforcement that Democrats opposed. In its immigration section, the 2008 platform referred three times to people entering the country “illegally.” The immigration section of the 2016 platform didn’t use the word illegal, or any variation of it, at all.
     

    “A decade or two ago,” says Jason Furman, a former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, “Democrats were divided on immigration. Now everyone agrees and is passionate and thinks very little about any potential downsides.” How did this come to be?
     

    A larger explanation is political. Between 2008 and 2016, Democrats became more and more confident that the country’s growing Latino population gave the party an electoral edge. To win the presidency, Democrats convinced themselves, they didn’t need to reassure white people skeptical of immigration so long as they turned out their Latino base. “The fastest-growing sector of the American electorate stampeded toward the Democrats this November,” Salon declared after Obama’s 2008 win. “If that pattern continues, the GOP is doomed to 40 years of wandering in a desert.”
     

    This combination of Latino and corporate activism made it perilous for Democrats to discuss immigration’s costs, as Bernie Sanders learned the hard way. In July 2015, two months after officially announcing his candidacy for president, Sanders was interviewed by Ezra Klein, the editor in chief of Vox. Klein asked whether, in order to fight global poverty, the U.S. should consider “sharply raising the level of immigration we permit, even up to a level of open borders.” Sanders reacted with horror. “That’s a Koch brothers proposal,” he scoffed. He went on to insist that “right-wing people in this country would love … an open-border policy. Bring in all kinds of people, work for $2 or $3 an hour, that would be great for them. I don’t believe in that. I think we have to raise wages in this country.”
     

    Sanders came under immediate attack. Vox’s Dylan Matthews declared that his “fear of immigrant labor is ugly—and wrongheaded.” The president of FWD.us accused Sanders of “the sort of backward-looking thinking that progressives have rightly moved away from in the past years.” ThinkProgress published a blog post titled “Why Immigration Is the Hole in Bernie Sanders’ Progressive Agenda.” The senator, it argued, was supporting “the idea that immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs and hurting the economy, a theory that has been proven incorrect.”
     

    Sanders stopped emphasizing immigration’s costs. By January 2016, FWD.us’s policy director noted with satisfaction that he had “evolved on this issue.”

    But has the claim that “immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs” actually been proved “incorrect”? A decade ago, liberals weren’t so sure. In 2006, Krugman wrote that America was experiencing “large increases in the number of low-skill workers relative to other inputs into production, so it’s inevitable that this means a fall in wages.”

    It’s hard to imagine a prominent liberal columnist writing that sentence today. To the contrary, progressive commentators now routinely claim that there’s a near-consensus among economists on immigration’s benefits.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    LOL. Damn you for posting that before I did!!!!

  57. @syonredux
    A surprisingly good article in immigration in the Atlantic

    Prominent liberals didn’t oppose immigration a decade ago. Most acknowledged its benefits to America’s economy and culture. They supported a path to citizenship for the undocumented. Still, they routinely asserted that low-skilled immigrants depressed the wages of low-skilled American workers and strained America’s welfare state. And they were far more likely than liberals today are to acknowledge that, as Krugman put it, “immigration is an intensely painful topic … because it places basic principles in conflict.”
     

    Today, little of that ambivalence remains. In 2008, the Democratic platform called undocumented immigrants “our neighbors.” But it also warned, “We cannot continue to allow people to enter the United States undetected, undocumented, and unchecked,” adding that “those who enter our country’s borders illegally, and those who employ them, disrespect the rule of the law.” By 2016, such language was gone. The party’s platform described America’s immigration system as a problem, but not illegal immigration itself. And it focused almost entirely on the forms of immigration enforcement that Democrats opposed. In its immigration section, the 2008 platform referred three times to people entering the country “illegally.” The immigration section of the 2016 platform didn’t use the word illegal, or any variation of it, at all.
     

    “A decade or two ago,” says Jason Furman, a former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, “Democrats were divided on immigration. Now everyone agrees and is passionate and thinks very little about any potential downsides.” How did this come to be?
     

    A larger explanation is political. Between 2008 and 2016, Democrats became more and more confident that the country’s growing Latino population gave the party an electoral edge. To win the presidency, Democrats convinced themselves, they didn’t need to reassure white people skeptical of immigration so long as they turned out their Latino base. “The fastest-growing sector of the American electorate stampeded toward the Democrats this November,” Salon declared after Obama’s 2008 win. “If that pattern continues, the GOP is doomed to 40 years of wandering in a desert.”
     

    This combination of Latino and corporate activism made it perilous for Democrats to discuss immigration’s costs, as Bernie Sanders learned the hard way. In July 2015, two months after officially announcing his candidacy for president, Sanders was interviewed by Ezra Klein, the editor in chief of Vox. Klein asked whether, in order to fight global poverty, the U.S. should consider “sharply raising the level of immigration we permit, even up to a level of open borders.” Sanders reacted with horror. “That’s a Koch brothers proposal,” he scoffed. He went on to insist that “right-wing people in this country would love … an open-border policy. Bring in all kinds of people, work for $2 or $3 an hour, that would be great for them. I don’t believe in that. I think we have to raise wages in this country.”
     

    Sanders came under immediate attack. Vox’s Dylan Matthews declared that his “fear of immigrant labor is ugly—and wrongheaded.” The president of FWD.us accused Sanders of “the sort of backward-looking thinking that progressives have rightly moved away from in the past years.” ThinkProgress published a blog post titled “Why Immigration Is the Hole in Bernie Sanders’ Progressive Agenda.” The senator, it argued, was supporting “the idea that immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs and hurting the economy, a theory that has been proven incorrect.”
     

    Sanders stopped emphasizing immigration’s costs. By January 2016, FWD.us’s policy director noted with satisfaction that he had “evolved on this issue.”

    But has the claim that “immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs” actually been proved “incorrect”? A decade ago, liberals weren’t so sure. In 2006, Krugman wrote that America was experiencing “large increases in the number of low-skill workers relative to other inputs into production, so it’s inevitable that this means a fall in wages.”

    It’s hard to imagine a prominent liberal columnist writing that sentence today. To the contrary, progressive commentators now routinely claim that there’s a near-consensus among economists on immigration’s benefits.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    You missed the juicy part at the beginning:

    In 2005, a left-leaning blogger wrote, “Illegal immigration wreaks havoc economically, socially, and culturally; makes a mockery of the rule of law; and is disgraceful just on basic fairness grounds alone.” In 2006, a liberal columnist wrote that “immigration reduces the wages of domestic workers who compete with immigrants” and that “the fiscal burden of low-wage immigrants is also pretty clear.” His conclusion: “We’ll need to reduce the inflow of low-skill immigrants.” That same year, a Democratic senator wrote, “When I see Mexican flags waved at proimmigration demonstrations, I sometimes feel a flush of patriotic resentment. When I’m forced to use a translator to communicate with the guy fixing my car, I feel a certain frustration.”

    The blogger was Glenn Greenwald. The columnist was Paul Krugman. The senator was Barack Obama. [Boldface mine.]

    It is a good, and rather honest, article given the source, but unsurprisingly still comes to the wrong conclusion. We all know what the right conclusion is – to reduce immigration, both legal and illegal, dramatically. All the recommendations in this article are fine and dandy, but are marginal at best in the end.

    • Replies: @Jean Ralphio
    It's a good article as far as summarizing what all of us here already know, but his recommendation on how to fix it is "We need immigrants to assimilate so we can convince white people to let more in." He admits that immigrants drive down wages but does not suggest limiting immigration to stop this from happening, and I think he focuses too much on low-skilled immigration.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You missed the juicy part at the beginning
     
    And the jewciest part of the whole article (emphasis added):

    The problem with [merit based intake], from a liberal perspective, is its cruelty. It denies many immigrants who are already here the ability to reunite with their loved ones. And it flouts the country’s best traditions. Would we remove from the Statue of Liberty the poem welcoming the “poor,” the “wretched,” and the “homeless”?
     
    , @gregor
    Consider the audience, though. Any stronger and he would be risking excommunication. Maybe the author means every word, as written. I haven't read this guy enough to really judge. But to me it felt like he shoehorned in some of obligatory talking points just to soften it a bit. If I were a progressive with doubts about the orthodox immigration position, I imagine I would be similarly equivocal.
    , @ben tillman
    You can add Senator Harry Reid to that list. From a comment on that article:


    Reid introduced a bill on Aug. 4, 1993, the Immigration Stabilization Act of 1993 (S.1351), which would have ended birthright citizenship (an idea he called “insane”), clamped down on asylum seekers (very pertinent to World Trade Center bombing), expanded deportation of criminal aliens, increased penalties on re-entries and visa fraud, and excluded all legal immigrants from admission who “cannot demonstrably support themselves without public or private assistance.”

    In a press release unveiling the bill, Reid noted the following:

    "Our borders have overflowed with illegal immigrants placing tremendous burdens on our criminal justice system, schools and social programs. The Immigration and Naturalization Service needs the ability to step up enforcement. "Our federal wallet is stretched to the limit by illegal aliens getting welfare, food stamps, medical care and other benefits often without paying any taxes. "Safeguards like welfare and free medical care are in place to boost Americans in need of short-term assistance. These programs were not meant to entice freeloaders and scam artists from around the world.”

    He added this Trumpesque line:

    "Even worse, Americans have seen heinous crimes committed by individuals who are here illegally."
     
  58. @Alec Leamas

    “It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation,” said Martinez, whose employees typically work 15-hour days and six or seven days a week.
     
    I'm sure this has nothing to do with expecting Señor Martinez to comply with Federal Wage and Hour Laws and pay overtime wages for the 50-65 hours per week they'd be working in excess of the 40 hour standard? Perhaps he counts every Carlos and Jose as and "independent contractor" and entrepreneur like the liars who keep stats on "immigrant businesses" do. That means when one of his wage slaves falls off a ladder, Martinez can throw him into a wheelbarrow and dump him in the nearest emergency room so you get to pay - indirectly - for the poor fellow's medical care.

    I’m sure this has nothing to do with expecting Señor Martinez to comply with Federal Wage and Hour Laws and pay overtime wages for the 50-65 hours per week they’d be working in excess of the 40 hour standard?

    Why the wimp-out?

    Foreigners should be paid overtime starting with the very first hour. See how popular they’ll be with employers then.

    • Replies: @DWB
    Completely agree.

    Here in Silicon Valley, we are treated to an almost steady chorus of "We need more H1-b visas because start up companies will not exist without them" - to the point that it becomes almost ambient noise of the sort one hears when living just behind a freeway sound wall (imagine: "whoooosh" at 30 dB all day long).

    We often hear defenders say that the visas are forced to pay "prevailing wage."

    THAT is not how economics works. friends. If there is really, truly an urgent need - to the point that we need to create special visas to meet it - then the visas should require that the wages be 100%, 200%, I dunno, you pick, higher than the prevailing wage.

    So, if a so-called "software engineer" (when I was younger, formerly known as a "programmer") commands a baseline salary of $100,000 per year, and we really cannot get one from the local stock, fine. Grant the company the H1, and require that:

    1) The pay must be not $100k, but $200k
    2) That the visa be portable - if another company wants to offer the visa holder some more money to move, the visa goes with the worker. It does not belong to, say, Mark Zuckerberg.

    Fair?
    , @anonymous-antimarxist
    Whenever the subject of H-1B visa up comes I point out the goal is not just to obtain cheap labor but free labor in the form of uncompensated overtime as well.

    One of the supposed benefits that employers gain from the H-1B is not just the uncompensated OT labor from the "non-immigrant" visa holder, but from the citizen STEM worker who feels bullied into working uncompensated OT as well. Fail to work extra hours and come "Rank and Yank" time you be shown the door for letting down the team.

    Also the H-1B has allowed corporate America to employ usually worthless females in middle management roles who help the keep the EEOC gender Marxist rent seekers off their backs.

    Spend all week like Dilbert or Office Space's Peter Gibbons in worthless meetings held for the benefit of your female project leader???? Good you can come in on Saturday and attempt to get some real work done when the office is quite and you are left alone.

    Over the long run there is very little correlation between long hours and actual computer programmer productivity and quality. Besides Most STEM workers are capable of about 4-5 hours a day max of concentrated analytical and programming productive time if they can get it during the work week. The rest of day is consumed by administrative tasks and yes some necessary meetings. Expecting anything else over the long haul leads to depression and burn out.

    Unlike lets say using a nail gun for 12 hours a day, I seriously doubt doing a line a coke or meth even in the short run helps one become a more productive computer programmer. You are much better off with some exercise, a social/sex life and a good nights sleep.

    I believe one of the big failings of the H-1B visa program is that it has actually contributed to a dramatic drop in STEM worker productivity per hour worked.

  59. @syonredux

    In her 2005 book, The Authoritarian Dynamic, which has been heralded for identifying the forces that powered Trump’s campaign, Karen Stenner, then a professor of politics at Princeton, wrote:

    Exposure to difference, talking about difference, and applauding difference—the hallmarks of liberal democracy—are the surest ways to aggravate those who are innately intolerant, and to guarantee the increased expression of their predispositions in manifestly intolerant attitudes and behaviors. Paradoxically, then, it would seem that we can best limit intolerance of difference by parading, talking about, and applauding our sameness.
     

    In 2014, the University of California listed melting pot as a term it considered a “microaggression.” What if Hillary Clinton had traveled to one of its campuses and called that absurd? What if she had challenged elite universities to celebrate not merely multiculturalism and globalization but Americanness? What if she had said more boldly that the slowing rate of English-language acquisition was a problem she was determined to solve? What if she had acknowledged the challenges that mass immigration brings, and then insisted that Americans could overcome those challenges by focusing not on what makes them different but on what makes them the same?

    Some on the left would have howled. But I suspect that Clinton would be president today.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    What surprises me is that one of these liberals actually remembers something important about how things were in the past. He noticed a difference between what liberals thought then and what they think now. I never thought I would see the day.

    The myth, which liberals like myself find tempting, is that only the right has changed.

    Don’t know where he gets that idea. Liberals change what they believe all the time. It’s the one constant aobut them. How many of them thought gay marriage was important twenty years ago?

    • Replies: @Seamus Padraig

    Liberals change what they believe all the time. It’s the one constant aobut them. How many of them thought gay marriage was important twenty years ago?
     
    No kidding! I remember back in 1986, when Barbara Jordan was arguing against Reagan's amnesty bill.
  60. At one job last year I worked 14 hour days on a regular basis. The legal max was 15 hours. Other Americans I worked with regularly put in 12 hours+ as well. The claim that Americans don’t put in long hours is absolute bullshit. Pardon the rough language, but this Mexican is lying through his teeth and it pisses me off.

    BTW, we were dealing with machines weighing tens of thousands of tons — each! And with crews of four men. The productivity of this cruddy contractor’s illegal work gang doesn’t even begin to compare.

    I am so sick of hearing how much better Mexicans are at hard work. Why don’t these elites fire all the white pilots that fly them to Europe, often while working grueling schedules, and replace them with campesinos? I mean, the Mexicans can handle the hard work and long hours so much better, so that ought to reassure the passengers, right?

    • Replies: @Hail

    Why don’t these elites fire all the white pilots that fly them to Europe, often while working grueling schedules, and replace them with campesinos?
     
    Now we're thinking. As Steve points out from time to time, the global elite can rhetorically shove around those Flyover losers with no cost, without really a care for practical effects; but start talking about air travel...and they snap to attention.
    , @Reginald Maplethorp
    Which Americans do you think Martinez was talking about? Faithful iSteve readers will recognize Martinez's reasoning from Bret Stevens' recent piece.

    Doctors used to have to put in long hours during residency. I suspect at elite medical institutions this is still the case. It's not backbreaking work, but it's stressful, cognitively demanding, and requires being on one's feet.

    Then again, this is redundant since so many illegals are doctors.

    , @stillCARealist
    remember: Hispanics hire Hispanics. Mostly they hire from extended family and in-laws. This way there's a sense of obligation to the employer and to each other to work as much as possible. Are you really going to go off to lunch when your brother-in-law is sneering at your wimpiness? Also, if you get hurt, are you going to make a worker's comp claim against your cousin's business?

    the Americans this guy is talking about are most likely Mexican-Americans and not part of his clan. They didn't feel the blood calling and insisted on taking breaks and having lunch.
  61. Anti-White sentiments are routine. They are baked into the culture of the West, and America in particular. The question is, why?

    The Stormfront argument is “the Jewsssss!!!!! eleventy” and this is also btw the standard Muslim response to any social ill. I would argue that Senor Martinez and his open anti-White sentiments are part of a mating market gone insane.

    What women screen for constantly, and never ever stop even if married, since marriage is merely an at-will employment agreement that can and will be terminated by the woman at any sign of too much beta maleness (or any attention at all by an Alpha) … is “spot the Alpha Male.”

    Thus handicapping White men with the burden of mass Third World immigration makes spotting Alpha males easier. Pretenders are easily separated from contenders. Its not btw earnings that matter — look at Zuckerberg’s wife, who can barely stand him and has more than half his money according to one report. Rather it is Alpha attitude and aggression, and importing lots of hostile Third World Men separates the Pajama Boys from the Hard Men which is all women care about. Hence the anti-White sentiment; a predictable reaction from tingles uber alles that drives women.

    • Replies: @DWB
    I'm becoming convinced that this "account" is a 'bot that someone ginned up for laughs.

    No matter the topic, it spews out effluvia about "beta males" and aggressive dating theory BS.

    It used to be kind of funny. But it's a bit like Carrot Top's routine - it got old. Quickly.
  62. @Twinkie
    You missed the juicy part at the beginning:

    In 2005, a left-leaning blogger wrote, “Illegal immigration wreaks havoc economically, socially, and culturally; makes a mockery of the rule of law; and is disgraceful just on basic fairness grounds alone.” In 2006, a liberal columnist wrote that “immigration reduces the wages of domestic workers who compete with immigrants” and that “the fiscal burden of low-wage immigrants is also pretty clear.” His conclusion: “We’ll need to reduce the inflow of low-skill immigrants.” That same year, a Democratic senator wrote, “When I see Mexican flags waved at proimmigration demonstrations, I sometimes feel a flush of patriotic resentment. When I’m forced to use a translator to communicate with the guy fixing my car, I feel a certain frustration.”

    The blogger was Glenn Greenwald. The columnist was Paul Krugman. The senator was Barack Obama. [Boldface mine.]
     
    It is a good, and rather honest, article given the source, but unsurprisingly still comes to the wrong conclusion. We all know what the right conclusion is - to reduce immigration, both legal and illegal, dramatically. All the recommendations in this article are fine and dandy, but are marginal at best in the end.

    It’s a good article as far as summarizing what all of us here already know, but his recommendation on how to fix it is “We need immigrants to assimilate so we can convince white people to let more in.” He admits that immigrants drive down wages but does not suggest limiting immigration to stop this from happening, and I think he focuses too much on low-skilled immigration.

    • Replies: @Forbes

    “We need immigrants to assimilate so we can convince white people to let more in.”
     
    That's the talking point cover for Dems to continue with open borders/looking the other way. We'll soon be told that assimilation is happening. They'll gin up some survey material pointing out various anodyne factors such as HS graduation, or language proficiency, or college admissions, or blah, blah, blah, anything that looks like a winning PR strategy. Lather, Rinse, Repeat, until you're sufficiently re-educated with the current lie.
  63. Dee says:

    Guys that sheet rocked my house in ’91 were 4 white and 1 Hispanic. 8 hour days, 5 days a week. They all drove nice trucks, so they were being well paid.

    I bet the guy in Texass is under reporting wages; workman’s comp insurance is brutal in construction. Roofers pay 3 times the employees wages for that insurance. I think drywall is somewhere around 1.5 times wages.

    The illegals are getting paid pretty close to what a native born American would get; their hourly is about the same. It’s all the other costs the boss doesn’t pay for the illegal is what makes it so attractive. Somebody working on the books might be $40 an hour, in cash $15-20 to the boss.

    And the illegals can live quite comfortably on $20 an hour since they’re not paying any taxes on it….it’s a really screwed up racket.

    • Agree: Triumph104
  64. Another difference is how long those employees expect to hang-around.

    If a guy has zero in his pocket and is there to make as much money as fast as possible for a 4-6 week stint before moving on to greener pastures, sure he can hack 15 hour days.

    If the guy is a local that lives in the community, already has a place to live and at least some food on the table, he’s looking for something with a future. He knows 15 hour days aren’t long-term sustainable, so he’s not going to waste his time in a meat grinder. He’ll take his pay at the normal quittin’ time and go looking for something else more realistic the next day.

  65. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas

    “It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation,” said Martinez, whose employees typically work 15-hour days and six or seven days a week.
     
    I'm sure this has nothing to do with expecting Señor Martinez to comply with Federal Wage and Hour Laws and pay overtime wages for the 50-65 hours per week they'd be working in excess of the 40 hour standard? Perhaps he counts every Carlos and Jose as and "independent contractor" and entrepreneur like the liars who keep stats on "immigrant businesses" do. That means when one of his wage slaves falls off a ladder, Martinez can throw him into a wheelbarrow and dump him in the nearest emergency room so you get to pay - indirectly - for the poor fellow's medical care.

    That means when one of his wage slaves falls off a ladder, Martinez can throw him into a wheelbarrow and dump him in the nearest emergency room so you get to pay – indirectly – for the poor fellow’s medical care.

    When my roof was being replaced, one of the Mexicans working on it fell off a one-story area of my roof (rolled down a bit and then landed on my wooden deck). The other workers helped him a little and then went back to work. I called the company to tell them what happened. I’m not sure anyone cared too much. It was all quite odd to witness.

  66. Hail says: • Website
    @Bill P
    At one job last year I worked 14 hour days on a regular basis. The legal max was 15 hours. Other Americans I worked with regularly put in 12 hours+ as well. The claim that Americans don't put in long hours is absolute bullshit. Pardon the rough language, but this Mexican is lying through his teeth and it pisses me off.

    BTW, we were dealing with machines weighing tens of thousands of tons -- each! And with crews of four men. The productivity of this cruddy contractor's illegal work gang doesn't even begin to compare.

    I am so sick of hearing how much better Mexicans are at hard work. Why don't these elites fire all the white pilots that fly them to Europe, often while working grueling schedules, and replace them with campesinos? I mean, the Mexicans can handle the hard work and long hours so much better, so that ought to reassure the passengers, right?

    Why don’t these elites fire all the white pilots that fly them to Europe, often while working grueling schedules, and replace them with campesinos?

    Now we’re thinking. As Steve points out from time to time, the global elite can rhetorically shove around those Flyover losers with no cost, without really a care for practical effects; but start talking about air travel…and they snap to attention.

  67. If Mexico is filled with such Stakhanovites why isn’t it dominating the world?

  68. @gman
    Off topic:

    Enterprise is shutting down its Chicago-based car share program (similar to Zipcar) as 40% of their vehicles have either been stolen or damaged.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/bluesky/originals/ct-bsi-enterprise-carshare-leaves-chicago-20170614-story.html

    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles. Or Stephen Moore saying that what’s really needed for economic growth is a large tax cut. This is why I loathe establishment Republicans.


    NB: The article states that Zipcar hasn’t experienced similar vehicle security challenges in Chicago. However, as a Chicago Zipcar customer, I once misplaced my Zipcar card and one of the features Zipcar has is that it can open cars remotely through an app or by calling customer service. The customer rep wasn’t able to remote me in and saidthe company had disabled it due to high thefts/vandalism (not sure I get the logic). So I had to cancel my reservation.

    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles.

    The problem isn’t too much free market; it’s not enough. Southern Italy has a well developed private security and enforcement infrastructure. The Sicilian model could be complemented by roving groups of Somali style security provided by 50cals mounted on Toyota Hiluxes.

    • LOL: Clyde
    • Replies: @Hanoi Paris Hilton
    Judging from the most of the pix out there, the "technicals" in Somalia and elsewhere tend not be mounted with cal. 50 BMG (13.0 x 99mm) Ma Deuces, but rather with the Soviet ("DShK" ) and Chinese equivalents, firing the 12.7 x 108 mm cartridge.

    The more butch crowd, say, in Syria, now sports technicals featuring two-up KPVs firing the 14.5 x 114 mm round. (Four-up KPVs have figured large in the Nork public executions of their Emmanuel Goldsteins,)

    Although these days, like with everything else in the firepower olympics, the trend is towards 20mm —or larger— auto cannons, which do a lot more damage at the receiving end.)

  69. @Reg Cæsar

    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said…
     
    I was going to suggest treating them like Americans. But that might be hard for Señor Martinez to grasp, not being an American himself.

    I doubt very, very much he hired any Americans. That’s the latest propaganda employers spout, Americans are lazy drug addicts who expect all sorts of pampering such as the 8 hour day, 3o minute lunch break, paid overtime, safe working conditions etc.

    There’s a big Tesla factory in Ca. Most of the workers are from Eastern Europe. So when I read about companies opening new facilities with 500 jobs I wonder if those jobs will go to Americans or immigrants. I’m beginning to assume the jobs will go to immigrants.

  70. “It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation.”

    I could imagine Mr. Martinez as a plantation owner saying the same thing in 1865.

  71. By the way, I would expect that the solution to optimum hours per week worked depends a great deal on the nature of the job. I would buy 52 hours a week for a manual labor type job (whether construction or even building planes for Lockheed). My guess is the number goes up when you’re able to sit down at work.

    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    About six hours a day in any job, sitting or not, is the max for productive work, according to some study I read years ago. Then there is a natural slacking-off.

    Of course, employees can slack and "wool-gather" for almost any number of additional hours per day...as long as the employer's checks don't bounce.

    , @unpc downunder
    Breaks are very important too. Two hours is about the maximum length of time an adult can work before they start slowing down mentally and physically. Expecting people to work continuously for more than three hours in a manual job is a common cause of accidents, physical injury and technical blunders.
  72. @Bill P
    At one job last year I worked 14 hour days on a regular basis. The legal max was 15 hours. Other Americans I worked with regularly put in 12 hours+ as well. The claim that Americans don't put in long hours is absolute bullshit. Pardon the rough language, but this Mexican is lying through his teeth and it pisses me off.

    BTW, we were dealing with machines weighing tens of thousands of tons -- each! And with crews of four men. The productivity of this cruddy contractor's illegal work gang doesn't even begin to compare.

    I am so sick of hearing how much better Mexicans are at hard work. Why don't these elites fire all the white pilots that fly them to Europe, often while working grueling schedules, and replace them with campesinos? I mean, the Mexicans can handle the hard work and long hours so much better, so that ought to reassure the passengers, right?

    Which Americans do you think Martinez was talking about? Faithful iSteve readers will recognize Martinez’s reasoning from Bret Stevens’ recent piece.

    Doctors used to have to put in long hours during residency. I suspect at elite medical institutions this is still the case. It’s not backbreaking work, but it’s stressful, cognitively demanding, and requires being on one’s feet.

    Then again, this is redundant since so many illegals are doctors.

  73. Let’s hope we see the day soon when publication of an interview like this will result in the swift arrest of the employer and confiscation of his assets.

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    "Let’s hope we see the day soon when publication of an interview like this will result in the swift arrest of the employer and confiscation of his assets."

    Spot on! Why is there never any follow up by the law enforcement officials?
  74. I got no sympathy for Texas. They wanted to hire the cheapest possible workers for the job so they allowed illegal immigration to happen at the expense of telling American-born workers that they are overqualified or too expensive or forcing them to go though 100 gigabytes of job applications that no one ever looks at only to be told that they are not wanted. Texas companies CHOSE to hire illegals. And then chose to elect a racist. Now they are paying the price. I hope these businesses fail.

  75. Wrong. The jews turned old leftism into pokemon celebration festival for the replacements of the goyim. The economic stuff was more important once.

    Open borders is marxs theory that capitalist need more returning after squeezing the workers so gard over the past 30 years. Open borders can be argued as a natural capitalist iniative to increase profit.

    Even taking the jews aside.

  76. @Thomas
    By the way, I would expect that the solution to optimum hours per week worked depends a great deal on the nature of the job. I would buy 52 hours a week for a manual labor type job (whether construction or even building planes for Lockheed). My guess is the number goes up when you're able to sit down at work.

    About six hours a day in any job, sitting or not, is the max for productive work, according to some study I read years ago. Then there is a natural slacking-off.

    Of course, employees can slack and “wool-gather” for almost any number of additional hours per day…as long as the employer’s checks don’t bounce.

  77. The role of Capitalists in undermining the West reminds me of this saying from Russia: “We knew that the Communists were lying to us about Communism, but we did not know that they were telling us the truth about Capitalism.”

  78. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Guy De Champlaigne
    Even if many treated them well that doesn't mean the average employer did. And the fact that so many of the paternalistic employers like Robert Owen (who didn't himself think that paternalistic capitalism was the answer and went on to embrace utopian socialism) were so noteworthy shows just what a rarity they were.

    Even the average employer gave people Sunday off – Victorian Britain was uber-Christian, Sunday work was just not done and there was opposition even to railways running on a Sunday.

    It was only in the Thatcher years that Sunday started to become just another day for getting and spending in the UK, and even now it’s only retail that is really a 7 day thing.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    We have blue laws in my county that keep most retail stores closed on Sundays (with exceptions for drug stores, groceries, and liquor stores, I think).
    , @Verymuchalive
    From the 1960s onwards, the number of part-time jobs has been rapidly increasing at the expense of full-time work. This is the cause of 24-7 retail development.
  79. @Marty
    Seems fitting in that Enterprise is largely a black operation. They're the only car rental outfit with black announcers on their commercials, and blacks often man their satellite offices inside repair shops.

    Blacks seem to gravitate toward travel related industries, like working at airports. Early jets were extremely loud so they probably pushed a lot of neighborhoods under flight paths black, like Inglewood under the Los Angeles International descent path.

    But I think blacks and the travel industry go back further, such as to Pullman sleeping car porters in the late 19th Century. Pullman porters formed an elite among African Americans of well-paid, urbane men who traveled the country and saw how things were different in some places.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Are there a significant number of black airplane pilots?
    , @Alden
    Airports are under the EEOC gun like all large enterprises and government involved businesses. At FSO any company that has an airport contract has to have 51 percent non White employees AND 51 percent non
    White ownership.

    I use the term non White rather than minority as it is honest about race replacement. I hate airports. In even the biggest, O'Hare, etc sometimes one doesn't see a White worker until you get on the plane. Airports are like government buildings, no Whites need apply
    , @Marty
    As I was reading your reply, at a restaurant across the street from the Stanford football stadium, a guy sits down next to me with a Fuego Maya golf cap. I'd never heard of it. Turns out Pete Dye built a course in Guatemala.
  80. @Guy De Champlaigne
    Even if many treated them well that doesn't mean the average employer did. And the fact that so many of the paternalistic employers like Robert Owen (who didn't himself think that paternalistic capitalism was the answer and went on to embrace utopian socialism) were so noteworthy shows just what a rarity they were.

    Actually Utopian settlements were quite common in early 19th Century North America. Southey and Coleridge, hardly socialists, planned one themselves.
    Modern research does not support the thesis that Owen advocated a Utopian Socialist solution to the problems of 19th Century Society. He certainly was a strong proponent of Cooperatism.
    The Cooperative movement was a strong influence on the early British Labour Party for the good: social aims should be attained by voluntary cooperation of members of society, not by compulsion by the state. Clause 4 ended that and the Labour Party became another State Socialist Party.
    Actually, the paternalistic employer was ten-a-penny during the late Victorian period. Often, it is only the most prominent that are now remembered. Sir Titus Salt at Saltaire, and Lord Lever at Port Sunlight outshone ( if you pardon the pun ) anything that Owen did at New Lanark. One thinks of Lord Armstrong and others as well.

    • Replies: @Guy De Champlaigne
    Owen left his mill in Scotland to found a (failed) utopian community in Indiana. The idea behind utopian socialism was that these small scale successes would grow and attract more and more people until people simply abandoned traditional capitalism. This didn't work and Marx specifically defines communism against this in the Communist Manifesto.

    I think it's hard to compare this guy to anyone in the nineteenth century because ultimately the way he treats his employees is going to be tied to the economy and welfare state as it exists today (e.g. it's more humane to injure someone when they'll just get free medical treatment than if they'll starve)
  81. @Anon
    Even the average employer gave people Sunday off - Victorian Britain was uber-Christian, Sunday work was just not done and there was opposition even to railways running on a Sunday.

    It was only in the Thatcher years that Sunday started to become just another day for getting and spending in the UK, and even now it's only retail that is really a 7 day thing.

    We have blue laws in my county that keep most retail stores closed on Sundays (with exceptions for drug stores, groceries, and liquor stores, I think).

    • Replies: @Anon
    You're fortunate. In the UK Sunday is for many the Great Shopping Day Out.

    One of the neat things about Germany and France is that Sundays there are more like a UK Sunday used to be. Most shops are closed and the open ones (convenience stores, chemists) are shut by noon or one. This may well change in France following the election of the globalist candidate, France's Tony Blair.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    I lived in Colorado and Texas when they both had blue laws. I liked them. People don't have to go shopping every day.
    , @ScarletNumber
    Liquor stores are controlled by municipal ordinance. Some towns allow all sales after noon. Others don't allow hard liquor sales at all.

    A town like Teaneck is interesting because many of its stores are closed on Saturday as well because of the Jewish population.

    I think the only NJ-wide blue law is against car sales.
  82. @Hail
    I wonder if British employers ever included a "tea-break clause" in a work contract.

    I don't expect "19th century manufacturing workers" had formal contracts as such, though.

    You’re probably right about 19th Century manufacturing workers as a whole. But late Victorian skilled manufacturing workers could read and write and had skills very much in demand, so it made sense that employers would want to tie them down with a written contract. Don’t know about a “tea break” clause, but you never can say never.

  83. HA says:
    @Hail
    I wonder if British employers ever included a "tea-break clause" in a work contract.

    I don't expect "19th century manufacturing workers" had formal contracts as such, though.

    “I don’t expect “19th century manufacturing workers” had formal contracts as such, though.”

    I think you’re wrong about that. We now know that as far back as the Pyramids, expectations between labor and employers were committed to writing. For example, in Bill Bryson’s At Home, he notes that

    …lobsters were once so abundant in Britain that servants sought agreements from their employers that they would not be served them more than twice a week.

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/jun/06/bryson-at-home-book-review

    Nothing worse than scumbag employers trying to feed me lobster more than twice a week. I say they need to feed that stuff to foreigners and immigrants, not me. I’m still holding out for some of that cake they’re always telling me I should try.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    The guys - or should that be goys - who built the Pyramids were highly skilled workers, like mediaeval cathedral builders. They were much in demand, and if they weren't paid they would move where work was, as mediaeval masons did. So contracts formulated in writing were in the interests of both parties.
    The heavy lifting at the Pyramids was done by conscripts, not by slaves, Hebrew or otherwise.
    I don't think the conscripts had a written contract !
    The Lobster story is a new variant of the Salmon story. In the late 19th Century, agricultural workers in Northern and Eastern Scotland used to complain that their employers were feeding them most days with the cheapest product available - freshly caught salmon. In some places, this revolting practice continued well into the 1930s !
    , @Another Canadian
    I visited the Museum of Crime and Punishment in Rothenberg, Germany. They had a poster of office rules from the 19th century:

    https://lorneanderson.com/2016/09/19/rules-for-work/amp/

    I liked the part about personnel bringing 4 pounds of coal daily in the winter.
  84. @Kirt
    I read the entire linked article twice and didn't see anything which stated that Martinez's workers typically worked 15 hours per day, six or seven days a week. Where does that come from?

    Paragraph 14.

  85. @bored identity
    Sweet OT:


    Echo Chambering Tribalists Burn $21.000.000 on Their People's Candidate:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user230519/imageroot/2017/06/20/2017.06.20%20-%20GA%2018_0.JPG

    Yet, Evil Vlad, just like his predecessor, establishes a full control over Tovarish Koba's Home State:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user230519/imageroot/2017/06/20/2017.06.20%20-%20GA%2017_0.JPG

    Echo Chambering Tribalists Burn $21.000.000 on Their People’s Candidate:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user230519/imageroot/2017/06/20/2017.06.20%20-%20GA%2018_0.JPG

    Funniest take on the Quixotic Ossoff candidacy from last night:

    Georgia woman devises elaborate $23 million hoax to convince her boyfriend to propose— PoliMath (@politicalmath) June 21, 2017

  86. @Clyde
    I am going to need a new roof in a few years. All the roofing crews I see here are Central Americans or Mexicans. Can anyone comment on how good or bad their work quality is? Personal experiences with these crews work? Thanks/

    The main problem I have with work done by illegals is not the workers themselves. Those guys work hard, and can certainly learn skills. But the type of guy who hires illegals, doesn’t care about the law, and is likely to cheat you with crappy materials and other ways of cheating you.

    The guys coming up from Guatemala or Mexico aren’t the problem here. They’re just following the work, and responding to an obvious situation that doesn’t punish illegally crossing the borders.

  87. @HA
    "I don’t expect “19th century manufacturing workers” had formal contracts as such, though."

    I think you're wrong about that. We now know that as far back as the Pyramids, expectations between labor and employers were committed to writing. For example, in Bill Bryson's At Home, he notes that


    ...lobsters were once so abundant in Britain that servants sought agreements from their employers that they would not be served them more than twice a week.
     
    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/jun/06/bryson-at-home-book-review

    Nothing worse than scumbag employers trying to feed me lobster more than twice a week. I say they need to feed that stuff to foreigners and immigrants, not me. I'm still holding out for some of that cake they're always telling me I should try.

    The guys – or should that be goys – who built the Pyramids were highly skilled workers, like mediaeval cathedral builders. They were much in demand, and if they weren’t paid they would move where work was, as mediaeval masons did. So contracts formulated in writing were in the interests of both parties.
    The heavy lifting at the Pyramids was done by conscripts, not by slaves, Hebrew or otherwise.
    I don’t think the conscripts had a written contract !
    The Lobster story is a new variant of the Salmon story. In the late 19th Century, agricultural workers in Northern and Eastern Scotland used to complain that their employers were feeding them most days with the cheapest product available – freshly caught salmon. In some places, this revolting practice continued well into the 1930s !

  88. @Hail
    I wonder if British employers ever included a "tea-break clause" in a work contract.

    I don't expect "19th century manufacturing workers" had formal contracts as such, though.

    Stanley Kubrick dealing with British teabreaks

    https://www.youtube.com/#/watch?v=0JwAnMUavzA

  89. @HA
    "I don’t expect “19th century manufacturing workers” had formal contracts as such, though."

    I think you're wrong about that. We now know that as far back as the Pyramids, expectations between labor and employers were committed to writing. For example, in Bill Bryson's At Home, he notes that


    ...lobsters were once so abundant in Britain that servants sought agreements from their employers that they would not be served them more than twice a week.
     
    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/jun/06/bryson-at-home-book-review

    Nothing worse than scumbag employers trying to feed me lobster more than twice a week. I say they need to feed that stuff to foreigners and immigrants, not me. I'm still holding out for some of that cake they're always telling me I should try.

    I visited the Museum of Crime and Punishment in Rothenberg, Germany. They had a poster of office rules from the 19th century:

    https://lorneanderson.com/2016/09/19/rules-for-work/amp/

    I liked the part about personnel bringing 4 pounds of coal daily in the winter.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    I went there, too! My last trip to Germany before the New Year Cologne vibrancy love-a-thon happened. Great museum!
    , @Reg Cæsar

    the Museum of Crime and Punishment in Rothenberg, Germany.
     
    Prof van der Poel's tax museum in Rotterdam would be a good addition to anyone's Eurocrime itinerary.
  90. @Verymuchalive
    Actually Utopian settlements were quite common in early 19th Century North America. Southey and Coleridge, hardly socialists, planned one themselves.
    Modern research does not support the thesis that Owen advocated a Utopian Socialist solution to the problems of 19th Century Society. He certainly was a strong proponent of Cooperatism.
    The Cooperative movement was a strong influence on the early British Labour Party for the good: social aims should be attained by voluntary cooperation of members of society, not by compulsion by the state. Clause 4 ended that and the Labour Party became another State Socialist Party.
    Actually, the paternalistic employer was ten-a-penny during the late Victorian period. Often, it is only the most prominent that are now remembered. Sir Titus Salt at Saltaire, and Lord Lever at Port Sunlight outshone ( if you pardon the pun ) anything that Owen did at New Lanark. One thinks of Lord Armstrong and others as well.

    Owen left his mill in Scotland to found a (failed) utopian community in Indiana. The idea behind utopian socialism was that these small scale successes would grow and attract more and more people until people simply abandoned traditional capitalism. This didn’t work and Marx specifically defines communism against this in the Communist Manifesto.

    I think it’s hard to compare this guy to anyone in the nineteenth century because ultimately the way he treats his employees is going to be tied to the economy and welfare state as it exists today (e.g. it’s more humane to injure someone when they’ll just get free medical treatment than if they’ll starve)

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    But the larger point being, perhaps regarding some aspects of the economy, the US is returning to 19th century norms? After all, in the late 19th century we had a fairly large immigration boom which over time caused unexpected competition for jobs for the native born workers (e.g. CA's immigration laws vs the Chinese were meant to keep them out and protect native CA workers's jobs). Then as now, the US didn't have a labor shortage, they had an abundance of cheap labor, and a large part of that was supplied by immigration.

    How do you think that Carnegie; Rockefeller; and the other titans of big industry were able to amass such large fortunes (for their time)? And remember, there wasn't a minimum wage; no benefits; no pensions; unions were barely allowed to organize. And the great Magnates were greatly helped by an abundance of cheap labor, a significant part of it coming from immigrants.

    Much like in 2017 America.

  91. @Dr. X

    Mr. Martinez, who boasts of working his illegal workers not 12 hours, like in the era of Marx and Dickens, but 15 hours per day.
     
    What's he paying them... $11 an hour with no benefits, no sick time, and no paid days off?

    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said.
     
    Maybe Americans are smart enough to figure out in half a day that their employer is a ripoff artist and an asshole.

    When I was an undergraduate, I got a summer job with a professional painter. The guy couldn't figure out why he couldn't keep help.

    On Day One the guy threatened to throw me off a roof -- before lunchtime. The then intentionally sprayed paint in my face and then told me if I dropped the ladder I was holding he'd kill me.

    At the end of the day he said he hoped I'd come back and not quit.

    I quit.

    Fuck Martinez and every creep out there like him.

  92. @Kirt
    I read the entire linked article twice and didn't see anything which stated that Martinez's workers typically worked 15 hours per day, six or seven days a week. Where does that come from?

    Fifth paragraph from the bottom. It’s a direct quote.

    • Replies: @Kirt
    Thanks to you and the others who corrected my overlooking this. You're right that it's a direct quote from the article, but not from Martinez. So where did the reporter get his stats? Did the workers themselves tell him? Did he personally clock their hours? Ninety to one hundred and five hours a week sounds suspiciously high to me.
  93. @Trelane
    Meanwhile in Japan...

    https://youtu.be/eEzH40l-Dg8?t=9

    And in Hong Kong...

    https://youtu.be/Qd3QDTPgkOg

    And the back lot at Paramount...

    https://youtu.be/YbeyivYA7sI

    Strange that those Chinese designers picked a white to be their robot.

  94. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. X

    Mr. Martinez, who boasts of working his illegal workers not 12 hours, like in the era of Marx and Dickens, but 15 hours per day.
     
    What's he paying them... $11 an hour with no benefits, no sick time, and no paid days off?

    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said.
     
    Maybe Americans are smart enough to figure out in half a day that their employer is a ripoff artist and an asshole.

    When I was an undergraduate, I got a summer job with a professional painter. The guy couldn't figure out why he couldn't keep help.

    On Day One the guy threatened to throw me off a roof -- before lunchtime. The then intentionally sprayed paint in my face and then told me if I dropped the ladder I was holding he'd kill me.

    At the end of the day he said he hoped I'd come back and not quit.

    I quit.

    Fuck Martinez and every creep out there like him.

    I’m going to have to defend your asshole boss here. That’s dangerous work. You don’t want snowflakes, slackers or idiots working with you because they could get you killed. Any new guy is going to catch hell from the old hands just as a test of character. You’d do the same in their position.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Absolutely. Spraying paint in a new employee's face and threatening to kill them is a just "test of character" and a normal, non-psychotic person would behave exactly the same way.
    , @Dr. X
    I think the guy was just off his meds...
  95. @Anonymous
    This is how you keep the economy going: hire an unlimited stream of illegal immigrants to build homes for an unlimited stream of legal immigrants. Who benefit? The immigrants themselves of course, both legal and illegal, they get to escape the third world hell holes that they helped create, plus a few Americans --- the real estate developers, real estate agents, mortgage brokers, bankers, immigration lawyers, new teachers, administrators, social workers, Democratic party...what a coincidence, all professions dominated by a certain tribe, while other members of the tribe pretend to be journalists and write flat out false stories such as this pointing to fake "studies" of how immigration and multiculturalism benefit the country, to keep the scam going.

    Who loses? Everyone else. We get to see the destruction of our country and our lifestyle in slowmo, lose ever more jobs to cheap foreign labor, watch all the trees in our neighborhood get cut down to make way for more development, get stuck in traffic wherever we go, see our neighborhood go to the dogs with newcomers who don't bother taking care of the yard or the house, live with unpleasant neighbors who don't speak English, don't even say hi, send our kids to schools overcrowded with immigrant kids who don't speak English, have horrible manners and are in gangs, pay ever higher taxes for social services that we don't benefit from and face ever higher crime rate. All while the tribe lords over us telling us this is why diversity is good for us.

    watch all the trees in our neighborhood get cut down to make way for more development, get stuck in traffic wherever we go, see our neighborhood go to the dogs with newcomers who don’t bother taking care of the yard or the house, live with unpleasant neighbors who don’t speak English, don’t even say hi, send our kids to schools overcrowded with immigrant kids who don’t speak English, have horrible manners and are in gangs, pay ever higher taxes for social services that we don’t benefit from and face ever higher crime rate.

    It’s almost like you and I live in the same community.

    And it’s not just immigrants from Mexico or Central America. My area has been completely transformed by immigrants from China, India, the Middle East and Africa.

    I am a stranger in my home town.

    I’ve mentioned it here before, but my wife and I speak often of what we call the “immigrant tax;” that is, the irritations and added time required to conduct daily life in a community filled with people who barely speak English and share no cultural traits with one another.

    Try completing even the simplest task at the pharmacy or bank when the person helping you was hired because she can speak Hindi (but not English).

  96. @syonredux
    A surprisingly good article in immigration in the Atlantic

    Prominent liberals didn’t oppose immigration a decade ago. Most acknowledged its benefits to America’s economy and culture. They supported a path to citizenship for the undocumented. Still, they routinely asserted that low-skilled immigrants depressed the wages of low-skilled American workers and strained America’s welfare state. And they were far more likely than liberals today are to acknowledge that, as Krugman put it, “immigration is an intensely painful topic … because it places basic principles in conflict.”
     

    Today, little of that ambivalence remains. In 2008, the Democratic platform called undocumented immigrants “our neighbors.” But it also warned, “We cannot continue to allow people to enter the United States undetected, undocumented, and unchecked,” adding that “those who enter our country’s borders illegally, and those who employ them, disrespect the rule of the law.” By 2016, such language was gone. The party’s platform described America’s immigration system as a problem, but not illegal immigration itself. And it focused almost entirely on the forms of immigration enforcement that Democrats opposed. In its immigration section, the 2008 platform referred three times to people entering the country “illegally.” The immigration section of the 2016 platform didn’t use the word illegal, or any variation of it, at all.
     

    “A decade or two ago,” says Jason Furman, a former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, “Democrats were divided on immigration. Now everyone agrees and is passionate and thinks very little about any potential downsides.” How did this come to be?
     

    A larger explanation is political. Between 2008 and 2016, Democrats became more and more confident that the country’s growing Latino population gave the party an electoral edge. To win the presidency, Democrats convinced themselves, they didn’t need to reassure white people skeptical of immigration so long as they turned out their Latino base. “The fastest-growing sector of the American electorate stampeded toward the Democrats this November,” Salon declared after Obama’s 2008 win. “If that pattern continues, the GOP is doomed to 40 years of wandering in a desert.”
     

    This combination of Latino and corporate activism made it perilous for Democrats to discuss immigration’s costs, as Bernie Sanders learned the hard way. In July 2015, two months after officially announcing his candidacy for president, Sanders was interviewed by Ezra Klein, the editor in chief of Vox. Klein asked whether, in order to fight global poverty, the U.S. should consider “sharply raising the level of immigration we permit, even up to a level of open borders.” Sanders reacted with horror. “That’s a Koch brothers proposal,” he scoffed. He went on to insist that “right-wing people in this country would love … an open-border policy. Bring in all kinds of people, work for $2 or $3 an hour, that would be great for them. I don’t believe in that. I think we have to raise wages in this country.”
     

    Sanders came under immediate attack. Vox’s Dylan Matthews declared that his “fear of immigrant labor is ugly—and wrongheaded.” The president of FWD.us accused Sanders of “the sort of backward-looking thinking that progressives have rightly moved away from in the past years.” ThinkProgress published a blog post titled “Why Immigration Is the Hole in Bernie Sanders’ Progressive Agenda.” The senator, it argued, was supporting “the idea that immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs and hurting the economy, a theory that has been proven incorrect.”
     

    Sanders stopped emphasizing immigration’s costs. By January 2016, FWD.us’s policy director noted with satisfaction that he had “evolved on this issue.”

    But has the claim that “immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs” actually been proved “incorrect”? A decade ago, liberals weren’t so sure. In 2006, Krugman wrote that America was experiencing “large increases in the number of low-skill workers relative to other inputs into production, so it’s inevitable that this means a fall in wages.”

    It’s hard to imagine a prominent liberal columnist writing that sentence today. To the contrary, progressive commentators now routinely claim that there’s a near-consensus among economists on immigration’s benefits.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    It’s depressing though, because they start off acknowledging that there are two legitimate sides and then, starting with a Columbia professor’s grudging and incoherent admission of bias in the field of immigration research, we get the Atlantic laying out to the simple truth, ie complete BS. But the good reader will understand that there are not two sides, there’s just a need for more training of the displaced ignorant honkies who don’t get it.

    “George [Borjas] and I come out on different sides of policy on immigration,” Davis said, “but I agree that there are aspects of discussion in academia that don’t get sort of full view if you come to the wrong conclusion.”

    None of this means that liberals should oppose immigration. Entry to the United States is, for starters, a boon to immigrants and to the family members back home to whom they send money. It should be valued on these moral grounds alone. But immigration benefits the economy, too.

    The real question is what to do with our unfit.

  97. @Stealth
    What surprises me is that one of these liberals actually remembers something important about how things were in the past. He noticed a difference between what liberals thought then and what they think now. I never thought I would see the day.

    The myth, which liberals like myself find tempting, is that only the right has changed.
     
    Don't know where he gets that idea. Liberals change what they believe all the time. It's the one constant aobut them. How many of them thought gay marriage was important twenty years ago?

    Liberals change what they believe all the time. It’s the one constant aobut them. How many of them thought gay marriage was important twenty years ago?

    No kidding! I remember back in 1986, when Barbara Jordan was arguing against Reagan’s amnesty bill.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3yesvvYEvs

    This was a Democratic President. Not even 25 years ago. How times have changed.

    (On the other side, Bush Senior was defeated in part because the neocons in the basement revolted in 1992... because he *refused* to boot the Ba'athists out of Baghdad, knowing full well what that would do to the region. 10 years later...)

    If you go back further... I'll never understand why, for the love of God, Trump never cited Gompers, or especially Cesar Chavez (added benefit of defusing racism charges), when blasting illegal immigration. You can't think of a better political juxtaposition for appealing to the American working class-of all races.

  98. @Marty
    Seems fitting in that Enterprise is largely a black operation. They're the only car rental outfit with black announcers on their commercials, and blacks often man their satellite offices inside repair shops.

    Enterprise hires almost exclusively college jocks. Back when I was a district manager,I used to rent from Enterprise around sixty times a year over a 3 state area. In that time I met 2 Enterprise employees who were not college jocks of one sort or another. Some were baseball players, some were female golfers etc. If you hire from that cohort you are going to end up with lots of blacks, unless you have a corporate deathwish and wish to engage in protracted litigation with EEOC and DOJ with the attendant negative publicity etc.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    If you watch the NCAA basketball tournament, they brag about this.
  99. Many of these illegals aren’t around any more as workers because they are able to start their own businesses.

    It’s not at all unusual in Texas to get a bid from a painting, flooring, etc., company and find that absolutely no one, including the owner, speaks much English. I doubt these guys have gone through all the hoops to immigrate legally.

    After a few years as an illegal laborer, they simply buy a used truck, hire their buddies and off they go. And they undercut their previous employee on price. Happens all the time.

    Taxes? Social security? Insurance? Who needs all that?

  100. “It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation,” said Martinez, whose employees typically work 15-hour days and six or seven days a week.

    There is a word for this running away condition: drapetomania.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drapetomania

  101. @bored identity
    Sweet OT:


    Echo Chambering Tribalists Burn $21.000.000 on Their People's Candidate:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user230519/imageroot/2017/06/20/2017.06.20%20-%20GA%2018_0.JPG

    Yet, Evil Vlad, just like his predecessor, establishes a full control over Tovarish Koba's Home State:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user230519/imageroot/2017/06/20/2017.06.20%20-%20GA%2017_0.JPG

    Nate Silver’s pre-election take is interesting (and highlights his current fallibility, it looks like much of his “genius” was events lining up with his biases): https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/why-the-georgia-special-election-matters/

    • Replies: @Forbes
    Interesting? Convoluted more like it. Silver calls the outcome every possible way. His post is entirely worthless.

    You called it: his so-called genius was events lining up with his preferences. Nothing more than coin-toss precision.
  102. @JackOH
    A telemarketing call center here (West Corporation?) used to routinely offer "opportunities" for its workers to work 16 hour days. Some random performance auditing of phone calls was done by its managers in the Philippines. To sound a bit old-fashioned, there's something unsavory about this, something like an inverted colonialism.

    I gather those who declined those "opportunities" could be thought of as slackers, as in that old management tripe, "Those people just don't want to work." Has me thinking of Southern apologists for slavery who noted that Northerners had the "thing", wage slavery, just not the name.

    A telemarketing call center here (West Corporation?) used to routinely offer “opportunities” for its workers to work 16 hour days. Some random performance auditing of phone calls was done by its managers in the Philippines. To sound a bit old-fashioned, there’s something unsavory about this, something like an inverted colonialism.

    I recently needed to contact Verizon customer service… they were all subcontinental Indians, with obvious accents — in India.

    Wonder what they’re getting paid, and how many hours they’re working, while Verizon rips me off?

    • Replies: @JackOH
    The management types I know these days are pretty much uniformly contemptuous of American workers regardless of individual or unit performance. Our overlords see only wage spreads---say, $30 an hour in the Midwest, $22 an hour in the South, $6 an hour (?) in Mexico, and $1 or $2 an hour in China or India. It's astounding to hear someone barely a generation removed from his own family's ignorance and poverty sniff, "Look at how much those people make." As I mentioned, there's something deeply unsavory about all this.
  103. @Anon 2
    OT Ossoff lost the congressional race in Georgia.

    Kellyanne Conway just tweeted "Laughing my Ossoff."

    The name "Ossoff" sounds Russian Jewish. What
    an unfortunate name for a U.S. politician to have, almost as
    bad as Weiner.

    The name “Ossoff” sounds Russian Jewish.

    I believe Ossoff is the Russian word for “carpetbagger.”

  104. res says:
    @Jean Ralphio
    Sailer-bait over at The Atlantic:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    That was a surprisingly reasonable article. The first paragraph:

    The myth, which liberals like myself find tempting, is that only the right has changed. In June 2015, we tell ourselves, Donald Trump rode down his golden escalator and pretty soon nativism, long a feature of conservative politics, had engulfed it. But that’s not the full story. If the right has grown more nationalistic, the left has grown less so. A decade ago, liberals publicly questioned immigration in ways that would shock many progressives today.

    And this:

    Democrats should put immigrants’ learning English at the center of their immigration agenda. If more immigrants speak English fluently, native-born whites may well feel a stronger connection to them, and be more likely to support government policies that help them. Promoting English will also give Democrats a greater chance of attracting those native-born whites who consider growing diversity a threat. According to a preelection study by Adam Bonica, a Stanford political scientist, the single best predictor of whether a voter supported Trump was whether he or she agreed with the statement “People living in the U.S. should follow American customs and traditions.”

    Compare that to the spin given the same point in this post election NYT oped: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/10/opinion/presidential-small-ball.html

    Bonica said in an email that many of the responses suggested that Trump loyalists could be described as “authoritarian/nationalists.” Nearly nine out of ten Trump supporters agreed that “people living in the U.S. should follow American customs and learn English,” the single strongest predictor of Trump support. One out of four Clinton supporters shared this view.

  105. @jJay
    There's a call the bluff problem with Steve's underlying thesis. It's like the pick your own damn cotton instead of having the slaves do it. The plantation owners may be wrong and evil but the vacuum left in their in absence will be something to behold.

    You and I could pick strawberries in Oxnard, CA tomorrow morning starting at 6 am. There are still a few whites and blacks who do just that. This is not minimum wage work. A picker with a steady rhythm and strong back can earn $30 to $40 an hour with a bit less skill required than putting up drywall.

    The Mexican immigrants are not here to make minimum wage or a just few dollars more. I am not sure that sinks through.

    I made some money picking strawberries in the North of England while at University, the bloody wasps follow you around all day,

  106. @Kirt
    I read the entire linked article twice and didn't see anything which stated that Martinez's workers typically worked 15 hours per day, six or seven days a week. Where does that come from?

    Reread the article. That passage is in paragraph 14.

  107. I can’t specifically comment re roofers (ours was replaced by Mexicans – you can’t find a non-Mexican construction worker in the DFW area, but it seems to be holding up well), but as far as basic house building, the illegals suck. Not one door or window in our home is plum. We had them replace the front and back doors twice and they still didn’t get it right. Same with the kitchen floor. We’ve replaced all 3 toilets and discovered they used the wrong screws and applied no waterproofing. When we called to check on local inspection for a new hot water heater, we found that we were supposed to have had a number of other things inspected, and the Mexican English-speaking bosses claimed they’d taken care of it and we’d even paid for it, but not one was ever done or on record.

    These guys are functionally illiterate and innumerate in their own language. They don’t measure anything or follow procedures unless watched constantly, and the supervisors (whether Mexican or White) don’t care – it’s all about throwing up a house as fast as possible for as big a profit as possible. I even hired an older White guy when we finally, at our own cost, replaced our front and back doors, which had to be specially ordered, because nothing in our house is “standard” size. He had his own team of Mexicans, most likely illegal, but he taught them what he knew and supervised them minutely, so the work was done right. Still doesn’t mean I wouldn’t have preferred White Americans, even at a higher cost. You get what you pay for.

    Even if a certain percentage of the illegals leave, they’ll merely be replaced by more non-Whites – tons of Chinese, Indians, and Arabs around here. Whites are easily outnumbered 10 to 1, and most of those Whites are from NY or California or Chicago. One of many reasons I haven’t bothered to vote locally in about 10 years – anything I care about always goes the other way due to all the White virtue signaling. And no, I don’t welcome “our” new mystery meat overlords in any way for anything.

  108. The few true right wing latinos in the U.S. Should cook up a avocacy group that names and shames these employer scumbags like Martinez for being whatever the latino equivalent of a house nigger or a black field overseer is — exploiting and brutalizing his own kind to make a few bucks for himself and a lot of bucks for Whitey. I’m sure they have words in mixtec and Spanish for race traitor or collaborator/etc.

  109. @Kirt
    I read the entire linked article twice and didn't see anything which stated that Martinez's workers typically worked 15 hours per day, six or seven days a week. Where does that come from?

    Paragraph 14, below the jump.

  110. @Kirt
    I read the entire linked article twice and didn't see anything which stated that Martinez's workers typically worked 15 hours per day, six or seven days a week. Where does that come from?

    Really? Sure it’s in the 14th paragraph but it was pretty easy to spot. I didn’t even use the search feature. Here’s the quote:

    “It just breaks my heart when they have to leave because of the situation,” said Martinez, whose employees typically work 15-hour days and six or seven days a week. “It’s not fair.”

  111. @J.Ross
    I have come across "indivisible" labor at construction sites peeing at random places, or peeing in lidless cups and then accidentally knocking them over. This was at sites where portajohns were provided, at the expense of the client, and known to the workers. Every supervisor will tell you they forget how to understand English whenever convenient. In one case the source of the boundless energy of the 15-hr/day worker was not belief in America but powder cocaine. To be fair some I assumed were good people.
    But how does it happen that liberals want every last molecule and hand-washing regulated, until it comes to their own immediate personal projects (which will presumably affect them most directly), and then they're cool with sleep deprivation and narcotically-enabled overwork? Have they never seen what happens when a semi driver misses sleep? Do they think an elecrician or a millwright would be more naturally alert?
    Do liberals only understand regulation as a pseudo-moral, passive-aggressive attack on competition?

    I doubt the Dems even thought that far, or even thought of ethics at all.

    Their thinking stopped at “Enough Latinos in the population” = permanent Dem majorities.

  112. @Marty
    Seems fitting in that Enterprise is largely a black operation. They're the only car rental outfit with black announcers on their commercials, and blacks often man their satellite offices inside repair shops.

    Those rare times I need a rental vehicle, I invariably deal with Enterprise out here in the Chicago far exurbs, and it’s definitely staffed by high-responsibility, high-motivation black entrepreneurial (or pre-entrepreneurial) types. Have always been treated very professionally and respectfully. Definitely antidotal to hair-up-as* over dindu outrageousness.

    • Replies: @Alden
    When I travel by plane I get a package deal plane tickets and car rental. It seems every Enterprise operation in every airport I've been in is staffed by good performance blacks.
  113. @Anonymous
    Amazing how the Japanese don't have any shortage of workers willing to build houses.

    There’s not even a shortage in the largely white Vancouver Island.

    (Why is the island still so white? My theory is that the 1 ½ hour ferry ride to Vancouver discourages immigrants).

    I’m not sure how things work in Vancouver itself. Lots of legal immigrants, not many illegals.

    I have a nephew living there who is currently installing gutters for a living. But he would be working only an 8 hour day.

  114. @Charles Pewitt
    "We're more concerned about the buying power of this population," she said, pointing to the estimated 1.1 million people in Texas who are living in the U.S. illegally, second only to California. "When you have over a million people not feeling welcome they'll move somewhere they are welcome."

    Over a million illegal alien invaders in Texas? There are only 1.3 million people in New Hampshire. The Chamber of Commerce types who support mass immigration really do only think of cheap labor and toilet paper.

    Texas is moving away from open borders free trade and open borders mass immigration. The battle to control the Texas GOP between the open borders globalizers and the pro-sovereignty patriots is going to be bloody. How can the cheap labor crowd win this fight to control the Texas GOP? It seems that the cheap labor crowd in the Texas Chamber of Commerce will be wiped out.

    Over a million illegal alien invaders in Texas? There are only 1.3 million people in New Hampshire. The Chamber of Commerce types who support mass immigration really do only think of cheap labor and toilet paper.

    We are still a manufacturing super power when it comes to disposable plastic diapers and toilet paper. To keep it real the messy soiled diapers must be tossed in the parking lot of the store where you (illegal alien) just bought groceries with your wiped EBT card. Illegal aliens boost those two manufacturing sectors and real estate prices in certain states/areas.

    • Replies: @Henry Bowman
    You ever run over a full, loaded Diaper that has been roasting in the sun all afternoon? That smell will change your views on life, race, immigration, taxes, property rights, etc.

    Its like a life altering event that itself seems bigger then the outcome you might think possible.
  115. multiculturalism is the very essence of modern neoliberalism…that should be obvious to anyone who reads and understands the article sailer discusses here….and yet oddly enough every single commentor here on this page (except me) would agree with this sentence: “multiculturalism is cultural marxism.”

    Something does not match up here….

    • Replies: @Thea
    I blame Jonah Goldberg.
  116. @Anonym
    I could imagine Paul Ryan looking at this and saying the problem is we have too much regulation and need to adopt free-market principles.

    The problem isn't too much free market; it's not enough. Southern Italy has a well developed private security and enforcement infrastructure. The Sicilian model could be complemented by roving groups of Somali style security provided by 50cals mounted on Toyota Hiluxes.

    Judging from the most of the pix out there, the “technicals” in Somalia and elsewhere tend not be mounted with cal. 50 BMG (13.0 x 99mm) Ma Deuces, but rather with the Soviet (“DShK” ) and Chinese equivalents, firing the 12.7 x 108 mm cartridge.

    The more butch crowd, say, in Syria, now sports technicals featuring two-up KPVs firing the 14.5 x 114 mm round. (Four-up KPVs have figured large in the Nork public executions of their Emmanuel Goldsteins,)

    Although these days, like with everything else in the firepower olympics, the trend is towards 20mm —or larger— auto cannons, which do a lot more damage at the receiving end.)

  117. Isn’t TX the second largest state by population? So the idea that he can’t find enough native born Texans to do the job or that TX faces some kind of work shortage is ridiculous.The fact that he admitted that one-third of his workers are illegal makes one tend to wonder how high the actual percentage of illegals are doing the job in his business.

  118. @Steve Sailer
    Blacks seem to gravitate toward travel related industries, like working at airports. Early jets were extremely loud so they probably pushed a lot of neighborhoods under flight paths black, like Inglewood under the Los Angeles International descent path.

    But I think blacks and the travel industry go back further, such as to Pullman sleeping car porters in the late 19th Century. Pullman porters formed an elite among African Americans of well-paid, urbane men who traveled the country and saw how things were different in some places.

    Are there a significant number of black airplane pilots?

    • Replies: @res

    Are there a significant number of black airplane pilots?
     
    Come on Opinionater. At least try searching for yourself first.

    https://www.quora.com/How-many-black-airline-pilots-are-there-in-the-US
    , @Opinionator
    The link you provided propagates a false story about Ann Coulter. What else is false in it?

    In any case, in the context of Steve's comment about the travel industry, my question was referring to commercial airline pilots. Do your statistics, true or not, speak to that?

    Have you ever flown aboard a commercial airliner that was piloted by an African American? Steve observes that they gravitate to the travel industry.
  119. @Rob McX
    Let's hope we see the day soon when publication of an interview like this will result in the swift arrest of the employer and confiscation of his assets.

    “Let’s hope we see the day soon when publication of an interview like this will result in the swift arrest of the employer and confiscation of his assets.”

    Spot on! Why is there never any follow up by the law enforcement officials?

  120. @jJay
    There's a call the bluff problem with Steve's underlying thesis. It's like the pick your own damn cotton instead of having the slaves do it. The plantation owners may be wrong and evil but the vacuum left in their in absence will be something to behold.

    You and I could pick strawberries in Oxnard, CA tomorrow morning starting at 6 am. There are still a few whites and blacks who do just that. This is not minimum wage work. A picker with a steady rhythm and strong back can earn $30 to $40 an hour with a bit less skill required than putting up drywall.

    The Mexican immigrants are not here to make minimum wage or a just few dollars more. I am not sure that sinks through.

    “This is not minimum wage work. A picker with a steady rhythm and strong back can earn $30 to $40 an hour with a bit less skill required than putting up drywall.”

    I call your bluff. $30-40 an hr jobs ALSO will have benefits, pension, medical, etc. for US workers. ILLEGAL workers, are not required to be paid medical, pension, and competitive wages per union wages in the state. IF the business owner decided to hire only US workers, he’d have to pay competitive wages, benefits, etc. which he doesn’t have to by hiring illegals. If it’s $30-40 per hr, he’s probably paying the illegals $17-19 per hr, and no benefits either.

    What part of ‘you can’t pay Americans 1950’s wages for 2017 work’ don’t you understand? Americans will do the work, any work out there, but not at 1950’s wages for 2017 work.

    “The Mexican immigrants are not here to make minimum wage or a just few dollars more.

    Sure they are. What is considered just a few bucks more goes a lot farther in Mexico.

    You think they’re making $30-40 an hr with full benefits/pension/etc? Why would businesses want so many illegals to work in their jobs and pay them the same rate they’re requied to pay US born workers? That doesn’t make any sense.

    “I am not sure that sinks through.”

    What sinks in, is that you actually think that business owners are flouting the immigration laws to bring in illegals to do the work at the same full rate and paid benefits that they’re required by law to pay native born US workers. Please, child. That makes no sense at all.

    Why are they going to great lengths to get Congress to increase the number of illegal workers? Maybe, just maybe, because of the great profits and savings (not paying benefits, lower wages, etc) that they get when they don’t hire US native born workers.

    What’s slowly been dawning on me is that the GOP has been hornswaggling conservatives into going for social issues like abortion, rather than holding them accountable for HB-1 Visas and other types of immigration-related legislation.

    Prolly why GOP doesn’t back Trump on immigration the way that they should. Too many sacred cows being gored.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    >What’s slowly been dawning on me is that the GOP has been hornswaggling conservatives into going for social issues like abortion, rather than holding them accountable for HB-1 Visas and other types of immigration-related legislation.

    And presumably, if your goal is to lessen the immigrant demographics in the US, why be against abortion at all? On the contrary, that should be encouraged as much as possible. Let's face it: we'll never get rid of all 11 million illegal immigrants in the US. Not that should be used as an excuse for deporting none, but there you go. What's the next best thing? Assimilation-and demographic control. Push birth control, have the females educated, make sure they don't marry too young. And this isn't just an American issue. Personally, I think the best thing you can do for Africa, both for the world and for the quality of life for Africans themselves, is offer $10000 dollars to any man willing to be sterilized, especially if they've already had a kid or two.

    I've never understood this about the white nationalist-lite Religious Right types, which is why I think white nationalism is just another stupid form of identity politics. It makes zero sense to be against abortion if you actually want to lessen the demographics of those who reproduce the most. (And if, like me, you agree that a nation doesn't need an ever-expanding populace.)

  121. @Bill P
    At one job last year I worked 14 hour days on a regular basis. The legal max was 15 hours. Other Americans I worked with regularly put in 12 hours+ as well. The claim that Americans don't put in long hours is absolute bullshit. Pardon the rough language, but this Mexican is lying through his teeth and it pisses me off.

    BTW, we were dealing with machines weighing tens of thousands of tons -- each! And with crews of four men. The productivity of this cruddy contractor's illegal work gang doesn't even begin to compare.

    I am so sick of hearing how much better Mexicans are at hard work. Why don't these elites fire all the white pilots that fly them to Europe, often while working grueling schedules, and replace them with campesinos? I mean, the Mexicans can handle the hard work and long hours so much better, so that ought to reassure the passengers, right?

    remember: Hispanics hire Hispanics. Mostly they hire from extended family and in-laws. This way there’s a sense of obligation to the employer and to each other to work as much as possible. Are you really going to go off to lunch when your brother-in-law is sneering at your wimpiness? Also, if you get hurt, are you going to make a worker’s comp claim against your cousin’s business?

    the Americans this guy is talking about are most likely Mexican-Americans and not part of his clan. They didn’t feel the blood calling and insisted on taking breaks and having lunch.

    • Replies: @E. Rekshun
    the Americans this guy is talking about are most likely Mexican-Americans and not part of his clan.

    I think this is it exactly. The lazy Americans that Martinez is insulting aren't White, they're second generation Mexicans.
  122. @Opinionator
    Are there a significant number of black airplane pilots?

    Are there a significant number of black airplane pilots?

    Come on Opinionater. At least try searching for yourself first.

    https://www.quora.com/How-many-black-airline-pilots-are-there-in-the-US

    • Replies: @anon
    He calls himself " opinionator " , but really he should be called " human questionnaire " .
    , @Opinionator
    The link you provided propagates a false story about Ann Coulter. What else is false in it?

    In any case, in the context of Steve’s comment about the travel industry, my question was referring to commercial airline pilots. Do your statistics, true or not, speak to that?

    Have you ever flown on a commercial airliner that was piloted by an African American? Steve comments that they gravitate to the travel industry.
  123. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "This is not minimum wage work. A picker with a steady rhythm and strong back can earn $30 to $40 an hour with a bit less skill required than putting up drywall."

    I call your bluff. $30-40 an hr jobs ALSO will have benefits, pension, medical, etc. for US workers. ILLEGAL workers, are not required to be paid medical, pension, and competitive wages per union wages in the state. IF the business owner decided to hire only US workers, he'd have to pay competitive wages, benefits, etc. which he doesn't have to by hiring illegals. If it's $30-40 per hr, he's probably paying the illegals $17-19 per hr, and no benefits either.

    What part of 'you can't pay Americans 1950's wages for 2017 work' don't you understand? Americans will do the work, any work out there, but not at 1950's wages for 2017 work.


    "The Mexican immigrants are not here to make minimum wage or a just few dollars more.

    Sure they are. What is considered just a few bucks more goes a lot farther in Mexico.

    You think they're making $30-40 an hr with full benefits/pension/etc? Why would businesses want so many illegals to work in their jobs and pay them the same rate they're requied to pay US born workers? That doesn't make any sense.


    "I am not sure that sinks through."

    What sinks in, is that you actually think that business owners are flouting the immigration laws to bring in illegals to do the work at the same full rate and paid benefits that they're required by law to pay native born US workers. Please, child. That makes no sense at all.

    Why are they going to great lengths to get Congress to increase the number of illegal workers? Maybe, just maybe, because of the great profits and savings (not paying benefits, lower wages, etc) that they get when they don't hire US native born workers.

    What's slowly been dawning on me is that the GOP has been hornswaggling conservatives into going for social issues like abortion, rather than holding them accountable for HB-1 Visas and other types of immigration-related legislation.

    Prolly why GOP doesn't back Trump on immigration the way that they should. Too many sacred cows being gored.

    >What’s slowly been dawning on me is that the GOP has been hornswaggling conservatives into going for social issues like abortion, rather than holding them accountable for HB-1 Visas and other types of immigration-related legislation.

    And presumably, if your goal is to lessen the immigrant demographics in the US, why be against abortion at all? On the contrary, that should be encouraged as much as possible. Let’s face it: we’ll never get rid of all 11 million illegal immigrants in the US. Not that should be used as an excuse for deporting none, but there you go. What’s the next best thing? Assimilation-and demographic control. Push birth control, have the females educated, make sure they don’t marry too young. And this isn’t just an American issue. Personally, I think the best thing you can do for Africa, both for the world and for the quality of life for Africans themselves, is offer $10000 dollars to any man willing to be sterilized, especially if they’ve already had a kid or two.

    I’ve never understood this about the white nationalist-lite Religious Right types, which is why I think white nationalism is just another stupid form of identity politics. It makes zero sense to be against abortion if you actually want to lessen the demographics of those who reproduce the most. (And if, like me, you agree that a nation doesn’t need an ever-expanding populace.)

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    If you want to be realistically cynical, one particular policy you could advocate: Open up even more abortion clinics in the urban areas/inner cities. Open them up a la Starbucks; McDonald's: The goal would be to have at least one clinic on nearly every single street corner. Every single one.

    Then, you get Congress to tie family planning policy directly to welfare; food stamps; unemployment; etc. And have Planned Parenthood directly in charge of helping to implement the policy. Also, promote family planning in pop culture; on urban radio; on urban TV/net streaming shows. Thoroughly saturate the urban areas in the US with the message: Planning is good, AND the free stuff a la welfare; cash in kind benefits; etc. is directly tied to whether or not one agrees to go to clinics for family planning.

    About 10-20 yrs. of implementing these policies, the non-white population should see a direct decrease in overall percentage of US population. Again, follow the McDonald's/Starbucks/Walgreens method: Planning would be on nearly every single street corner of US's urban areas/inner cities. The message would be thoroughy saturated in urban schools; radio; TV/internet. Everywhere, until it became subliminal.

    Any opposition would shrink. After all, the Democrats never found an abortion policy they didn't like, and no one wants to be viewed as racist, what's more compassionate than helping minorities with family planning?

    Every single street corner. And with the government actively promoting family planning while tying it directly to the social programs that minorities receive, 10-20 yrs from now and the results will be substantial.

    That's a realistically cynical policy, and one in which the Democrats would certainly implement as it increases one of their sacred cows (abortion) over more and more of the tax code.

  124. DWB says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    I’m sure this has nothing to do with expecting Señor Martinez to comply with Federal Wage and Hour Laws and pay overtime wages for the 50-65 hours per week they’d be working in excess of the 40 hour standard?
     
    Why the wimp-out?

    Foreigners should be paid overtime starting with the very first hour. See how popular they'll be with employers then.

    Completely agree.

    Here in Silicon Valley, we are treated to an almost steady chorus of “We need more H1-b visas because start up companies will not exist without them” – to the point that it becomes almost ambient noise of the sort one hears when living just behind a freeway sound wall (imagine: “whoooosh” at 30 dB all day long).

    We often hear defenders say that the visas are forced to pay “prevailing wage.”

    THAT is not how economics works. friends. If there is really, truly an urgent need – to the point that we need to create special visas to meet it – then the visas should require that the wages be 100%, 200%, I dunno, you pick, higher than the prevailing wage.

    So, if a so-called “software engineer” (when I was younger, formerly known as a “programmer”) commands a baseline salary of $100,000 per year, and we really cannot get one from the local stock, fine. Grant the company the H1, and require that:

    1) The pay must be not $100k, but $200k
    2) That the visa be portable – if another company wants to offer the visa holder some more money to move, the visa goes with the worker. It does not belong to, say, Mark Zuckerberg.

    Fair?

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    Hear hear, from a young aspiring programmer to an old one.
    , @E. Rekshun
    if a so-called “software engineer” (when I was younger, formerly known as a “programmer”) commands a baseline salary of $100,000 per year, and we really cannot get one from the local stock, fine.

    It's just not believable that out of a country of over 300 million with the best universities in the world, a qualified native-born American could not be found to found to fill any tech job.

    Moreover, one thing I never understood - I've had to undergo a rigorous background check for every software job I've held. How in the world does company X perform any kind of background check on software programmer Patel from India?
  125. DWB says: • Website
    @Whiskey
    Anti-White sentiments are routine. They are baked into the culture of the West, and America in particular. The question is, why?

    The Stormfront argument is "the Jewsssss!!!!! eleventy" and this is also btw the standard Muslim response to any social ill. I would argue that Senor Martinez and his open anti-White sentiments are part of a mating market gone insane.

    What women screen for constantly, and never ever stop even if married, since marriage is merely an at-will employment agreement that can and will be terminated by the woman at any sign of too much beta maleness (or any attention at all by an Alpha) ... is "spot the Alpha Male."

    Thus handicapping White men with the burden of mass Third World immigration makes spotting Alpha males easier. Pretenders are easily separated from contenders. Its not btw earnings that matter -- look at Zuckerberg's wife, who can barely stand him and has more than half his money according to one report. Rather it is Alpha attitude and aggression, and importing lots of hostile Third World Men separates the Pajama Boys from the Hard Men which is all women care about. Hence the anti-White sentiment; a predictable reaction from tingles uber alles that drives women.

    I’m becoming convinced that this “account” is a ‘bot that someone ginned up for laughs.

    No matter the topic, it spews out effluvia about “beta males” and aggressive dating theory BS.

    It used to be kind of funny. But it’s a bit like Carrot Top’s routine – it got old. Quickly.

    • Replies: @Alden
    I agree it's getting old. And with his obsession with black and brown alpha males I believe he is a gay White man whose sexual preference is big strong rough sex blacks and Browns instead of women.
  126. @Seamus Padraig

    Liberals change what they believe all the time. It’s the one constant aobut them. How many of them thought gay marriage was important twenty years ago?
     
    No kidding! I remember back in 1986, when Barbara Jordan was arguing against Reagan's amnesty bill.

    This was a Democratic President. Not even 25 years ago. How times have changed.

    (On the other side, Bush Senior was defeated in part because the neocons in the basement revolted in 1992… because he *refused* to boot the Ba’athists out of Baghdad, knowing full well what that would do to the region. 10 years later…)

    If you go back further… I’ll never understand why, for the love of God, Trump never cited Gompers, or especially Cesar Chavez (added benefit of defusing racism charges), when blasting illegal immigration. You can’t think of a better political juxtaposition for appealing to the American working class-of all races.

  127. Anonymous [AKA "Ed Mckean"] says:

    The real question everybody should be asking is: Why isn’t Oscar Martinez in prison for breaking our labor laws? Here he is, openly admitting that he hires ineligble workers, yet his business is still allowed to exist.

    Why?

  128. @DWB
    Completely agree.

    Here in Silicon Valley, we are treated to an almost steady chorus of "We need more H1-b visas because start up companies will not exist without them" - to the point that it becomes almost ambient noise of the sort one hears when living just behind a freeway sound wall (imagine: "whoooosh" at 30 dB all day long).

    We often hear defenders say that the visas are forced to pay "prevailing wage."

    THAT is not how economics works. friends. If there is really, truly an urgent need - to the point that we need to create special visas to meet it - then the visas should require that the wages be 100%, 200%, I dunno, you pick, higher than the prevailing wage.

    So, if a so-called "software engineer" (when I was younger, formerly known as a "programmer") commands a baseline salary of $100,000 per year, and we really cannot get one from the local stock, fine. Grant the company the H1, and require that:

    1) The pay must be not $100k, but $200k
    2) That the visa be portable - if another company wants to offer the visa holder some more money to move, the visa goes with the worker. It does not belong to, say, Mark Zuckerberg.

    Fair?

    Hear hear, from a young aspiring programmer to an old one.

  129. Boo effing hoo. We’re scaring off all the cheap illegal labor that poor Senor Martinez wants to use instead of paying native-born Americans a decent wage. Just think of what desparate straits Senor Martinez would be in if Mr. Trump actually did something about illegal immigration.

  130. @Reg Cæsar

    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said…
     
    I was going to suggest treating them like Americans. But that might be hard for Señor Martinez to grasp, not being an American himself.

    Americans used to hang drywall. They used to do roofing. Now, in the Chicago area, both those trades are entirely Mexican. I doubt that it’s because Americans ca no longer do those jobs.

  131. @Anon
    Even the average employer gave people Sunday off - Victorian Britain was uber-Christian, Sunday work was just not done and there was opposition even to railways running on a Sunday.

    It was only in the Thatcher years that Sunday started to become just another day for getting and spending in the UK, and even now it's only retail that is really a 7 day thing.

    From the 1960s onwards, the number of part-time jobs has been rapidly increasing at the expense of full-time work. This is the cause of 24-7 retail development.

  132. @Anonymous
    In a country run by people who care about the country, that Martinez guy would be in jail long ago.

    This is how the entire illegal immigration problem can be solved in no time: Start jailing employers who hire illegals. Not the laughable fines but a very real time in the slammer. Will only take less than a year and a few high profile cases.

    Jailing them is definitely the answer. And it will happen only after a popular revolt.

  133. @Guy De Champlaigne
    Trump made it crystal clear with all his terrible corporatist appointments that he's not going after businesses for anything: not environmental abuses, not worker abuses, not financial crimes, not anything.

    As far as I can tell the plan is just to go after a trivial number of immigrants in really stupid public ways and use the over the top media attention to trick his supporters into thinking he's actually tackling the issue.

    If Trump were serious he would be saturating the airwaves with ads about the rewards to people offering tips on the employees and landlords of illegals and the whole anti immigration apparatus would be paying for itself with the massive number of fines being issued.

    Trump is certainly not anti-immigration. Perhaps it was deluded to expect that a billionnaire developer would be. Both of the political parties are full-bore pro-immigration. It appears that a real nationalist movement will have to develop outside of electoral politics.

  134. Just because you can’t get laid doesn’t mean the majority of White men can’t get laid by? with? White women.

    You need to get out more.

  135. @JohnnyD
    Wasn't there a certain Mexican-American labor leader who opposed illegal immigration because it would undercut his workers? Aren't there streets named after this guy?

    Yeah, but that was in the 20th century. You’d have to know about, or study, history–a practice long unfashionable. And those streets named after him? As if anyone can point to a policy behind the newly re-named RFK Bridge in NYC (replacing the Tri-Boro Bridge), or the long ago named Adam Clayton Powell, Jr Blvd (Seventh Ave.) in Harlem.

  136. @DWB
    I'm becoming convinced that this "account" is a 'bot that someone ginned up for laughs.

    No matter the topic, it spews out effluvia about "beta males" and aggressive dating theory BS.

    It used to be kind of funny. But it's a bit like Carrot Top's routine - it got old. Quickly.

    I agree it’s getting old. And with his obsession with black and brown alpha males I believe he is a gay White man whose sexual preference is big strong rough sex blacks and Browns instead of women.

  137. @Bard of Bumperstickers
    The international bankster cartel won WWII.

    They also started it.

    In Wilson’s time.

    And for anyone who cringes from that as hitlernazihitler altright darkweb doom froggery…I was taught that by my grandfather, schooled at West Point and having served in the Spanish-American War.

    He also lost a good chunk of life savings to Executive Order 6102. The aureate bailout of the central banks engineered IIRC by Henry Morgenthau, Jr. You know, Barbara Tuchman’s uncle.

    That’s the problem with this cartel. Periodically they demand you hand everything over to them.

    Which still isn’t enough, they then want all your sons and by extension their families and sons and daughters. Just to level the genetic playing field numbers. While cleaning up on the hemoclysm.

  138. @Hanoi Paris Hilton
    Those rare times I need a rental vehicle, I invariably deal with Enterprise out here in the Chicago far exurbs, and it's definitely staffed by high-responsibility, high-motivation black entrepreneurial (or pre-entrepreneurial) types. Have always been treated very professionally and respectfully. Definitely antidotal to hair-up-as* over dindu outrageousness.

    When I travel by plane I get a package deal plane tickets and car rental. It seems every Enterprise operation in every airport I’ve been in is staffed by good performance blacks.

  139. @res
    Nate Silver's pre-election take is interesting (and highlights his current fallibility, it looks like much of his "genius" was events lining up with his biases): https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/why-the-georgia-special-election-matters/

    Interesting? Convoluted more like it. Silver calls the outcome every possible way. His post is entirely worthless.

    You called it: his so-called genius was events lining up with his preferences. Nothing more than coin-toss precision.

  140. Anon • Disclaimer says: • Website

    and the same people who comment on this article (and seem to understand the issues) will make comments on another article to the effect that the liberals are trying to push communism on us…this is not communism…and the liberals are not communist….the liberal policies (which are shared by the GOP, de facto) are neoliberal and they result in cheap labor and expensive homes and higher corporate profits and higher asset prices…that aint communism…that aint socialism….

    what color is the sky in your world if you think that cheap labor and expensive homes and higher corporate profits and higher asset prices have anything in the world to do with socialism/communism???

  141. @Steve Sailer
    Blacks seem to gravitate toward travel related industries, like working at airports. Early jets were extremely loud so they probably pushed a lot of neighborhoods under flight paths black, like Inglewood under the Los Angeles International descent path.

    But I think blacks and the travel industry go back further, such as to Pullman sleeping car porters in the late 19th Century. Pullman porters formed an elite among African Americans of well-paid, urbane men who traveled the country and saw how things were different in some places.

    Airports are under the EEOC gun like all large enterprises and government involved businesses. At FSO any company that has an airport contract has to have 51 percent non White employees AND 51 percent non
    White ownership.

    I use the term non White rather than minority as it is honest about race replacement. I hate airports. In even the biggest, O’Hare, etc sometimes one doesn’t see a White worker until you get on the plane. Airports are like government buildings, no Whites need apply

    • Replies: @peterike

    In even the biggest, O’Hare, etc sometimes one doesn’t see a White worker until you get on the plane.

     

    Yup. Interestingly, Shake Shack in JFK is 100% black employees (aka 100% diverse), while most of the other places are staffed by various members of the brown to yellow spectrum.
  142. @Jean Ralphio
    It's a good article as far as summarizing what all of us here already know, but his recommendation on how to fix it is "We need immigrants to assimilate so we can convince white people to let more in." He admits that immigrants drive down wages but does not suggest limiting immigration to stop this from happening, and I think he focuses too much on low-skilled immigration.

    “We need immigrants to assimilate so we can convince white people to let more in.”

    That’s the talking point cover for Dems to continue with open borders/looking the other way. We’ll soon be told that assimilation is happening. They’ll gin up some survey material pointing out various anodyne factors such as HS graduation, or language proficiency, or college admissions, or blah, blah, blah, anything that looks like a winning PR strategy. Lather, Rinse, Repeat, until you’re sufficiently re-educated with the current lie.

  143. @Anonymous
    I'm going to have to defend your asshole boss here. That's dangerous work. You don't want snowflakes, slackers or idiots working with you because they could get you killed. Any new guy is going to catch hell from the old hands just as a test of character. You'd do the same in their position.

    Absolutely. Spraying paint in a new employee’s face and threatening to kill them is a just “test of character” and a normal, non-psychotic person would behave exactly the same way.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    He wanted to see how you'd react: whether you'd keep calm - or panic and freak out (and fall off the scaffolding pulling other guys behind you.) Better to learn this when you're both on the ground than 20' up a wall.
  144. @nebulafox
    >What’s slowly been dawning on me is that the GOP has been hornswaggling conservatives into going for social issues like abortion, rather than holding them accountable for HB-1 Visas and other types of immigration-related legislation.

    And presumably, if your goal is to lessen the immigrant demographics in the US, why be against abortion at all? On the contrary, that should be encouraged as much as possible. Let's face it: we'll never get rid of all 11 million illegal immigrants in the US. Not that should be used as an excuse for deporting none, but there you go. What's the next best thing? Assimilation-and demographic control. Push birth control, have the females educated, make sure they don't marry too young. And this isn't just an American issue. Personally, I think the best thing you can do for Africa, both for the world and for the quality of life for Africans themselves, is offer $10000 dollars to any man willing to be sterilized, especially if they've already had a kid or two.

    I've never understood this about the white nationalist-lite Religious Right types, which is why I think white nationalism is just another stupid form of identity politics. It makes zero sense to be against abortion if you actually want to lessen the demographics of those who reproduce the most. (And if, like me, you agree that a nation doesn't need an ever-expanding populace.)

    If you want to be realistically cynical, one particular policy you could advocate: Open up even more abortion clinics in the urban areas/inner cities. Open them up a la Starbucks; McDonald’s: The goal would be to have at least one clinic on nearly every single street corner. Every single one.

    Then, you get Congress to tie family planning policy directly to welfare; food stamps; unemployment; etc. And have Planned Parenthood directly in charge of helping to implement the policy. Also, promote family planning in pop culture; on urban radio; on urban TV/net streaming shows. Thoroughly saturate the urban areas in the US with the message: Planning is good, AND the free stuff a la welfare; cash in kind benefits; etc. is directly tied to whether or not one agrees to go to clinics for family planning.

    About 10-20 yrs. of implementing these policies, the non-white population should see a direct decrease in overall percentage of US population. Again, follow the McDonald’s/Starbucks/Walgreens method: Planning would be on nearly every single street corner of US’s urban areas/inner cities. The message would be thoroughy saturated in urban schools; radio; TV/internet. Everywhere, until it became subliminal.

    Any opposition would shrink. After all, the Democrats never found an abortion policy they didn’t like, and no one wants to be viewed as racist, what’s more compassionate than helping minorities with family planning?

    Every single street corner. And with the government actively promoting family planning while tying it directly to the social programs that minorities receive, 10-20 yrs from now and the results will be substantial.

    That’s a realistically cynical policy, and one in which the Democrats would certainly implement as it increases one of their sacred cows (abortion) over more and more of the tax code.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    Exactly! That's what I thought.

    The really sad part is that I think Trump, left to his own devices, is sufficiently cynical and pragmatic enough to consider this. I don't buy for a second that he is a genuine Religious Right ally, never have: this is the NYC playboy billionaire with three marriages, an endless line of mistresses, and Jewish grandkids, remember? But... Trump probably never expected to be elected, and is naturally lazy and intellectually shallow, so he'll take the easy route of listening to what the GOP leadership says. Which, more often than not, is the exact opposite of what he should do for not just the country, but his own political fortunes.

    Your other note of the US economy returning to 19th century norms is excellent. In general, our elite seem to want a future not of social mobility, but of a stratified caste system that lets have more control, the difference being that the proles get a base income and endless video games, so they don't revolt. To change this, the power balance between our oligarchs and the declining middle class must radically change, and the first step is to halt open immigration, H1B visa program, etc.

  145. @Trelane
    Meanwhile in Japan...

    https://youtu.be/eEzH40l-Dg8?t=9

    And in Hong Kong...

    https://youtu.be/Qd3QDTPgkOg

    And the back lot at Paramount...

    https://youtu.be/YbeyivYA7sI

    Trelane, You know you have a top notch robot when they can learn to speak Japanese…right?

  146. I can tell you right now that this guy is a lying piece of shit. My kid is currently living in Indiana and working construction, carpentry, and they have no problems finding workers.

    maybe if this prick would pay a decent wage he wouldn’t have a problem.

  147. @Anonymous
    This is how you keep the economy going: hire an unlimited stream of illegal immigrants to build homes for an unlimited stream of legal immigrants. Who benefit? The immigrants themselves of course, both legal and illegal, they get to escape the third world hell holes that they helped create, plus a few Americans --- the real estate developers, real estate agents, mortgage brokers, bankers, immigration lawyers, new teachers, administrators, social workers, Democratic party...what a coincidence, all professions dominated by a certain tribe, while other members of the tribe pretend to be journalists and write flat out false stories such as this pointing to fake "studies" of how immigration and multiculturalism benefit the country, to keep the scam going.

    Who loses? Everyone else. We get to see the destruction of our country and our lifestyle in slowmo, lose ever more jobs to cheap foreign labor, watch all the trees in our neighborhood get cut down to make way for more development, get stuck in traffic wherever we go, see our neighborhood go to the dogs with newcomers who don't bother taking care of the yard or the house, live with unpleasant neighbors who don't speak English, don't even say hi, send our kids to schools overcrowded with immigrant kids who don't speak English, have horrible manners and are in gangs, pay ever higher taxes for social services that we don't benefit from and face ever higher crime rate. All while the tribe lords over us telling us this is why diversity is good for us.

    Drywall rotting in the fields . . .

    • Replies: @Henry Bowman
    The meaning of your post?

    Was it to make fun of the idea of "crops rotting in the fields"?
  148. @Paco Wové
    Fifth paragraph from the bottom. It's a direct quote.

    Thanks to you and the others who corrected my overlooking this. You’re right that it’s a direct quote from the article, but not from Martinez. So where did the reporter get his stats? Did the workers themselves tell him? Did he personally clock their hours? Ninety to one hundred and five hours a week sounds suspiciously high to me.

  149. @Jean Ralphio
    Sailer-bait over at The Atlantic:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    I can’t believe the Atlantic published this. Steve should do a post on it. It’s about time someone on the left pointed out how extreme they’ve moved on the issue just within the last 10 years, and their impure motives for doing so (dilution of the franchise of whites and corporate interests).

    When liberals do attempt to compromise on immigration, invariably they suggest amnesty plus an insincere promise for future enforcement. But that is a sucker offer because they get something big and irreversible right away in exchange for an easily broken future commitment.

  150. @Twinkie
    You missed the juicy part at the beginning:

    In 2005, a left-leaning blogger wrote, “Illegal immigration wreaks havoc economically, socially, and culturally; makes a mockery of the rule of law; and is disgraceful just on basic fairness grounds alone.” In 2006, a liberal columnist wrote that “immigration reduces the wages of domestic workers who compete with immigrants” and that “the fiscal burden of low-wage immigrants is also pretty clear.” His conclusion: “We’ll need to reduce the inflow of low-skill immigrants.” That same year, a Democratic senator wrote, “When I see Mexican flags waved at proimmigration demonstrations, I sometimes feel a flush of patriotic resentment. When I’m forced to use a translator to communicate with the guy fixing my car, I feel a certain frustration.”

    The blogger was Glenn Greenwald. The columnist was Paul Krugman. The senator was Barack Obama. [Boldface mine.]
     
    It is a good, and rather honest, article given the source, but unsurprisingly still comes to the wrong conclusion. We all know what the right conclusion is - to reduce immigration, both legal and illegal, dramatically. All the recommendations in this article are fine and dandy, but are marginal at best in the end.

    You missed the juicy part at the beginning

    And the jewciest part of the whole article (emphasis added):

    The problem with [merit based intake], from a liberal perspective, is its cruelty. It denies many immigrants who are already here the ability to reunite with their loved ones. And it flouts the country’s best traditions. Would we remove from the Statue of Liberty the poem welcoming the “poor,” the “wretched,” and the “homeless”?

    • Replies: @FX Enderby
    Yes, let's remove that wretched poem! Jeff Davis & Robert E Lee are getting pulled down. Getting rid of any trace of Emma Lazarus is fair play.
    , @Henry Bowman
    "The problem with [merit based intake], from a liberal perspective, is its cruelty. It denies many immigrants who are already here the ability to reunite with their loved ones. And it flouts the country’s best traditions. Would we remove from the Statue of Liberty the poem welcoming the “poor,” the “wretched,” and the “homeless”?


    Yes, we fucking should.
  151. I’d like to ask Mr. Martinez how is it possible then that two white old school contractors built our 3000+ sq. ft. house in a very difficult place to build (the Bay Area) on time (6 months to the day) and thousands of dollars under budget. No illegals involved at all. They dug trenches, drilled for piers, the whole business. Some kind of miracle I tell you.

  152. Since when does immigration improve labour shortages anyway?

    New Zealand had record immigration last year, yet employers there are complaining of increasing skill shortages. This is because for every immigrant that fills a genuine job vacancy there will be at three others who are simply adding to demand for productive labour (children, wives, eldery and deadbeat relatives, those looking for work in fields without relative labour shortages).

    Hence, if you want more workers you would provide temporary work visas in specific areas of need. And you should only provide temporary visas if there is significant wage inflation. No need for more workers in fields where wages are stagnant.

    Those pushing for more immigration don’t really care that much about real or perceived labour shortages, that’s just a cover story, what they care about is using immigration to increase the size of the economy and make money through real estate sales etc. This is what is keeping the Anglo economies growing despite serious industrial decline.

  153. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    We have blue laws in my county that keep most retail stores closed on Sundays (with exceptions for drug stores, groceries, and liquor stores, I think).

    You’re fortunate. In the UK Sunday is for many the Great Shopping Day Out.

    One of the neat things about Germany and France is that Sundays there are more like a UK Sunday used to be. Most shops are closed and the open ones (convenience stores, chemists) are shut by noon or one. This may well change in France following the election of the globalist candidate, France’s Tony Blair.

  154. @Reg Cæsar

    I’m sure this has nothing to do with expecting Señor Martinez to comply with Federal Wage and Hour Laws and pay overtime wages for the 50-65 hours per week they’d be working in excess of the 40 hour standard?
     
    Why the wimp-out?

    Foreigners should be paid overtime starting with the very first hour. See how popular they'll be with employers then.

    Whenever the subject of H-1B visa up comes I point out the goal is not just to obtain cheap labor but free labor in the form of uncompensated overtime as well.

    One of the supposed benefits that employers gain from the H-1B is not just the uncompensated OT labor from the “non-immigrant” visa holder, but from the citizen STEM worker who feels bullied into working uncompensated OT as well. Fail to work extra hours and come “Rank and Yank” time you be shown the door for letting down the team.

    Also the H-1B has allowed corporate America to employ usually worthless females in middle management roles who help the keep the EEOC gender Marxist rent seekers off their backs.

    Spend all week like Dilbert or Office Space‘s Peter Gibbons in worthless meetings held for the benefit of your female project leader???? Good you can come in on Saturday and attempt to get some real work done when the office is quite and you are left alone.

    Over the long run there is very little correlation between long hours and actual computer programmer productivity and quality. Besides Most STEM workers are capable of about 4-5 hours a day max of concentrated analytical and programming productive time if they can get it during the work week. The rest of day is consumed by administrative tasks and yes some necessary meetings. Expecting anything else over the long haul leads to depression and burn out.

    Unlike lets say using a nail gun for 12 hours a day, I seriously doubt doing a line a coke or meth even in the short run helps one become a more productive computer programmer. You are much better off with some exercise, a social/sex life and a good nights sleep.

    I believe one of the big failings of the H-1B visa program is that it has actually contributed to a dramatic drop in STEM worker productivity per hour worked.

  155. @Thomas
    By the way, I would expect that the solution to optimum hours per week worked depends a great deal on the nature of the job. I would buy 52 hours a week for a manual labor type job (whether construction or even building planes for Lockheed). My guess is the number goes up when you're able to sit down at work.

    Breaks are very important too. Two hours is about the maximum length of time an adult can work before they start slowing down mentally and physically. Expecting people to work continuously for more than three hours in a manual job is a common cause of accidents, physical injury and technical blunders.

  156. @Steve Sailer
    Blacks seem to gravitate toward travel related industries, like working at airports. Early jets were extremely loud so they probably pushed a lot of neighborhoods under flight paths black, like Inglewood under the Los Angeles International descent path.

    But I think blacks and the travel industry go back further, such as to Pullman sleeping car porters in the late 19th Century. Pullman porters formed an elite among African Americans of well-paid, urbane men who traveled the country and saw how things were different in some places.

    As I was reading your reply, at a restaurant across the street from the Stanford football stadium, a guy sits down next to me with a Fuego Maya golf cap. I’d never heard of it. Turns out Pete Dye built a course in Guatemala.

  157. @Twinkie
    You missed the juicy part at the beginning:

    In 2005, a left-leaning blogger wrote, “Illegal immigration wreaks havoc economically, socially, and culturally; makes a mockery of the rule of law; and is disgraceful just on basic fairness grounds alone.” In 2006, a liberal columnist wrote that “immigration reduces the wages of domestic workers who compete with immigrants” and that “the fiscal burden of low-wage immigrants is also pretty clear.” His conclusion: “We’ll need to reduce the inflow of low-skill immigrants.” That same year, a Democratic senator wrote, “When I see Mexican flags waved at proimmigration demonstrations, I sometimes feel a flush of patriotic resentment. When I’m forced to use a translator to communicate with the guy fixing my car, I feel a certain frustration.”

    The blogger was Glenn Greenwald. The columnist was Paul Krugman. The senator was Barack Obama. [Boldface mine.]
     
    It is a good, and rather honest, article given the source, but unsurprisingly still comes to the wrong conclusion. We all know what the right conclusion is - to reduce immigration, both legal and illegal, dramatically. All the recommendations in this article are fine and dandy, but are marginal at best in the end.

    Consider the audience, though. Any stronger and he would be risking excommunication. Maybe the author means every word, as written. I haven’t read this guy enough to really judge. But to me it felt like he shoehorned in some of obligatory talking points just to soften it a bit. If I were a progressive with doubts about the orthodox immigration position, I imagine I would be similarly equivocal.

    • Replies: @FX Enderby
    (((Peter Beinart))) is a well known liar around here. The jist of his ridiculous is-it-good-for-the-tribe? argument is that the goyim are revolting and need to be more carefully watched as their chosen masters dispossess and ultimately destroy them.
  158. @Clyde
    I am going to need a new roof in a few years. All the roofing crews I see here are Central Americans or Mexicans. Can anyone comment on how good or bad their work quality is? Personal experiences with these crews work? Thanks/

    Last month I had a new metal roof put on my 2000 sf two-story home. While the estimator was a regular White guy, the job foreman and entire crew were Mexicans (and there’s really not all that many Mexicans in FL). These guys worked their butts off in the sun and 80 degree heat. They finished in two 12-hour days and the job is high-quality and perfect!

  159. Years ago on blast furnace tear downs we worked 12 hour days for as long as it took to finish the rebuild. You eased into the job with a normal forty hour week as you loaded in equipment and material. You eased out of the job with a normal 40 hour week as you punch listed the job and loaded out. This was extremely hard and dangerous work as the other blast furnaces and steel making processes continued around the shut down furnace. These 7/12s as we called them took a lot out of you. A 15 hour day only leaves you with 9 non work hours, figure in an hour both ways to get to a job and your clean up and eating and you have about 6 hours or less to interact with your family and sleep. I am sure that Mr. Martinez complies with all the Labor, EPA and OSHA regs. that cover his jobs. Instead of carrying water for Mr. Martinez the AP should be calling for an investigation into his business.

  160. @Anon
    multiculturalism is the very essence of modern neoliberalism...that should be obvious to anyone who reads and understands the article sailer discusses here....and yet oddly enough every single commentor here on this page (except me) would agree with this sentence: "multiculturalism is cultural marxism."

    Something does not match up here....

    I blame Jonah Goldberg.

  161. @Dr. X

    A telemarketing call center here (West Corporation?) used to routinely offer “opportunities” for its workers to work 16 hour days. Some random performance auditing of phone calls was done by its managers in the Philippines. To sound a bit old-fashioned, there’s something unsavory about this, something like an inverted colonialism.

     

    I recently needed to contact Verizon customer service... they were all subcontinental Indians, with obvious accents -- in India.

    Wonder what they're getting paid, and how many hours they're working, while Verizon rips me off?

    The management types I know these days are pretty much uniformly contemptuous of American workers regardless of individual or unit performance. Our overlords see only wage spreads—say, $30 an hour in the Midwest, $22 an hour in the South, $6 an hour (?) in Mexico, and $1 or $2 an hour in China or India. It’s astounding to hear someone barely a generation removed from his own family’s ignorance and poverty sniff, “Look at how much those people make.” As I mentioned, there’s something deeply unsavory about all this.

  162. @anonymous-antiskynetist
    Next thing, everyone is going to start talking about how unions maybe didn't ruin America after all, and might have been a good thing.

    Next thing, everyone is going to start talking about how unions maybe didn’t ruin America after all, and might have been a good thing.

    You don’t get how it works do you?

    Unions were the exact same con – “vote for us and we’ll loot your employer and give it to you in the form of ‘wages’ that you don’t earn – they’re rich anyway and the rich don’t do anything”. Unfortunately that con ended because everyone ends up poor and miserable. Now they’re much smarter – they just import voters who don’t care about poverty because it’s a step up from what they’re used to but make no mistake – it’s the exact same con.

  163. @Dave Pinsen
    We have blue laws in my county that keep most retail stores closed on Sundays (with exceptions for drug stores, groceries, and liquor stores, I think).

    I lived in Colorado and Texas when they both had blue laws. I liked them. People don’t have to go shopping every day.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    There's a perennial debate about whether blue laws make Saturday traffic worse, because everyone jams their shopping into that day. Really, though, I think there are just too many people here. An immigration moratorium for a few years would make this area more pleasant. People leave, but the population keeps getting replenished by immigration.
    , @E. Rekshun
    I lived in Colorado and Texas when they both had blue laws. I liked them. People don’t have to go shopping every day.

    I agree and I remember the same in Massachusetts. But, on the other hand, I guess letting the retailers open up shop on Sunday created a lot of minimum wage jobs for high school kids (40 years ago).
  164. @Twinkie
    You missed the juicy part at the beginning:

    In 2005, a left-leaning blogger wrote, “Illegal immigration wreaks havoc economically, socially, and culturally; makes a mockery of the rule of law; and is disgraceful just on basic fairness grounds alone.” In 2006, a liberal columnist wrote that “immigration reduces the wages of domestic workers who compete with immigrants” and that “the fiscal burden of low-wage immigrants is also pretty clear.” His conclusion: “We’ll need to reduce the inflow of low-skill immigrants.” That same year, a Democratic senator wrote, “When I see Mexican flags waved at proimmigration demonstrations, I sometimes feel a flush of patriotic resentment. When I’m forced to use a translator to communicate with the guy fixing my car, I feel a certain frustration.”

    The blogger was Glenn Greenwald. The columnist was Paul Krugman. The senator was Barack Obama. [Boldface mine.]
     
    It is a good, and rather honest, article given the source, but unsurprisingly still comes to the wrong conclusion. We all know what the right conclusion is - to reduce immigration, both legal and illegal, dramatically. All the recommendations in this article are fine and dandy, but are marginal at best in the end.

    You can add Senator Harry Reid to that list. From a comment on that article:

    Reid introduced a bill on Aug. 4, 1993, the Immigration Stabilization Act of 1993 (S.1351), which would have ended birthright citizenship (an idea he called “insane”), clamped down on asylum seekers (very pertinent to World Trade Center bombing), expanded deportation of criminal aliens, increased penalties on re-entries and visa fraud, and excluded all legal immigrants from admission who “cannot demonstrably support themselves without public or private assistance.”

    In a press release unveiling the bill, Reid noted the following:

    “Our borders have overflowed with illegal immigrants placing tremendous burdens on our criminal justice system, schools and social programs. The Immigration and Naturalization Service needs the ability to step up enforcement. “Our federal wallet is stretched to the limit by illegal aliens getting welfare, food stamps, medical care and other benefits often without paying any taxes. “Safeguards like welfare and free medical care are in place to boost Americans in need of short-term assistance. These programs were not meant to entice freeloaders and scam artists from around the world.”

    He added this Trumpesque line:

    “Even worse, Americans have seen heinous crimes committed by individuals who are here illegally.”

    • Replies: @FX Enderby
    Saw a contrite Harry Reid on C-Span around 2002 crying about how his wife chastised him for being against open borders and that now thanks to his wife he had seen the light and was now in favor of endless mass immigration (or something). Thought, gee that's weird, is his wife Mexican wtf?

    Later found out that Reid's wife is Jewish. Oh, she "converted" to Mormon but remains a strongly self identified Jewess, involved in Jewish organizations - proudly involved with fundraisers and so forth. Now we know how such a punch drunk zero got so far in DC. Do the tribe's bidding and there isno limit to how far you can go. Certainly not your natural abilities or intellect.
  165. @Anonymous
    I'm going to have to defend your asshole boss here. That's dangerous work. You don't want snowflakes, slackers or idiots working with you because they could get you killed. Any new guy is going to catch hell from the old hands just as a test of character. You'd do the same in their position.

    I think the guy was just off his meds…

  166. @Libtard hypocrisy
    What else do you expect from a journalist named Meredith HOFFMAN? Like the NYT article today on Dallas School integration by Dana GOLDSTEIN...the Jew World Order is in full effect. These people will not stop until they completely wreck the west with "multiculturalism" and "diversity" aka the black and brown horde.

    This is the real story behind the real estate boom in America - bring in unlimited number of Central Americans to build new homes for the unlimited number of Indians and Chinese who came in on H1B, EB5, F1, OPT, completely wreck the environment while the Jewish realtors and immigration lawyers collect all the fat fees from everybody.

    Time to go…I think you must be late for your Bund meeting.

    • Replies: @Henry Bowman
    The truth always gets out, do not like it? Return to what ever 3rd world slum your parents escaped from.
  167. @stillCARealist
    remember: Hispanics hire Hispanics. Mostly they hire from extended family and in-laws. This way there's a sense of obligation to the employer and to each other to work as much as possible. Are you really going to go off to lunch when your brother-in-law is sneering at your wimpiness? Also, if you get hurt, are you going to make a worker's comp claim against your cousin's business?

    the Americans this guy is talking about are most likely Mexican-Americans and not part of his clan. They didn't feel the blood calling and insisted on taking breaks and having lunch.

    the Americans this guy is talking about are most likely Mexican-Americans and not part of his clan.

    I think this is it exactly. The lazy Americans that Martinez is insulting aren’t White, they’re second generation Mexicans.

  168. @DWB
    Completely agree.

    Here in Silicon Valley, we are treated to an almost steady chorus of "We need more H1-b visas because start up companies will not exist without them" - to the point that it becomes almost ambient noise of the sort one hears when living just behind a freeway sound wall (imagine: "whoooosh" at 30 dB all day long).

    We often hear defenders say that the visas are forced to pay "prevailing wage."

    THAT is not how economics works. friends. If there is really, truly an urgent need - to the point that we need to create special visas to meet it - then the visas should require that the wages be 100%, 200%, I dunno, you pick, higher than the prevailing wage.

    So, if a so-called "software engineer" (when I was younger, formerly known as a "programmer") commands a baseline salary of $100,000 per year, and we really cannot get one from the local stock, fine. Grant the company the H1, and require that:

    1) The pay must be not $100k, but $200k
    2) That the visa be portable - if another company wants to offer the visa holder some more money to move, the visa goes with the worker. It does not belong to, say, Mark Zuckerberg.

    Fair?

    if a so-called “software engineer” (when I was younger, formerly known as a “programmer”) commands a baseline salary of $100,000 per year, and we really cannot get one from the local stock, fine.

    It’s just not believable that out of a country of over 300 million with the best universities in the world, a qualified native-born American could not be found to found to fill any tech job.

    Moreover, one thing I never understood – I’ve had to undergo a rigorous background check for every software job I’ve held. How in the world does company X perform any kind of background check on software programmer Patel from India?

    • Replies: @DWB
    No, of course it's not believable. We are being fed a steady stream of low-grade bullshit by people who want to squeeze as much for themselves as possible by rent-seeking and capturing the political class.

    It's really that simple.

    In plain, economic terms, there is never really a 'shortage' of anything that can be created. If one can make one widget, one can make two, or three, or a thousand.

    The issue is, there are not enough of widgets available at the price that buyer X wants to pay.

    There is no "shortage", for example, of McLaren super cars.

    Here, if Zuckerberg or any other software bigshot really needs to find the top talent, he can try $100,000. If he cannot pull the talent he needs, he can try $150, or $200. Or, they can offer other incentives.

    They do not want to do that because it means less for them - less cash, less stock, and ultimately, less control. THAT is the real issue with the damned stock options. If the CEO of a start-up (sic) has to dilute his shares beyond a certain point, he no longer gets to run the company like his own private Idaho.

    In terms of the "no one will clean hotel rooms or pick strawberries," if someone were willing to offer me a half million dollars a year, I will go clean hotel rooms. I suspect that there are plenty of people willing to clean a toilet for substantially less than that.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    How in the world does company X perform any kind of background check on software programmer Patel from India?
     
    When my employer hired Somalis and other African refugees back in the '90s, the speed bump then was we needed to give five, and for some sensitive areas, ten, years' addresses on the application forms for clearance. Good luck with those!

    Today it's much easier. Their addresses for the last two decades now have a 55xxx Zip Code.
  169. @Clyde
    I am going to need a new roof in a few years. All the roofing crews I see here are Central Americans or Mexicans. Can anyone comment on how good or bad their work quality is? Personal experiences with these crews work? Thanks/

    Who cares? If all the roofing crews are from down there, it doesn’t matter how competent they are. On the other hand, if not all the crews are from down there, then you have a patriotic duty to “buy American” regardless of work quality. So, it doesn’t matter.

  170. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. ..."

    So roughly half a work day in his world is about 8hrs per day.

    To be fair, I think in the era of Dickens and Andrew Carnegie the average US industrial worker did work about 14hrs per day, oftentimes six days a week. So Martinez is just returning to historical norms of 19th century.

    MA19thcGA.

  171. If you cannot pay a decent wage you should put your pos business out of it’s misery.

  172. @Anonymous
    Amazing how the Japanese don't have any shortage of workers willing to build houses.

    Actually, I believe Chinese are being brought in to do some construction work. E.g., in preparation for the 2020 Olympics (which, by the way, needs to be outstanding in every way, or it will ruin brand Japan, which they can’t afford).

    You have to remember that while Abe and Japanese politicians are subject to idiosyncracies of being Japanese, Japan is highly integrated with the world economy and therefore the elites are subject to influence from outside too.

    Japan’s loosening visa standards and attempts to change Article 9 point to the current gov’t being the Jap version of invade/invite.

  173. @syonredux
    A surprisingly good article in immigration in the Atlantic

    Prominent liberals didn’t oppose immigration a decade ago. Most acknowledged its benefits to America’s economy and culture. They supported a path to citizenship for the undocumented. Still, they routinely asserted that low-skilled immigrants depressed the wages of low-skilled American workers and strained America’s welfare state. And they were far more likely than liberals today are to acknowledge that, as Krugman put it, “immigration is an intensely painful topic … because it places basic principles in conflict.”
     

    Today, little of that ambivalence remains. In 2008, the Democratic platform called undocumented immigrants “our neighbors.” But it also warned, “We cannot continue to allow people to enter the United States undetected, undocumented, and unchecked,” adding that “those who enter our country’s borders illegally, and those who employ them, disrespect the rule of the law.” By 2016, such language was gone. The party’s platform described America’s immigration system as a problem, but not illegal immigration itself. And it focused almost entirely on the forms of immigration enforcement that Democrats opposed. In its immigration section, the 2008 platform referred three times to people entering the country “illegally.” The immigration section of the 2016 platform didn’t use the word illegal, or any variation of it, at all.
     

    “A decade or two ago,” says Jason Furman, a former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, “Democrats were divided on immigration. Now everyone agrees and is passionate and thinks very little about any potential downsides.” How did this come to be?
     

    A larger explanation is political. Between 2008 and 2016, Democrats became more and more confident that the country’s growing Latino population gave the party an electoral edge. To win the presidency, Democrats convinced themselves, they didn’t need to reassure white people skeptical of immigration so long as they turned out their Latino base. “The fastest-growing sector of the American electorate stampeded toward the Democrats this November,” Salon declared after Obama’s 2008 win. “If that pattern continues, the GOP is doomed to 40 years of wandering in a desert.”
     

    This combination of Latino and corporate activism made it perilous for Democrats to discuss immigration’s costs, as Bernie Sanders learned the hard way. In July 2015, two months after officially announcing his candidacy for president, Sanders was interviewed by Ezra Klein, the editor in chief of Vox. Klein asked whether, in order to fight global poverty, the U.S. should consider “sharply raising the level of immigration we permit, even up to a level of open borders.” Sanders reacted with horror. “That’s a Koch brothers proposal,” he scoffed. He went on to insist that “right-wing people in this country would love … an open-border policy. Bring in all kinds of people, work for $2 or $3 an hour, that would be great for them. I don’t believe in that. I think we have to raise wages in this country.”
     

    Sanders came under immediate attack. Vox’s Dylan Matthews declared that his “fear of immigrant labor is ugly—and wrongheaded.” The president of FWD.us accused Sanders of “the sort of backward-looking thinking that progressives have rightly moved away from in the past years.” ThinkProgress published a blog post titled “Why Immigration Is the Hole in Bernie Sanders’ Progressive Agenda.” The senator, it argued, was supporting “the idea that immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs and hurting the economy, a theory that has been proven incorrect.”
     

    Sanders stopped emphasizing immigration’s costs. By January 2016, FWD.us’s policy director noted with satisfaction that he had “evolved on this issue.”

    But has the claim that “immigrants coming to the U.S. are taking jobs” actually been proved “incorrect”? A decade ago, liberals weren’t so sure. In 2006, Krugman wrote that America was experiencing “large increases in the number of low-skill workers relative to other inputs into production, so it’s inevitable that this means a fall in wages.”

    It’s hard to imagine a prominent liberal columnist writing that sentence today. To the contrary, progressive commentators now routinely claim that there’s a near-consensus among economists on immigration’s benefits.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/07/the-democrats-immigration-mistake/528678/

    I was just checking to see if anybody here had referenced the article. It’s pretty funny to read it with Sailer Goggles on.

    A condensed version: “Hey, guys, it turns out immigration actually SUCKS for most citizens! Except, well…shit. We’ve kind of painted ourselves into a corner. Hmmmm. Maybe we should try some tougher-sounding slogans — not that we really mean them! But it’s become clear that The Multicultural Future is not arriving on the expected timetable, so we’re gonna have to slap something together here to get us through the last stretch.”

    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    Even shorter version:

    "The sunk-cost fallacy in action."
  174. @Trelane
    Meanwhile in Japan...

    https://youtu.be/eEzH40l-Dg8?t=9

    And in Hong Kong...

    https://youtu.be/Qd3QDTPgkOg

    And the back lot at Paramount...

    https://youtu.be/YbeyivYA7sI

    If engineering nerds had a better sense of humor/irony and were more self-aware, they would make Schwarzenegger ‘bots and be embarassed to be pursuing escort ‘bots.

    On the other hand, maybe the rise of escort ‘bots will prevent western-style feminist entitlement from spreading to Asia.

  175. @Clyde
    I am going to need a new roof in a few years. All the roofing crews I see here are Central Americans or Mexicans. Can anyone comment on how good or bad their work quality is? Personal experiences with these crews work? Thanks/

    23 Clyde > I am going to need a new roof in a few years.

    A properly done roof will last until your great-great-great grandchildren sell the place.

    The best investment is in learning how to do it yourself. I bet your local public library and youtube can teach you everything you need to know.

    If you REALLY want to help your kids…. teach THEM to do it.

  176. @Mr. Blank
    I was just checking to see if anybody here had referenced the article. It's pretty funny to read it with Sailer Goggles on.

    A condensed version: "Hey, guys, it turns out immigration actually SUCKS for most citizens! Except, well...shit. We've kind of painted ourselves into a corner. Hmmmm. Maybe we should try some tougher-sounding slogans — not that we really mean them! But it's become clear that The Multicultural Future is not arriving on the expected timetable, so we're gonna have to slap something together here to get us through the last stretch."

    Even shorter version:

    “The sunk-cost fallacy in action.”

  177. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You missed the juicy part at the beginning
     
    And the jewciest part of the whole article (emphasis added):

    The problem with [merit based intake], from a liberal perspective, is its cruelty. It denies many immigrants who are already here the ability to reunite with their loved ones. And it flouts the country’s best traditions. Would we remove from the Statue of Liberty the poem welcoming the “poor,” the “wretched,” and the “homeless”?
     

    Yes, let’s remove that wretched poem! Jeff Davis & Robert E Lee are getting pulled down. Getting rid of any trace of Emma Lazarus is fair play.

  178. @gregor
    Consider the audience, though. Any stronger and he would be risking excommunication. Maybe the author means every word, as written. I haven't read this guy enough to really judge. But to me it felt like he shoehorned in some of obligatory talking points just to soften it a bit. If I were a progressive with doubts about the orthodox immigration position, I imagine I would be similarly equivocal.

    (((Peter Beinart))) is a well known liar around here. The jist of his ridiculous is-it-good-for-the-tribe? argument is that the goyim are revolting and need to be more carefully watched as their chosen masters dispossess and ultimately destroy them.

  179. @Jimi

    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …
     
    Unsaid a "Half a day" is 10 hours without breaks.

    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …

    Unsaid a “Half a day” is 10 hours without breaks.

    Employer also ignores workplace safety regulations and doesn’t pay overtime. Workers must be complicit in various false reporting activities as well. Not too hard when workers don’t know building codes, employment regulations, or even the language. The only reason he wants to hire these people is that they are entirely powerless. They can’t complain or expect legal treatment.

    It is disgusting. And the establishment Republicans support and facilitate it.

    This reminds me of the journalist who kept an old woman as a slave in Seattle (or Portland). You would think that a guy wouldn’t be advertising that he violates all manner of employment regulations far beyond hiring illegal aliens. You would think the journalist might be appalled at the employer’s wanton violations of employee rights, but no, scum “progressive” lackeys don’t care how badly anyone else is treated. And we thought they were just insensitive to their enemies. Nah, they couldn’t care less about those they hope will create permanent Democrat rule and fags über alles.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Also, discount tree trimmers: one illegal alien up in the tree with a chain saw, three illegal aliens underneath picking up branches as they fall. Number of hard hats worn: zero.

    There are trees rotting in the yards because American hard hats demand to wear hard hats while doing hard hat work.

    , @Jimi
    Here in NYC the law requires asbestos testing before any construction or demolition work. If asbestos is found, licensed workers with masks and safety suits remove the asbestos.

    Unscrupulous landlords and developers get around this by hiring illegal immigrants to just rip out the asbestos with nothing more than their hands (maybe latex gloves) and definitely no respiratory protection.
  180. @ben tillman
    You can add Senator Harry Reid to that list. From a comment on that article:


    Reid introduced a bill on Aug. 4, 1993, the Immigration Stabilization Act of 1993 (S.1351), which would have ended birthright citizenship (an idea he called “insane”), clamped down on asylum seekers (very pertinent to World Trade Center bombing), expanded deportation of criminal aliens, increased penalties on re-entries and visa fraud, and excluded all legal immigrants from admission who “cannot demonstrably support themselves without public or private assistance.”

    In a press release unveiling the bill, Reid noted the following:

    "Our borders have overflowed with illegal immigrants placing tremendous burdens on our criminal justice system, schools and social programs. The Immigration and Naturalization Service needs the ability to step up enforcement. "Our federal wallet is stretched to the limit by illegal aliens getting welfare, food stamps, medical care and other benefits often without paying any taxes. "Safeguards like welfare and free medical care are in place to boost Americans in need of short-term assistance. These programs were not meant to entice freeloaders and scam artists from around the world.”

    He added this Trumpesque line:

    "Even worse, Americans have seen heinous crimes committed by individuals who are here illegally."
     

    Saw a contrite Harry Reid on C-Span around 2002 crying about how his wife chastised him for being against open borders and that now thanks to his wife he had seen the light and was now in favor of endless mass immigration (or something). Thought, gee that’s weird, is his wife Mexican wtf?

    Later found out that Reid’s wife is Jewish. Oh, she “converted” to Mormon but remains a strongly self identified Jewess, involved in Jewish organizations – proudly involved with fundraisers and so forth. Now we know how such a punch drunk zero got so far in DC. Do the tribe’s bidding and there isno limit to how far you can go. Certainly not your natural abilities or intellect.

  181. @Jim Don Bob
    I lived in Colorado and Texas when they both had blue laws. I liked them. People don't have to go shopping every day.

    There’s a perennial debate about whether blue laws make Saturday traffic worse, because everyone jams their shopping into that day. Really, though, I think there are just too many people here. An immigration moratorium for a few years would make this area more pleasant. People leave, but the population keeps getting replenished by immigration.

  182. @Joe Schmoe



    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …

     

    Unsaid a “Half a day” is 10 hours without breaks.
     
    Employer also ignores workplace safety regulations and doesn't pay overtime. Workers must be complicit in various false reporting activities as well. Not too hard when workers don't know building codes, employment regulations, or even the language. The only reason he wants to hire these people is that they are entirely powerless. They can't complain or expect legal treatment.

    It is disgusting. And the establishment Republicans support and facilitate it.

    This reminds me of the journalist who kept an old woman as a slave in Seattle (or Portland). You would think that a guy wouldn't be advertising that he violates all manner of employment regulations far beyond hiring illegal aliens. You would think the journalist might be appalled at the employer's wanton violations of employee rights, but no, scum "progressive" lackeys don't care how badly anyone else is treated. And we thought they were just insensitive to their enemies. Nah, they couldn't care less about those they hope will create permanent Democrat rule and fags über alles.

    Also, discount tree trimmers: one illegal alien up in the tree with a chain saw, three illegal aliens underneath picking up branches as they fall. Number of hard hats worn: zero.

    There are trees rotting in the yards because American hard hats demand to wear hard hats while doing hard hat work.

  183. @kaganovitch
    Enterprise hires almost exclusively college jocks. Back when I was a district manager,I used to rent from Enterprise around sixty times a year over a 3 state area. In that time I met 2 Enterprise employees who were not college jocks of one sort or another. Some were baseball players, some were female golfers etc. If you hire from that cohort you are going to end up with lots of blacks, unless you have a corporate deathwish and wish to engage in protracted litigation with EEOC and DOJ with the attendant negative publicity etc.

    If you watch the NCAA basketball tournament, they brag about this.

  184. @Dave Pinsen
    We have blue laws in my county that keep most retail stores closed on Sundays (with exceptions for drug stores, groceries, and liquor stores, I think).

    Liquor stores are controlled by municipal ordinance. Some towns allow all sales after noon. Others don’t allow hard liquor sales at all.

    A town like Teaneck is interesting because many of its stores are closed on Saturday as well because of the Jewish population.

    I think the only NJ-wide blue law is against car sales.

  185. @Alden
    Airports are under the EEOC gun like all large enterprises and government involved businesses. At FSO any company that has an airport contract has to have 51 percent non White employees AND 51 percent non
    White ownership.

    I use the term non White rather than minority as it is honest about race replacement. I hate airports. In even the biggest, O'Hare, etc sometimes one doesn't see a White worker until you get on the plane. Airports are like government buildings, no Whites need apply

    In even the biggest, O’Hare, etc sometimes one doesn’t see a White worker until you get on the plane.

    Yup. Interestingly, Shake Shack in JFK is 100% black employees (aka 100% diverse), while most of the other places are staffed by various members of the brown to yellow spectrum.

  186. @res

    Are there a significant number of black airplane pilots?
     
    Come on Opinionater. At least try searching for yourself first.

    https://www.quora.com/How-many-black-airline-pilots-are-there-in-the-US

    He calls himself ” opinionator ” , but really he should be called ” human questionnaire ” .

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @res
    When he first showed up here he went through a period of deciding whether to be "Opinionator" or "Questionator." I think he chose incorrectly.
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/wsj-the-plot-against-america/#comment-1618548
  187. @Guy De Champlaigne
    Owen left his mill in Scotland to found a (failed) utopian community in Indiana. The idea behind utopian socialism was that these small scale successes would grow and attract more and more people until people simply abandoned traditional capitalism. This didn't work and Marx specifically defines communism against this in the Communist Manifesto.

    I think it's hard to compare this guy to anyone in the nineteenth century because ultimately the way he treats his employees is going to be tied to the economy and welfare state as it exists today (e.g. it's more humane to injure someone when they'll just get free medical treatment than if they'll starve)

    But the larger point being, perhaps regarding some aspects of the economy, the US is returning to 19th century norms? After all, in the late 19th century we had a fairly large immigration boom which over time caused unexpected competition for jobs for the native born workers (e.g. CA’s immigration laws vs the Chinese were meant to keep them out and protect native CA workers’s jobs). Then as now, the US didn’t have a labor shortage, they had an abundance of cheap labor, and a large part of that was supplied by immigration.

    How do you think that Carnegie; Rockefeller; and the other titans of big industry were able to amass such large fortunes (for their time)? And remember, there wasn’t a minimum wage; no benefits; no pensions; unions were barely allowed to organize. And the great Magnates were greatly helped by an abundance of cheap labor, a significant part of it coming from immigrants.

    Much like in 2017 America.

  188. @Opinionator
    Are there a significant number of black airplane pilots?

    The link you provided propagates a false story about Ann Coulter. What else is false in it?

    In any case, in the context of Steve’s comment about the travel industry, my question was referring to commercial airline pilots. Do your statistics, true or not, speak to that?

    Have you ever flown aboard a commercial airliner that was piloted by an African American? Steve observes that they gravitate to the travel industry.

  189. @res

    Are there a significant number of black airplane pilots?
     
    Come on Opinionater. At least try searching for yourself first.

    https://www.quora.com/How-many-black-airline-pilots-are-there-in-the-US

    The link you provided propagates a false story about Ann Coulter. What else is false in it?

    In any case, in the context of Steve’s comment about the travel industry, my question was referring to commercial airline pilots. Do your statistics, true or not, speak to that?

    Have you ever flown on a commercial airliner that was piloted by an African American? Steve comments that they gravitate to the travel industry.

    • Replies: @res
    That was my last response to a question of yours. Thanks for preventing me wasting my time on you in the future.
  190. @anon
    He calls himself " opinionator " , but really he should be called " human questionnaire " .

    When he first showed up here he went through a period of deciding whether to be “Opinionator” or “Questionator.” I think he chose incorrectly.
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/wsj-the-plot-against-america/#comment-1618548

  191. @Clyde

    Over a million illegal alien invaders in Texas? There are only 1.3 million people in New Hampshire. The Chamber of Commerce types who support mass immigration really do only think of cheap labor and toilet paper.
     
    We are still a manufacturing super power when it comes to disposable plastic diapers and toilet paper. To keep it real the messy soiled diapers must be tossed in the parking lot of the store where you (illegal alien) just bought groceries with your wiped EBT card. Illegal aliens boost those two manufacturing sectors and real estate prices in certain states/areas.

    You ever run over a full, loaded Diaper that has been roasting in the sun all afternoon? That smell will change your views on life, race, immigration, taxes, property rights, etc.

    Its like a life altering event that itself seems bigger then the outcome you might think possible.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Diapers rotting in the parking lot.
  192. @Jim Don Bob
    I lived in Colorado and Texas when they both had blue laws. I liked them. People don't have to go shopping every day.

    I lived in Colorado and Texas when they both had blue laws. I liked them. People don’t have to go shopping every day.

    I agree and I remember the same in Massachusetts. But, on the other hand, I guess letting the retailers open up shop on Sunday created a lot of minimum wage jobs for high school kids (40 years ago).

  193. @Charles Pewitt
    "We're more concerned about the buying power of this population," she said, pointing to the estimated 1.1 million people in Texas who are living in the U.S. illegally, second only to California. "When you have over a million people not feeling welcome they'll move somewhere they are welcome."

    Over a million illegal alien invaders in Texas? There are only 1.3 million people in New Hampshire. The Chamber of Commerce types who support mass immigration really do only think of cheap labor and toilet paper.

    Texas is moving away from open borders free trade and open borders mass immigration. The battle to control the Texas GOP between the open borders globalizers and the pro-sovereignty patriots is going to be bloody. How can the cheap labor crowd win this fight to control the Texas GOP? It seems that the cheap labor crowd in the Texas Chamber of Commerce will be wiped out.

    As they fucking well should….They get to pocket money, passing off the costs/burdens on to you and me, “the little people”.

    They get to live in massive, newly build mansions, in gated suburbs, drive the newest cars, have the greatest healthcare plans, send their kids to the best private schools, and if you dare try to climb the ladder via hard work you are some how “less then noting”, if you oppose the continuation of their rack, the theft of our nation and the end of our people we are some how “trash”….

    The base has show its naked hate for us, wish us to “just die” as they can not justifying our existence if it means one less Yacht for them.

    The GOPe/Neo Cons are finished.

  194. @2Mintzin1
    Time to go...I think you must be late for your Bund meeting.

    The truth always gets out, do not like it? Return to what ever 3rd world slum your parents escaped from.

  195. @Jim Don Bob
    Drywall rotting in the fields . . .

    The meaning of your post?

    Was it to make fun of the idea of “crops rotting in the fields”?

  196. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You missed the juicy part at the beginning
     
    And the jewciest part of the whole article (emphasis added):

    The problem with [merit based intake], from a liberal perspective, is its cruelty. It denies many immigrants who are already here the ability to reunite with their loved ones. And it flouts the country’s best traditions. Would we remove from the Statue of Liberty the poem welcoming the “poor,” the “wretched,” and the “homeless”?
     

    “The problem with [merit based intake], from a liberal perspective, is its cruelty. It denies many immigrants who are already here the ability to reunite with their loved ones. And it flouts the country’s best traditions. Would we remove from the Statue of Liberty the poem welcoming the “poor,” the “wretched,” and the “homeless”?

    Yes, we fucking should.

  197. @Anon
    Absolutely. Spraying paint in a new employee's face and threatening to kill them is a just "test of character" and a normal, non-psychotic person would behave exactly the same way.

    He wanted to see how you’d react: whether you’d keep calm – or panic and freak out (and fall off the scaffolding pulling other guys behind you.) Better to learn this when you’re both on the ground than 20′ up a wall.

  198. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    If you want to be realistically cynical, one particular policy you could advocate: Open up even more abortion clinics in the urban areas/inner cities. Open them up a la Starbucks; McDonald's: The goal would be to have at least one clinic on nearly every single street corner. Every single one.

    Then, you get Congress to tie family planning policy directly to welfare; food stamps; unemployment; etc. And have Planned Parenthood directly in charge of helping to implement the policy. Also, promote family planning in pop culture; on urban radio; on urban TV/net streaming shows. Thoroughly saturate the urban areas in the US with the message: Planning is good, AND the free stuff a la welfare; cash in kind benefits; etc. is directly tied to whether or not one agrees to go to clinics for family planning.

    About 10-20 yrs. of implementing these policies, the non-white population should see a direct decrease in overall percentage of US population. Again, follow the McDonald's/Starbucks/Walgreens method: Planning would be on nearly every single street corner of US's urban areas/inner cities. The message would be thoroughy saturated in urban schools; radio; TV/internet. Everywhere, until it became subliminal.

    Any opposition would shrink. After all, the Democrats never found an abortion policy they didn't like, and no one wants to be viewed as racist, what's more compassionate than helping minorities with family planning?

    Every single street corner. And with the government actively promoting family planning while tying it directly to the social programs that minorities receive, 10-20 yrs from now and the results will be substantial.

    That's a realistically cynical policy, and one in which the Democrats would certainly implement as it increases one of their sacred cows (abortion) over more and more of the tax code.

    Exactly! That’s what I thought.

    The really sad part is that I think Trump, left to his own devices, is sufficiently cynical and pragmatic enough to consider this. I don’t buy for a second that he is a genuine Religious Right ally, never have: this is the NYC playboy billionaire with three marriages, an endless line of mistresses, and Jewish grandkids, remember? But… Trump probably never expected to be elected, and is naturally lazy and intellectually shallow, so he’ll take the easy route of listening to what the GOP leadership says. Which, more often than not, is the exact opposite of what he should do for not just the country, but his own political fortunes.

    Your other note of the US economy returning to 19th century norms is excellent. In general, our elite seem to want a future not of social mobility, but of a stratified caste system that lets have more control, the difference being that the proles get a base income and endless video games, so they don’t revolt. To change this, the power balance between our oligarchs and the declining middle class must radically change, and the first step is to halt open immigration, H1B visa program, etc.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Trump may be intellectually lazy but he's not lazy as far as work goes. This is a man who averages about 5hrs of sleep per night. Despite his popular reputation as a party-hardy playboy, Trump actually puts in time in the office. He didn't become a billionaire without putting in the time. In other words, first one to work and last one to leave. And remember, its well established that he doesn't drink or take drugs.

    The one thing he still has going for him are his instincts. IF he perceives that the GOP establishment is trying to sell him out, he'll pivot himself to go back to doing what got him elected: Make America Great Again, and he'll take it to the people directly.

    Now that he's in, you think he doesn't think he can't get re-elected? As Chuck Noll used to say "Whatever it takes."

    Start building the Wall, Mr. President. And bring back Chris Bannon. Also try once in a while to bring the First Lady to the White House. Could be a secondary help in times like these.
  199. @nebulafox
    Exactly! That's what I thought.

    The really sad part is that I think Trump, left to his own devices, is sufficiently cynical and pragmatic enough to consider this. I don't buy for a second that he is a genuine Religious Right ally, never have: this is the NYC playboy billionaire with three marriages, an endless line of mistresses, and Jewish grandkids, remember? But... Trump probably never expected to be elected, and is naturally lazy and intellectually shallow, so he'll take the easy route of listening to what the GOP leadership says. Which, more often than not, is the exact opposite of what he should do for not just the country, but his own political fortunes.

    Your other note of the US economy returning to 19th century norms is excellent. In general, our elite seem to want a future not of social mobility, but of a stratified caste system that lets have more control, the difference being that the proles get a base income and endless video games, so they don't revolt. To change this, the power balance between our oligarchs and the declining middle class must radically change, and the first step is to halt open immigration, H1B visa program, etc.

    Trump may be intellectually lazy but he’s not lazy as far as work goes. This is a man who averages about 5hrs of sleep per night. Despite his popular reputation as a party-hardy playboy, Trump actually puts in time in the office. He didn’t become a billionaire without putting in the time. In other words, first one to work and last one to leave. And remember, its well established that he doesn’t drink or take drugs.

    The one thing he still has going for him are his instincts. IF he perceives that the GOP establishment is trying to sell him out, he’ll pivot himself to go back to doing what got him elected: Make America Great Again, and he’ll take it to the people directly.

    Now that he’s in, you think he doesn’t think he can’t get re-elected? As Chuck Noll used to say “Whatever it takes.”

    Start building the Wall, Mr. President. And bring back Chris Bannon. Also try once in a while to bring the First Lady to the White House. Could be a secondary help in times like these.

  200. @Henry Bowman
    You ever run over a full, loaded Diaper that has been roasting in the sun all afternoon? That smell will change your views on life, race, immigration, taxes, property rights, etc.

    Its like a life altering event that itself seems bigger then the outcome you might think possible.

    Diapers rotting in the parking lot.

    • Replies: @Henry Bowman
    Its a powerful experience.
  201. DWB says: • Website
    @E. Rekshun
    if a so-called “software engineer” (when I was younger, formerly known as a “programmer”) commands a baseline salary of $100,000 per year, and we really cannot get one from the local stock, fine.

    It's just not believable that out of a country of over 300 million with the best universities in the world, a qualified native-born American could not be found to found to fill any tech job.

    Moreover, one thing I never understood - I've had to undergo a rigorous background check for every software job I've held. How in the world does company X perform any kind of background check on software programmer Patel from India?

    No, of course it’s not believable. We are being fed a steady stream of low-grade bullshit by people who want to squeeze as much for themselves as possible by rent-seeking and capturing the political class.

    It’s really that simple.

    In plain, economic terms, there is never really a ‘shortage’ of anything that can be created. If one can make one widget, one can make two, or three, or a thousand.

    The issue is, there are not enough of widgets available at the price that buyer X wants to pay.

    There is no “shortage”, for example, of McLaren super cars.

    Here, if Zuckerberg or any other software bigshot really needs to find the top talent, he can try $100,000. If he cannot pull the talent he needs, he can try $150, or $200. Or, they can offer other incentives.

    They do not want to do that because it means less for them – less cash, less stock, and ultimately, less control. THAT is the real issue with the damned stock options. If the CEO of a start-up (sic) has to dilute his shares beyond a certain point, he no longer gets to run the company like his own private Idaho.

    In terms of the “no one will clean hotel rooms or pick strawberries,” if someone were willing to offer me a half million dollars a year, I will go clean hotel rooms. I suspect that there are plenty of people willing to clean a toilet for substantially less than that.

  202. @Another Canadian
    I visited the Museum of Crime and Punishment in Rothenberg, Germany. They had a poster of office rules from the 19th century:

    https://lorneanderson.com/2016/09/19/rules-for-work/amp/

    I liked the part about personnel bringing 4 pounds of coal daily in the winter.

    I went there, too! My last trip to Germany before the New Year Cologne vibrancy love-a-thon happened. Great museum!

  203. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Diapers rotting in the parking lot.

    Its a powerful experience.

  204. @Opinionator
    The link you provided propagates a false story about Ann Coulter. What else is false in it?

    In any case, in the context of Steve’s comment about the travel industry, my question was referring to commercial airline pilots. Do your statistics, true or not, speak to that?

    Have you ever flown on a commercial airliner that was piloted by an African American? Steve comments that they gravitate to the travel industry.

    That was my last response to a question of yours. Thanks for preventing me wasting my time on you in the future.

  205. @E. Rekshun
    if a so-called “software engineer” (when I was younger, formerly known as a “programmer”) commands a baseline salary of $100,000 per year, and we really cannot get one from the local stock, fine.

    It's just not believable that out of a country of over 300 million with the best universities in the world, a qualified native-born American could not be found to found to fill any tech job.

    Moreover, one thing I never understood - I've had to undergo a rigorous background check for every software job I've held. How in the world does company X perform any kind of background check on software programmer Patel from India?

    How in the world does company X perform any kind of background check on software programmer Patel from India?

    When my employer hired Somalis and other African refugees back in the ’90s, the speed bump then was we needed to give five, and for some sensitive areas, ten, years’ addresses on the application forms for clearance. Good luck with those!

    Today it’s much easier. Their addresses for the last two decades now have a 55xxx Zip Code.

  206. @Guy De Champlaigne
    Trump made it crystal clear with all his terrible corporatist appointments that he's not going after businesses for anything: not environmental abuses, not worker abuses, not financial crimes, not anything.

    As far as I can tell the plan is just to go after a trivial number of immigrants in really stupid public ways and use the over the top media attention to trick his supporters into thinking he's actually tackling the issue.

    If Trump were serious he would be saturating the airwaves with ads about the rewards to people offering tips on the employees and landlords of illegals and the whole anti immigration apparatus would be paying for itself with the massive number of fines being issued.

    Actually, Trump doesn’t have to do it. Good enough if he just lets us do it.

  207. @Another Canadian
    I visited the Museum of Crime and Punishment in Rothenberg, Germany. They had a poster of office rules from the 19th century:

    https://lorneanderson.com/2016/09/19/rules-for-work/amp/

    I liked the part about personnel bringing 4 pounds of coal daily in the winter.

    the Museum of Crime and Punishment in Rothenberg, Germany.

    Prof van der Poel’s tax museum in Rotterdam would be a good addition to anyone’s Eurocrime itinerary.

  208. @Joe Schmoe



    “The Americans I hire can’t last in this job more than half a day,” Martinez said. …

     

    Unsaid a “Half a day” is 10 hours without breaks.
     
    Employer also ignores workplace safety regulations and doesn't pay overtime. Workers must be complicit in various false reporting activities as well. Not too hard when workers don't know building codes, employment regulations, or even the language. The only reason he wants to hire these people is that they are entirely powerless. They can't complain or expect legal treatment.

    It is disgusting. And the establishment Republicans support and facilitate it.

    This reminds me of the journalist who kept an old woman as a slave in Seattle (or Portland). You would think that a guy wouldn't be advertising that he violates all manner of employment regulations far beyond hiring illegal aliens. You would think the journalist might be appalled at the employer's wanton violations of employee rights, but no, scum "progressive" lackeys don't care how badly anyone else is treated. And we thought they were just insensitive to their enemies. Nah, they couldn't care less about those they hope will create permanent Democrat rule and fags über alles.

    Here in NYC the law requires asbestos testing before any construction or demolition work. If asbestos is found, licensed workers with masks and safety suits remove the asbestos.

    Unscrupulous landlords and developers get around this by hiring illegal immigrants to just rip out the asbestos with nothing more than their hands (maybe latex gloves) and definitely no respiratory protection.

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