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America: from Coolest Country to the Most Reverent?
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America’s soft power remains, but it’s of a very different type, and more vulnerable in the long run. Converting all these soft power institutions like Hollywood into instruments for propagating a very American form of secular gospel may open up space for competitors.

The rise of TikTok is instructive. Twenty years ago, the idea that a Chinese app could outcool Hollywood & SV to win millions of US teenagers would be laughable.

Is it a national security threat? Maybe, but the soft power issue may be a bigger deal than even the data collection.

The closest analogy to US posture vis-a-vis TikTok may be France’s reaction to Anglo-American hegemony. The Académie Française has waged a campaign of cultural protectionism against foreign influence for years, acting literally as the language police.

There is actually a common logic behind the French campaign against Franglais, the American campaign against TikTok, and even the Chinese campaign against Facebook. Namely: “There is more power in rock music and blue jeans than in the entire Red Army.”

Cultural protectionism arises when a culture is insecure. That’s not to say it’s all bad, or always bad. For a small country or community to pass down its ancient culture and language intact in the face of global American cultural hegemony requires a determined effort.

The US still thinks of itself as effortlessly culturally dominant, so the recent wave of cultural protectionism & wariness of foreign influence hasn’t been recognized as such. It focused first on politics (the Russians), then on social media (the Chinese), but won’t stop there.

When did America become the coolest country in the world? (I’d define cool as whatever appeals to ages 13 to, say, 29.)

To the American Midwesterners Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Cole Porter, Paris was still the coolest city in the world in 1919. But in 1946, Paris had by then fallen behind New York.

I’m guessing the first American song to become a global hit was Stephen Foster’s “Oh Susanna” at the time of the California gold rush in 1849. I presume the popularity of the American song was linked to the excitement generated by the news of the gold rush.

When did American pop music become the leading type of music? 1920s jazz? 1930s big band swing?

The first cool American was likely Ben Franklin when he arrived in Paris as ambassador of the American Revolution. Franklin, who had dressed in the height of gentlemanly fashion in London in 1774, invented a new look for himself in Paris as a long-haired backwoods sage, practically a Noble Savage, which the French went crazy over.

The American cowboy era of 1865-1875 was hugely appealing to the world’s young (e.g., the novels of Karl May).

Silent movies were popular all over the world. Was Charlie Chaplin, the biggest star, seen as English or American?

The Wright Brothers invented the airplane in the U.S. in 1903, but nobody in Europe much believed them until Wilbur flew laps at Le Mans in front of a vast, ecstatic crowd in 1908. Around the same time, Henry Ford made the automobile affordable.

In Jean-Luc Godard’s 1960 New Wave movie Breathless, the premise is that, even to a Frenchman, Humphrey Bogart was cooler than any French movie star. So that marks a date by which we can assume that America is the coolest country would have gotten wide acceptance in Europe.

Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?

Probably not.

 
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  1. So the great- or great-great-grandchildren of the folks who made America the “coolest” are pissing it away?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Redneck farmer

    "And" not "or." This is clearly a multigenerational effort.

    , @Anonymous
    @Redneck farmer

    No. They imported a new population that the world looks at and says: We know those goons. Can dress them up as new Americans but they are not cool or new in anyway.

    # mass immigration

  2. The rise of TikTok is instructive. Twenty years ago, the idea that a Chinese app could outcool Hollywood & SV to win millions of US teenagers would be laughable.

    Just build your own platform they said. It’s a free market they said.

  3. The American West fascinated most of Europe, as it did most of civilized America. The idea of unspoiled wide-open land just aching for someone with the will to make it their own and prosperous was incredibly hypnotic to

    But “cool America” likely didn’t happen till WW2. We achieved international dominance and were seen as protecting the world from the Soviets, and, with Germany destroyed, our film industry had no rival (the German film industry had been the second-best to America’s since film began, and punched well above its weight), so American films could push American stories as desirable unabated.

    By the time WW2 ended were were the cool big brother. Our little brothers ran to us for protection from bullies, and secretly stole into our room to look at the posters on our walls and listen to our records.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @R.G.Camara

    "cool America"

    I enjoy embarrassing my Danish teenage daughter in front of her friends by acting like what I truly am: a cool American. Rock N Roll!!!

  4. Here’s a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea – Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan – Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China – Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India – Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK – “Cool Britannia.” Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more “posh” accents.
    7. Australia – Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders – Cool accents. Also, they’re called “Kiwis.” That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland – Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy – Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany – Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden – Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece – Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain – Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice “siesta” lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland – Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands – Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium – Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland – Amazing parties. Also, “ice” sounds cool.
    19. Thailand – Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali – Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil – Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia – Sort of like Brazil.

    • Replies: @gent
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The answer is none of the above, distributed social networks are from where coolness is derived now. TikTok isn't cool, the USER BASE is cool, for now. Once it reaches a threshold of popularity, middle aged people will start to join in to see what the fuss is about and it will kill the platform's "coolness integrity." We've seen it happen with all the other social media sites, from MySpace, Facebook, Reddit, even to places like /pol/ on 4chan, which went "safe" after reaching the threshold of popular consciousness in 2016.

    , @dfordoom
    @JohnnyWalker123


    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
     
    French cool was very elitist. The French working class has never been considered cool. It was French intellectuals and artists who were cool. But in the age of Kardashian Worship French cool is too upmarket.

    The British cool of the 60s was much more proletarian. That made it very fashionable at the time. British pop culture/celebrity culture today is just trashy rather than proletarian. But these days trashy is popular.

    Maybe that's China's problem? They don't produce enough trash culture. Hong Kong had a certain amount of cool in the 70s with kung fu movies (which were trashy but excellent). China doesn't seem to have been able to replicate that pop culture formula. Maybe China has a society that is too successful and functional. Maybe you need a certain degree of dysfunction to produce really successful cool culture.

    Replies: @syonredux

    , @Wilkey
    @JohnnyWalker123


    6. UK – “Cool Britannia.” Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more “posh” accents.
     
    Yes. The British are so much trashier than our basketball players, rap stars, and Kardashians.

    Even excluding the black celebrities I’d wager that British celebs are, at worst, equal to Americans in quality. America just produces a lot more ghetto blacks than Britain does.

    Some people might argue that black culture is a lot of what makes America cool. But America became cool before blacks were much involved or made much of a contribution.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Known Fact
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Great list -- Britain was super-cool from 60s pop through Monty Python and Lady Di, not to mention so many great actors and all that Shakespearean grandeur, but they have diluted their brand with too much immigration (Sweden too, and that's where the US is headed).

    The Aussies and Kiwis were looking cool, fun and manly, but that image has gone the wrong way, the leaders becoming more woke and the people apparently more cucked. This is one small barometer but American racetracks went through a phase 20 years ago where they all simply had to have an Aussie PA announcer to do the calls. That cache is fading.

    American pop culture led for a long time but now much of it is too deliberately flaked, formed and processed for foreign markets, especially China. Bugs Bunny was American -- and you couldn't do him now. Oh, and despite Mark Steyn's yeoman efforts, Canada's coolness peaked with SCTV and those Dave Thomas-Rick Moranis sketches. Back bacon, eh?

    Replies: @Known Fact

    , @Drew
    @JohnnyWalker123

    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?

    Because they have imported millions of muslims in recent decades. Muslims started being the opposite of cool since the death of Saladin, and have been the decided I opposite of cool since they started losing the reconquista. They're boorish, ugly, inbred and generally stupid, so no one much likes or respects them, let alone wants to be like them; they're the world's embarrassing younger cousin.

    , @kaganovitch
    @JohnnyWalker123

    15. Switzerland – Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.

    Also yodeling. That pushes them over the top in my book.

    , @Cowboy Shaw
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I wonder if anywhere produces as many 'celebrities' all the way down the alphabet as the UK (per captita). There is a vast insatiable demand for it right down the class layers and a huge media system supporting it. Most of it is staggeringly idotic and crass.

    But when it comes to actual genuine 'cool', as opposed to the rubbish soft power of mass crap like K-Pop, the British, or at least a very specific slice of their upper middle class, are still pretty much number 1. The latest Guy Ritchie film The Gentleman demonstrates that - it's a very specific fantasy idea of Britain but whatever it is it is cool.

    The first global culture - the dance music explosion of the 90s - was developed by working class brits in the late 80s. Ironically they were using bits of culture from here and there to do it: Chicago house music, Ibiza clubbing, Dutch drugs, and their own northern soul movement. But they did it, and it's now everywhere.

    American cool seems to increasingly rely on retro, which is probably the point of the original post. Tarantino had to go back to the 60s to pull off serious cool in his latest film.

    Replies: @JMcG

    , @Anon 2
    @JohnnyWalker123

    In terms of video games Poland is probably the coolest country
    among predominantly white countries right now mostly because of the
    company CD Projekt Red (Warsaw), and its many products such as
    Witcher 3, Cyberpunk 2077 (to be released in a few days), etc. People
    are awaiting the release of Cyberpunk 2077 the way kids couldn’t
    wait for the next Harry Potter volume back in the day. Poland is
    a country of storytellers so there are many books that are waiting
    to be turned into video games and movies such as Andrzej Sapkowski’s
    magnificent Hussite Trilogy and the Nobelist Olga Tokarczuk’s
    many novels , e.g., Books of Jacob.

    It doesn’t hurt that Poland has won the Junior Eurovision Song
    Contest twice in a row (check out the incredibly talented Wiktoria
    (“Viki”) Gabor), and its rap scene is one of the most dynamic
    in Europe, if not the world.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @JohnnyWalker123

    A very observant list, but...


    1. South Korea – Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
     
    Most people don't know or care where tech comes from. And yes K Pop is friendly to non-blacks who want to be hip, but how much future is there for that?

    2. Japan – Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
     
    True, as are Bill P's observations. As ever, Japan is the truly exceptional nation.

    3. China – Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
     
    Agreed.

    4. India – Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
     
    Agree. The more people see of Indians, the less India fascinates.

    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
     
    France no longer French. Next question.

    6. UK – “Cool Britannia.” Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more “posh” accents.
     
    These days, Britian's just a weak-sauce America. In the 1960s the British Invasion was organic as was the 1980s New Wave. But the modern "Cool Britannia" is just another Blair-tier government program.

    7. Australia – Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders – Cool accents. Also, they’re called “Kiwis.” That sounds cool.
     
    Yes, the Antipodeans still have a chance if they don't blow it by importing/sacralizing the Third World.

    9. Ireland – Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
     
    Coulda shoulda woulda been the Antipodeans of the Atlantic, but decided to negrify themselves instead.

    10. Italy – Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany – Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden – Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece – Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain – Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice “siesta” lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland – Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands – Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium – Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland – Amazing parties. Also, “ice” sounds cool.
     
    Yep, still in the game. Throw in Portugal too.

    19. Thailand – Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali – Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil – Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia – Sort of like Brazil.
     
    I'm pretty sure brothel clients don't aspire to adopt the culture of their brothels.

    tl;dr: The last white country standing will be the coolest.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Steve Sailer

    , @Jack D
    @JohnnyWalker123

    While some of these countries could be thought of as "cool" in certain aspects, most of them could never be considered THE #1 coolEST country. Being cool and being THE COOLEST are two different things. The COOLEST country is the country that all other countries look to for their fashion cues, for what kind of art and music is good, for what kind of literature is good, even for what kind of food is good, even for how you should style automobiles. The leader sets the fashion and then everyone else copies it. Even behind the Iron Curtain the Russians would (badly) copy American car styles. Even the Germans did - late '60s BMWs borrowed their styling from the Corvair.

    Sometimes the title is shared because not every country is good at everything. For many centuries France and England mostly shared the title. After WWII, the US was mostly the one to imitate. Basically, you can tell which is the coolest country by going to any up and coming developing country and seeing who they try to imitate the most. America may be fading but for now I think American culture is still the culture that is most imitated by others.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

    , @Morton's toes
    @JohnnyWalker123


    3. China
     
    Do you know any Chinese people?

    4. India
     
    They shit on the street, the sidewalk, and in the gutter. Like San Francisco homeless. No.

    7. Australia
     
    They have celebrities who get killed spectacularly by wildlife that we have never heard of before. Top candidate on the list for sure. Also when we were signing peace treaties with our indigenous people they were hunting theirs for sport. Who on unz ain't an Aussie at heart?

    10. Italy
     
    Italy is the most beautiful place that has ever been.

    16. Netherlands – Amsterdam.
     
    Good at business but they are boring as f**k. Also Belgium.

    19. Thailand – Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali – Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil – Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia – Sort of like Brazil.
     
    Not in a hundred years. Maybe 200. Have you seen those surveys where they claim the people in Colombia are measurably the happiest people on planet earth?

    It looks to me like a close contest between Australia and Japan.
    , @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The U.S. is the center of the world, according to all those who say it's collapsing. Bloggers and Tweeters from Australia and China talk mostly about American politics and mores.

    I don't think it was ever the coolest as a whole nation, but New York and Los Angeles both definitely used to be.

    France, Italy, Greece--because of what they were, and they're all still very sensual people despite the Muslims.

    Tahiti is super-cool, and that's not just because of billionaires with overwater bungalows: The French are much better at that sort of colonial possession than the British were: you get great French restaurants and the interior of Tahiti and also the lagoon of Bora Bora are as beautiful as anything in Europe or America.

    In terms of charisma, the U.S., not because of 'charming cool', but because even with collapses and upheavals every few minutes, everybody else in the world knows all the latest U.S. news. An Australian I used to chat with knew all about the candidates for Democratic nominee, and I still can't remember their president or prime minister.

    Maybe the U.S. really is the coolest--and more than ever--because it is so dangerous and yet every event here is watched by the entire world. I know I already said that, but it's a big deal, even if I personally don't find American culture 'cool' at this juncture.

    Also, it doesn't have to be new things. France, Italy and Greece are still way cooler in aesthetic ways than the U.S. for things that happened and were made and still exist up to several thousand years ago. Iraq is the same, but somehow was isolated in modern times and never had a cool period till the Iraq War.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  5. In the early 1960s England gave us a run for the money as far as coolness in music and fashion, but we had the first cool national leader in Kennedy and, soon, bands that could hold their own against the British Invasion.

    Other Western nations have adopted our wokeness, and it seems to prevail among youth populations, yet there’s nothing cool about it. As is said above, it’s an expression of cultural insecurity rather than confidence–a censorious, conformist, self-flagellating, religious mania.

    But what other nation is coming up with a culture that resonates as cool? Certainly not China; maybe Japan? Many trends that originate in Japan have spread to America, but while aspects of Japanese culture are admired and sometimes aped, it doesn’t have the potential to be anywhere near as dominant as the US once was.

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Harry Baldwin

    I'd say that the Deep State Swamp was back in control now, but the fact is they always were.


    Under Biden, expect more bombing and 'regime change'
    George Szamuely

    A US foreign policy run by Antony J. Blinken and Jake Sullivan, the likely next secretary of state and national security adviser, will mean more global interventions and regime-change operations, Clinton and Obama style.

    Blinken played a prominent foreign policy role in both the Bill Clinton and Barack Obama administrations, while Sullivan was part of the Obama one.

    The Democrat-boosting media are, not surprisingly, excited by media-anointed President-elect Joe Biden’s choice of Blinken, his long-time national security adviser, as his secretary of state. Along with his pick of Jake Sullivan, another close aide, as his national security adviser, these appointments supposedly signal restoration of “internationalism” and “globalpartnerships” as guiding principles of US foreign policy.
     


    Media fawns for fake ‘internationalism’

    Blinken, a “defender of global alliances,” in the soothing words of the New York Times, will “help calm American diplomats and global leaders alike after four years of the Trump administration’s ricocheting strategies and nationalist swaggering.” To the Washington Post, Blinken’s appointment would be fulfillment of Biden’s “vows to reassemble global alliances and insert the United States into a more prominent position on the world stage.” The Guardian purred that the appointees are:

    “...committed internationalists, in strong contrast to the Trump era, which saw a bonfire of foreign treaties and agreements, and abrasive relations with traditional allies under the banner of ‘America First’, which Biden said during the campaign had led to ‘America alone’.”

    That’s the message then: The foreign policy professionals are back, and US allies can rest assured that the United States will once again treat them with courtesy and respect. Such talk is delusional, if not downright deceptive. Blinken’s outlook is that of a career US interventionist, as is that of Sullivan. The opinions of other countries are worth considering only if they coincide with the views of US policymakers. If they don’t coincide, then they can be discounted...

    In an article last year that he co-authored with leading neocon publicist Robert Kagan, Blinken argued that in Syria, the US made the “error of doing too little. Without bringing appropriate power to bear, no peace could be negotiated, much less imposed.

    https://www.rt.com/op-ed/507657-biden-blinken-regime-change/


     

    , @Paul Mendez
    @Harry Baldwin

    Japan’s too geriatric to be cool. To be cool, you need a vibrant youth culture.

    Come to think of it, you need a vibrant youth culture to even care about what is and isn’t cool. Perhaps the future of cool is Nigerian kids imitating Indonesian fashions.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "Certainly not China; maybe Japan?"

    Amazingly the highbrow "University Challenge" UK TV quiz program last night had a series of questions on anime - and even more surprisingly, one of the teams (was it Durham or Edinburgh?) actually got one right.

  6. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    The answer is none of the above, distributed social networks are from where coolness is derived now. TikTok isn’t cool, the USER BASE is cool, for now. Once it reaches a threshold of popularity, middle aged people will start to join in to see what the fuss is about and it will kill the platform’s “coolness integrity.” We’ve seen it happen with all the other social media sites, from MySpace, Facebook, Reddit, even to places like /pol/ on 4chan, which went “safe” after reaching the threshold of popular consciousness in 2016.

  7. @Harry Baldwin
    In the early 1960s England gave us a run for the money as far as coolness in music and fashion, but we had the first cool national leader in Kennedy and, soon, bands that could hold their own against the British Invasion.

    Other Western nations have adopted our wokeness, and it seems to prevail among youth populations, yet there's nothing cool about it. As is said above, it's an expression of cultural insecurity rather than confidence--a censorious, conformist, self-flagellating, religious mania.

    But what other nation is coming up with a culture that resonates as cool? Certainly not China; maybe Japan? Many trends that originate in Japan have spread to America, but while aspects of Japanese culture are admired and sometimes aped, it doesn't have the potential to be anywhere near as dominant as the US once was.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Paul Mendez, @YetAnotherAnon

    I’d say that the Deep State Swamp was back in control now, but the fact is they always were.

    Under Biden, expect more bombing and ‘regime change’
    George Szamuely

    A US foreign policy run by Antony J. Blinken and Jake Sullivan, the likely next secretary of state and national security adviser, will mean more global interventions and regime-change operations, Clinton and Obama style.

    Blinken played a prominent foreign policy role in both the Bill Clinton and Barack Obama administrations, while Sullivan was part of the Obama one.

    The Democrat-boosting media are, not surprisingly, excited by media-anointed President-elect Joe Biden’s choice of Blinken, his long-time national security adviser, as his secretary of state. Along with his pick of Jake Sullivan, another close aide, as his national security adviser, these appointments supposedly signal restoration of “internationalism” and “globalpartnerships” as guiding principles of US foreign policy.

    [MORE]

    Media fawns for fake ‘internationalism’

    Blinken, a “defender of global alliances,” in the soothing words of the New York Times, will “help calm American diplomats and global leaders alike after four years of the Trump administration’s ricocheting strategies and nationalist swaggering.” To the Washington Post, Blinken’s appointment would be fulfillment of Biden’s “vows to reassemble global alliances and insert the United States into a more prominent position on the world stage.” The Guardian purred that the appointees are:

    “…committed internationalists, in strong contrast to the Trump era, which saw a bonfire of foreign treaties and agreements, and abrasive relations with traditional allies under the banner of ‘America First’, which Biden said during the campaign had led to ‘America alone’.”

    That’s the message then: The foreign policy professionals are back, and US allies can rest assured that the United States will once again treat them with courtesy and respect. Such talk is delusional, if not downright deceptive. Blinken’s outlook is that of a career US interventionist, as is that of Sullivan. The opinions of other countries are worth considering only if they coincide with the views of US policymakers. If they don’t coincide, then they can be discounted…

    In an article last year that he co-authored with leading neocon publicist Robert Kagan, Blinken argued that in Syria, the US made the “error of doing too little. Without bringing appropriate power to bear, no peace could be negotiated, much less imposed.

    https://www.rt.com/op-ed/507657-biden-blinken-regime-change/

  8. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?

    French cool was very elitist. The French working class has never been considered cool. It was French intellectuals and artists who were cool. But in the age of Kardashian Worship French cool is too upmarket.

    The British cool of the 60s was much more proletarian. That made it very fashionable at the time. British pop culture/celebrity culture today is just trashy rather than proletarian. But these days trashy is popular.

    Maybe that’s China’s problem? They don’t produce enough trash culture. Hong Kong had a certain amount of cool in the 70s with kung fu movies (which were trashy but excellent). China doesn’t seem to have been able to replicate that pop culture formula. Maybe China has a society that is too successful and functional. Maybe you need a certain degree of dysfunction to produce really successful cool culture.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @dfordoom

    French pop culture (Dumas, Jules Verne, etc) was very popular in the 19th century.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  9. Coolness is usually nothing more than a media artefact. For the past few decades it has consisted of little more than the glorification of non-whites’ (particularly blacks’) contribution to “popular culture”.

    To the American Midwesterners Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Cole Porter, Paris was still the coolest city in the world in 1919.

    Didn’t the strong dollar have something to do with that?

    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?

    Think of how cool it would be if it hadn’t entered these wars.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Rob McX

    Just blacks and Puerto Ricans (who are half black anyway)

    , @Anonymous
    @Rob McX

    Well we were attacked by Japan. GI Joe was appealing up til Nam. Adventure, blood and guts etc

    , @Paul Mendez
    @Rob McX

    Since WW2, American pop culture has been defined by Narcissistic Negroes and the dorky young whites who idolize them.

    It started with music. Then sports. Then movies and TV. Then politics. Now it’s culminated in what passes today for intellectualism.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Bardon Kaldian

  10. Coolness seems to come just as the economic wave has reached its greatest height. People are confident, have fatter wallets, and more leisure time. It’s like the end of a hard week, and you just want to have a fun weekend. When China becomes cool, you’ll know the big Chinese crash is coming.

  11. I wonder what impact free HD 24/7 pornography has had on young people. Could it make a person, especially a female, turn prudish?

    There isn’t much celebration of sex in the culture. I mean, something sexy and alluring. There’s lots of talk about sexuality in a dry, sociological sense (what gender am I today) but nothing erotic or fun.

    We aren’t to “objectify” women (i.e. tell them how beautiful and valued they are), instead we are to mouth PC slogans we don’t mean. And the sex they see early in life is as brutal and crude as producers can get away with.

    It’s enough to make someone a Puritan.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @RichardTaylor

    There’s a lot to what you say. The “cool” referred to here is mostly the California lifestyle of the 60s and 70s. See Once Upon a Time in Hollywood as a gold toned example. California has gone from Trader Vic’s and making it to the surf on time to really horrifying porn filmed in multi-million dollar houses. It’s a hard, hard world for young people these days.

    Replies: @Feryl

  12. When did America become the coolest country in the world? (I’d define cool as whatever appeals to ages 13 to, say, 29.)

    If you ever lived abroad for some time, you’d find America was quite popular among the youngsters. Not so much Americans, or the US (American and the USA are not the same), but the concepts and symbology of the America are all over the place and coveted.

    • Agree: black sea
  13. Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?

    Probably not.

    Could America have become the seediest country in the world without having squandered its coolness?

    Probably not.

  14. Most reverent of the coolest: blacks.

  15. America is arguably the worst country in the world, and I am not talking about the sociopathic politicians (although the US ones are one of the worst as well). I am talking about the average person, every American I have come across is either the woke fanatic or the bomb the world because we are America type. Sure you will say this anecdotal, but name one country where you have met a more unpleasant average citizen than America? Even the stereotype of the rude Frenchmen or cold German is nothing close compared to the insufferable America person.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @neutral


    Even the stereotype of the rude Frenchmen or cold German is nothing close compared to the insufferable America person.
     
    Yes, America is the "worst country in the world" per you. Where do you live anyway?

    And don't let the door hit you on your way out. No one is forcing you to stay here with the insufferables.

    Oddly enough, the President is trying to build big walls on our border to keep others from sneaking into the USA.

    But you are free to leave any time. No one here with a conscience wants to see you suffer any further. Or read about your suffering.
    , @Matra
    @neutral

    every American I have come across is either the woke fanatic or the bomb the world because we are America type

    When the French & Germans were major world powers they just never dreamed of bombing or invading other countries. Never.

    As for wokeness, that's just a new name for political correctness. In general the French* & Germans are more PC on race than not just Americans but most of the English-speaking world. (Though in this regard class probably matters more than nationality).

    * French support for Le Pen is mostly focused on 'regressive' Islam.

    , @black sea
    @neutral

    The reputation (positive and negative) of Americans abroad is generally as follows:

    oafish and overweight

    loud

    considerate

    ignorant and uncaring about the rest of the world

    honest

    self-confident (deservedly so or not)

    complacent

    good at business

    consumerist (something that every society secretly aspires to become)

    helpful for no obvious reason, just in order to be helpful

    uncultured

    ill-educated

    reckless (with good and bad consequences)

    friendly to everyone, but not inclined to form enduring friendships

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

  16. Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?

    The US didn’t win WWI at all. It was just meddling in a European War for reasons unclear. I still don’t know what that was about. Afterwards everything went pear-shaped and nasty at the League of Nations.

    “Cultural exports” picked up post-WWI because the US-Europe distance was getting smaller due to better communication and transportation. Post WWII it was of course all over for Europe, one could dump anything on them.

    When did America become the coolest country in the world? (I’d define cool as whatever appeals to ages 13 to, say, 29.)

    What _is_ cool coming from the US?

    > Native Americans
    > Unbelievable natural vistas and deserts
    > Everything is BIGGER
    > Cola cans
    > The original Star Trek
    > The early Internet and Cray supercomputers
    > You could actually start a business easily once
    > The Apollo program and nuclear submarines
    > The AR-15
    > Memes about trucks driving down the highway for days and days (aka Freedom Memes)

    [MORE]

    Here is Mézières (who is good at drawing extraterrestrials in “Valérian”) about his American Dream in “Pilote”, 1974, reprinted in an ’83 collection

    After a forced trip to Algeria, going to the USA:

    Better go West and work as Cowboy. Hell yeah:

    The good life:

    Things that are bad & THE END!

    There are even photos. Do these times still exist?

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @El Dato

    America didn’t win the First World War as much as America’s coming in to the War enabled the western allies to emerge victorious. Both sides were bled white and we, like idiots, tipped the scales.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @El Dato


    > The Apollo program and nuclear submarines
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4HvpJ3x2_8

    The USA didn't pay attention to this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=goh2x_G0ct4

    But unabashedly embraced it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sehXutM623A

    > The AR-15
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lap8cmxJHTU
    , @syonredux
    @El Dato


    What _is_ cool coming from the US?

    > Native Americans
    > Unbelievable natural vistas and deserts
    > Everything is BIGGER
    > Cola cans
    > The original Star Trek
    > The early Internet and Cray supercomputers
    > You could actually start a business easily once
    > The Apollo program and nuclear submarines
    > The AR-15
    > Memes about trucks driving down the highway for days and days (aka Freedom Memes)
     
    The Western

    Jazz

    The Detective Story (invented by Poe)

    The Private Detective (PI) story (codified byHammett and Chandler, embodied by Bogart)

    Golden Age Hollywood

    Robert Mitchum

    Humphrey Bogart

    The Colt Revolver

    Frank Sinatra

    Replies: @syonredux

  17. Right-wingers are the cool kids now. They are rock and roll, rebellion, creative, edgy, unapologetically heterosexual.

    Liberals are Muzak, metamucil, child-free, and lonely.

    • Agree: Redman
    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Elmer T. Jones


    Right-wingers are the cool kids now. They are rock and roll, rebellion, creative, edgy, unapologetically heterosexual.
     
    I think there's a lot of wishful thinking in that comment.
  18. Don’t overlook Negro rap music – no melody, just chanted angry misogynistic anti-white folks lyrics in doggerel verse. I was amazed on a trip to France around 2000 how popular it had become: billboards advertising “concerts” by American rap stars. Rap music translates easy into French. Or more exactly French rap breaks the rules of French pronunciation by stressing syllables in the middle of the word unlike standard French which does not stress interior syllables of a word.

    Aside what the singer is actually saying, incomprehensible French rap sounds like it is English language rap.

    From Charlie Chaplin and the heights of American jazz from the 20s through the 60s to nihilistic ghetto anger.

  19. “Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?”

    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without the European empires self destructing 1914 to the present? Can America remain the coolest country while maintaining an international empire?

    Were the production codes ‘cool’?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_Picture_Production_Code

    The ‘cool’ you remember might be a product of a high birthrate and a low death rate from wars leading to a vibrant youth culture coupled with a lack of competition from other places.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  20. I had a similar thought when I realized Hollywood could not make a “Dirty Harry’ movie today. Have the hero shoot down three negro thugs and snarl at the remaining one ” Go ahead, make my day” as he holds him at gunpoint? Could James Cagney smash a grapefruit into his girlfriend”s face? Richard Widmark push an old lady in a wheelchair down a flight of stairs? Gun Crazy where the psycho is the female star?

  21. Between “Rock around the Clock” and The Beatles. Just a few years.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @onetwothree

    Our car culture was cool from the late 50s to late 60s -- great auto styling, drive-ins, motor hotels and so on. That Cape Canaveral look in decor and architecture. Then came the bloatmobiles, sprawl, smog and high gas prices, along with killjoy environmentalism.

    Replies: @Marty

  22. American culture, though still endlessly aped, is less and less cool. People don’t like to be constantly sermonized.

    “Coolness” has many factors, not only economic. Once Germany had it; then France; Italy during the Renaissance and for a brief post-WWII period.

    I think Chinese culture is too alien to become really too popular among Europeans. Although Japanese animes and K-pop are popular. And if China really becomes the winning superpower, then it might become “cool” by default. Most people worship power.

    I think once one European country such as Germany or France rediscovers its roots and goes back to nationalism, it might become cool again. Fascism and Nazism were once cool, the coolest show on Earth for a few brief years. Why? Again, power or perceptions of power. Nothing to do with its intrinsic quality, necessarily.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Dumbo


    American culture, though still endlessly aped, is less and less cool. People don’t like to be constantly sermonized.
     
    Unfortunately it appears that people do like being constantly sermonised. It makes them feel virtuous.

    Just like Christians used to love being told how sinful people were. They always assumed it was other people who were sinful, not them. So they got that wonderful buzz of self-righteousness.

    And self-righteousness is very appealing to teenagers.
  23. Thank you, Steve, for linking to that preview selection from McCullough’s book.

  24. Turn of the century American singers seemed to have a sort of Received Pronounciation accent. Ditto politicians – even FDR. But this might just have been the accent of the East Coast elite, at the time?

    But in the talkies of the 1930s that was mostly gone. And by the 50’s, British popular singers affected American or mid-Atlantic accents.

    So maybe American cool happened when US popular culture sloughed off any sort of deference toward traditional elites. But Mark Twain had that attitude a century earlier.

  25. @Redneck farmer
    So the great- or great-great-grandchildren of the folks who made America the "coolest" are pissing it away?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anonymous

    “And” not “or.” This is clearly a multigenerational effort.

  26. @Rob McX
    Coolness is usually nothing more than a media artefact. For the past few decades it has consisted of little more than the glorification of non-whites' (particularly blacks') contribution to "popular culture".

    To the American Midwesterners Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Cole Porter, Paris was still the coolest city in the world in 1919.
     
    Didn't the strong dollar have something to do with that?

    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?
     
    Think of how cool it would be if it hadn't entered these wars.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anonymous, @Paul Mendez

    Just blacks and Puerto Ricans (who are half black anyway)

  27. Too many things mixed up.

    I’d say that the 20’s jazz had no rival as universal popular music in the broader Western world (including Latin America etc.).

    Also, I don’t think that winning wars was essential- Orwell observed that France had remained culturally the most influential country in the world even after the 1871 defeat, until WW1.

    US has been the most influential in crucial areas of pop-culture: music, films & TV. Fashion – I don’t know; ideology & religion -not; sports-not; ethics (American dream etc.)-not; food- not; high-brow culture- not.

    So, it is music & moving pictures- which is big.

    As regards woke “culture”- most of the civilized world thinks that Americans are lunatics with obsessive fads like jogging, demonization of smoking, gym cuture etc.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Also, I don’t think that winning wars was essential- Orwell observed that France had remained culturally the most influential country in the world even after the 1871 defeat, until WW1.
     
    I agree.

    And the coolness of Britain in the 60s wasn't affected by the fact that Britain had gone from being a world power to being a backward miserable third-rate power and American lapdog.
  28. @Redneck farmer
    So the great- or great-great-grandchildren of the folks who made America the "coolest" are pissing it away?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anonymous

    No. They imported a new population that the world looks at and says: We know those goons. Can dress them up as new Americans but they are not cool or new in anyway.

    # mass immigration

  29. @Rob McX
    Coolness is usually nothing more than a media artefact. For the past few decades it has consisted of little more than the glorification of non-whites' (particularly blacks') contribution to "popular culture".

    To the American Midwesterners Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Cole Porter, Paris was still the coolest city in the world in 1919.
     
    Didn't the strong dollar have something to do with that?

    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?
     
    Think of how cool it would be if it hadn't entered these wars.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anonymous, @Paul Mendez

    Well we were attacked by Japan. GI Joe was appealing up til Nam. Adventure, blood and guts etc

  30. @Rob McX
    Coolness is usually nothing more than a media artefact. For the past few decades it has consisted of little more than the glorification of non-whites' (particularly blacks') contribution to "popular culture".

    To the American Midwesterners Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Cole Porter, Paris was still the coolest city in the world in 1919.
     
    Didn't the strong dollar have something to do with that?

    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?
     
    Think of how cool it would be if it hadn't entered these wars.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anonymous, @Paul Mendez

    Since WW2, American pop culture has been defined by Narcissistic Negroes and the dorky young whites who idolize them.

    It started with music. Then sports. Then movies and TV. Then politics. Now it’s culminated in what passes today for intellectualism.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Paul Mendez

    From what I know- not. Blacks appeared now & then, but they were marginal (except for fetishist segments of some societies). American figures & themes globally popular, from 1945 on, were: Walt Disney, Frank Sinatra, John Wayne, westerns & gangster movies, Brando, Marilyn Monroe, parts of the cc 60's, JFK, Bob Dylan, blockbusters, legions of minor singers & actors, ....

    The only black many non-Americans knew about was Mohammad Ali. As for actors like Powell, Washington, Freeman,... they lagged very much behind virtually all white movie celebrities. Wilt Chamberlain was someone many have heard about, but actually no one cared for.

    American "icons" & cultural currents most of the world essentially ignored were Elvis, road movies, Beat generation, sports movies, Chevy Chase, Star Trek, superheroes, junk food, Hamburger Christianity (various cults), self-help literature, adoration of entrepreneurs (Steve Jobs etc.), restaurant eating culture, stand-up comedy, ...

    Replies: @Redman

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @Paul Mendez

    From what I know- not. Blacks appeared now & then, but they were marginal (except for fetishist segments of some societies). American figures & themes globally popular, from 1945 on, were: Walt Disney, Frank Sinatra, John Wayne, westerns & gangster movies, Brando, Marilyn Monroe, parts of the cc 60's, JFK, Bob Dylan, blockbusters, legions of minor singers & actors, ....

    The only black many non-Americans knew about was Mohammad Ali. As for actors like Powell, Washington, Freeman,... they lagged very much behind virtually all white movie celebrities. Wilt Chamberlain was someone many have heard about, but actually no one cared for.

    American "icons" & cultural currents most of the world essentially ignored were Elvis, road movies, Beat generation, sports movies, Chevy Chase, Star Trek, superheroes, junk food, Hamburger Christianity (various cults), self-help literature, adoration of entrepreneurs (Steve Jobs etc.), restaurant eating culture, stand-up comedy, ...

    For instance, Wakanda was basically ignored.

    Replies: @Ian Smith, @black sea

  31. The real question is whether or not “cool”, a term that points more toward marketing than to any real cultural cachet, is still a desirable designation. I could see a future where “coolness” as a signifier of social capital is a cultural artifact of a bygone era.

  32. @Harry Baldwin
    In the early 1960s England gave us a run for the money as far as coolness in music and fashion, but we had the first cool national leader in Kennedy and, soon, bands that could hold their own against the British Invasion.

    Other Western nations have adopted our wokeness, and it seems to prevail among youth populations, yet there's nothing cool about it. As is said above, it's an expression of cultural insecurity rather than confidence--a censorious, conformist, self-flagellating, religious mania.

    But what other nation is coming up with a culture that resonates as cool? Certainly not China; maybe Japan? Many trends that originate in Japan have spread to America, but while aspects of Japanese culture are admired and sometimes aped, it doesn't have the potential to be anywhere near as dominant as the US once was.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Paul Mendez, @YetAnotherAnon

    Japan’s too geriatric to be cool. To be cool, you need a vibrant youth culture.

    Come to think of it, you need a vibrant youth culture to even care about what is and isn’t cool. Perhaps the future of cool is Nigerian kids imitating Indonesian fashions.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  33. @Harry Baldwin
    In the early 1960s England gave us a run for the money as far as coolness in music and fashion, but we had the first cool national leader in Kennedy and, soon, bands that could hold their own against the British Invasion.

    Other Western nations have adopted our wokeness, and it seems to prevail among youth populations, yet there's nothing cool about it. As is said above, it's an expression of cultural insecurity rather than confidence--a censorious, conformist, self-flagellating, religious mania.

    But what other nation is coming up with a culture that resonates as cool? Certainly not China; maybe Japan? Many trends that originate in Japan have spread to America, but while aspects of Japanese culture are admired and sometimes aped, it doesn't have the potential to be anywhere near as dominant as the US once was.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Paul Mendez, @YetAnotherAnon

    “Certainly not China; maybe Japan?”

    Amazingly the highbrow “University Challenge” UK TV quiz program last night had a series of questions on anime – and even more surprisingly, one of the teams (was it Durham or Edinburgh?) actually got one right.

  34. Dear Steve,

    You owe us an apology for your hurtful and insensitive words.

    How can you talk about ‘cool’ when global warming is going to fry us in just ten (er, actually nine now) years’ time (just ask those kool kids Alexandria and Greta!).

    How dare you!

    How can you talk about a lot of famous dead white males, when racist white cops are gunning down our colored youth: the flower of America’s genius in music, literature and the arts, the sciences, philosophy, aircraft design, etc, etc (just ask those kool kids Tiny Duck and, er, whatever he calls himself now!)

    How could you!

    Now we’re going to retreat into our safe space, you mansplaining manspreader you!

    Yours, literally shaking (not stirred)

    Frank Sinatra
    Peter Lawford
    Dean Martin
    Joey Bishop
    Sammy Davis Jnr

  35. The current USA is like a poor little rich boy pissing away his inheritance.

  36. Balaji Srinivasan, a Tamil Brahmin, is a member of our new overlord class of technology plutocrats who are busy tinkering with and rearranging our world and lives. They speak like this:

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @PiltdownMan

    A few of the rest of us can vaguely understand their priestly information sciences tongue, but for the most part, as the pace of innovation they introduce picks up, the rest of us are excluded. It seems to me that our humanities educated political class will be putty in their hands, far more than they have been in the last two decades.

    Replies: @Lot, @Pop Warner, @Peter D. Bredon

    , @J.Ross
    @PiltdownMan

    Why would this be accessible to the public without censorship? It would be bursting with hate facts! The purchasing data alone would be iStevey!

    , @uman
    @PiltdownMan

    Jeez whyy you gotta hate on baljeet??

    , @anon
    @PiltdownMan

    In other words, the ledger of record will be a panopticon of social credit far bigger than Facebook / Twitter / everything else, and it will be the ultimate fact-checker underlying all facts. All of them. Every single one.

    Seems legit. What could go wrong?

  37. The problem is that you people view everything now as “the best, the coolest, the most powerful” while in history, that’s the exception, not the rule.

    This American global ultradominance is ending, and nobody will really replace it, because they got to that position in the first place by being, in geopolitical terms, a middle of nowhere, practically impossible to invade at the time of WW1 and WW2, allowing it to escape unscathed while the more geopolitically important lands were destroyed.

    As they recover, so does multipolarism.

    So there will be no next leader of globohomo, or coolest country, or superpower – we’re back to the pre-WW1 great power politics, except on roids because instead of just Europe and the West, there will be multiple civilizational blocs to add

  38. @PiltdownMan
    Balaji Srinivasan, a Tamil Brahmin, is a member of our new overlord class of technology plutocrats who are busy tinkering with and rearranging our world and lives. They speak like this:

    https://twitter.com/balajis/status/1290326486382022656?s=20

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @J.Ross, @uman, @anon

    A few of the rest of us can vaguely understand their priestly information sciences tongue, but for the most part, as the pace of innovation they introduce picks up, the rest of us are excluded. It seems to me that our humanities educated political class will be putty in their hands, far more than they have been in the last two decades.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @PiltdownMan

    I understand him 100%.

    He’s an Indian technobabbler with a worthless “cryptocoin” he wants you to buy from him by appealing to your greed.

    There are many different sorts. The asian techno futurist technobabblers like this guy aren’t really aimed at the iSteve audience. The scamming scumbags who sell worthless “coins” and “tokens” to you all will be using the language of “freedom from government currency” and “fiat money.”

    That’s how pyramid affinity scams work!

    Replies: @Alden, @International Jew

    , @Pop Warner
    @PiltdownMan


    as the pace of innovation they introduce picks up, the rest of us are excluded
     
    This is a similar strategy employed by Wokeists as a loyalty test. Not know all of the new and inclusive language? That's a cancelin'. You can tell who the professional activists are at protests because 1. They speak to the media and 2. Know all of the new lingo like BIPOC and Latinx without reminder or reprimand. Higher status Wokeists know all of these terms right away and thus gain value in the eyes of the faith. And it becomes more and more complicated to the point where you need to train in understanding all of the language, in the same way a theologian or lawyer would have to for their fields.
    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @PiltdownMan

    The "humanities educated political class" knew how to deal with scientists (I prefer to call them ziontists) like Galileo, etc.

    You don't have to "understand their priestly information sciences tongue" just cut it off. Or control it.

    And btw, I don't see any evidence of "information sciences" types being take charge types anyway; conformists to the core;Kuhn's "normal science" vs paradigm shifts, today's "settled science", tenure tracks, etc.

    The proper attitude to science geeks: "Greece and Rome rose on the backs of unwilling slaves. We shall rise on the backs of willing slaves." Paul Feyerabend (philosopher, decorated Luftwaffe pilot), "Science in a Free Society".

    The problem of course is that our current "humanities educated political class" has been "educated" by our ethnic enemies.

    Replies: @anon

  39. Public in-school attendance causes the spread of sick pop-culture; and virulent germs.

    In school or on Zoom, it causes functional illiteracy; and high taxes.

  40. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    6. UK – “Cool Britannia.” Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more “posh” accents.

    Yes. The British are so much trashier than our basketball players, rap stars, and Kardashians.

    Even excluding the black celebrities I’d wager that British celebs are, at worst, equal to Americans in quality. America just produces a lot more ghetto blacks than Britain does.

    Some people might argue that black culture is a lot of what makes America cool. But America became cool before blacks were much involved or made much of a contribution.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Wilkey

    It depends on a class-education axis, combined with generation.

    For instance, I'd say that most people born after 1995 don't know anything about earlier movies, even popular ones. Also, they are politically & historically illiterate.

    Virtually no one of graduate students I know, cares & or has a basic knowledge of rap "icons". Also, no male cares about British royals (who are they, anyway?). Kardashians? Never heard.

    International sports, rap, .... this is a phenomenon for young underclass; soaps are, basically, for barely educated females.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Wilkey

    British culture is very trashy these days. The Kardashian sisters and their various rapper/basketball boyfriends would fit in very well over there. From my experience (admittedly limited) with British pop culture, it seems a bit worse over there. Though I could be wrong.


    Some people might argue that black culture is a lot of what makes America cool. But America became cool before blacks were much involved or made much of a contribution.
     
    That's true. White-Americans actually used to be considered really cool throughout the world. Up through the 80s or so. They still do have some social status overseas (especially Asia), but they've lost a lot of status in America over the last 3 decades due to cultural demoralization.

    Replies: @Lot

  41. Who was it who thought America was cool? People who, despite European heritage or citizenship, were still connected to (increasingly historical) European ideas about freedom. Who probably decides today what is cool? Chinese and Indians.

  42. Coolness requires confidence and belief in oneself. And fewer and fewer Americans have confidence in themselves or the “country.”
    Confidence requires some empirical data of superiority or accomplishment : e.g. once America was plainly richer than Europeans, or had just won a war or at least one of the fronts eg WW2. Bombing Afghanistan from the air is not the same as marching through Paris, or bringing home an attractive German wife in 1946.

  43. @PiltdownMan
    Balaji Srinivasan, a Tamil Brahmin, is a member of our new overlord class of technology plutocrats who are busy tinkering with and rearranging our world and lives. They speak like this:

    https://twitter.com/balajis/status/1290326486382022656?s=20

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @J.Ross, @uman, @anon

    Why would this be accessible to the public without censorship? It would be bursting with hate facts! The purchasing data alone would be iStevey!

  44. The lingua Franca of the pop world is still inner city black music and dialect. It’s been that way since rap/hip hop took over in the early 1990s. By the time Napster came along, there was no way for a new form of pop music to gain traction by dominance in the market. The purveyors of pop culture could only package and sell celebrity since the music had become essentially free and thus worthless.

    But Tik Tok is mostly just the the same sounds of hip hop combined with the digital power for kids to make their own music videos.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    @Redman

    Creativity started to nosedive in the 90's (certainly, pop music has been dreadful since then), before internet tech made a difference. And it seems to be a global phenomenon.

    Ed Dutton thinks that generations of easy living produce ugly and maladjusted people. Maybe repetitive music with flat vocals is part of the price we have to pay for allowing weak, boring, and neurotic people to survive in unprecedented numbers and reproduce heavily. Gen Z is the loneliest and weakest generation ever. Even the military recently admitted that Gen Z is too "sedentary" to tolerate traditional rigors.

  45. Who is this balajis guy? His definition of anything might be really lame. My cool would be somewhere deep in the sticks or stuck in time . Siberia in the summer sounds really cool to me. Despite its dictators, the antiquated nature of North Korea sounds cool to me as well. I doubt anyone else would agree.

  46. AFAICT the yoof are looking to South Korea, with Japanese anime also a perennial favourite; Millennials and especially Gen X & older still look primarily to the USA. Honourable mention to Finland. The coolest videogames studio is in Warsaw – https://en.cdprojektred.com/

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Simon in London

    I am so square I am cool.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

  47. @Paul Mendez
    @Rob McX

    Since WW2, American pop culture has been defined by Narcissistic Negroes and the dorky young whites who idolize them.

    It started with music. Then sports. Then movies and TV. Then politics. Now it’s culminated in what passes today for intellectualism.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Bardon Kaldian

    From what I know- not. Blacks appeared now & then, but they were marginal (except for fetishist segments of some societies). American figures & themes globally popular, from 1945 on, were: Walt Disney, Frank Sinatra, John Wayne, westerns & gangster movies, Brando, Marilyn Monroe, parts of the cc 60’s, JFK, Bob Dylan, blockbusters, legions of minor singers & actors, ….

    The only black many non-Americans knew about was Mohammad Ali. As for actors like Powell, Washington, Freeman,… they lagged very much behind virtually all white movie celebrities. Wilt Chamberlain was someone many have heard about, but actually no one cared for.

    American “icons” & cultural currents most of the world essentially ignored were Elvis, road movies, Beat generation, sports movies, Chevy Chase, Star Trek, superheroes, junk food, Hamburger Christianity (various cults), self-help literature, adoration of entrepreneurs (Steve Jobs etc.), restaurant eating culture, stand-up comedy, …

    • Replies: @Redman
    @Bardon Kaldian

    What about the NBA?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  48. This might be a generational thing. As an early millennial, I never thought America was cool — how can your country be cool when it’s culture factory produces everything for your grandparents?

    Japan was the source of the morning cartoons, most of the ‘hip’ cinema when I was 16-29 was all from irreverent Nordic European directors like Verhoeven, Refn & von Trier. My parents put me in Euroball “soccer” camps because Wisconsin Pop Warner was dominated by blacks lying about their age. The music was Eurobeat techno because Milwaukee had a brief rave moment. The only thing that America dominated for me culturally were video games, and I wasn’t much of a gamer. This may be why the Gamer Right is America First.

    MySpace and Facebook were American, but American in the parenthetical sense.

    Today’s zoomers have Bieber (Canadian) and Korean pop music (K-pop related tags were 2/5ths of Twitter trending hashtags last night). The TV they watch is often Japanese or British. The social media is Chinese or explicitly Anti-American like twitter. Marvel movies are made in America for Chinese consumption.

    America stopped being cool in the 90s. Roughly the same time boomers stopped being cool.

    • Replies: @Redman
    @Supply and Demand

    Roughly the same time the internet arrived.

  49. Widespread material wealth contributed. And being part of the Angloshphere. We weren’t really alone in coolness, all Anglo cultures shared it.

    There is just something laid back about England, Australia, the US., NZ and Canada that no one has ever fully replicated.

  50. @Paul Mendez
    @Rob McX

    Since WW2, American pop culture has been defined by Narcissistic Negroes and the dorky young whites who idolize them.

    It started with music. Then sports. Then movies and TV. Then politics. Now it’s culminated in what passes today for intellectualism.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Bardon Kaldian

    From what I know- not. Blacks appeared now & then, but they were marginal (except for fetishist segments of some societies). American figures & themes globally popular, from 1945 on, were: Walt Disney, Frank Sinatra, John Wayne, westerns & gangster movies, Brando, Marilyn Monroe, parts of the cc 60’s, JFK, Bob Dylan, blockbusters, legions of minor singers & actors, ….

    The only black many non-Americans knew about was Mohammad Ali. As for actors like Powell, Washington, Freeman,… they lagged very much behind virtually all white movie celebrities. Wilt Chamberlain was someone many have heard about, but actually no one cared for.

    American “icons” & cultural currents most of the world essentially ignored were Elvis, road movies, Beat generation, sports movies, Chevy Chase, Star Trek, superheroes, junk food, Hamburger Christianity (various cults), self-help literature, adoration of entrepreneurs (Steve Jobs etc.), restaurant eating culture, stand-up comedy, …

    For instance, Wakanda was basically ignored.

    • Replies: @Ian Smith
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I’d disagree about ‘Trek:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6aEYd-U0pk

    Replies: @black sea

    , @black sea
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Elvis had a worldwide following even during his attenuated lifetime. The first Elvis Presley fan club in the UK was founded in 1957.

    I don't know what kind of global celebrity status Steve Jobs enjoyed during his lifetime, if any, but much of the world has now elevated him to the status of visionary/entrepreneur/genius/guru. His name is recognized and mostly revered among the educated class worldwide.

    From what I've read, Jobs wasn't nearly so cool as people make him out to be -- and was in fact a fairly nasty fellow in many ways -- but his products were mostly loved, he did interview very well, and by the standards of Silicon Valley geekdom he looked like a leading man.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  51. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Great list — Britain was super-cool from 60s pop through Monty Python and Lady Di, not to mention so many great actors and all that Shakespearean grandeur, but they have diluted their brand with too much immigration (Sweden too, and that’s where the US is headed).

    The Aussies and Kiwis were looking cool, fun and manly, but that image has gone the wrong way, the leaders becoming more woke and the people apparently more cucked. This is one small barometer but American racetracks went through a phase 20 years ago where they all simply had to have an Aussie PA announcer to do the calls. That cache is fading.

    American pop culture led for a long time but now much of it is too deliberately flaked, formed and processed for foreign markets, especially China. Bugs Bunny was American — and you couldn’t do him now. Oh, and despite Mark Steyn’s yeoman efforts, Canada’s coolness peaked with SCTV and those Dave Thomas-Rick Moranis sketches. Back bacon, eh?

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Known Fact

    Oops, sorry Canada, I almost forgot Terrance and Philip!

  52. To the American Midwesterners Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Cole Porter, Paris was still the coolest city in the world in 1919.

    Why wouldn’t it be, in 1919 Paris was teeming with young widows and (even better) unmarried women who suddenly outnumbered their male counterparts. A pickup artist’s dream. But yeah, the architecture, the baguettes etc etc.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Bragadocious

    What really drew Americans including S Americans and English to France in the 1920s and 30s was the low value of the franc against the dollar, pound and even upper middle class S American incomes.

    Devaluation means more exports and less imports and endless tourists and expats spending money. Lots of middle class English women went to France for clothes because even with the cost of travel it was cheaper. France was always cool. But the low cost of living for Americans made it really really cool. Hemingway and his first wife lived very well in France on her inheritance. It would have been a studio apartment and rice and beans had they stayed in Chicago.

    Even James Joyce and F Scott Fitzgerald lived in France partly because the pound and dollar were so high against the franc.

    It was something like Americans going across the border to Mexico for inexpensive vacations, shopping, car repair, medical and dental care nowadays. Or middle class Japanese buying clothes, electronics, household things on vacation in America and Europe during the glory days when the Yen was so high. .

    London housing was supposed to be very cheap during the 1960s. After the massive post war rebuilding and before the immigrant hordes I suppose.

    It’s all gone and we are doomed.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @prosa123

  53. @PiltdownMan
    @PiltdownMan

    A few of the rest of us can vaguely understand their priestly information sciences tongue, but for the most part, as the pace of innovation they introduce picks up, the rest of us are excluded. It seems to me that our humanities educated political class will be putty in their hands, far more than they have been in the last two decades.

    Replies: @Lot, @Pop Warner, @Peter D. Bredon

    I understand him 100%.

    He’s an Indian technobabbler with a worthless “cryptocoin” he wants you to buy from him by appealing to your greed.

    There are many different sorts. The asian techno futurist technobabblers like this guy aren’t really aimed at the iSteve audience. The scamming scumbags who sell worthless “coins” and “tokens” to you all will be using the language of “freedom from government currency” and “fiat money.”

    That’s how pyramid affinity scams work!

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Lot

    Thanks, I had no idea what he was writing about.

    , @International Jew
    @Lot

    Thanks. Based just on the tweet Piltdown Man quoted, it looks to me like Balajis is thinking of storing all our social media posts on some peta-scale Blockchain.

    As I learned from Bruce Schneier, Blockchain is 90% hype:
    https://www.wired.com/story/theres-no-good-reason-to-trust-blockchain-technology/

  54. Off topic, but I was just re-reading the wiki page on the song ‘jingle bells’ to confirm that I remembered correctly that it is not actually a Christmas song (it isn’t).

    I started to read the biography of the composer, James Lord Pierpont, and it mentions that he fought for the Confederacy, in spite of the fact that he was born in New England to a father who was a Unitarian preacher, and an abolitionist. Whilst fighting for the South he even wrote Confederate war songs.

    In the Current Year this must make him double-plus bad. He doesn’t even have the excuse of being a Southerner who didn’t know better!

    So….how long until Jingle Bells is cancelled?

  55. I think what is described as being “cool” is being muddled a bit with what is simply “fashionable.”

    Cool implies a sort of unflappable self confidence that does not care what anyone thinks.

    That is why someone like Barack Obama may indeed be fashionable, but he is ultimately very uncool. He cares so deeply about what the right people think about him that he comes across as hopelessly try-hard.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @James Braxton

    "I think what is described as being “cool” is being muddled a bit with what is simply “fashionable.”

    Cool implies a sort of unflappable self confidence that does not care what anyone thinks."

    Too right, mate.

    Most of these comments are vitiated by the confusion. Cool originally referred a state of being, Zen-like, as the original 50s guys would have said.

    Pynchon's pal Richard Farina nailed it:

    "I am invisible, he thinks often. And Exempt. Immunity has been granted me, for I do not lose my cool. Polarity is selected at will, for I am not ionized and I possess not valence. Call me inert and featureless but Beware, I am the Shadow, free to could men's minds. Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? I am the Dracula, look into my eye." --Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me (1966)

    At some point in the 60s [?] it became a mindless grunt of approval, "that's cool, man" meaning little more than 'ya know?"

    Cool was perhaps uniquely American as being the successor to noble oblige, reworked for a natural aristocracy.

    Steve McQueen (the real one) was cool. The new one (Sir Steven Rodney McQueen CBE ) may be fashionable but never cool.

    Replies: @James Braxton

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @James Braxton


    Cool implies a sort of unflappable self confidence that does not care what anyone thinks.
     
    There may also be a kind of "nerd cool," in which autists, aficionados, and obsessives use their focused interests to immunize themselves from the need to fashionably pose like the "cool kids."

    Unfortunately, it's not usually recognized as "cool" by others at the time.
  56. @Simon in London
    AFAICT the yoof are looking to South Korea, with Japanese anime also a perennial favourite; Millennials and especially Gen X & older still look primarily to the USA. Honourable mention to Finland. The coolest videogames studio is in Warsaw - https://en.cdprojektred.com/

    Replies: @Old Prude

    I am so square I am cool.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Old Prude


    I am so square I am cool.
     
    https://youtu.be/LB5YkmjalDg
  57. Shenandoah got around the world before Susanna. Not sure how popular it was, but sailors liked it.

    My teens like Japanese stuff. Culturally speaking, Japan is a real heavyweight. The themes of a lot of Japanese shows are decidedly NOT politically correct. Communism and related ideologies are depicted as great evils. Blacks are nowhere to be seen, whereas various European ethnicities and styles play prominent roles. Shintoism is a ubiquitous theme, although it isn’t explicit. This last part concerns me a bit, since American interpretations of Shintoism are unlikely to be socially adaptive.

    The coronavirus lockdowns and American negromania have not been particularly popular among the world’s youth. If black grievance, hyper-entitlement and moral enshrinement were really popular, as opposed to, say, basketball, music and dancing, South Africa would have enormous global prestige. It doesn’t.

  58. I am so square I am cool. The US would do well to follow my example.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Old Prude

    https://youtu.be/fpSD-QU-FfE

  59. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?

    Because they have imported millions of muslims in recent decades. Muslims started being the opposite of cool since the death of Saladin, and have been the decided I opposite of cool since they started losing the reconquista. They’re boorish, ugly, inbred and generally stupid, so no one much likes or respects them, let alone wants to be like them; they’re the world’s embarrassing younger cousin.

  60. America became cool immediately following WWII when Europe was largely rubble or under the thumb of the commies. Our occupation of Japan made us “cool” with them (See baseball). Big cars, Elvis, our film stars.

    I think we kept our cool factor into the 1980s, even though intellectuals and the Left in Europe hated Reagan. Reagan was so uncool he was actually kind of cool in the eyes of at least some rank-and-file Western Euros who, pre-internet, had no voice whatsoever, and I’m sure lots of Eastern Euros liked his anti-communism. Look at that crowd at Reagan’s “tear down this wall” speech at the Berlin Wall in 1987. Not every Euro was attending those huge nuclear freeze gatherings. Now, only an Obama-like figure could appear at a mass gathering in Western Europe, but Obama is the antithesis of “cool.” (A lithe, pseudo-intellectual, negro who smokes like Obama would have been cool in 1959, but by 2008 it was just the usual tiresome negro-worship).

    I think we lost our “cool factor” with the Iraq war, when our “Cowboy culture” degenerated into weird Christian millennialism, looking to bring about the Rapture by bombing civilians with cruise missiles. That’s when the Right lost its mojo. The Left went nuts and lost whatever cool factor it still maintained about 10 years ago when mentally imbalanced women completed their take-over of social media, the schools, a big part of the entertainment industry, and the Democratic Party (unionized teachers and government employees).

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Patrick in SC


    lots of Eastern Euros liked his anti-communism.
     
    In Budapest, Hungary there is a life-sized statue of Reagan not far from their Parliament building.
    , @Anonymouse
    @Patrick in SC

    >Our occupation of Japan made us “cool” with them (See baseball).

    Japan played professional baseball before WW II, the sport having been introduced long before that. There is a good early Kurosawa b&w movie in which the denouement takes place in a baseball arena.

  61. America is still the “coolest” country in the world and there isn’t much competition. America is both the home of Trump and the home of BLM, it truly offers something for everyone.

    What has changed is the relative position of the other countries in the world. In the 1960s Italy and France used to offer interesting alternative cinema, now that role has been taken over by South Korea. Japan and anime is probably the cultural equivalent of the way the UK dominated pop music in the 1960s-80s (is pop music even cool now?).

    Netflix dominates global culture in a way that is unprecedented, although it is possible that the proliferation of streaming services will eventually undermine that. Netflix is also producing global content at a rate and profusion that Amazon, HBO and even Disney (all American, btw) seem unable or unwilling to do but that “global” content often seems very American in sensibility (like the German series “Dark”).

    What is interesting is how Africa seems to remain resolutely “uncool”, and has become even less cool now than it was in the 1970s, when you had at least had swaggering revolutionary movements that could fool young people. Now Africa is just a giant environmental disaster where immigrants come from. Also true to some extent of South America, which was kind of cool in the 1960s, but even with some sluggish economic growth seems less and less relevant every decade.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Peter Akuleyev


    What is interesting is how Africa seems to remain resolutely “uncool”, and has become even less cool now than it was in the 1970s, when you had at least had swaggering revolutionary movements that could fool young people. Now Africa is just a giant environmental disaster where immigrants come from. Also true to some extent of South America, which was kind of cool in the 1960s, but even with some sluggish economic growth seems less and less relevant every decade.
     
    Reality therapy.

    These places were by some addled Marxist-leftist types seen as being "cool" when seen from a great distance. Then some idealistic types (young, female, college mis-educated liberals) were lured into the Peace Corp or other do-gooder outfits. Only the Christian missionaries know what it is like.

    Living in these places removes a lot of blinders. Yes, some very good and interesting aspects but overall horrible places to actually live. S. America better but much of it is and was extremely poor. Now formerly middle class Venezuela is like Paraguay or worse. Africa isn't cool when you live there. I've only been there on business, but you don't forget what you see.

    Marxist revolutions end up in bloodthirsty dictatorships relying (in Africa) on tribalism and sometimes genocide. Much of it isn't safe to travel, even for hardened travelers. Compared to other places, some poor, it is dangerous and dysfunctional. Food bad, services poor or nonexistent.

    In the 70s I sat next to a formerly idealistic Peace Corp volunteer flying back from one of the "better" African countries. She was exhausted and what little she said spoke volumes. Send every unhappy BLM black on a three month "vacation" there. A cheap way to administer reality therapy.

    Likewise, drag Berkeley commies to El Salvador or Nicaragua or even Venezuela. The few who went in the 70-90s are mostly all back here. People can be nice enough. The politics/culture isn't. Especially when poisoned by neo-Marxism, the kind that now infects Wokesters.

    Too much of what supposedly educated/smart people believe about these places is all from artificial reality. Edited visuals seen from tens of thousands of miles away. You don't smell the shit that way, or see the litter, chaos and primitive way of life. Near constant diarrhea in Africa is not conducive to "cool." Bad roads, if any, unreliable power and the omnipresent threat of unchecked police or army "security" lurking around, not to mention ordinary street crime. America by contrast is paradise.
    , @prosa123
    @Peter Akuleyev

    I wouldn't necessarily say that South America is uncool, it just seems low-profile, sort of going its own way under the radar. It might be because South America is in a relatively peaceful part of the world far from major conflicts. Some countries have internal conflicts but the outbreak of region-wide conflict simply isn't going to happen.

    Also, from a US perspective, South America isn't sufficiently different to be exotic (or threatening). There isn't a completely different culture as in the Middle East, and there's less extreme poverty than Africa or India.

  62. To a New Yorker like Henry Miller (“Tropic of Cancer” etc) Paris in the early
    1930s was still the coolest city in the world. Of course, a favorable rate of
    currency exchange was also a big factor – he was getting small amounts
    of money from the States, but because of the power of the dollar he still
    had some cash left after indulging in his highest priority – streetwalkers,
    like those in the Place de Clichy whom he could observe for hours sitting at
    a café across the street and taking notes

  63. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    15. Switzerland – Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.

    Also yodeling. That pushes them over the top in my book.

  64. @Wilkey
    @JohnnyWalker123


    6. UK – “Cool Britannia.” Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more “posh” accents.
     
    Yes. The British are so much trashier than our basketball players, rap stars, and Kardashians.

    Even excluding the black celebrities I’d wager that British celebs are, at worst, equal to Americans in quality. America just produces a lot more ghetto blacks than Britain does.

    Some people might argue that black culture is a lot of what makes America cool. But America became cool before blacks were much involved or made much of a contribution.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @JohnnyWalker123

    It depends on a class-education axis, combined with generation.

    For instance, I’d say that most people born after 1995 don’t know anything about earlier movies, even popular ones. Also, they are politically & historically illiterate.

    Virtually no one of graduate students I know, cares & or has a basic knowledge of rap “icons”. Also, no male cares about British royals (who are they, anyway?). Kardashians? Never heard.

    International sports, rap, …. this is a phenomenon for young underclass; soaps are, basically, for barely educated females.

  65. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    I wonder if anywhere produces as many ‘celebrities’ all the way down the alphabet as the UK (per captita). There is a vast insatiable demand for it right down the class layers and a huge media system supporting it. Most of it is staggeringly idotic and crass.

    But when it comes to actual genuine ‘cool’, as opposed to the rubbish soft power of mass crap like K-Pop, the British, or at least a very specific slice of their upper middle class, are still pretty much number 1. The latest Guy Ritchie film The Gentleman demonstrates that – it’s a very specific fantasy idea of Britain but whatever it is it is cool.

    The first global culture – the dance music explosion of the 90s – was developed by working class brits in the late 80s. Ironically they were using bits of culture from here and there to do it: Chicago house music, Ibiza clubbing, Dutch drugs, and their own northern soul movement. But they did it, and it’s now everywhere.

    American cool seems to increasingly rely on retro, which is probably the point of the original post. Tarantino had to go back to the 60s to pull off serious cool in his latest film.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Cowboy Shaw

    I’ve long thought that Coronation Street and the like has had a lot to answer for as a cause of the decline and fall of the British ( and Irish ) working class. The shaved heads and track suits, the daily soap opera of life; it all made sense when I saw a couple of episodes of that garbage.

  66. Steve, do you really think we won WWI? All we won was to save Wall Street loan\ portfolio to France and a return ticket to fight WWII. It would have been much ‘cooler’ for America to have stayed out of WWI and let the exhausted nations negotiate a peace. Had we done that there would have been no WWII. Duh.

  67. @PiltdownMan
    Balaji Srinivasan, a Tamil Brahmin, is a member of our new overlord class of technology plutocrats who are busy tinkering with and rearranging our world and lives. They speak like this:

    https://twitter.com/balajis/status/1290326486382022656?s=20

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @J.Ross, @uman, @anon

    Jeez whyy you gotta hate on baljeet??

  68. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    In terms of video games Poland is probably the coolest country
    among predominantly white countries right now mostly because of the
    company CD Projekt Red (Warsaw), and its many products such as
    Witcher 3, Cyberpunk 2077 (to be released in a few days), etc. People
    are awaiting the release of Cyberpunk 2077 the way kids couldn’t
    wait for the next Harry Potter volume back in the day. Poland is
    a country of storytellers so there are many books that are waiting
    to be turned into video games and movies such as Andrzej Sapkowski’s
    magnificent Hussite Trilogy and the Nobelist Olga Tokarczuk’s
    many novels , e.g., Books of Jacob.

    It doesn’t hurt that Poland has won the Junior Eurovision Song
    Contest twice in a row (check out the incredibly talented Wiktoria
    (“Viki”) Gabor), and its rap scene is one of the most dynamic
    in Europe, if not the world.

  69. @Peter Akuleyev
    America is still the "coolest" country in the world and there isn't much competition. America is both the home of Trump and the home of BLM, it truly offers something for everyone.

    What has changed is the relative position of the other countries in the world. In the 1960s Italy and France used to offer interesting alternative cinema, now that role has been taken over by South Korea. Japan and anime is probably the cultural equivalent of the way the UK dominated pop music in the 1960s-80s (is pop music even cool now?).

    Netflix dominates global culture in a way that is unprecedented, although it is possible that the proliferation of streaming services will eventually undermine that. Netflix is also producing global content at a rate and profusion that Amazon, HBO and even Disney (all American, btw) seem unable or unwilling to do but that "global" content often seems very American in sensibility (like the German series "Dark").

    What is interesting is how Africa seems to remain resolutely "uncool", and has become even less cool now than it was in the 1970s, when you had at least had swaggering revolutionary movements that could fool young people. Now Africa is just a giant environmental disaster where immigrants come from. Also true to some extent of South America, which was kind of cool in the 1960s, but even with some sluggish economic growth seems less and less relevant every decade.

    Replies: @Muggles, @prosa123

    What is interesting is how Africa seems to remain resolutely “uncool”, and has become even less cool now than it was in the 1970s, when you had at least had swaggering revolutionary movements that could fool young people. Now Africa is just a giant environmental disaster where immigrants come from. Also true to some extent of South America, which was kind of cool in the 1960s, but even with some sluggish economic growth seems less and less relevant every decade.

    Reality therapy.

    These places were by some addled Marxist-leftist types seen as being “cool” when seen from a great distance. Then some idealistic types (young, female, college mis-educated liberals) were lured into the Peace Corp or other do-gooder outfits. Only the Christian missionaries know what it is like.

    Living in these places removes a lot of blinders. Yes, some very good and interesting aspects but overall horrible places to actually live. S. America better but much of it is and was extremely poor. Now formerly middle class Venezuela is like Paraguay or worse. Africa isn’t cool when you live there. I’ve only been there on business, but you don’t forget what you see.

    Marxist revolutions end up in bloodthirsty dictatorships relying (in Africa) on tribalism and sometimes genocide. Much of it isn’t safe to travel, even for hardened travelers. Compared to other places, some poor, it is dangerous and dysfunctional. Food bad, services poor or nonexistent.

    In the 70s I sat next to a formerly idealistic Peace Corp volunteer flying back from one of the “better” African countries. She was exhausted and what little she said spoke volumes. Send every unhappy BLM black on a three month “vacation” there. A cheap way to administer reality therapy.

    Likewise, drag Berkeley commies to El Salvador or Nicaragua or even Venezuela. The few who went in the 70-90s are mostly all back here. People can be nice enough. The politics/culture isn’t. Especially when poisoned by neo-Marxism, the kind that now infects Wokesters.

    Too much of what supposedly educated/smart people believe about these places is all from artificial reality. Edited visuals seen from tens of thousands of miles away. You don’t smell the shit that way, or see the litter, chaos and primitive way of life. Near constant diarrhea in Africa is not conducive to “cool.” Bad roads, if any, unreliable power and the omnipresent threat of unchecked police or army “security” lurking around, not to mention ordinary street crime. America by contrast is paradise.

    • Agree: Rob McX, Almost Missouri
  70. @PiltdownMan
    Balaji Srinivasan, a Tamil Brahmin, is a member of our new overlord class of technology plutocrats who are busy tinkering with and rearranging our world and lives. They speak like this:

    https://twitter.com/balajis/status/1290326486382022656?s=20

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @J.Ross, @uman, @anon

    In other words, the ledger of record will be a panopticon of social credit far bigger than Facebook / Twitter / everything else, and it will be the ultimate fact-checker underlying all facts. All of them. Every single one.

    Seems legit. What could go wrong?

  71. Spanish is stealing some of the coolness from the English language.
    More and more pop hits are sung in Spanish, e.g., Despacito and
    Con Altura. This process will probably accelerate in the future
    as the U.S. is devolving into a Third World Latin American country.
    The whole world has loved Spanish language telenovelas for decades
    now, so in a sense this is nothing new. The world will always prefer
    Latin culture to Black culture (the latter has now degenerated into rap,
    and appears to be creatively exhausted although low IQ people will
    probably always like Black Culture)

  72. @PiltdownMan
    @PiltdownMan

    A few of the rest of us can vaguely understand their priestly information sciences tongue, but for the most part, as the pace of innovation they introduce picks up, the rest of us are excluded. It seems to me that our humanities educated political class will be putty in their hands, far more than they have been in the last two decades.

    Replies: @Lot, @Pop Warner, @Peter D. Bredon

    as the pace of innovation they introduce picks up, the rest of us are excluded

    This is a similar strategy employed by Wokeists as a loyalty test. Not know all of the new and inclusive language? That’s a cancelin’. You can tell who the professional activists are at protests because 1. They speak to the media and 2. Know all of the new lingo like BIPOC and Latinx without reminder or reprimand. Higher status Wokeists know all of these terms right away and thus gain value in the eyes of the faith. And it becomes more and more complicated to the point where you need to train in understanding all of the language, in the same way a theologian or lawyer would have to for their fields.

  73. @Peter Akuleyev
    America is still the "coolest" country in the world and there isn't much competition. America is both the home of Trump and the home of BLM, it truly offers something for everyone.

    What has changed is the relative position of the other countries in the world. In the 1960s Italy and France used to offer interesting alternative cinema, now that role has been taken over by South Korea. Japan and anime is probably the cultural equivalent of the way the UK dominated pop music in the 1960s-80s (is pop music even cool now?).

    Netflix dominates global culture in a way that is unprecedented, although it is possible that the proliferation of streaming services will eventually undermine that. Netflix is also producing global content at a rate and profusion that Amazon, HBO and even Disney (all American, btw) seem unable or unwilling to do but that "global" content often seems very American in sensibility (like the German series "Dark").

    What is interesting is how Africa seems to remain resolutely "uncool", and has become even less cool now than it was in the 1970s, when you had at least had swaggering revolutionary movements that could fool young people. Now Africa is just a giant environmental disaster where immigrants come from. Also true to some extent of South America, which was kind of cool in the 1960s, but even with some sluggish economic growth seems less and less relevant every decade.

    Replies: @Muggles, @prosa123

    I wouldn’t necessarily say that South America is uncool, it just seems low-profile, sort of going its own way under the radar. It might be because South America is in a relatively peaceful part of the world far from major conflicts. Some countries have internal conflicts but the outbreak of region-wide conflict simply isn’t going to happen.

    Also, from a US perspective, South America isn’t sufficiently different to be exotic (or threatening). There isn’t a completely different culture as in the Middle East, and there’s less extreme poverty than Africa or India.

  74. I’d be happy if America were seen as less cool, less holier-than-thou, less invade the world invite the world, and in particular I hope we lose our penchant for “making it rain” for other countries like we’re James Harden at a trashy Houston strip club.

    IDGAF what any other country on the planet thinks of my country. I don’t care what our “standing” is with other countries (outside of favorable trade FOR THE USA).

    I just moved back from the UK, thank God. And just about every person over there that talked politics with me sounded exactly like many progressives over here. Same phrasing, same meme like response to anything that popped up, that snarky condescending patois of the smug-so gross. They love CNN/BBC. I was surprised at how much they knew about my country that was so blatantly wrong. All they learned of the US was from CNN, blue check Twitter, shitty movies and even shittier television.

    It’d be nice if everyone else just focused on their little slice of heaven and leave us alone so we try and enjoy ours.

    And Good willing, never the twain shall meet.

  75. @PiltdownMan
    @PiltdownMan

    A few of the rest of us can vaguely understand their priestly information sciences tongue, but for the most part, as the pace of innovation they introduce picks up, the rest of us are excluded. It seems to me that our humanities educated political class will be putty in their hands, far more than they have been in the last two decades.

    Replies: @Lot, @Pop Warner, @Peter D. Bredon

    The “humanities educated political class” knew how to deal with scientists (I prefer to call them ziontists) like Galileo, etc.

    You don’t have to “understand their priestly information sciences tongue” just cut it off. Or control it.

    And btw, I don’t see any evidence of “information sciences” types being take charge types anyway; conformists to the core;Kuhn’s “normal science” vs paradigm shifts, today’s “settled science”, tenure tracks, etc.

    The proper attitude to science geeks: “Greece and Rome rose on the backs of unwilling slaves. We shall rise on the backs of willing slaves.” Paul Feyerabend (philosopher, decorated Luftwaffe pilot), “Science in a Free Society”.

    The problem of course is that our current “humanities educated political class” has been “educated” by our ethnic enemies.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Peter D. Bredon

    Paul Feyerabend (philosopher, decorated Luftwaffe pilot)

    Repeating this nonsense is foolish.

    Paul Feyerabend was never in the Luftwaffe.

  76. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    A very observant list, but…

    1. South Korea – Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.

    Most people don’t know or care where tech comes from. And yes K Pop is friendly to non-blacks who want to be hip, but how much future is there for that?

    2. Japan – Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.

    True, as are Bill P‘s observations. As ever, Japan is the truly exceptional nation.

    3. China – Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.

    Agreed.

    4. India – Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.

    Agree. The more people see of Indians, the less India fascinates.

    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?

    France no longer French. Next question.

    6. UK – “Cool Britannia.” Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more “posh” accents.

    These days, Britian’s just a weak-sauce America. In the 1960s the British Invasion was organic as was the 1980s New Wave. But the modern “Cool Britannia” is just another Blair-tier government program.

    7. Australia – Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders – Cool accents. Also, they’re called “Kiwis.” That sounds cool.

    Yes, the Antipodeans still have a chance if they don’t blow it by importing/sacralizing the Third World.

    9. Ireland – Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.

    Coulda shoulda woulda been the Antipodeans of the Atlantic, but decided to negrify themselves instead.

    10. Italy – Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany – Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden – Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece – Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain – Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice “siesta” lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland – Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands – Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium – Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland – Amazing parties. Also, “ice” sounds cool.

    Yep, still in the game. Throw in Portugal too.

    19. Thailand – Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali – Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil – Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia – Sort of like Brazil.

    I’m pretty sure brothel clients don’t aspire to adopt the culture of their brothels.

    tl;dr: The last white country standing will be the coolest.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Almost Missouri


    K Pop is friendly to non-blacks who want to be hip, but how much future is there for that?

     

    For whatever reason, Koreans seem to be winning at producing the prettiest men. That's one reason for KPop's popularity.

    https://sputniknews.com/society/202011201081224865-bts-jungkook-is-named-sexiest-international-man-2020-by-peoples-readers/

    Japan is the truly exceptional nation

     

    It is.

    Agree. The more people see of Indians, the less India fascinates.

     

    I think foreigners were traditionally exposed to the elite end of the Indian achievement spectrum, which is quite impressive. The internet has unfortunately brought the world into contact with regular non-elite Indians, who are depressingly prole (in a gaudy West Asian "guido" way) and often quite crude. It's like judging Italians based on their notable cultural exports, but then coming into contact with the barbaric "Eye-Talian" tribes of Staten Island, Bensonhurst, and North Boston. Luciano Pavarotti vs "The Jersey Shore."

    These days, Britain’s just a weak-sauce America. In the 1960s the British Invasion was organic as was the 1980s New Wave. But the modern “Cool Britannia” is just another Blair-tier government program.

     

    Fair enough.

    France no longer French. Next question.

     

    Well, not French in the large metros. Then again, it's the large metros from which culture arises, especially in a city-centric place like Europe. So if native French are being pushed out of Paris, that could explain it.

    Yes, the Antipodeans still have a chance if they don’t blow it by importing/sacralizing the Third World.

     

    They sort of have already. Large cities (Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland) look like colonies of Asia and India. Though the perception is still that both countries are overwhelmingly Anglo-Celtic and insular.

    Coulda shoulda woulda been the Antipodeans of the Atlantic, but decided to negrify themselves instead.

     

    Ireland has a shocking number of immigrants. A huge share are Euro, but it's startling to see the demographics change so quickly. I think a lot of people think of Ireland as still being a quaint and insular society, full of Catholic priests and peasants looking for Leprachauns.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_the_Republic_of_Ireland

    Throw in Portugal too.

     

    Yeah, Lisbon. Forgot. Good nightlife.

    I’m pretty sure brothel clients don’t aspire to adopt the culture of their brothels.

     

    Thailand does seem to attract a lot of stereotypical losers looking for sex. However, Brazil is a soccer superpower, while Bali has world class beaches and cool religious traditions.

    By the way, let's add Israel to the list. Meditteranean country with lots of hot women, tasty food, and good nightlife. Though the large number of Muslims and Orthodox types drags down the place.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @James O'Meara

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Almost Missouri

    Iceland has gotten much cooler over the decades even though practically nobody lives there.

    Replies: @black sea, @dfordoom

  77. What determines that something is “cool”?

  78. Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?

    Probably not.

    You’ll note that French gratitude toward us was highest back after they had intervened militarily at Yorktown to help liberate us. As Ben Franklin observed, “He that has once done you a kindness will be more ready to do you another than he whom you yourself have obliged.” That’s why the French gave us the Statue of Liberty, when, really, we should have given them something for saving us.

    Thus, after we’d intervened militarily to save France in WWI (“Lafayette, we are here!” proclaimed General Pershing’s aide in Paris on July 4, 1917) and WWII, French feelings of thankfulness toward us shriveled.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/charles-krauthammer-chain-yanker/?highlight=franklin+gratitude

  79. America now exports Globohomo. it’s still persuasive, but far less so than 1950s to 2000s US culture.

    the great decline in the quality of American music, movies, and shows mean the soft power influence does not translate as well to the rest of the world as it used to – there’s open rejection of negro worship in half of the world, for one thing. China and India are not buying, though eurofags are. promotion of homosexuals and transexuals is not popular with the masses but has found a place among the bureaucrats and educrats who increasingly promote it.

    baseball and basketball have spread about as much as they’re going to – they’re both actually in decline in the source country, America. British sports culture is growing faster globally. soccer, tennis, boxing, rugby, and golf are still expanding into the world, though cricket seems to have stalled. indeed, in the US, British sports culture is on the way out. tennis, boxing, and golf have declined a lot in the US, and only soccer has grown. rugby never took hold due to football.

    pro wrestling, about equal in cultural projection to 1 of the major US sports, is over, so that vector has ended as well. Attitude Era WWF was probably about as popular in other countries are Premier League had been in non-soccer nations when PL first started up, now that’s completely flipped and WWF is about as popular in foreign nations as NFL, which is to say, not very anymore. WCW never made the jump to international, i’m guessing, even during NWO.

    UFC is the only new, cultural sports export.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @prime noticer


    UFC is the only new, cultural sports export.
     
    K-1 and PRIDE fighting in Japan were so much more fun than UFC.
    , @prosa123
    @prime noticer

    Indeed, in the US, British sports culture is on the way out. tennis, boxing, and golf have declined a lot in the US, and only soccer has grown. rugby never took hold due to football.

    I don't see that the declines in those sports in the US have anything to do with a rejection of British culture. Indeed, except for golf and its Scottish roots they're about as American as you can get. Tennis declined because people are too lazy to play, and poor sportsmanship reduces its appeal as a spectator sport. Pay per view and the proliferation of alphabet soup sanctioning bodies killed off boxing. Golf's decline is hard to understand.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @vinny

  80. @Known Fact
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Great list -- Britain was super-cool from 60s pop through Monty Python and Lady Di, not to mention so many great actors and all that Shakespearean grandeur, but they have diluted their brand with too much immigration (Sweden too, and that's where the US is headed).

    The Aussies and Kiwis were looking cool, fun and manly, but that image has gone the wrong way, the leaders becoming more woke and the people apparently more cucked. This is one small barometer but American racetracks went through a phase 20 years ago where they all simply had to have an Aussie PA announcer to do the calls. That cache is fading.

    American pop culture led for a long time but now much of it is too deliberately flaked, formed and processed for foreign markets, especially China. Bugs Bunny was American -- and you couldn't do him now. Oh, and despite Mark Steyn's yeoman efforts, Canada's coolness peaked with SCTV and those Dave Thomas-Rick Moranis sketches. Back bacon, eh?

    Replies: @Known Fact

    Oops, sorry Canada, I almost forgot Terrance and Philip!

  81. This neo-moralism, which has little practical value for perpetuating society, is an extremely important development. There a significant chance that this ideology, inflexible and full of ardent zest, will cause the end of US hegemony. That is because this wokist ideology is so backwards that it contradicts many cultural norms of every other society. It is also peculiar in that it reduces the fertility of its adherents while simultaneously making communities harder to form. It may be called an anti-culture.

    Long term, I see the US trying to impose Woke on countries who resist and end up band-wagoning with a culture agnostic China in some sort of new currency union. As the dollar loses reserve status, our power base crumbles.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Yak-15


    It is also peculiar in that it reduces the fertility of its adherents while simultaneously making communities harder to form.
     
    It would be absolutely fascinating to see the TFR of the Wokemon crowd.

    Replies: @Yak-15

    , @Peter D. Bredon
    @Yak-15

    "This neo-moralism, which has little practical value for perpetuating society, is an extremely important development. ... It is also peculiar in that it reduces the fertility of its adherents while simultaneously making communities harder to form. It may be called an anti-culture."

    Indeed. People from Aristotle to Nietzsche to Rawls etc. have critiqued various "moralities" but I'm not familiar with any other one that seems to be almost designed to destroy rather than more or less support a community. No reproduction, and day to day life is a living hell of being yelled at by Karens. I guess a bad marriage is still technically a marriage, but still....

  82. Regarding neo religion:

    1. Scott Alexander had a long piece last summer about the new religion in CA is gay pride and the parade in San Francisco every June is its holy clebration.

    2. Steve Outtrim has a marathon 8 video / 24 hour presentation on Burning Man = Satanism (among other things, the central topic is Burning Man) which also has a 1 hour summary but the whole thing is worth looking over. He provides his powerpoints for download and I quit checking his citations after the first 30 checked out as factual.

    His deductions and inferences are not as flawless but it’s really great stuff nevertheless.

    3. There is a professional sociologist of religion, William Sims Bainbridge, who did scrupulous scholarship early in his career and somehow got roped into military money somewhere along the path and he promotes full-force the concept that the religion of the future is omnisexual transhuman communist holodeck worship of ourselves.

    This is capital “E” Evil.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Morton's toes

    Stark is one of those "Christianity created science and capitalism and individuality so worship the Jew is essential for a good society" guys so I wouldn't trust his views as far as I could throw him.

  83. When did America become the coolest country in the world?

    Here’s an outside-the-box answer:

    The period bracketed by the two NYC World Fairs, between
    1940 and
    1964.

    My Silent Generation parents—too young for the World Wars, too old for Vietnam—used to gush about that period. “American style alone was enough of an export! We didn’t even need the food, fuel or manufactures.” Of course, I’m sure it didn’t hurt the “style” comparison that the rest of the world was starving, cold and bombed out for half of that period.

    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?

    My parents had several friends who were Silent Gen Euro refugees of the recent war (WWII). One thing they said was, “You can’t imagine what six years of war does to a people: underfed, diseased, desperate, tattered clothes, grey skin, grey teeth, grey eyes, grey souls. When the fresh faced and well-supplied Americans showed up, it was like a race of supermen. Our men were instantly in awe, our women instantly in love. What could these supermen not do?”

    Well, defeat Crapistan or count ballots in a single day, as it turns out. But I’m sure it was fun for them (my parents) while it lasted. They continued to vote every election as if it were 1960, BTW, and I’m sure they weren’t alone.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Almost Missouri

    I think you are close, but it was not the question. This applies to perception of those to whom the US looked like a land of safety, wealth, health, freedom & plenitude.

    But the question is not about "good life"; it is about seductiveness of a broader culture. It's about glamour, trends, attractiveness. For instance, people now in Liechtenstein, Austria, Switzerland ... live much better lives than those in the US. But they are not newsmakers; they are not attractive or glamorous. They don't produce global TV shows or attract global interest.

    US has become- and still remains- the biggest generator of attractive global culture somewhere after WW2.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  84. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    While some of these countries could be thought of as “cool” in certain aspects, most of them could never be considered THE #1 coolEST country. Being cool and being THE COOLEST are two different things. The COOLEST country is the country that all other countries look to for their fashion cues, for what kind of art and music is good, for what kind of literature is good, even for what kind of food is good, even for how you should style automobiles. The leader sets the fashion and then everyone else copies it. Even behind the Iron Curtain the Russians would (badly) copy American car styles. Even the Germans did – late ’60s BMWs borrowed their styling from the Corvair.

    Sometimes the title is shared because not every country is good at everything. For many centuries France and England mostly shared the title. After WWII, the US was mostly the one to imitate. Basically, you can tell which is the coolest country by going to any up and coming developing country and seeing who they try to imitate the most. America may be fading but for now I think American culture is still the culture that is most imitated by others.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Jack D

    '...America may be fading but for now I think American culture is still the culture that is most imitated by others.'

    Yeah -- but the body will keep twitching for some time after the mortal blow has been administered.

    Britain really became terminal as of World War One -- even if as late as the Sixties it was still a global cultural leader. The Ottoman Empire still held most of its territory at the beginning of the nineteenth century -- but it had actually fallen hopelessly behind more than a century before that.

    For us, even if others still imitate us, the fatal rot may have set in fifty years ago. If gangrene has spread throughout the system, does it really matter if the patient is still conscious? He's not going to live.

    , @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills
    @Jack D

    In that case the Pacific Northwest (Portland/Seattle/Vancouver) is the coolest “nation” in the world. Has led the charge in terms of drug legalization in the Anglo world, SJWism, fashion (the lumberjack look that’s been the default for men in the last decade). It’s also the whitest group of cities in the world in an English speaking country.

    Replies: @fnn

  85. “…From blue jeans & counterculture to blue checks & cancel culture.”

    That’s a great line. The change in America came about gradually from the inside. We went from church culture to HR culture.

    You can reject the church in America and thrive. But thumb your nose at HR and you won’t know where your next meal is coming from.

    As with the church, the problem isn’t HR per se, but its adherents, who take its messages as reality
    and use them to destroy others.

    Since a large number of us work for corporations and everyone gets their messages through corporate media, we are tipping towards being a society of “HR thinkers.” Compliments = insults. First Amendment = “They’re corporations, so they can do what they like.” Freedom = slavery.

  86. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    3. China

    Do you know any Chinese people?

    4. India

    They shit on the street, the sidewalk, and in the gutter. Like San Francisco homeless. No.

    7. Australia

    They have celebrities who get killed spectacularly by wildlife that we have never heard of before. Top candidate on the list for sure. Also when we were signing peace treaties with our indigenous people they were hunting theirs for sport. Who on unz ain’t an Aussie at heart?

    10. Italy

    Italy is the most beautiful place that has ever been.

    16. Netherlands – Amsterdam.

    Good at business but they are boring as f**k. Also Belgium.

    19. Thailand – Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali – Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil – Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia – Sort of like Brazil.

    Not in a hundred years. Maybe 200. Have you seen those surveys where they claim the people in Colombia are measurably the happiest people on planet earth?

    It looks to me like a close contest between Australia and Japan.

  87. @Wilkey
    @JohnnyWalker123


    6. UK – “Cool Britannia.” Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more “posh” accents.
     
    Yes. The British are so much trashier than our basketball players, rap stars, and Kardashians.

    Even excluding the black celebrities I’d wager that British celebs are, at worst, equal to Americans in quality. America just produces a lot more ghetto blacks than Britain does.

    Some people might argue that black culture is a lot of what makes America cool. But America became cool before blacks were much involved or made much of a contribution.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @JohnnyWalker123

    British culture is very trashy these days. The Kardashian sisters and their various rapper/basketball boyfriends would fit in very well over there. From my experience (admittedly limited) with British pop culture, it seems a bit worse over there. Though I could be wrong.

    Some people might argue that black culture is a lot of what makes America cool. But America became cool before blacks were much involved or made much of a contribution.

    That’s true. White-Americans actually used to be considered really cool throughout the world. Up through the 80s or so. They still do have some social status overseas (especially Asia), but they’ve lost a lot of status in America over the last 3 decades due to cultural demoralization.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @JohnnyWalker123

    “ British culture is very trashy these days. The Kardashian sisters and their various rapper/basketball boyfriends would fit in very well over there. From my experience (admittedly limited) with British pop culture, it seems a bit worse over there. ”

    Agree. Americans mostly import classy Brit culture, but I download a moderate amount of random Brit TV, and the general level of degradation of the white British is much worse than the US or Canada.

    Welfare use, illegitimacy, alcohol abuse, and most crime is worse for the white British than Americans.

    Their culture and government has a US level negrophilia, but on top of this has a similar thing for Subcons of both the Hindu and Islamic type that is just as bad. I get the impression that expressions of love for fast food level curry and kebabs is mandatory, and they aggressively push Islamic culture onto white kids there.

    We don’t have anything like this with our main non-blacks (mexicans and east asians), who are themselves far less objectionable than England’s subcons.

    Another way the UK is worse is it just lacks the somewhat aspirational aspect of US mainstream culture. For example, we just don’t have a lot of TV featuring prole single moms, the UK does.

    Steve has made similar observations in the past, and correctly IMO attributes part of this to much lower religious observance of UK whites, plus a lot of degrading behavior being over here “black” and shunned even by our poorest whites, who do not depressingly identify as being at the bottom of the social scale.

    Replies: @Feryl

  88. ‘…Cultural protectionism arises when a culture is insecure. That’s not to say it’s all bad, or always bad. For a small country or community to pass down its ancient culture and language intact in the face of global American cultural hegemony requires a determined effort…’

    That relates to something I’ve noticed. If one goes back a hundred years or so, we were very open to — if perhaps ignorant of — alien cultures. See, for example, the attitude of the makers of the ca. 1920 documentary about Iranian nomads: Grass: a Nation’s Battle for Life. The gist is ‘These people are fascinating!’

    There’s no sense of threat or insecurity at all. Ditto for Kipling’s stories about traditional India, or Pearl Buck’s The Good Earth. One can question the accuracy of the perception, but there’s no mistaking the frank and receptive interest. We were quite certain of who we were, and therefore, perfectly willing to comprehend who others were.

    Compare and contrast to now. We burn Korans, and profess to fear the introduction of Sharia Law. At bottom, isn’t it a fear that what’s left of our own cultural foundation has become so thin that it could be washed away entirely?

  89. @Almost Missouri

    When did America become the coolest country in the world?
     
    Here's an outside-the-box answer:

    The period bracketed by the two NYC World Fairs, between

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/1939fairhelicline.jpg
    1940 and

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5a/1964-65_New_York_World's_Fair_Unisphere_fountain.jpg
    1964.

    My Silent Generation parents—too young for the World Wars, too old for Vietnam—used to gush about that period. "American style alone was enough of an export! We didn't even need the food, fuel or manufactures." Of course, I'm sure it didn't hurt the "style" comparison that the rest of the world was starving, cold and bombed out for half of that period.


    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?
     
    My parents had several friends who were Silent Gen Euro refugees of the recent war (WWII). One thing they said was, "You can't imagine what six years of war does to a people: underfed, diseased, desperate, tattered clothes, grey skin, grey teeth, grey eyes, grey souls. When the fresh faced and well-supplied Americans showed up, it was like a race of supermen. Our men were instantly in awe, our women instantly in love. What could these supermen not do?"

    Well, defeat Crapistan or count ballots in a single day, as it turns out. But I'm sure it was fun for them (my parents) while it lasted. They continued to vote every election as if it were 1960, BTW, and I'm sure they weren't alone.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    I think you are close, but it was not the question. This applies to perception of those to whom the US looked like a land of safety, wealth, health, freedom & plenitude.

    But the question is not about “good life”; it is about seductiveness of a broader culture. It’s about glamour, trends, attractiveness. For instance, people now in Liechtenstein, Austria, Switzerland … live much better lives than those in the US. But they are not newsmakers; they are not attractive or glamorous. They don’t produce global TV shows or attract global interest.

    US has become- and still remains- the biggest generator of attractive global culture somewhere after WW2.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Right, when you can export style irrespective of anything else, you are seductive, glamorous, trendy, and attractive.

  90. @Jack D
    @JohnnyWalker123

    While some of these countries could be thought of as "cool" in certain aspects, most of them could never be considered THE #1 coolEST country. Being cool and being THE COOLEST are two different things. The COOLEST country is the country that all other countries look to for their fashion cues, for what kind of art and music is good, for what kind of literature is good, even for what kind of food is good, even for how you should style automobiles. The leader sets the fashion and then everyone else copies it. Even behind the Iron Curtain the Russians would (badly) copy American car styles. Even the Germans did - late '60s BMWs borrowed their styling from the Corvair.

    Sometimes the title is shared because not every country is good at everything. For many centuries France and England mostly shared the title. After WWII, the US was mostly the one to imitate. Basically, you can tell which is the coolest country by going to any up and coming developing country and seeing who they try to imitate the most. America may be fading but for now I think American culture is still the culture that is most imitated by others.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

    ‘…America may be fading but for now I think American culture is still the culture that is most imitated by others.’

    Yeah — but the body will keep twitching for some time after the mortal blow has been administered.

    Britain really became terminal as of World War One — even if as late as the Sixties it was still a global cultural leader. The Ottoman Empire still held most of its territory at the beginning of the nineteenth century — but it had actually fallen hopelessly behind more than a century before that.

    For us, even if others still imitate us, the fatal rot may have set in fifty years ago. If gangrene has spread throughout the system, does it really matter if the patient is still conscious? He’s not going to live.

  91. @Almost Missouri
    @JohnnyWalker123

    A very observant list, but...


    1. South Korea – Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
     
    Most people don't know or care where tech comes from. And yes K Pop is friendly to non-blacks who want to be hip, but how much future is there for that?

    2. Japan – Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
     
    True, as are Bill P's observations. As ever, Japan is the truly exceptional nation.

    3. China – Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
     
    Agreed.

    4. India – Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
     
    Agree. The more people see of Indians, the less India fascinates.

    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
     
    France no longer French. Next question.

    6. UK – “Cool Britannia.” Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more “posh” accents.
     
    These days, Britian's just a weak-sauce America. In the 1960s the British Invasion was organic as was the 1980s New Wave. But the modern "Cool Britannia" is just another Blair-tier government program.

    7. Australia – Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders – Cool accents. Also, they’re called “Kiwis.” That sounds cool.
     
    Yes, the Antipodeans still have a chance if they don't blow it by importing/sacralizing the Third World.

    9. Ireland – Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
     
    Coulda shoulda woulda been the Antipodeans of the Atlantic, but decided to negrify themselves instead.

    10. Italy – Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany – Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden – Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece – Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain – Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice “siesta” lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland – Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands – Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium – Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland – Amazing parties. Also, “ice” sounds cool.
     
    Yep, still in the game. Throw in Portugal too.

    19. Thailand – Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali – Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil – Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia – Sort of like Brazil.
     
    I'm pretty sure brothel clients don't aspire to adopt the culture of their brothels.

    tl;dr: The last white country standing will be the coolest.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Steve Sailer

    K Pop is friendly to non-blacks who want to be hip, but how much future is there for that?

    For whatever reason, Koreans seem to be winning at producing the prettiest men. That’s one reason for KPop’s popularity.

    https://sputniknews.com/society/202011201081224865-bts-jungkook-is-named-sexiest-international-man-2020-by-peoples-readers/

    Japan is the truly exceptional nation

    It is.

    Agree. The more people see of Indians, the less India fascinates.

    I think foreigners were traditionally exposed to the elite end of the Indian achievement spectrum, which is quite impressive. The internet has unfortunately brought the world into contact with regular non-elite Indians, who are depressingly prole (in a gaudy West Asian “guido” way) and often quite crude. It’s like judging Italians based on their notable cultural exports, but then coming into contact with the barbaric “Eye-Talian” tribes of Staten Island, Bensonhurst, and North Boston. Luciano Pavarotti vs “The Jersey Shore.”

    These days, Britain’s just a weak-sauce America. In the 1960s the British Invasion was organic as was the 1980s New Wave. But the modern “Cool Britannia” is just another Blair-tier government program.

    Fair enough.

    France no longer French. Next question.

    Well, not French in the large metros. Then again, it’s the large metros from which culture arises, especially in a city-centric place like Europe. So if native French are being pushed out of Paris, that could explain it.

    Yes, the Antipodeans still have a chance if they don’t blow it by importing/sacralizing the Third World.

    They sort of have already. Large cities (Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland) look like colonies of Asia and India. Though the perception is still that both countries are overwhelmingly Anglo-Celtic and insular.

    Coulda shoulda woulda been the Antipodeans of the Atlantic, but decided to negrify themselves instead.

    Ireland has a shocking number of immigrants. A huge share are Euro, but it’s startling to see the demographics change so quickly. I think a lot of people think of Ireland as still being a quaint and insular society, full of Catholic priests and peasants looking for Leprachauns.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_the_Republic_of_Ireland

    Throw in Portugal too.

    Yeah, Lisbon. Forgot. Good nightlife.

    I’m pretty sure brothel clients don’t aspire to adopt the culture of their brothels.

    Thailand does seem to attract a lot of stereotypical losers looking for sex. However, Brazil is a soccer superpower, while Bali has world class beaches and cool religious traditions.

    By the way, let’s add Israel to the list. Meditteranean country with lots of hot women, tasty food, and good nightlife. Though the large number of Muslims and Orthodox types drags down the place.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Thailand does seem to attract a lot of stereotypical losers looking for sex.

    One of the State Department's lesser-known functions is handling matters when US citizens die in foreign countries. A few years ago I read that Thailand ranks second only to Mexico, which has vastly more US citizen vistors and residents, in the number of such deaths, with the rate being by far the highest. It appears to be a consequence of so many fat old men traveling to Thailand for sex, and finding out too late that their hearts can't handle the strain.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Yeah, it was a bit unfair of me to lump in those other three under Thailand. And maybe even unfair to Thailand as well. I'm told there are lots of other attractions, but the sex trade sure seems to be a big driver for them. Some of those prosties must be enduring world record levels of use.

    I have a rather favorable, if second-hand, impression of Brazil. But Brazil already had its cultural moment back in the late 1950s - early 1960s with Orfeu Negro, samba, "Garota de Ipanema", and Pelé. That moment came, went and is now gone. It had and has its admirers, but nothing new replaced it, and it's not adding new admirers faster than they're dying off.

    I have a similarly favorable impression of Columbia, but in terms of world-beating "coolness"? I think Colombians are just happy not to be an overt narco-state anymore.

    , @James O'Meara
    @JohnnyWalker123

    "By the way, let’s add Israel to the list. Meditteranean country with lots of hot women, tasty food, and good nightlife."

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/travel/2016/03/17/welcome-tel-aviv-gayest-city-earth/y9V15VazXhtSjXVSo9gT9K/story.html

  92. @Patrick in SC
    America became cool immediately following WWII when Europe was largely rubble or under the thumb of the commies. Our occupation of Japan made us "cool" with them (See baseball). Big cars, Elvis, our film stars.

    I think we kept our cool factor into the 1980s, even though intellectuals and the Left in Europe hated Reagan. Reagan was so uncool he was actually kind of cool in the eyes of at least some rank-and-file Western Euros who, pre-internet, had no voice whatsoever, and I'm sure lots of Eastern Euros liked his anti-communism. Look at that crowd at Reagan's "tear down this wall" speech at the Berlin Wall in 1987. Not every Euro was attending those huge nuclear freeze gatherings. Now, only an Obama-like figure could appear at a mass gathering in Western Europe, but Obama is the antithesis of "cool." (A lithe, pseudo-intellectual, negro who smokes like Obama would have been cool in 1959, but by 2008 it was just the usual tiresome negro-worship).

    I think we lost our "cool factor" with the Iraq war, when our "Cowboy culture" degenerated into weird Christian millennialism, looking to bring about the Rapture by bombing civilians with cruise missiles. That's when the Right lost its mojo. The Left went nuts and lost whatever cool factor it still maintained about 10 years ago when mentally imbalanced women completed their take-over of social media, the schools, a big part of the entertainment industry, and the Democratic Party (unionized teachers and government employees).

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Anonymouse

    lots of Eastern Euros liked his anti-communism.

    In Budapest, Hungary there is a life-sized statue of Reagan not far from their Parliament building.

  93. @prime noticer
    America now exports Globohomo. it's still persuasive, but far less so than 1950s to 2000s US culture.

    the great decline in the quality of American music, movies, and shows mean the soft power influence does not translate as well to the rest of the world as it used to - there's open rejection of negro worship in half of the world, for one thing. China and India are not buying, though eurofags are. promotion of homosexuals and transexuals is not popular with the masses but has found a place among the bureaucrats and educrats who increasingly promote it.

    baseball and basketball have spread about as much as they're going to - they're both actually in decline in the source country, America. British sports culture is growing faster globally. soccer, tennis, boxing, rugby, and golf are still expanding into the world, though cricket seems to have stalled. indeed, in the US, British sports culture is on the way out. tennis, boxing, and golf have declined a lot in the US, and only soccer has grown. rugby never took hold due to football.

    pro wrestling, about equal in cultural projection to 1 of the major US sports, is over, so that vector has ended as well. Attitude Era WWF was probably about as popular in other countries are Premier League had been in non-soccer nations when PL first started up, now that's completely flipped and WWF is about as popular in foreign nations as NFL, which is to say, not very anymore. WCW never made the jump to international, i'm guessing, even during NWO.

    UFC is the only new, cultural sports export.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @prosa123

    UFC is the only new, cultural sports export.

    K-1 and PRIDE fighting in Japan were so much more fun than UFC.

  94. @Yak-15
    This neo-moralism, which has little practical value for perpetuating society, is an extremely important development. There a significant chance that this ideology, inflexible and full of ardent zest, will cause the end of US hegemony. That is because this wokist ideology is so backwards that it contradicts many cultural norms of every other society. It is also peculiar in that it reduces the fertility of its adherents while simultaneously making communities harder to form. It may be called an anti-culture.

    Long term, I see the US trying to impose Woke on countries who resist and end up band-wagoning with a culture agnostic China in some sort of new currency union. As the dollar loses reserve status, our power base crumbles.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Peter D. Bredon

    It is also peculiar in that it reduces the fertility of its adherents while simultaneously making communities harder to form.

    It would be absolutely fascinating to see the TFR of the Wokemon crowd.

    • Replies: @Yak-15
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    AE on Unz has all sorts of fertility charts of liberals.

  95. All contemporary American culture can be summarized by Black Friday. Yuck. Why would anybody want this?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Daniel H

    A few Thanksgivings ago I was with a group of young Europeans with a few days off of their jobs in America. What did they want to do with their free days? After Thanksgiving, their big wish was to "see Black Friday". This was the America they had heard about and wanted to see for themselves. I tried to persuade them there was nothing edifying or attractive about this event, but they would not be dissuaded. Eventually I gave up trying to divert them and said they were free to go but 1) I would not join them, and 2) if they wanted to see a real Platinum Plan Black Friday they would have to go the extra distance to get to a ... uh ... duskier neighborhood.

    I think in the end they settled for the nearer, less melanined destination, and they were kind of disappointed.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  96. Wokelism isn’t reverence. That’s almost exactly what it’s missing.

  97. @prime noticer
    America now exports Globohomo. it's still persuasive, but far less so than 1950s to 2000s US culture.

    the great decline in the quality of American music, movies, and shows mean the soft power influence does not translate as well to the rest of the world as it used to - there's open rejection of negro worship in half of the world, for one thing. China and India are not buying, though eurofags are. promotion of homosexuals and transexuals is not popular with the masses but has found a place among the bureaucrats and educrats who increasingly promote it.

    baseball and basketball have spread about as much as they're going to - they're both actually in decline in the source country, America. British sports culture is growing faster globally. soccer, tennis, boxing, rugby, and golf are still expanding into the world, though cricket seems to have stalled. indeed, in the US, British sports culture is on the way out. tennis, boxing, and golf have declined a lot in the US, and only soccer has grown. rugby never took hold due to football.

    pro wrestling, about equal in cultural projection to 1 of the major US sports, is over, so that vector has ended as well. Attitude Era WWF was probably about as popular in other countries are Premier League had been in non-soccer nations when PL first started up, now that's completely flipped and WWF is about as popular in foreign nations as NFL, which is to say, not very anymore. WCW never made the jump to international, i'm guessing, even during NWO.

    UFC is the only new, cultural sports export.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @prosa123

    Indeed, in the US, British sports culture is on the way out. tennis, boxing, and golf have declined a lot in the US, and only soccer has grown. rugby never took hold due to football.

    I don’t see that the declines in those sports in the US have anything to do with a rejection of British culture. Indeed, except for golf and its Scottish roots they’re about as American as you can get. Tennis declined because people are too lazy to play, and poor sportsmanship reduces its appeal as a spectator sport. Pay per view and the proliferation of alphabet soup sanctioning bodies killed off boxing. Golf’s decline is hard to understand.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @prosa123


    Golf’s decline is hard to understand.
     
    Golf is a "get together with the guys" sport. And pretty white and pricey.

    I think the video game alternative has eroded the number of teenaged white guys who pick up the sport. And then there are just fewer young white guys to start with, more Asians who might be interested, but also more Mexicans and blacks who generally aren't.

    , @vinny
    @prosa123

    Golf is pretty expensive. Not a sport for the downward mobility generations that America has been producing since 2000.

  98. @onetwothree
    Between "Rock around the Clock" and The Beatles. Just a few years.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    Our car culture was cool from the late 50s to late 60s — great auto styling, drive-ins, motor hotels and so on. That Cape Canaveral look in decor and architecture. Then came the bloatmobiles, sprawl, smog and high gas prices, along with killjoy environmentalism.

    • Replies: @Marty
    @Known Fact

    Detroit’s cars were ugly until ‘64.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Known Fact

  99. Washington has been taken over by a master race of beautiful black people. I wish they’d all stay.

    I guess we’re supposed to know who this “Chris Hayes” is. Some fool I guess.

    But I am reminded of the last political commentator/orator/figure who used the phrase “master race” quite liberally.

    It wasn’t a sign of his good intentions towards others. Kinda makes you wonder…

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Muggles

    "I guess we’re supposed to know who this “Chris Hayes” is. Some fool I guess."

    Rachel Maddow's more feminine brother.

  100. @neutral
    America is arguably the worst country in the world, and I am not talking about the sociopathic politicians (although the US ones are one of the worst as well). I am talking about the average person, every American I have come across is either the woke fanatic or the bomb the world because we are America type. Sure you will say this anecdotal, but name one country where you have met a more unpleasant average citizen than America? Even the stereotype of the rude Frenchmen or cold German is nothing close compared to the insufferable America person.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Matra, @black sea

    Even the stereotype of the rude Frenchmen or cold German is nothing close compared to the insufferable America person.

    Yes, America is the “worst country in the world” per you. Where do you live anyway?

    And don’t let the door hit you on your way out. No one is forcing you to stay here with the insufferables.

    Oddly enough, the President is trying to build big walls on our border to keep others from sneaking into the USA.

    But you are free to leave any time. No one here with a conscience wants to see you suffer any further. Or read about your suffering.

  101. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Almost Missouri


    K Pop is friendly to non-blacks who want to be hip, but how much future is there for that?

     

    For whatever reason, Koreans seem to be winning at producing the prettiest men. That's one reason for KPop's popularity.

    https://sputniknews.com/society/202011201081224865-bts-jungkook-is-named-sexiest-international-man-2020-by-peoples-readers/

    Japan is the truly exceptional nation

     

    It is.

    Agree. The more people see of Indians, the less India fascinates.

     

    I think foreigners were traditionally exposed to the elite end of the Indian achievement spectrum, which is quite impressive. The internet has unfortunately brought the world into contact with regular non-elite Indians, who are depressingly prole (in a gaudy West Asian "guido" way) and often quite crude. It's like judging Italians based on their notable cultural exports, but then coming into contact with the barbaric "Eye-Talian" tribes of Staten Island, Bensonhurst, and North Boston. Luciano Pavarotti vs "The Jersey Shore."

    These days, Britain’s just a weak-sauce America. In the 1960s the British Invasion was organic as was the 1980s New Wave. But the modern “Cool Britannia” is just another Blair-tier government program.

     

    Fair enough.

    France no longer French. Next question.

     

    Well, not French in the large metros. Then again, it's the large metros from which culture arises, especially in a city-centric place like Europe. So if native French are being pushed out of Paris, that could explain it.

    Yes, the Antipodeans still have a chance if they don’t blow it by importing/sacralizing the Third World.

     

    They sort of have already. Large cities (Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland) look like colonies of Asia and India. Though the perception is still that both countries are overwhelmingly Anglo-Celtic and insular.

    Coulda shoulda woulda been the Antipodeans of the Atlantic, but decided to negrify themselves instead.

     

    Ireland has a shocking number of immigrants. A huge share are Euro, but it's startling to see the demographics change so quickly. I think a lot of people think of Ireland as still being a quaint and insular society, full of Catholic priests and peasants looking for Leprachauns.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_the_Republic_of_Ireland

    Throw in Portugal too.

     

    Yeah, Lisbon. Forgot. Good nightlife.

    I’m pretty sure brothel clients don’t aspire to adopt the culture of their brothels.

     

    Thailand does seem to attract a lot of stereotypical losers looking for sex. However, Brazil is a soccer superpower, while Bali has world class beaches and cool religious traditions.

    By the way, let's add Israel to the list. Meditteranean country with lots of hot women, tasty food, and good nightlife. Though the large number of Muslims and Orthodox types drags down the place.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @James O'Meara

    Thailand does seem to attract a lot of stereotypical losers looking for sex.

    One of the State Department’s lesser-known functions is handling matters when US citizens die in foreign countries. A few years ago I read that Thailand ranks second only to Mexico, which has vastly more US citizen vistors and residents, in the number of such deaths, with the rate being by far the highest. It appears to be a consequence of so many fat old men traveling to Thailand for sex, and finding out too late that their hearts can’t handle the strain.

    • LOL: Alden
  102. @Patrick in SC
    America became cool immediately following WWII when Europe was largely rubble or under the thumb of the commies. Our occupation of Japan made us "cool" with them (See baseball). Big cars, Elvis, our film stars.

    I think we kept our cool factor into the 1980s, even though intellectuals and the Left in Europe hated Reagan. Reagan was so uncool he was actually kind of cool in the eyes of at least some rank-and-file Western Euros who, pre-internet, had no voice whatsoever, and I'm sure lots of Eastern Euros liked his anti-communism. Look at that crowd at Reagan's "tear down this wall" speech at the Berlin Wall in 1987. Not every Euro was attending those huge nuclear freeze gatherings. Now, only an Obama-like figure could appear at a mass gathering in Western Europe, but Obama is the antithesis of "cool." (A lithe, pseudo-intellectual, negro who smokes like Obama would have been cool in 1959, but by 2008 it was just the usual tiresome negro-worship).

    I think we lost our "cool factor" with the Iraq war, when our "Cowboy culture" degenerated into weird Christian millennialism, looking to bring about the Rapture by bombing civilians with cruise missiles. That's when the Right lost its mojo. The Left went nuts and lost whatever cool factor it still maintained about 10 years ago when mentally imbalanced women completed their take-over of social media, the schools, a big part of the entertainment industry, and the Democratic Party (unionized teachers and government employees).

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Anonymouse

    >Our occupation of Japan made us “cool” with them (See baseball).

    Japan played professional baseball before WW II, the sport having been introduced long before that. There is a good early Kurosawa b&w movie in which the denouement takes place in a baseball arena.

  103. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Almost Missouri


    K Pop is friendly to non-blacks who want to be hip, but how much future is there for that?

     

    For whatever reason, Koreans seem to be winning at producing the prettiest men. That's one reason for KPop's popularity.

    https://sputniknews.com/society/202011201081224865-bts-jungkook-is-named-sexiest-international-man-2020-by-peoples-readers/

    Japan is the truly exceptional nation

     

    It is.

    Agree. The more people see of Indians, the less India fascinates.

     

    I think foreigners were traditionally exposed to the elite end of the Indian achievement spectrum, which is quite impressive. The internet has unfortunately brought the world into contact with regular non-elite Indians, who are depressingly prole (in a gaudy West Asian "guido" way) and often quite crude. It's like judging Italians based on their notable cultural exports, but then coming into contact with the barbaric "Eye-Talian" tribes of Staten Island, Bensonhurst, and North Boston. Luciano Pavarotti vs "The Jersey Shore."

    These days, Britain’s just a weak-sauce America. In the 1960s the British Invasion was organic as was the 1980s New Wave. But the modern “Cool Britannia” is just another Blair-tier government program.

     

    Fair enough.

    France no longer French. Next question.

     

    Well, not French in the large metros. Then again, it's the large metros from which culture arises, especially in a city-centric place like Europe. So if native French are being pushed out of Paris, that could explain it.

    Yes, the Antipodeans still have a chance if they don’t blow it by importing/sacralizing the Third World.

     

    They sort of have already. Large cities (Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland) look like colonies of Asia and India. Though the perception is still that both countries are overwhelmingly Anglo-Celtic and insular.

    Coulda shoulda woulda been the Antipodeans of the Atlantic, but decided to negrify themselves instead.

     

    Ireland has a shocking number of immigrants. A huge share are Euro, but it's startling to see the demographics change so quickly. I think a lot of people think of Ireland as still being a quaint and insular society, full of Catholic priests and peasants looking for Leprachauns.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_the_Republic_of_Ireland

    Throw in Portugal too.

     

    Yeah, Lisbon. Forgot. Good nightlife.

    I’m pretty sure brothel clients don’t aspire to adopt the culture of their brothels.

     

    Thailand does seem to attract a lot of stereotypical losers looking for sex. However, Brazil is a soccer superpower, while Bali has world class beaches and cool religious traditions.

    By the way, let's add Israel to the list. Meditteranean country with lots of hot women, tasty food, and good nightlife. Though the large number of Muslims and Orthodox types drags down the place.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @James O'Meara

    Yeah, it was a bit unfair of me to lump in those other three under Thailand. And maybe even unfair to Thailand as well. I’m told there are lots of other attractions, but the sex trade sure seems to be a big driver for them. Some of those prosties must be enduring world record levels of use.

    I have a rather favorable, if second-hand, impression of Brazil. But Brazil already had its cultural moment back in the late 1950s – early 1960s with Orfeu Negro, samba, “Garota de Ipanema”, and Pelé. That moment came, went and is now gone. It had and has its admirers, but nothing new replaced it, and it’s not adding new admirers faster than they’re dying off.

    I have a similarly favorable impression of Columbia, but in terms of world-beating “coolness”? I think Colombians are just happy not to be an overt narco-state anymore.

  104. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Yak-15


    It is also peculiar in that it reduces the fertility of its adherents while simultaneously making communities harder to form.
     
    It would be absolutely fascinating to see the TFR of the Wokemon crowd.

    Replies: @Yak-15

    AE on Unz has all sorts of fertility charts of liberals.

  105. @Bragadocious

    To the American Midwesterners Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Cole Porter, Paris was still the coolest city in the world in 1919.

     

    Why wouldn't it be, in 1919 Paris was teeming with young widows and (even better) unmarried women who suddenly outnumbered their male counterparts. A pickup artist's dream. But yeah, the architecture, the baguettes etc etc.

    Replies: @Alden

    What really drew Americans including S Americans and English to France in the 1920s and 30s was the low value of the franc against the dollar, pound and even upper middle class S American incomes.

    Devaluation means more exports and less imports and endless tourists and expats spending money. Lots of middle class English women went to France for clothes because even with the cost of travel it was cheaper. France was always cool. But the low cost of living for Americans made it really really cool. Hemingway and his first wife lived very well in France on her inheritance. It would have been a studio apartment and rice and beans had they stayed in Chicago.

    Even James Joyce and F Scott Fitzgerald lived in France partly because the pound and dollar were so high against the franc.

    It was something like Americans going across the border to Mexico for inexpensive vacations, shopping, car repair, medical and dental care nowadays. Or middle class Japanese buying clothes, electronics, household things on vacation in America and Europe during the glory days when the Yen was so high. .

    London housing was supposed to be very cheap during the 1960s. After the massive post war rebuilding and before the immigrant hordes I suppose.

    It’s all gone and we are doomed.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Alden


    It’s all gone and we are doomed.
     
    Jeez.

    I thought I was blackpilled.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @prosa123
    @Alden

    When we were in Paris in late 2018 we had a 4-hour guided tour as part of our travel package. We were talking about housing prices, and the guide said that the prices in Paris ranged from astronomical to several dimensions beyond astronomical.

  106. @Lot
    @PiltdownMan

    I understand him 100%.

    He’s an Indian technobabbler with a worthless “cryptocoin” he wants you to buy from him by appealing to your greed.

    There are many different sorts. The asian techno futurist technobabblers like this guy aren’t really aimed at the iSteve audience. The scamming scumbags who sell worthless “coins” and “tokens” to you all will be using the language of “freedom from government currency” and “fiat money.”

    That’s how pyramid affinity scams work!

    Replies: @Alden, @International Jew

    Thanks, I had no idea what he was writing about.

  107. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Paul Mendez

    From what I know- not. Blacks appeared now & then, but they were marginal (except for fetishist segments of some societies). American figures & themes globally popular, from 1945 on, were: Walt Disney, Frank Sinatra, John Wayne, westerns & gangster movies, Brando, Marilyn Monroe, parts of the cc 60's, JFK, Bob Dylan, blockbusters, legions of minor singers & actors, ....

    The only black many non-Americans knew about was Mohammad Ali. As for actors like Powell, Washington, Freeman,... they lagged very much behind virtually all white movie celebrities. Wilt Chamberlain was someone many have heard about, but actually no one cared for.

    American "icons" & cultural currents most of the world essentially ignored were Elvis, road movies, Beat generation, sports movies, Chevy Chase, Star Trek, superheroes, junk food, Hamburger Christianity (various cults), self-help literature, adoration of entrepreneurs (Steve Jobs etc.), restaurant eating culture, stand-up comedy, ...

    Replies: @Redman

    What about the NBA?

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Redman

    NBA is a complex question. I am not too qualified, but my friend, a basketball coach -when we had been having a small talk about it- said it oscillated: once, hugely popular & then, barely anyone notices.

    I don't know whether it is one of those entertainments which endure, or after some time fizzle, globally. I don't have enough data, but I would say it will retain a niche of faithful followers- like jazz; just, I'm not sure whether it will remain globally popular like rock/pop from the 60s to the 90s.

    I've seen posts claiming that rap is hugely popular in Paris; I don't see it in anywhere from Rome to Moscow.

  108. @Supply and Demand
    This might be a generational thing. As an early millennial, I never thought America was cool — how can your country be cool when it’s culture factory produces everything for your grandparents?

    Japan was the source of the morning cartoons, most of the ‘hip’ cinema when I was 16-29 was all from irreverent Nordic European directors like Verhoeven, Refn & von Trier. My parents put me in Euroball “soccer” camps because Wisconsin Pop Warner was dominated by blacks lying about their age. The music was Eurobeat techno because Milwaukee had a brief rave moment. The only thing that America dominated for me culturally were video games, and I wasn’t much of a gamer. This may be why the Gamer Right is America First.

    MySpace and Facebook were American, but American in the parenthetical sense.

    Today’s zoomers have Bieber (Canadian) and Korean pop music (K-pop related tags were 2/5ths of Twitter trending hashtags last night). The TV they watch is often Japanese or British. The social media is Chinese or explicitly Anti-American like twitter. Marvel movies are made in America for Chinese consumption.

    America stopped being cool in the 90s. Roughly the same time boomers stopped being cool.

    Replies: @Redman

    Roughly the same time the internet arrived.

  109. @Daniel H
    All contemporary American culture can be summarized by Black Friday. Yuck. Why would anybody want this?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    A few Thanksgivings ago I was with a group of young Europeans with a few days off of their jobs in America. What did they want to do with their free days? After Thanksgiving, their big wish was to “see Black Friday”. This was the America they had heard about and wanted to see for themselves. I tried to persuade them there was nothing edifying or attractive about this event, but they would not be dissuaded. Eventually I gave up trying to divert them and said they were free to go but 1) I would not join them, and 2) if they wanted to see a real Platinum Plan Black Friday they would have to go the extra distance to get to a … uh … duskier neighborhood.

    I think in the end they settled for the nearer, less melanined destination, and they were kind of disappointed.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Almost Missouri

    Soooo- Black Friday was, after all, not so black?

  110. • Replies: @Anonymous
    @MEH 0910

    It appears he was bought out just months before the election. Someone must have spent a lot of money to neutralize him.

  111. Cool stands for popular cultural influence, not for science, innovation, high-brow culture, military power or anything similar.

    Basically, it makes sense only for the modern world. It would be weird to say that Rome was cool in the 2nd C or Baghdad is the 8th C. And it implies something global. It is Western culture that has become global in past two centuries. Then, it is connected to language; also, with technological innovation that made popular culture available to masses.

    As regards language, French was dominant not only until WW1, but also in the interwar period. True, modern languages of sciences had been three: French, German & English, but English remained the only one after WW2. Never mind that Britain was the biggest Empire, people still, everywhere, learned French, and not English as the second language. English became the no 1 language because of America, and not the British empire.

    Technology (gramophone, early film cameras,…) made wide cultural influences, on unprecedented scale, possible. Not literacy, not even comics, but sound & moving pictures.

    And there, US has started influencing the global world through jazz & Hollywood, and proceeded via TV, Internet & social networks.

    As long as we remain old-fashioned homo sapiens without significant IQ-enhancing genetic engineering (so, no easy & complete learning of 5 languages in a year for most people) & as long as some unimaginable form of entertainment/addiction appears, not constrained to words, sounds & images – US will have remained the coolest country, even after becoming Brazil with nukes with only 30% of Chinese GDP.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I'm sure that ancient Britons circa 100 AD thought it was 'cool' to speak Latin, wear togas, worship the emperor, be knowledgeable about Greek/Roman history, culture and politics. Such people would have looked down on their 'uncool' fellow countrymen who didn't care about such things.

  112. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Almost Missouri

    I think you are close, but it was not the question. This applies to perception of those to whom the US looked like a land of safety, wealth, health, freedom & plenitude.

    But the question is not about "good life"; it is about seductiveness of a broader culture. It's about glamour, trends, attractiveness. For instance, people now in Liechtenstein, Austria, Switzerland ... live much better lives than those in the US. But they are not newsmakers; they are not attractive or glamorous. They don't produce global TV shows or attract global interest.

    US has become- and still remains- the biggest generator of attractive global culture somewhere after WW2.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Right, when you can export style irrespective of anything else, you are seductive, glamorous, trendy, and attractive.

  113. @Almost Missouri
    @Daniel H

    A few Thanksgivings ago I was with a group of young Europeans with a few days off of their jobs in America. What did they want to do with their free days? After Thanksgiving, their big wish was to "see Black Friday". This was the America they had heard about and wanted to see for themselves. I tried to persuade them there was nothing edifying or attractive about this event, but they would not be dissuaded. Eventually I gave up trying to divert them and said they were free to go but 1) I would not join them, and 2) if they wanted to see a real Platinum Plan Black Friday they would have to go the extra distance to get to a ... uh ... duskier neighborhood.

    I think in the end they settled for the nearer, less melanined destination, and they were kind of disappointed.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Soooo- Black Friday was, after all, not so black?

  114. @neutral
    America is arguably the worst country in the world, and I am not talking about the sociopathic politicians (although the US ones are one of the worst as well). I am talking about the average person, every American I have come across is either the woke fanatic or the bomb the world because we are America type. Sure you will say this anecdotal, but name one country where you have met a more unpleasant average citizen than America? Even the stereotype of the rude Frenchmen or cold German is nothing close compared to the insufferable America person.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Matra, @black sea

    every American I have come across is either the woke fanatic or the bomb the world because we are America type

    When the French & Germans were major world powers they just never dreamed of bombing or invading other countries. Never.

    As for wokeness, that’s just a new name for political correctness. In general the French* & Germans are more PC on race than not just Americans but most of the English-speaking world. (Though in this regard class probably matters more than nationality).

    * French support for Le Pen is mostly focused on ‘regressive’ Islam.

  115. Is TikTok something we’re supposed to respect now? Is it really ingenious?

    Honest question, is there anything culturally Chinese about the product, aside from its business model of profiting off unpaid fame-starved lumpenproles? Which Zuckerberg/Google had already been doing with a broader demo

  116. @Redman
    @Bardon Kaldian

    What about the NBA?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    NBA is a complex question. I am not too qualified, but my friend, a basketball coach -when we had been having a small talk about it- said it oscillated: once, hugely popular & then, barely anyone notices.

    I don’t know whether it is one of those entertainments which endure, or after some time fizzle, globally. I don’t have enough data, but I would say it will retain a niche of faithful followers- like jazz; just, I’m not sure whether it will remain globally popular like rock/pop from the 60s to the 90s.

    I’ve seen posts claiming that rap is hugely popular in Paris; I don’t see it in anywhere from Rome to Moscow.

  117. @RichardTaylor
    I wonder what impact free HD 24/7 pornography has had on young people. Could it make a person, especially a female, turn prudish?

    There isn't much celebration of sex in the culture. I mean, something sexy and alluring. There's lots of talk about sexuality in a dry, sociological sense (what gender am I today) but nothing erotic or fun.

    We aren't to "objectify" women (i.e. tell them how beautiful and valued they are), instead we are to mouth PC slogans we don't mean. And the sex they see early in life is as brutal and crude as producers can get away with.

    It's enough to make someone a Puritan.

    Replies: @JMcG

    There’s a lot to what you say. The “cool” referred to here is mostly the California lifestyle of the 60s and 70s. See Once Upon a Time in Hollywood as a gold toned example. California has gone from Trader Vic’s and making it to the surf on time to really horrifying porn filmed in multi-million dollar houses. It’s a hard, hard world for young people these days.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    @JMcG

    It's the Boomers (like Tarantino) who glorify the 60's and early 70's. Millennials are much bigger fans of the 80's and 90's (Gen X is somewhere between the two extremes).

    Also, are we talking about economics or aesthetics? Standard of living-wise, of course the 60's and 70's were awesome. But a lot of that era's pop culture and fashion is very dated. And architecture-wise, the 1950's-70's were horrible (e.g., brutalism).

  118. @El Dato

    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?
     
    The US didn't win WWI at all. It was just meddling in a European War for reasons unclear. I still don't know what that was about. Afterwards everything went pear-shaped and nasty at the League of Nations.

    "Cultural exports" picked up post-WWI because the US-Europe distance was getting smaller due to better communication and transportation. Post WWII it was of course all over for Europe, one could dump anything on them.

    When did America become the coolest country in the world? (I’d define cool as whatever appeals to ages 13 to, say, 29.)
     
    What _is_ cool coming from the US?

    > Native Americans
    > Unbelievable natural vistas and deserts
    > Everything is BIGGER
    > Cola cans
    > The original Star Trek
    > The early Internet and Cray supercomputers
    > You could actually start a business easily once
    > The Apollo program and nuclear submarines
    > The AR-15
    > Memes about trucks driving down the highway for days and days (aka Freedom Memes)



    Here is Mézières (who is good at drawing extraterrestrials in "Valérian") about his American Dream in "Pilote", 1974, reprinted in an '83 collection

    https://i.postimg.cc/gkJNQrPC/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-1.jpg

    After a forced trip to Algeria, going to the USA:

    https://i.postimg.cc/htRQx3M2/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-2.jpg

    Better go West and work as Cowboy. Hell yeah:

    https://i.postimg.cc/wB49g7GS/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-4.jpg

    The good life:

    https://i.postimg.cc/MpCkHQSB/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-7.jpg

    Things that are bad & THE END!

    https://i.postimg.cc/bvPRJysg/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-9.jpg

    There are even photos. Do these times still exist?

    https://i.postimg.cc/66dKFzCv/Tonton-raconte.jpg

    Replies: @JMcG, @Joe Stalin, @syonredux

    America didn’t win the First World War as much as America’s coming in to the War enabled the western allies to emerge victorious. Both sides were bled white and we, like idiots, tipped the scales.

  119. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Wilkey

    British culture is very trashy these days. The Kardashian sisters and their various rapper/basketball boyfriends would fit in very well over there. From my experience (admittedly limited) with British pop culture, it seems a bit worse over there. Though I could be wrong.


    Some people might argue that black culture is a lot of what makes America cool. But America became cool before blacks were much involved or made much of a contribution.
     
    That's true. White-Americans actually used to be considered really cool throughout the world. Up through the 80s or so. They still do have some social status overseas (especially Asia), but they've lost a lot of status in America over the last 3 decades due to cultural demoralization.

    Replies: @Lot

    “ British culture is very trashy these days. The Kardashian sisters and their various rapper/basketball boyfriends would fit in very well over there. From my experience (admittedly limited) with British pop culture, it seems a bit worse over there. ”

    Agree. Americans mostly import classy Brit culture, but I download a moderate amount of random Brit TV, and the general level of degradation of the white British is much worse than the US or Canada.

    Welfare use, illegitimacy, alcohol abuse, and most crime is worse for the white British than Americans.

    Their culture and government has a US level negrophilia, but on top of this has a similar thing for Subcons of both the Hindu and Islamic type that is just as bad. I get the impression that expressions of love for fast food level curry and kebabs is mandatory, and they aggressively push Islamic culture onto white kids there.

    We don’t have anything like this with our main non-blacks (mexicans and east asians), who are themselves far less objectionable than England’s subcons.

    Another way the UK is worse is it just lacks the somewhat aspirational aspect of US mainstream culture. For example, we just don’t have a lot of TV featuring prole single moms, the UK does.

    Steve has made similar observations in the past, and correctly IMO attributes part of this to much lower religious observance of UK whites, plus a lot of degrading behavior being over here “black” and shunned even by our poorest whites, who do not depressingly identify as being at the bottom of the social scale.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    @Lot

    The downside you don't bring up is that modern US whites have become so dejected that they can't even get off their butts and commit crimes anymore. The (white) US is almost at 1990's era Russia levels of despair.

  120. @Cowboy Shaw
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I wonder if anywhere produces as many 'celebrities' all the way down the alphabet as the UK (per captita). There is a vast insatiable demand for it right down the class layers and a huge media system supporting it. Most of it is staggeringly idotic and crass.

    But when it comes to actual genuine 'cool', as opposed to the rubbish soft power of mass crap like K-Pop, the British, or at least a very specific slice of their upper middle class, are still pretty much number 1. The latest Guy Ritchie film The Gentleman demonstrates that - it's a very specific fantasy idea of Britain but whatever it is it is cool.

    The first global culture - the dance music explosion of the 90s - was developed by working class brits in the late 80s. Ironically they were using bits of culture from here and there to do it: Chicago house music, Ibiza clubbing, Dutch drugs, and their own northern soul movement. But they did it, and it's now everywhere.

    American cool seems to increasingly rely on retro, which is probably the point of the original post. Tarantino had to go back to the 60s to pull off serious cool in his latest film.

    Replies: @JMcG

    I’ve long thought that Coronation Street and the like has had a lot to answer for as a cause of the decline and fall of the British ( and Irish ) working class. The shaved heads and track suits, the daily soap opera of life; it all made sense when I saw a couple of episodes of that garbage.

  121. @Old Prude
    I am so square I am cool. The US would do well to follow my example.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

  122. @James Braxton
    I think what is described as being "cool" is being muddled a bit with what is simply "fashionable."

    Cool implies a sort of unflappable self confidence that does not care what anyone thinks.

    That is why someone like Barack Obama may indeed be fashionable, but he is ultimately very uncool. He cares so deeply about what the right people think about him that he comes across as hopelessly try-hard.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @Hypnotoad666

    “I think what is described as being “cool” is being muddled a bit with what is simply “fashionable.”

    Cool implies a sort of unflappable self confidence that does not care what anyone thinks.”

    Too right, mate.

    Most of these comments are vitiated by the confusion. Cool originally referred a state of being, Zen-like, as the original 50s guys would have said.

    Pynchon’s pal Richard Farina nailed it:

    “I am invisible, he thinks often. And Exempt. Immunity has been granted me, for I do not lose my cool. Polarity is selected at will, for I am not ionized and I possess not valence. Call me inert and featureless but Beware, I am the Shadow, free to could men’s minds. Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? I am the Dracula, look into my eye.” –Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me (1966)

    At some point in the 60s [?] it became a mindless grunt of approval, “that’s cool, man” meaning little more than ‘ya know?”

    Cool was perhaps uniquely American as being the successor to noble oblige, reworked for a natural aristocracy.

    Steve McQueen (the real one) was cool. The new one (Sir Steven Rodney McQueen CBE ) may be fashionable but never cool.

    • Replies: @James Braxton
    @Peter D. Bredon

    Thanks. I have always wanted to be called "mate."

  123. @Alden
    @Bragadocious

    What really drew Americans including S Americans and English to France in the 1920s and 30s was the low value of the franc against the dollar, pound and even upper middle class S American incomes.

    Devaluation means more exports and less imports and endless tourists and expats spending money. Lots of middle class English women went to France for clothes because even with the cost of travel it was cheaper. France was always cool. But the low cost of living for Americans made it really really cool. Hemingway and his first wife lived very well in France on her inheritance. It would have been a studio apartment and rice and beans had they stayed in Chicago.

    Even James Joyce and F Scott Fitzgerald lived in France partly because the pound and dollar were so high against the franc.

    It was something like Americans going across the border to Mexico for inexpensive vacations, shopping, car repair, medical and dental care nowadays. Or middle class Japanese buying clothes, electronics, household things on vacation in America and Europe during the glory days when the Yen was so high. .

    London housing was supposed to be very cheap during the 1960s. After the massive post war rebuilding and before the immigrant hordes I suppose.

    It’s all gone and we are doomed.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @prosa123

    It’s all gone and we are doomed.

    Jeez.

    I thought I was blackpilled.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    It was a joke.

  124. @Yak-15
    This neo-moralism, which has little practical value for perpetuating society, is an extremely important development. There a significant chance that this ideology, inflexible and full of ardent zest, will cause the end of US hegemony. That is because this wokist ideology is so backwards that it contradicts many cultural norms of every other society. It is also peculiar in that it reduces the fertility of its adherents while simultaneously making communities harder to form. It may be called an anti-culture.

    Long term, I see the US trying to impose Woke on countries who resist and end up band-wagoning with a culture agnostic China in some sort of new currency union. As the dollar loses reserve status, our power base crumbles.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @Peter D. Bredon

    “This neo-moralism, which has little practical value for perpetuating society, is an extremely important development. … It is also peculiar in that it reduces the fertility of its adherents while simultaneously making communities harder to form. It may be called an anti-culture.”

    Indeed. People from Aristotle to Nietzsche to Rawls etc. have critiqued various “moralities” but I’m not familiar with any other one that seems to be almost designed to destroy rather than more or less support a community. No reproduction, and day to day life is a living hell of being yelled at by Karens. I guess a bad marriage is still technically a marriage, but still….

  125. @Morton's toes
    Regarding neo religion:

    1. Scott Alexander had a long piece last summer about the new religion in CA is gay pride and the parade in San Francisco every June is its holy clebration.

    2. Steve Outtrim has a marathon 8 video / 24 hour presentation on Burning Man = Satanism (among other things, the central topic is Burning Man) which also has a 1 hour summary but the whole thing is worth looking over. He provides his powerpoints for download and I quit checking his citations after the first 30 checked out as factual.

    His deductions and inferences are not as flawless but it's really great stuff nevertheless.

    3. There is a professional sociologist of religion, William Sims Bainbridge, who did scrupulous scholarship early in his career and somehow got roped into military money somewhere along the path and he promotes full-force the concept that the religion of the future is omnisexual transhuman communist holodeck worship of ourselves.

    https://www.amazon.com/Future-Religion-Rodney-Stark/dp/0520057317

    This is capital "E" Evil.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    Stark is one of those “Christianity created science and capitalism and individuality so worship the Jew is essential for a good society” guys so I wouldn’t trust his views as far as I could throw him.

  126. @Alden
    @Bragadocious

    What really drew Americans including S Americans and English to France in the 1920s and 30s was the low value of the franc against the dollar, pound and even upper middle class S American incomes.

    Devaluation means more exports and less imports and endless tourists and expats spending money. Lots of middle class English women went to France for clothes because even with the cost of travel it was cheaper. France was always cool. But the low cost of living for Americans made it really really cool. Hemingway and his first wife lived very well in France on her inheritance. It would have been a studio apartment and rice and beans had they stayed in Chicago.

    Even James Joyce and F Scott Fitzgerald lived in France partly because the pound and dollar were so high against the franc.

    It was something like Americans going across the border to Mexico for inexpensive vacations, shopping, car repair, medical and dental care nowadays. Or middle class Japanese buying clothes, electronics, household things on vacation in America and Europe during the glory days when the Yen was so high. .

    London housing was supposed to be very cheap during the 1960s. After the massive post war rebuilding and before the immigrant hordes I suppose.

    It’s all gone and we are doomed.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @prosa123

    When we were in Paris in late 2018 we had a 4-hour guided tour as part of our travel package. We were talking about housing prices, and the guide said that the prices in Paris ranged from astronomical to several dimensions beyond astronomical.

  127. @Elmer T. Jones
    Right-wingers are the cool kids now. They are rock and roll, rebellion, creative, edgy, unapologetically heterosexual.

    Liberals are Muzak, metamucil, child-free, and lonely.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Right-wingers are the cool kids now. They are rock and roll, rebellion, creative, edgy, unapologetically heterosexual.

    I think there’s a lot of wishful thinking in that comment.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  128. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Almost Missouri


    K Pop is friendly to non-blacks who want to be hip, but how much future is there for that?

     

    For whatever reason, Koreans seem to be winning at producing the prettiest men. That's one reason for KPop's popularity.

    https://sputniknews.com/society/202011201081224865-bts-jungkook-is-named-sexiest-international-man-2020-by-peoples-readers/

    Japan is the truly exceptional nation

     

    It is.

    Agree. The more people see of Indians, the less India fascinates.

     

    I think foreigners were traditionally exposed to the elite end of the Indian achievement spectrum, which is quite impressive. The internet has unfortunately brought the world into contact with regular non-elite Indians, who are depressingly prole (in a gaudy West Asian "guido" way) and often quite crude. It's like judging Italians based on their notable cultural exports, but then coming into contact with the barbaric "Eye-Talian" tribes of Staten Island, Bensonhurst, and North Boston. Luciano Pavarotti vs "The Jersey Shore."

    These days, Britain’s just a weak-sauce America. In the 1960s the British Invasion was organic as was the 1980s New Wave. But the modern “Cool Britannia” is just another Blair-tier government program.

     

    Fair enough.

    France no longer French. Next question.

     

    Well, not French in the large metros. Then again, it's the large metros from which culture arises, especially in a city-centric place like Europe. So if native French are being pushed out of Paris, that could explain it.

    Yes, the Antipodeans still have a chance if they don’t blow it by importing/sacralizing the Third World.

     

    They sort of have already. Large cities (Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland) look like colonies of Asia and India. Though the perception is still that both countries are overwhelmingly Anglo-Celtic and insular.

    Coulda shoulda woulda been the Antipodeans of the Atlantic, but decided to negrify themselves instead.

     

    Ireland has a shocking number of immigrants. A huge share are Euro, but it's startling to see the demographics change so quickly. I think a lot of people think of Ireland as still being a quaint and insular society, full of Catholic priests and peasants looking for Leprachauns.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_the_Republic_of_Ireland

    Throw in Portugal too.

     

    Yeah, Lisbon. Forgot. Good nightlife.

    I’m pretty sure brothel clients don’t aspire to adopt the culture of their brothels.

     

    Thailand does seem to attract a lot of stereotypical losers looking for sex. However, Brazil is a soccer superpower, while Bali has world class beaches and cool religious traditions.

    By the way, let's add Israel to the list. Meditteranean country with lots of hot women, tasty food, and good nightlife. Though the large number of Muslims and Orthodox types drags down the place.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @James O'Meara

    “By the way, let’s add Israel to the list. Meditteranean country with lots of hot women, tasty food, and good nightlife.”

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/travel/2016/03/17/welcome-tel-aviv-gayest-city-earth/y9V15VazXhtSjXVSo9gT9K/story.html

  129. @Muggles

    Washington has been taken over by a master race of beautiful black people. I wish they'd all stay.
     
    I guess we're supposed to know who this "Chris Hayes" is. Some fool I guess.

    But I am reminded of the last political commentator/orator/figure who used the phrase "master race" quite liberally.

    It wasn't a sign of his good intentions towards others. Kinda makes you wonder...

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    “I guess we’re supposed to know who this “Chris Hayes” is. Some fool I guess.”

    Rachel Maddow’s more feminine brother.

  130. @Dumbo
    American culture, though still endlessly aped, is less and less cool. People don't like to be constantly sermonized.

    "Coolness" has many factors, not only economic. Once Germany had it; then France; Italy during the Renaissance and for a brief post-WWII period.

    I think Chinese culture is too alien to become really too popular among Europeans. Although Japanese animes and K-pop are popular. And if China really becomes the winning superpower, then it might become "cool" by default. Most people worship power.

    I think once one European country such as Germany or France rediscovers its roots and goes back to nationalism, it might become cool again. Fascism and Nazism were once cool, the coolest show on Earth for a few brief years. Why? Again, power or perceptions of power. Nothing to do with its intrinsic quality, necessarily.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    American culture, though still endlessly aped, is less and less cool. People don’t like to be constantly sermonized.

    Unfortunately it appears that people do like being constantly sermonised. It makes them feel virtuous.

    Just like Christians used to love being told how sinful people were. They always assumed it was other people who were sinful, not them. So they got that wonderful buzz of self-righteousness.

    And self-righteousness is very appealing to teenagers.

  131. @Bardon Kaldian
    Too many things mixed up.

    I'd say that the 20's jazz had no rival as universal popular music in the broader Western world (including Latin America etc.).

    Also, I don't think that winning wars was essential- Orwell observed that France had remained culturally the most influential country in the world even after the 1871 defeat, until WW1.

    US has been the most influential in crucial areas of pop-culture: music, films & TV. Fashion - I don't know; ideology & religion -not; sports-not; ethics (American dream etc.)-not; food- not; high-brow culture- not.

    So, it is music & moving pictures- which is big.

    As regards woke "culture"- most of the civilized world thinks that Americans are lunatics with obsessive fads like jogging, demonization of smoking, gym cuture etc.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Also, I don’t think that winning wars was essential- Orwell observed that France had remained culturally the most influential country in the world even after the 1871 defeat, until WW1.

    I agree.

    And the coolness of Britain in the 60s wasn’t affected by the fact that Britain had gone from being a world power to being a backward miserable third-rate power and American lapdog.

  132. @prosa123
    @prime noticer

    Indeed, in the US, British sports culture is on the way out. tennis, boxing, and golf have declined a lot in the US, and only soccer has grown. rugby never took hold due to football.

    I don't see that the declines in those sports in the US have anything to do with a rejection of British culture. Indeed, except for golf and its Scottish roots they're about as American as you can get. Tennis declined because people are too lazy to play, and poor sportsmanship reduces its appeal as a spectator sport. Pay per view and the proliferation of alphabet soup sanctioning bodies killed off boxing. Golf's decline is hard to understand.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @vinny

    Golf’s decline is hard to understand.

    Golf is a “get together with the guys” sport. And pretty white and pricey.

    I think the video game alternative has eroded the number of teenaged white guys who pick up the sport. And then there are just fewer young white guys to start with, more Asians who might be interested, but also more Mexicans and blacks who generally aren’t.

  133. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Alden


    It’s all gone and we are doomed.
     
    Jeez.

    I thought I was blackpilled.

    Replies: @Alden

    It was a joke.

  134. @El Dato

    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?
     
    The US didn't win WWI at all. It was just meddling in a European War for reasons unclear. I still don't know what that was about. Afterwards everything went pear-shaped and nasty at the League of Nations.

    "Cultural exports" picked up post-WWI because the US-Europe distance was getting smaller due to better communication and transportation. Post WWII it was of course all over for Europe, one could dump anything on them.

    When did America become the coolest country in the world? (I’d define cool as whatever appeals to ages 13 to, say, 29.)
     
    What _is_ cool coming from the US?

    > Native Americans
    > Unbelievable natural vistas and deserts
    > Everything is BIGGER
    > Cola cans
    > The original Star Trek
    > The early Internet and Cray supercomputers
    > You could actually start a business easily once
    > The Apollo program and nuclear submarines
    > The AR-15
    > Memes about trucks driving down the highway for days and days (aka Freedom Memes)



    Here is Mézières (who is good at drawing extraterrestrials in "Valérian") about his American Dream in "Pilote", 1974, reprinted in an '83 collection

    https://i.postimg.cc/gkJNQrPC/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-1.jpg

    After a forced trip to Algeria, going to the USA:

    https://i.postimg.cc/htRQx3M2/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-2.jpg

    Better go West and work as Cowboy. Hell yeah:

    https://i.postimg.cc/wB49g7GS/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-4.jpg

    The good life:

    https://i.postimg.cc/MpCkHQSB/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-7.jpg

    Things that are bad & THE END!

    https://i.postimg.cc/bvPRJysg/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-9.jpg

    There are even photos. Do these times still exist?

    https://i.postimg.cc/66dKFzCv/Tonton-raconte.jpg

    Replies: @JMcG, @Joe Stalin, @syonredux

    > The Apollo program and nuclear submarines

    The USA didn’t pay attention to this:

    But unabashedly embraced it:

    > The AR-15

  135. One thing they said was, “You can’t imagine what six years of war does to a people: underfed, diseased, desperate, tattered clothes, grey skin, grey teeth, grey eyes, grey souls. When the fresh faced and well-supplied Americans showed up, it was like a race of supermen. Our men were instantly in awe, our women instantly in love. What could these supermen not do?”

    Around 1969, I watched this in a movie theater as a kid, and I thought Europeans were impossibly cool. They were, too. A remarkable turnaround in just two decades.

  136. @JMcG
    @RichardTaylor

    There’s a lot to what you say. The “cool” referred to here is mostly the California lifestyle of the 60s and 70s. See Once Upon a Time in Hollywood as a gold toned example. California has gone from Trader Vic’s and making it to the surf on time to really horrifying porn filmed in multi-million dollar houses. It’s a hard, hard world for young people these days.

    Replies: @Feryl

    It’s the Boomers (like Tarantino) who glorify the 60’s and early 70’s. Millennials are much bigger fans of the 80’s and 90’s (Gen X is somewhere between the two extremes).

    Also, are we talking about economics or aesthetics? Standard of living-wise, of course the 60’s and 70’s were awesome. But a lot of that era’s pop culture and fashion is very dated. And architecture-wise, the 1950’s-70’s were horrible (e.g., brutalism).

  137. @Peter D. Bredon
    @James Braxton

    "I think what is described as being “cool” is being muddled a bit with what is simply “fashionable.”

    Cool implies a sort of unflappable self confidence that does not care what anyone thinks."

    Too right, mate.

    Most of these comments are vitiated by the confusion. Cool originally referred a state of being, Zen-like, as the original 50s guys would have said.

    Pynchon's pal Richard Farina nailed it:

    "I am invisible, he thinks often. And Exempt. Immunity has been granted me, for I do not lose my cool. Polarity is selected at will, for I am not ionized and I possess not valence. Call me inert and featureless but Beware, I am the Shadow, free to could men's minds. Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? I am the Dracula, look into my eye." --Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me (1966)

    At some point in the 60s [?] it became a mindless grunt of approval, "that's cool, man" meaning little more than 'ya know?"

    Cool was perhaps uniquely American as being the successor to noble oblige, reworked for a natural aristocracy.

    Steve McQueen (the real one) was cool. The new one (Sir Steven Rodney McQueen CBE ) may be fashionable but never cool.

    Replies: @James Braxton

    Thanks. I have always wanted to be called “mate.”

  138. @Redman
    The lingua Franca of the pop world is still inner city black music and dialect. It’s been that way since rap/hip hop took over in the early 1990s. By the time Napster came along, there was no way for a new form of pop music to gain traction by dominance in the market. The purveyors of pop culture could only package and sell celebrity since the music had become essentially free and thus worthless.

    But Tik Tok is mostly just the the same sounds of hip hop combined with the digital power for kids to make their own music videos.

    Replies: @Feryl

    Creativity started to nosedive in the 90’s (certainly, pop music has been dreadful since then), before internet tech made a difference. And it seems to be a global phenomenon.

    Ed Dutton thinks that generations of easy living produce ugly and maladjusted people. Maybe repetitive music with flat vocals is part of the price we have to pay for allowing weak, boring, and neurotic people to survive in unprecedented numbers and reproduce heavily. Gen Z is the loneliest and weakest generation ever. Even the military recently admitted that Gen Z is too “sedentary” to tolerate traditional rigors.

  139. @Lot
    @JohnnyWalker123

    “ British culture is very trashy these days. The Kardashian sisters and their various rapper/basketball boyfriends would fit in very well over there. From my experience (admittedly limited) with British pop culture, it seems a bit worse over there. ”

    Agree. Americans mostly import classy Brit culture, but I download a moderate amount of random Brit TV, and the general level of degradation of the white British is much worse than the US or Canada.

    Welfare use, illegitimacy, alcohol abuse, and most crime is worse for the white British than Americans.

    Their culture and government has a US level negrophilia, but on top of this has a similar thing for Subcons of both the Hindu and Islamic type that is just as bad. I get the impression that expressions of love for fast food level curry and kebabs is mandatory, and they aggressively push Islamic culture onto white kids there.

    We don’t have anything like this with our main non-blacks (mexicans and east asians), who are themselves far less objectionable than England’s subcons.

    Another way the UK is worse is it just lacks the somewhat aspirational aspect of US mainstream culture. For example, we just don’t have a lot of TV featuring prole single moms, the UK does.

    Steve has made similar observations in the past, and correctly IMO attributes part of this to much lower religious observance of UK whites, plus a lot of degrading behavior being over here “black” and shunned even by our poorest whites, who do not depressingly identify as being at the bottom of the social scale.

    Replies: @Feryl

    The downside you don’t bring up is that modern US whites have become so dejected that they can’t even get off their butts and commit crimes anymore. The (white) US is almost at 1990’s era Russia levels of despair.

  140. @El Dato

    Could America have become the coolest country in the world without winning WWI and WWII?
     
    The US didn't win WWI at all. It was just meddling in a European War for reasons unclear. I still don't know what that was about. Afterwards everything went pear-shaped and nasty at the League of Nations.

    "Cultural exports" picked up post-WWI because the US-Europe distance was getting smaller due to better communication and transportation. Post WWII it was of course all over for Europe, one could dump anything on them.

    When did America become the coolest country in the world? (I’d define cool as whatever appeals to ages 13 to, say, 29.)
     
    What _is_ cool coming from the US?

    > Native Americans
    > Unbelievable natural vistas and deserts
    > Everything is BIGGER
    > Cola cans
    > The original Star Trek
    > The early Internet and Cray supercomputers
    > You could actually start a business easily once
    > The Apollo program and nuclear submarines
    > The AR-15
    > Memes about trucks driving down the highway for days and days (aka Freedom Memes)



    Here is Mézières (who is good at drawing extraterrestrials in "Valérian") about his American Dream in "Pilote", 1974, reprinted in an '83 collection

    https://i.postimg.cc/gkJNQrPC/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-1.jpg

    After a forced trip to Algeria, going to the USA:

    https://i.postimg.cc/htRQx3M2/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-2.jpg

    Better go West and work as Cowboy. Hell yeah:

    https://i.postimg.cc/wB49g7GS/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-4.jpg

    The good life:

    https://i.postimg.cc/MpCkHQSB/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-7.jpg

    Things that are bad & THE END!

    https://i.postimg.cc/bvPRJysg/Mon-Am-rique-Moi-M-zi-res-Pilot-1974-page-9.jpg

    There are even photos. Do these times still exist?

    https://i.postimg.cc/66dKFzCv/Tonton-raconte.jpg

    Replies: @JMcG, @Joe Stalin, @syonredux

    What _is_ cool coming from the US?

    > Native Americans
    > Unbelievable natural vistas and deserts
    > Everything is BIGGER
    > Cola cans
    > The original Star Trek
    > The early Internet and Cray supercomputers
    > You could actually start a business easily once
    > The Apollo program and nuclear submarines
    > The AR-15
    > Memes about trucks driving down the highway for days and days (aka Freedom Memes)

    The Western

    Jazz

    The Detective Story (invented by Poe)

    The Private Detective (PI) story (codified byHammett and Chandler, embodied by Bogart)

    Golden Age Hollywood

    Robert Mitchum

    Humphrey Bogart

    The Colt Revolver

    Frank Sinatra

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @syonredux
    @syonredux

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/criterion-production/films/382b3bdf34ee6057403e947817456b38/I8Z5Bln46SVpTSdqJB4E1ChE1CutI2_large.jpg

    http://vanishingpointchronicles.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/humphrey_bogart_sam_spade_the_maltese_falcon.png

    https://hotcorn-cdn.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2018/05/23095801/robert-mitchum-out-of-the-past.jpg

    http://www.riverjunction.com/assets/images/4338/pairofcoltrevolver-3.jpg

  141. What baffles me about Tiktok is that its basically Vines…..the early 2010s app that weirdly faded into obscurity…..

    Most of the hype around Tiktok though is the BM/WF thing the Kardashians push….

  142. @syonredux
    @El Dato


    What _is_ cool coming from the US?

    > Native Americans
    > Unbelievable natural vistas and deserts
    > Everything is BIGGER
    > Cola cans
    > The original Star Trek
    > The early Internet and Cray supercomputers
    > You could actually start a business easily once
    > The Apollo program and nuclear submarines
    > The AR-15
    > Memes about trucks driving down the highway for days and days (aka Freedom Memes)
     
    The Western

    Jazz

    The Detective Story (invented by Poe)

    The Private Detective (PI) story (codified byHammett and Chandler, embodied by Bogart)

    Golden Age Hollywood

    Robert Mitchum

    Humphrey Bogart

    The Colt Revolver

    Frank Sinatra

    Replies: @syonredux

  143. @Jack D
    @JohnnyWalker123

    While some of these countries could be thought of as "cool" in certain aspects, most of them could never be considered THE #1 coolEST country. Being cool and being THE COOLEST are two different things. The COOLEST country is the country that all other countries look to for their fashion cues, for what kind of art and music is good, for what kind of literature is good, even for what kind of food is good, even for how you should style automobiles. The leader sets the fashion and then everyone else copies it. Even behind the Iron Curtain the Russians would (badly) copy American car styles. Even the Germans did - late '60s BMWs borrowed their styling from the Corvair.

    Sometimes the title is shared because not every country is good at everything. For many centuries France and England mostly shared the title. After WWII, the US was mostly the one to imitate. Basically, you can tell which is the coolest country by going to any up and coming developing country and seeing who they try to imitate the most. America may be fading but for now I think American culture is still the culture that is most imitated by others.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

    In that case the Pacific Northwest (Portland/Seattle/Vancouver) is the coolest “nation” in the world. Has led the charge in terms of drug legalization in the Anglo world, SJWism, fashion (the lumberjack look that’s been the default for men in the last decade). It’s also the whitest group of cities in the world in an English speaking country.

    • Replies: @fnn
    @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

    Portland is the capital of Antifa, and Antifa doesn't seem that cool.

    Replies: @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

  144. Everyone’s in here well before me, but i’ll toss over my two:

    1) Capability drives cool.

    What’s the absolute coolest thing the US ever did? Landed on the moon. No one ever did that crazy shit before!

    Right now the US is still highly capable. It created the Internet; has the world’s driving tech capability; builds the world’s best airplanes jet engines. (Seriously the 777X will have the lowest cost seat mile transport cost in history.)

    I think if 50 years from now, the Chinese have world beating technology, build the best airplanes and land some dudes on Mars, their cool factor will skyrocket. They’ll still be hampered by their jing-sing-ping language. But if they are the most capable, doing stuff no one else can … they’ll be cool.

    2) Schoolmarms are super uncool.

    Women do not drive “cool”. Guys thinking up and doing cool stuff drive cool. Girls can definitely *be* cool, if they are fun and sexy.

    But a bunch of tubby, purple-haired screechers on twitter basically yelling “stay between the lines!” and “think no unapproved thoughts” are just excruciatingly un-cool. Un-coolness personified.

    Americans giving these shews credence in our culture, is driving down our coolness and left unchecked will destroy it and open the door for others to poach our cool crown.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @AnotherDad


    2) Schoolmarms are super uncool.
     
    Yup. Jay Leno in his "Garage" series talks about you can't produce even a clone of the original Ford GT street car anymore because the head lights don't meet regulations anymore in terms of height. He's talked about in the 1960s, you could produce what you wanted design-wise, and put it on the street.

    Remember when toys you purchased did cool stuff?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJ5l26calSU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EauvwU2iWFI

    If it were up to me, I'd bring back mail-order firearms, bring back smoking ads and make Constitutional Carry the law of the land.

    The "school marms" would succumb to all the percieved risks that would be broadcast 24/7 on NPR.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @Jack D
    @AnotherDad


    They’ll still be hampered by their jing-sing-ping language.
     
    There's nothing wrong with the language - all humans understand their native language equally well. It might all sound like jing-sing-ping to you but they understand it perfectly well.

    The writing system is different than the Western alphabetic system. It has both advantages and disadvantages but it is completely workable once you have put in the hard work to memorize enough characters. The widespread availability of cell phones and computers has lessened the disadvantages and maybe even created a best of both worlds situation - most input is done alphabetically in pinyin and then the machine converts the pinyin to characters which are more compact.

    If you look at the length of messages in a multi-lingual product insert (3.000 years from now, our Rosetta Stone will be a set of Ikea instructions for putting together a coffee table) you'll see that the French instructions are the most verbose (because you have to keep saying "de la" this and "du" that so that 1 or 2 word expressions in English become 3 or 4 words in French). Eyeglasses become "les lunettes de vue". And Chinese instructions are the shortest. Hippopotamus becomes 河马 ("river horse").

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @TheJester
    @AnotherDad


    Women do not drive “cool”. Guys thinking up and doing cool stuff drive cool. Girls can definitely *be* cool, if they are fun and sexy.
     
    Women are "cool" and sexy because of what they ARE. Men are "cool" and sexy because of what they OWN ... their Alph Markers. Women perceive that their ability to attract male power and wealth will determine their place and status on the male dominance matrix, the only one that counts in life.

    So, nothing changes in the sociobiological "engine" that ensures the continued existence of the human race ... even in the face of feminism, homosexuality, and transgenderism as momentary distractions played out in the lives of the rich and famous for our amusement.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Harry Baldwin

  145. @AnotherDad
    Everyone's in here well before me, but i'll toss over my two:

    1) Capability drives cool.

    What's the absolute coolest thing the US ever did? Landed on the moon. No one ever did that crazy shit before!

    Right now the US is still highly capable. It created the Internet; has the world's driving tech capability; builds the world's best airplanes jet engines. (Seriously the 777X will have the lowest cost seat mile transport cost in history.)

    I think if 50 years from now, the Chinese have world beating technology, build the best airplanes and land some dudes on Mars, their cool factor will skyrocket. They'll still be hampered by their jing-sing-ping language. But if they are the most capable, doing stuff no one else can ... they'll be cool.

    2) Schoolmarms are super uncool.

    Women do not drive "cool". Guys thinking up and doing cool stuff drive cool. Girls can definitely *be* cool, if they are fun and sexy.

    But a bunch of tubby, purple-haired screechers on twitter basically yelling "stay between the lines!" and "think no unapproved thoughts" are just excruciatingly un-cool. Un-coolness personified.

    Americans giving these shews credence in our culture, is driving down our coolness and left unchecked will destroy it and open the door for others to poach our cool crown.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Jack D, @TheJester

    2) Schoolmarms are super uncool.

    Yup. Jay Leno in his “Garage” series talks about you can’t produce even a clone of the original Ford GT street car anymore because the head lights don’t meet regulations anymore in terms of height. He’s talked about in the 1960s, you could produce what you wanted design-wise, and put it on the street.

    Remember when toys you purchased did cool stuff?

    If it were up to me, I’d bring back mail-order firearms, bring back smoking ads and make Constitutional Carry the law of the land.

    The “school marms” would succumb to all the percieved risks that would be broadcast 24/7 on NPR.

    • Agree: SunBakedSuburb
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Joe Stalin

    https://www.wired.com/wp-content/uploads/images_blogs/photos/uncategorized/2007/06/12/iverjohnsonsaferevolverad.jpg

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Dissident

  146. @James Braxton
    I think what is described as being "cool" is being muddled a bit with what is simply "fashionable."

    Cool implies a sort of unflappable self confidence that does not care what anyone thinks.

    That is why someone like Barack Obama may indeed be fashionable, but he is ultimately very uncool. He cares so deeply about what the right people think about him that he comes across as hopelessly try-hard.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @Hypnotoad666

    Cool implies a sort of unflappable self confidence that does not care what anyone thinks.

    There may also be a kind of “nerd cool,” in which autists, aficionados, and obsessives use their focused interests to immunize themselves from the need to fashionably pose like the “cool kids.”

    Unfortunately, it’s not usually recognized as “cool” by others at the time.

  147. @Old Prude
    @Simon in London

    I am so square I am cool.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    I am so square I am cool.

  148. @Lot
    @PiltdownMan

    I understand him 100%.

    He’s an Indian technobabbler with a worthless “cryptocoin” he wants you to buy from him by appealing to your greed.

    There are many different sorts. The asian techno futurist technobabblers like this guy aren’t really aimed at the iSteve audience. The scamming scumbags who sell worthless “coins” and “tokens” to you all will be using the language of “freedom from government currency” and “fiat money.”

    That’s how pyramid affinity scams work!

    Replies: @Alden, @International Jew

    Thanks. Based just on the tweet Piltdown Man quoted, it looks to me like Balajis is thinking of storing all our social media posts on some peta-scale Blockchain.

    As I learned from Bruce Schneier, Blockchain is 90% hype:
    https://www.wired.com/story/theres-no-good-reason-to-trust-blockchain-technology/

  149. C’mon, man, even Joe Biden is a revenant Catholic. Recently he said:

    “…and if we do, and I’m sure we can, we can perclaim, the palmist, the palmist who wrote these following words, “The Lord is my strength and my shield…””

    Start no earlier than 16:15, especially if you are inclined to nod off:

    OTOH, this speech is exactly what we need to increase support for and interest in refusing to certify election results; we’ll throw the election to the Congress. Listening to this speech must be similar to what if feels like to be embalmed.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Anon7


    “…and if we do, and I’m sure we can, we can perclaim, the palmist, the palmist who wrote these following words, “The Lord is my strength and my shield…””
     
    Is he talking about Jeffrey Toobin?
  150. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here's a question.

    If America no longer is the coolest country in the world, then who is?

    Let me nominate a few countries.

    1. South Korea - Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
    2. Japan - Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
    3. China - Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
    4. India - Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
    5. France - Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
    6. UK - "Cool Britannia." Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more "posh" accents.
    7. Australia - Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders - Cool accents. Also, they're called "Kiwis." That sounds cool.
    9. Ireland - Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
    10. Italy - Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany - Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden - Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece - Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain - Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice "siesta" lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland - Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands - Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium - Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland - Amazing parties. Also, "ice" sounds cool.
    19. Thailand - Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali - Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil - Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia - Sort of like Brazil.

    Replies: @gent, @dfordoom, @Wilkey, @Known Fact, @Drew, @kaganovitch, @Cowboy Shaw, @Anon 2, @Almost Missouri, @Jack D, @Morton's toes, @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    The U.S. is the center of the world, according to all those who say it’s collapsing. Bloggers and Tweeters from Australia and China talk mostly about American politics and mores.

    I don’t think it was ever the coolest as a whole nation, but New York and Los Angeles both definitely used to be.

    France, Italy, Greece–because of what they were, and they’re all still very sensual people despite the Muslims.

    Tahiti is super-cool, and that’s not just because of billionaires with overwater bungalows: The French are much better at that sort of colonial possession than the British were: you get great French restaurants and the interior of Tahiti and also the lagoon of Bora Bora are as beautiful as anything in Europe or America.

    In terms of charisma, the U.S., not because of ‘charming cool’, but because even with collapses and upheavals every few minutes, everybody else in the world knows all the latest U.S. news. An Australian I used to chat with knew all about the candidates for Democratic nominee, and I still can’t remember their president or prime minister.

    Maybe the U.S. really is the coolest–and more than ever–because it is so dangerous and yet every event here is watched by the entire world. I know I already said that, but it’s a big deal, even if I personally don’t find American culture ‘cool’ at this juncture.

    Also, it doesn’t have to be new things. France, Italy and Greece are still way cooler in aesthetic ways than the U.S. for things that happened and were made and still exist up to several thousand years ago. Iraq is the same, but somehow was isolated in modern times and never had a cool period till the Iraq War.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race


    France, Italy and Greece are still way cooler in aesthetic ways than the U.S. for things that happened
     
    When I look at a movie that is filmed in a French city, and to a lesser extent Western Europe, the first thing I look for is graffiti. The graffiti sure is aesthetic. I once heard a Black man explain to a White on the CTA train that Europe was civilized because they had graffiti everywhere.

    I will gladly accept that Chicago isn't as cool as France because we fight graffiti around the clock.

    https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2019/04/29/graffiti-removal-blasters-streets-and-sanitation/

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

  151. Edgar Allan Poe: Cool hero for the 19th century European avant-garde literati. Poe stan Baudelaire’s translations of Poe form a huge chunk of his literary corpus.

    Walt Whitman: Cool hero for 19th century homos (Oscar Wilde, John Addington Symonds, etc)

    Orson Welles: Cool hero for directors and film critics all over the world.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @syonredux

    Poe stands large because he was the first American author who actually tried (with mixed results) to make a living as a professional writer. His mystery and horror works had more popular than elite appeal - to this day these are popular commercial genres and he practically invented them as part of his efforts to write stuff that people would actually be willing to pay for. This did not exactly make him cool but rather an interesting novelty to Europeans, like a talking dog. Americans weren't supposed to have any literary culture at all.

    Before Welles, Twain was a worldwide hero. But generally, yes, American "coolness" progressed from a rather limited niche appeal in the early part of the 19th century to worldwide recognition in the 20th. Even (especially) behind the Iron Curtain things like American blue jeans were widely coveted. Stalin was a big fan of Hollywood movies, especially John Wayne Westerns. Mao had a fondness for Buicks.

    Replies: @syonredux, @syonredux, @syonredux

  152. Only non Americans are maybe really in the position to make anything like an objective judgement as to whether the US is no 1 when it comes to coolness ( or anything else for that matter ) . In opinion seeking of this kind one is usually prohibited from voting for one’s own team / side

    For my part if I was limited to stuff from one country only -books , film ,TV , radio , music, sports , newspapers and magazines , food , drink, snacks , hobbies, recreations – and anything else you can think of – it would be a contest between the US and the UK with daylight third . I’d say that the UK leads slightly but accept that this may be both generational and smartness related .
    In Australia , where I’m from , the US’s appeal is much greater among , er , dumb people ( Disneyland and Las Vegas vacation anyone ? ) who are always the majority

  153. @Joe Stalin
    @AnotherDad


    2) Schoolmarms are super uncool.
     
    Yup. Jay Leno in his "Garage" series talks about you can't produce even a clone of the original Ford GT street car anymore because the head lights don't meet regulations anymore in terms of height. He's talked about in the 1960s, you could produce what you wanted design-wise, and put it on the street.

    Remember when toys you purchased did cool stuff?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJ5l26calSU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EauvwU2iWFI

    If it were up to me, I'd bring back mail-order firearms, bring back smoking ads and make Constitutional Carry the law of the land.

    The "school marms" would succumb to all the percieved risks that would be broadcast 24/7 on NPR.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Rob McX

    Thanks for posting this. A creepy grin forms on my face knowing this image of Americana would horrify certain foreigners and white leftists and imperious immigrants. Guns A' Blazin!!!

    , @Dissident
    @Rob McX

    DRAGNET,
    .22 Rifle for Christmas (File #21, Dragnet_49-12-22_030_22_Rifle_for_Christmas.mp3 on page at URL in first link )
    https://archive.org/download/OTRR_Certified_Dragnet/OTRR_Certified_Dragnet.jpg
    This is the original radio version*, originally aired December 22, 1949. It was re-broadcast many times subsequently.

    *DRAGNET began on radio in 1949. The television version began in 1951. From the OTRRArchive (Old Time Radio Researchers Group) DRAGNET page at Archive.org that I have linked-to:


    Due in part to Webb's fondness for radio drama, Dragnet persisted on radio until 1957, as one of the last old time radio shows to give way to television's increasing popularity. In fact, the TV show would prove to be effectively a visual version of the radio show, as the style was virtually the same. The TV show could be listened to, without watching it, with no loss of understanding of the storyline.
     
    The entire OTRR Certified Set of Dragnet can be found compressed into a total of 11 .zip files on this page.
  154. @neutral
    America is arguably the worst country in the world, and I am not talking about the sociopathic politicians (although the US ones are one of the worst as well). I am talking about the average person, every American I have come across is either the woke fanatic or the bomb the world because we are America type. Sure you will say this anecdotal, but name one country where you have met a more unpleasant average citizen than America? Even the stereotype of the rude Frenchmen or cold German is nothing close compared to the insufferable America person.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Matra, @black sea

    The reputation (positive and negative) of Americans abroad is generally as follows:

    oafish and overweight

    loud

    considerate

    ignorant and uncaring about the rest of the world

    honest

    self-confident (deservedly so or not)

    complacent

    good at business

    consumerist (something that every society secretly aspires to become)

    helpful for no obvious reason, just in order to be helpful

    uncultured

    ill-educated

    reckless (with good and bad consequences)

    friendly to everyone, but not inclined to form enduring friendships

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @black sea

    "oafish and overweight"

    Rock N Roll!!!

  155. @Anon7
    C'mon, man, even Joe Biden is a revenant Catholic. Recently he said:

    "...and if we do, and I'm sure we can, we can perclaim, the palmist, the palmist who wrote these following words, "The Lord is my strength and my shield...""

    Start no earlier than 16:15, especially if you are inclined to nod off:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wAkPFMp-M8

    OTOH, this speech is exactly what we need to increase support for and interest in refusing to certify election results; we'll throw the election to the Congress. Listening to this speech must be similar to what if feels like to be embalmed.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    “…and if we do, and I’m sure we can, we can perclaim, the palmist, the palmist who wrote these following words, “The Lord is my strength and my shield…””

    Is he talking about Jeffrey Toobin?

  156. @Almost Missouri
    @JohnnyWalker123

    A very observant list, but...


    1. South Korea – Music (K Pop, Gangnam Style) and tech devices.
     
    Most people don't know or care where tech comes from. And yes K Pop is friendly to non-blacks who want to be hip, but how much future is there for that?

    2. Japan – Anime, video games, sushi, tech devices.
     
    True, as are Bill P's observations. As ever, Japan is the truly exceptional nation.

    3. China – Traditionally not cool, but its economic&technological rise will probably generate soft power at some point.
     
    Agreed.

    4. India – Eastern philosophy (yoga, meditation) and unique culture. However, the recent explosion of low-IQ Indian dudes on the internet may have taken Indians down a few notches.
     
    Agree. The more people see of Indians, the less India fascinates.

    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
     
    France no longer French. Next question.

    6. UK – “Cool Britannia.” Produces lots of trashy pop culture and celebs. Sort of like a mini-America, but with more “posh” accents.
     
    These days, Britian's just a weak-sauce America. In the 1960s the British Invasion was organic as was the 1980s New Wave. But the modern "Cool Britannia" is just another Blair-tier government program.

    7. Australia – Outdoorsy culture, nice beaches, and lots of masculine men. Cool accents too.
    8. New Zealanders – Cool accents. Also, they’re called “Kiwis.” That sounds cool.
     
    Yes, the Antipodeans still have a chance if they don't blow it by importing/sacralizing the Third World.

    9. Ireland – Pub crawls and Leprechauns. Lots of Irish-origin overseas are eager to rediscover their roots.
     
    Coulda shoulda woulda been the Antipodeans of the Atlantic, but decided to negrify themselves instead.

    10. Italy – Fashionable people with a very strong brand of cool. Good at soccer. Elite contender.
    11. Germany – Rising affluence and popular destination for Euro migrants. Also, legendary nightlife in Berlin.
    12. Sweden – Cool aesthetic. Lots of hot women and handsome men.
    13. Greece – Popular party destination for hedonistic Euro travelers.
    14. Spain – Barcelona is a popular travel destination. Good weather. Nice “siesta” lifestyle.
    15. Switzerland – Good chocolate and highly adept at making watches.
    16. Netherlands – Amsterdam.
    17. Belgium – Good chocolate. Capital of EU.
    18. Iceland – Amazing parties. Also, “ice” sounds cool.
     
    Yep, still in the game. Throw in Portugal too.

    19. Thailand – Popular travel destination.
    20. Bali – Popular travel destination.
    21. Brazil – Carnival. Good at soccer. Debauchery.
    22. Colombia – Sort of like Brazil.
     
    I'm pretty sure brothel clients don't aspire to adopt the culture of their brothels.

    tl;dr: The last white country standing will be the coolest.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Steve Sailer

    Iceland has gotten much cooler over the decades even though practically nobody lives there.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Steve Sailer

    Same is true of New Zealand.

    Maybe this is the faraway island century.

    Replies: @prosa123

    , @dfordoom
    @Steve Sailer


    Iceland has gotten much cooler over the decades even though practically nobody lives there.
     
    Maybe it's cooler because practically nobody lives there. And practically nobody goes there. It's one of the few places left that still sounds genuinely remote and exotic. We can still have fantasies of what a strange and fascinating place it must be because most of us will never have our illusions shattered by actually visiting the place.

    I like to imagine that Icelanders live on a diet of weird dishes consisting of seal blubber and herrings. But they probably mostly eat at McDonalds. And I like to think Icelandic women are kinda like Valkyries, but sexy Valkyries. And that they still recite sagas and stuff, and still reminisce about being Vikings.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  157. @Steve Sailer
    @Almost Missouri

    Iceland has gotten much cooler over the decades even though practically nobody lives there.

    Replies: @black sea, @dfordoom

    Same is true of New Zealand.

    Maybe this is the faraway island century.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @black sea

    New Zealand's coolness benefitted from The Lord of the Rings.

  158. I am not the Balaji who wrote on Twitter. I do not have a Twitter account but I agree fully with my namesake. I found the following Wokist Creed as a yard sign in front of a house in my neighborhood.

    “We Believe
    Black Lives Matter
    Love is Love
    Feminism is for Everyone
    No Human Being is Illegal
    Science is Real
    Be Kind to All”

    It has been there from the Hot Summer of George to the Dark Winter of Joe. No doubt the purpose of this article of faith is to invoke the blessings of the Great Woke Spirit on the occupants of the house.

  159. @black sea
    @Steve Sailer

    Same is true of New Zealand.

    Maybe this is the faraway island century.

    Replies: @prosa123

    New Zealand’s coolness benefitted from The Lord of the Rings.

  160. @AnotherDad
    Everyone's in here well before me, but i'll toss over my two:

    1) Capability drives cool.

    What's the absolute coolest thing the US ever did? Landed on the moon. No one ever did that crazy shit before!

    Right now the US is still highly capable. It created the Internet; has the world's driving tech capability; builds the world's best airplanes jet engines. (Seriously the 777X will have the lowest cost seat mile transport cost in history.)

    I think if 50 years from now, the Chinese have world beating technology, build the best airplanes and land some dudes on Mars, their cool factor will skyrocket. They'll still be hampered by their jing-sing-ping language. But if they are the most capable, doing stuff no one else can ... they'll be cool.

    2) Schoolmarms are super uncool.

    Women do not drive "cool". Guys thinking up and doing cool stuff drive cool. Girls can definitely *be* cool, if they are fun and sexy.

    But a bunch of tubby, purple-haired screechers on twitter basically yelling "stay between the lines!" and "think no unapproved thoughts" are just excruciatingly un-cool. Un-coolness personified.

    Americans giving these shews credence in our culture, is driving down our coolness and left unchecked will destroy it and open the door for others to poach our cool crown.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Jack D, @TheJester

    They’ll still be hampered by their jing-sing-ping language.

    There’s nothing wrong with the language – all humans understand their native language equally well. It might all sound like jing-sing-ping to you but they understand it perfectly well.

    The writing system is different than the Western alphabetic system. It has both advantages and disadvantages but it is completely workable once you have put in the hard work to memorize enough characters. The widespread availability of cell phones and computers has lessened the disadvantages and maybe even created a best of both worlds situation – most input is done alphabetically in pinyin and then the machine converts the pinyin to characters which are more compact.

    If you look at the length of messages in a multi-lingual product insert (3.000 years from now, our Rosetta Stone will be a set of Ikea instructions for putting together a coffee table) you’ll see that the French instructions are the most verbose (because you have to keep saying “de la” this and “du” that so that 1 or 2 word expressions in English become 3 or 4 words in French). Eyeglasses become “les lunettes de vue”. And Chinese instructions are the shortest. Hippopotamus becomes 河马 (“river horse”).

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    There’s nothing wrong with the language – all humans understand their native language equally well.
     
    Jack, my point isn't that there's some sort of problem with Chinese for the Chinese, just that it's less tractable, appealing for others. Not everything in the world is "equal".

    -- English had the advantage not only of the British Empire, but that half the world's people--and more of its geography--speak an Indo-European language. English has some spelling/pronunciation "gottchas" from its invasion driven composite character and the vowel shift. But it's still quite tractable for other Indo-European language speakers.

    -- Chinese is tonal. I can learn some word ... then the Chinese still think i'm saying it wrong.

    -- An alphabetic language is much easier for someone to learn--period and especially as a 2nd language. And of course easier for people who already speak a language with an alphabet--most people.

    -- Chinese characters are a primitive, sub-optimal system. (Lame, kind of like Roman numerals.) And basically a huge unnecessary time sink for 2nd language learners.

    ~~~

    I really do expect the Chinese to climb to some sort of world "pre-eminence", basically because minoritarianisn-immigrationism is killing the West. That's depressing enough.

    However, i don't really expect Chinese to become the dominant world language. Both because a lot of other people will resist Chinese hegemony, and because it has the deficiencies i noted above.

    (Unless the Chinese at some point engineer a super-germ to kill all the non-Chinese ... not outside the realm of possibility.)

  161. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The U.S. is the center of the world, according to all those who say it's collapsing. Bloggers and Tweeters from Australia and China talk mostly about American politics and mores.

    I don't think it was ever the coolest as a whole nation, but New York and Los Angeles both definitely used to be.

    France, Italy, Greece--because of what they were, and they're all still very sensual people despite the Muslims.

    Tahiti is super-cool, and that's not just because of billionaires with overwater bungalows: The French are much better at that sort of colonial possession than the British were: you get great French restaurants and the interior of Tahiti and also the lagoon of Bora Bora are as beautiful as anything in Europe or America.

    In terms of charisma, the U.S., not because of 'charming cool', but because even with collapses and upheavals every few minutes, everybody else in the world knows all the latest U.S. news. An Australian I used to chat with knew all about the candidates for Democratic nominee, and I still can't remember their president or prime minister.

    Maybe the U.S. really is the coolest--and more than ever--because it is so dangerous and yet every event here is watched by the entire world. I know I already said that, but it's a big deal, even if I personally don't find American culture 'cool' at this juncture.

    Also, it doesn't have to be new things. France, Italy and Greece are still way cooler in aesthetic ways than the U.S. for things that happened and were made and still exist up to several thousand years ago. Iraq is the same, but somehow was isolated in modern times and never had a cool period till the Iraq War.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    France, Italy and Greece are still way cooler in aesthetic ways than the U.S. for things that happened

    When I look at a movie that is filmed in a French city, and to a lesser extent Western Europe, the first thing I look for is graffiti. The graffiti sure is aesthetic. I once heard a Black man explain to a White on the CTA train that Europe was civilized because they had graffiti everywhere.

    I will gladly accept that Chicago isn’t as cool as France because we fight graffiti around the clock.

    https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2019/04/29/graffiti-removal-blasters-streets-and-sanitation/

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Joe Stalin

    Oh man, am I sorry about that, and you in Chicago have lots of reasons for feeling uncool--at least the mayor wouldn't condone the theft and looting. Graffiti is garbage anywhere, and you're arrested for it in NYC, so we don't have nearly as much as we did way back in the 70s. Blacks are always going to like 'the squalid look', at least the ordinary ones (I admit to liking quite a number of black musicians, and Ella Fitzgerald sounds white because she was influenced mostly by the white singer Connie Boswell), plus you get arrest for graffiti since Ed Koch, who was good at things like that. Does Chicago arrest for graffiti? I've never seen the appeal of the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat--a saw a whole show of his works, and they all look like big canvasses of graffiti. The very worst here was spraying the windows of the subway black so you couldn't see where you were, and that's thankfully gone, although I don't take the subway anymore. If I have to get somewhere, a bus.

    And, of course, at the peak of the early St. George riots, NYT would put a photo of 'young girl painting a mural'--it was someone's fucking house, it was private property! They acted as if it were an important creative act! Disgusting!

    I was thinking of the heritage going back so far with France, Italy and Greece, I still think it's part of what makes them cool, although I think Steve wanted current trends to be the criterion for 'coolness'. I did watch all the recent movies of my long-time favourite Catherine Deneuve last year, and I didn't notice any graffiti, but it was probably there and I just didn't see it.

    I'd put Portland and Seattle as *Most Uncool U.S. cities* right now.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  162. @syonredux
    Edgar Allan Poe: Cool hero for the 19th century European avant-garde literati. Poe stan Baudelaire's translations of Poe form a huge chunk of his literary corpus.

    Walt Whitman: Cool hero for 19th century homos (Oscar Wilde, John Addington Symonds, etc)

    Orson Welles: Cool hero for directors and film critics all over the world.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Poe stands large because he was the first American author who actually tried (with mixed results) to make a living as a professional writer. His mystery and horror works had more popular than elite appeal – to this day these are popular commercial genres and he practically invented them as part of his efforts to write stuff that people would actually be willing to pay for. This did not exactly make him cool but rather an interesting novelty to Europeans, like a talking dog. Americans weren’t supposed to have any literary culture at all.

    Before Welles, Twain was a worldwide hero. But generally, yes, American “coolness” progressed from a rather limited niche appeal in the early part of the 19th century to worldwide recognition in the 20th. Even (especially) behind the Iron Curtain things like American blue jeans were widely coveted. Stalin was a big fan of Hollywood movies, especially John Wayne Westerns. Mao had a fondness for Buicks.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Jack D


    . This did not exactly make him cool but rather an interesting novelty to Europeans, like a talking dog.
     
    Now you're being foolish. The French avant-garde worshipped Poe: Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Paul Valéry, etc. To them, he was the beau ideal of the neglected genius.

    It was his fellow Americans who denigrated him. To Emerson, Poe was "the jingle man," and James Russell Lowell said that Poe was " “three-fifths genius and two-fifths sheer fudge.”

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @syonredux
    @Jack D

    Paul Valery on Poe:

    "Let us not fail to observe here that Poe's universal glory is weak or contested only in his native country and England . This Anglo - Saxon poet is strangely neglected by his own race."

    "Poe is the only impeccable writer. He was never mistaken."

    "I prize the theories of Poe, so profound and so insidiously learned."

    , @syonredux
    @Jack D

    "The Tomb of Edgar Poe"
    by Stéphane Mallarmé

    Such as into Himself at last eternity changes him,
    the Poet with a naked sword provokes
    his century appalled to not have known
    death triumphed in that strange voice!

    They, like an upstart hydra hearing the angel once
    purify the meaning of tribal words
    proclaimed out loud the prophecy drunk
    without honour in the tide of some black mixture.

    From soil and hostile cloud, what strife!
    if our idea fails to sculpt a bas-relief
    to ornament the dazzling tomb of Poe,

    calm block fallen down here from an unseen disaster,
    let this granite at least set for all time a limit
    to the black flights of Blasphemy scattered in the future.

  163. @R.G.Camara
    The American West fascinated most of Europe, as it did most of civilized America. The idea of unspoiled wide-open land just aching for someone with the will to make it their own and prosperous was incredibly hypnotic to

    But "cool America" likely didn't happen till WW2. We achieved international dominance and were seen as protecting the world from the Soviets, and, with Germany destroyed, our film industry had no rival (the German film industry had been the second-best to America's since film began, and punched well above its weight), so American films could push American stories as desirable unabated.

    By the time WW2 ended were were the cool big brother. Our little brothers ran to us for protection from bullies, and secretly stole into our room to look at the posters on our walls and listen to our records.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “cool America”

    I enjoy embarrassing my Danish teenage daughter in front of her friends by acting like what I truly am: a cool American. Rock N Roll!!!

  164. @black sea
    @neutral

    The reputation (positive and negative) of Americans abroad is generally as follows:

    oafish and overweight

    loud

    considerate

    ignorant and uncaring about the rest of the world

    honest

    self-confident (deservedly so or not)

    complacent

    good at business

    consumerist (something that every society secretly aspires to become)

    helpful for no obvious reason, just in order to be helpful

    uncultured

    ill-educated

    reckless (with good and bad consequences)

    friendly to everyone, but not inclined to form enduring friendships

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “oafish and overweight”

    Rock N Roll!!!

  165. @Rob McX
    @Joe Stalin

    https://www.wired.com/wp-content/uploads/images_blogs/photos/uncategorized/2007/06/12/iverjohnsonsaferevolverad.jpg

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Dissident

    Thanks for posting this. A creepy grin forms on my face knowing this image of Americana would horrify certain foreigners and white leftists and imperious immigrants. Guns A’ Blazin!!!

  166. @prosa123
    @prime noticer

    Indeed, in the US, British sports culture is on the way out. tennis, boxing, and golf have declined a lot in the US, and only soccer has grown. rugby never took hold due to football.

    I don't see that the declines in those sports in the US have anything to do with a rejection of British culture. Indeed, except for golf and its Scottish roots they're about as American as you can get. Tennis declined because people are too lazy to play, and poor sportsmanship reduces its appeal as a spectator sport. Pay per view and the proliferation of alphabet soup sanctioning bodies killed off boxing. Golf's decline is hard to understand.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @vinny

    Golf is pretty expensive. Not a sport for the downward mobility generations that America has been producing since 2000.

  167. @Joe Stalin
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race


    France, Italy and Greece are still way cooler in aesthetic ways than the U.S. for things that happened
     
    When I look at a movie that is filmed in a French city, and to a lesser extent Western Europe, the first thing I look for is graffiti. The graffiti sure is aesthetic. I once heard a Black man explain to a White on the CTA train that Europe was civilized because they had graffiti everywhere.

    I will gladly accept that Chicago isn't as cool as France because we fight graffiti around the clock.

    https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2019/04/29/graffiti-removal-blasters-streets-and-sanitation/

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Oh man, am I sorry about that, and you in Chicago have lots of reasons for feeling uncool–at least the mayor wouldn’t condone the theft and looting. Graffiti is garbage anywhere, and you’re arrested for it in NYC, so we don’t have nearly as much as we did way back in the 70s. Blacks are always going to like ‘the squalid look’, at least the ordinary ones (I admit to liking quite a number of black musicians, and Ella Fitzgerald sounds white because she was influenced mostly by the white singer Connie Boswell), plus you get arrest for graffiti since Ed Koch, who was good at things like that. Does Chicago arrest for graffiti? I’ve never seen the appeal of the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat–a saw a whole show of his works, and they all look like big canvasses of graffiti. The very worst here was spraying the windows of the subway black so you couldn’t see where you were, and that’s thankfully gone, although I don’t take the subway anymore. If I have to get somewhere, a bus.

    And, of course, at the peak of the early St. George riots, NYT would put a photo of ‘young girl painting a mural’–it was someone’s fucking house, it was private property! They acted as if it were an important creative act! Disgusting!

    I was thinking of the heritage going back so far with France, Italy and Greece, I still think it’s part of what makes them cool, although I think Steve wanted current trends to be the criterion for ‘coolness’. I did watch all the recent movies of my long-time favourite Catherine Deneuve last year, and I didn’t notice any graffiti, but it was probably there and I just didn’t see it.

    I’d put Portland and Seattle as *Most Uncool U.S. cities* right now.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race


    I’ve never seen the appeal of the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat–a saw a whole show of his works, and they all look like big canvasses of graffiti.
     
    Don't insult graffiti.

    This is Basquiat:

    https://www.we-heart.com/upload-images/[email protected]

    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/1e21ebd73c25c533415d95edcbdd85ebcfddccb8/0_377_1914_1148/master/1914.jpg?width=700&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=2821b177310dd44e46d0c45c28cd26fe

    And these are graffiti....

    https://www.tripsavvy.com/thmb/OobryMnCHW_VrvYouHEyqXSh9is=/2048x1366/filters:no_upscale():max_bytes(150000):strip_icc()/southeastemicbelfastmural-5c2a1ae1c9e77c000100f834.jpg

    https://i2-prod.belfastlive.co.uk/incoming/article13489461.ece/ALTERNATES/s615/VW-Jon-Snow.jpg

  168. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/tabletmag/status/1331402223578996737

    Replies: @Anonymous

    It appears he was bought out just months before the election. Someone must have spent a lot of money to neutralize him.

  169. @Bardon Kaldian
    Cool stands for popular cultural influence, not for science, innovation, high-brow culture, military power or anything similar.

    Basically, it makes sense only for the modern world. It would be weird to say that Rome was cool in the 2nd C or Baghdad is the 8th C. And it implies something global. It is Western culture that has become global in past two centuries. Then, it is connected to language; also, with technological innovation that made popular culture available to masses.

    As regards language, French was dominant not only until WW1, but also in the interwar period. True, modern languages of sciences had been three: French, German & English, but English remained the only one after WW2. Never mind that Britain was the biggest Empire, people still, everywhere, learned French, and not English as the second language. English became the no 1 language because of America, and not the British empire.

    Technology (gramophone, early film cameras,...) made wide cultural influences, on unprecedented scale, possible. Not literacy, not even comics, but sound & moving pictures.

    And there, US has started influencing the global world through jazz & Hollywood, and proceeded via TV, Internet & social networks.

    As long as we remain old-fashioned homo sapiens without significant IQ-enhancing genetic engineering (so, no easy & complete learning of 5 languages in a year for most people) & as long as some unimaginable form of entertainment/addiction appears, not constrained to words, sounds & images - US will have remained the coolest country, even after becoming Brazil with nukes with only 30% of Chinese GDP.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I’m sure that ancient Britons circa 100 AD thought it was ‘cool’ to speak Latin, wear togas, worship the emperor, be knowledgeable about Greek/Roman history, culture and politics. Such people would have looked down on their ‘uncool’ fellow countrymen who didn’t care about such things.

  170. @Rob McX
    @Joe Stalin

    https://www.wired.com/wp-content/uploads/images_blogs/photos/uncategorized/2007/06/12/iverjohnsonsaferevolverad.jpg

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Dissident

    DRAGNET,
    .22 Rifle for Christmas (File #21, Dragnet_49-12-22_030_22_Rifle_for_Christmas.mp3 on page at URL in first link )

    [MORE]
    This is the original radio version*, originally aired December 22, 1949. It was re-broadcast many times subsequently.

    *DRAGNET began on radio in 1949. The television version began in 1951. From the OTRRArchive (Old Time Radio Researchers Group) DRAGNET page at Archive.org that I have linked-to:

    Due in part to Webb’s fondness for radio drama, Dragnet persisted on radio until 1957, as one of the last old time radio shows to give way to television’s increasing popularity. In fact, the TV show would prove to be effectively a visual version of the radio show, as the style was virtually the same. The TV show could be listened to, without watching it, with no loss of understanding of the storyline.

    The entire OTRR Certified Set of Dragnet can be found compressed into a total of 11 .zip files on this page.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
  171. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad


    They’ll still be hampered by their jing-sing-ping language.
     
    There's nothing wrong with the language - all humans understand their native language equally well. It might all sound like jing-sing-ping to you but they understand it perfectly well.

    The writing system is different than the Western alphabetic system. It has both advantages and disadvantages but it is completely workable once you have put in the hard work to memorize enough characters. The widespread availability of cell phones and computers has lessened the disadvantages and maybe even created a best of both worlds situation - most input is done alphabetically in pinyin and then the machine converts the pinyin to characters which are more compact.

    If you look at the length of messages in a multi-lingual product insert (3.000 years from now, our Rosetta Stone will be a set of Ikea instructions for putting together a coffee table) you'll see that the French instructions are the most verbose (because you have to keep saying "de la" this and "du" that so that 1 or 2 word expressions in English become 3 or 4 words in French). Eyeglasses become "les lunettes de vue". And Chinese instructions are the shortest. Hippopotamus becomes 河马 ("river horse").

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    There’s nothing wrong with the language – all humans understand their native language equally well.

    Jack, my point isn’t that there’s some sort of problem with Chinese for the Chinese, just that it’s less tractable, appealing for others. Not everything in the world is “equal”.

    — English had the advantage not only of the British Empire, but that half the world’s people–and more of its geography–speak an Indo-European language. English has some spelling/pronunciation “gottchas” from its invasion driven composite character and the vowel shift. But it’s still quite tractable for other Indo-European language speakers.

    — Chinese is tonal. I can learn some word … then the Chinese still think i’m saying it wrong.

    — An alphabetic language is much easier for someone to learn–period and especially as a 2nd language. And of course easier for people who already speak a language with an alphabet–most people.

    — Chinese characters are a primitive, sub-optimal system. (Lame, kind of like Roman numerals.) And basically a huge unnecessary time sink for 2nd language learners.

    ~~~

    I really do expect the Chinese to climb to some sort of world “pre-eminence”, basically because minoritarianisn-immigrationism is killing the West. That’s depressing enough.

    However, i don’t really expect Chinese to become the dominant world language. Both because a lot of other people will resist Chinese hegemony, and because it has the deficiencies i noted above.

    (Unless the Chinese at some point engineer a super-germ to kill all the non-Chinese … not outside the realm of possibility.)

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
  172. @Jack D
    @syonredux

    Poe stands large because he was the first American author who actually tried (with mixed results) to make a living as a professional writer. His mystery and horror works had more popular than elite appeal - to this day these are popular commercial genres and he practically invented them as part of his efforts to write stuff that people would actually be willing to pay for. This did not exactly make him cool but rather an interesting novelty to Europeans, like a talking dog. Americans weren't supposed to have any literary culture at all.

    Before Welles, Twain was a worldwide hero. But generally, yes, American "coolness" progressed from a rather limited niche appeal in the early part of the 19th century to worldwide recognition in the 20th. Even (especially) behind the Iron Curtain things like American blue jeans were widely coveted. Stalin was a big fan of Hollywood movies, especially John Wayne Westerns. Mao had a fondness for Buicks.

    Replies: @syonredux, @syonredux, @syonredux

    . This did not exactly make him cool but rather an interesting novelty to Europeans, like a talking dog.

    Now you’re being foolish. The French avant-garde worshipped Poe: Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Paul Valéry, etc. To them, he was the beau ideal of the neglected genius.

    It was his fellow Americans who denigrated him. To Emerson, Poe was “the jingle man,” and James Russell Lowell said that Poe was ” “three-fifths genius and two-fifths sheer fudge.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @syonredux


    "...three-fifths genius and two-fifths sheer fudge."

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mAiquX7Gd_E

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvayhZX6Tsg

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  173. American authors who were cool heroes for young men all over the world:

    Jack London

    Ernest Hemingway

  174. @Jack D
    @syonredux

    Poe stands large because he was the first American author who actually tried (with mixed results) to make a living as a professional writer. His mystery and horror works had more popular than elite appeal - to this day these are popular commercial genres and he practically invented them as part of his efforts to write stuff that people would actually be willing to pay for. This did not exactly make him cool but rather an interesting novelty to Europeans, like a talking dog. Americans weren't supposed to have any literary culture at all.

    Before Welles, Twain was a worldwide hero. But generally, yes, American "coolness" progressed from a rather limited niche appeal in the early part of the 19th century to worldwide recognition in the 20th. Even (especially) behind the Iron Curtain things like American blue jeans were widely coveted. Stalin was a big fan of Hollywood movies, especially John Wayne Westerns. Mao had a fondness for Buicks.

    Replies: @syonredux, @syonredux, @syonredux

    Paul Valery on Poe:

    “Let us not fail to observe here that Poe’s universal glory is weak or contested only in his native country and England . This Anglo – Saxon poet is strangely neglected by his own race.”

    “Poe is the only impeccable writer. He was never mistaken.”

    “I prize the theories of Poe, so profound and so insidiously learned.”

  175. @Known Fact
    @onetwothree

    Our car culture was cool from the late 50s to late 60s -- great auto styling, drive-ins, motor hotels and so on. That Cape Canaveral look in decor and architecture. Then came the bloatmobiles, sprawl, smog and high gas prices, along with killjoy environmentalism.

    Replies: @Marty

    Detroit’s cars were ugly until ‘64.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Marty


    Detroit’s cars were ugly until ‘64.
     
    Tail fins were awesome.
    , @Known Fact
    @Marty

    Mid-60s were the best, but my dad's 59 Buick was so cool LA Guns drove one around in their One More Reason vid! Some of those late-50s boats with the tailfins and huge chrome bullets up front were cool too -- my 3rd grade teacher, a polite, petite young lady, had one of the most awesome battlecruisers ever.

  176. @syonredux
    @Jack D


    . This did not exactly make him cool but rather an interesting novelty to Europeans, like a talking dog.
     
    Now you're being foolish. The French avant-garde worshipped Poe: Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Paul Valéry, etc. To them, he was the beau ideal of the neglected genius.

    It was his fellow Americans who denigrated him. To Emerson, Poe was "the jingle man," and James Russell Lowell said that Poe was " “three-fifths genius and two-fifths sheer fudge.”

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    “…three-fifths genius and two-fifths sheer fudge.”

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://twitter.com/NPR/status/1336452335774691329

  177. @dfordoom
    @JohnnyWalker123


    5. France – Traditionally a very cool country, but seems to have gone quiet in recent decades. Why?
     
    French cool was very elitist. The French working class has never been considered cool. It was French intellectuals and artists who were cool. But in the age of Kardashian Worship French cool is too upmarket.

    The British cool of the 60s was much more proletarian. That made it very fashionable at the time. British pop culture/celebrity culture today is just trashy rather than proletarian. But these days trashy is popular.

    Maybe that's China's problem? They don't produce enough trash culture. Hong Kong had a certain amount of cool in the 70s with kung fu movies (which were trashy but excellent). China doesn't seem to have been able to replicate that pop culture formula. Maybe China has a society that is too successful and functional. Maybe you need a certain degree of dysfunction to produce really successful cool culture.

    Replies: @syonredux

    French pop culture (Dumas, Jules Verne, etc) was very popular in the 19th century.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @syonredux

    It still is. Only Eugene Sue vanished.

  178. @Steve Sailer
    @Almost Missouri

    Iceland has gotten much cooler over the decades even though practically nobody lives there.

    Replies: @black sea, @dfordoom

    Iceland has gotten much cooler over the decades even though practically nobody lives there.

    Maybe it’s cooler because practically nobody lives there. And practically nobody goes there. It’s one of the few places left that still sounds genuinely remote and exotic. We can still have fantasies of what a strange and fascinating place it must be because most of us will never have our illusions shattered by actually visiting the place.

    I like to imagine that Icelanders live on a diet of weird dishes consisting of seal blubber and herrings. But they probably mostly eat at McDonalds. And I like to think Icelandic women are kinda like Valkyries, but sexy Valkyries. And that they still recite sagas and stuff, and still reminisce about being Vikings.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @dfordoom

    Iceland is a paradise for world wankers united.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1ScHDSB4xA

  179. @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills
    @Jack D

    In that case the Pacific Northwest (Portland/Seattle/Vancouver) is the coolest “nation” in the world. Has led the charge in terms of drug legalization in the Anglo world, SJWism, fashion (the lumberjack look that’s been the default for men in the last decade). It’s also the whitest group of cities in the world in an English speaking country.

    Replies: @fnn

    Portland is the capital of Antifa, and Antifa doesn’t seem that cool.

    • Replies: @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills
    @fnn

    So why did millions of young people go out and march for BLM?

  180. @Jack D
    @syonredux

    Poe stands large because he was the first American author who actually tried (with mixed results) to make a living as a professional writer. His mystery and horror works had more popular than elite appeal - to this day these are popular commercial genres and he practically invented them as part of his efforts to write stuff that people would actually be willing to pay for. This did not exactly make him cool but rather an interesting novelty to Europeans, like a talking dog. Americans weren't supposed to have any literary culture at all.

    Before Welles, Twain was a worldwide hero. But generally, yes, American "coolness" progressed from a rather limited niche appeal in the early part of the 19th century to worldwide recognition in the 20th. Even (especially) behind the Iron Curtain things like American blue jeans were widely coveted. Stalin was a big fan of Hollywood movies, especially John Wayne Westerns. Mao had a fondness for Buicks.

    Replies: @syonredux, @syonredux, @syonredux

    “The Tomb of Edgar Poe”
    by Stéphane Mallarmé

    Such as into Himself at last eternity changes him,
    the Poet with a naked sword provokes
    his century appalled to not have known
    death triumphed in that strange voice!

    They, like an upstart hydra hearing the angel once
    purify the meaning of tribal words
    proclaimed out loud the prophecy drunk
    without honour in the tide of some black mixture.

    From soil and hostile cloud, what strife!
    if our idea fails to sculpt a bas-relief
    to ornament the dazzling tomb of Poe,

    calm block fallen down here from an unseen disaster,
    let this granite at least set for all time a limit
    to the black flights of Blasphemy scattered in the future.

  181. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @Joe Stalin

    Oh man, am I sorry about that, and you in Chicago have lots of reasons for feeling uncool--at least the mayor wouldn't condone the theft and looting. Graffiti is garbage anywhere, and you're arrested for it in NYC, so we don't have nearly as much as we did way back in the 70s. Blacks are always going to like 'the squalid look', at least the ordinary ones (I admit to liking quite a number of black musicians, and Ella Fitzgerald sounds white because she was influenced mostly by the white singer Connie Boswell), plus you get arrest for graffiti since Ed Koch, who was good at things like that. Does Chicago arrest for graffiti? I've never seen the appeal of the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat--a saw a whole show of his works, and they all look like big canvasses of graffiti. The very worst here was spraying the windows of the subway black so you couldn't see where you were, and that's thankfully gone, although I don't take the subway anymore. If I have to get somewhere, a bus.

    And, of course, at the peak of the early St. George riots, NYT would put a photo of 'young girl painting a mural'--it was someone's fucking house, it was private property! They acted as if it were an important creative act! Disgusting!

    I was thinking of the heritage going back so far with France, Italy and Greece, I still think it's part of what makes them cool, although I think Steve wanted current trends to be the criterion for 'coolness'. I did watch all the recent movies of my long-time favourite Catherine Deneuve last year, and I didn't notice any graffiti, but it was probably there and I just didn't see it.

    I'd put Portland and Seattle as *Most Uncool U.S. cities* right now.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    I’ve never seen the appeal of the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat–a saw a whole show of his works, and they all look like big canvasses of graffiti.

    Don’t insult graffiti.

    This is Basquiat:

    And these are graffiti….

  182. @syonredux
    @dfordoom

    French pop culture (Dumas, Jules Verne, etc) was very popular in the 19th century.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    It still is. Only Eugene Sue vanished.

  183. @dfordoom
    @Steve Sailer


    Iceland has gotten much cooler over the decades even though practically nobody lives there.
     
    Maybe it's cooler because practically nobody lives there. And practically nobody goes there. It's one of the few places left that still sounds genuinely remote and exotic. We can still have fantasies of what a strange and fascinating place it must be because most of us will never have our illusions shattered by actually visiting the place.

    I like to imagine that Icelanders live on a diet of weird dishes consisting of seal blubber and herrings. But they probably mostly eat at McDonalds. And I like to think Icelandic women are kinda like Valkyries, but sexy Valkyries. And that they still recite sagas and stuff, and still reminisce about being Vikings.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Iceland is a paradise for world wankers united.

  184. The coolest of the cool:

  185. @Peter D. Bredon
    @PiltdownMan

    The "humanities educated political class" knew how to deal with scientists (I prefer to call them ziontists) like Galileo, etc.

    You don't have to "understand their priestly information sciences tongue" just cut it off. Or control it.

    And btw, I don't see any evidence of "information sciences" types being take charge types anyway; conformists to the core;Kuhn's "normal science" vs paradigm shifts, today's "settled science", tenure tracks, etc.

    The proper attitude to science geeks: "Greece and Rome rose on the backs of unwilling slaves. We shall rise on the backs of willing slaves." Paul Feyerabend (philosopher, decorated Luftwaffe pilot), "Science in a Free Society".

    The problem of course is that our current "humanities educated political class" has been "educated" by our ethnic enemies.

    Replies: @anon

    Paul Feyerabend (philosopher, decorated Luftwaffe pilot)

    Repeating this nonsense is foolish.

    Paul Feyerabend was never in the Luftwaffe.

  186. @Marty
    @Known Fact

    Detroit’s cars were ugly until ‘64.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Known Fact

    Detroit’s cars were ugly until ‘64.

    Tail fins were awesome.

  187. @fnn
    @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

    Portland is the capital of Antifa, and Antifa doesn't seem that cool.

    Replies: @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

    So why did millions of young people go out and march for BLM?

  188. @AnotherDad
    Everyone's in here well before me, but i'll toss over my two:

    1) Capability drives cool.

    What's the absolute coolest thing the US ever did? Landed on the moon. No one ever did that crazy shit before!

    Right now the US is still highly capable. It created the Internet; has the world's driving tech capability; builds the world's best airplanes jet engines. (Seriously the 777X will have the lowest cost seat mile transport cost in history.)

    I think if 50 years from now, the Chinese have world beating technology, build the best airplanes and land some dudes on Mars, their cool factor will skyrocket. They'll still be hampered by their jing-sing-ping language. But if they are the most capable, doing stuff no one else can ... they'll be cool.

    2) Schoolmarms are super uncool.

    Women do not drive "cool". Guys thinking up and doing cool stuff drive cool. Girls can definitely *be* cool, if they are fun and sexy.

    But a bunch of tubby, purple-haired screechers on twitter basically yelling "stay between the lines!" and "think no unapproved thoughts" are just excruciatingly un-cool. Un-coolness personified.

    Americans giving these shews credence in our culture, is driving down our coolness and left unchecked will destroy it and open the door for others to poach our cool crown.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Jack D, @TheJester

    Women do not drive “cool”. Guys thinking up and doing cool stuff drive cool. Girls can definitely *be* cool, if they are fun and sexy.

    Women are “cool” and sexy because of what they ARE. Men are “cool” and sexy because of what they OWN … their Alph Markers. Women perceive that their ability to attract male power and wealth will determine their place and status on the male dominance matrix, the only one that counts in life.

    So, nothing changes in the sociobiological “engine” that ensures the continued existence of the human race … even in the face of feminism, homosexuality, and transgenderism as momentary distractions played out in the lives of the rich and famous for our amusement.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @TheJester

    Men are “cool” and sexy because of what they OWN

    Demonstrably false. Men are cool because of what they ARE too. Having lots of expensive crap doesn't make you cool. Zuckerberg and Gates aren't cool.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @TheJester

    Men are “cool” and sexy because of what they OWN

    Demonstrably false. Men are cool because of what they ARE too. Having lots of expensive crap doesn't make you cool. Zuckerberg and Gates aren't cool.

  189. @Marty
    @Known Fact

    Detroit’s cars were ugly until ‘64.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Known Fact

    Mid-60s were the best, but my dad’s 59 Buick was so cool LA Guns drove one around in their One More Reason vid! Some of those late-50s boats with the tailfins and huge chrome bullets up front were cool too — my 3rd grade teacher, a polite, petite young lady, had one of the most awesome battlecruisers ever.

  190. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Paul Mendez

    From what I know- not. Blacks appeared now & then, but they were marginal (except for fetishist segments of some societies). American figures & themes globally popular, from 1945 on, were: Walt Disney, Frank Sinatra, John Wayne, westerns & gangster movies, Brando, Marilyn Monroe, parts of the cc 60's, JFK, Bob Dylan, blockbusters, legions of minor singers & actors, ....

    The only black many non-Americans knew about was Mohammad Ali. As for actors like Powell, Washington, Freeman,... they lagged very much behind virtually all white movie celebrities. Wilt Chamberlain was someone many have heard about, but actually no one cared for.

    American "icons" & cultural currents most of the world essentially ignored were Elvis, road movies, Beat generation, sports movies, Chevy Chase, Star Trek, superheroes, junk food, Hamburger Christianity (various cults), self-help literature, adoration of entrepreneurs (Steve Jobs etc.), restaurant eating culture, stand-up comedy, ...

    For instance, Wakanda was basically ignored.

    Replies: @Ian Smith, @black sea

    I’d disagree about ‘Trek:

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Ian Smith

    Turist Ömer sounds suspiciously like Borat. I wonder if Sasha Baron-Cohen was a fan.

  191. @Ian Smith
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I’d disagree about ‘Trek:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6aEYd-U0pk

    Replies: @black sea

    Turist Ömer sounds suspiciously like Borat. I wonder if Sasha Baron-Cohen was a fan.

  192. @Bardon Kaldian
    @Paul Mendez

    From what I know- not. Blacks appeared now & then, but they were marginal (except for fetishist segments of some societies). American figures & themes globally popular, from 1945 on, were: Walt Disney, Frank Sinatra, John Wayne, westerns & gangster movies, Brando, Marilyn Monroe, parts of the cc 60's, JFK, Bob Dylan, blockbusters, legions of minor singers & actors, ....

    The only black many non-Americans knew about was Mohammad Ali. As for actors like Powell, Washington, Freeman,... they lagged very much behind virtually all white movie celebrities. Wilt Chamberlain was someone many have heard about, but actually no one cared for.

    American "icons" & cultural currents most of the world essentially ignored were Elvis, road movies, Beat generation, sports movies, Chevy Chase, Star Trek, superheroes, junk food, Hamburger Christianity (various cults), self-help literature, adoration of entrepreneurs (Steve Jobs etc.), restaurant eating culture, stand-up comedy, ...

    For instance, Wakanda was basically ignored.

    Replies: @Ian Smith, @black sea

    Elvis had a worldwide following even during his attenuated lifetime. The first Elvis Presley fan club in the UK was founded in 1957.

    I don’t know what kind of global celebrity status Steve Jobs enjoyed during his lifetime, if any, but much of the world has now elevated him to the status of visionary/entrepreneur/genius/guru. His name is recognized and mostly revered among the educated class worldwide.

    From what I’ve read, Jobs wasn’t nearly so cool as people make him out to be — and was in fact a fairly nasty fellow in many ways — but his products were mostly loved, he did interview very well, and by the standards of Silicon Valley geekdom he looked like a leading man.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @black sea

    Beware of people with a Jobs clothes fetish. Elizabeth Holmes wore the same kind of pullover, as if she'd thereby absorb some of its Apple juju. The same goes for Markus Braun, when he was CEO of the (very briefly) multibillion dollar company Wirecard. He has since been arrested.

    https://www.ft.com/__origami/service/image/v2/images/raw/https://d1e00ek4ebabms.cloudfront.net/production/59325827-be4d-447a-a774-268c23f39a09.jpg?source=next&fit=scale-down&quality=highest&width=1440

  193. @black sea
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Elvis had a worldwide following even during his attenuated lifetime. The first Elvis Presley fan club in the UK was founded in 1957.

    I don't know what kind of global celebrity status Steve Jobs enjoyed during his lifetime, if any, but much of the world has now elevated him to the status of visionary/entrepreneur/genius/guru. His name is recognized and mostly revered among the educated class worldwide.

    From what I've read, Jobs wasn't nearly so cool as people make him out to be -- and was in fact a fairly nasty fellow in many ways -- but his products were mostly loved, he did interview very well, and by the standards of Silicon Valley geekdom he looked like a leading man.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Beware of people with a Jobs clothes fetish. Elizabeth Holmes wore the same kind of pullover, as if she’d thereby absorb some of its Apple juju. The same goes for Markus Braun, when he was CEO of the (very briefly) multibillion dollar company Wirecard. He has since been arrested.

    https://www.ft.com/__origami/service/image/v2/images/raw/https://d1e00ek4ebabms.cloudfront.net/production/59325827-be4d-447a-a774-268c23f39a09.jpg?source=next&fit=scale-down&quality=highest&width=1440

  194. @TheJester
    @AnotherDad


    Women do not drive “cool”. Guys thinking up and doing cool stuff drive cool. Girls can definitely *be* cool, if they are fun and sexy.
     
    Women are "cool" and sexy because of what they ARE. Men are "cool" and sexy because of what they OWN ... their Alph Markers. Women perceive that their ability to attract male power and wealth will determine their place and status on the male dominance matrix, the only one that counts in life.

    So, nothing changes in the sociobiological "engine" that ensures the continued existence of the human race ... even in the face of feminism, homosexuality, and transgenderism as momentary distractions played out in the lives of the rich and famous for our amusement.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Harry Baldwin

    Men are “cool” and sexy because of what they OWN

    Demonstrably false. Men are cool because of what they ARE too. Having lots of expensive crap doesn’t make you cool. Zuckerberg and Gates aren’t cool.

  195. @TheJester
    @AnotherDad


    Women do not drive “cool”. Guys thinking up and doing cool stuff drive cool. Girls can definitely *be* cool, if they are fun and sexy.
     
    Women are "cool" and sexy because of what they ARE. Men are "cool" and sexy because of what they OWN ... their Alph Markers. Women perceive that their ability to attract male power and wealth will determine their place and status on the male dominance matrix, the only one that counts in life.

    So, nothing changes in the sociobiological "engine" that ensures the continued existence of the human race ... even in the face of feminism, homosexuality, and transgenderism as momentary distractions played out in the lives of the rich and famous for our amusement.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Harry Baldwin

    Men are “cool” and sexy because of what they OWN

    Demonstrably false. Men are cool because of what they ARE too. Having lots of expensive crap doesn’t make you cool. Zuckerberg and Gates aren’t cool.

  196. @Reg Cæsar
    @syonredux


    "...three-fifths genius and two-fifths sheer fudge."

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mAiquX7Gd_E

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvayhZX6Tsg

    Replies: @MEH 0910

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