The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Amy Wax to Debate Reparations at the Comedy Cellar
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

THE UNDERGROUND DEBATE SERIES – LIVE AT THE VILLAGE UNDERGROUND

Comedy Cellar
117 MacDougal Street
New York, NY 10012
Monday, July 22, 2019
Showtime: 8:00PM (seating begins 1 hour prior to showtime)
Price: $40.00
Qty:

JAMIL SMITH:

Jamil Smith is a Senior Writer at Rolling Stone, where he covers national affairs and culture. His career has run the gamut from politics to sports and back again, from Emmy Award-winning work as a producer with NFL Films and MSNBC to reporting and commentary for The New Republic and MTV News, where he also hosted podcasts. His work has been featured on the cover of Time, on the airwaves at WNYC and KCRW, and on the opinion pages of the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Washington Post.

COLEMAN HUGHES:

Coleman Hughes is an undergraduate philosophy major at Columbia University and columnist for Quillette magazine. His writing has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, City Journal, and the Spectator.

AMY L. WAX:

Amy L. Wax, the Robert Mundheim Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, teaches remedies, conservative political and legal thought, social welfare law and policy, and the law and economics of work and family. A graduate of Yale College, Harvard Medical School, and Columbia Law School, she served as an Assistant to the Solicitor General in the United States Department of Justice from 1988 to 1994, where she argued 15 cases before the United States Supreme Court. She has published widely in law reviews and journals of opinion, including the Wall Street Journal, Policy Review, Commentary, American Affairs, National Affairs, The New Criterion, National Review, and First Things. She is the author of Race, Wrongs, and Remedies (2009 Hoover Press).

JOHN TORPEY:

John Torpey is the Presidential Professor of Sociology and History and Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center, CUNY. He is the author or editor of ten books, including The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship, and the State (2000; 2nd ed. 2018); Making Whole What Has Been Smashed: On Reparations Politics (2006; re-issued 2017); Transformations of Warfare in the Contemporary World (edited with David Jacobson, 2016); Legal Integration of Islam: A Transatlantic Comparison (with Christian Joppke, 2013); Old Europe, New Europe, Core Europe: Transatlantic Relations after the Iraq War (2005); and Intellectuals, Socialism, and Dissent: The East German Opposition and its Legacy (1995). He has written for the San Francisco Chronicle, The Nation, The Hill.com, Times Higher Education Supplement, Huffington Post, The Conversation, openDemocracy, and many other publications. During 2016-17, Mr. Torpey was president of the Eastern Sociological Society.

Moderated by: DAVID PLOTZ

David Plotz is the CEO of Atlas Obscura and host of the popular and long-running podcast, The Slate Political Gabfest. He is the former Editor-in-Chief of Slate Magazine.

 
Hide 80 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. They’re gonna need a bigger venue.

  2. That sounds great! Was there once, fun vibe and very small and tight. Will there by a 2 drink minimum? Isn’t Coleman too young to be in a drinking establishment?

    Hope some New Yorkers reading will go and show support.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    In case you aren't being facetious, you can be under 21 and still work in a bar.

    It's moot in this case, as Coleman a 24-year-old undergrad.
  3. With a lineup like this, surely we’ll get to the bottom of this important question.

    • LOL: HammerJack
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    I've already gotten to the bottom of it: it's being debated, so it is going to happen. "Democracy" and "justice" have no limiting principles.
    , @Anon

    With a lineup like this, surely we’ll get to the bottom of this important question.
     
    In a real democracy, rather than one in which values are dictated to the nation by the CIA involved and Jewish owned Press, the discussion would be over whether or not the question was important.
  4. John Torpey is the Presidential Professor of Sociology and History and Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies

    Sounds like he’s got his undies in a Bunche.

    • LOL: Alden
    • Replies: @bomag
    Isn't there some kind of rule where the more pretentious the title, the more useless the work?
  5. No reparations without repatriations.

    • Agree: Clyde, DCThrowback
  6. If the ticket price was $10 I would go, but by setting the ticket price at $40, you literally are only going to get true believers in the audience.

    • Replies: @Spangel
    Lol, you know 40 bucks is chump change for a lot of single professionals in manahattan. They spend more on a cocktail for brunch.

    I’ll go. Sounds fun.
  7. “Come and see it. You’re gonna plotz!”

    – Moderator David

  8. Anon[294] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    The New York Times does a surprisingly exhaustive take on the Raining Tacos homeless controversy in Florida:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/18/us/baby-shark-homeless.html

    The guy has done his research:

    And businesses around the country have resorted to auditory deterrents to drive people away, from high-pitched beeping to recordings of chain saws [false range error … but the Times fired their copyeditors] — and even to classical music. A number of cities have outfitted parks and public spaces with devices that blast a high-frequency sound that only teenagers and young people can hear.

    https://news.streetroots.org/2019/01/30/7-eleven-blasts-high-pitched-sound-repel-homeless

    https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/Amplified-blare-rousts-Civic-s-homeless-campers-3526273.php

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/bach-at-the-burger-king/#!

    https://www.inquirer.com/philly/news/20140404_Buzzing_machines_at_rec_center_help_prevent_vandalism.html

    I’ve thought a lot about this, and I think the best soundtrack is something that you cannot ignore, something that jumps to the front of your mind easily. A steady beat, however loud, doesn’t do that. Some concrete ideas:

    — Modern music with arhythmical and changing time signatures, like Derek Bourgeois’s Serenade that starts in the subliminally annoying 11/8, then doubles down by changing to 13/8.

    — Culturally annoying music: Tricky, because rap is annoying to many whites, while Bach baroqure harpsichord is annoying to many blacks.

    — Spoken word, especially after the absence of spoken word. I find certain Australian and British accents very annoying and hard to ignore because I have to concentrate to understand them. My mind is forced to listen closely. You could commission custom tapes of Australians reading English text that doesn’t completely make sense, so no matter how hard you listen you’ll never understand it. This Florida facility could even have ads for itself, cleverly varied each time that you’d notice.

    — Subject matter that is distressing. Anything medical to a hypochondriac, for example. Homeless people are probably worried about many things. Research that and make tapes where such topics are discussed. Medical, family matters, psychological problems, ways that people screw up their lives. Try to get under their skin. Killing Me Softly tactics.

    — Variety, changing volumes, occasional screams or animal howls, “Sir, your Uber is here,” mix it up.

    With surveillance cameras you could have real-time pseudo-A.I. watching the surroundings to A-B test and vary the mix to maximize obnoxiousness. Or give a real A.I. a sound library and leave it up to it to make the whole soundtrack while watching the results.

    • Replies: @Days of Broken Arrows
    The music you're looking for is: Capt. Beefheart's "Trout Mask Replica" and "Lick My Decals Off, Baby" and Ruth White's "The Flowers Of Evil."
    , @Another Canadian
    The Toronto shopping centre at 10 Dundas East has settled on a street broadcast of the CBC classical music channel to deter homeless spillover from the Toronto Public Health needle exchange at Dundas Square. The theory appears to be that a disordered mind is repulsed by the order of classical music composition.
    , @Expletive Deleted

    You could commission custom tapes of Australians reading English text that doesn’t completely make sense
     
    There are whole image boards full of that stuff.

    https://i.warosu.org/data/ic/thumb/0025/45/1464849951203s.jpg
    , @J.Ross
    a high-frequency sound that only teenagers and young people can hear.

    Ah, that must be the appealing aspect of dubstep.
    , @Alden
    Some cities are getting rid of bus benches at the request of business owners and pedestrians. The homeless live on the bus benches annoying every passer by. So people avoid the businesses. There’s hardly any bus benches left in Beverly Hills despite buses every 15 minutes in the main streets.
    The absolute biggest draw for obnoxious homeless is the combination of a 7/11 with a bus bench in front. They beg change from 7/11 customers buy their food malt liquor and lottery tickets at the 7/11 and destroy the intersection
  9. Amy Wax just came out with a very good paper on why immigration restriction is a good thing, right-wing, white supremacists notwithstanding. I really hope that someone would dare challenge her in an open forum on this matter.

    • Replies: @216
    There is untold millions, if not probably billions, of dollars on the table for anyone willing to shill for mass immigration.

    No one is getting billionaire cash to oppose immigration.

    Every foolish college student sponsored by National Review can easily see that Oliver Darcy was well-rewarded to switch sides, while Katie McHugh was destroyed for going further right before her recent groveling.
  10. While Coleman Hughes has done a fine job at presenting himself, he’s also a fucking undergrad under 24 years old. And he will be sharing the stage with a law professor from a t14 school.

    To the degree that his act is opportunistic, it is working. He is the Barack Obama of the right. He could be the first black president from the GOP.

    • Replies: @Anon
    I have really admired Hughes's writing, but when he appeared on Glenn Loury's Bloggingheads show a few weeks back, Loury, who mostly agrees with him, easily had him on the run on any issue he disagreed on. So Hughes is still a little green. Loury is a really smart, well-read guy, but Wax is smarter and more well read. Wax has the secret weopon of seeming like a slightly ditzy grandmother for the first minute or so, and then you realize she has suddenly chopped the head off of her inquisitor.
    , @Known Fact
    I'd never heard of him but you could not come up with a central-casting name more dripping in black gravitas -- think Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, Langston Hughes ... (on the other hand there's Gary Coleman and Choo Choo Coleman)
    , @NOTA
    Yeah, Hughes is a smart guy, but he's overexposed and probably underprepared. Hopefully he can avoid the Ta-Nahisi Coates curse of being univesally hailed as a genius for being a pretty good writer with a good head on his shoulderswho is saying the right things. TNC got way less interesting as a writer once he got legions of admirers telling him his sh-t didn't stink. I hope the same fate doesn't befall Coleman Hughes.
  11. Meh, I saw Amy Wax on youtube interviewed by Adam Serwer. She was pretty underwhelming. Maybe just not good at thinking on her feet.

  12. @Anon
    OT

    The New York Times does a surprisingly exhaustive take on the Raining Tacos homeless controversy in Florida:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/18/us/baby-shark-homeless.html

    The guy has done his research:

    And businesses around the country have resorted to auditory deterrents to drive people away, from high-pitched beeping to recordings of chain saws [false range error ... but the Times fired their copyeditors] — and even to classical music. A number of cities have outfitted parks and public spaces with devices that blast a high-frequency sound that only teenagers and young people can hear.

    https://news.streetroots.org/2019/01/30/7-eleven-blasts-high-pitched-sound-repel-homeless

    https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/Amplified-blare-rousts-Civic-s-homeless-campers-3526273.php

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/bach-at-the-burger-king/#!

    https://www.inquirer.com/philly/news/20140404_Buzzing_machines_at_rec_center_help_prevent_vandalism.html
     
    I've thought a lot about this, and I think the best soundtrack is something that you cannot ignore, something that jumps to the front of your mind easily. A steady beat, however loud, doesn't do that. Some concrete ideas:

    -- Modern music with arhythmical and changing time signatures, like Derek Bourgeois's Serenade that starts in the subliminally annoying 11/8, then doubles down by changing to 13/8.

    -- Culturally annoying music: Tricky, because rap is annoying to many whites, while Bach baroqure harpsichord is annoying to many blacks.

    -- Spoken word, especially after the absence of spoken word. I find certain Australian and British accents very annoying and hard to ignore because I have to concentrate to understand them. My mind is forced to listen closely. You could commission custom tapes of Australians reading English text that doesn't completely make sense, so no matter how hard you listen you'll never understand it. This Florida facility could even have ads for itself, cleverly varied each time that you'd notice.

    -- Subject matter that is distressing. Anything medical to a hypochondriac, for example. Homeless people are probably worried about many things. Research that and make tapes where such topics are discussed. Medical, family matters, psychological problems, ways that people screw up their lives. Try to get under their skin. Killing Me Softly tactics.

    -- Variety, changing volumes, occasional screams or animal howls, "Sir, your Uber is here," mix it up.

    With surveillance cameras you could have real-time pseudo-A.I. watching the surroundings to A-B test and vary the mix to maximize obnoxiousness. Or give a real A.I. a sound library and leave it up to it to make the whole soundtrack while watching the results.

    The music you’re looking for is: Capt. Beefheart’s “Trout Mask Replica” and “Lick My Decals Off, Baby” and Ruth White’s “The Flowers Of Evil.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    What, no Dave Brubeck?
    , @Expletive Deleted
    Anything by Gilad's old mucker, Robert "Bobby" Wyatt.
    A way of trolling (and possibly emptying) a whole pub back in the days of jukeboxes (some still have a modern version), and known quite simply as "wyatting". Just preload the same track over and over.

    https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Wyatting
    , @larry lurker
    I'll see your Trout Mask Replica and raise you Ben Johnston's microtonal String Quartet No. 7:

    https://youtu.be/Wp7VjBtOJ74
  13. 216 says:
    @Daniel H
    Amy Wax just came out with a very good paper on why immigration restriction is a good thing, right-wing, white supremacists notwithstanding. I really hope that someone would dare challenge her in an open forum on this matter.

    There is untold millions, if not probably billions, of dollars on the table for anyone willing to shill for mass immigration.

    No one is getting billionaire cash to oppose immigration.

    Every foolish college student sponsored by National Review can easily see that Oliver Darcy was well-rewarded to switch sides, while Katie McHugh was destroyed for going further right before her recent groveling.

  14. Pardon my language, but Amy Wax has more balls than the professional conservatives. I just hope she’s not professional ruined by the SJW Mob calling for her head.

    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/u-penn-professor-faces-backlash-for-allegedly-saying-us-would-be-better-off-with-more-whites-and-fewer-nonwhites-220301733.html

    • Replies: @Jim bob Lassiter
    Wax is tenured. The worst thing (arguably legal) they can do is put her in a rubber room during what would be her normal class lecture time slots and continue paying her compensation package while her case winds through the courts.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    I'm gurssing that taking part in an event like this means she is beyond worrying about professional ruination.

    She is not a savior, but she is an important figure because (((she))) is, unusually, on our side. If she keeps this up, maybe (((other academics))) will start telling the truth too.
    , @Alden
    Is it UPenn or Temple that’s located in one of the most dangerous black ghettoes in the country?

    Amazing how the profs and even worse diversity coordinators at Columbia Yale University of Chicago USC and other schools whose surroundings are the most dangerous in the country continue to love black criminals and hate law abiding Whites.
  15. @Days of Broken Arrows
    The music you're looking for is: Capt. Beefheart's "Trout Mask Replica" and "Lick My Decals Off, Baby" and Ruth White's "The Flowers Of Evil."

    What, no Dave Brubeck?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    The Swingle Singers too.
  16. John Torpey is the Presidential Professor of Sociology and History and Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the Graduate Center, CUNY

    I suspect there’s an inverse relation between the length of the title and the utility of the position it describes.

    • Agree: bomag, Mr. Anon, Jim Don Bob
  17. @Lot
    That sounds great! Was there once, fun vibe and very small and tight. Will there by a 2 drink minimum? Isn’t Coleman too young to be in a drinking establishment?

    Hope some New Yorkers reading will go and show support.

    In case you aren’t being facetious, you can be under 21 and still work in a bar.

    It’s moot in this case, as Coleman a 24-year-old undergrad.

  18. Is the Reparations surcharge already included in the $40? This was usually the case when I went to something on Broadway that was to benefit some worthy cause.

  19. @Reg Cæsar
    What, no Dave Brubeck?

    The Swingle Singers too.

  20. So, is this the “alternative comedy” I’ve heard of?

  21. Anon[294] • Disclaimer says:
    @bucky
    While Coleman Hughes has done a fine job at presenting himself, he's also a fucking undergrad under 24 years old. And he will be sharing the stage with a law professor from a t14 school.

    To the degree that his act is opportunistic, it is working. He is the Barack Obama of the right. He could be the first black president from the GOP.

    I have really admired Hughes’s writing, but when he appeared on Glenn Loury’s Bloggingheads show a few weeks back, Loury, who mostly agrees with him, easily had him on the run on any issue he disagreed on. So Hughes is still a little green. Loury is a really smart, well-read guy, but Wax is smarter and more well read. Wax has the secret weopon of seeming like a slightly ditzy grandmother for the first minute or so, and then you realize she has suddenly chopped the head off of her inquisitor.

  22. • Replies: @TWS
    That's good old fashioned nightmare fuel.
  23. Does she wear a wig? Or is it only ultraorthdox women who do that?

  24. @JohnnyD
    Pardon my language, but Amy Wax has more balls than the professional conservatives. I just hope she's not professional ruined by the SJW Mob calling for her head.

    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/u-penn-professor-faces-backlash-for-allegedly-saying-us-would-be-better-off-with-more-whites-and-fewer-nonwhites-220301733.html

    Wax is tenured. The worst thing (arguably legal) they can do is put her in a rubber room during what would be her normal class lecture time slots and continue paying her compensation package while her case winds through the courts.

  25. @Reg Cæsar

    John Torpey is the Presidential Professor of Sociology and History and Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies
     
    Sounds like he's got his undies in a Bunche.

    Isn’t there some kind of rule where the more pretentious the title, the more useless the work?

  26. Won’t happen. Leftist / Anarchist/ antifa will shut it down

  27. I second International Jew’s remark—her resume is shockingly impressive. Her abilities in a face-to-face debate are completely underwhelming, at least when she’s on bloggingheads.tv. She’s no better than Mona Charon — both are paralyzed by their squareness.

  28. @Anon
    OT

    The New York Times does a surprisingly exhaustive take on the Raining Tacos homeless controversy in Florida:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/18/us/baby-shark-homeless.html

    The guy has done his research:

    And businesses around the country have resorted to auditory deterrents to drive people away, from high-pitched beeping to recordings of chain saws [false range error ... but the Times fired their copyeditors] — and even to classical music. A number of cities have outfitted parks and public spaces with devices that blast a high-frequency sound that only teenagers and young people can hear.

    https://news.streetroots.org/2019/01/30/7-eleven-blasts-high-pitched-sound-repel-homeless

    https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/Amplified-blare-rousts-Civic-s-homeless-campers-3526273.php

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/bach-at-the-burger-king/#!

    https://www.inquirer.com/philly/news/20140404_Buzzing_machines_at_rec_center_help_prevent_vandalism.html
     
    I've thought a lot about this, and I think the best soundtrack is something that you cannot ignore, something that jumps to the front of your mind easily. A steady beat, however loud, doesn't do that. Some concrete ideas:

    -- Modern music with arhythmical and changing time signatures, like Derek Bourgeois's Serenade that starts in the subliminally annoying 11/8, then doubles down by changing to 13/8.

    -- Culturally annoying music: Tricky, because rap is annoying to many whites, while Bach baroqure harpsichord is annoying to many blacks.

    -- Spoken word, especially after the absence of spoken word. I find certain Australian and British accents very annoying and hard to ignore because I have to concentrate to understand them. My mind is forced to listen closely. You could commission custom tapes of Australians reading English text that doesn't completely make sense, so no matter how hard you listen you'll never understand it. This Florida facility could even have ads for itself, cleverly varied each time that you'd notice.

    -- Subject matter that is distressing. Anything medical to a hypochondriac, for example. Homeless people are probably worried about many things. Research that and make tapes where such topics are discussed. Medical, family matters, psychological problems, ways that people screw up their lives. Try to get under their skin. Killing Me Softly tactics.

    -- Variety, changing volumes, occasional screams or animal howls, "Sir, your Uber is here," mix it up.

    With surveillance cameras you could have real-time pseudo-A.I. watching the surroundings to A-B test and vary the mix to maximize obnoxiousness. Or give a real A.I. a sound library and leave it up to it to make the whole soundtrack while watching the results.

    The Toronto shopping centre at 10 Dundas East has settled on a street broadcast of the CBC classical music channel to deter homeless spillover from the Toronto Public Health needle exchange at Dundas Square. The theory appears to be that a disordered mind is repulsed by the order of classical music composition.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    the order of classical music composition.
     
    What is the argument that classical music is more "ordered" (whatever that means) than other music?
  29. So the public face of the anti-reparations movement are a black man and a Jewess?

  30. @JohnnyD
    Pardon my language, but Amy Wax has more balls than the professional conservatives. I just hope she's not professional ruined by the SJW Mob calling for her head.

    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/u-penn-professor-faces-backlash-for-allegedly-saying-us-would-be-better-off-with-more-whites-and-fewer-nonwhites-220301733.html

    I’m gurssing that taking part in an event like this means she is beyond worrying about professional ruination.

    She is not a savior, but she is an important figure because (((she))) is, unusually, on our side. If she keeps this up, maybe (((other academics))) will start telling the truth too.

  31. White dupes are going to pay forty dollars for the show? What a scam!

    Will any blacks even show up with forty dollars? Will they get “comped” instead?

    • Replies: @c matt
    Blacks only pay $20 per new protocols.
  32. @Anon
    OT

    The New York Times does a surprisingly exhaustive take on the Raining Tacos homeless controversy in Florida:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/18/us/baby-shark-homeless.html

    The guy has done his research:

    And businesses around the country have resorted to auditory deterrents to drive people away, from high-pitched beeping to recordings of chain saws [false range error ... but the Times fired their copyeditors] — and even to classical music. A number of cities have outfitted parks and public spaces with devices that blast a high-frequency sound that only teenagers and young people can hear.

    https://news.streetroots.org/2019/01/30/7-eleven-blasts-high-pitched-sound-repel-homeless

    https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/Amplified-blare-rousts-Civic-s-homeless-campers-3526273.php

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/bach-at-the-burger-king/#!

    https://www.inquirer.com/philly/news/20140404_Buzzing_machines_at_rec_center_help_prevent_vandalism.html
     
    I've thought a lot about this, and I think the best soundtrack is something that you cannot ignore, something that jumps to the front of your mind easily. A steady beat, however loud, doesn't do that. Some concrete ideas:

    -- Modern music with arhythmical and changing time signatures, like Derek Bourgeois's Serenade that starts in the subliminally annoying 11/8, then doubles down by changing to 13/8.

    -- Culturally annoying music: Tricky, because rap is annoying to many whites, while Bach baroqure harpsichord is annoying to many blacks.

    -- Spoken word, especially after the absence of spoken word. I find certain Australian and British accents very annoying and hard to ignore because I have to concentrate to understand them. My mind is forced to listen closely. You could commission custom tapes of Australians reading English text that doesn't completely make sense, so no matter how hard you listen you'll never understand it. This Florida facility could even have ads for itself, cleverly varied each time that you'd notice.

    -- Subject matter that is distressing. Anything medical to a hypochondriac, for example. Homeless people are probably worried about many things. Research that and make tapes where such topics are discussed. Medical, family matters, psychological problems, ways that people screw up their lives. Try to get under their skin. Killing Me Softly tactics.

    -- Variety, changing volumes, occasional screams or animal howls, "Sir, your Uber is here," mix it up.

    With surveillance cameras you could have real-time pseudo-A.I. watching the surroundings to A-B test and vary the mix to maximize obnoxiousness. Or give a real A.I. a sound library and leave it up to it to make the whole soundtrack while watching the results.

    You could commission custom tapes of Australians reading English text that doesn’t completely make sense

    There are whole image boards full of that stuff.

  33. @Days of Broken Arrows
    The music you're looking for is: Capt. Beefheart's "Trout Mask Replica" and "Lick My Decals Off, Baby" and Ruth White's "The Flowers Of Evil."

    Anything by Gilad’s old mucker, Robert “Bobby” Wyatt.
    A way of trolling (and possibly emptying) a whole pub back in the days of jukeboxes (some still have a modern version), and known quite simply as “wyatting”. Just preload the same track over and over.

    https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Wyatting

  34. Will the show’s profits go to the descendants of slaves or instead go to the venue’s ownership that is of a certain (surprise!) ethnicity?

  35. @Clifford Brown
    If the ticket price was $10 I would go, but by setting the ticket price at $40, you literally are only going to get true believers in the audience.

    Lol, you know 40 bucks is chump change for a lot of single professionals in manahattan. They spend more on a cocktail for brunch.

    I’ll go. Sounds fun.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I’ll go. Sounds fun.
     
    We await your report.
  36. Interesting. The biographies are not listed alphabetically, but rather black-to-white.

    Two Blacks, a Jew, and an Irishman debate about whether WASPS should pay reparations. Nice to know that my interests will be represented.

  37. @trelane
    With a lineup like this, surely we'll get to the bottom of this important question.

    I’ve already gotten to the bottom of it: it’s being debated, so it is going to happen. “Democracy” and “justice” have no limiting principles.

  38. The moderator is a former editor for Slate? Well that’s fair.

  39. So the nay side is represented by a black/Puerto Rican and a Jew. Moderator is a Jew.

    No thanks. This is the kind of garbage we don’t need. We need white Europeans advocating for our own interests. I am not going to cheer these kinds of false flag token conservatives.

    This is just neoconservatism2.0. Anything that is not about white identity is part of the problem at this point. We are losing not because we don’t have enough arguments against reparations or immigration but because whites don’t have racial consciousness. We are at a point where no more progress can be made without changing that. Without racial consciousness, conservatives will stay trapped in “Democrats are the real racists” and Israel First forever as the demographics get worse and worse.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    So the nay side is represented by a black/Puerto Rican and a Jew. Moderator is a Jew.
     
    Do you know that the black/Puerto Rican isn't also Jewish, as Ocasio-Cortez is?
  40. @Anon
    OT

    The New York Times does a surprisingly exhaustive take on the Raining Tacos homeless controversy in Florida:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/18/us/baby-shark-homeless.html

    The guy has done his research:

    And businesses around the country have resorted to auditory deterrents to drive people away, from high-pitched beeping to recordings of chain saws [false range error ... but the Times fired their copyeditors] — and even to classical music. A number of cities have outfitted parks and public spaces with devices that blast a high-frequency sound that only teenagers and young people can hear.

    https://news.streetroots.org/2019/01/30/7-eleven-blasts-high-pitched-sound-repel-homeless

    https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/Amplified-blare-rousts-Civic-s-homeless-campers-3526273.php

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/bach-at-the-burger-king/#!

    https://www.inquirer.com/philly/news/20140404_Buzzing_machines_at_rec_center_help_prevent_vandalism.html
     
    I've thought a lot about this, and I think the best soundtrack is something that you cannot ignore, something that jumps to the front of your mind easily. A steady beat, however loud, doesn't do that. Some concrete ideas:

    -- Modern music with arhythmical and changing time signatures, like Derek Bourgeois's Serenade that starts in the subliminally annoying 11/8, then doubles down by changing to 13/8.

    -- Culturally annoying music: Tricky, because rap is annoying to many whites, while Bach baroqure harpsichord is annoying to many blacks.

    -- Spoken word, especially after the absence of spoken word. I find certain Australian and British accents very annoying and hard to ignore because I have to concentrate to understand them. My mind is forced to listen closely. You could commission custom tapes of Australians reading English text that doesn't completely make sense, so no matter how hard you listen you'll never understand it. This Florida facility could even have ads for itself, cleverly varied each time that you'd notice.

    -- Subject matter that is distressing. Anything medical to a hypochondriac, for example. Homeless people are probably worried about many things. Research that and make tapes where such topics are discussed. Medical, family matters, psychological problems, ways that people screw up their lives. Try to get under their skin. Killing Me Softly tactics.

    -- Variety, changing volumes, occasional screams or animal howls, "Sir, your Uber is here," mix it up.

    With surveillance cameras you could have real-time pseudo-A.I. watching the surroundings to A-B test and vary the mix to maximize obnoxiousness. Or give a real A.I. a sound library and leave it up to it to make the whole soundtrack while watching the results.

    a high-frequency sound that only teenagers and young people can hear.

    Ah, that must be the appealing aspect of dubstep.

  41. The only real value of the reparations discussion is the opportunity it gives to Black grievance jihadis to stick it it to the Man. It’s year-round Black History month. By stirring up white guilt, it’s the gift that keeps on giving. Guilt is gelt, brothas and sistas.

  42. @bucky
    While Coleman Hughes has done a fine job at presenting himself, he's also a fucking undergrad under 24 years old. And he will be sharing the stage with a law professor from a t14 school.

    To the degree that his act is opportunistic, it is working. He is the Barack Obama of the right. He could be the first black president from the GOP.

    I’d never heard of him but you could not come up with a central-casting name more dripping in black gravitas — think Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, Langston Hughes … (on the other hand there’s Gary Coleman and Choo Choo Coleman)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's almost as if his parents had thought up a dignified name for him to take pride in.
  43. a very good chance the left will try to violently shut this down.

  44. @Anon
    OT

    The New York Times does a surprisingly exhaustive take on the Raining Tacos homeless controversy in Florida:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/18/us/baby-shark-homeless.html

    The guy has done his research:

    And businesses around the country have resorted to auditory deterrents to drive people away, from high-pitched beeping to recordings of chain saws [false range error ... but the Times fired their copyeditors] — and even to classical music. A number of cities have outfitted parks and public spaces with devices that blast a high-frequency sound that only teenagers and young people can hear.

    https://news.streetroots.org/2019/01/30/7-eleven-blasts-high-pitched-sound-repel-homeless

    https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/Amplified-blare-rousts-Civic-s-homeless-campers-3526273.php

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/bach-at-the-burger-king/#!

    https://www.inquirer.com/philly/news/20140404_Buzzing_machines_at_rec_center_help_prevent_vandalism.html
     
    I've thought a lot about this, and I think the best soundtrack is something that you cannot ignore, something that jumps to the front of your mind easily. A steady beat, however loud, doesn't do that. Some concrete ideas:

    -- Modern music with arhythmical and changing time signatures, like Derek Bourgeois's Serenade that starts in the subliminally annoying 11/8, then doubles down by changing to 13/8.

    -- Culturally annoying music: Tricky, because rap is annoying to many whites, while Bach baroqure harpsichord is annoying to many blacks.

    -- Spoken word, especially after the absence of spoken word. I find certain Australian and British accents very annoying and hard to ignore because I have to concentrate to understand them. My mind is forced to listen closely. You could commission custom tapes of Australians reading English text that doesn't completely make sense, so no matter how hard you listen you'll never understand it. This Florida facility could even have ads for itself, cleverly varied each time that you'd notice.

    -- Subject matter that is distressing. Anything medical to a hypochondriac, for example. Homeless people are probably worried about many things. Research that and make tapes where such topics are discussed. Medical, family matters, psychological problems, ways that people screw up their lives. Try to get under their skin. Killing Me Softly tactics.

    -- Variety, changing volumes, occasional screams or animal howls, "Sir, your Uber is here," mix it up.

    With surveillance cameras you could have real-time pseudo-A.I. watching the surroundings to A-B test and vary the mix to maximize obnoxiousness. Or give a real A.I. a sound library and leave it up to it to make the whole soundtrack while watching the results.

    Some cities are getting rid of bus benches at the request of business owners and pedestrians. The homeless live on the bus benches annoying every passer by. So people avoid the businesses. There’s hardly any bus benches left in Beverly Hills despite buses every 15 minutes in the main streets.
    The absolute biggest draw for obnoxious homeless is the combination of a 7/11 with a bus bench in front. They beg change from 7/11 customers buy their food malt liquor and lottery tickets at the 7/11 and destroy the intersection

  45. @JohnnyD
    Pardon my language, but Amy Wax has more balls than the professional conservatives. I just hope she's not professional ruined by the SJW Mob calling for her head.

    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/u-penn-professor-faces-backlash-for-allegedly-saying-us-would-be-better-off-with-more-whites-and-fewer-nonwhites-220301733.html

    Is it UPenn or Temple that’s located in one of the most dangerous black ghettoes in the country?

    Amazing how the profs and even worse diversity coordinators at Columbia Yale University of Chicago USC and other schools whose surroundings are the most dangerous in the country continue to love black criminals and hate law abiding Whites.

    • Replies: @lavoisier

    Amazing how the profs and even worse diversity coordinators at Columbia Yale University of Chicago USC and other schools whose surroundings are the most dangerous in the country continue to love black criminals and hate law abiding Whites.
     
    Never underestimate the stupidity of the white liberal.
    , @Anon

    Is it UPenn or Temple that’s located in one of the most dangerous black ghettoes in the country?
     
    Temple is in one, UPenn planted itself in one and then gentrified the campus area. It takes their own privately funded and armed police force to maintain that gentrification, with policing power equivalent to any Philadelphia Police Station.

    Fun fact: Philadelphia's Antifa group has its central locus in the next neighborhood over from Penn, which exists as somewhat livable only because it benefits from being in the shadow of Penn's increased police presence. After that neighborhood is an extremely dangerous ghetto whose stark, bombed out devastation in parts is difficult to adequately describe. It used to be a White neighborhood four or five generations ago.
  46. Anyone going? I live right nearby.

  47. @Days of Broken Arrows
    The music you're looking for is: Capt. Beefheart's "Trout Mask Replica" and "Lick My Decals Off, Baby" and Ruth White's "The Flowers Of Evil."

    I’ll see your Trout Mask Replica and raise you Ben Johnston’s microtonal String Quartet No. 7:

    • Replies: @Days of Broken Arrows
    I personally love this stuff. Thanks for the recommendation. Reminds me a bit of Zappa's orchestral music, which I've liked since high school (along with "Trout Mask").

    That said, I could see it sending a bunch of teenagers scurrying away. Except me as a teen. I'd have asked for a cassette.
  48. that you’re debating it means you’re losing.

    same principle behind a lot of things. debating whether their should be a border? you’re losing. debating who america belongs to? you’re losing.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    same principle behind a lot of things. debating whether their should be a border? you’re losing. debating who america belongs to? you’re losing.
     
    What is the alternative?
    , @c matt
    Debating whether to deport? Does that mean we are winning? No, not until the debate is how many to deport.
  49. Good to see they got a politically neutral moderator, The CIA’s Slate?

    Was that really the best they could do?

    Hey Bucky. Ya really think the GOP will last 11 years?

  50. The thing about Wax that should raise suspicion – well, the (((other thing))) – is that she is apparently qualified to practice medicine and chose law, then, doubling down, navel-gazing legal academia.

    It’s unfathomable. It’s like if Terry Bozzio had decided to just shake a tambourine for Katy Perry on her tours.

    Is it a weird kind of megalomania? (Saving lives does not scale the way grandstanding does.) Avarice? (She doubtless makes more money than Joe the Internist, but does she really do better than talented neurosurgeons? Or – since she’s milking the minor celebrity in the style of (((Dershowitz))) and (((Allred))) – say, Drew Pinsky or Mehmet Öz?)

    • Replies: @lavoisier

    (She doubtless makes more money than Joe the Internist, but does she really do better than talented neurosurgeons? Or – since she’s milking the minor celebrity in the style of (((Dershowitz))) and (((Allred))) – say, Drew Pinsky or Mehmet Öz?)
     
    Much lower ceiling on earning potential for doctors than for lawyers.

    Even talented neurosurgeons will have a difficult time cracking the 7 figure income mark while lawyers who rise to partners in top law firms routinely earn 7 figure incomes.

    So if you want to chase after the serious money, going into medicine is a mistake.
    , @Autochthon
    Right; (((avarice))), then.
    , @Anonymous

    The thing about Wax that should raise suspicion – well, the (((other thing))) – is that she is apparently qualified to practice medicine and chose law, then, doubling down, navel-gazing legal academia.

    It’s unfathomable.
     
    I cannot discern from your comment what is so "unfathomable" about it.
  51. is that she is apparently qualified to practice medicine and chose law, then, doubling down, navel-gazing legal academia.

    Law is more influential, and academic law is far easier than almost any medicine position she might hold. And maybe she just doesn’t want to be responsible for the death of a patient.

  52. @Known Fact
    I'd never heard of him but you could not come up with a central-casting name more dripping in black gravitas -- think Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, Langston Hughes ... (on the other hand there's Gary Coleman and Choo Choo Coleman)

    It’s almost as if his parents had thought up a dignified name for him to take pride in.

    • Agree: Dave Pinsen
  53. @Alden
    Is it UPenn or Temple that’s located in one of the most dangerous black ghettoes in the country?

    Amazing how the profs and even worse diversity coordinators at Columbia Yale University of Chicago USC and other schools whose surroundings are the most dangerous in the country continue to love black criminals and hate law abiding Whites.

    Amazing how the profs and even worse diversity coordinators at Columbia Yale University of Chicago USC and other schools whose surroundings are the most dangerous in the country continue to love black criminals and hate law abiding Whites.

    Never underestimate the stupidity of the white liberal.

  54. @Autochthon
    The thing about Wax that should raise suspicion – well, the (((other thing))) – is that she is apparently qualified to practice medicine and chose law, then, doubling down, navel-gazing legal academia.

    It's unfathomable. It's like if Terry Bozzio had decided to just shake a tambourine for Katy Perry on her tours.

    Is it a weird kind of megalomania? (Saving lives does not scale the way grandstanding does.) Avarice? (She doubtless makes more money than Joe the Internist, but does she really do better than talented neurosurgeons? Or – since she's milking the minor celebrity in the style of (((Dershowitz))) and (((Allred))) – say, Drew Pinsky or Mehmet Öz?)

    (She doubtless makes more money than Joe the Internist, but does she really do better than talented neurosurgeons? Or – since she’s milking the minor celebrity in the style of (((Dershowitz))) and (((Allred))) – say, Drew Pinsky or Mehmet Öz?)

    Much lower ceiling on earning potential for doctors than for lawyers.

    Even talented neurosurgeons will have a difficult time cracking the 7 figure income mark while lawyers who rise to partners in top law firms routinely earn 7 figure incomes.

    So if you want to chase after the serious money, going into medicine is a mistake.

  55. @trelane
    With a lineup like this, surely we'll get to the bottom of this important question.

    With a lineup like this, surely we’ll get to the bottom of this important question.

    In a real democracy, rather than one in which values are dictated to the nation by the CIA involved and Jewish owned Press, the discussion would be over whether or not the question was important.

  56. Anon[171] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden
    Is it UPenn or Temple that’s located in one of the most dangerous black ghettoes in the country?

    Amazing how the profs and even worse diversity coordinators at Columbia Yale University of Chicago USC and other schools whose surroundings are the most dangerous in the country continue to love black criminals and hate law abiding Whites.

    Is it UPenn or Temple that’s located in one of the most dangerous black ghettoes in the country?

    Temple is in one, UPenn planted itself in one and then gentrified the campus area. It takes their own privately funded and armed police force to maintain that gentrification, with policing power equivalent to any Philadelphia Police Station.

    Fun fact: Philadelphia’s Antifa group has its central locus in the next neighborhood over from Penn, which exists as somewhat livable only because it benefits from being in the shadow of Penn’s increased police presence. After that neighborhood is an extremely dangerous ghetto whose stark, bombed out devastation in parts is difficult to adequately describe. It used to be a White neighborhood four or five generations ago.

  57. @Autochthon
    The thing about Wax that should raise suspicion – well, the (((other thing))) – is that she is apparently qualified to practice medicine and chose law, then, doubling down, navel-gazing legal academia.

    It's unfathomable. It's like if Terry Bozzio had decided to just shake a tambourine for Katy Perry on her tours.

    Is it a weird kind of megalomania? (Saving lives does not scale the way grandstanding does.) Avarice? (She doubtless makes more money than Joe the Internist, but does she really do better than talented neurosurgeons? Or – since she's milking the minor celebrity in the style of (((Dershowitz))) and (((Allred))) – say, Drew Pinsky or Mehmet Öz?)

    Right; (((avarice))), then.

  58. @larry lurker
    I'll see your Trout Mask Replica and raise you Ben Johnston's microtonal String Quartet No. 7:

    https://youtu.be/Wp7VjBtOJ74

    I personally love this stuff. Thanks for the recommendation. Reminds me a bit of Zappa’s orchestral music, which I’ve liked since high school (along with “Trout Mask”).

    That said, I could see it sending a bunch of teenagers scurrying away. Except me as a teen. I’d have asked for a cassette.

    • Replies: @larry lurker

    I personally love this stuff. Thanks for the recommendation.

    ... Except me as a teen. I’d have asked for a cassette.
     

    Glad you liked it. Yeah, as with Captain Beefheart your first reaction is "what is this bullshit?", but then your ears slowly get acclimated to it and you start liking certain parts more than others - next thing you know you're recommending it to people ...
  59. @Days of Broken Arrows
    I personally love this stuff. Thanks for the recommendation. Reminds me a bit of Zappa's orchestral music, which I've liked since high school (along with "Trout Mask").

    That said, I could see it sending a bunch of teenagers scurrying away. Except me as a teen. I'd have asked for a cassette.

    I personally love this stuff. Thanks for the recommendation.

    … Except me as a teen. I’d have asked for a cassette.

    Glad you liked it. Yeah, as with Captain Beefheart your first reaction is “what is this bullshit?”, but then your ears slowly get acclimated to it and you start liking certain parts more than others – next thing you know you’re recommending it to people …

  60. @bucky
    While Coleman Hughes has done a fine job at presenting himself, he's also a fucking undergrad under 24 years old. And he will be sharing the stage with a law professor from a t14 school.

    To the degree that his act is opportunistic, it is working. He is the Barack Obama of the right. He could be the first black president from the GOP.

    Yeah, Hughes is a smart guy, but he’s overexposed and probably underprepared. Hopefully he can avoid the Ta-Nahisi Coates curse of being univesally hailed as a genius for being a pretty good writer with a good head on his shoulderswho is saying the right things. TNC got way less interesting as a writer once he got legions of admirers telling him his sh-t didn’t stink. I hope the same fate doesn’t befall Coleman Hughes.

  61. Anonymous[219] • Disclaimer says:
    @Another Canadian
    The Toronto shopping centre at 10 Dundas East has settled on a street broadcast of the CBC classical music channel to deter homeless spillover from the Toronto Public Health needle exchange at Dundas Square. The theory appears to be that a disordered mind is repulsed by the order of classical music composition.

    the order of classical music composition.

    What is the argument that classical music is more “ordered” (whatever that means) than other music?

  62. Anonymous[219] • Disclaimer says:
    @ATBOTL
    So the nay side is represented by a black/Puerto Rican and a Jew. Moderator is a Jew.

    No thanks. This is the kind of garbage we don't need. We need white Europeans advocating for our own interests. I am not going to cheer these kinds of false flag token conservatives.

    This is just neoconservatism2.0. Anything that is not about white identity is part of the problem at this point. We are losing not because we don't have enough arguments against reparations or immigration but because whites don't have racial consciousness. We are at a point where no more progress can be made without changing that. Without racial consciousness, conservatives will stay trapped in "Democrats are the real racists" and Israel First forever as the demographics get worse and worse.

    So the nay side is represented by a black/Puerto Rican and a Jew. Moderator is a Jew.

    Do you know that the black/Puerto Rican isn’t also Jewish, as Ocasio-Cortez is?

  63. Anonymous[219] • Disclaimer says:
    @prime noticer
    that you're debating it means you're losing.

    same principle behind a lot of things. debating whether their should be a border? you're losing. debating who america belongs to? you're losing.

    same principle behind a lot of things. debating whether their should be a border? you’re losing. debating who america belongs to? you’re losing.

    What is the alternative?

  64. Anonymous[219] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon
    The thing about Wax that should raise suspicion – well, the (((other thing))) – is that she is apparently qualified to practice medicine and chose law, then, doubling down, navel-gazing legal academia.

    It's unfathomable. It's like if Terry Bozzio had decided to just shake a tambourine for Katy Perry on her tours.

    Is it a weird kind of megalomania? (Saving lives does not scale the way grandstanding does.) Avarice? (She doubtless makes more money than Joe the Internist, but does she really do better than talented neurosurgeons? Or – since she's milking the minor celebrity in the style of (((Dershowitz))) and (((Allred))) – say, Drew Pinsky or Mehmet Öz?)

    The thing about Wax that should raise suspicion – well, the (((other thing))) – is that she is apparently qualified to practice medicine and chose law, then, doubling down, navel-gazing legal academia.

    It’s unfathomable.

    I cannot discern from your comment what is so “unfathomable” about it.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Quite right; it's not clear. It's not objectively unfathomable, like, say, a purple unicorn who shits spaghetti. What I meant is that, for me, with my moral values, my selfish priorities about interesting and meaningful work, and my expertise of what practicing law is really like, it's unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law (ceteris paribus, as seems to have been the case here; there seem to have been no dilemmas about the huge costs of completing another advanced degree and such at the time the choice was made).

    The other commenters' points about the money, of course, explain, I suppose, the one of my suggested motivations (avarice), which is (((no surprise))).
  65. @Sean
    https://i.etsystatic.com/11838042/r/il/295f96/1437079456/il_794xN.1437079456_i3uo.jpg

    That’s good old fashioned nightmare fuel.

  66. @Anonymous

    The thing about Wax that should raise suspicion – well, the (((other thing))) – is that she is apparently qualified to practice medicine and chose law, then, doubling down, navel-gazing legal academia.

    It’s unfathomable.
     
    I cannot discern from your comment what is so "unfathomable" about it.

    Quite right; it’s not clear. It’s not objectively unfathomable, like, say, a purple unicorn who shits spaghetti. What I meant is that, for me, with my moral values, my selfish priorities about interesting and meaningful work, and my expertise of what practicing law is really like, it’s unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law (ceteris paribus, as seems to have been the case here; there seem to have been no dilemmas about the huge costs of completing another advanced degree and such at the time the choice was made).

    The other commenters’ points about the money, of course, explain, I suppose, the one of my suggested motivations (avarice), which is (((no surprise))).

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    it’s unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law.
     
    Did you intend this sentence read this way? It seems incomplete.
    , @Anonymous
    Doctors do quit medicine for seemingly unlikely pursuits on occasion.

    Besides, did she ever actually complete a residency and hang out the shingle so to speak? You may have the degree after four years, but you don't really know anything about actually practicing medicine until a few years into a residency.
  67. @Spangel
    Lol, you know 40 bucks is chump change for a lot of single professionals in manahattan. They spend more on a cocktail for brunch.

    I’ll go. Sounds fun.

    I’ll go. Sounds fun.

    We await your report.

    • Replies: @Spangel
    Sorry. Terrible weather last night. I didn’t go out.
  68. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon
    Quite right; it's not clear. It's not objectively unfathomable, like, say, a purple unicorn who shits spaghetti. What I meant is that, for me, with my moral values, my selfish priorities about interesting and meaningful work, and my expertise of what practicing law is really like, it's unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law (ceteris paribus, as seems to have been the case here; there seem to have been no dilemmas about the huge costs of completing another advanced degree and such at the time the choice was made).

    The other commenters' points about the money, of course, explain, I suppose, the one of my suggested motivations (avarice), which is (((no surprise))).

    it’s unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law.

    Did you intend this sentence read this way? It seems incomplete.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Sorry; I meant:

    "[I]t's unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law would choose law...."
  69. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon
    Quite right; it's not clear. It's not objectively unfathomable, like, say, a purple unicorn who shits spaghetti. What I meant is that, for me, with my moral values, my selfish priorities about interesting and meaningful work, and my expertise of what practicing law is really like, it's unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law (ceteris paribus, as seems to have been the case here; there seem to have been no dilemmas about the huge costs of completing another advanced degree and such at the time the choice was made).

    The other commenters' points about the money, of course, explain, I suppose, the one of my suggested motivations (avarice), which is (((no surprise))).

    Doctors do quit medicine for seemingly unlikely pursuits on occasion.

    Besides, did she ever actually complete a residency and hang out the shingle so to speak? You may have the degree after four years, but you don’t really know anything about actually practicing medicine until a few years into a residency.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    She seems to have completed a residency in neurology and worked as a "consulting neurologist" for a few years. Go figure.
  70. @Jim Don Bob

    I’ll go. Sounds fun.
     
    We await your report.

    Sorry. Terrible weather last night. I didn’t go out.

  71. @Anonymous

    it’s unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law.
     
    Did you intend this sentence read this way? It seems incomplete.

    Sorry; I meant:

    “[I]t’s unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law would choose law….”

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Sorry; I meant:

    “[I]t’s unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law would choose law….”
     
    Thank you for the clarification. Could you possibly do me the favor of expanding on that opinon? What is your reasoning?
  72. @Anonymous
    Doctors do quit medicine for seemingly unlikely pursuits on occasion.

    Besides, did she ever actually complete a residency and hang out the shingle so to speak? You may have the degree after four years, but you don't really know anything about actually practicing medicine until a few years into a residency.

    She seems to have completed a residency in neurology and worked as a “consulting neurologist” for a few years. Go figure.

  73. @Paul
    White dupes are going to pay forty dollars for the show? What a scam!

    Will any blacks even show up with forty dollars? Will they get "comped" instead?

    Blacks only pay $20 per new protocols.

  74. @prime noticer
    that you're debating it means you're losing.

    same principle behind a lot of things. debating whether their should be a border? you're losing. debating who america belongs to? you're losing.

    Debating whether to deport? Does that mean we are winning? No, not until the debate is how many to deport.

  75. Anonymous[153] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon
    Sorry; I meant:

    "[I]t's unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law would choose law...."

    Sorry; I meant:

    “[I]t’s unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law would choose law….”

    Thank you for the clarification. Could you possibly do me the favor of expanding on that opinon? What is your reasoning?

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Law has a bimodal distribution. "Either you are, or you aren't," as they say. It's like acting that way. Sure, the richest lawyers and actors are rich beyond the dreams of avarice. But they are a tiny minority; most toil in poverty, or leave the work altogether.

    Medicine is harder to get obscenely rich at, say some (I'm not a physician; my expertise wanes significantly here). However, it's a rare thing to encounter a physician who isn't financially comfortable as Hell, as to were. They've almost perfect job security. Even in the worst scenario, they've the option to relocate worldwide. Sure, they may have to sit another exam or hassle about reciprocation to be licensed, but it's not as though Slovakian organs will baffle a Chilean physician. Expertise in law is much more limited to one, or at best a few, jurisdictions. While a Peruvian opthalmologist can treat a Chinaman, a Canadian, a Nigerian, a Swede, and an Egyptian...it'd be a Hell of an intellect who could handle the divorces of each of those guys, in his own nation, with any competence. It's just the nature of the two professions for this glaring difference to be so.

    Medicine is far more meaningful work than law. A physician can save and change lives in drama ways. Most lawyers dither about bullshit. Even in the criminal courts, the cynicism and futility is rampant (most defendants are guilty, and most police are thuggish megalomaniacs – they deserve each other). Perry Mason and Ben Matlock are much more figments of your imagination than Hawkeye Pierce and Gregory House are. A competent orthopedic surgeon can dramatically improve several patients' lives in one day's work. Rare indeed would any lawyer have such an opportunity to do good. It's much likely to one can achieve the life of that surgeon than that one will ever achieve the life of Erin Brockovich. (Yes, I realize she is not a lawyer; my casting about for an example is itself telling, and what would one do: harass and destroy Christians for the American Civil Liberties [sic] Union or the the government? Crush Americans and hand their patrimony over to savage invaders? That's "public interest law" nowadays. You want to work for the good guys? Ha! Judge after judge will bitch slap you around with arbitrary rulings in violation of settled law. (Ask Donald Trump how this works.)

    I could write about it for a week, but I've already bored even myself. I do hope it may provide you some edification.
  76. @Anonymous

    Sorry; I meant:

    “[I]t’s unfathomable anyone with a choice to practice medicine instead of law would choose law….”
     
    Thank you for the clarification. Could you possibly do me the favor of expanding on that opinon? What is your reasoning?

    Law has a bimodal distribution. “Either you are, or you aren’t,” as they say. It’s like acting that way. Sure, the richest lawyers and actors are rich beyond the dreams of avarice. But they are a tiny minority; most toil in poverty, or leave the work altogether.

    Medicine is harder to get obscenely rich at, say some (I’m not a physician; my expertise wanes significantly here). However, it’s a rare thing to encounter a physician who isn’t financially comfortable as Hell, as to were. They’ve almost perfect job security. Even in the worst scenario, they’ve the option to relocate worldwide. Sure, they may have to sit another exam or hassle about reciprocation to be licensed, but it’s not as though Slovakian organs will baffle a Chilean physician. Expertise in law is much more limited to one, or at best a few, jurisdictions. While a Peruvian opthalmologist can treat a Chinaman, a Canadian, a Nigerian, a Swede, and an Egyptian…it’d be a Hell of an intellect who could handle the divorces of each of those guys, in his own nation, with any competence. It’s just the nature of the two professions for this glaring difference to be so.

    Medicine is far more meaningful work than law. A physician can save and change lives in drama ways. Most lawyers dither about bullshit. Even in the criminal courts, the cynicism and futility is rampant (most defendants are guilty, and most police are thuggish megalomaniacs – they deserve each other). Perry Mason and Ben Matlock are much more figments of your imagination than Hawkeye Pierce and Gregory House are. A competent orthopedic surgeon can dramatically improve several patients’ lives in one day’s work. Rare indeed would any lawyer have such an opportunity to do good. It’s much likely to one can achieve the life of that surgeon than that one will ever achieve the life of Erin Brockovich. (Yes, I realize she is not a lawyer; my casting about for an example is itself telling, and what would one do: harass and destroy Christians for the American Civil Liberties [sic] Union or the the government? Crush Americans and hand their patrimony over to savage invaders? That’s “public interest law” nowadays. You want to work for the good guys? Ha! Judge after judge will bitch slap you around with arbitrary rulings in violation of settled law. (Ask Donald Trump how this works.)

    I could write about it for a week, but I’ve already bored even myself. I do hope it may provide you some edification.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Thank you so, so very much, Autochthon!

    If you ever had the urge to write more, I would read it with interest, even writings of a week long.

    What advice would you offer a lawyer, or to someone already committed to law or on that pathway, considering these circumstances?

  77. Anonymous[137] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon
    Law has a bimodal distribution. "Either you are, or you aren't," as they say. It's like acting that way. Sure, the richest lawyers and actors are rich beyond the dreams of avarice. But they are a tiny minority; most toil in poverty, or leave the work altogether.

    Medicine is harder to get obscenely rich at, say some (I'm not a physician; my expertise wanes significantly here). However, it's a rare thing to encounter a physician who isn't financially comfortable as Hell, as to were. They've almost perfect job security. Even in the worst scenario, they've the option to relocate worldwide. Sure, they may have to sit another exam or hassle about reciprocation to be licensed, but it's not as though Slovakian organs will baffle a Chilean physician. Expertise in law is much more limited to one, or at best a few, jurisdictions. While a Peruvian opthalmologist can treat a Chinaman, a Canadian, a Nigerian, a Swede, and an Egyptian...it'd be a Hell of an intellect who could handle the divorces of each of those guys, in his own nation, with any competence. It's just the nature of the two professions for this glaring difference to be so.

    Medicine is far more meaningful work than law. A physician can save and change lives in drama ways. Most lawyers dither about bullshit. Even in the criminal courts, the cynicism and futility is rampant (most defendants are guilty, and most police are thuggish megalomaniacs – they deserve each other). Perry Mason and Ben Matlock are much more figments of your imagination than Hawkeye Pierce and Gregory House are. A competent orthopedic surgeon can dramatically improve several patients' lives in one day's work. Rare indeed would any lawyer have such an opportunity to do good. It's much likely to one can achieve the life of that surgeon than that one will ever achieve the life of Erin Brockovich. (Yes, I realize she is not a lawyer; my casting about for an example is itself telling, and what would one do: harass and destroy Christians for the American Civil Liberties [sic] Union or the the government? Crush Americans and hand their patrimony over to savage invaders? That's "public interest law" nowadays. You want to work for the good guys? Ha! Judge after judge will bitch slap you around with arbitrary rulings in violation of settled law. (Ask Donald Trump how this works.)

    I could write about it for a week, but I've already bored even myself. I do hope it may provide you some edification.

    Thank you so, so very much, Autochthon!

    If you ever had the urge to write more, I would read it with interest, even writings of a week long.

    What advice would you offer a lawyer, or to someone already committed to law or on that pathway, considering these circumstances?

  78. You’re welcome. You could read the old scam-blogs. Its emotionally draining work, and there’s only so much to say, in a sense (how many ways are there to rephrase “I’ve been had! Don’t let it happen to you!”) so a lot of those guys quit writing. Get out. Paul Campos got involved for a while, and even he quit writing about it. But the law school racket is only a small part of the bigger picture. It’s the only the foyer to the shit-house, as it were.

    You’re never “committed to law.”

    If you are in school for it, quit. You’ll recover from a year of exorbitant debt without a degree than will recover from three years’ exorbitant debt with a degree.

    Switch to a different line: medicine, engineering, dentistry, optometry. If you truly feel stuck and cannot pull of a change, you’re about to finish your third year, or stomach the sunken costs, talk to a recruiter. Sign on to join the navy, army, or air force’s judge advocate general corps. Hammer out a deal where they pay off your debt so long as you complete however many years in your commission (I suspect you could pull it off in exchange for about six years’ service) – get all that stuff in writing, because military recruiters are just above law schools’ deans of admissions in that circle of Hell for liars. (Since the F.U.S.A. is a now a kind of third-world shithole, better still to join the French Foreign Legion and use your French citizenship to move to Poland or Hungary. As an added bonus, creditors will never get a dime from you or be able to do anything about it, while you are happily canoodling with a gorgeous Slavic gal…) If you think six years is a long time, think about spending forty years serving that debt.

    Of course, if you have wealthy parents or otherwise avoided debt, congratulations.

    If you are already working in law and want out, there are countless options. Usually the biggest limit is ensuring other work pays enough to serve your Hellish debts (see supra…>). One guy hears seems to think claims adjusting is good work for lawyers. Having been both a claims adjustor and a lawyer, I can assure you he is full of shit.

    The trick is often convincing someone to hire “a lawyer” to so x. If you can account for your time otherwise (did you keep working part-time?; can you colourably claim you took a year off to explore your options or backpack in Europe?) then it can be best to just leave the law degree or time in law school off your résumé altogether. No one will ever hire a person with a J.D. to be a paralegal, so if you have some perverse drive to stay in law that way, you may be hosed.

    What lines can be receptive to hiring a lawyer? Your mileage will vary wildly.

    Become licensed to appraise real estate; sell real estate (that’s a lucrative racket requiring hardly any real work; it’s all glad-handing and bullshitting, so if you are attractive and chatty, it could be for you); do competitive intelligence or related analysis for giant corporations (they pay people to pore over dockets, securities filings, patents, press releases, and so on to help them make good decisions).

    Good luck.

    There are a few other lawyers among Steve’s regular commenters. My baggage should not be your baggage. Maybe they will chime in with other perspectives. (Be wary of baby boomers, who went to school when a fellow could pay as he went by washing cars and did not face the horrible wages and housing costs they wrought by overpopulating the Hell out of the place.)

    Don’t forget: if all else fails, you can become a race-hustl—er, I mean “community organiser” in Chicago, do the right politicking, and then just be a do-nothing president of the F.U.S.A. hailed as the second coming of Marcus Aurelius. This last option only works, of course, if you are not, racially, a European (or at least do not have a penis).

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Please forgive the copious typos. I'm hurried.
  79. @Autochthon
    You're welcome. You could read the old scam-blogs. Its emotionally draining work, and there's only so much to say, in a sense (how many ways are there to rephrase "I've been had! Don't let it happen to you!") so a lot of those guys quit writing. Get out. Paul Campos got involved for a while, and even he quit writing about it. But the law school racket is only a small part of the bigger picture. It's the only the foyer to the shit-house, as it were.

    You're never "committed to law."

    If you are in school for it, quit. You'll recover from a year of exorbitant debt without a degree than will recover from three years' exorbitant debt with a degree.

    Switch to a different line: medicine, engineering, dentistry, optometry. If you truly feel stuck and cannot pull of a change, you're about to finish your third year, or stomach the sunken costs, talk to a recruiter. Sign on to join the navy, army, or air force's judge advocate general corps. Hammer out a deal where they pay off your debt so long as you complete however many years in your commission (I suspect you could pull it off in exchange for about six years' service) – get all that stuff in writing, because military recruiters are just above law schools' deans of admissions in that circle of Hell for liars. (Since the F.U.S.A. is a now a kind of third-world shithole, better still to join the French Foreign Legion and use your French citizenship to move to Poland or Hungary. As an added bonus, creditors will never get a dime from you or be able to do anything about it, while you are happily canoodling with a gorgeous Slavic gal...) If you think six years is a long time, think about spending forty years serving that debt.

    Of course, if you have wealthy parents or otherwise avoided debt, congratulations.

    If you are already working in law and want out, there are countless options. Usually the biggest limit is ensuring other work pays enough to serve your Hellish debts (see supra...>). One guy hears seems to think claims adjusting is good work for lawyers. Having been both a claims adjustor and a lawyer, I can assure you he is full of shit.

    The trick is often convincing someone to hire "a lawyer" to so x. If you can account for your time otherwise (did you keep working part-time?; can you colourably claim you took a year off to explore your options or backpack in Europe?) then it can be best to just leave the law degree or time in law school off your résumé altogether. No one will ever hire a person with a J.D. to be a paralegal, so if you have some perverse drive to stay in law that way, you may be hosed.

    What lines can be receptive to hiring a lawyer? Your mileage will vary wildly.

    Become licensed to appraise real estate; sell real estate (that's a lucrative racket requiring hardly any real work; it's all glad-handing and bullshitting, so if you are attractive and chatty, it could be for you); do competitive intelligence or related analysis for giant corporations (they pay people to pore over dockets, securities filings, patents, press releases, and so on to help them make good decisions).

    Good luck.

    There are a few other lawyers among Steve's regular commenters. My baggage should not be your baggage. Maybe they will chime in with other perspectives. (Be wary of baby boomers, who went to school when a fellow could pay as he went by washing cars and did not face the horrible wages and housing costs they wrought by overpopulating the Hell out of the place.)

    Don't forget: if all else fails, you can become a race-hustl—er, I mean "community organiser" in Chicago, do the right politicking, and then just be a do-nothing president of the F.U.S.A. hailed as the second coming of Marcus Aurelius. This last option only works, of course, if you are not, racially, a European (or at least do not have a penis).

    Please forgive the copious typos. I’m hurried.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Thank you, Autochthon.
  80. Anonymous[212] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon
    Please forgive the copious typos. I'm hurried.

    Thank you, Autochthon.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?