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Amy Harmon Does Another Touchdown Dance Over Her Having Gotten James Watson Canceled
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  1. Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by… oh, yesterday.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Abe

    No, the acronym — Horny Mama — is just too good.

    , @Ano
    @Abe

    Optimist!

    The way it's going, it's just as likely, in a world ruled over by Amy Harmons, we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don't be surprised if that day is closer than you think.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Ragno, @PiltdownMan

    , @indeed
    @Abe

    As Feynman said:

    “From a long view of the history of mankind, seen from, say, ten thousand years from now, there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell's discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade.”

    Discovering DNA is in the same category, but for twentieth century (there are a few other big ones in that one).

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Jim Christian
    @Abe

    Never heard of her myself.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Abe

    Abe, your comment, being the first here, makes it easy for me to skip the others. A few words to say it all. And in a fair universe, Harmon gets "cancelled."

    , @Prester John
    @Abe

    I forgot who she was already. Oh, wait a minute... . NY Times, right?

    , @Anonymous
    @Abe

    Does she care what people will think of her in the future? I assume like most women Harmon only cares about interpersonal relationships and so has no thought on this matter beyond it makes my black friends unhappy.

    Replies: @Lurker

    , @AnotherDad
    @Abe


    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by… oh, yesterday.
     
    Harmon is of course a nothing (one who has failed to even do the one thing women are designed to do).

    But are the Chinese going to bother remembering the names of dead white guys who discovered X, Y or Z? That's not my read on it.

    Replies: @vhrm

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Abe

    People may not remember Amy Harmon’s name—I only know of it, thanks to Steve—but she exerts tremendous influence from her perch at the new york times. Tens of thousands of pc school teachers, professors, staffers and administrators read her, er, “things” religiously, and impose her party line.

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Abe

    People may not remember Amy Harmon’s name—I only know of it, thanks to Steve—but she exerts tremendous influence from her perch at the new york times. Tens of thousands of pc school teachers, professors, staffers and administrators read her, er, “things” religiously, and impose her party line.

  2. “Unsupported comments”

  3. Perhaps we can replace July the Fourth with Amy Harmon James Watson Cancellation Day as an annual holiday of national celebration?

    • LOL: Hibernian
  4. Amy Harmon, by the way, for those of you who are keeping score, is a Jew.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hockamaw


    Amy Harmon, by the way, for those of you who are keeping score, is a Jew.
     
    The word is Jewess. And this means she almost certainly supports the Epperson v. Arkansas decision.

    However, I believe Watson did, too. Which means at some level, they're on the same wavelength, the same side. Against Arkansans.

    Who can we trust anymore?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    , @bigdicknick
    @Hockamaw

    named and shamed.

    , @Achilles Wannabe
    @Hockamaw

    Thank you. I am ALWAYS keeping score.

  5. @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    No, the acronym — Horny Mama — is just too good.

  6. Is anyone going to ask what Cold Harbor’s “mission and values” are?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Ben tillman


    Is anyone going to ask what Cold Harbor’s “mission and values” are?
     
    Apparently, it's mission is now the dissemination of lies; it's chief value, dishonesty.
  7. nyt “journalists” are becoming an increasingly bigger joke by the day.

    For example, this nyt “journalist” skips the main part of the story when she complains about some guy named Balaji harassing her.

    https://hotair.com/archives/john-s-2/2020/07/01/ny-times-tech-journalist-complains-harassed-omits-harassment-paraphrase-something-wrote/

    Eventually, these kinds of folks are going to push back.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @wren


    For example, this nyt “journalist” skips the main part of the story when she complains about some guy named Balaji harassing her.
     
    I did some research. The guy named Balaji is Balaji Srinivasan, a general partner at Andreesen Horowitz, and he founded and sold a Silicon Valley firm for a few hundred million dollars. Trump had him shortlisted to run the FDA. From his page

    Srinivasan holds a BS, MS, and PhD in Electrical Engineering and an MS in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University. He also teaches the occasional class at Stanford ...
     
    https://i.imgur.com/9sPd5ND.jpg

    Replies: @wren

    , @El Dato
    @wren

    Triggering at Twitter now so out of control that language has to be controlled:

    No more slaves and masters: Twitter engineers BAN whole range of terms in fight for 'more inclusive language'

    I suppose some Twitter people are CHAZ survivors and brought home new ideology?

    https://twitter.com/TwitterEng/status/1278733305190342656

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous

  8. Anon[428] • Disclaimer says:

    Prophetic Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (h/t Larry Johnson at https://turcopolier.typepad.com/sic_semper_tyrannis/)

    HARRISON BERGERON by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

    THE YEAR WAS 2081, and everybody was finally equal. They weren’t only equal before God and the law. They were equal every which way. Nobody was smarter than anybody else. Nobody was better looking than anybody else. Nobody was
    stronger or quicker than anybody else. All this equality was due to the 211th, 212th, and 213th Amendments to the Constitution, and to the unceasing vigilance of agents of the United States Handicapper General.

    Some things about living still weren’t quite right, though. April for instance, still drove people crazy by not being springtime. And it was in that clammy month that the H-G men took George and Hazel Bergeron’s fourteen-year-old son, Harrison, away.

    It was tragic, all right, but George and Hazel couldn’t think about it very hard. Hazel had a perfectly average intelligence, which meant she couldn’t think about anything except in short bursts. And George, while his intelligence was way above normal, had a little mental handicap radio in his ear. He was required by law to wear it at all times. It was tuned to a government transmitter. Every twenty seconds or so, the transmitter would send out some sharp noise to keep people like George from taking unfair advantage of their brains…

    https://archive.org/stream/HarrisonBergeron/Harrison%20Bergeron_djvu.txt

    • Agree: Antonius
    • Replies: @Deadite
    @Anon

    Nowadays it’s just our iPhones that suppress our intelligence.

  9. Ano says:
    @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    Optimist!

    The way it’s going, it’s just as likely, in a world ruled over by Amy Harmons, we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don’t be surprised if that day is closer than you think.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Gordo
    @Ano


    The way it’s going, it’s just as likely, in a world ruled over by Amy Harmons, we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don’t be surprised if that day is closer than you think.
     
    Behind the times Ano, the BBC has already done a docudrama (i.e. fiction) where the diverse one did all the hard work and the evil white males exploited it.
    , @Ragno
    @Ano


    In a world ruled over by Amy Harmons, we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.
     

    Well, her or the three cleaning ladies who made space travel possible. (Oh yes it did happen! - I seen it in a movie an' whatnot.)
    , @PiltdownMan
    @Ano


    ... we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don’t be surprised if that day is closer than you think.
     

    If that is so, I think I should repost my long post from a few years ago, with Mr. Sailer's permission.

    There is a strong mythology nowadays of the wallflower Rosalind Franklin being cheated of her intellectual dues by the underhanded bro methods of Watson and Crick, which essentially states that they stole her intellectual property and then made fun of her. She is something of a feminist totem in that regard.

    Rosalind Franklin needs no support from feminists to safeguard her reputation. She was already one of the world’s top x-ray crystallographers when she was hired into King’s College, London to work aside Maurice Wilkins as a senior scientist. She had an aristocratic manner and was no pushover.

    At that time, the structure of DNA was only one of a few top problems in the chemistry of biological molecules, the others including the structure of hemoglobin, and other proteins.


    The centrality of Watson and Crick’s discovery to all of biological science became apparent only when they actually discovered the particulars of the double helix structure of the molecule. Its role in genetic inheritance was immediately apparent once they figured that out, first to them, and then to the world biologists and geneticists. Biochemists, though, took some more years to convince, with additional confirmatory data and analysis.

    But DNA’s monumental importance was not obvious in advance of their discovery. It was merely one of a few very interesting problems.

    Rosalind Franklin worked on the structure of DNA simultaneously, but with a more rigorous and slower crystallographic approach that required higher standards of proof. Watson and Crick tried a somewhat controversial lateral thinking model based structural approach which called heavily on spatial intuition; she went stuck to x-ray crystallography and never used the cardboard models they sent to her lab from Cambridge.

    Both Watson and Crick’s seminal paper, as well as Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkin’s papers on DNA were published in the same issue of Nature. Watson and Crick briefly acknowledged her work in their article. Franklin’s work had identified the double strand helical structure, but Watson and Crick had also discovered the structure of the base pairs, which was essential to understanding replication. It is not clear if Franklin ever focused on that particular aspect of the problem, while Watson and Crick realized its central biological importance in the last stage of their work and hurried to complete it.

    The key piece of the puzzle in terms of intellectual credit is that Franklin had previously agreed that her crystallographs were King’s College’s intellectual property and not hers.

    And she had already given notice of her resignation and move to Birbeck College when her student, Raymond Gosling, gave Watson and Crick a look at Photo 51. In this day and age, it also needs to be said that back then, university research was not played close to the chest, and was not proprietary the way it is these days, with vast commercial potential at stake.

    Watson and Crick then had their eureka moment in realizing how to modify their cardboard model based approach to arrive at the correct structure and base pairings. The photo, by itself, did not reveal enough information to deduce the complete structure in detail. Nor is it clear that Franklin saw that as particularly important.

    Franklin, of course went on to do more research at Birbeck College, and may well have won a Nobel Prize for her groundbreaking work there on the structure of the tobacco mosaic virus, may perhaps even shared the prize for DNA itself, had she lived.

    But no one stole anything, and relations between Franklin and Watson and Crick were cordial.
    What got Watson into trouble was his ‘Double Helix’ memoir, which made immature and un-chivalrous remarks about Rosalind Franklin, long after her death. He apologized for that.

    But the image stuck. Of a frat-boyish duo brushing aside and stealing a great woman scientist’s work and deliberately relegating her to obscurity, only for her reputation to be rescued by the powers of feminist narrative. It is a myth impossible to kill now.


     

    Replies: @Anonymous

  10. A lot of people keep asking why more girls haven’t come forward.

    Here’s what Courtney Love’s father had to say on Facebook.

    Here’s what Manhattan-based journalist Kirby Sommers said.

    The above might sound hard to believe, but here’s something interesting to consider.

    As you can see in the above picture, Leslie Wexner (Victoria’s Secret Owner who gave over $1 billion to Epstein) has a HUGE mansion in Ohio. This mansion has a weird crop circle thing nearby.

    In the picture below, you can also see a weird crop circle next to Epstein’s New Mexico mansion. (The Clintons visited this mansion.)

    What’s the purpose of these weird crop circle things? Are space aliens visiting both Epstein and Wexner?

    Here’s one more thing that’s strange.

    There appear to be facilities below the ground on Epstein’s island. How do we know that? Well, there’s a large underground ventilation system there. (Bill Clinton was on that island too).

    So what exactly was happening underground? Why hasn’t anything been reported about that?

    We know that a huge number of girls were trafficked by Epstein, but only a few have come forward. What happened to those other girls? Were they killed?

    It’s worth exploring.

    If you disagree with my post, then you have to answer 4 questions.

    1. Epstein, Maxwell, and Wexner enticed a huge number of girls into prostitution. Only a few came forward. Where are the other girls? Wouldn’t these other girls want their 5 minutes of fame? Wouldn’t they want to sell their stories to the media? Are these girls “hiding” somewhere?

    2. What are all those weird crop circle things next to Epstein’s New Mexico mansion and Wexner’s Ohio mansion? Do you guys have anything like that on your property?

    3. What the hell was going on underground in Epstein’s island?

    4. Why would Courtney Love’s father make these allegations about his daughter?

    • LOL: Chrisnonymous, Kyle
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/Kabamur_Taygeta/status/1197650923922702338

    Replies: @wren

    , @BenKenobi
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I'm two degrees separated from Epstein via Courtney Love. That's pretty wild.

    Replies: @jack daniels

    , @Bert
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Johnny, you provide a lot of circumstantial evidence that Epstein and his associates could have committed crimes far worse than violation of age of consent statutes.

    But don't leave out the counterfactual argument.

    To infer what Epstein's activities involved, the counterfactual statements are: "Without Jeffrey Epstein, older men could not find young women for sexual acitivities." And "Without secure locations, Jeffrey Epstein could not have supplied young women to older men." In an earlier thread, I argued that the first statement is false, implying that some of Epstein's older men were interested in something more taboo than extramarital sex. It seems clear that the second statement is also false, implying that some taboo activities might have been horrific.

    , @Paco Wové
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Learn to use the "MORE" tag for your obsessions, jackass.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Kyle
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Yes. The CIA is hugely interested in performing satanic rituals. That way they can give all of their agents demonic super powers. It’s settled science.

    1. The other girls are probably still prostitutes or have wound up dead, like most prostitutes.

    2. A garden and fountain.

    3. Structures on islands don’t have basements because they would flood. That structure on Epstein’s island looks like an industrial sized AC unit. Or if he did have a basement it would need one hell of a pumping unit to mitigate bad floods. Perhaps that’s it.

    4. His daughter is a train wreck.

  11. @Ben tillman
    Is anyone going to ask what Cold Harbor’s “mission and values” are?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Is anyone going to ask what Cold Harbor’s “mission and values” are?

    Apparently, it’s mission is now the dissemination of lies; it’s chief value, dishonesty.

    • Agree: SimpleSong
  12. @JohnnyWalker123
    A lot of people keep asking why more girls haven't come forward.

    Here's what Courtney Love's father had to say on Facebook.

    https://i.imgur.com/fxEufHGl.png

    Here's what Manhattan-based journalist Kirby Sommers said.

    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1225098298303963136

    The above might sound hard to believe, but here's something interesting to consider.

    As you can see in the above picture, Leslie Wexner (Victoria's Secret Owner who gave over $1 billion to Epstein) has a HUGE mansion in Ohio. This mansion has a weird crop circle thing nearby.

    In the picture below, you can also see a weird crop circle next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion. (The Clintons visited this mansion.)

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/579a58884bef48648181e383d1503a11/3000.jpeg

    What's the purpose of these weird crop circle things? Are space aliens visiting both Epstein and Wexner?

    Here's one more thing that's strange.

    There appear to be facilities below the ground on Epstein's island. How do we know that? Well, there's a large underground ventilation system there. (Bill Clinton was on that island too).

    https://twitter.com/Sacha_Dobler/status/1161269318635491331

    So what exactly was happening underground? Why hasn't anything been reported about that?

    We know that a huge number of girls were trafficked by Epstein, but only a few have come forward. What happened to those other girls? Were they killed?

    It's worth exploring.

    If you disagree with my post, then you have to answer 4 questions.

    1. Epstein, Maxwell, and Wexner enticed a huge number of girls into prostitution. Only a few came forward. Where are the other girls? Wouldn't these other girls want their 5 minutes of fame? Wouldn't they want to sell their stories to the media? Are these girls "hiding" somewhere?

    2. What are all those weird crop circle things next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion and Wexner's Ohio mansion? Do you guys have anything like that on your property?

    3. What the hell was going on underground in Epstein's island?

    4. Why would Courtney Love's father make these allegations about his daughter?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @BenKenobi, @Bert, @Paco Wové, @Kyle

    • Replies: @wren
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I always read that labyrinth pattern on Epstein's pedo island as a billboard saying, simply, "PEDO."

    You have to squint a little and mentally add a stem on the "P."

    It sure doesn't look fancy.

    Knowing what Clinton did with his intern and other women, (and wondering about Hillary and Huma), surely the Clintons were involved in all kinds of shenanigans there.

    And yet I have almost no expectations about any of it ever seeing the light of day.

    Replies: @SFG, @Bucky

  13. If Amy Harmon were not a real person, I’d almost think she was one of those cardboard-cutout villains from an Ayn Rand novel – the dull-witted conformist drone enforcing a dishonest orthodoxy.

  14. It is amusing how they rush to denounce Watson, but stop short of saying that he is wrong.

  15. vhrm says:

    What’s particularly interesting about this is that that chances are 90+% that Watson’s broadly correct.

    Surely most people in the field know this. So they know they’re being the Church to Watson’s Galileo…
    We’re basically seeing in realtime a whole generation of psychologists, cog sci people etc making a Faustian bargain of sorts: they know they’re lying and that it’s inevitable that they’ll eventually be found out, but they need to get their grants and tenure now so they’re ok lying about it since everyone else is. If 10 or 20 years from now the sham is shown up who really cares? By then they’ll have cashed out/ retired etc. or simply “evolved their views” like Obama on gay marriage.

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @vhrm


    If 10 or 20 years from now the sham is shown up who really cares? By then they’ll have cashed out/ retired etc. or simply “evolved their views”

     

    Ten years from now you'll be in a slave labor camp for even thinking that.
    , @Bert
    @vhrm

    Truth barely exists in universities nowadays. No one cares about anything except their benefits, broadly defined.

    , @Prof. Woland
    @vhrm

    What will end this debate is when we can actually start selecting genetic traits we desire in our children. In spite of the dogma, people will be under enormous pressure to make their children taller, better looking, healthier, and smarter and no amount of happy talk will change that. At that point, 100 + years of debate will be over and the 'proof' will be in the pudding.

    Replies: @Ancient Briton

    , @Anonymous
    @vhrm

    "Treason is a matter of dates"

  16. OK, readers, if you are a young, white, male, aspiring scientist or innovator you need to learn something from this.

    James Watson, one of the most accomplished scientists in history is being unpersoned. Maybe your dream is to be one tenth the scientist that Watson was. (I would have been happy to have been 1/1000th.)

    If that is your dream, and if you choose the traditional career path and work within the current Research Industrial Complex, and you do in fact discover something significant (no guarantee of that) you will likely either

    1.) never get credit–it will go to whomever had the darkest complexion in the lab at the time of discovery, regardless of whether that person can tie their own shoes, or
    2.) you will be given credit but you will be unpersoned as soon as you utter a heterodox opinion. So the prize for your discovery will be a life in a straitjacket.

    So it is time to consider putting those dreams away. You need to get as far away from these institutions as possible, but don’t stop making things. Channel your inner Ron Unz. Turn your creative energy into tearing these institutions down by making them irrelevant. Tor, bitcoin, online education models, tech innovations that help people live off grid, 3d printing, this sort of thing. That is what the world needs right now. Support others who are innovating in this vein, use their stuff, evangelize. Realistically, you won’t have the power to do much by yourself . This is OK. Do what you can.

    • Agree: Lurker
  17. The best response to Harmon is about 4-5 comments down: “And yet it moves.”

    “Eppur si muove.” A real or alleged quote from Galileo, when he was silenced by the Church for claiming that Earth orbits the Sun.

    These people are pushing a fanatical religion. They are stifling fact in the name of some ideals they have pulled from the sky…or from their ass…and want to believe in just because, and will persecute anyone who doesn’t agree.

    There is no better response to any of that than “And yet it moves.”

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Wilkey


    There is no better response to any of that than “And yet it moves.”
     
    It's a reasonable "historically literate burn", so historically-literate people will smirk and think "Sick burn, bro".

    But it's actually not a sick burn, because it will go completely over the heads of anyone who is not already decided.

    For it to achieve anything would require more than zero people on a Twitter thread who were
     ⓪ undecided or blue-pilled; and
     ① understood the reference; and
     ② make the link between Galileo and Watson; and
     ③ switch to the correct (i.e., redpill) side.

    Pr(⓪ ∧ ① ∧ ②∧ ③ | in amy_harmon Twitter feed) ≡ 0.00000

    Same is true of the 'OK Kaganovich' and 'Congratulations Lysenko' comments; it's even worse than casting pearls before swine, it's like dropping a pearl outside the front gate of a Smithfield Foods CAFO. That's because Harmon and her ilk are perfectly comfortable with Beria/Lysenko/Kaganovich methods; it's practically their intellectual heritage (along with Richelieue).

    , @Giancarlo M. Kumquat
    @Wilkey

    George Costanza: Ea movetur. It moved.

  18. In related news, Steven Pinker is about to get canceled:

    • Replies: @Bucky
    @JohnnyD

    Yikes

    , @Anonymous
    @JohnnyD

    As of last night the signatories were a bunch of nobodies. A majority of people who listed their affiliation as "PhD Candidate" or "consultant, private industry," or even listed no affiliation. A few actual professors but no names I recognized. It is (so far) a nothing burger.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @JohnnyD

    By now, I should be used to it, but I am still shocked when people say, essentially, "disproving my central claims proves you are dishonest and evil".

    In this battle, Pinker's central problem is going to be his intelligence. People like Pinker who fundmentally get what stats mean aren't good at communicating the meaning to dumber people.

    This is just a microcosm of the whole BLM movement. Viral video vs inferring things from data--viral video wins, even with people who can get decent grades in university.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @MEH 0910
    @JohnnyD

    https://twitter.com/Evolutionistrue/status/1279829924258500608

    https://twitter.com/charlesmurray/status/1280112960443203591

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  19. What’s particularly interesting about this is that that chances are 90+% that Watson’s broadly correct.

    90% ??? I’d say his conclusions are pretty much ironclad. I mean, seriously ?

    We’re basically seeing in realtime a whole generation of psychologists, cog sci people etc making a Faustian bargain of sorts: they know they’re lying and that it’s inevitable that they’ll eventually be found out, but they need to get their grants and tenure now so they’re ok lying about it since everyone else is.

    You are overestimating those quacks. Most of them are only slightly more intelligent than squirrels. You are also underestimating the power of groupthink and self-delusion. I think most of those so-called scientists genuinely believe that race does not exist. Oh, and doing actual cognitive science research is pretty much verboten, just look at what happened to Steve Hsu.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Black-hole creator

    It's not even about how good they are as psychologists: Outside of ethnic studies and the like profs (and even grad students) at elite institutions are relatively high IQ and spend their time surrounded by high IQ people.

    The profs will notice that they've only ever met a handful of really smart NAM colleagues and that most of their NAM students, applicants to their grad programs, applicants for faculty jobs etc were relatively lackluster.

    They know because they live in a world on the right side of the IQ distribution where the differences are stark.

    Replies: @NOTA

  20. @wren
    nyt "journalists" are becoming an increasingly bigger joke by the day.

    For example, this nyt "journalist" skips the main part of the story when she complains about some guy named Balaji harassing her.

    https://hotair.com/archives/john-s-2/2020/07/01/ny-times-tech-journalist-complains-harassed-omits-harassment-paraphrase-something-wrote/

    Eventually, these kinds of folks are going to push back.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @El Dato

    For example, this nyt “journalist” skips the main part of the story when she complains about some guy named Balaji harassing her.

    I did some research. The guy named Balaji is Balaji Srinivasan, a general partner at Andreesen Horowitz, and he founded and sold a Silicon Valley firm for a few hundred million dollars. Trump had him shortlisted to run the FDA. From his page

    Srinivasan holds a BS, MS, and PhD in Electrical Engineering and an MS in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University. He also teaches the occasional class at Stanford …

    • Replies: @wren
    @PiltdownMan

    Wow! That's pretty impressive.

    Must be a smart guy.

    Maybe Trump will offer him a cabinet position in his second term.

  21. The problem is this will slow innovation. Most scientists are motivated by fame. All this has a demoralizing/demotivating effect and that means the rest of us will suffer.

    If someone comes up with a lifesaving technology, do you really care what their personal opinions are on anything?

    These crazy anti-White Leftists are not just vicious, they are stupidly suicidal.

  22. I love the way the press release cannot even bring itself to give the name before the change, only saying that it was “named after” Watson.

  23. @JohnnyWalker123
    A lot of people keep asking why more girls haven't come forward.

    Here's what Courtney Love's father had to say on Facebook.

    https://i.imgur.com/fxEufHGl.png

    Here's what Manhattan-based journalist Kirby Sommers said.

    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1225098298303963136

    The above might sound hard to believe, but here's something interesting to consider.

    As you can see in the above picture, Leslie Wexner (Victoria's Secret Owner who gave over $1 billion to Epstein) has a HUGE mansion in Ohio. This mansion has a weird crop circle thing nearby.

    In the picture below, you can also see a weird crop circle next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion. (The Clintons visited this mansion.)

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/579a58884bef48648181e383d1503a11/3000.jpeg

    What's the purpose of these weird crop circle things? Are space aliens visiting both Epstein and Wexner?

    Here's one more thing that's strange.

    There appear to be facilities below the ground on Epstein's island. How do we know that? Well, there's a large underground ventilation system there. (Bill Clinton was on that island too).

    https://twitter.com/Sacha_Dobler/status/1161269318635491331

    So what exactly was happening underground? Why hasn't anything been reported about that?

    We know that a huge number of girls were trafficked by Epstein, but only a few have come forward. What happened to those other girls? Were they killed?

    It's worth exploring.

    If you disagree with my post, then you have to answer 4 questions.

    1. Epstein, Maxwell, and Wexner enticed a huge number of girls into prostitution. Only a few came forward. Where are the other girls? Wouldn't these other girls want their 5 minutes of fame? Wouldn't they want to sell their stories to the media? Are these girls "hiding" somewhere?

    2. What are all those weird crop circle things next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion and Wexner's Ohio mansion? Do you guys have anything like that on your property?

    3. What the hell was going on underground in Epstein's island?

    4. Why would Courtney Love's father make these allegations about his daughter?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @BenKenobi, @Bert, @Paco Wové, @Kyle

    I’m two degrees separated from Epstein via Courtney Love. That’s pretty wild.

    • Replies: @jack daniels
    @BenKenobi

    Really like the Hole video on YouTube where she lets the groupie sing with her on Celebrity Skin (a great song btw).

  24. @PiltdownMan
    @wren


    For example, this nyt “journalist” skips the main part of the story when she complains about some guy named Balaji harassing her.
     
    I did some research. The guy named Balaji is Balaji Srinivasan, a general partner at Andreesen Horowitz, and he founded and sold a Silicon Valley firm for a few hundred million dollars. Trump had him shortlisted to run the FDA. From his page

    Srinivasan holds a BS, MS, and PhD in Electrical Engineering and an MS in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University. He also teaches the occasional class at Stanford ...
     
    https://i.imgur.com/9sPd5ND.jpg

    Replies: @wren

    Wow! That’s pretty impressive.

    Must be a smart guy.

    Maybe Trump will offer him a cabinet position in his second term.

  25. • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @MEH 0910

    "My DMs are always open to those who support my Narrative."

  26. The White global anthem

  27. @Hockamaw
    Amy Harmon, by the way, for those of you who are keeping score, is a Jew.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @bigdicknick, @Achilles Wannabe

    Amy Harmon, by the way, for those of you who are keeping score, is a Jew.

    The word is Jewess. And this means she almost certainly supports the Epperson v. Arkansas decision.

    However, I believe Watson did, too. Which means at some level, they’re on the same wavelength, the same side. Against Arkansans.

    Who can we trust anymore?

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    the Epperson v. Arkansas decision
     
    Reg, at heart you’re an old-timey devout Black church lady. You’re voting for that nice man Joe Biden, aren’t you ?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPMuLL81WC4

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  28. @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    As Feynman said:

    “From a long view of the history of mankind, seen from, say, ten thousand years from now, there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell’s discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade.”

    Discovering DNA is in the same category, but for twentieth century (there are a few other big ones in that one).

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @indeed


    As Feynman said:

    “From a long view of the history of mankind, seen from, say, ten thousand years from now, there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell’s discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade.”

    Discovering DNA is in the same category, but for twentieth century (there are a few other big ones in that one).
     
    That's a nice sentiment, and an understandable one from a scientist, but it isn't true. You could say the same thing about technological developments of the distant past - brickmaking, the horseshoe, whatever. But we don't much remember them, Instead we remember the exploits of "Great Men" - the Punic Wars, or the Conquest of Gaul, or the campaigns of Ramesses II.

    History is written by historians, and they are primarily interested in power and the people who wield it (or at least the people who are perceived to have wielded it). And the powerful themselves are primarily interested in themselves, and favor those who chronicle their exploits.

    Scientists and engineers are viewed as mere technicians. They are not deemed that important. Of course their work IS important, as it creates the material circumstances of our lives. But it is seldom seen to be the case. Now that might change from the present time on, but there it will not necessarily be the case.

    I think the World would be a better place if people like Feynman were more likely to be hailed as heroes worthy of emulation than generals and politicians are. But that doesn't appear to be the world we live in.
  29. @vhrm
    What's particularly interesting about this is that that chances are 90+% that Watson's broadly correct.

    Surely most people in the field know this. So they know they're being the Church to Watson's Galileo...
    We're basically seeing in realtime a whole generation of psychologists, cog sci people etc making a Faustian bargain of sorts: they know they're lying and that it's inevitable that they'll eventually be found out, but they need to get their grants and tenure now so they're ok lying about it since everyone else is. If 10 or 20 years from now the sham is shown up who really cares? By then they'll have cashed out/ retired etc. or simply "evolved their views" like Obama on gay marriage.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Bert, @Prof. Woland, @Anonymous

    If 10 or 20 years from now the sham is shown up who really cares? By then they’ll have cashed out/ retired etc. or simply “evolved their views”

    Ten years from now you’ll be in a slave labor camp for even thinking that.

  30. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/amy_harmon/status/1279260754370351106

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    “My DMs are always open to those who support my Narrative.”

  31. @Ano
    @Abe

    Optimist!

    The way it's going, it's just as likely, in a world ruled over by Amy Harmons, we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don't be surprised if that day is closer than you think.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Ragno, @PiltdownMan

    The way it’s going, it’s just as likely, in a world ruled over by Amy Harmons, we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don’t be surprised if that day is closer than you think.

    Behind the times Ano, the BBC has already done a docudrama (i.e. fiction) where the diverse one did all the hard work and the evil white males exploited it.

  32. wren says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/Kabamur_Taygeta/status/1197650923922702338

    Replies: @wren

    I always read that labyrinth pattern on Epstein’s pedo island as a billboard saying, simply, “PEDO.”

    You have to squint a little and mentally add a stem on the “P.”

    It sure doesn’t look fancy.

    Knowing what Clinton did with his intern and other women, (and wondering about Hillary and Huma), surely the Clintons were involved in all kinds of shenanigans there.

    And yet I have almost no expectations about any of it ever seeing the light of day.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @wren

    Probably he just thought he was living out the secret rich-people-orgy scene from 'Eyes Wide Shut' (and if he'd stuck to women of legal age, he probably would have gotten away with it).

    I wouldn't make too much of the occult symbolism. I've found Christians get very fascinated by the patterns and decorations on these sites of iniquity because churches actually do have layouts and carvings and so on that are rich with symbolism and go back centuries--the cross-shaped layout of a cathedral, the special names for all the parts, transepts and altars and naves and narthexes and vestibules, and so on. A cathedral is the culmination of centuries of 'sacred technology' developed to create a sense of the religious and wonder before the Lord.

    But people doing bad stuff? Except for the occasional cultist, usually they just want to kill and rape and get away with it (and Epstein did for a while). At most the guy wanted to imagine he was some god-king from ancient times or something. That there's some whole 'inverse Christianity' devoted to worshipping Satan and doing evil deeds with a hierarchy of sins that are actually holy in their mirrored liturgy I doubt. There are Satanists, but they're mostly people trying to shock evangelical Christians--people actually planning to commit murder and rape don't draw attention to themselves with Black Masses and pentagrams.

    This is why Qanon gets so worked up over stuff like 'Spirit Cooking', which was another ugly art installation, not some satanic ritual. The people destroying America are driven by greed and hubris (and in some cases tribalism); there's no goat-headed demon calling the shots.

    Replies: @BB753, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Bucky
    @wren

    The Epstein thing is amusing, but really, he likes young girls. It is weird when he has a perfectly fine woman in Ms Maxwell who would have loved him etc if he had just chosen to be conventional.

    But at the early 1900's he would not be considered a pedo because the age of consent in many if not most States was like 14.

    Pedo is targeting pre-puberty girls. He did not target pre-puberty girls.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @syonredux

  33. Bert says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    A lot of people keep asking why more girls haven't come forward.

    Here's what Courtney Love's father had to say on Facebook.

    https://i.imgur.com/fxEufHGl.png

    Here's what Manhattan-based journalist Kirby Sommers said.

    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1225098298303963136

    The above might sound hard to believe, but here's something interesting to consider.

    As you can see in the above picture, Leslie Wexner (Victoria's Secret Owner who gave over $1 billion to Epstein) has a HUGE mansion in Ohio. This mansion has a weird crop circle thing nearby.

    In the picture below, you can also see a weird crop circle next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion. (The Clintons visited this mansion.)

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/579a58884bef48648181e383d1503a11/3000.jpeg

    What's the purpose of these weird crop circle things? Are space aliens visiting both Epstein and Wexner?

    Here's one more thing that's strange.

    There appear to be facilities below the ground on Epstein's island. How do we know that? Well, there's a large underground ventilation system there. (Bill Clinton was on that island too).

    https://twitter.com/Sacha_Dobler/status/1161269318635491331

    So what exactly was happening underground? Why hasn't anything been reported about that?

    We know that a huge number of girls were trafficked by Epstein, but only a few have come forward. What happened to those other girls? Were they killed?

    It's worth exploring.

    If you disagree with my post, then you have to answer 4 questions.

    1. Epstein, Maxwell, and Wexner enticed a huge number of girls into prostitution. Only a few came forward. Where are the other girls? Wouldn't these other girls want their 5 minutes of fame? Wouldn't they want to sell their stories to the media? Are these girls "hiding" somewhere?

    2. What are all those weird crop circle things next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion and Wexner's Ohio mansion? Do you guys have anything like that on your property?

    3. What the hell was going on underground in Epstein's island?

    4. Why would Courtney Love's father make these allegations about his daughter?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @BenKenobi, @Bert, @Paco Wové, @Kyle

    Johnny, you provide a lot of circumstantial evidence that Epstein and his associates could have committed crimes far worse than violation of age of consent statutes.

    But don’t leave out the counterfactual argument.

    To infer what Epstein’s activities involved, the counterfactual statements are: “Without Jeffrey Epstein, older men could not find young women for sexual acitivities.” And “Without secure locations, Jeffrey Epstein could not have supplied young women to older men.” In an earlier thread, I argued that the first statement is false, implying that some of Epstein’s older men were interested in something more taboo than extramarital sex. It seems clear that the second statement is also false, implying that some taboo activities might have been horrific.

  34. @vhrm
    What's particularly interesting about this is that that chances are 90+% that Watson's broadly correct.

    Surely most people in the field know this. So they know they're being the Church to Watson's Galileo...
    We're basically seeing in realtime a whole generation of psychologists, cog sci people etc making a Faustian bargain of sorts: they know they're lying and that it's inevitable that they'll eventually be found out, but they need to get their grants and tenure now so they're ok lying about it since everyone else is. If 10 or 20 years from now the sham is shown up who really cares? By then they'll have cashed out/ retired etc. or simply "evolved their views" like Obama on gay marriage.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Bert, @Prof. Woland, @Anonymous

    Truth barely exists in universities nowadays. No one cares about anything except their benefits, broadly defined.

  35. I love the comments on her Twitter: References to historical censorship of science, a survey of the intelligence researchers(who tend to agree with Watson) and reminders to Amy that Watson has accomplished an infinitely greater amount than she ever will. Hopefully social media censorship doesn’t make beautiful things like this impossible anytime soon.

    • Agree: vhrm
  36. vhrm says:
    @Black-hole creator

    What’s particularly interesting about this is that that chances are 90+% that Watson’s broadly correct.

     

    90% ??? I'd say his conclusions are pretty much ironclad. I mean, seriously ?


    We’re basically seeing in realtime a whole generation of psychologists, cog sci people etc making a Faustian bargain of sorts: they know they’re lying and that it’s inevitable that they’ll eventually be found out, but they need to get their grants and tenure now so they’re ok lying about it since everyone else is.

     

    You are overestimating those quacks. Most of them are only slightly more intelligent than squirrels. You are also underestimating the power of groupthink and self-delusion. I think most of those so-called scientists genuinely believe that race does not exist. Oh, and doing actual cognitive science research is pretty much verboten, just look at what happened to Steve Hsu.

    Replies: @vhrm

    It’s not even about how good they are as psychologists: Outside of ethnic studies and the like profs (and even grad students) at elite institutions are relatively high IQ and spend their time surrounded by high IQ people.

    The profs will notice that they’ve only ever met a handful of really smart NAM colleagues and that most of their NAM students, applicants to their grad programs, applicants for faculty jobs etc were relatively lackluster.

    They know because they live in a world on the right side of the IQ distribution where the differences are stark.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @vhrm

    The more obvious the truth you are trying not to know, the stronger the crimestop you need in order to avoid knowing it.

  37. Bert says:

    Slightly off topic. Link to study showing that the protests are accelerating Covid-19 infections:
    https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.29.20143131v2

    Results: We document a country-wide increase of over 3.06 cases per day, per 100,000 population, following the onset of the protests (95%CI: 2.47-3.65), and a further increase of 1.73 cases per day, per 100,000 population, in the counties in which the protests took place (95%CI: 0.59-2.87). Relative to the week preceding the onset of the protests, this represents a 61.2% country-wide increase in COVID-19 cases, and a further 34.6% increase in the protest counties. Conclusions: Our study documents a significant increase in COVID-19 case counts in counties that experienced a protest, and we conclude that social distancing practices causally impact the spread of SARS-CoV-2.

  38. @Reg Cæsar
    @Hockamaw


    Amy Harmon, by the way, for those of you who are keeping score, is a Jew.
     
    The word is Jewess. And this means she almost certainly supports the Epperson v. Arkansas decision.

    However, I believe Watson did, too. Which means at some level, they're on the same wavelength, the same side. Against Arkansans.

    Who can we trust anymore?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    the Epperson v. Arkansas decision

    Reg, at heart you’re an old-timey devout Black church lady. You’re voting for that nice man Joe Biden, aren’t you ?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I don't care about the anthropology-- as far as I care, it could be turtles all the way down.

    It's about law and politics. Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I've posed that question several times in the past month, and fellow commenters are chary about answering it.

    I think I've found our counterpart to "Islam is right about women".

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @James Speaks, @anon

  39. When is the cancel culture coming for Harmon? There’s gotta be something.

  40. She toppled a metaphorical statue.
    The primates on the streets are taking it to the next logical stage.

  41. @wren
    nyt "journalists" are becoming an increasingly bigger joke by the day.

    For example, this nyt "journalist" skips the main part of the story when she complains about some guy named Balaji harassing her.

    https://hotair.com/archives/john-s-2/2020/07/01/ny-times-tech-journalist-complains-harassed-omits-harassment-paraphrase-something-wrote/

    Eventually, these kinds of folks are going to push back.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @El Dato

    Triggering at Twitter now so out of control that language has to be controlled:

    No more slaves and masters: Twitter engineers BAN whole range of terms in fight for ‘more inclusive language’

    I suppose some Twitter people are CHAZ survivors and brought home new ideology?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    No slaves and masters? What are car mechanics gonna tweet when discussing brakes and clutches? Oh, never mind, car mechanics have real work to do so don't twitter away their time.

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes

    , @Almost Missouri
    @El Dato

    Forbidden words:


    "Sanity check"
     
    Well, at least they're admitting they refuse to distinguish insanity from sanity.

    Replies: @NOTA

    , @Anonymous
    @El Dato



    We’re starting with a set of words we want to move away from using in favor of more inclusive language, such as:

     

    I wonder to whom, specifically, they are referring to when they use the word "we." I suspect it goes far beyond Twatter's "engineering" team.

    (Perhaps they actually meant to say, "social engineering team." That would make sense.)

    In any case, I am afraid the key word there is "starting."

    RT says:


    Among the terms to be terminated are “whitelist” and “blacklist,”“master” and “slave,” which will be replaced with “allowlist” and “denylist,” and “leader” and “follower” respectively. Gendered pronouns such as “guys” will be swapped for gender-neutral terms like “folks” and “y’all,” while the terms “man hours” and “grandfathered” will have their patriarchal connotations expunged, and will be replaced with “person hours” and “legacy status.” Even “dummy value” was deemed offensive.

     

    What should I do if I find these thinly disguised attempts at fascist repression offensive?

    Replies: @NOTA

  42. SFG says:
    @wren
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I always read that labyrinth pattern on Epstein's pedo island as a billboard saying, simply, "PEDO."

    You have to squint a little and mentally add a stem on the "P."

    It sure doesn't look fancy.

    Knowing what Clinton did with his intern and other women, (and wondering about Hillary and Huma), surely the Clintons were involved in all kinds of shenanigans there.

    And yet I have almost no expectations about any of it ever seeing the light of day.

    Replies: @SFG, @Bucky

    Probably he just thought he was living out the secret rich-people-orgy scene from ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ (and if he’d stuck to women of legal age, he probably would have gotten away with it).

    I wouldn’t make too much of the occult symbolism. I’ve found Christians get very fascinated by the patterns and decorations on these sites of iniquity because churches actually do have layouts and carvings and so on that are rich with symbolism and go back centuries–the cross-shaped layout of a cathedral, the special names for all the parts, transepts and altars and naves and narthexes and vestibules, and so on. A cathedral is the culmination of centuries of ‘sacred technology’ developed to create a sense of the religious and wonder before the Lord.

    But people doing bad stuff? Except for the occasional cultist, usually they just want to kill and rape and get away with it (and Epstein did for a while). At most the guy wanted to imagine he was some god-king from ancient times or something. That there’s some whole ‘inverse Christianity’ devoted to worshipping Satan and doing evil deeds with a hierarchy of sins that are actually holy in their mirrored liturgy I doubt. There are Satanists, but they’re mostly people trying to shock evangelical Christians–people actually planning to commit murder and rape don’t draw attention to themselves with Black Masses and pentagrams.

    This is why Qanon gets so worked up over stuff like ‘Spirit Cooking’, which was another ugly art installation, not some satanic ritual. The people destroying America are driven by greed and hubris (and in some cases tribalism); there’s no goat-headed demon calling the shots.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @SFG

    You don't need to become a card-carrying Satanist to serve Satan. You just have to carry on his plans, unwittingly, through sin. His endgame is destroying humanity , either physically or morally. In that sense, our elites are all demonic and satanic.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @SFG


    I’ve found Christians get very fascinated by the patterns and decorations on these sites of iniquity because churches actually do have layouts and carvings and so on that are rich with symbolism and go back centuries...
     
    Yes, but isn't it the low-church crowd doing most of this? It would simply be a natural extension of their basic iconoclasm. They don't like Rome any better.
  43. @JohnnyD
    In related news, Steven Pinker is about to get canceled:

    https://twitter.com/joelpust/status/1279195476613632000

    Replies: @Bucky, @Anonymous, @Chrisnonymous, @MEH 0910

    Yikes

  44. @wren
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I always read that labyrinth pattern on Epstein's pedo island as a billboard saying, simply, "PEDO."

    You have to squint a little and mentally add a stem on the "P."

    It sure doesn't look fancy.

    Knowing what Clinton did with his intern and other women, (and wondering about Hillary and Huma), surely the Clintons were involved in all kinds of shenanigans there.

    And yet I have almost no expectations about any of it ever seeing the light of day.

    Replies: @SFG, @Bucky

    The Epstein thing is amusing, but really, he likes young girls. It is weird when he has a perfectly fine woman in Ms Maxwell who would have loved him etc if he had just chosen to be conventional.

    But at the early 1900’s he would not be considered a pedo because the age of consent in many if not most States was like 14.

    Pedo is targeting pre-puberty girls. He did not target pre-puberty girls.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Bucky

    Right. Epstein was less a weird guy than a bad guy.

    , @syonredux
    @Bucky


    But at the early 1900’s he would not be considered a pedo because the age of consent in many if not most States was like 14.

    Pedo is targeting pre-puberty girls. He did not target pre-puberty girls.
     
    Yeah, the Paedo accusation is incorrect. Epstein liked "jailbait," girls a year or two below the legal age of consent.
  45. @Bucky
    @wren

    The Epstein thing is amusing, but really, he likes young girls. It is weird when he has a perfectly fine woman in Ms Maxwell who would have loved him etc if he had just chosen to be conventional.

    But at the early 1900's he would not be considered a pedo because the age of consent in many if not most States was like 14.

    Pedo is targeting pre-puberty girls. He did not target pre-puberty girls.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @syonredux

    Right. Epstein was less a weird guy than a bad guy.

  46. @Wilkey
    The best response to Harmon is about 4-5 comments down: "And yet it moves."

    "Eppur si muove." A real or alleged quote from Galileo, when he was silenced by the Church for claiming that Earth orbits the Sun.

    These people are pushing a fanatical religion. They are stifling fact in the name of some ideals they have pulled from the sky...or from their ass...and want to believe in just because, and will persecute anyone who doesn't agree.

    There is no better response to any of that than "And yet it moves."

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    There is no better response to any of that than “And yet it moves.”

    It’s a reasonable “historically literate burn”, so historically-literate people will smirk and think “Sick burn, bro“.

    But it’s actually not a sick burn, because it will go completely over the heads of anyone who is not already decided.

    For it to achieve anything would require more than zero people on a Twitter thread who were
     ⓪ undecided or blue-pilled; and
     ① understood the reference; and
     ② make the link between Galileo and Watson; and
     ③ switch to the correct (i.e., redpill) side.

    Pr(⓪ ∧ ① ∧ ②∧ ③ | in amy_harmon Twitter feed) ≡ 0.00000

    Same is true of the ‘OK Kaganovich‘ and ‘Congratulations Lysenko‘ comments; it’s even worse than casting pearls before swine, it’s like dropping a pearl outside the front gate of a Smithfield Foods CAFO. That’s because Harmon and her ilk are perfectly comfortable with Beria/Lysenko/Kaganovich methods; it’s practically their intellectual heritage (along with Richelieue).

  47. In past, say, 60-70 years US has been the world no 1. in exact sciences, bar none.

    In next, say, 30 years US will be, re exact sciences, a glorious has been.

    • Agree: donut
    • Replies: @donut
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Actually I agree with your prediction except I believe it will happen much sooner than 30 yrs.

  48. well,

    That’s silly. His work in genetic doesn’t have much bearing on the question.

  49. @BenKenobi
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I'm two degrees separated from Epstein via Courtney Love. That's pretty wild.

    Replies: @jack daniels

    Really like the Hole video on YouTube where she lets the groupie sing with her on Celebrity Skin (a great song btw).

  50. @El Dato
    @wren

    Triggering at Twitter now so out of control that language has to be controlled:

    No more slaves and masters: Twitter engineers BAN whole range of terms in fight for 'more inclusive language'

    I suppose some Twitter people are CHAZ survivors and brought home new ideology?

    https://twitter.com/TwitterEng/status/1278733305190342656

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous

    No slaves and masters? What are car mechanics gonna tweet when discussing brakes and clutches? Oh, never mind, car mechanics have real work to do so don’t twitter away their time.

    • Replies: @Calvin Hobbes
    @Achmed E. Newman


    No slaves and masters? What are car mechanics gonna tweet when discussing brakes and clutches? Oh, never mind, car mechanics have real work to do so don’t twitter away their time.
     
    I propose massa cylinder and [ebonic n-word] cylinder as the new terminology.
  51. @JohnnyWalker123
    A lot of people keep asking why more girls haven't come forward.

    Here's what Courtney Love's father had to say on Facebook.

    https://i.imgur.com/fxEufHGl.png

    Here's what Manhattan-based journalist Kirby Sommers said.

    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1225098298303963136

    The above might sound hard to believe, but here's something interesting to consider.

    As you can see in the above picture, Leslie Wexner (Victoria's Secret Owner who gave over $1 billion to Epstein) has a HUGE mansion in Ohio. This mansion has a weird crop circle thing nearby.

    In the picture below, you can also see a weird crop circle next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion. (The Clintons visited this mansion.)

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/579a58884bef48648181e383d1503a11/3000.jpeg

    What's the purpose of these weird crop circle things? Are space aliens visiting both Epstein and Wexner?

    Here's one more thing that's strange.

    There appear to be facilities below the ground on Epstein's island. How do we know that? Well, there's a large underground ventilation system there. (Bill Clinton was on that island too).

    https://twitter.com/Sacha_Dobler/status/1161269318635491331

    So what exactly was happening underground? Why hasn't anything been reported about that?

    We know that a huge number of girls were trafficked by Epstein, but only a few have come forward. What happened to those other girls? Were they killed?

    It's worth exploring.

    If you disagree with my post, then you have to answer 4 questions.

    1. Epstein, Maxwell, and Wexner enticed a huge number of girls into prostitution. Only a few came forward. Where are the other girls? Wouldn't these other girls want their 5 minutes of fame? Wouldn't they want to sell their stories to the media? Are these girls "hiding" somewhere?

    2. What are all those weird crop circle things next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion and Wexner's Ohio mansion? Do you guys have anything like that on your property?

    3. What the hell was going on underground in Epstein's island?

    4. Why would Courtney Love's father make these allegations about his daughter?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @BenKenobi, @Bert, @Paco Wové, @Kyle

    Learn to use the “MORE” tag for your obsessions, jackass.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Paco Wové


    Learn to use the “MORE” tag for your obsessions, jackass.
     
    Or just lay off his namesake.


    https://www.thespruceeats.com/thmb/BHJKwFAkLlyvnvP-ox4WbO8-rnI=/920x518/filters:fill(auto,1)/collection-image-with-18-small-c4cd0d0b190d4a638b9eada11d3e7ea0.jpg
  52. @El Dato
    @wren

    Triggering at Twitter now so out of control that language has to be controlled:

    No more slaves and masters: Twitter engineers BAN whole range of terms in fight for 'more inclusive language'

    I suppose some Twitter people are CHAZ survivors and brought home new ideology?

    https://twitter.com/TwitterEng/status/1278733305190342656

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous

    Forbidden words:

    “Sanity check”

    Well, at least they’re admitting they refuse to distinguish insanity from sanity.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Almost Missouri

    That almost has to be an easter egg stuck in by some sensible engineer stuck on the committee that put out that dumbass list.

  53. OT – NFL plans to play the “Black National Anthem” prior to Week 1’s games:

    https://madison.com/sports/football/the-nfl-plans-to-play-the-black-national-anthem-before-week-1-games-hear-the/article_94df0ee3-e757-512f-b4a6-d28c98c4f0c1.html

    For pro football, this is it for me. No more.

  54. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:

    It just dawned on me: Can Francis Crick institute in London be far behind? Like CSHL, it’s a very big deal in bio research. Crick, being smarter and less conformist than Watson, held and expressed significantly more realist views on HBD. But he was also older and died before the current wokism. So maybe his name, just like Darwin’s, will be spared.

    Francis Crick by iSteve popular author Matt Ridley is a very good biography, by the way.

  55. @Anon
    Prophetic Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (h/t Larry Johnson at https://turcopolier.typepad.com/sic_semper_tyrannis/)

    HARRISON BERGERON by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

    THE YEAR WAS 2081, and everybody was finally equal. They weren't only equal before God and the law. They were equal every which way. Nobody was smarter than anybody else. Nobody was better looking than anybody else. Nobody was
    stronger or quicker than anybody else. All this equality was due to the 211th, 212th, and 213th Amendments to the Constitution, and to the unceasing vigilance of agents of the United States Handicapper General.

    Some things about living still weren't quite right, though. April for instance, still drove people crazy by not being springtime. And it was in that clammy month that the H-G men took George and Hazel Bergeron's fourteen-year-old son, Harrison, away.

    It was tragic, all right, but George and Hazel couldn't think about it very hard. Hazel had a perfectly average intelligence, which meant she couldn't think about anything except in short bursts. And George, while his intelligence was way above normal, had a little mental handicap radio in his ear. He was required by law to wear it at all times. It was tuned to a government transmitter. Every twenty seconds or so, the transmitter would send out some sharp noise to keep people like George from taking unfair advantage of their brains...

    https://archive.org/stream/HarrisonBergeron/Harrison%20Bergeron_djvu.txt
     

    Replies: @Deadite

    Nowadays it’s just our iPhones that suppress our intelligence.

  56. Anonymous[789] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyD
    In related news, Steven Pinker is about to get canceled:

    https://twitter.com/joelpust/status/1279195476613632000

    Replies: @Bucky, @Anonymous, @Chrisnonymous, @MEH 0910

    As of last night the signatories were a bunch of nobodies. A majority of people who listed their affiliation as “PhD Candidate” or “consultant, private industry,” or even listed no affiliation. A few actual professors but no names I recognized. It is (so far) a nothing burger.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Anonymous

    So were the people who got Steve Hsu canned from his VP position at Michigan State, nobodies in large part are leading these attempts at enforcing ideological conformity.

  57. @SFG
    @wren

    Probably he just thought he was living out the secret rich-people-orgy scene from 'Eyes Wide Shut' (and if he'd stuck to women of legal age, he probably would have gotten away with it).

    I wouldn't make too much of the occult symbolism. I've found Christians get very fascinated by the patterns and decorations on these sites of iniquity because churches actually do have layouts and carvings and so on that are rich with symbolism and go back centuries--the cross-shaped layout of a cathedral, the special names for all the parts, transepts and altars and naves and narthexes and vestibules, and so on. A cathedral is the culmination of centuries of 'sacred technology' developed to create a sense of the religious and wonder before the Lord.

    But people doing bad stuff? Except for the occasional cultist, usually they just want to kill and rape and get away with it (and Epstein did for a while). At most the guy wanted to imagine he was some god-king from ancient times or something. That there's some whole 'inverse Christianity' devoted to worshipping Satan and doing evil deeds with a hierarchy of sins that are actually holy in their mirrored liturgy I doubt. There are Satanists, but they're mostly people trying to shock evangelical Christians--people actually planning to commit murder and rape don't draw attention to themselves with Black Masses and pentagrams.

    This is why Qanon gets so worked up over stuff like 'Spirit Cooking', which was another ugly art installation, not some satanic ritual. The people destroying America are driven by greed and hubris (and in some cases tribalism); there's no goat-headed demon calling the shots.

    Replies: @BB753, @Reg Cæsar

    You don’t need to become a card-carrying Satanist to serve Satan. You just have to carry on his plans, unwittingly, through sin. His endgame is destroying humanity , either physically or morally. In that sense, our elites are all demonic and satanic.

  58. @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    Never heard of her myself.

  59. @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    Abe, your comment, being the first here, makes it easy for me to skip the others. A few words to say it all. And in a fair universe, Harmon gets “cancelled.”

  60. @JohnnyD
    In related news, Steven Pinker is about to get canceled:

    https://twitter.com/joelpust/status/1279195476613632000

    Replies: @Bucky, @Anonymous, @Chrisnonymous, @MEH 0910

    By now, I should be used to it, but I am still shocked when people say, essentially, “disproving my central claims proves you are dishonest and evil”.

    In this battle, Pinker’s central problem is going to be his intelligence. People like Pinker who fundmentally get what stats mean aren’t good at communicating the meaning to dumber people.

    This is just a microcosm of the whole BLM movement. Viral video vs inferring things from data–viral video wins, even with people who can get decent grades in university.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous


    In this battle, Pinker’s central problem is going to be his intelligence. People like Pinker who fundmentally get what stats mean aren’t good at communicating the meaning to dumber people.
     
    A large part of YouTube is dedicated to this kind of intersectionality, those who can do and can teach. Pinker needs a good animator, as does Steve.

    Not that YouTube would let them stay for long. Unless they stayed under the radar.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  61. Kyle says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    A lot of people keep asking why more girls haven't come forward.

    Here's what Courtney Love's father had to say on Facebook.

    https://i.imgur.com/fxEufHGl.png

    Here's what Manhattan-based journalist Kirby Sommers said.

    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1225098298303963136

    The above might sound hard to believe, but here's something interesting to consider.

    As you can see in the above picture, Leslie Wexner (Victoria's Secret Owner who gave over $1 billion to Epstein) has a HUGE mansion in Ohio. This mansion has a weird crop circle thing nearby.

    In the picture below, you can also see a weird crop circle next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion. (The Clintons visited this mansion.)

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/579a58884bef48648181e383d1503a11/3000.jpeg

    What's the purpose of these weird crop circle things? Are space aliens visiting both Epstein and Wexner?

    Here's one more thing that's strange.

    There appear to be facilities below the ground on Epstein's island. How do we know that? Well, there's a large underground ventilation system there. (Bill Clinton was on that island too).

    https://twitter.com/Sacha_Dobler/status/1161269318635491331

    So what exactly was happening underground? Why hasn't anything been reported about that?

    We know that a huge number of girls were trafficked by Epstein, but only a few have come forward. What happened to those other girls? Were they killed?

    It's worth exploring.

    If you disagree with my post, then you have to answer 4 questions.

    1. Epstein, Maxwell, and Wexner enticed a huge number of girls into prostitution. Only a few came forward. Where are the other girls? Wouldn't these other girls want their 5 minutes of fame? Wouldn't they want to sell their stories to the media? Are these girls "hiding" somewhere?

    2. What are all those weird crop circle things next to Epstein's New Mexico mansion and Wexner's Ohio mansion? Do you guys have anything like that on your property?

    3. What the hell was going on underground in Epstein's island?

    4. Why would Courtney Love's father make these allegations about his daughter?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @BenKenobi, @Bert, @Paco Wové, @Kyle

    Yes. The CIA is hugely interested in performing satanic rituals. That way they can give all of their agents demonic super powers. It’s settled science.

    1. The other girls are probably still prostitutes or have wound up dead, like most prostitutes.

    2. A garden and fountain.

    3. Structures on islands don’t have basements because they would flood. That structure on Epstein’s island looks like an industrial sized AC unit. Or if he did have a basement it would need one hell of a pumping unit to mitigate bad floods. Perhaps that’s it.

    4. His daughter is a train wreck.

  62. @vhrm
    What's particularly interesting about this is that that chances are 90+% that Watson's broadly correct.

    Surely most people in the field know this. So they know they're being the Church to Watson's Galileo...
    We're basically seeing in realtime a whole generation of psychologists, cog sci people etc making a Faustian bargain of sorts: they know they're lying and that it's inevitable that they'll eventually be found out, but they need to get their grants and tenure now so they're ok lying about it since everyone else is. If 10 or 20 years from now the sham is shown up who really cares? By then they'll have cashed out/ retired etc. or simply "evolved their views" like Obama on gay marriage.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Bert, @Prof. Woland, @Anonymous

    What will end this debate is when we can actually start selecting genetic traits we desire in our children. In spite of the dogma, people will be under enormous pressure to make their children taller, better looking, healthier, and smarter and no amount of happy talk will change that. At that point, 100 + years of debate will be over and the ‘proof’ will be in the pudding.

    • Agree: Some Guy
    • Replies: @Ancient Briton
    @Prof. Woland

    The proof of the pudding is in the ... Eating.

  63. @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    I forgot who she was already. Oh, wait a minute… . NY Times, right?

  64. @Bardon Kaldian
    In past, say, 60-70 years US has been the world no 1. in exact sciences, bar none.

    In next, say, 30 years US will be, re exact sciences, a glorious has been.

    Replies: @donut

    Actually I agree with your prediction except I believe it will happen much sooner than 30 yrs.

  65. @Hockamaw
    Amy Harmon, by the way, for those of you who are keeping score, is a Jew.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @bigdicknick, @Achilles Wannabe

    named and shamed.

  66. @Wilkey
    The best response to Harmon is about 4-5 comments down: "And yet it moves."

    "Eppur si muove." A real or alleged quote from Galileo, when he was silenced by the Church for claiming that Earth orbits the Sun.

    These people are pushing a fanatical religion. They are stifling fact in the name of some ideals they have pulled from the sky...or from their ass...and want to believe in just because, and will persecute anyone who doesn't agree.

    There is no better response to any of that than "And yet it moves."

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    George Costanza: Ea movetur. It moved.

  67. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    the Epperson v. Arkansas decision
     
    Reg, at heart you’re an old-timey devout Black church lady. You’re voting for that nice man Joe Biden, aren’t you ?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPMuLL81WC4

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I don’t care about the anthropology– as far as I care, it could be turtles all the way down.

    It’s about law and politics. Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I’ve posed that question several times in the past month, and fellow commenters are chary about answering it.

    I think I’ve found our counterpart to “Islam is right about women”.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I’ve posed that question several times …
     
    You repeatedly bring up teaching creationism/religion in public schools, with the implication it should be allowed if enough voters want it. I say turn to private/parochial/home schooling if creationism and classroom prayer is required for one’s young ‘uns.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @James Speaks
    @Reg Cæsar

    We side with local authorities and eventually they learn their dogma prevents their children from learning things they need to know. Creationism is a dead end. This might take a long time, but the alternative is to turn all decisions over to the ACLU and stands by while our liberties go down the memory hole.

    , @anon
    @Reg Cæsar


    Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I’ve posed that question several times in the past month, and fellow commenters are chary about answering it.
     
    I've posted on this before. You side with the voters for the sake of democracy. It's a mistake to not teach evolution in schools, but it is critically important to let the voters make, and live with, their own decisions, even if wrong. It's more important for Arkansas government to be accountable to the majority than it is for the majority to be right.
    That nasty teacher should have gone to the catfish fry and tried to make her case to the local folks to let her teach evolution, and then accepted their decision even if she lost. But Epperson was too stupid and cowardly and smug to talk to the farmers, so she took it to court to get elite backing against the democratic majority.
    Private schools/charter schools are a great idea - let the voters of Arkansas vote on that too and maybe some schools would teach evolution and some not.
    Sovereignty has to come first. Being right or wrong as you exercise your sovereignty is important but secondary.
  68. @Paco Wové
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Learn to use the "MORE" tag for your obsessions, jackass.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Learn to use the “MORE” tag for your obsessions, jackass.

    Or just lay off his namesake.

  69. @SFG
    @wren

    Probably he just thought he was living out the secret rich-people-orgy scene from 'Eyes Wide Shut' (and if he'd stuck to women of legal age, he probably would have gotten away with it).

    I wouldn't make too much of the occult symbolism. I've found Christians get very fascinated by the patterns and decorations on these sites of iniquity because churches actually do have layouts and carvings and so on that are rich with symbolism and go back centuries--the cross-shaped layout of a cathedral, the special names for all the parts, transepts and altars and naves and narthexes and vestibules, and so on. A cathedral is the culmination of centuries of 'sacred technology' developed to create a sense of the religious and wonder before the Lord.

    But people doing bad stuff? Except for the occasional cultist, usually they just want to kill and rape and get away with it (and Epstein did for a while). At most the guy wanted to imagine he was some god-king from ancient times or something. That there's some whole 'inverse Christianity' devoted to worshipping Satan and doing evil deeds with a hierarchy of sins that are actually holy in their mirrored liturgy I doubt. There are Satanists, but they're mostly people trying to shock evangelical Christians--people actually planning to commit murder and rape don't draw attention to themselves with Black Masses and pentagrams.

    This is why Qanon gets so worked up over stuff like 'Spirit Cooking', which was another ugly art installation, not some satanic ritual. The people destroying America are driven by greed and hubris (and in some cases tribalism); there's no goat-headed demon calling the shots.

    Replies: @BB753, @Reg Cæsar

    I’ve found Christians get very fascinated by the patterns and decorations on these sites of iniquity because churches actually do have layouts and carvings and so on that are rich with symbolism and go back centuries…

    Yes, but isn’t it the low-church crowd doing most of this? It would simply be a natural extension of their basic iconoclasm. They don’t like Rome any better.

  70. So I now have to cancel myself for having long held a feral gummint issued license as Master?

  71. @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    No slaves and masters? What are car mechanics gonna tweet when discussing brakes and clutches? Oh, never mind, car mechanics have real work to do so don't twitter away their time.

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes

    No slaves and masters? What are car mechanics gonna tweet when discussing brakes and clutches? Oh, never mind, car mechanics have real work to do so don’t twitter away their time.

    I propose massa cylinder and [ebonic n-word] cylinder as the new terminology.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  72. Anonymous[376] • Disclaimer says:
    @vhrm
    What's particularly interesting about this is that that chances are 90+% that Watson's broadly correct.

    Surely most people in the field know this. So they know they're being the Church to Watson's Galileo...
    We're basically seeing in realtime a whole generation of psychologists, cog sci people etc making a Faustian bargain of sorts: they know they're lying and that it's inevitable that they'll eventually be found out, but they need to get their grants and tenure now so they're ok lying about it since everyone else is. If 10 or 20 years from now the sham is shown up who really cares? By then they'll have cashed out/ retired etc. or simply "evolved their views" like Obama on gay marriage.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Bert, @Prof. Woland, @Anonymous

    “Treason is a matter of dates”

  73. Anonymous[376] • Disclaimer says:
    @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    Does she care what people will think of her in the future? I assume like most women Harmon only cares about interpersonal relationships and so has no thought on this matter beyond it makes my black friends unhappy.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Anonymous


    and so has no thought on this matter beyond it makes my [imaginary] black friends unhappy
     
  74. @indeed
    @Abe

    As Feynman said:

    “From a long view of the history of mankind, seen from, say, ten thousand years from now, there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell's discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade.”

    Discovering DNA is in the same category, but for twentieth century (there are a few other big ones in that one).

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    As Feynman said:

    “From a long view of the history of mankind, seen from, say, ten thousand years from now, there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell’s discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade.”

    Discovering DNA is in the same category, but for twentieth century (there are a few other big ones in that one).

    That’s a nice sentiment, and an understandable one from a scientist, but it isn’t true. You could say the same thing about technological developments of the distant past – brickmaking, the horseshoe, whatever. But we don’t much remember them, Instead we remember the exploits of “Great Men” – the Punic Wars, or the Conquest of Gaul, or the campaigns of Ramesses II.

    History is written by historians, and they are primarily interested in power and the people who wield it (or at least the people who are perceived to have wielded it). And the powerful themselves are primarily interested in themselves, and favor those who chronicle their exploits.

    Scientists and engineers are viewed as mere technicians. They are not deemed that important. Of course their work IS important, as it creates the material circumstances of our lives. But it is seldom seen to be the case. Now that might change from the present time on, but there it will not necessarily be the case.

    I think the World would be a better place if people like Feynman were more likely to be hailed as heroes worthy of emulation than generals and politicians are. But that doesn’t appear to be the world we live in.

    • Agree: Cortes
  75. @Ano
    @Abe

    Optimist!

    The way it's going, it's just as likely, in a world ruled over by Amy Harmons, we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don't be surprised if that day is closer than you think.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Ragno, @PiltdownMan

    In a world ruled over by Amy Harmons, we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Well, her or the three cleaning ladies who made space travel possible. (Oh yes it did happen! – I seen it in a movie an’ whatnot.)

  76. @Anonymous
    @Abe

    Does she care what people will think of her in the future? I assume like most women Harmon only cares about interpersonal relationships and so has no thought on this matter beyond it makes my black friends unhappy.

    Replies: @Lurker

    and so has no thought on this matter beyond it makes my [imaginary] black friends unhappy

  77. @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by… oh, yesterday.

    Harmon is of course a nothing (one who has failed to even do the one thing women are designed to do).

    But are the Chinese going to bother remembering the names of dead white guys who discovered X, Y or Z? That’s not my read on it.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @AnotherDad


    But are the Chinese going to bother remembering the names of dead white guys who discovered X, Y or Z? That’s not my read on it.
     
    Historians are nerds. The Soviets had a thing for pretending they invented everything, but for the most part history currently documents the facts as they are known. For science most of the advancement was in the West, but for math it's more spread out and that's documented and acknowledged afaik.

    Replies: @Mr. Blank

  78. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I don't care about the anthropology-- as far as I care, it could be turtles all the way down.

    It's about law and politics. Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I've posed that question several times in the past month, and fellow commenters are chary about answering it.

    I think I've found our counterpart to "Islam is right about women".

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @James Speaks, @anon

    Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I’ve posed that question several times …

    You repeatedly bring up teaching creationism/religion in public schools, with the implication it should be allowed if enough voters want it. I say turn to private/parochial/home schooling if creationism and classroom prayer is required for one’s young ‘uns.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    I say turn to private/parochial/home schooling if creationism and classroom prayer is required for one’s young ‘uns.
     
    And the same for evolution?

    (BTW, our children are homeschooled, so we're ahead of you there.)

    You repeatedly bring up teaching creationism/religion in public schools, with the implication it should be allowed if enough voters want it.
     
    Commenters here repeately bring up the ACLU and other Jewish organizations working to weaken and destroy our civilization. It follows that the "monkey trial", and their objection to the fining and dismissing of teachers who mention Darwin in schools, must be part and parcel of this effort. Thus, we're pretty much forced to side with Bryan and Sue K Hicks.

    I'm not the one who drew this circle, so don't blame me for not being able to square it!

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  79. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I’ve posed that question several times …
     
    You repeatedly bring up teaching creationism/religion in public schools, with the implication it should be allowed if enough voters want it. I say turn to private/parochial/home schooling if creationism and classroom prayer is required for one’s young ‘uns.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I say turn to private/parochial/home schooling if creationism and classroom prayer is required for one’s young ‘uns.

    And the same for evolution?

    (BTW, our children are homeschooled, so we’re ahead of you there.)

    You repeatedly bring up teaching creationism/religion in public schools, with the implication it should be allowed if enough voters want it.

    Commenters here repeately bring up the ACLU and other Jewish organizations working to weaken and destroy our civilization. It follows that the “monkey trial”, and their objection to the fining and dismissing of teachers who mention Darwin in schools, must be part and parcel of this effort. Thus, we’re pretty much forced to side with Bryan and Sue K Hicks.

    I’m not the one who drew this circle, so don’t blame me for not being able to square it!

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    And the same for evolution?
     
    No, of course not. Evolution should be taught in public schools.

    Unfortunately among the left, evolution has become a dirty word. Religion is back big time: All men, womxn, etc. are Created Equal. Except straight white males, who are Less Equal. That’s religion, and it’s taught in public (and private) schools, to the detriment of society.

    Commenters here repeatedly bring up the ACLU
     
    The old ACLU did some good work. Commenters are not criticizing everything the ACLU has done. Only the bad stuff of recent decades.

    It follows that the “monkey trial”, and their objection to the fining and dismissing of teachers who mention Darwin in schools, must be part and parcel of this effort.
     
    Nah. As I wrote, the old ACLU did some good stuff. You may side with Bryan if you want to, but there’s no logical obligation to do so just because some commenters disagree with the modern ACLU.

    I’m not the one who drew this circle, so don’t blame me for not being able to square it!
     
    Reg, you’re one of the wittier commenters; I expect you to square whatever premise you present. :)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad

  80. @Anonymous
    @JohnnyD

    As of last night the signatories were a bunch of nobodies. A majority of people who listed their affiliation as "PhD Candidate" or "consultant, private industry," or even listed no affiliation. A few actual professors but no names I recognized. It is (so far) a nothing burger.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    So were the people who got Steve Hsu canned from his VP position at Michigan State, nobodies in large part are leading these attempts at enforcing ideological conformity.

  81. @Chrisnonymous
    @JohnnyD

    By now, I should be used to it, but I am still shocked when people say, essentially, "disproving my central claims proves you are dishonest and evil".

    In this battle, Pinker's central problem is going to be his intelligence. People like Pinker who fundmentally get what stats mean aren't good at communicating the meaning to dumber people.

    This is just a microcosm of the whole BLM movement. Viral video vs inferring things from data--viral video wins, even with people who can get decent grades in university.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    In this battle, Pinker’s central problem is going to be his intelligence. People like Pinker who fundmentally get what stats mean aren’t good at communicating the meaning to dumber people.

    A large part of YouTube is dedicated to this kind of intersectionality, those who can do and can teach. Pinker needs a good animator, as does Steve.

    Not that YouTube would let them stay for long. Unless they stayed under the radar.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Reg Cæsar


    Pinker needs a good animator, as does Steve.
     
    Definitely!
  82. @Prof. Woland
    @vhrm

    What will end this debate is when we can actually start selecting genetic traits we desire in our children. In spite of the dogma, people will be under enormous pressure to make their children taller, better looking, healthier, and smarter and no amount of happy talk will change that. At that point, 100 + years of debate will be over and the 'proof' will be in the pudding.

    Replies: @Ancient Briton

    The proof of the pudding is in the … Eating.

  83. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I don't care about the anthropology-- as far as I care, it could be turtles all the way down.

    It's about law and politics. Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I've posed that question several times in the past month, and fellow commenters are chary about answering it.

    I think I've found our counterpart to "Islam is right about women".

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @James Speaks, @anon

    We side with local authorities and eventually they learn their dogma prevents their children from learning things they need to know. Creationism is a dead end. This might take a long time, but the alternative is to turn all decisions over to the ACLU and stands by while our liberties go down the memory hole.

  84. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    I say turn to private/parochial/home schooling if creationism and classroom prayer is required for one’s young ‘uns.
     
    And the same for evolution?

    (BTW, our children are homeschooled, so we're ahead of you there.)

    You repeatedly bring up teaching creationism/religion in public schools, with the implication it should be allowed if enough voters want it.
     
    Commenters here repeately bring up the ACLU and other Jewish organizations working to weaken and destroy our civilization. It follows that the "monkey trial", and their objection to the fining and dismissing of teachers who mention Darwin in schools, must be part and parcel of this effort. Thus, we're pretty much forced to side with Bryan and Sue K Hicks.

    I'm not the one who drew this circle, so don't blame me for not being able to square it!

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    And the same for evolution?

    No, of course not. Evolution should be taught in public schools.

    Unfortunately among the left, evolution has become a dirty word. Religion is back big time: All men, womxn, etc. are Created Equal. Except straight white males, who are Less Equal. That’s religion, and it’s taught in public (and private) schools, to the detriment of society.

    Commenters here repeatedly bring up the ACLU

    The old ACLU did some good work. Commenters are not criticizing everything the ACLU has done. Only the bad stuff of recent decades.

    It follows that the “monkey trial”, and their objection to the fining and dismissing of teachers who mention Darwin in schools, must be part and parcel of this effort.

    Nah. As I wrote, the old ACLU did some good stuff. You may side with Bryan if you want to, but there’s no logical obligation to do so just because some commenters disagree with the modern ACLU.

    I’m not the one who drew this circle, so don’t blame me for not being able to square it!

    Reg, you’re one of the wittier commenters; I expect you to square whatever premise you present. 🙂

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    The old ACLU did some good work. Commenters are not criticizing everything the ACLU has done. Only the bad stuff of recent decades.
     
    But they're Jewish!

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    No, of course not. Evolution should be taught in public schools.
     
    I agree. (Although i also see no need to have "public schools". Vouchers are better--even outside of questions of politics--by allowing competition in education rather than stasis, with the Fordist model).

    However, on the Constitutional question it's up to the voters of Arkansas to determine through their elected representatives what their public school curriculum is. Not me. Not you.

    If you don't like it ... roll your own, just like what you're telling Reg.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Reg Cæsar

  85. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    And the same for evolution?
     
    No, of course not. Evolution should be taught in public schools.

    Unfortunately among the left, evolution has become a dirty word. Religion is back big time: All men, womxn, etc. are Created Equal. Except straight white males, who are Less Equal. That’s religion, and it’s taught in public (and private) schools, to the detriment of society.

    Commenters here repeatedly bring up the ACLU
     
    The old ACLU did some good work. Commenters are not criticizing everything the ACLU has done. Only the bad stuff of recent decades.

    It follows that the “monkey trial”, and their objection to the fining and dismissing of teachers who mention Darwin in schools, must be part and parcel of this effort.
     
    Nah. As I wrote, the old ACLU did some good stuff. You may side with Bryan if you want to, but there’s no logical obligation to do so just because some commenters disagree with the modern ACLU.

    I’m not the one who drew this circle, so don’t blame me for not being able to square it!
     
    Reg, you’re one of the wittier commenters; I expect you to square whatever premise you present. :)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad

    The old ACLU did some good work. Commenters are not criticizing everything the ACLU has done. Only the bad stuff of recent decades.

    But they’re Jewish!

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    But they’re Jewish!
     
    NTTAWWT, amirite? ;)

    Reg, what’s going on, big guy? It seems you’re doing a surreal version of Corvinus’s strawman/question-begging shtick, e.g.: “I’m just noticing cOnTrAdiCtiOnS. If you believe x, then you must also believe this other thing I declare is connected, or else you’re a hypocrite.”

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  86. @Bucky
    @wren

    The Epstein thing is amusing, but really, he likes young girls. It is weird when he has a perfectly fine woman in Ms Maxwell who would have loved him etc if he had just chosen to be conventional.

    But at the early 1900's he would not be considered a pedo because the age of consent in many if not most States was like 14.

    Pedo is targeting pre-puberty girls. He did not target pre-puberty girls.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @syonredux

    But at the early 1900’s he would not be considered a pedo because the age of consent in many if not most States was like 14.

    Pedo is targeting pre-puberty girls. He did not target pre-puberty girls.

    Yeah, the Paedo accusation is incorrect. Epstein liked “jailbait,” girls a year or two below the legal age of consent.

  87. @Ano
    @Abe

    Optimist!

    The way it's going, it's just as likely, in a world ruled over by Amy Harmons, we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don't be surprised if that day is closer than you think.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Ragno, @PiltdownMan

    … we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don’t be surprised if that day is closer than you think.

    If that is so, I think I should repost my long post from a few years ago, with Mr. Sailer’s permission.

    There is a strong mythology nowadays of the wallflower Rosalind Franklin being cheated of her intellectual dues by the underhanded bro methods of Watson and Crick, which essentially states that they stole her intellectual property and then made fun of her. She is something of a feminist totem in that regard.

    Rosalind Franklin needs no support from feminists to safeguard her reputation. She was already one of the world’s top x-ray crystallographers when she was hired into King’s College, London to work aside Maurice Wilkins as a senior scientist. She had an aristocratic manner and was no pushover.

    At that time, the structure of DNA was only one of a few top problems in the chemistry of biological molecules, the others including the structure of hemoglobin, and other proteins.

    The centrality of Watson and Crick’s discovery to all of biological science became apparent only when they actually discovered the particulars of the double helix structure of the molecule. Its role in genetic inheritance was immediately apparent once they figured that out, first to them, and then to the world biologists and geneticists. Biochemists, though, took some more years to convince, with additional confirmatory data and analysis.

    But DNA’s monumental importance was not obvious in advance of their discovery. It was merely one of a few very interesting problems.

    Rosalind Franklin worked on the structure of DNA simultaneously, but with a more rigorous and slower crystallographic approach that required higher standards of proof. Watson and Crick tried a somewhat controversial lateral thinking model based structural approach which called heavily on spatial intuition; she went stuck to x-ray crystallography and never used the cardboard models they sent to her lab from Cambridge.

    Both Watson and Crick’s seminal paper, as well as Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkin’s papers on DNA were published in the same issue of Nature. Watson and Crick briefly acknowledged her work in their article. Franklin’s work had identified the double strand helical structure, but Watson and Crick had also discovered the structure of the base pairs, which was essential to understanding replication. It is not clear if Franklin ever focused on that particular aspect of the problem, while Watson and Crick realized its central biological importance in the last stage of their work and hurried to complete it.

    The key piece of the puzzle in terms of intellectual credit is that Franklin had previously agreed that her crystallographs were King’s College’s intellectual property and not hers.

    And she had already given notice of her resignation and move to Birbeck College when her student, Raymond Gosling, gave Watson and Crick a look at Photo 51. In this day and age, it also needs to be said that back then, university research was not played close to the chest, and was not proprietary the way it is these days, with vast commercial potential at stake.

    Watson and Crick then had their eureka moment in realizing how to modify their cardboard model based approach to arrive at the correct structure and base pairings. The photo, by itself, did not reveal enough information to deduce the complete structure in detail. Nor is it clear that Franklin saw that as particularly important.

    Franklin, of course went on to do more research at Birbeck College, and may well have won a Nobel Prize for her groundbreaking work there on the structure of the tobacco mosaic virus, may perhaps even shared the prize for DNA itself, had she lived.

    But no one stole anything, and relations between Franklin and Watson and Crick were cordial.
    What got Watson into trouble was his ‘Double Helix’ memoir, which made immature and un-chivalrous remarks about Rosalind Franklin, long after her death. He apologized for that.

    But the image stuck. Of a frat-boyish duo brushing aside and stealing a great woman scientist’s work and deliberately relegating her to obscurity, only for her reputation to be rescued by the powers of feminist narrative. It is a myth impossible to kill now.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @PiltdownMan

    Your account does not give enough credit to Crick and omits Franklin's inexcusable lack of understanding of her own crystallography. You see, one of the several "eureka!" moments was Crick's learning (from Watson, who heard it from Franklin during her open presentation) that the symmetry in the ordered DNA corresponded to the C2 space group. This told nothing to Watson (who was clueless in crystallography), this was ignored as irrelevant by Franklin (because that was just one symmetry out of >60 possible), but Crick, a physicist and crystallography autodidact, immediately realized the physical implication: There was an anti-parallel dimer in the structure (that is, two strands that run in opposite directions).

    There was plenty of luck for Watson and Crick but in the end, it was Crick's IQ that mattered most. (Just like it mattered during his later equally Nobel-worthy work on genetic code).

    Regardless, later in life Crick and Franklin became quite close friends. And Crick was very displeased with Watson's treatment of Franklin in his book.

  88. vhrm says:
    @AnotherDad
    @Abe


    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by… oh, yesterday.
     
    Harmon is of course a nothing (one who has failed to even do the one thing women are designed to do).

    But are the Chinese going to bother remembering the names of dead white guys who discovered X, Y or Z? That's not my read on it.

    Replies: @vhrm

    But are the Chinese going to bother remembering the names of dead white guys who discovered X, Y or Z? That’s not my read on it.

    Historians are nerds. The Soviets had a thing for pretending they invented everything, but for the most part history currently documents the facts as they are known. For science most of the advancement was in the West, but for math it’s more spread out and that’s documented and acknowledged afaik.

    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    @vhrm


    The Soviets had a thing for pretending they invented everything,
     
    I think this is a universal tendency. The Chinese do the same thing. It even affects non-totalitarian societies: The French have a tendency to aggrandize their historical accomplishments, for example. And America does it too — I was in college before I learned that Americans didn’t invent the automobile; a lot of Americans STILL believe the automobile was a 100 percent American invention.

    Part of the problem is that groundbreaking intellectual discoveries tend to happen in stages. Often the first guy to discover something is pretty clueless about its significance, then some other guy comes along and grasps the significance and tries to capitalize on it. Sometimes the process goes through several iterations before it finally “catches”; look at the tangled history behind the invention of the personal computer. Or just look at the history of computers in general — what was the “first computer?”

    The result is that there are often a half-dozen or so plausible claimants for every big “invention” or “discovery,” so the facts can be massaged to fit different nationalistic narratives.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

  89. @Hockamaw
    Amy Harmon, by the way, for those of you who are keeping score, is a Jew.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @bigdicknick, @Achilles Wannabe

    Thank you. I am ALWAYS keeping score.

  90. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:
    @PiltdownMan
    @Ano


    ... we will have to (if we value our jobs/careers/physical safety) say DNA was discovered by Rosalind Franklin.

    Rosalind Franklin. Full stop.

    Don’t be surprised if that day is closer than you think.
     

    If that is so, I think I should repost my long post from a few years ago, with Mr. Sailer's permission.

    There is a strong mythology nowadays of the wallflower Rosalind Franklin being cheated of her intellectual dues by the underhanded bro methods of Watson and Crick, which essentially states that they stole her intellectual property and then made fun of her. She is something of a feminist totem in that regard.

    Rosalind Franklin needs no support from feminists to safeguard her reputation. She was already one of the world’s top x-ray crystallographers when she was hired into King’s College, London to work aside Maurice Wilkins as a senior scientist. She had an aristocratic manner and was no pushover.

    At that time, the structure of DNA was only one of a few top problems in the chemistry of biological molecules, the others including the structure of hemoglobin, and other proteins.


    The centrality of Watson and Crick’s discovery to all of biological science became apparent only when they actually discovered the particulars of the double helix structure of the molecule. Its role in genetic inheritance was immediately apparent once they figured that out, first to them, and then to the world biologists and geneticists. Biochemists, though, took some more years to convince, with additional confirmatory data and analysis.

    But DNA’s monumental importance was not obvious in advance of their discovery. It was merely one of a few very interesting problems.

    Rosalind Franklin worked on the structure of DNA simultaneously, but with a more rigorous and slower crystallographic approach that required higher standards of proof. Watson and Crick tried a somewhat controversial lateral thinking model based structural approach which called heavily on spatial intuition; she went stuck to x-ray crystallography and never used the cardboard models they sent to her lab from Cambridge.

    Both Watson and Crick’s seminal paper, as well as Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkin’s papers on DNA were published in the same issue of Nature. Watson and Crick briefly acknowledged her work in their article. Franklin’s work had identified the double strand helical structure, but Watson and Crick had also discovered the structure of the base pairs, which was essential to understanding replication. It is not clear if Franklin ever focused on that particular aspect of the problem, while Watson and Crick realized its central biological importance in the last stage of their work and hurried to complete it.

    The key piece of the puzzle in terms of intellectual credit is that Franklin had previously agreed that her crystallographs were King’s College’s intellectual property and not hers.

    And she had already given notice of her resignation and move to Birbeck College when her student, Raymond Gosling, gave Watson and Crick a look at Photo 51. In this day and age, it also needs to be said that back then, university research was not played close to the chest, and was not proprietary the way it is these days, with vast commercial potential at stake.

    Watson and Crick then had their eureka moment in realizing how to modify their cardboard model based approach to arrive at the correct structure and base pairings. The photo, by itself, did not reveal enough information to deduce the complete structure in detail. Nor is it clear that Franklin saw that as particularly important.

    Franklin, of course went on to do more research at Birbeck College, and may well have won a Nobel Prize for her groundbreaking work there on the structure of the tobacco mosaic virus, may perhaps even shared the prize for DNA itself, had she lived.

    But no one stole anything, and relations between Franklin and Watson and Crick were cordial.
    What got Watson into trouble was his ‘Double Helix’ memoir, which made immature and un-chivalrous remarks about Rosalind Franklin, long after her death. He apologized for that.

    But the image stuck. Of a frat-boyish duo brushing aside and stealing a great woman scientist’s work and deliberately relegating her to obscurity, only for her reputation to be rescued by the powers of feminist narrative. It is a myth impossible to kill now.


     

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Your account does not give enough credit to Crick and omits Franklin’s inexcusable lack of understanding of her own crystallography. You see, one of the several “eureka!” moments was Crick’s learning (from Watson, who heard it from Franklin during her open presentation) that the symmetry in the ordered DNA corresponded to the C2 space group. This told nothing to Watson (who was clueless in crystallography), this was ignored as irrelevant by Franklin (because that was just one symmetry out of >60 possible), but Crick, a physicist and crystallography autodidact, immediately realized the physical implication: There was an anti-parallel dimer in the structure (that is, two strands that run in opposite directions).

    There was plenty of luck for Watson and Crick but in the end, it was Crick’s IQ that mattered most. (Just like it mattered during his later equally Nobel-worthy work on genetic code).

    Regardless, later in life Crick and Franklin became quite close friends. And Crick was very displeased with Watson’s treatment of Franklin in his book.

  91. I’d hazard a guess that Amy Harmon would flunk out of the introductory mol bio class for CSHU first years.

  92. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    And the same for evolution?
     
    No, of course not. Evolution should be taught in public schools.

    Unfortunately among the left, evolution has become a dirty word. Religion is back big time: All men, womxn, etc. are Created Equal. Except straight white males, who are Less Equal. That’s religion, and it’s taught in public (and private) schools, to the detriment of society.

    Commenters here repeatedly bring up the ACLU
     
    The old ACLU did some good work. Commenters are not criticizing everything the ACLU has done. Only the bad stuff of recent decades.

    It follows that the “monkey trial”, and their objection to the fining and dismissing of teachers who mention Darwin in schools, must be part and parcel of this effort.
     
    Nah. As I wrote, the old ACLU did some good stuff. You may side with Bryan if you want to, but there’s no logical obligation to do so just because some commenters disagree with the modern ACLU.

    I’m not the one who drew this circle, so don’t blame me for not being able to square it!
     
    Reg, you’re one of the wittier commenters; I expect you to square whatever premise you present. :)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad

    No, of course not. Evolution should be taught in public schools.

    I agree. (Although i also see no need to have “public schools”. Vouchers are better–even outside of questions of politics–by allowing competition in education rather than stasis, with the Fordist model).

    However, on the Constitutional question it’s up to the voters of Arkansas to determine through their elected representatives what their public school curriculum is. Not me. Not you.

    If you don’t like it … roll your own, just like what you’re telling Reg.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @AnotherDad


    Not me. Not you.
     
    AD, I refuse to abandon Arkansas, a proud state in our great Union, with a supercilious application of “the soft bigotry of low expectations.” Science class is for science, church is for revelation of Creation. And the Ozarks are for Mountain Daredevils.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    Vouchers are better...
     
    There is a contradiction inherent in vouchers, though. You have parents and you have taxpayers. The power given to either comes at the expense of the other.

    Yes, there is significant overlap, but far from total.
  93. @vhrm
    @AnotherDad


    But are the Chinese going to bother remembering the names of dead white guys who discovered X, Y or Z? That’s not my read on it.
     
    Historians are nerds. The Soviets had a thing for pretending they invented everything, but for the most part history currently documents the facts as they are known. For science most of the advancement was in the West, but for math it's more spread out and that's documented and acknowledged afaik.

    Replies: @Mr. Blank

    The Soviets had a thing for pretending they invented everything,

    I think this is a universal tendency. The Chinese do the same thing. It even affects non-totalitarian societies: The French have a tendency to aggrandize their historical accomplishments, for example. And America does it too — I was in college before I learned that Americans didn’t invent the automobile; a lot of Americans STILL believe the automobile was a 100 percent American invention.

    Part of the problem is that groundbreaking intellectual discoveries tend to happen in stages. Often the first guy to discover something is pretty clueless about its significance, then some other guy comes along and grasps the significance and tries to capitalize on it. Sometimes the process goes through several iterations before it finally “catches”; look at the tangled history behind the invention of the personal computer. Or just look at the history of computers in general — what was the “first computer?”

    The result is that there are often a half-dozen or so plausible claimants for every big “invention” or “discovery,” so the facts can be massaged to fit different nationalistic narratives.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Blank

    In 1979, I worked for a company that made weed whackers for the Weedeater Company -- rotating fishing line devices for gardening. The firm paid royalties to the patent holder, but other manufacturers did not on the grounds that 2 other inventors had equally good claims. The device appears to have been independently invented in three different countries in a few weeks in 1970(?). I think Weedeater hired Racehorse Haynes to defend their patent, but ended up losing.

    Or maybe I've got that backward. It looks like most sources today credit George Ballas of Houston, founder of Weed Eater Inc., as the sole inventor.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/02/business/02ballas.html?ref=deathsobituaries

    I presume Ballas hired Haynes, who was the top litigator in Houston.

    , @Anonymous
    @Mr. Blank

    Yes, the French regard Lamark not Darwin as the discoverer of evolution.

  94. @Mr. Blank
    @vhrm


    The Soviets had a thing for pretending they invented everything,
     
    I think this is a universal tendency. The Chinese do the same thing. It even affects non-totalitarian societies: The French have a tendency to aggrandize their historical accomplishments, for example. And America does it too — I was in college before I learned that Americans didn’t invent the automobile; a lot of Americans STILL believe the automobile was a 100 percent American invention.

    Part of the problem is that groundbreaking intellectual discoveries tend to happen in stages. Often the first guy to discover something is pretty clueless about its significance, then some other guy comes along and grasps the significance and tries to capitalize on it. Sometimes the process goes through several iterations before it finally “catches”; look at the tangled history behind the invention of the personal computer. Or just look at the history of computers in general — what was the “first computer?”

    The result is that there are often a half-dozen or so plausible claimants for every big “invention” or “discovery,” so the facts can be massaged to fit different nationalistic narratives.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    In 1979, I worked for a company that made weed whackers for the Weedeater Company — rotating fishing line devices for gardening. The firm paid royalties to the patent holder, but other manufacturers did not on the grounds that 2 other inventors had equally good claims. The device appears to have been independently invented in three different countries in a few weeks in 1970(?). I think Weedeater hired Racehorse Haynes to defend their patent, but ended up losing.

    Or maybe I’ve got that backward. It looks like most sources today credit George Ballas of Houston, founder of Weed Eater Inc., as the sole inventor.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/02/business/02ballas.html?ref=deathsobituaries

    I presume Ballas hired Haynes, who was the top litigator in Houston.

  95. @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    People may not remember Amy Harmon’s name—I only know of it, thanks to Steve—but she exerts tremendous influence from her perch at the new york times. Tens of thousands of pc school teachers, professors, staffers and administrators read her, er, “things” religiously, and impose her party line.

  96. @Abe
    Barring global thermonuclear war or impact with a Hawaii-sized asteroid, James Watson’s name will always be remembered. Amy Harmon’s name, on the other hand, will have been forgotten by... oh, yesterday.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Ano, @indeed, @Jim Christian, @Buffalo Joe, @Prester John, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Nicholas Stix, @Nicholas Stix

    People may not remember Amy Harmon’s name—I only know of it, thanks to Steve—but she exerts tremendous influence from her perch at the new york times. Tens of thousands of pc school teachers, professors, staffers and administrators read her, er, “things” religiously, and impose her party line.

  97. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    The old ACLU did some good work. Commenters are not criticizing everything the ACLU has done. Only the bad stuff of recent decades.
     
    But they're Jewish!

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    But they’re Jewish!

    NTTAWWT, amirite? 😉

    Reg, what’s going on, big guy? It seems you’re doing a surreal version of Corvinus’s strawman/question-begging shtick, e.g.: “I’m just noticing cOnTrAdiCtiOnS. If you believe x, then you must also believe this other thing I declare is connected, or else you’re a hypocrite.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I'm just allergic to the "unified field" explanations of decadence, "It's all their fault!". I stand with Pogo:

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-HYDiYulKRQM/TbSsfpzW56I/AAAAAAAADU8/Vhgle2sJ6Ak/s400/Pogo+4.jpg


    I'm just wired to mock them, as is Steve. (Aha-- so that's why I spend so much time here!)

    It also helps reveal how much "opposite" sides have in common, such as BLM progressives and neo-Confederates, whose arguments both hang on the purported value to the white man of Africans.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  98. @AnotherDad
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    No, of course not. Evolution should be taught in public schools.
     
    I agree. (Although i also see no need to have "public schools". Vouchers are better--even outside of questions of politics--by allowing competition in education rather than stasis, with the Fordist model).

    However, on the Constitutional question it's up to the voters of Arkansas to determine through their elected representatives what their public school curriculum is. Not me. Not you.

    If you don't like it ... roll your own, just like what you're telling Reg.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Reg Cæsar

    Not me. Not you.

    AD, I refuse to abandon Arkansas, a proud state in our great Union, with a supercilious application of “the soft bigotry of low expectations.” Science class is for science, church is for revelation of Creation. And the Ozarks are for Mountain Daredevils.

  99. Anonymous[302] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Blank
    @vhrm


    The Soviets had a thing for pretending they invented everything,
     
    I think this is a universal tendency. The Chinese do the same thing. It even affects non-totalitarian societies: The French have a tendency to aggrandize their historical accomplishments, for example. And America does it too — I was in college before I learned that Americans didn’t invent the automobile; a lot of Americans STILL believe the automobile was a 100 percent American invention.

    Part of the problem is that groundbreaking intellectual discoveries tend to happen in stages. Often the first guy to discover something is pretty clueless about its significance, then some other guy comes along and grasps the significance and tries to capitalize on it. Sometimes the process goes through several iterations before it finally “catches”; look at the tangled history behind the invention of the personal computer. Or just look at the history of computers in general — what was the “first computer?”

    The result is that there are often a half-dozen or so plausible claimants for every big “invention” or “discovery,” so the facts can be massaged to fit different nationalistic narratives.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    Yes, the French regard Lamark not Darwin as the discoverer of evolution.

  100. @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous


    In this battle, Pinker’s central problem is going to be his intelligence. People like Pinker who fundmentally get what stats mean aren’t good at communicating the meaning to dumber people.
     
    A large part of YouTube is dedicated to this kind of intersectionality, those who can do and can teach. Pinker needs a good animator, as does Steve.

    Not that YouTube would let them stay for long. Unless they stayed under the radar.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Pinker needs a good animator, as does Steve.

    Definitely!

  101. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @El Dato
    @wren

    Triggering at Twitter now so out of control that language has to be controlled:

    No more slaves and masters: Twitter engineers BAN whole range of terms in fight for 'more inclusive language'

    I suppose some Twitter people are CHAZ survivors and brought home new ideology?

    https://twitter.com/TwitterEng/status/1278733305190342656

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous

    We’re starting with a set of words we want to move away from using in favor of more inclusive language, such as:

    I wonder to whom, specifically, they are referring to when they use the word “we.” I suspect it goes far beyond Twatter’s “engineering” team.

    (Perhaps they actually meant to say, “social engineering team.” That would make sense.)

    In any case, I am afraid the key word there is “starting.”

    RT says:

    Among the terms to be terminated are “whitelist” and “blacklist,”“master” and “slave,” which will be replaced with “allowlist” and “denylist,” and “leader” and “follower” respectively. Gendered pronouns such as “guys” will be swapped for gender-neutral terms like “folks” and “y’all,” while the terms “man hours” and “grandfathered” will have their patriarchal connotations expunged, and will be replaced with “person hours” and “legacy status.” Even “dummy value” was deemed offensive.

    What should I do if I find these thinly disguised attempts at fascist repression offensive?

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Anonymous

    Most of these have no history of racial association. This is cosmetic change done to avoid having to do real
    change.

    What fraction of Twitter's engineering team is black? My guess is that they would much rather be the wokest of the woke than to have to face pressure to make their engineering team "look like America." Spreading bullshit that the literal-minded types who congregate in tech will take much too seriously is a small price to pay for continuing to have 90% male and 60/40 Asian/white engineers.

  102. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    But they’re Jewish!
     
    NTTAWWT, amirite? ;)

    Reg, what’s going on, big guy? It seems you’re doing a surreal version of Corvinus’s strawman/question-begging shtick, e.g.: “I’m just noticing cOnTrAdiCtiOnS. If you believe x, then you must also believe this other thing I declare is connected, or else you’re a hypocrite.”

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I’m just allergic to the “unified field” explanations of decadence, “It’s all their fault!”. I stand with Pogo:

    I’m just wired to mock them, as is Steve. (Aha– so that’s why I spend so much time here!)

    It also helps reveal how much “opposite” sides have in common, such as BLM progressives and neo-Confederates, whose arguments both hang on the purported value to the white man of Africans.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    I’m just allergic to the “unified field” explanations of decadence
     
    Ah. Fair enough. Although it’s easy to get tempted into anachronistic, facile strains of rhetoric if one isn’t being direct. I daresay ‘syntax precision’ Reg and ‘coy rhetoric’ Reg are at odds, stylistically. Perhaps the former is unconscious cover for the latter? Is there hinted decadence in the heart of Reg, obliquely revealed to us iStevers in some of your more off-color posts? We can only guess.
  103. @AnotherDad
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    No, of course not. Evolution should be taught in public schools.
     
    I agree. (Although i also see no need to have "public schools". Vouchers are better--even outside of questions of politics--by allowing competition in education rather than stasis, with the Fordist model).

    However, on the Constitutional question it's up to the voters of Arkansas to determine through their elected representatives what their public school curriculum is. Not me. Not you.

    If you don't like it ... roll your own, just like what you're telling Reg.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Reg Cæsar

    Vouchers are better…

    There is a contradiction inherent in vouchers, though. You have parents and you have taxpayers. The power given to either comes at the expense of the other.

    Yes, there is significant overlap, but far from total.

  104. anon[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I don't care about the anthropology-- as far as I care, it could be turtles all the way down.

    It's about law and politics. Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I've posed that question several times in the past month, and fellow commenters are chary about answering it.

    I think I've found our counterpart to "Islam is right about women".

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @James Speaks, @anon

    Whom do we side with, Arkansas and Tennessee lawmakers and their constituents, or the ACLU? I’ve posed that question several times in the past month, and fellow commenters are chary about answering it.

    I’ve posted on this before. You side with the voters for the sake of democracy. It’s a mistake to not teach evolution in schools, but it is critically important to let the voters make, and live with, their own decisions, even if wrong. It’s more important for Arkansas government to be accountable to the majority than it is for the majority to be right.
    That nasty teacher should have gone to the catfish fry and tried to make her case to the local folks to let her teach evolution, and then accepted their decision even if she lost. But Epperson was too stupid and cowardly and smug to talk to the farmers, so she took it to court to get elite backing against the democratic majority.
    Private schools/charter schools are a great idea – let the voters of Arkansas vote on that too and maybe some schools would teach evolution and some not.
    Sovereignty has to come first. Being right or wrong as you exercise your sovereignty is important but secondary.

  105. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I'm just allergic to the "unified field" explanations of decadence, "It's all their fault!". I stand with Pogo:

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-HYDiYulKRQM/TbSsfpzW56I/AAAAAAAADU8/Vhgle2sJ6Ak/s400/Pogo+4.jpg


    I'm just wired to mock them, as is Steve. (Aha-- so that's why I spend so much time here!)

    It also helps reveal how much "opposite" sides have in common, such as BLM progressives and neo-Confederates, whose arguments both hang on the purported value to the white man of Africans.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I’m just allergic to the “unified field” explanations of decadence

    Ah. Fair enough. Although it’s easy to get tempted into anachronistic, facile strains of rhetoric if one isn’t being direct. I daresay ‘syntax precision’ Reg and ‘coy rhetoric’ Reg are at odds, stylistically. Perhaps the former is unconscious cover for the latter? Is there hinted decadence in the heart of Reg, obliquely revealed to us iStevers in some of your more off-color posts? We can only guess.

  106. @JohnnyD
    In related news, Steven Pinker is about to get canceled:

    https://twitter.com/joelpust/status/1279195476613632000

    Replies: @Bucky, @Anonymous, @Chrisnonymous, @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/sapinker/status/1280857867009040384

  107. @vhrm
    @Black-hole creator

    It's not even about how good they are as psychologists: Outside of ethnic studies and the like profs (and even grad students) at elite institutions are relatively high IQ and spend their time surrounded by high IQ people.

    The profs will notice that they've only ever met a handful of really smart NAM colleagues and that most of their NAM students, applicants to their grad programs, applicants for faculty jobs etc were relatively lackluster.

    They know because they live in a world on the right side of the IQ distribution where the differences are stark.

    Replies: @NOTA

    The more obvious the truth you are trying not to know, the stronger the crimestop you need in order to avoid knowing it.

  108. NOTA says:
    @Anonymous
    @El Dato



    We’re starting with a set of words we want to move away from using in favor of more inclusive language, such as:

     

    I wonder to whom, specifically, they are referring to when they use the word "we." I suspect it goes far beyond Twatter's "engineering" team.

    (Perhaps they actually meant to say, "social engineering team." That would make sense.)

    In any case, I am afraid the key word there is "starting."

    RT says:


    Among the terms to be terminated are “whitelist” and “blacklist,”“master” and “slave,” which will be replaced with “allowlist” and “denylist,” and “leader” and “follower” respectively. Gendered pronouns such as “guys” will be swapped for gender-neutral terms like “folks” and “y’all,” while the terms “man hours” and “grandfathered” will have their patriarchal connotations expunged, and will be replaced with “person hours” and “legacy status.” Even “dummy value” was deemed offensive.

     

    What should I do if I find these thinly disguised attempts at fascist repression offensive?

    Replies: @NOTA

    Most of these have no history of racial association. This is cosmetic change done to avoid having to do real
    change.

    What fraction of Twitter’s engineering team is black? My guess is that they would much rather be the wokest of the woke than to have to face pressure to make their engineering team “look like America.” Spreading bullshit that the literal-minded types who congregate in tech will take much too seriously is a small price to pay for continuing to have 90% male and 60/40 Asian/white engineers.

  109. @Almost Missouri
    @El Dato

    Forbidden words:


    "Sanity check"
     
    Well, at least they're admitting they refuse to distinguish insanity from sanity.

    Replies: @NOTA

    That almost has to be an easter egg stuck in by some sensible engineer stuck on the committee that put out that dumbass list.

  110. https://twitter.com/OsitaNwanevu/status/1280116856028901383

    • Replies: @Escher
    @MEH 0910

    Drivel.

  111. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/OsitaNwanevu/status/1280116856028901383

    https://twitter.com/zackbeauchamp/status/1280143431172608001

    Replies: @Escher

    Drivel.

  112. @MEH 0910
    @JohnnyD

    https://twitter.com/Evolutionistrue/status/1279829924258500608

    https://twitter.com/charlesmurray/status/1280112960443203591

    Replies: @MEH 0910

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