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America's Yeltsin Era: Life Expectancy Dropped in 2015
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From the Washington Post:

U.S. life expectancy declines for the first time since 1993

By Lenny Bernstein December 8 at 12:01 AM

For the first time in more than two decades, life expectancy for Americans declined last year [2015] — a troubling development linked to a panoply of worsening health problems in the United States.

Rising fatalities from heart disease and stroke, diabetes, drug overdoses, accidents and other conditions caused the lower life expectancy revealed in a report released Thursday by the National Center for Health Statistics. In all, death rates rose for eight of the top 10 leading causes of death.

“I think we should be very concerned,” said Princeton economist Anne Case, who called for thorough research on the increase in deaths from heart disease, the No. 1 killer in the United States. “This is singular. This doesn’t happen.”

A year ago, research by Case and Angus Deaton, also an economist at Princeton, brought worldwide attention to the unexpected jump in mortality rates among white middle-aged Americans. That trend was blamed on what are sometimes called diseases of despair: overdoses, alcoholism and suicide. The new report raises the possibility that major illnesses may be eroding prospects for an even wider group of Americans.

Its findings show increases in “virtually every cause of death. It’s all ages,” said David Weir, director of the health and retirement study at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Over the past five years, he noted, improvements in death rates were among the smallest of the past four decades. “There’s this just across-the-board [phenomenon] of not doing very well in the United States.”

Overall, life expectancy fell by one-tenth of a year, from 78.9 in 2014 to 78.8 in 2015, according to the latest data. The last time U.S. life expectancy at birth declined was in 1993, when it dropped from 75.6 to 75.4, according to World Bank data.

1993 had a high death rate due to AIDS, crack, and crack murders.

The overall death rate rose 1.2 percent in 2015, its first uptick since 1999. More than 2.7 million people died, about 45 percent of them from heart disease or cancer. …

The report’s lone bright spot was a drop in the death rate from cancer, probably because fewer people are smoking, the disease is being detected earlier and new treatments have been developed recently, experts said.

… Death rates rose for white men, white women and black men. They stayed essentially even for black women and Hispanic men and women. “It’s just confirming this deterioration in survival for certain groups,” said Ellen Meara, a professor at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. She wonders what factors might be protecting Hispanic men and women from the negative trend.

An alternative way of looking at is that this is still the White Death, but, perhaps, black men got hit hard by black on black homicide in 2015 due to the Ferguson Effect.

Age-adjusted death rates for selected populations. (CDC/NCHS/HHS/NVSS)
According to the new report, males could expect to live 76.3 years at birth last year, down from 76.5 in 2014. Females could expect to live to 81.2 years, down from 81.3 the previous year.

Life expectancy at age 65 did not fall, another indication that the diseases behind the lower life expectancy occur in middle age or younger.

My look at the White Death data last year suggested that there was sharp worsening of age-adjusted death rates for those born in the early 1950s versus those born in the late 1940s. My guess is that people who turned 18 from the end of the 1960s onward were more at risk of heroin or prescription opioid overdoses than those who turned 18 before “White Rabbit.”

The number of unintentional injuries — which include overdoses from drugs, alcohol and other chemicals, as well as motor vehicle crashes and other accidents — climbed to more than 146,000 in 2015 from slightly more than 136,000 in 2014.

Something is going wrong with car crash deaths. What if all the new electronic safety gizmos on cars are causing accidents? (I have no evidence for that, by the way, but somebody ought to look into it.)

Deaths from suicide, the 10th-leading cause of death in the United States, rose to 44,193 from 42,773 in 2014.

Not good.

Several experts pointed out that other Western nations are not seeing similar rises in mortality, suggesting an urgency to determine what is unique about health, health care and socioeconomic conditions in the United States.

“Mortality rates in middle age have totally flat­lined in the U.S. for people in their 30s and 40s and 50s, or have been increasing,” Case said. “What we really need to do is find out why we have stopped making progress against heart disease. And I don’t have the answer to that.”

Meara noted that more people need better health care but that “the health-care system is only a part of health.” Income inequality, nutrition differences and lingering unemployment all need to be addressed, she said.

Reminiscent of the Yeltsin years in Russia …

 
• Tags: White Death 
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  1. Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @Yep

    Also the Ferguson effect; cops aren't bothering to pull people over for bad driving, especially if they're black.

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Yep


    Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute.

     

    I find this disturbingly plausible . . . .

    Replies: @ss

    , @Jack D
    @Yep

    Yes. Whatever improvement is coming from new safety gizmos is far outweighed by people who are looking at their phones and are distracted while driving. The safety gizmos (automatic braking, lane departure warnings, etc.) haven't really penetrated the fleet much yet anyway. Even on new cars they are optional and more than half the cars that are on the road are from before they were even available.

    People need to be saved from their own idiocy. Phones should be designed so that the keyboards don't work in moving vehicles. The phones have GPS chips and know when they are moving. 90% of those texting are the drivers and not passengers so if the passengers lose their ability to text then that's a small price to be paid vs. the # of lives that will be saved. Highways need more frequent areas where drivers can pull over and read and reply to their messages safely.

    What is really amazing is how little America gets for its vast healthcare expenditure. Mexico, which spends maybe 5 pesos on its entire healthcare system, is within spitting distance of the US in life expectancy.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  2. “Reminiscent of the Yeltsin years in Russia…”

    I wonder what life expectancy looks like if you break it down by religiosity? The Left has spent several decades waging war on society’s traditional, non-government institutions – churches, the Boy Scouts, the Rotary Club, you name it. Society has become atomized, with nothing but the weak glue of mindless government institutions to hold us together.

    It sucks to grow ill and old. Growing ill and/or old in an atomized society is, in many ways, harder than growing ill or old in a society with subpar healthcare. My uncle just died a few weeks ago after a four year battle with cancer. He probably would have died long before without the material and emotional support he received from his family and his church – the kind of support fewer and fewer people have these days. The demos that have seen their life expectancies hardest hit seem to be the ones least likely to be religious and have large families around to support them.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Wilkey

    Except that life expectancy keeps rising in the UK. Their family and religious culture is just as atomized as ours.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/nov/29/life-expectancy-in-uk-rises-but-years-spent-in-good-health-falling-ons

    Life expectancy is rising in Canada too.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/ted-bruce/canadians-living-longer_b_12900896.html

    Life expectancy is rising in Australia.

    http://www.businessinsider.com.au/australians-are-now-no-7-in-the-world-when-it-comes-to-life-expectancy-2016-4

    Replies: @snorlax, @The Alarmist, @Anonymous Nephew

    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Wilkey

    Absent their love of immigrantion, which is a fairly recent phenomenon, the left is always good for a significant population drop once they get into power. The earliest example of this is post-revolutionary France. Traditionally, France had been the most populous country in Europe. They usually carried between 2 and 3 times the population of their close rival, Great Britain. From the time of Napoleon's defeat to the beginning of WW1, GB had caught up to them and Germany had far surpassed them.

    , @anon
    @Wilkey


    The demos that have seen their life expectancies hardest hit seem to be the ones least likely to be religious and have large families around to support them.
     
    No - the demos hardest hit are in the rust belt.
  3. @Yep
    Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute.

    Replies: @snorlax, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Jack D

    Also the Ferguson effect; cops aren’t bothering to pull people over for bad driving, especially if they’re black.

  4. “Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute.”

    Or maybe the important fact in there is the number of people doing 75. It’s shocking the number of people you can see doing 80-90 mph on the freeways these days, and they drive with almost no fear of being pulled over because the cops are almost never around.

    • Replies: @JW Bell
    @Wilkey

    95mph is common on I5 north of LA, during Sunday morning.

    , @hhs
    @Wilkey

    The speed limit in France is 130, or around 80mph.

    Replies: @Yak-15

    , @Thea
    @Wilkey

    when the highway speed limits increased the auto fatalities went way up. It appears we, as a society, are willing to accept higher death rates in order to drive faster. Or perhaps people just don't notice it.

  5. In part this must be the effects of the 2008 crash and its aftermath coming home to roost.

    Just last week the BBC ran a segment on drug addiction in Virginia. All the addicts were white. You would never have seen something so downbeat during the Obama years. Now that he’s leaving expect to see a lot more reporting on the troubled side of America.

    • Replies: @Yep
    @Hugh

    I was at Barnes and Noble this past weekend and saw new two books on the white working class. One was called Hillbilly Elegy and the other was White Trash. Not very subtle titles.

    Replies: @iffen

    , @anon
    @Hugh


    In part this must be the effects of the 2008 crash and its aftermath coming home to roost.
     
    It's been going up for 20 years - starting some years after off-shoring started.
  6. The default velocity on the 134 freeway through Burbank, CA when there’s no traffic jam appears to be 80 mph.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Steve Sailer

    Have better car design, materials, and components made that a safer speed than it seems?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Esso, @South Texas Guy, @melendwyr

  7. I drove on the interstate in Utah north of Las Vegas. I think they were testing 80 mph as the legal speed limit.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @Steve Sailer

    Utah, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho and South Dakota all have 80 mph speed limits on their interstates in rural areas. I haven't looked at traffic fatalities from year to year, but South Dakota's for 2015 could be slightly skewed by the 75th anniversary of the Sturgis motorcycle rally that year which had record attendance and 13 traffic fatalities. I drive 80 on the interstate get passed more than I end up passing other drivers. Cheap gas prices could be a factor in all this also, if gas went back to $3.50-$4.00 a gallon, some of these people might slow down.

    , @ben tillman
    @Steve Sailer


    I drove on the interstate in Utah north of Las Vegas. I think they were testing 80 mph as the legal speed limit.
     
    There are places in Texas where it's 85.
  8. @Steve Sailer
    The default velocity on the 134 freeway through Burbank, CA when there's no traffic jam appears to be 80 mph.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    Have better car design, materials, and components made that a safer speed than it seems?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Opinionator

    I don't know.

    Replies: @Yak-15

    , @Esso
    @Opinionator

    If you want to survive frontal impacts at speeds above 100 km/h, you should squat on the seat with no restraint belts applied and steer your flight towards the nearest body of water.

    Of course it makes more sense to brake before the crash. But kinetic energy, and thus the distance of braking to a halt, are quadratic in speed. The 120th km/h takes twice the distance to shed as does the 60th. Fortunately the distance traveled before applying the brakes, during the reaction time, grows only linearily with speed.

    Crash tests are usually conducted at about 40 mph (65 km/h). The Euro NCAP rigid wall impact test, which is a more honest indicator for symmetric frontal crashes, is at 50 km/h.

    Replies: @2Mintzin1

    , @South Texas Guy
    @Opinionator

    @ Opinionator,

    I can tell you the answer is an unqualified yes. Vehicle safety has come so far in the last even 15 years. I've been at the site of wrecks where you think "How in the Hell could anyone possibly live through that?" But quite often it was just a few cuts and bruises, and maybe a minor bone fracture. They were taken to the hospital as a precaution and released.

    One that sticks out is a man and wife, along with their 12 year old sons, flipped a 2012 Camaro SS seven times, so violently that two wheels came off, and all walked away without a scratch.

    It was more often the occcupants of pre 1995 or so vehicles that didn't fair so well.

    , @melendwyr
    @Opinionator


    Have better car design, materials, and components made that a safer speed than it seems?
     
    If such a claim were made, would you believe it wholeheartedly?

    At this point, I wouldn't.
  9. @Opinionator
    @Steve Sailer

    Have better car design, materials, and components made that a safer speed than it seems?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Esso, @South Texas Guy, @melendwyr

    I don’t know.

    • Replies: @Yak-15
    @Steve Sailer

    There are no speed limits on some sections of the autobahn. Seems to work for Germany.

    Replies: @Anon87

  10. @Wilkey
    "Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute."

    Or maybe the important fact in there is the number of people doing 75. It's shocking the number of people you can see doing 80-90 mph on the freeways these days, and they drive with almost no fear of being pulled over because the cops are almost never around.

    Replies: @JW Bell, @hhs, @Thea

    95mph is common on I5 north of LA, during Sunday morning.

  11. We still haven’t really recovered from the ’08 crash. We’ve basically been in an economic depression for a decade now.

  12. “Unintentional injuries — which include overdoses from drugs, alcohol and other chemicals, as well as motor vehicle crashes and other accidents” may well be a result of carelessness which is a result of depression.

  13. @Hugh
    In part this must be the effects of the 2008 crash and its aftermath coming home to roost.

    Just last week the BBC ran a segment on drug addiction in Virginia. All the addicts were white. You would never have seen something so downbeat during the Obama years. Now that he's leaving expect to see a lot more reporting on the troubled side of America.

    Replies: @Yep, @anon

    I was at Barnes and Noble this past weekend and saw new two books on the white working class. One was called Hillbilly Elegy and the other was White Trash. Not very subtle titles.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Yep

    White Trash. Not very subtle titles.

    White Trash is a good book. It is a scholarly book written from a class cognizant perspective. It does require some reading around. The author goes absolutely sideways on the idea that people have from time immemorial thought that it is a good idea for women to have babies. It is worth the price of the book just to see 101 names for white trash that have been used over the years.

  14. @Wilkey
    "Reminiscent of the Yeltsin years in Russia…"

    I wonder what life expectancy looks like if you break it down by religiosity? The Left has spent several decades waging war on society's traditional, non-government institutions - churches, the Boy Scouts, the Rotary Club, you name it. Society has become atomized, with nothing but the weak glue of mindless government institutions to hold us together.

    It sucks to grow ill and old. Growing ill and/or old in an atomized society is, in many ways, harder than growing ill or old in a society with subpar healthcare. My uncle just died a few weeks ago after a four year battle with cancer. He probably would have died long before without the material and emotional support he received from his family and his church - the kind of support fewer and fewer people have these days. The demos that have seen their life expectancies hardest hit seem to be the ones least likely to be religious and have large families around to support them.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Hapalong Cassidy, @anon

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The level of hate hate HATE whitey messaging in those countries is only about the level it was here during the Clinton or Dubya administrations, maybe the pre-Trayvon first Obama term.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Perspective

    , @The Alarmist
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Except that life expectancy keeps rising in the UK. Their family and religious culture is just as atomized as ours.
     
    Except that UK mortality improvements have tapered off and slightly reversed since 2012. The actuaries have tried to explain this past year's worsening on the wrong flu jabs (shots) being given to the folks.
    , @Anonymous Nephew
    @JohnnyWalker123

    In the UK you get medical treatment no matter how poor you are (indeed no matter if you've just arrived illegally in the country). That would IMHO have made a difference. Prescriptions are free for over-60s and there's a lot of preventative stuff - flu jabs and the like.

    How long this can last as the tax base collapses I don't know.

  15. @Yep
    Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute.

    Replies: @snorlax, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Jack D

    Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute.

    I find this disturbingly plausible . . . .

    • Replies: @ss
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Smart phones make it impossible to text using one hand unless they are using their feet to drive.

  16. @Wilkey
    "Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute."

    Or maybe the important fact in there is the number of people doing 75. It's shocking the number of people you can see doing 80-90 mph on the freeways these days, and they drive with almost no fear of being pulled over because the cops are almost never around.

    Replies: @JW Bell, @hhs, @Thea

    The speed limit in France is 130, or around 80mph.

    • Replies: @Yak-15
    @hhs

    Haha, where in France is this? Drove to Normandy from Paris a few years ago and I remember we were capped at 60.

  17. Car crashes aside, since death rates from heart disease, stroke and diabetes are also rising, is it possible that a couple of corners have been turned?

    Specifically, first, have previous decreases in the death rates from these diseases petered out because the benefits of fewer people smoking have leveled off?

    Second, has the obesity epidemic finally started to increase the death rates for these three obesity-exacerbated disorders?

    • Replies: @Cletus Rothschild
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Very good points. The "incubation period" for these sorts of diseases is very long. It's also just about the time when the low-fat dogma and cholesterol-lowering drugs really took off. People will attempt to look for ONE major cause as usual, but it's more than likely the result of many factors.

  18. Ultimately I think the best result for WNs is a phyric victory for the likes of sailer vs the liberals, sort of how the sasanid Byzantine wars left the Byzantines so weakened that they were swept aside by the Arab invasions.

  19. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Yep


    Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute.

     

    I find this disturbingly plausible . . . .

    Replies: @ss

    Smart phones make it impossible to text using one hand unless they are using their feet to drive.

  20. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Wilkey

    Except that life expectancy keeps rising in the UK. Their family and religious culture is just as atomized as ours.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/nov/29/life-expectancy-in-uk-rises-but-years-spent-in-good-health-falling-ons

    Life expectancy is rising in Canada too.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/ted-bruce/canadians-living-longer_b_12900896.html

    Life expectancy is rising in Australia.

    http://www.businessinsider.com.au/australians-are-now-no-7-in-the-world-when-it-comes-to-life-expectancy-2016-4

    Replies: @snorlax, @The Alarmist, @Anonymous Nephew

    The level of hate hate HATE whitey messaging in those countries is only about the level it was here during the Clinton or Dubya administrations, maybe the pre-Trayvon first Obama term.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @snorlax

    The UK supposedly is about as bad as the U.S. Canada seems to have embraced multiculturalism more than the U.S. Not sure about Australia.

    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities. Status-whoring SWPL whites might, but they aren't the ones dying off.

    My guess is this is due to a combination of factors.

    1. Deindustralization and outsourcing. Lots of working-class whites used to get very generous salaries and healthcare benefits from these jobs. Now they're gone and a lot of former employees are underemployed and poorly paid.
    2. Mass immigration (both legal and illegal) is driving down wages and employment at a startling rate.
    3. Decline of unions.
    4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can't afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It's not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.
    5. Work place culture is cut throat as hell.

    America used to be a democracy as recently as the 70s and 80s. A democracy not just in the sense of voting for our leaders, but having unions to represent our interests and protect workers. These days our country is run by oligarchs who have completely free reign. They can import as many foreigners as they want (while still complaining about "worker shortages"), easily outsource, and push around their employees with little chance of punishment. Americans are such status-seeking materialists that they willingly embrace the system because they think they may get rich.

    The more educated and affluent may have economically prospered under the current system (though with lots of stress in their lives), but blue collar people are getting hammered hard. Really hard. Our completely worthless national leaders (including media) are so out of touch and unconcerned that they don't even talk about what's happening in America. If you exclusively follow the mainstream media outlets, you wouldn't even be aware of the massive fall of the average American's' standard of living.

    Replies: @Thea, @27 year old, @anon, @JohnnyWalker123, @Rod1963, @reiner Tor

    , @Perspective
    @snorlax

    The percentage of drug addicts by country would be useful for comparison purposes. The US tends to be a leading indicator for various trends compared with other countries, perhaps there's a bit of a lag. There's been a lot of discussion on the part of the Canadian media about the ongoing and escalating fentanyl crisis.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/investigations/a-killer-high-how-canada-got-addicted-tofentanyl/article29570025/

    Also the oil boom in Alberta employed mostly young men from all across Canada, I know a few guys who didn't finish high school but were making 8k a month or more doing labour jobs. Now that oil prices have collapsed many of the workers have fallen on hard times. Only time will tell how these people fare.

  21. Overdoses have more than doubled since 2000.

    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6450a3.htm

    Overdose deaths rose slightly from the mid 80s through the early 90s. Then skyrocketed from the mid 90s onward. Almost 50,000 Americans are now dying from overdoses per year.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6101a3.htm

    Overdoses deaths (per-capita) are now 8x more common than in the 70s and early 80s. Per capita, overdoses are also about 5x more common than in the early 90s.

    That’s absolutely remarkable.

    Equally remarkable is how little attention was devoted to this issue until recently. Even now, it’s still not covered that much in the news.

    If Americans today were overdosing at the year 2000 rate, over 300,000 deaths would’ve been averted over the last decade and a half. That’s about 100x the number of people who died on 9/11. Think about that. One-hundred 9/11s have occurred over the last decade and a half. That’s been mostly ignored and even now still only lightly covered.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Equally remarkable is how little attention was devoted to this issue until recently. Even now, it’s still not covered that much in the news.
     
    McConnell won re-election by relentlessly hammering it in his campaign ads. It was pretty much all he talked about.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @anon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Yes, covered up by the media for 20-ish years.

  22. http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20161206_9_dead_from_apparent_heroin_ODs_over_weekend_in_Kensington_area.html

    Kensington, Philadelphia, Pa. Charles Murray territory: 9 Heroin deaths in 36 hours. Police anticipate 900 deaths in Philadelphia due to Heroin overdose in 2016.

    • Replies: @Another Canadian
    @Daniel H

    Vancouver is the one city in Canada with a big U.S.-style urban drug culture. The morgues are full with fentanyl deaths. It would be interesting to investigate the effects of designer drugs on US death rates.

    http://www.straight.com/news/840756/overdose-deaths-involving-fentanyl-fill-vancouver-morgues-capacity

    Replies: @penntothal, @David

  23. @snorlax
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The level of hate hate HATE whitey messaging in those countries is only about the level it was here during the Clinton or Dubya administrations, maybe the pre-Trayvon first Obama term.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Perspective

    The UK supposedly is about as bad as the U.S. Canada seems to have embraced multiculturalism more than the U.S. Not sure about Australia.

    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities. Status-whoring SWPL whites might, but they aren’t the ones dying off.

    My guess is this is due to a combination of factors.

    1. Deindustralization and outsourcing. Lots of working-class whites used to get very generous salaries and healthcare benefits from these jobs. Now they’re gone and a lot of former employees are underemployed and poorly paid.
    2. Mass immigration (both legal and illegal) is driving down wages and employment at a startling rate.
    3. Decline of unions.
    4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can’t afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It’s not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.
    5. Work place culture is cut throat as hell.

    America used to be a democracy as recently as the 70s and 80s. A democracy not just in the sense of voting for our leaders, but having unions to represent our interests and protect workers. These days our country is run by oligarchs who have completely free reign. They can import as many foreigners as they want (while still complaining about “worker shortages”), easily outsource, and push around their employees with little chance of punishment. Americans are such status-seeking materialists that they willingly embrace the system because they think they may get rich.

    The more educated and affluent may have economically prospered under the current system (though with lots of stress in their lives), but blue collar people are getting hammered hard. Really hard. Our completely worthless national leaders (including media) are so out of touch and unconcerned that they don’t even talk about what’s happening in America. If you exclusively follow the mainstream media outlets, you wouldn’t even be aware of the massive fall of the average American’s’ standard of living.

    • Replies: @Thea
    @JohnnyWalker123

    They'll just stick a scantily clad Kardashian up there or a tranny to get people to look away from the collapse of society. Economic, educational, social and moral cohesion has completely fallen away except as fractured group identities.

    It's really grotesque the lifestyle of the rich, promiscuous, arrogant and famous being thrown in our faces to show us what losers we are.

    , @27 year old
    @JohnnyWalker123

    >4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can’t afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It’s not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.

    Calling this "extreme consumerism" is like saying "demographic change". This feeling of consuminption inferiority is being deliberately inflicted on us. By the same type of people who are deliberately inflicting the demographic change.

    Side point, worse still than seeing the wealthy flaunt their wealth on Instagram, I'd say, is seeing the allegedly impoverished blacks do it right in front of you in real life at the checkout line, etc etc.

    RE McMansions, Americans buy McMansions to get away from blacks, not because they really want a McMansion as a status symbol. It's all about escaping diversity.

    , @anon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    exactly

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    One more factor.

    6. America is a dog-eat-dog society. Lots of people here are willing to do anything to climb up to the next rung of the economic ladder, including doctors. Plenty of doctors made a lot of money giving unnecessary prescriptions through pill mills. Apparently, for at least some of them, making $200,000 a year wasn't enough. They needed more. Another vacation home, a 2nd BMW, a trip to Tahiti.

    By the way, doctors are very vigorous in lobbying and regulating through the AMA (American Medical Association). Whenever any attempt is made to cut doctor reimbursement or allow nurses to perform medical procedures, the AMA leaps into action quickly. It doesn't reflect well on the profession that not much was done to reign in the unscrupulous pill mill doctors. The AMA could've done a lot more to nip this in the bud, but they were slow to act. So even if a small percentage of doctors turned into drug dealers, they couldn't have gotten away with it if not for the apathy of so many of their fellow docs.

    America is dog-eat-dog in a lot of ways. Employers make record profits by firing workers, outsourcing jobs, and insourcing immigrants. Bankers drive up commissions by selling people loans they won't be able to pay back. Defense contractors get wealthy by supplying munitions for the never ending "War on Terror" (a war they lobby politicians to keep on fighting), while thousands of soldiers die and over 1+ million come back with injuries. Private equity firms do leveraged buyouts in which they kill viable companies and sell off their assets. Politicians sign disastrous free trade deals (NAFTA, TPP, etc.) that offshore our manufacturing base (which took centuries to build) so they can later on collect "speaking fees." The Bushes allow Saudi Arabia to evade responsibility for 9/11 because the Saudi royal family has bribed them with generous business deals.

    It's truly madness. Unfortunately, the mentality among a large swathe of the country is to be indifferent to all of this. The mentality is that everyone is on his own and nobody has any obligation to anybody. As long as you're getting ahead, that's all that matters. That has had unfortunate consequences for a large percentage of Americans.

    When you combine this cutthroat culture with widespread hostility to whites, you get the white death.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @utu

    , @Rod1963
    @JohnnyWalker123

    You nailed it.

    Problem is, most folks don't get it, even if you spell it out for them. This is why Trump's rise and win surprised people on both sides. Most didn't even know white blue collars existed, even in the alt-right where Trump was pilloried by most as being a loser and dim wit.

    You're spot on about our national leaders and MSM. Neither has a clue as to whats happening in America. During the campaign WaPo sent down a bunch of reporters to the mid-West to figure out why Trump was so popular, they found nothing. No doubt they only talked to like minded people which guaranteed them learning nothing.

    They had no idea of the hammering the white blue collars and middle-class have taken over the last 20 years.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Charles Pewitt

    , @reiner Tor
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities.
     
    They are constantly bombarded by messages that whites are bad and are going extinct soon. You don't have to be smart to figure out that you're hated by the ruling classes and that there is no hope for you and your posterity. The psychological demoralizing effect must be profound.
  24. Here’s a story about distracted driving that I just heard yesterday.
    http://www.wnyc.org/story/designated-driver-texting-mass-media

  25. @Opinionator
    @Steve Sailer

    Have better car design, materials, and components made that a safer speed than it seems?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Esso, @South Texas Guy, @melendwyr

    If you want to survive frontal impacts at speeds above 100 km/h, you should squat on the seat with no restraint belts applied and steer your flight towards the nearest body of water.

    Of course it makes more sense to brake before the crash. But kinetic energy, and thus the distance of braking to a halt, are quadratic in speed. The 120th km/h takes twice the distance to shed as does the 60th. Fortunately the distance traveled before applying the brakes, during the reaction time, grows only linearily with speed.

    Crash tests are usually conducted at about 40 mph (65 km/h). The Euro NCAP rigid wall impact test, which is a more honest indicator for symmetric frontal crashes, is at 50 km/h.

    • Replies: @2Mintzin1
    @Esso

    "If you want to survive frontal impacts at speeds above 100 km/h, you should squat on the seat with no restraint belts applied and steer your flight towards the nearest body of water."

    Very funny, in a tongue-cheek kind of way.
    Living in North Texas, I guess that means I would have to head for a stream or maybe somebody's backyard pool.

  26. anon • Disclaimer says:

    There is a problem with counting drug OD’s. Especially prescription medication ODs.

    1. A lot, if not most, are people using a combination of substances. Alcohol tends to be in the mix. So, lets assume Xanax, Red Bull, a half dozen shooters, and then Vicodin or Oxy. Or however the hell people ‘party’ these days. Very heavy night — doesn’t wake up. Which drug caused it. They will blame the Vicodin/Oxy. They have to pick something.

    2. Suicides and accidents are also involved. That is, someone took too much by mistake.

    It is pretty well accepted that prescription pain meds have been a target. This — in my opinion — was due to the publicized problems with prescribed opioids. The result of this has been a switch back to heroin.

    There is no doubt in my mind that heroin is much more dangerous than prescribed opioids. We were on our way to ‘soft’ legalization. You could get what you wanted at a ‘pain mill’. But it came from a pharmacy, there was a record of it, you were seen by a doctor of some sort, and it was all done indoors. No guns or gangsters or the awful blowback of prohibition.

    There is a ‘anti drug’ lobby — an industry if you will. The various medical and public health agencies associated with the war on drugs. I recall going through the statistics … maybe an NIH report or whatever and being underwhelmed by the data.

    We are prescribing a shit load of amphetamine like drugs for ADHD. Health wise, its way better than cocaine. In my opinion.

    I’ll confess to being somewhat libertarian regarding drugs. Not saying its a great idea — but prohibition has a lot of costs. Now it is the quality of Heroin and the associated ODs.

    As far as traffic accidents — I was just casually looking at it. A lot of motorcycles. Pedestrians. To many bicyclists. And then, they tend to happen after midnight. There are very few deaths per mile driven during prime commuting hours in large cities. With lower gas prices and an improved economy total vehicle miles driven is also up. And yea … distracted driving. I got rear ended by a female that MUST have been on her cell. I will admit to making the error of driving the speed limit, which was at least 5 mph under typical speeds. But there was very little traffic, weather clear, perfect day, etc. Boomers are getting older — and older isn’t better after a certain point. And don’t forget suicides. Like the oil guy — Chesapeake Energy guy. I’d also like to see how it breaks out by newer vs older cars. The latest models are quite tricked out with safety stuff if you want it. Plus the small overlap crash test is rigorous and is the reason that hitting a tree at a high rate of speed was always so dangerous. And finally …. in the 90’s when airbags were first used in a substantial number of cars, there were a lot of crashes where the passenger survived but suffered horrendous leg injuries. The newest model cars are pretty damn safe — and a sober person commuting to work isn’t going to end up dead unless something really runs amok.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    "I’d also like to see how it breaks out by newer vs older cars."

    Me too. I really, really hope that the new electronic safety doodads would make me a better driver. My current cars are 15 and 18 years old, so I'll probably need to buy a car in the next few years. I hope to get one that will pander to my no doubt declining driving skills until I can afford a robot car in, say, two decades. It would be bad if the new safety options turn out to make me a less safe driver.

    Replies: @Jack D, @stillCARealist

  27. It will be interesting to see if this election year has an effect on this. One might call it “The Tiny Duck Effect”.

  28. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Car crashes aside, since death rates from heart disease, stroke and diabetes are also rising, is it possible that a couple of corners have been turned?

    Specifically, first, have previous decreases in the death rates from these diseases petered out because the benefits of fewer people smoking have leveled off?

    Second, has the obesity epidemic finally started to increase the death rates for these three obesity-exacerbated disorders?

    Replies: @Cletus Rothschild

    Very good points. The “incubation period” for these sorts of diseases is very long. It’s also just about the time when the low-fat dogma and cholesterol-lowering drugs really took off. People will attempt to look for ONE major cause as usual, but it’s more than likely the result of many factors.

  29. @anon
    There is a problem with counting drug OD's. Especially prescription medication ODs.

    1. A lot, if not most, are people using a combination of substances. Alcohol tends to be in the mix. So, lets assume Xanax, Red Bull, a half dozen shooters, and then Vicodin or Oxy. Or however the hell people 'party' these days. Very heavy night -- doesn't wake up. Which drug caused it. They will blame the Vicodin/Oxy. They have to pick something.

    2. Suicides and accidents are also involved. That is, someone took too much by mistake.

    It is pretty well accepted that prescription pain meds have been a target. This -- in my opinion -- was due to the publicized problems with prescribed opioids. The result of this has been a switch back to heroin.

    There is no doubt in my mind that heroin is much more dangerous than prescribed opioids. We were on our way to 'soft' legalization. You could get what you wanted at a 'pain mill'. But it came from a pharmacy, there was a record of it, you were seen by a doctor of some sort, and it was all done indoors. No guns or gangsters or the awful blowback of prohibition.

    There is a 'anti drug' lobby -- an industry if you will. The various medical and public health agencies associated with the war on drugs. I recall going through the statistics ... maybe an NIH report or whatever and being underwhelmed by the data.

    We are prescribing a shit load of amphetamine like drugs for ADHD. Health wise, its way better than cocaine. In my opinion.

    I'll confess to being somewhat libertarian regarding drugs. Not saying its a great idea -- but prohibition has a lot of costs. Now it is the quality of Heroin and the associated ODs.

    As far as traffic accidents -- I was just casually looking at it. A lot of motorcycles. Pedestrians. To many bicyclists. And then, they tend to happen after midnight. There are very few deaths per mile driven during prime commuting hours in large cities. With lower gas prices and an improved economy total vehicle miles driven is also up. And yea ... distracted driving. I got rear ended by a female that MUST have been on her cell. I will admit to making the error of driving the speed limit, which was at least 5 mph under typical speeds. But there was very little traffic, weather clear, perfect day, etc. Boomers are getting older -- and older isn't better after a certain point. And don't forget suicides. Like the oil guy -- Chesapeake Energy guy. I'd also like to see how it breaks out by newer vs older cars. The latest models are quite tricked out with safety stuff if you want it. Plus the small overlap crash test is rigorous and is the reason that hitting a tree at a high rate of speed was always so dangerous. And finally .... in the 90's when airbags were first used in a substantial number of cars, there were a lot of crashes where the passenger survived but suffered horrendous leg injuries. The newest model cars are pretty damn safe -- and a sober person commuting to work isn't going to end up dead unless something really runs amok.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “I’d also like to see how it breaks out by newer vs older cars.”

    Me too. I really, really hope that the new electronic safety doodads would make me a better driver. My current cars are 15 and 18 years old, so I’ll probably need to buy a car in the next few years. I hope to get one that will pander to my no doubt declining driving skills until I can afford a robot car in, say, two decades. It would be bad if the new safety options turn out to make me a less safe driver.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Steve Sailer

    Probably not less safe but no safer. For example, many of the lane departure warning systems give so many false positives that people just turn them off. If your car is beeping at you every 30 seconds you'll go nuts.

    , @stillCARealist
    @Steve Sailer

    I have a new 2016 CR-V and I love it. The braking and accelerating are almost perfect in response and smoothness. BUT, the instrument panel is too much. A camera view shows up when you turn on the right signal and that's good when i'm about to turn right on a city street. Not so good when I'm changing lanes on the freeway and I need to have complete awareness of my lane and the one next to me. Stuff happens fast on the freeway and I shouldn't have a little movie playing on my dash.

    There's also a touchscreen for the radio stations. This means I have to look at it to change stations whereas in the older car I could just feel it and not take my eyes off the road.

    Using the cruise control is a whole mess of buttons/switches that is like a mini-IQ test for me to solve when I actually want to use it (very rarely. I drive in crowded conditions almost exclusively).

    Even the windshield wipers are too complex. And don't get me started on the climate control and vents.
    Add to all this the tendency for everyone to text and surf around on their phones and I can see why there's more wrecks. I hit the back of a car a few years ago trying to turn off my phone as it was ringing. Now I leave the sound all the way down on the beast.

  30. @Daniel H
    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20161206_9_dead_from_apparent_heroin_ODs_over_weekend_in_Kensington_area.html

    Kensington, Philadelphia, Pa. Charles Murray territory: 9 Heroin deaths in 36 hours. Police anticipate 900 deaths in Philadelphia due to Heroin overdose in 2016.

    Replies: @Another Canadian

    Vancouver is the one city in Canada with a big U.S.-style urban drug culture. The morgues are full with fentanyl deaths. It would be interesting to investigate the effects of designer drugs on US death rates.

    http://www.straight.com/news/840756/overdose-deaths-involving-fentanyl-fill-vancouver-morgues-capacity

    • Replies: @penntothal
    @Another Canadian

    Vancouver has government -endorsed injection centers where addicts can shoot-up legally.

    http://www.vch.ca/your-health/health-topics/supervised-injection/supervised-injection

    These centers were touted by progressives as a way to reduce stigma and get addicts into a safer space, maybe as a bridge to treatment.

    Maybe the morgues are still filling up in Vancouver because this progressive tolerant approach doesn't work.

    There is a large recovery and treatment industry with a vested interest in downplaying how ineffective "treatment" for opiate addiction actually is. Opiate addiction is sort-of like lung cancer: Investment in prevention from exposure (never get the disease in the first place) pays off much higher dividends than the enormous sums invested in treatment for people already afflicted (almost none of whom can ever be cured.)

    , @David
    @Another Canadian

    According to the Toronto Star 638 people died of opiod overdose in Ontario in 2013, or about 1 per 20,000 of provincial population. NPR this morning said about 44 Americans a day die of the same cause which works out to 1 in 20,236 annually. Not much difference. Any chance that like a typical Canadian, your fundamental paradigm in life is that your better than US?

    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2016/11/10/opioids-to-blame-for-hundreds-of-overdose-deaths-in-ontario-report-says.html

  31. @Yep
    @Hugh

    I was at Barnes and Noble this past weekend and saw new two books on the white working class. One was called Hillbilly Elegy and the other was White Trash. Not very subtle titles.

    Replies: @iffen

    White Trash. Not very subtle titles.

    White Trash is a good book. It is a scholarly book written from a class cognizant perspective. It does require some reading around. The author goes absolutely sideways on the idea that people have from time immemorial thought that it is a good idea for women to have babies. It is worth the price of the book just to see 101 names for white trash that have been used over the years.

  32. Reminiscent of the Yeltsin years in Russia …

    Reminiscent of the Obama years in America …

  33. Mortality worsening in general? That would be Obamacare kicking in. Funny coincidence that 1993 almost gave us Clintoncare, no?

    Car crashes? People texting and Instagramming and Facebagging while driving.

  34. @Another Canadian
    @Daniel H

    Vancouver is the one city in Canada with a big U.S.-style urban drug culture. The morgues are full with fentanyl deaths. It would be interesting to investigate the effects of designer drugs on US death rates.

    http://www.straight.com/news/840756/overdose-deaths-involving-fentanyl-fill-vancouver-morgues-capacity

    Replies: @penntothal, @David

    Vancouver has government -endorsed injection centers where addicts can shoot-up legally.

    http://www.vch.ca/your-health/health-topics/supervised-injection/supervised-injection

    These centers were touted by progressives as a way to reduce stigma and get addicts into a safer space, maybe as a bridge to treatment.

    Maybe the morgues are still filling up in Vancouver because this progressive tolerant approach doesn’t work.

    There is a large recovery and treatment industry with a vested interest in downplaying how ineffective “treatment” for opiate addiction actually is. Opiate addiction is sort-of like lung cancer: Investment in prevention from exposure (never get the disease in the first place) pays off much higher dividends than the enormous sums invested in treatment for people already afflicted (almost none of whom can ever be cured.)

  35. @hhs
    @Wilkey

    The speed limit in France is 130, or around 80mph.

    Replies: @Yak-15

    Haha, where in France is this? Drove to Normandy from Paris a few years ago and I remember we were capped at 60.

  36. @Steve Sailer
    @Opinionator

    I don't know.

    Replies: @Yak-15

    There are no speed limits on some sections of the autobahn. Seems to work for Germany.

    • Replies: @Anon87
    @Yak-15

    But I believe they require more testing to get a license. I love the autobahn, but I wouldn't want to see it here. I don't trust drivers in the US.

  37. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Wilkey

    Except that life expectancy keeps rising in the UK. Their family and religious culture is just as atomized as ours.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/nov/29/life-expectancy-in-uk-rises-but-years-spent-in-good-health-falling-ons

    Life expectancy is rising in Canada too.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/ted-bruce/canadians-living-longer_b_12900896.html

    Life expectancy is rising in Australia.

    http://www.businessinsider.com.au/australians-are-now-no-7-in-the-world-when-it-comes-to-life-expectancy-2016-4

    Replies: @snorlax, @The Alarmist, @Anonymous Nephew

    Except that life expectancy keeps rising in the UK. Their family and religious culture is just as atomized as ours.

    Except that UK mortality improvements have tapered off and slightly reversed since 2012. The actuaries have tried to explain this past year’s worsening on the wrong flu jabs (shots) being given to the folks.

  38. @Esso
    @Opinionator

    If you want to survive frontal impacts at speeds above 100 km/h, you should squat on the seat with no restraint belts applied and steer your flight towards the nearest body of water.

    Of course it makes more sense to brake before the crash. But kinetic energy, and thus the distance of braking to a halt, are quadratic in speed. The 120th km/h takes twice the distance to shed as does the 60th. Fortunately the distance traveled before applying the brakes, during the reaction time, grows only linearily with speed.

    Crash tests are usually conducted at about 40 mph (65 km/h). The Euro NCAP rigid wall impact test, which is a more honest indicator for symmetric frontal crashes, is at 50 km/h.

    Replies: @2Mintzin1

    “If you want to survive frontal impacts at speeds above 100 km/h, you should squat on the seat with no restraint belts applied and steer your flight towards the nearest body of water.”

    Very funny, in a tongue-cheek kind of way.
    Living in North Texas, I guess that means I would have to head for a stream or maybe somebody’s backyard pool.

  39. Perhaps when you have systemic civilizational decline, many systems and institutions start failing at the same time. Life expectancy is merely a symptom. It’s like when you are in the hospital with your very old relative dying from old age and the Dr. says “well if it were just so and so’s (heart, lungs, liver, kidneys etc) we could address the problem, but every thing is failing.”

    It is the first principle of true conservatism. Once the culture is broken, you can’t put it back together again.

  40. @Wilkey
    "Reminiscent of the Yeltsin years in Russia…"

    I wonder what life expectancy looks like if you break it down by religiosity? The Left has spent several decades waging war on society's traditional, non-government institutions - churches, the Boy Scouts, the Rotary Club, you name it. Society has become atomized, with nothing but the weak glue of mindless government institutions to hold us together.

    It sucks to grow ill and old. Growing ill and/or old in an atomized society is, in many ways, harder than growing ill or old in a society with subpar healthcare. My uncle just died a few weeks ago after a four year battle with cancer. He probably would have died long before without the material and emotional support he received from his family and his church - the kind of support fewer and fewer people have these days. The demos that have seen their life expectancies hardest hit seem to be the ones least likely to be religious and have large families around to support them.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Hapalong Cassidy, @anon

    Absent their love of immigrantion, which is a fairly recent phenomenon, the left is always good for a significant population drop once they get into power. The earliest example of this is post-revolutionary France. Traditionally, France had been the most populous country in Europe. They usually carried between 2 and 3 times the population of their close rival, Great Britain. From the time of Napoleon’s defeat to the beginning of WW1, GB had caught up to them and Germany had far surpassed them.

  41. I wonder to what extent lower cancer rates (from repression of smoking) comes at the expense of higher obesity illness (eg, diabetes).

    Is it a case of, you can either have ..

    A certain % of thin smokers who die from cancer, or
    B certain % of fat non smokers who die of obesity related illness

    Pick your poison. I think there was a Simpson’s quip, “smoke yourself thin!”

    Steve , this sounds like a crime misery graph.

  42. @Wilkey
    "Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute."

    Or maybe the important fact in there is the number of people doing 75. It's shocking the number of people you can see doing 80-90 mph on the freeways these days, and they drive with almost no fear of being pulled over because the cops are almost never around.

    Replies: @JW Bell, @hhs, @Thea

    when the highway speed limits increased the auto fatalities went way up. It appears we, as a society, are willing to accept higher death rates in order to drive faster. Or perhaps people just don’t notice it.

  43. @snorlax
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The level of hate hate HATE whitey messaging in those countries is only about the level it was here during the Clinton or Dubya administrations, maybe the pre-Trayvon first Obama term.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Perspective

    The percentage of drug addicts by country would be useful for comparison purposes. The US tends to be a leading indicator for various trends compared with other countries, perhaps there’s a bit of a lag. There’s been a lot of discussion on the part of the Canadian media about the ongoing and escalating fentanyl crisis.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/investigations/a-killer-high-how-canada-got-addicted-tofentanyl/article29570025/

    Also the oil boom in Alberta employed mostly young men from all across Canada, I know a few guys who didn’t finish high school but were making 8k a month or more doing labour jobs. Now that oil prices have collapsed many of the workers have fallen on hard times. Only time will tell how these people fare.

  44. Maybe in a fast paced, unmoored, atomized electro/industrial society, smoking and cheap cigarettes are an essential glue for its plebes. A quick un-addling boost for the drones who know they’re on the way down.

  45. More distractions from electronic devices (handheld or built into the car) seem like a plausible cause for more road deaths. It’s also possible that the rise in murder rates in some cities in the us is the start of a trend, and the same social forces driving more crime are also giving us more highway deaths, more overdoses, more suicides, etc.

  46. @Steve Sailer
    I drove on the interstate in Utah north of Las Vegas. I think they were testing 80 mph as the legal speed limit.

    Replies: @Barnard, @ben tillman

    Utah, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho and South Dakota all have 80 mph speed limits on their interstates in rural areas. I haven’t looked at traffic fatalities from year to year, but South Dakota’s for 2015 could be slightly skewed by the 75th anniversary of the Sturgis motorcycle rally that year which had record attendance and 13 traffic fatalities. I drive 80 on the interstate get passed more than I end up passing other drivers. Cheap gas prices could be a factor in all this also, if gas went back to $3.50-$4.00 a gallon, some of these people might slow down.

  47. Regarding the rising rates of car accidents, I’m not surprised. People are so self absorbed with their phone or themselves that they have very little conception of how their actions affect others. Countless times I will see drive thru queues backed up on to the road, only because someone further up has left a massive gap between themselves in the car in front because they’re too busy texting. I’ve witnessed pedestrians nearly get hit because they decided to cross the street without looking because they were totally immersed in their smart phones.

  48. @Opinionator
    @Steve Sailer

    Have better car design, materials, and components made that a safer speed than it seems?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Esso, @South Texas Guy, @melendwyr

    @ Opinionator,

    I can tell you the answer is an unqualified yes. Vehicle safety has come so far in the last even 15 years. I’ve been at the site of wrecks where you think “How in the Hell could anyone possibly live through that?” But quite often it was just a few cuts and bruises, and maybe a minor bone fracture. They were taken to the hospital as a precaution and released.

    One that sticks out is a man and wife, along with their 12 year old sons, flipped a 2012 Camaro SS seven times, so violently that two wheels came off, and all walked away without a scratch.

    It was more often the occcupants of pre 1995 or so vehicles that didn’t fair so well.

  49. A major way to cut back on overdose deaths is to move heroin addicts into some kind of maintenance treatment/dosing scheme. (This is hard to do politically, and you could imagine a local program drawing heroin addicts to your city–not at all what you want. But it would almost certainly cut back on ODs.).

    A second thing you can do is to make Narcan widely available–that’s the drug you use to treat a heroin (or opioid) overdose, and I don’t think it has any abuse potential. I don’t know whether many heroin addicts would bother keeping a dose around, but maybe their family and friends might.

    Both of these treat the “symptom”–they don’t decrease the number of addicts, they just try to contain the damage.

  50. @JohnnyWalker123
    @snorlax

    The UK supposedly is about as bad as the U.S. Canada seems to have embraced multiculturalism more than the U.S. Not sure about Australia.

    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities. Status-whoring SWPL whites might, but they aren't the ones dying off.

    My guess is this is due to a combination of factors.

    1. Deindustralization and outsourcing. Lots of working-class whites used to get very generous salaries and healthcare benefits from these jobs. Now they're gone and a lot of former employees are underemployed and poorly paid.
    2. Mass immigration (both legal and illegal) is driving down wages and employment at a startling rate.
    3. Decline of unions.
    4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can't afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It's not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.
    5. Work place culture is cut throat as hell.

    America used to be a democracy as recently as the 70s and 80s. A democracy not just in the sense of voting for our leaders, but having unions to represent our interests and protect workers. These days our country is run by oligarchs who have completely free reign. They can import as many foreigners as they want (while still complaining about "worker shortages"), easily outsource, and push around their employees with little chance of punishment. Americans are such status-seeking materialists that they willingly embrace the system because they think they may get rich.

    The more educated and affluent may have economically prospered under the current system (though with lots of stress in their lives), but blue collar people are getting hammered hard. Really hard. Our completely worthless national leaders (including media) are so out of touch and unconcerned that they don't even talk about what's happening in America. If you exclusively follow the mainstream media outlets, you wouldn't even be aware of the massive fall of the average American's' standard of living.

    Replies: @Thea, @27 year old, @anon, @JohnnyWalker123, @Rod1963, @reiner Tor

    They’ll just stick a scantily clad Kardashian up there or a tranny to get people to look away from the collapse of society. Economic, educational, social and moral cohesion has completely fallen away except as fractured group identities.

    It’s really grotesque the lifestyle of the rich, promiscuous, arrogant and famous being thrown in our faces to show us what losers we are.

  51. The increase in car deaths is undoubtedly due to distracted driving. These days most people will be texting / Facebooking / Twitting / whatever-ing when stopped at a light, and plenty will be doing that while moving. Must get that status update in, you know.

    As for the rest, I think you might be reading too much in to it. Yes, overdoses are up, but the bulk is probably just the results of long-term trends in health and lifestyle that have been unfolding for decades. Specifically: overeating, fast food, and sedentary lifestyles. This triad of trends have been on a secular increase from essentially zero in 1950 to the dominant way to live for most Americans today.

  52. “I drove on the interstate in Utah north of Las Vegas. I think they were testing 80 mph as the legal speed limit.”

    Utah raised the limit outside of metro areas to 80 about two years ago. It’s 70 in the metro areas, and it seems like they don’t pull over anyone doing less than 80. But velocity isn’t nearly as great a danger as people who drive erratically or cut people off, and no one ever seems to get pulled over for either. I wonder if that’s because those infractions are more subjective than speeding and thus less likely to hold up in court.

    Incidentally, traffic deaths are one area where conservative states seem to do unquestionably worse than liberal ones. Nine of the ten states with the lowest traffic fatality rates voted for Clinton (1st: Massachusetts, 4.79 deaths per 100k). Ten of ten states with the highest traffic fatality rates voted for Trump (50th: Wyoming, 27.48 per 100k). Utah ranks 12th, with 8.5 people per 100k dying from traffic accidents.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Wilkey

    In a place like Wyoming, everything is 50 miles from everything else so people do a lot of driving (not to mention that they have nasty winters). There are a lot of people in Boston who never drive at all and if they do they are going 20 blocks in slow traffic, not 80 mph on the interstate. Places like Wyoming also have darn few people (the entire state has about as many people as live on Staten Island, the least populous borough of NYC) so if you look at the gross #s rather than the per capita rates there aren't that many deaths.

    , @Barnard
    @Wilkey

    The ten highest states are a split between Southern and Western states. There are most likely many factors for this. In the Western states, this might be caused by a combination of a large land area creating a lot of miles of highway with a low population. Some have high DUI death percentages. Also, none of these states are going to have significant mass transit systems, meaning almost everyone is driving a car.



    http://vehicle-fatalities.findthedata.com/

    , @res
    @Wilkey

    My initial thought was population density and vehicle miles traveled (in line with Jack D's comment), but I did a quick search and this 2004 study did also find an effect (called southern location, I do not have the paper full text to elaborate) more in line with your comment.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15350874

  53. First see my post

    HBD Is Life and Death

    There is a strong region pattern to lifespan, even among American Whites. Particularly, Scots-Irish Americans live distinctly shorter than others Whites. They also suffer from higher rates of nearly all the social maladies discussed here; they even have higher traffic fatality rates.

    Gelman found that the “White Death” was driven entirely by women in the South. I’d wager Scots-Irish were leading that trend.

    I’d like to see a regional breakdown of changes in death rates. I’d also like to see regional breakdown of increased birth rates during the Baby Boom.

    • Replies: @Muse
    @JayMan

    Maybe the proportion of whites that are of primarily Scots-Irish ancestry is creeping up as they reproduce at a faster rate while the Protestant-Germanic types slowly exterminate themselves via abortion, delayed marriage and childbirth, feminist careerism and alternate lifestyles.

    The national death rates for all whites slowly edges up reflecting the comparably higher death rates of the Scots-Irish.

    http://www.abort73.com/abortion_facts/states/

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/01/29/states-that-are-more-opposed-to-abortion-have-fewer-abortions-but-not-fewer-unintended-pregnancies/?utm_term=.72055b327b2a

    , @epebble
    @JayMan

    From this link http://scholars.unh.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1288&context=carsey

    Page 3 has this list of states in the order (large to small) death - birth for whites:

    FL
    PA
    RI
    WV
    CA
    NM
    CT
    NJ
    AL
    ME
    NV
    DE
    MA
    AZ
    AR
    MS
    NH

  54. What if all the new electronic safety gizmos on cars are causing accidents? (I have no evidence for that, by the way, but somebody ought to look into it.)

    There’s been a big spike in PSA’s (radio and billboards) about it. Given that it’s politically/ideologically non-controversial, that suggests some empirical basis.

  55. @JohnnyWalker123
    Overdoses have more than doubled since 2000.

    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6450a3.htm

    Overdose deaths rose slightly from the mid 80s through the early 90s. Then skyrocketed from the mid 90s onward. Almost 50,000 Americans are now dying from overdoses per year.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6101a3.htm

    Overdoses deaths (per-capita) are now 8x more common than in the 70s and early 80s. Per capita, overdoses are also about 5x more common than in the early 90s.

    That's absolutely remarkable.

    Equally remarkable is how little attention was devoted to this issue until recently. Even now, it's still not covered that much in the news.

    If Americans today were overdosing at the year 2000 rate, over 300,000 deaths would've been averted over the last decade and a half. That's about 100x the number of people who died on 9/11. Think about that. One-hundred 9/11s have occurred over the last decade and a half. That's been mostly ignored and even now still only lightly covered.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @anon

    Equally remarkable is how little attention was devoted to this issue until recently. Even now, it’s still not covered that much in the news.

    McConnell won re-election by relentlessly hammering it in his campaign ads. It was pretty much all he talked about.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Desiderius

    It wasn't discussed much in the general election. On national television, there's light, occasional coverage.

    McConnell represents a state that's been especially hard hit by the overdose epidemic. That's all he should be talking about.

    The 2 main points are this.

    1. It's remarkable that it took 2 decades before we started talking extensively about a very visible overdose epidemic. Imagine if politicians and media ignored talking about the 9/11 attacks until a couple of years ago (also assume 9/11s were happening every 2 months from 2001 through today).
    2. Given that we've had at least 300,000 excess overdose deaths since 2001, this should be getting discussed hours every night. Again, imagine back in 2001, if the 9/11 attacks were covered just a few minutes a night.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  56. What About Obeseity? Every year America gets even more obese it must have some consequences… it is the most obese country in the OECD

  57. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Many people seem to be distracted while driving, skyping or texting with one hand while driving with the other. I’ve seen some people eating while also doing the above. A large part of the population is on some form of government support and have few prospects in life ahead of them so they zone out with pills, alcohol and drugs. Morbid obesity seems to be a form of this ‘dropping out’ where people just give up and no longer care about themselves. Drug abuse seems to have crept in everywhere. Something is going on and it can’t be found out from official government proclamations that unemployment is in the negative range and that everything is rosy.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @anonymous


    Something is going on and it can’t be found out from official government proclamations that unemployment is in the negative range and that everything is rosy.

     

    It's a spiritual vacuum. You work to have enough money to pay taxes and buy food and housing so you can rest up and eat to work to make the money. Lather, rinse, repeat. Disposable income is squandered on entertainment, psychotropic drugs, booze, and the ersatz tribalism of sporting events. People were meant to do something other than merely exist, but their metaphysics and their heroic legends have been taken from them. Anglo-Americans chose rootless Protestantism, secular democracy, and the marketplace over things like tradition, family, nation, and it is coming back to bite them.

    I have a lot of immigrant acquaintances, and my perception is that one of the greatest gulfs between them and me is who our heroes are. The American mythos--characters like Paul Bunyan, Johnny Appleseed, the Last of the Mohicans, and actual men like Daniel Boone and Davey Crockett--is being scrubbed from the culture to make the new arrivals more comfortable. It is being replaced with people like Rosa Parks and St. Martin of Atlanta (because, of course, recorded history did not actually start until 1965). The Pakistani who set foot on the tarmac thirty minutes ago must be assured that he is every bit as American as somebody whose family came ashore with John Wesley; nay, since we're a Nation Of Immigrants, even more so due to his greater immigrant-ness! Founding stock Americans are becoming a people without a past and, as they are endlessly screamed at, no future.
  58. @Yep
    Car death increases may be due to texting and driving. I see lots of people texting while driving 75 on the freeway during my daily commute.

    Replies: @snorlax, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Jack D

    Yes. Whatever improvement is coming from new safety gizmos is far outweighed by people who are looking at their phones and are distracted while driving. The safety gizmos (automatic braking, lane departure warnings, etc.) haven’t really penetrated the fleet much yet anyway. Even on new cars they are optional and more than half the cars that are on the road are from before they were even available.

    People need to be saved from their own idiocy. Phones should be designed so that the keyboards don’t work in moving vehicles. The phones have GPS chips and know when they are moving. 90% of those texting are the drivers and not passengers so if the passengers lose their ability to text then that’s a small price to be paid vs. the # of lives that will be saved. Highways need more frequent areas where drivers can pull over and read and reply to their messages safely.

    What is really amazing is how little America gets for its vast healthcare expenditure. Mexico, which spends maybe 5 pesos on its entire healthcare system, is within spitting distance of the US in life expectancy.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    What is really amazing is how little America gets for its vast healthcare expenditure. Mexico, which spends maybe 5 pesos on its entire healthcare system, is within spitting distance of the US in life expectancy.
     
    That's no surprise. In a market economy for health care, we get high doctor salaries, large numbers of doctors and immediate treatment. In a socialist economy for doctors (the rest of the world), they get low doctor salaries, small numbers of doctors and long waiting periods for treatment. If we impose price controls the way other economies have done, we can get health care costs down. The price we pay is the rate of drug or therapeutic innovation slows down to match the rest of the world - practically zero.
  59. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    "I’d also like to see how it breaks out by newer vs older cars."

    Me too. I really, really hope that the new electronic safety doodads would make me a better driver. My current cars are 15 and 18 years old, so I'll probably need to buy a car in the next few years. I hope to get one that will pander to my no doubt declining driving skills until I can afford a robot car in, say, two decades. It would be bad if the new safety options turn out to make me a less safe driver.

    Replies: @Jack D, @stillCARealist

    Probably not less safe but no safer. For example, many of the lane departure warning systems give so many false positives that people just turn them off. If your car is beeping at you every 30 seconds you’ll go nuts.

  60. @Wilkey
    "I drove on the interstate in Utah north of Las Vegas. I think they were testing 80 mph as the legal speed limit."

    Utah raised the limit outside of metro areas to 80 about two years ago. It's 70 in the metro areas, and it seems like they don't pull over anyone doing less than 80. But velocity isn't nearly as great a danger as people who drive erratically or cut people off, and no one ever seems to get pulled over for either. I wonder if that's because those infractions are more subjective than speeding and thus less likely to hold up in court.

    Incidentally, traffic deaths are one area where conservative states seem to do unquestionably worse than liberal ones. Nine of the ten states with the lowest traffic fatality rates voted for Clinton (1st: Massachusetts, 4.79 deaths per 100k). Ten of ten states with the highest traffic fatality rates voted for Trump (50th: Wyoming, 27.48 per 100k). Utah ranks 12th, with 8.5 people per 100k dying from traffic accidents.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Barnard, @res

    In a place like Wyoming, everything is 50 miles from everything else so people do a lot of driving (not to mention that they have nasty winters). There are a lot of people in Boston who never drive at all and if they do they are going 20 blocks in slow traffic, not 80 mph on the interstate. Places like Wyoming also have darn few people (the entire state has about as many people as live on Staten Island, the least populous borough of NYC) so if you look at the gross #s rather than the per capita rates there aren’t that many deaths.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
  61. As I’ve bitched about previously on iSteve, here in New York, millennials are dying from heroin at a breathtaking rate. The corruption facilitated by war in Afghanistan and the de facto legalization of marijuana have effectively conspired to increased the supply. The anti-doctor shopping law ( a reaction to the wonderful work done by drug company salesmen) has increased the demand.

    At least with prescription opioids, the addicts knew how much they were taking, and the drug was unadulterated. Now, they’re found dead with the needles still in their arms.

    • Replies: @melendwyr
    @I, Libertine

    That sounds like a resounding success for the policy.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

  62. In Yeltsin’s Russia, it was cheap vodka brewed by Yeltsin’s cronies that did the damage.

    In the US, a lot of the reduction in life expectancy is down to this ‘philanthropist’:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_Sackler

    And as in Russia, the Sackler clan have flattered their way into the elite, by being the money behind establishment art galleries:

    http://usuncut.com/news/sackler-family-oxycontin-clan-overdose-epidemic/

  63. On motor vehicle fatalities, I imagine it is i.) aging Boomer drivers refusing to turn in the license, and ii.) all the methadone zombies on the streets courtesy of the opioid crisis.

    No one is talking about it, but despite the fact that 10% of health care “consumers’ consume 90% of the budget, these high deductible policies pretty much encourage people not to seek medical help, which means they wait until they get the heart attack or the stroke or they are dying of sepsis before they get to the ER.

  64. @Wilkey
    "I drove on the interstate in Utah north of Las Vegas. I think they were testing 80 mph as the legal speed limit."

    Utah raised the limit outside of metro areas to 80 about two years ago. It's 70 in the metro areas, and it seems like they don't pull over anyone doing less than 80. But velocity isn't nearly as great a danger as people who drive erratically or cut people off, and no one ever seems to get pulled over for either. I wonder if that's because those infractions are more subjective than speeding and thus less likely to hold up in court.

    Incidentally, traffic deaths are one area where conservative states seem to do unquestionably worse than liberal ones. Nine of the ten states with the lowest traffic fatality rates voted for Clinton (1st: Massachusetts, 4.79 deaths per 100k). Ten of ten states with the highest traffic fatality rates voted for Trump (50th: Wyoming, 27.48 per 100k). Utah ranks 12th, with 8.5 people per 100k dying from traffic accidents.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Barnard, @res

    The ten highest states are a split between Southern and Western states. There are most likely many factors for this. In the Western states, this might be caused by a combination of a large land area creating a lot of miles of highway with a low population. Some have high DUI death percentages. Also, none of these states are going to have significant mass transit systems, meaning almost everyone is driving a car.

    http://vehicle-fatalities.findthedata.com/

  65. I don’t think it had something to do with the Ferguson effect or a continuation of the White death. In many other developed countries, life expectyncies declined as well in 2015 compared to 2014, due to an exceptionally deadly flu season in the beginning of 2015.

    In Italy for example, LE declined from 82.7 in 2014 to 82.3 in 2015, in Belgium from 81.1 to 80.9, in Austria from 81.4 to 81.15 and in the UK by 0.2-0.3 years. ( http://www.theactuary.com/news/2016/04/life-expectancy-falls-thanks-to-a-spike-in-flu-and-dementia-related-deaths/ )

    All of these declines are stronger than the one in the US.

  66. I just learned that my cousin died. He was two years older than I. As his brother explained to me (in his Gary Cooper, man of few words way) he died from “lifestyle choices over decades.” That means drugs, alcohol, partying, living in the moment the way our music and counterculture has taught us since I was born. “You are nothing. Ego is evil.” “Let go all thoughts, float down stream,” as John Lennon sang.

    The countercultural, left wing, non-white, non-goy, outsized influence on Americans is killing people like my cousin. He was part of the sex, drugs, rock-n-roll culture. Guess what, that culture is Tin Pan Alley, non goy, non white.

    Leave it behind and learn about our culture.

  67. @Wilkey
    "I drove on the interstate in Utah north of Las Vegas. I think they were testing 80 mph as the legal speed limit."

    Utah raised the limit outside of metro areas to 80 about two years ago. It's 70 in the metro areas, and it seems like they don't pull over anyone doing less than 80. But velocity isn't nearly as great a danger as people who drive erratically or cut people off, and no one ever seems to get pulled over for either. I wonder if that's because those infractions are more subjective than speeding and thus less likely to hold up in court.

    Incidentally, traffic deaths are one area where conservative states seem to do unquestionably worse than liberal ones. Nine of the ten states with the lowest traffic fatality rates voted for Clinton (1st: Massachusetts, 4.79 deaths per 100k). Ten of ten states with the highest traffic fatality rates voted for Trump (50th: Wyoming, 27.48 per 100k). Utah ranks 12th, with 8.5 people per 100k dying from traffic accidents.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Barnard, @res

    My initial thought was population density and vehicle miles traveled (in line with Jack D’s comment), but I did a quick search and this 2004 study did also find an effect (called southern location, I do not have the paper full text to elaborate) more in line with your comment.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15350874

  68. @Desiderius
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Equally remarkable is how little attention was devoted to this issue until recently. Even now, it’s still not covered that much in the news.
     
    McConnell won re-election by relentlessly hammering it in his campaign ads. It was pretty much all he talked about.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    It wasn’t discussed much in the general election. On national television, there’s light, occasional coverage.

    McConnell represents a state that’s been especially hard hit by the overdose epidemic. That’s all he should be talking about.

    The 2 main points are this.

    1. It’s remarkable that it took 2 decades before we started talking extensively about a very visible overdose epidemic. Imagine if politicians and media ignored talking about the 9/11 attacks until a couple of years ago (also assume 9/11s were happening every 2 months from 2001 through today).
    2. Given that we’ve had at least 300,000 excess overdose deaths since 2001, this should be getting discussed hours every night. Again, imagine back in 2001, if the 9/11 attacks were covered just a few minutes a night.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I'm starting to see a few articles that are linking Trump's win to the overdose epidemic.

    The political/media elites were stunned by Trump's victory. If they had any sense what was happening in their own country, they wouldn't have been. There's a huge amount of death and despair in parts of the country. Trump (and also Bernie Sanders) tapped into the anger.

    Over 300,000 excessive overdose deaths happen over the past decade and a half. Politcians and media almost completely ignore it, as people scream out in anger for years. People get angry at being ignored. People finally vote for a non-establishment candidate that runs against the political/media overclass. Elites are stunned at candidate's victory and don't understand his popularity.

    America is a completely ridiculous country.

    Replies: @anon

  69. Did you, by any chance, search that article for the word “Obamacare?” As far as driving goes, I would worry about all of the high-tech new-car features, too; but, if I still lived in L.A., I would worry a lot more about sharing the roads with drunken foreigners!?!

  70. @JohnnyWalker123
    @snorlax

    The UK supposedly is about as bad as the U.S. Canada seems to have embraced multiculturalism more than the U.S. Not sure about Australia.

    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities. Status-whoring SWPL whites might, but they aren't the ones dying off.

    My guess is this is due to a combination of factors.

    1. Deindustralization and outsourcing. Lots of working-class whites used to get very generous salaries and healthcare benefits from these jobs. Now they're gone and a lot of former employees are underemployed and poorly paid.
    2. Mass immigration (both legal and illegal) is driving down wages and employment at a startling rate.
    3. Decline of unions.
    4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can't afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It's not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.
    5. Work place culture is cut throat as hell.

    America used to be a democracy as recently as the 70s and 80s. A democracy not just in the sense of voting for our leaders, but having unions to represent our interests and protect workers. These days our country is run by oligarchs who have completely free reign. They can import as many foreigners as they want (while still complaining about "worker shortages"), easily outsource, and push around their employees with little chance of punishment. Americans are such status-seeking materialists that they willingly embrace the system because they think they may get rich.

    The more educated and affluent may have economically prospered under the current system (though with lots of stress in their lives), but blue collar people are getting hammered hard. Really hard. Our completely worthless national leaders (including media) are so out of touch and unconcerned that they don't even talk about what's happening in America. If you exclusively follow the mainstream media outlets, you wouldn't even be aware of the massive fall of the average American's' standard of living.

    Replies: @Thea, @27 year old, @anon, @JohnnyWalker123, @Rod1963, @reiner Tor

    >4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can’t afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It’s not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.

    Calling this “extreme consumerism” is like saying “demographic change”. This feeling of consuminption inferiority is being deliberately inflicted on us. By the same type of people who are deliberately inflicting the demographic change.

    Side point, worse still than seeing the wealthy flaunt their wealth on Instagram, I’d say, is seeing the allegedly impoverished blacks do it right in front of you in real life at the checkout line, etc etc.

    RE McMansions, Americans buy McMansions to get away from blacks, not because they really want a McMansion as a status symbol. It’s all about escaping diversity.

  71. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Desiderius

    It wasn't discussed much in the general election. On national television, there's light, occasional coverage.

    McConnell represents a state that's been especially hard hit by the overdose epidemic. That's all he should be talking about.

    The 2 main points are this.

    1. It's remarkable that it took 2 decades before we started talking extensively about a very visible overdose epidemic. Imagine if politicians and media ignored talking about the 9/11 attacks until a couple of years ago (also assume 9/11s were happening every 2 months from 2001 through today).
    2. Given that we've had at least 300,000 excess overdose deaths since 2001, this should be getting discussed hours every night. Again, imagine back in 2001, if the 9/11 attacks were covered just a few minutes a night.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    I’m starting to see a few articles that are linking Trump’s win to the overdose epidemic.

    The political/media elites were stunned by Trump’s victory. If they had any sense what was happening in their own country, they wouldn’t have been. There’s a huge amount of death and despair in parts of the country. Trump (and also Bernie Sanders) tapped into the anger.

    Over 300,000 excessive overdose deaths happen over the past decade and a half. Politcians and media almost completely ignore it, as people scream out in anger for years. People get angry at being ignored. People finally vote for a non-establishment candidate that runs against the political/media overclass. Elites are stunned at candidate’s victory and don’t understand his popularity.

    America is a completely ridiculous country.

    • Replies: @anon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    As you say it's caused by off-shoring, unemployment, housing costs etc for the benefit of the banking mafia.

    The media is owned by the banking mafia so the media covered it up.

  72. RE driving deaths, maybe the roads are more dangerous because there are more nonWhites driving now. That seems like a simple explanation. Some people are just not as good at driving and we now have more of those people

  73. Regarding heroin overdoses, my wife and my parents were discussing it, because my wife’s coworker (a blue collar European immigrant, and also a big Trump guy) has a son who is an addict and really struggling. My wife mentioned some numbers about how many deaths there have been in our area. My father replied that he didn’t see a problem, that this was Darwin in action and a good thing. I told him it was easy for him to say since it wasn’t his son who was going to die. The boomers really don’t get it.

    • Replies: @grapesoda
    @27 year old

    Darwinism is often just used an excuse by people to be uncaring a-holes

    Replies: @colm

    , @Bleuteaux
    @27 year old

    The wholesale indifference towards anyone outside of your tribe really picked up with Baby Boomers. I've been astonished by it my entire (millennial) life. I've been particularly amazed that I almost never hear them ask where their grandchildren are going to work, when right now they drive through cities where industry has been totally wiped out. How does that soul-searching never come up?

    , @utu
    @27 year old

    I hope you will not become like your father.

  74. Yes, these are Yeltsin times in America. But it began during Reagan with union busting as advent of neoliberalism:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/piketty-maybe-we-ought-to-think-about-immigration-as-a-factor-in-growing-inequality/
    This group — the approximately 117 million adults stuck on the lower half of the income ladder — “has been completely shut off from economic growth since the 1970s,” the team of economists found. “Even after taxes and transfers, there has been close to zero growth for working-age adults in the bottom 50 percent.”

    It is whites who relatively suffer the most. It is a comparative disadvantage. The Blacks and Browns may feel they are improving just by observing what is happening to Whites.

  75. How about obesity? One would expect life expectancy to decline if it really is as bad as they say it is.

  76. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    "I’d also like to see how it breaks out by newer vs older cars."

    Me too. I really, really hope that the new electronic safety doodads would make me a better driver. My current cars are 15 and 18 years old, so I'll probably need to buy a car in the next few years. I hope to get one that will pander to my no doubt declining driving skills until I can afford a robot car in, say, two decades. It would be bad if the new safety options turn out to make me a less safe driver.

    Replies: @Jack D, @stillCARealist

    I have a new 2016 CR-V and I love it. The braking and accelerating are almost perfect in response and smoothness. BUT, the instrument panel is too much. A camera view shows up when you turn on the right signal and that’s good when i’m about to turn right on a city street. Not so good when I’m changing lanes on the freeway and I need to have complete awareness of my lane and the one next to me. Stuff happens fast on the freeway and I shouldn’t have a little movie playing on my dash.

    There’s also a touchscreen for the radio stations. This means I have to look at it to change stations whereas in the older car I could just feel it and not take my eyes off the road.

    Using the cruise control is a whole mess of buttons/switches that is like a mini-IQ test for me to solve when I actually want to use it (very rarely. I drive in crowded conditions almost exclusively).

    Even the windshield wipers are too complex. And don’t get me started on the climate control and vents.
    Add to all this the tendency for everyone to text and surf around on their phones and I can see why there’s more wrecks. I hit the back of a car a few years ago trying to turn off my phone as it was ringing. Now I leave the sound all the way down on the beast.

  77. @Wilkey
    "Reminiscent of the Yeltsin years in Russia…"

    I wonder what life expectancy looks like if you break it down by religiosity? The Left has spent several decades waging war on society's traditional, non-government institutions - churches, the Boy Scouts, the Rotary Club, you name it. Society has become atomized, with nothing but the weak glue of mindless government institutions to hold us together.

    It sucks to grow ill and old. Growing ill and/or old in an atomized society is, in many ways, harder than growing ill or old in a society with subpar healthcare. My uncle just died a few weeks ago after a four year battle with cancer. He probably would have died long before without the material and emotional support he received from his family and his church - the kind of support fewer and fewer people have these days. The demos that have seen their life expectancies hardest hit seem to be the ones least likely to be religious and have large families around to support them.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Hapalong Cassidy, @anon

    The demos that have seen their life expectancies hardest hit seem to be the ones least likely to be religious and have large families around to support them.

    No – the demos hardest hit are in the rust belt.

  78. @Hugh
    In part this must be the effects of the 2008 crash and its aftermath coming home to roost.

    Just last week the BBC ran a segment on drug addiction in Virginia. All the addicts were white. You would never have seen something so downbeat during the Obama years. Now that he's leaving expect to see a lot more reporting on the troubled side of America.

    Replies: @Yep, @anon

    In part this must be the effects of the 2008 crash and its aftermath coming home to roost.

    It’s been going up for 20 years – starting some years after off-shoring started.

  79. @JohnnyWalker123
    Overdoses have more than doubled since 2000.

    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6450a3.htm

    Overdose deaths rose slightly from the mid 80s through the early 90s. Then skyrocketed from the mid 90s onward. Almost 50,000 Americans are now dying from overdoses per year.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6101a3.htm

    Overdoses deaths (per-capita) are now 8x more common than in the 70s and early 80s. Per capita, overdoses are also about 5x more common than in the early 90s.

    That's absolutely remarkable.

    Equally remarkable is how little attention was devoted to this issue until recently. Even now, it's still not covered that much in the news.

    If Americans today were overdosing at the year 2000 rate, over 300,000 deaths would've been averted over the last decade and a half. That's about 100x the number of people who died on 9/11. Think about that. One-hundred 9/11s have occurred over the last decade and a half. That's been mostly ignored and even now still only lightly covered.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @anon

    Yes, covered up by the media for 20-ish years.

  80. @JohnnyWalker123
    @snorlax

    The UK supposedly is about as bad as the U.S. Canada seems to have embraced multiculturalism more than the U.S. Not sure about Australia.

    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities. Status-whoring SWPL whites might, but they aren't the ones dying off.

    My guess is this is due to a combination of factors.

    1. Deindustralization and outsourcing. Lots of working-class whites used to get very generous salaries and healthcare benefits from these jobs. Now they're gone and a lot of former employees are underemployed and poorly paid.
    2. Mass immigration (both legal and illegal) is driving down wages and employment at a startling rate.
    3. Decline of unions.
    4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can't afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It's not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.
    5. Work place culture is cut throat as hell.

    America used to be a democracy as recently as the 70s and 80s. A democracy not just in the sense of voting for our leaders, but having unions to represent our interests and protect workers. These days our country is run by oligarchs who have completely free reign. They can import as many foreigners as they want (while still complaining about "worker shortages"), easily outsource, and push around their employees with little chance of punishment. Americans are such status-seeking materialists that they willingly embrace the system because they think they may get rich.

    The more educated and affluent may have economically prospered under the current system (though with lots of stress in their lives), but blue collar people are getting hammered hard. Really hard. Our completely worthless national leaders (including media) are so out of touch and unconcerned that they don't even talk about what's happening in America. If you exclusively follow the mainstream media outlets, you wouldn't even be aware of the massive fall of the average American's' standard of living.

    Replies: @Thea, @27 year old, @anon, @JohnnyWalker123, @Rod1963, @reiner Tor

    exactly

  81. Remember back in the Yeltsin years, the elites kept telling us that Yeltsin, for all his flaws, was the only acceptable choice for Russia? All the various nationalist challengers he had over the years were dismissed as dangerous nutjobs.

    I believed all of it at the time, but now I wonder. Even if it were true, maybe letting Russia have a crazy guy in charge for a few years might have been a healthier way for the country to work through its problems.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Mr. Blank

    They weren't dangerous. They just didn't want their country destroyed by rapacious, blood-sucking oligarchs. At the time, many American political and business leaders (such as Marc Rich and Larry Summers) were making deals with the oligarchs.

    Most of these modern day robber barons were also Jewish. So that's another factor in why Yeltsin (who was their pawn) was regarded so positively by our media.

    , @anonymous
    @Mr. Blank


    Remember back in the Yeltsin years, the elites kept telling us that Yeltsin, for all his flaws, was the only acceptable choice for Russia?
     
    They made him out to be a daring hero. Even when he had his own parliament shelled they made him out to be a plucky figure. Now of course we can see him for what he really was and why the western propaganda apparatus extolled him so highly.
  82. @JohnnyWalker123
    @snorlax

    The UK supposedly is about as bad as the U.S. Canada seems to have embraced multiculturalism more than the U.S. Not sure about Australia.

    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities. Status-whoring SWPL whites might, but they aren't the ones dying off.

    My guess is this is due to a combination of factors.

    1. Deindustralization and outsourcing. Lots of working-class whites used to get very generous salaries and healthcare benefits from these jobs. Now they're gone and a lot of former employees are underemployed and poorly paid.
    2. Mass immigration (both legal and illegal) is driving down wages and employment at a startling rate.
    3. Decline of unions.
    4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can't afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It's not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.
    5. Work place culture is cut throat as hell.

    America used to be a democracy as recently as the 70s and 80s. A democracy not just in the sense of voting for our leaders, but having unions to represent our interests and protect workers. These days our country is run by oligarchs who have completely free reign. They can import as many foreigners as they want (while still complaining about "worker shortages"), easily outsource, and push around their employees with little chance of punishment. Americans are such status-seeking materialists that they willingly embrace the system because they think they may get rich.

    The more educated and affluent may have economically prospered under the current system (though with lots of stress in their lives), but blue collar people are getting hammered hard. Really hard. Our completely worthless national leaders (including media) are so out of touch and unconcerned that they don't even talk about what's happening in America. If you exclusively follow the mainstream media outlets, you wouldn't even be aware of the massive fall of the average American's' standard of living.

    Replies: @Thea, @27 year old, @anon, @JohnnyWalker123, @Rod1963, @reiner Tor

    One more factor.

    6. America is a dog-eat-dog society. Lots of people here are willing to do anything to climb up to the next rung of the economic ladder, including doctors. Plenty of doctors made a lot of money giving unnecessary prescriptions through pill mills. Apparently, for at least some of them, making $200,000 a year wasn’t enough. They needed more. Another vacation home, a 2nd BMW, a trip to Tahiti.

    By the way, doctors are very vigorous in lobbying and regulating through the AMA (American Medical Association). Whenever any attempt is made to cut doctor reimbursement or allow nurses to perform medical procedures, the AMA leaps into action quickly. It doesn’t reflect well on the profession that not much was done to reign in the unscrupulous pill mill doctors. The AMA could’ve done a lot more to nip this in the bud, but they were slow to act. So even if a small percentage of doctors turned into drug dealers, they couldn’t have gotten away with it if not for the apathy of so many of their fellow docs.

    America is dog-eat-dog in a lot of ways. Employers make record profits by firing workers, outsourcing jobs, and insourcing immigrants. Bankers drive up commissions by selling people loans they won’t be able to pay back. Defense contractors get wealthy by supplying munitions for the never ending “War on Terror” (a war they lobby politicians to keep on fighting), while thousands of soldiers die and over 1+ million come back with injuries. Private equity firms do leveraged buyouts in which they kill viable companies and sell off their assets. Politicians sign disastrous free trade deals (NAFTA, TPP, etc.) that offshore our manufacturing base (which took centuries to build) so they can later on collect “speaking fees.” The Bushes allow Saudi Arabia to evade responsibility for 9/11 because the Saudi royal family has bribed them with generous business deals.

    It’s truly madness. Unfortunately, the mentality among a large swathe of the country is to be indifferent to all of this. The mentality is that everyone is on his own and nobody has any obligation to anybody. As long as you’re getting ahead, that’s all that matters. That has had unfortunate consequences for a large percentage of Americans.

    When you combine this cutthroat culture with widespread hostility to whites, you get the white death.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Good letter to VDARE.

    http://www.vdare.com/letters/first-they-came-for-the-janitors


    First they came for the janitors.
    At one time janitors were unionized and made enough to support a family on one paycheck. But this cost the right people money. How dare a lowly janitor make so much money! You can get Mexicans to do the work for a fraction of the cost—the janitors must be lazy. So they broke the unions, imported foreign labor, and now janitors work multiple shifts to support their families in unheated garages. But I wasn`t a janitor, so I said nothing.
    Then they came for the factory workers. We`re paying workers ten times what they make in China; we need to be globally competitive! How dare these fat unionized slobs make a good living when it would be so much more profitable to pay them a few dimes an hour! So they outsourced the factories to low-wage sweatshop countries, they tore up the contracts and benefits, gutted whole communities and our nation`s industrial strength. But I wasn`t a factory worker, so I said nothing.
    Then they came for the scientists and engineers. We advertise for experienced software engineers at minimum wage and no benefits and we don`t get Einstein! Americans must be lazy and stupid. So they imported massive numbers of foreign scientists and engineers, and started outsourcing advanced design work, and now even the most talented scientists and engineers are being forced into low-wage temporary jobs. But I wasn`t a scientist or an engineer, so I said nothing.
    Then they came for the public employees. Hey, everyone else is getting poorer, how dare people who clean the streets or check food quality or guide air traffic make a decent wage with benefits? So they trashed the public employee unions and tore up the contracts and slashed wages and gave the savings to Wall Street. But I wasn`t a public employee so I said nothing.
    And then they came for me. I thought I was special, but in the long run nobody who works for a living is. I recalled that once upon a time America had the highest wages in the world, and we gloried in it as proof of our greatness. Now we celebrate a steady descent into poverty as somehow wonderful and necessary: how did that happen?
    I realize now that driving down wages enriches only a few: the profits from destroying the wages of all my fellow citizens somehow never made it into my pocket
     
    .
    , @utu
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "America is dog-eat-dog in a lot of ways." - And we are indoctrinated to be so. For example by libertarianism. The top dogs in this dog-eat-dog environment through the ideology of libertarianism want to deprive the bottom dogs of the only defense they have, i.e., the labor organizing. I remember meeting a young technician in 1982 who was making a very passionate argument against the unions that he did not need them, that he was on the side of freedom. I did not know about libertarianism at that time but clearly he was the victim of this ideology.

    Replies: @melendwyr

  83. OT: The Oakland warehouse fire.
    I am betting that it is arson. Hispanics and POC are learning the first step in a white white return to the hood is the first sign of artistic hipsters. They open their art galleries, playhouses, and bookstores. Soon, the area becomes trendy, and soon the white middle class is moving in. The first hipsters were adventurous and enjoyed the urban life. They bring in the people who will complain about the noise.
    This is how Lincoln Park and Bucktown have been reclaimed. Logan Square is being reclained.
    Now, that they know how this works, the minorities are going to strike first and drive all whites out.

  84. @Mr. Blank
    Remember back in the Yeltsin years, the elites kept telling us that Yeltsin, for all his flaws, was the only acceptable choice for Russia? All the various nationalist challengers he had over the years were dismissed as dangerous nutjobs.

    I believed all of it at the time, but now I wonder. Even if it were true, maybe letting Russia have a crazy guy in charge for a few years might have been a healthier way for the country to work through its problems.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @anonymous

    They weren’t dangerous. They just didn’t want their country destroyed by rapacious, blood-sucking oligarchs. At the time, many American political and business leaders (such as Marc Rich and Larry Summers) were making deals with the oligarchs.

    Most of these modern day robber barons were also Jewish. So that’s another factor in why Yeltsin (who was their pawn) was regarded so positively by our media.

  85. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I'm starting to see a few articles that are linking Trump's win to the overdose epidemic.

    The political/media elites were stunned by Trump's victory. If they had any sense what was happening in their own country, they wouldn't have been. There's a huge amount of death and despair in parts of the country. Trump (and also Bernie Sanders) tapped into the anger.

    Over 300,000 excessive overdose deaths happen over the past decade and a half. Politcians and media almost completely ignore it, as people scream out in anger for years. People get angry at being ignored. People finally vote for a non-establishment candidate that runs against the political/media overclass. Elites are stunned at candidate's victory and don't understand his popularity.

    America is a completely ridiculous country.

    Replies: @anon

    As you say it’s caused by off-shoring, unemployment, housing costs etc for the benefit of the banking mafia.

    The media is owned by the banking mafia so the media covered it up.

  86. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    One more factor.

    6. America is a dog-eat-dog society. Lots of people here are willing to do anything to climb up to the next rung of the economic ladder, including doctors. Plenty of doctors made a lot of money giving unnecessary prescriptions through pill mills. Apparently, for at least some of them, making $200,000 a year wasn't enough. They needed more. Another vacation home, a 2nd BMW, a trip to Tahiti.

    By the way, doctors are very vigorous in lobbying and regulating through the AMA (American Medical Association). Whenever any attempt is made to cut doctor reimbursement or allow nurses to perform medical procedures, the AMA leaps into action quickly. It doesn't reflect well on the profession that not much was done to reign in the unscrupulous pill mill doctors. The AMA could've done a lot more to nip this in the bud, but they were slow to act. So even if a small percentage of doctors turned into drug dealers, they couldn't have gotten away with it if not for the apathy of so many of their fellow docs.

    America is dog-eat-dog in a lot of ways. Employers make record profits by firing workers, outsourcing jobs, and insourcing immigrants. Bankers drive up commissions by selling people loans they won't be able to pay back. Defense contractors get wealthy by supplying munitions for the never ending "War on Terror" (a war they lobby politicians to keep on fighting), while thousands of soldiers die and over 1+ million come back with injuries. Private equity firms do leveraged buyouts in which they kill viable companies and sell off their assets. Politicians sign disastrous free trade deals (NAFTA, TPP, etc.) that offshore our manufacturing base (which took centuries to build) so they can later on collect "speaking fees." The Bushes allow Saudi Arabia to evade responsibility for 9/11 because the Saudi royal family has bribed them with generous business deals.

    It's truly madness. Unfortunately, the mentality among a large swathe of the country is to be indifferent to all of this. The mentality is that everyone is on his own and nobody has any obligation to anybody. As long as you're getting ahead, that's all that matters. That has had unfortunate consequences for a large percentage of Americans.

    When you combine this cutthroat culture with widespread hostility to whites, you get the white death.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @utu

    Good letter to VDARE.

    http://www.vdare.com/letters/first-they-came-for-the-janitors

    First they came for the janitors.
    At one time janitors were unionized and made enough to support a family on one paycheck. But this cost the right people money. How dare a lowly janitor make so much money! You can get Mexicans to do the work for a fraction of the cost—the janitors must be lazy. So they broke the unions, imported foreign labor, and now janitors work multiple shifts to support their families in unheated garages. But I wasn`t a janitor, so I said nothing.
    Then they came for the factory workers. We`re paying workers ten times what they make in China; we need to be globally competitive! How dare these fat unionized slobs make a good living when it would be so much more profitable to pay them a few dimes an hour! So they outsourced the factories to low-wage sweatshop countries, they tore up the contracts and benefits, gutted whole communities and our nation`s industrial strength. But I wasn`t a factory worker, so I said nothing.
    Then they came for the scientists and engineers. We advertise for experienced software engineers at minimum wage and no benefits and we don`t get Einstein! Americans must be lazy and stupid. So they imported massive numbers of foreign scientists and engineers, and started outsourcing advanced design work, and now even the most talented scientists and engineers are being forced into low-wage temporary jobs. But I wasn`t a scientist or an engineer, so I said nothing.
    Then they came for the public employees. Hey, everyone else is getting poorer, how dare people who clean the streets or check food quality or guide air traffic make a decent wage with benefits? So they trashed the public employee unions and tore up the contracts and slashed wages and gave the savings to Wall Street. But I wasn`t a public employee so I said nothing.
    And then they came for me. I thought I was special, but in the long run nobody who works for a living is. I recalled that once upon a time America had the highest wages in the world, and we gloried in it as proof of our greatness. Now we celebrate a steady descent into poverty as somehow wonderful and necessary: how did that happen?
    I realize now that driving down wages enriches only a few: the profits from destroying the wages of all my fellow citizens somehow never made it into my pocket

    .

  87. anon • Disclaimer says:

    My look at the White Death data last year suggested that there was sharp worsening of age-adjusted death rates for those born in the early 1950s versus those born in the late 1940s.

    if you pick a year – say 1990 – then those born in the 1940s would be in their 40s and those born in the 1950s in their 30s

    and prime earning years as 40-55

    then you have a tipping point somewhere around those ages of people who could afford a home before off-shoring and unemployment kicked in.

    Something is going wrong with car crash deaths.

    some of that will be related to drink/drugs/suicidal tendencies – need to see if it aligned with the suicide hot spots

    Several experts pointed out that other Western nations are not seeing similar rises in mortality, suggesting an urgency to determine what is unique about health, health care and socioeconomic conditions in the United States.

    homelessness imo

    55, broke and homeless vs 55 broke, but mortgage paid before lost job

    people with no prospects faced with being homeless

    (all the other western countries have increases in self-destructive behaviors for the same reason but their welfare had more of a safety net so less lethal – key word “had” as the massive influx of immigrants now is kicking homelessness into overdrive)

  88. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Wilkey

    Except that life expectancy keeps rising in the UK. Their family and religious culture is just as atomized as ours.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/nov/29/life-expectancy-in-uk-rises-but-years-spent-in-good-health-falling-ons

    Life expectancy is rising in Canada too.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/ted-bruce/canadians-living-longer_b_12900896.html

    Life expectancy is rising in Australia.

    http://www.businessinsider.com.au/australians-are-now-no-7-in-the-world-when-it-comes-to-life-expectancy-2016-4

    Replies: @snorlax, @The Alarmist, @Anonymous Nephew

    In the UK you get medical treatment no matter how poor you are (indeed no matter if you’ve just arrived illegally in the country). That would IMHO have made a difference. Prescriptions are free for over-60s and there’s a lot of preventative stuff – flu jabs and the like.

    How long this can last as the tax base collapses I don’t know.

  89. @JayMan
    First see my post

    HBD Is Life and Death

    There is a strong region pattern to lifespan, even among American Whites. Particularly, Scots-Irish Americans live distinctly shorter than others Whites. They also suffer from higher rates of nearly all the social maladies discussed here; they even have higher traffic fatality rates.

    Gelman found that the "White Death" was driven entirely by women in the South. I'd wager Scots-Irish were leading that trend.

    I'd like to see a regional breakdown of changes in death rates. I'd also like to see regional breakdown of increased birth rates during the Baby Boom.

    Replies: @Muse, @epebble

    Maybe the proportion of whites that are of primarily Scots-Irish ancestry is creeping up as they reproduce at a faster rate while the Protestant-Germanic types slowly exterminate themselves via abortion, delayed marriage and childbirth, feminist careerism and alternate lifestyles.

    The national death rates for all whites slowly edges up reflecting the comparably higher death rates of the Scots-Irish.

    http://www.abort73.com/abortion_facts/states/

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/01/29/states-that-are-more-opposed-to-abortion-have-fewer-abortions-but-not-fewer-unintended-pregnancies/?utm_term=.72055b327b2a

  90. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    One more factor.

    6. America is a dog-eat-dog society. Lots of people here are willing to do anything to climb up to the next rung of the economic ladder, including doctors. Plenty of doctors made a lot of money giving unnecessary prescriptions through pill mills. Apparently, for at least some of them, making $200,000 a year wasn't enough. They needed more. Another vacation home, a 2nd BMW, a trip to Tahiti.

    By the way, doctors are very vigorous in lobbying and regulating through the AMA (American Medical Association). Whenever any attempt is made to cut doctor reimbursement or allow nurses to perform medical procedures, the AMA leaps into action quickly. It doesn't reflect well on the profession that not much was done to reign in the unscrupulous pill mill doctors. The AMA could've done a lot more to nip this in the bud, but they were slow to act. So even if a small percentage of doctors turned into drug dealers, they couldn't have gotten away with it if not for the apathy of so many of their fellow docs.

    America is dog-eat-dog in a lot of ways. Employers make record profits by firing workers, outsourcing jobs, and insourcing immigrants. Bankers drive up commissions by selling people loans they won't be able to pay back. Defense contractors get wealthy by supplying munitions for the never ending "War on Terror" (a war they lobby politicians to keep on fighting), while thousands of soldiers die and over 1+ million come back with injuries. Private equity firms do leveraged buyouts in which they kill viable companies and sell off their assets. Politicians sign disastrous free trade deals (NAFTA, TPP, etc.) that offshore our manufacturing base (which took centuries to build) so they can later on collect "speaking fees." The Bushes allow Saudi Arabia to evade responsibility for 9/11 because the Saudi royal family has bribed them with generous business deals.

    It's truly madness. Unfortunately, the mentality among a large swathe of the country is to be indifferent to all of this. The mentality is that everyone is on his own and nobody has any obligation to anybody. As long as you're getting ahead, that's all that matters. That has had unfortunate consequences for a large percentage of Americans.

    When you combine this cutthroat culture with widespread hostility to whites, you get the white death.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @utu

    “America is dog-eat-dog in a lot of ways.” – And we are indoctrinated to be so. For example by libertarianism. The top dogs in this dog-eat-dog environment through the ideology of libertarianism want to deprive the bottom dogs of the only defense they have, i.e., the labor organizing. I remember meeting a young technician in 1982 who was making a very passionate argument against the unions that he did not need them, that he was on the side of freedom. I did not know about libertarianism at that time but clearly he was the victim of this ideology.

    • Replies: @melendwyr
    @utu

    Unions can quite easily become a tool of oppression. Just as the political system can be dominated by people who have no interest in serving their voters, merely in exploiting them, unions can as well.

    And in many cases, it's illegal to work in an occupation and NOT belong to the union. Do you imagine the laws were passed out of concern for the workers? No, it was to ensure that the corrupt leaders of the unions had an easier time controlling their resource base, as it wasn't possible to leave if the union wasn't serving your interests.

    Replies: @utu

  91. @JayMan
    First see my post

    HBD Is Life and Death

    There is a strong region pattern to lifespan, even among American Whites. Particularly, Scots-Irish Americans live distinctly shorter than others Whites. They also suffer from higher rates of nearly all the social maladies discussed here; they even have higher traffic fatality rates.

    Gelman found that the "White Death" was driven entirely by women in the South. I'd wager Scots-Irish were leading that trend.

    I'd like to see a regional breakdown of changes in death rates. I'd also like to see regional breakdown of increased birth rates during the Baby Boom.

    Replies: @Muse, @epebble

    From this link http://scholars.unh.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1288&context=carsey

    Page 3 has this list of states in the order (large to small) death – birth for whites:

    FL
    PA
    RI
    WV
    CA
    NM
    CT
    NJ
    AL
    ME
    NV
    DE
    MA
    AZ
    AR
    MS
    NH

  92. @Another Canadian
    @Daniel H

    Vancouver is the one city in Canada with a big U.S.-style urban drug culture. The morgues are full with fentanyl deaths. It would be interesting to investigate the effects of designer drugs on US death rates.

    http://www.straight.com/news/840756/overdose-deaths-involving-fentanyl-fill-vancouver-morgues-capacity

    Replies: @penntothal, @David

    According to the Toronto Star 638 people died of opiod overdose in Ontario in 2013, or about 1 per 20,000 of provincial population. NPR this morning said about 44 Americans a day die of the same cause which works out to 1 in 20,236 annually. Not much difference. Any chance that like a typical Canadian, your fundamental paradigm in life is that your better than US?

    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2016/11/10/opioids-to-blame-for-hundreds-of-overdose-deaths-in-ontario-report-says.html

  93. @Opinionator
    @Steve Sailer

    Have better car design, materials, and components made that a safer speed than it seems?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Esso, @South Texas Guy, @melendwyr

    Have better car design, materials, and components made that a safer speed than it seems?

    If such a claim were made, would you believe it wholeheartedly?

    At this point, I wouldn’t.

  94. @JohnnyWalker123
    @snorlax

    The UK supposedly is about as bad as the U.S. Canada seems to have embraced multiculturalism more than the U.S. Not sure about Australia.

    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities. Status-whoring SWPL whites might, but they aren't the ones dying off.

    My guess is this is due to a combination of factors.

    1. Deindustralization and outsourcing. Lots of working-class whites used to get very generous salaries and healthcare benefits from these jobs. Now they're gone and a lot of former employees are underemployed and poorly paid.
    2. Mass immigration (both legal and illegal) is driving down wages and employment at a startling rate.
    3. Decline of unions.
    4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can't afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It's not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.
    5. Work place culture is cut throat as hell.

    America used to be a democracy as recently as the 70s and 80s. A democracy not just in the sense of voting for our leaders, but having unions to represent our interests and protect workers. These days our country is run by oligarchs who have completely free reign. They can import as many foreigners as they want (while still complaining about "worker shortages"), easily outsource, and push around their employees with little chance of punishment. Americans are such status-seeking materialists that they willingly embrace the system because they think they may get rich.

    The more educated and affluent may have economically prospered under the current system (though with lots of stress in their lives), but blue collar people are getting hammered hard. Really hard. Our completely worthless national leaders (including media) are so out of touch and unconcerned that they don't even talk about what's happening in America. If you exclusively follow the mainstream media outlets, you wouldn't even be aware of the massive fall of the average American's' standard of living.

    Replies: @Thea, @27 year old, @anon, @JohnnyWalker123, @Rod1963, @reiner Tor

    You nailed it.

    Problem is, most folks don’t get it, even if you spell it out for them. This is why Trump’s rise and win surprised people on both sides. Most didn’t even know white blue collars existed, even in the alt-right where Trump was pilloried by most as being a loser and dim wit.

    You’re spot on about our national leaders and MSM. Neither has a clue as to whats happening in America. During the campaign WaPo sent down a bunch of reporters to the mid-West to figure out why Trump was so popular, they found nothing. No doubt they only talked to like minded people which guaranteed them learning nothing.

    They had no idea of the hammering the white blue collars and middle-class have taken over the last 20 years.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @Rod1963

    "They had no idea of the hammering the white blue collars and middle-class have taken over the last 20 years."

    I keep hammering on about this amazing stat - that male real wages were lower in 2014 than in 1973, 41 years before. Those of you who are old enough can imagine what 1974 would have been like if men then earned less than in 1933.


    "The typical man with a full-time job–the one at the statistical middle of the middle–earned $50,383 last year, the Census Bureau reported this week. The typical man with a full-time job in 1973 earned $53,294, measured in 2014 dollars to adjust for inflation. You read that right: The median male worker who was employed year-round and full time earned less in 2014 than a similarly situated worker earned four decades ago. And those are the ones who had jobs."
     
    https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/the-typical-male-u-s-worker-earned-less-in-2014-than-in-1973/

    Women's real median wages have risen 30% in that time. But men's wages are more important from a demographic perspective - Steve's Affordable Family Formation - because having and raising children takes a woman out of the workforce, during which time she will (in a well-ordered society) be dependent on the father's income.

    Replies: @verylongaccountname

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @Rod1963

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/why-donald-trump-makes-sense-to-a-lot-of-voters--even-some-democrats/2015/08/15/cee648f0-42bf-11e5-8ab4-c73967a143d3_story.html?utm_term=.5ca29fa6a797


    "Why Donald Trump Makes Sense To A Lot Of Voters -- Even Some Democrats" by Washington Post reporter Dave Weigel -- August 15, 2015

  95. Vancouver has government -endorsed injection centers where addicts can shoot-up legally.

    These centers were touted by progressives as a way to reduce stigma and get addicts into a safer space, maybe as a bridge to treatment.

    Maybe the morgues are still filling up in Vancouver because this progressive tolerant approach doesn’t work.

    There is a large recovery and treatment industry with a vested interest in downplaying how ineffective “treatment” for opiate addiction actually is. Opiate addiction is sort-of like lung cancer: Investment in prevention from exposure (never get the disease in the first place) pays off much higher dividends than the enormous sums invested in treatment for people already afflicted (almost none of whom can ever be cured.)

  96. @27 year old
    Regarding heroin overdoses, my wife and my parents were discussing it, because my wife's coworker (a blue collar European immigrant, and also a big Trump guy) has a son who is an addict and really struggling. My wife mentioned some numbers about how many deaths there have been in our area. My father replied that he didn't see a problem, that this was Darwin in action and a good thing. I told him it was easy for him to say since it wasn't his son who was going to die. The boomers really don't get it.

    Replies: @grapesoda, @Bleuteaux, @utu

    Darwinism is often just used an excuse by people to be uncaring a-holes

    • Replies: @colm
    @grapesoda

    Darwinism is the reality. Those who are unfit to live in today's cutthroat world have no hope at all.

    Replies: @anon

  97. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Blank
    Remember back in the Yeltsin years, the elites kept telling us that Yeltsin, for all his flaws, was the only acceptable choice for Russia? All the various nationalist challengers he had over the years were dismissed as dangerous nutjobs.

    I believed all of it at the time, but now I wonder. Even if it were true, maybe letting Russia have a crazy guy in charge for a few years might have been a healthier way for the country to work through its problems.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @anonymous

    Remember back in the Yeltsin years, the elites kept telling us that Yeltsin, for all his flaws, was the only acceptable choice for Russia?

    They made him out to be a daring hero. Even when he had his own parliament shelled they made him out to be a plucky figure. Now of course we can see him for what he really was and why the western propaganda apparatus extolled him so highly.

  98. @Rod1963
    @JohnnyWalker123

    You nailed it.

    Problem is, most folks don't get it, even if you spell it out for them. This is why Trump's rise and win surprised people on both sides. Most didn't even know white blue collars existed, even in the alt-right where Trump was pilloried by most as being a loser and dim wit.

    You're spot on about our national leaders and MSM. Neither has a clue as to whats happening in America. During the campaign WaPo sent down a bunch of reporters to the mid-West to figure out why Trump was so popular, they found nothing. No doubt they only talked to like minded people which guaranteed them learning nothing.

    They had no idea of the hammering the white blue collars and middle-class have taken over the last 20 years.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Charles Pewitt

    “They had no idea of the hammering the white blue collars and middle-class have taken over the last 20 years.”

    I keep hammering on about this amazing stat – that male real wages were lower in 2014 than in 1973, 41 years before. Those of you who are old enough can imagine what 1974 would have been like if men then earned less than in 1933.

    “The typical man with a full-time job–the one at the statistical middle of the middle–earned $50,383 last year, the Census Bureau reported this week. The typical man with a full-time job in 1973 earned $53,294, measured in 2014 dollars to adjust for inflation. You read that right: The median male worker who was employed year-round and full time earned less in 2014 than a similarly situated worker earned four decades ago. And those are the ones who had jobs.”

    https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/the-typical-male-u-s-worker-earned-less-in-2014-than-in-1973/

    Women’s real median wages have risen 30% in that time. But men’s wages are more important from a demographic perspective – Steve’s Affordable Family Formation – because having and raising children takes a woman out of the workforce, during which time she will (in a well-ordered society) be dependent on the father’s income.

    • Replies: @verylongaccountname
    @Anonymous Nephew

    And the official estimates greatly understate the actual rate of inflation, thus hiding the real extent of the decline of wages. By comparing quality of life, I guess that the properly adjusted 1970 median wage is more like 70K in today's dollars.

  99. @Rod1963
    @JohnnyWalker123

    You nailed it.

    Problem is, most folks don't get it, even if you spell it out for them. This is why Trump's rise and win surprised people on both sides. Most didn't even know white blue collars existed, even in the alt-right where Trump was pilloried by most as being a loser and dim wit.

    You're spot on about our national leaders and MSM. Neither has a clue as to whats happening in America. During the campaign WaPo sent down a bunch of reporters to the mid-West to figure out why Trump was so popular, they found nothing. No doubt they only talked to like minded people which guaranteed them learning nothing.

    They had no idea of the hammering the white blue collars and middle-class have taken over the last 20 years.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Charles Pewitt

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/why-donald-trump-makes-sense-to-a-lot-of-voters–even-some-democrats/2015/08/15/cee648f0-42bf-11e5-8ab4-c73967a143d3_story.html?utm_term=.5ca29fa6a797

    “Why Donald Trump Makes Sense To A Lot Of Voters — Even Some Democrats” by Washington Post reporter Dave Weigel — August 15, 2015

  100. @JohnnyWalker123
    @snorlax

    The UK supposedly is about as bad as the U.S. Canada seems to have embraced multiculturalism more than the U.S. Not sure about Australia.

    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities. Status-whoring SWPL whites might, but they aren't the ones dying off.

    My guess is this is due to a combination of factors.

    1. Deindustralization and outsourcing. Lots of working-class whites used to get very generous salaries and healthcare benefits from these jobs. Now they're gone and a lot of former employees are underemployed and poorly paid.
    2. Mass immigration (both legal and illegal) is driving down wages and employment at a startling rate.
    3. Decline of unions.
    4. Extreme consumerism makes people feel like losers unless they own a huge SUV and McMansion. Lots of people can't afford that or go deep into debt to pay for it. It's not a nice feeling to see wealthy people parade their lifestyles on Instagram and tv constantly.
    5. Work place culture is cut throat as hell.

    America used to be a democracy as recently as the 70s and 80s. A democracy not just in the sense of voting for our leaders, but having unions to represent our interests and protect workers. These days our country is run by oligarchs who have completely free reign. They can import as many foreigners as they want (while still complaining about "worker shortages"), easily outsource, and push around their employees with little chance of punishment. Americans are such status-seeking materialists that they willingly embrace the system because they think they may get rich.

    The more educated and affluent may have economically prospered under the current system (though with lots of stress in their lives), but blue collar people are getting hammered hard. Really hard. Our completely worthless national leaders (including media) are so out of touch and unconcerned that they don't even talk about what's happening in America. If you exclusively follow the mainstream media outlets, you wouldn't even be aware of the massive fall of the average American's' standard of living.

    Replies: @Thea, @27 year old, @anon, @JohnnyWalker123, @Rod1963, @reiner Tor

    Most of these deaths are among working-class whites, who tend not have much white guilt. I doubt Appalachian and Southern whites really care much about minorities.

    They are constantly bombarded by messages that whites are bad and are going extinct soon. You don’t have to be smart to figure out that you’re hated by the ruling classes and that there is no hope for you and your posterity. The psychological demoralizing effect must be profound.

  101. Theoretically, stronger unions would have improved the current conditions.

    Unfortunately, the unions that actually exist (i.e., union leaders) have been complicit in creating the current conditions.

  102. @27 year old
    Regarding heroin overdoses, my wife and my parents were discussing it, because my wife's coworker (a blue collar European immigrant, and also a big Trump guy) has a son who is an addict and really struggling. My wife mentioned some numbers about how many deaths there have been in our area. My father replied that he didn't see a problem, that this was Darwin in action and a good thing. I told him it was easy for him to say since it wasn't his son who was going to die. The boomers really don't get it.

    Replies: @grapesoda, @Bleuteaux, @utu

    The wholesale indifference towards anyone outside of your tribe really picked up with Baby Boomers. I’ve been astonished by it my entire (millennial) life. I’ve been particularly amazed that I almost never hear them ask where their grandchildren are going to work, when right now they drive through cities where industry has been totally wiped out. How does that soul-searching never come up?

  103. The latest CDC Wonder data shows that age-adjusted suicide rates for non-Hispanic white reached a record-high 17 per 100,000. This is comparable to or higher than the rates for Russia or Japan of the same year (note that both these countries have seen notable declines in suicides since the last global WHO suicide rate study back in 2012).

    https://wonder.cdc.gov/controller/saved/D77/D6F553

  104. @Anonymous Nephew
    @Rod1963

    "They had no idea of the hammering the white blue collars and middle-class have taken over the last 20 years."

    I keep hammering on about this amazing stat - that male real wages were lower in 2014 than in 1973, 41 years before. Those of you who are old enough can imagine what 1974 would have been like if men then earned less than in 1933.


    "The typical man with a full-time job–the one at the statistical middle of the middle–earned $50,383 last year, the Census Bureau reported this week. The typical man with a full-time job in 1973 earned $53,294, measured in 2014 dollars to adjust for inflation. You read that right: The median male worker who was employed year-round and full time earned less in 2014 than a similarly situated worker earned four decades ago. And those are the ones who had jobs."
     
    https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/the-typical-male-u-s-worker-earned-less-in-2014-than-in-1973/

    Women's real median wages have risen 30% in that time. But men's wages are more important from a demographic perspective - Steve's Affordable Family Formation - because having and raising children takes a woman out of the workforce, during which time she will (in a well-ordered society) be dependent on the father's income.

    Replies: @verylongaccountname

    And the official estimates greatly understate the actual rate of inflation, thus hiding the real extent of the decline of wages. By comparing quality of life, I guess that the properly adjusted 1970 median wage is more like 70K in today’s dollars.

  105. @I, Libertine
    As I've bitched about previously on iSteve, here in New York, millennials are dying from heroin at a breathtaking rate. The corruption facilitated by war in Afghanistan and the de facto legalization of marijuana have effectively conspired to increased the supply. The anti-doctor shopping law ( a reaction to the wonderful work done by drug company salesmen) has increased the demand.

    At least with prescription opioids, the addicts knew how much they were taking, and the drug was unadulterated. Now, they're found dead with the needles still in their arms.

    Replies: @melendwyr

    That sounds like a resounding success for the policy.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @melendwyr


    That sounds like a resounding success for the policy.
     
    That kind of cold-hearted, callous response is why there are liberals.

    Replies: @Bleuteaux

  106. @utu
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "America is dog-eat-dog in a lot of ways." - And we are indoctrinated to be so. For example by libertarianism. The top dogs in this dog-eat-dog environment through the ideology of libertarianism want to deprive the bottom dogs of the only defense they have, i.e., the labor organizing. I remember meeting a young technician in 1982 who was making a very passionate argument against the unions that he did not need them, that he was on the side of freedom. I did not know about libertarianism at that time but clearly he was the victim of this ideology.

    Replies: @melendwyr

    Unions can quite easily become a tool of oppression. Just as the political system can be dominated by people who have no interest in serving their voters, merely in exploiting them, unions can as well.

    And in many cases, it’s illegal to work in an occupation and NOT belong to the union. Do you imagine the laws were passed out of concern for the workers? No, it was to ensure that the corrupt leaders of the unions had an easier time controlling their resource base, as it wasn’t possible to leave if the union wasn’t serving your interests.

    • Replies: @utu
    @melendwyr

    I will worry about the oppression by the unions when I see the unions. In the meantime we need unions to counterbalance the power of corporations.

    Replies: @melendwyr

  107. We are poorer, dumber, more stressed out, and less cohesive as a society than we were 30 or years ago, so not really surprising that we are not living as long.

    Even those of us who have been lucky enough to have steady work have had to put up with an incredible amount of bull sh*t from our not so benevolent employers to stay in what is truly a rat race. Stress takes a terrible toll.

    As for the increase in traffic related deaths, I wonder if it could be due to the dramatic increase in population without commensurate infastructure additions/improvements. Our current population is north of 300 million and is driving a system of roads designed and built for a populaton of a 150 million people.

  108. @grapesoda
    @27 year old

    Darwinism is often just used an excuse by people to be uncaring a-holes

    Replies: @colm

    Darwinism is the reality. Those who are unfit to live in today’s cutthroat world have no hope at all.

    • Replies: @anon
    @colm

    It's 3rd level Darwinism though.

    1st level is where people adapt to a physical environment - or don't.

    2nd level is where populations create a cultural environment to benefit the group as a whole and select against traits they don't want e.g. criminals, free riders etc

    3rd level is where one segment of the group uses cultural manipulation to change the cultural environment to their benefit which deliberately or indirectly harms some other part of the group e.g. the banking mafia imposing cheap labor economics which enriches them and harms others

    The people they killed are people who would be perfectly functional if their environment hadn't been poisoned.

    So yes it's still Darwinian but it's more group scale, game theory Darwinian - it's not how can individuals evolve to escape the problem it's how can the group evolve to deal with parasites poisoning their cultural environment.

  109. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @colm
    @grapesoda

    Darwinism is the reality. Those who are unfit to live in today's cutthroat world have no hope at all.

    Replies: @anon

    It’s 3rd level Darwinism though.

    1st level is where people adapt to a physical environment – or don’t.

    2nd level is where populations create a cultural environment to benefit the group as a whole and select against traits they don’t want e.g. criminals, free riders etc

    3rd level is where one segment of the group uses cultural manipulation to change the cultural environment to their benefit which deliberately or indirectly harms some other part of the group e.g. the banking mafia imposing cheap labor economics which enriches them and harms others

    The people they killed are people who would be perfectly functional if their environment hadn’t been poisoned.

    So yes it’s still Darwinian but it’s more group scale, game theory Darwinian – it’s not how can individuals evolve to escape the problem it’s how can the group evolve to deal with parasites poisoning their cultural environment.

  110. @melendwyr
    @I, Libertine

    That sounds like a resounding success for the policy.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    That sounds like a resounding success for the policy.

    That kind of cold-hearted, callous response is why there are liberals.

    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    He's probably saying that ironically.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

  111. @Jack D
    @Yep

    Yes. Whatever improvement is coming from new safety gizmos is far outweighed by people who are looking at their phones and are distracted while driving. The safety gizmos (automatic braking, lane departure warnings, etc.) haven't really penetrated the fleet much yet anyway. Even on new cars they are optional and more than half the cars that are on the road are from before they were even available.

    People need to be saved from their own idiocy. Phones should be designed so that the keyboards don't work in moving vehicles. The phones have GPS chips and know when they are moving. 90% of those texting are the drivers and not passengers so if the passengers lose their ability to text then that's a small price to be paid vs. the # of lives that will be saved. Highways need more frequent areas where drivers can pull over and read and reply to their messages safely.

    What is really amazing is how little America gets for its vast healthcare expenditure. Mexico, which spends maybe 5 pesos on its entire healthcare system, is within spitting distance of the US in life expectancy.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    What is really amazing is how little America gets for its vast healthcare expenditure. Mexico, which spends maybe 5 pesos on its entire healthcare system, is within spitting distance of the US in life expectancy.

    That’s no surprise. In a market economy for health care, we get high doctor salaries, large numbers of doctors and immediate treatment. In a socialist economy for doctors (the rest of the world), they get low doctor salaries, small numbers of doctors and long waiting periods for treatment. If we impose price controls the way other economies have done, we can get health care costs down. The price we pay is the rate of drug or therapeutic innovation slows down to match the rest of the world – practically zero.

  112. Reagan was America’s Yeltsin. Trump, America’s Putin is 30 years late.

  113. @melendwyr
    @utu

    Unions can quite easily become a tool of oppression. Just as the political system can be dominated by people who have no interest in serving their voters, merely in exploiting them, unions can as well.

    And in many cases, it's illegal to work in an occupation and NOT belong to the union. Do you imagine the laws were passed out of concern for the workers? No, it was to ensure that the corrupt leaders of the unions had an easier time controlling their resource base, as it wasn't possible to leave if the union wasn't serving your interests.

    Replies: @utu

    I will worry about the oppression by the unions when I see the unions. In the meantime we need unions to counterbalance the power of corporations.

    • Replies: @melendwyr
    @utu

    And how will they do that, when unions have become just another way for corporations to control workers?

    The leadership of unions has more to gain by selling out the workers than by representing them. As always, self-interest rules. Except where it can't rule, because it's been made illegal.

  114. @27 year old
    Regarding heroin overdoses, my wife and my parents were discussing it, because my wife's coworker (a blue collar European immigrant, and also a big Trump guy) has a son who is an addict and really struggling. My wife mentioned some numbers about how many deaths there have been in our area. My father replied that he didn't see a problem, that this was Darwin in action and a good thing. I told him it was easy for him to say since it wasn't his son who was going to die. The boomers really don't get it.

    Replies: @grapesoda, @Bleuteaux, @utu

    I hope you will not become like your father.

  115. @anonymous
    Many people seem to be distracted while driving, skyping or texting with one hand while driving with the other. I've seen some people eating while also doing the above. A large part of the population is on some form of government support and have few prospects in life ahead of them so they zone out with pills, alcohol and drugs. Morbid obesity seems to be a form of this 'dropping out' where people just give up and no longer care about themselves. Drug abuse seems to have crept in everywhere. Something is going on and it can't be found out from official government proclamations that unemployment is in the negative range and that everything is rosy.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Something is going on and it can’t be found out from official government proclamations that unemployment is in the negative range and that everything is rosy.

    It’s a spiritual vacuum. You work to have enough money to pay taxes and buy food and housing so you can rest up and eat to work to make the money. Lather, rinse, repeat. Disposable income is squandered on entertainment, psychotropic drugs, booze, and the ersatz tribalism of sporting events. People were meant to do something other than merely exist, but their metaphysics and their heroic legends have been taken from them. Anglo-Americans chose rootless Protestantism, secular democracy, and the marketplace over things like tradition, family, nation, and it is coming back to bite them.

    I have a lot of immigrant acquaintances, and my perception is that one of the greatest gulfs between them and me is who our heroes are. The American mythos–characters like Paul Bunyan, Johnny Appleseed, the Last of the Mohicans, and actual men like Daniel Boone and Davey Crockett–is being scrubbed from the culture to make the new arrivals more comfortable. It is being replaced with people like Rosa Parks and St. Martin of Atlanta (because, of course, recorded history did not actually start until 1965). The Pakistani who set foot on the tarmac thirty minutes ago must be assured that he is every bit as American as somebody whose family came ashore with John Wesley; nay, since we’re a Nation Of Immigrants, even more so due to his greater immigrant-ness! Founding stock Americans are becoming a people without a past and, as they are endlessly screamed at, no future.

  116. @utu
    @melendwyr

    I will worry about the oppression by the unions when I see the unions. In the meantime we need unions to counterbalance the power of corporations.

    Replies: @melendwyr

    And how will they do that, when unions have become just another way for corporations to control workers?

    The leadership of unions has more to gain by selling out the workers than by representing them. As always, self-interest rules. Except where it can’t rule, because it’s been made illegal.

  117. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @melendwyr


    That sounds like a resounding success for the policy.
     
    That kind of cold-hearted, callous response is why there are liberals.

    Replies: @Bleuteaux

    He’s probably saying that ironically.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Bleuteaux

    You don't know melendwyr.

  118. @Yak-15
    @Steve Sailer

    There are no speed limits on some sections of the autobahn. Seems to work for Germany.

    Replies: @Anon87

    But I believe they require more testing to get a license. I love the autobahn, but I wouldn’t want to see it here. I don’t trust drivers in the US.

  119. @Steve Sailer
    I drove on the interstate in Utah north of Las Vegas. I think they were testing 80 mph as the legal speed limit.

    Replies: @Barnard, @ben tillman

    I drove on the interstate in Utah north of Las Vegas. I think they were testing 80 mph as the legal speed limit.

    There are places in Texas where it’s 85.

  120. @Bleuteaux
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    He's probably saying that ironically.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    You don’t know melendwyr.

  121. “Mortality rates in middle age have totally flat­lined in the U.S. for people in their 30s and 40s and 50s, or have been increasing,” Case said.

    “Flatlined”! Does Casey have a tin ear or does he practise black humor?

  122. Looks like the market for Oxycontin is saturated in the US and the Sacklers are now aiming for the rest of the world:

    http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-me-oxycontin-part3/

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