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From The Guardian:

Cambridge gives role to academic accused of racist stereotyping

University professors among hundreds who object to award of research job to Noah Carl

Richard Adams Education editor

Fri 7 Dec 2018

University of Cambridge professors and academics from around the world have criticised the appointment of a social scientist whose work they say has stoked “racist, xenophobic, fascist and anti-immigration rhetoric”.

A letter protesting about the appointment of Noah Carl to a prestigious research fellowship at St Edmund’s College claims that Carl’s work focuses on “academically discredited lines of inquiry” involving race and genetics.

“A careful consideration of Carl’s published work and public stance on various issues, particularly on the relationship between race and ‘genetic intelligence’, leads us to the unambiguous conclusion that his research is ethically suspect and methodologically flawed,” states the letter, which is signed by seven Cambridge professors and more than 700 other academics.

The group calls on St Edmund’s College and Cambridge to condemn “any association with research that seeks to establish correlations between race, genes, intelligence and criminality”.

… Mouhot said Carl’s writings included associations between cousin-marriage and electoral fraud within Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in Britain.

“The conceptual premise of such work is so obviously ethically suspect, and the ensuing methods so flawed, that it begs the question how such weak scholarship – which doesn’t meet scientific standards – was ever considered for such a prestigious and competitive fellowship,” Mouhot said.

Excellent use of “begs the question,” Professor Mouhot.

Here’s the abstract of Noah Carl’s paper:

Ethnicity and electoral fraud in Britain

Article in Electoral Studies 50 · September 2017

Noah Carl

Abstract
Several reports have highlighted that, within Britain, allegations of electoral fraud tend to be more common in areas with large Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities. However, the extent of this association has not yet been quantified. Using data at the local authority level, this paper shows that percentage Pakistani and Bangladeshi (logged) is a robust predictor of two measures of electoral fraud allegations: one based on designations by the Electoral Commission, and one based on police enquiries. Indeed, the association persists after controlling for other minority shares, demographic characteristics, socio-economic deprivation, and anti-immigration attitudes. I interpret this finding with reference to the growing literature on consanguinity (cousin marriage) and corruption. Rates of cousin marriage tend to be high in countries such as Pakistan and Bangladesh, which may have fostered norms of nepotism and in-group favoritism that persist over time. To bolster my interpretation, I use individual level survey data to show that, within Europe, migrants from countries with high rates of cousin marriage are more likely to say that family should be one’s main priority in life, and are less likely to say it is wrong for a public official to request a bribe.

Here’s my 2003 article in The American Conservative on the socio-political side effects of a culture of cousin marriage, such as increased clannishness.

And here’s a recent Guardian article on ethnic tensions in Rotherham between Pakistanis and Gypsies:

They [male Pakistani Rotherhamites] refused to see the hijab incident as an isolated scrap between teenage girls. “This is not just a school issue… This is ready to blow up. Bang,” warned one man. “We’ve lived here 35, 40 years and you expect us to sit silently,” said another, claiming that he had 60 cousins ready to provide back-up for what he said could be “a riot like you’ve never seen before in your life”

 
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  1. Twinkie says:

    There used be an appropriate response to something like this. It was called getting your own research that contradicted the conclusion in your opponent’s research peer-reviewed and published.

    I use individual level survey data to show that, within Europe, migrants from countries with high rates of cousin marriage are more likely to say that family should be one’s main priority in life, and are less likely to say it is wrong for a public official to request a bribe.

    I see his real crime. He used the words of the community members themselves to reach a conclusion that was at odds with the tolerated view.

  2. From Wikipedia:

    Clément Mouhot (French: [muo]; born 19 August 1978) is a French mathematician and academic. He is Professor of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Cambridge, and a fellow of King’s College, Cambridge. His research is primarily in partial differential equations and mathematical physics (statistical mechanics, Boltzmann equation, Vlasov equation).

    Supremely well qualified to judge HBD research, then.

    • Replies: @JackOH
    , @Venator
    , @Anon
    , @Bill
  3. Anon[233] • Disclaimer says:

    A letter protesting about the appointment of Noah Carl to a prestigious research fellowship at St Edmund’s College claims that Carl’s work focuses on “academically discredited lines of inquiry” involving race and genetics.

    It seems social science works backwards.

    Instead of gathering and analyzing facts to reach conclusions, it already has a set of mandatory conclusions that must be confirmed by any new research.

    Does science work like this? “We have the Correct Answers already, and your job is merely to validate them.” What’s the point of such science? It’s like saying “We know the sun revolves around the earth, so you better use your calculations to prove what we know already.”

    So, it’s not a matter of scientific invalidation but ethical disapproval on ideological grounds.

    Certain observations are wrong no matter what the evidence because they are ‘racist’, ‘fascist’, and ‘xenophobic’, none of which are scientific terms.

    It’s like saying it’s been ‘discredited’ that men are stronger and more aggressive than women because it is ‘sexist’. Discredited by science or by ideology?

    In reality, objective race-ism beats subjective ‘anti-racism'(or subective ‘racism’ for that matter).
    Reality is what it is regardless of subjective dogmas. Ideologies are subjective.

    The fact that 700 academics signed it proves that social science should be called a social silence, a kind of cult. And most precious academics are more about status and approval than courage and integrity.

    Furthermore, even if a scientist is a ‘bigot’, he can be truthful. If a Jewish scientist arrogantly looks down on Gypsies as dumber than Jews, he may be a Jewish supremacist. But it still doesn’t invalidate his argument of higher IQ among Jews.

    Or suppose a black scientist is a black supremacist who says blacks can run faster. He may be an arrogant jerk, but it still doesn’t disprove his views as untrue.

  4. Richard S says:

    As far as I’m aware there are two related issues with electoral fraud in England. Firstly there is the actual practice of manipulating “postal votes” and secondly, and more insidiously,a lot of these family units are composed of UK-born males of Pakistani origin and their enslaved non-English-speaking immigrant wives who .. how to say this .. are not necessarily conversant with English democratic traditions.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-32428648

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/aug/12/report-stringent-id-checks-cordons-electoral-fraud-pickles

  5. The authoritarian and corrupt import as many voters as they can from authoritarian and corrupt shitholes so they can rule supreme. They don’t take opposition lightly.

  6. JackOH says:
    @Simon Tugmutton

    “Ph. D. creep” (as in Vietnam “mission creep”), Simon.

    I see the phenomenon among professors at my local less-selective American state university. Professors offering opinions about subjects that are clearly outside their area of expertise, and, who, nonetheless, insist they and their oafish thoughts be shown the same deference as they expect of their students in the classroom. I’d like to think a strong president and strong provost would check this sort of mischief, but they don’t.

  7. Richard S says:
    @Anon

    Indeed. As the walls of this whole rotten structure come tumbling down, these commissars of the failed god of late 20th century liberalism are growing more frantic.

    The rapidity of the evolution from:

    *the Academy insists on freedom of speech and discussion of controversial ideas*

    to *students have a right to “no-platform” speakers whose opinions they don’t like*

    to *university professors must demand a fellow-academic lose his livelihood because badthinkers might draw conclusions we don’t like*

    in only the past decade or two is headspinning.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    , @Samuel Skinner
  8. It would be interesting to lay out the differences between “Academically Discredited” and “Scientifically Discredited,” not to mention “Scientific Methodology” and the “Scientific Method.”

    Is the hypothesis falsifiable? Can the esteemed scientists show places where cousin marriage doesn’t yield similar problems?

  9. @JackOH

    From the study: “Using data at the local authority level, this paper shows that percentage Pakistani and Bangladeshi (logged) is a robust predictor of two measures of electoral fraud allegations: one based on designations by the Electoral Commission, and one based on police enquiries. Indeed, the association persists after controlling for other minority shares, demographic characteristics, socio-economic deprivation, and anti-immigration attitudes.”

    This argument is statistical, afaik of modest sophistication. Any math PhD should be well equipped to asses its merit and rigor–provided he’s willing to dig in any smart person can have a pretty educated guess here. Prof Mouhot is an asshole, mushy-brained, mushy-hearted, corrupt, a preening virtue-signalling narcissist, or a ruthless lefty ideologue, that’s what it is. Occam’s razor is our friend.

    > Professors offering opinions about subjects that are clearly outside their area of expertise
    That’s a problem, indeed, but then again, the rule of the technocrats and experts isn’t democratic. They get to impart their wisdom, we, the citizens, get to make head or tails of it. Then we get to vote, be it on the economy, financing and pros and cons of nuclear research, particle physics, or anything–it’s our money. As goes for hbd and/or immigration I care much more about my high school history and common sense than any social, ugh, science, or any-I’m just willing to listen. Then, when it walks like bull, smells like bull, looks and talks like bull I say it’s bull. It’s both depressing and joyful to tear modren academics a new one, that goes for first tier PhDs, too. They’re smarter than their colleagues from Podunkville but their corruption makes their arguments dumb, really clever bastards are rare.

  10. sean42 says:

    Once you internalize the fact that sex is for pleasure, how can you not eventually lead to the conclusion that bestiality and incest is acceptable, if the primary purpose of sex is pleasure? I mean you can say that sex as pleasure is only acceptable among certain classes of people, for example only among people of the same race AND opposite sexes but that is not how Western reasoning has worked since 1945, the dues vult argument can work equally as well, but the West had secularized since the 60s. And Western society has also since 1965 or so, given up on the idea that society of culture has the inherent right to enforce confirmity and discourage freaks and freakish behavior, and to encourage those who have a tendency towards freakish behavior to conform to what is right, or taking the very least to keep their deviant behavior behind closed doors. The biggest reason why Western culture has increasingly become trashy since the 60s is the libertarians legitimizing deviant behavior in the name of tolerance and freedom with who am I to judge, with the progressives getting on the act much later or, after the libertarians have eliminated the societal standards through their atomization of society. Basically nobody in the West born after 1945 has any idea what conservatism is all about, and in a sense conservatives are just liberals on a 20 year time delay.

  11. ic1000 says:

    Prof. Mouhot doesn’t go far enough. HBD Chick seems to have escaped his notice — perhaps the Eye of Sauron isn’t as all-seeing as was the case in Middle Earth. I hope he can ruin her life for her academically discredited lines of inquiry about the Hajnal Line. And I urge the professor and his fellow petitioners to make the short drive to John Hajnal’s grave, dig up his bones, then carry them back to Cambridge to be thrown out of Mouhot’s office window. When defense of the academic consensus is at stake, a symbolic defenestration is better than no defenestration at all.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  12. Where does incest come into this? Noah Carl’s paper, 128 pages long, does not contain any reference to incest. He seems merely to making the obvious point that unassimilated Pakistanis in Britain do not consider it electoral fraud to favor their fellow Pakistanis. A bit of a shocker for white Brits raised on the rule of fair play. Paper full of graphs and regression equations to make it “scientific.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @dfordoom
  13. songbird says:

    Muslims seem to have an odd attachment to cousin marriage.

    Interesting question is whether that was true of the MENA region before Islam or not. Many of the early figures in Islam, I believe Muhammad himself, married at least one cousin. Were they just engaging in an old-age custom there, or were their actions revolutionary, and then codified as a tradition?

    Of course, maybe another reason would be that many of their parents are cousins, so it is like you are insulting their family when you bring it up. I don’t think many of them understand the problems it causes with genetic load. Their understanding, when they have it, seems to be about well-known recessive disorders, which for instance, Saudi Arabia tests for, before marriage.

    BTW, I think the leaders of those countries would quickly be deposed if they tried to ban marriage between first cousins.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  14. [1] The group calls on St Edmund’s College and Cambridge to condemn “any association with research that seeks to establish correlations between race, genes, intelligence and criminality”.
    So this condemnation extends to any research that seeks to establish that the correlation between race and criminality is zero.

    [2] The research does not seeks to determine the association between subcontinental Muslims (“Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities”) and electoral fraud, but between subcontinental Muslims and *allegations* of electoral fraud. Why? Because counting allegations is easier than counting actual cases of electoral fraud?

  15. jim jones says:

    My Malaysian students get to vote in UK elections even though they pay no tax, their Imam tells them which way to vote.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  16. What are the odds Professor Mouhot read Carl’s article?

  17. Mohout feels ashamed that his people’s premodern behavior is being exposed to civil society.

  18. Anonymous[376] • Disclaimer says:

    ‘In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act’.

  19. The conceptual premise of such work is so obviously ethically suspect

    As a long-time student of legal rhetoric, I’m always suspicious when something is called “obviously … suspect.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
  20. anon[346] • Disclaimer says:

    Another reason why this will be China’s century.

  21. Corvinus says:

    You know, maybe Carl is right. Pakis and Banglis are notorious for their ethnic penchant for political fraud. Of course, there are other ethnic groups who by their very nature are also inclined to commit similar acts.

    From now on, we MUST consult with this scientifically proven racial hierarchy chart first created by Europeans. There ought be no complaints since it is entirely accurate. We must ALL recognize our station in life.

    Top–Aryan-Nordic (Germans)
    Next Tier–Non Aryan-Nordic (British, French, Norwegian)
    Next Tier–Non-Nordic Caucasian (Italian, Greek, Poles)
    Next Tier–Persians, Chinese, Japanese
    Next Tier–Africans, Latinos, Slavic Peoples
    Next Tier–Aboriginals

    Now, of course, there will be a number of fine posters who will protest over this well-established fact. I suppose to make them feel better about themselves they may feel free to use this hierarchy.

    Top–Wealthy WASPs
    Next Tier–Middle Class WASPs
    Next Tier–Poor WASPs
    Next Tier–“Old Immigrants” (but not Irish)
    Next Tier–Irish
    Next Tier–“New Immigrants”
    Next Tier–Asians, Latin Americans, Native Americans
    Next Tier–African Americans

    Sooner or later, however, we White People simply need to understand where we naturally fit. Paternalism! That’s it! This concepts means assuming a superior position and treating your subordinates like children. We White People aspire to sit among the great nations who arbitrate the fate of ‘lesser breeds”.

    The hell with “We are all made in the image of God (Genesis 1:27)”. Since when does religion even have to do with race realism anyways!

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
  22. El Dato says:

    a social scientist whose work they say has stoked “racist, xenophobic, fascist and anti-immigration rhetoric”.

    Not to mention alien abductionist rhetoric. Is there any independent proof that this guy’s work has “stoked rhetoric” expect the one of the suspiciously suave Guardian kind?

    Mouhot said.

    It could be that Professor Mouhot’s Feelz and Disquiet are not entirely based on rational thought nor are universally shared.

    Nita Sanghera, the vice-president of the University and College Union, which represents many university staff, said the union condemned “any individual or organisation that perpetuates the pseudoscientific myth of a genetic hierarchy”.

    Okay. But we were talking about this paper?

    She said: “I was extremely concerned to see that St Edmund’s College has appointed someone to a research position, despite his appearance at the discredited London Conference on Intelligence, and urge both the college and the university to act on the calls of the signatories to the letter.”

    Oh, he “appeared at the discreted conference” (you know, THAT one, described by the Guardian as having “notorious speakers including white supremacists” and “including contributions from a researcher who has previously advocated child rape”; you know how that is!). Yep, clearly some conferences shall not be attended no matter what.

    Obey the Mob!!

  23. dearieme says:

    It used to be assumed that the only sizeable election fraud in British general elections happened in constituencies with large Irish populations. The Irish seemed to be rather proud of their abilities in this regard.

    By contrast elections for trade union office had lots of fraud, often commies vs Roman Catholics – many of whom would be Irish of course. It seems somehow fairer if two sides are “at it”. Maybe the Republicans in the US should make a bigger effort.

    Anyway, back to Britain. Tony Blair’s government encouraged and allowed massive moslem immigration, and changed the voting laws, with the express intention of inviting election fraud in support of the Labour Party. This was clearly based on racist assumptions about Pakistanis and Bangladeshis; nobody made the slightest fuss about this racism at the time – or since. It’s also worth noting that having done all this Blair then launched aggressive wars against moslem countries – but then he is a bear of little brain.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  24. @theo the kraut

    We should attack the idea of Chevron deference in order to combat this.

  25. El Dato says:
    @ic1000

    Prof Mouhot is certainly pretty gud but he’s apparently one of the Smurf People.

  26. @JackOH

    They check it fine when they disagree with it. They would check it otherwise but they’re blind to the damage it does. It’s just chalked up to conservative anti-intellectualism.

  27. Venator says:
    @Simon Tugmutton

    Interesting. You wouldn’t assume mathematicians to be on the forefront of the PC-brigades. Anyone in deep cover in the ivory tower care to report?

  28. anon[363] • Disclaimer says:
    @Richard S

    It’s done quite openly, see: https://www.politico.eu/article/galloway-bradford-elections-uk-ge2015/ (Ctrl-F “Ron McKay”.)

    Kind of explains the other reason that Bradford’s famous, and why the local pols got reelected.

  29. Commenter NigerianNationalist deserves credit for both bringing to our attention that Noah Carl is being hounded out, and for pointing out that Noah Carl has posted on unz.com, albeit infrequently.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/max-boot-is-dispirited-over-being-called-a-cockwomble-blames-russians/#comment-2688072

    Very OT, but this guy: http://www.unz.com/comments/all/?commenterfilter=Noah+Carl is about to be hounded off his post-doc: https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2018/12/the-scandalous-shaming-of-noah-carl/

    If you guys care or anything.

  30. @Anon

    As is often the case with the the running dogs of Capitalist/Imperialist exploitation ,you are hung up on an outdated definition of “truth” as bourgeois truth I.e. correspondence with reality. What is really significant is revolutionary truth, I.e. that which serves the revolution

  31. Lurker says:
    @Richard S

    And a third – more fundamental issue – they shouldn’t be here at all.

    • Replies: @Richard S
  32. @Anon

    Well, women ARE more passive-aggressive, so the total aggressiveness is equal between the sexes.

  33. Ibound1 says:

    The SJWs give away the game

    The group calls on St Edmund’s College and Cambridge to condemn “any association with research that seeks to establish correlations between race, genes, intelligence and criminality”.

    They don’t care if the research is rigorous, leads to
    a valid conclusion. They don’t care about the methodology at all. They don’t want the research done – period.

    And naturally they use the word “correlation”

    And we all know why. Because deep inside it is they who believe and fear there is a causation.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  34. Bleuteaux says:

    There’s a game I like to play with these kinds of articles. Steve points out that NYT articles are written backwards.

    But these Salem witch trial hysteria type of articles are always written so that it takes you 5-10 or more paragraphs until they actually post what the accused person is supposed to have done.

    In this case, the first paragraph with an actual meaningful description of a specific act is paragraph 12.

    Mouhot said Carl’s writings included associations between cousin-marriage and electoral fraud within Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in Britain.

    That’s an actual description of something he specifically did. Before that, it’s 11 paragraphs of wailing and gnashing of the teeth.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  35. @Richard S

    For all the celebration in the UK of the centenary of votes for women, one aspect of the the abuse of postal voting is that many Muslim women are disenfranchised by their husbands. Needless to say, feminists and other SJWs really don’t give a s**t.

    The problems with electoral fraud in the UK’s Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities are well known and have been widely reported. What is slightly remarkable is that an academic has attempted to analyse the phenomenon using statistical and social-science methods. Good for him – but his colleagues will make him pay for his blasphemy.

    • Replies: @dearieme
  36. Anon[724] • Disclaimer says:
    @Simon Tugmutton

    Not that I agree with him, but all scientists (and even Masters level science graduates) are trained to critique all research. They can do this assuming that they have the topical vocab for any specific field, and can sometimes even do it when they don’t. They can do this because the process for critiquing all research is the same. Though if the average Trump voter can understand HBD, then so does he.

    That being said, any actual critique of his seems to be non-existent and that which he is ostensibly referencing is fatally flawed.

  37. @theo the kraut

    This argument is statistical, afaik of modest sophistication. Any math PhD should be well equipped to asses its merit and rigor–provided he’s willing to dig in any smart person can have a pretty educated guess here.

    Definitely not true. Unless they have learned enough statistics to have some decent intuition, STEM PhD’s are not much better at that game than the average smart person and often bring less common sense and relevant experience to the game.

    The worst, almost without exception, are (former, i.e., skill lapsed) theoretical physicists, because they are overconfident in thought-experiments and plausibility arguments as ways of “thinking out reality”, substitute intuitive math shortcuts for fully correct math, and are not used to operating in areas in which they are effectively idiots. There are some Internet famous examples of this arrogant savant-as-dunce phenomenon, who are well known to readers of this blog.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes, Bill
    • Replies: @Dtbb
    , @AndrewR
    , @JimB
    , @Twinkie
  38. Jack D says:
    @Percy Gryce

    I have often said (and it’s not an original observation) that when someone says that something is “obvious” then it’s usually not. If something is truly obvious then it goes without saying.

    Instead he is trying to sneak a rhetorical shortcut past us – instead of giving us evidence that the research is “ethically suspect” (itself a rhetorical trick – either the work is or is not unethical according to the standards of academic research – “suspect” has a real totalitarian ring to it) he just proclaims that it is “obvious” and we are supposed to nod our heads in agreement.

    • Replies: @dearieme
  39. OT, googling for “Emmanuelle Macron” yields 39.000 results, mostly involuntary (Freudian) slips.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=%22Emmanuelle+Macron%22

    Yes, it’s cheap, but you do what you can do.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Anon
  40. Wow, Carl is “racist, xenophobic, fascist and anti-immigration.” That has to be pinnacle that all right wingers hope to scale. Probably kicks puppies too.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
    , @SMK
  41. Mr. Anon says:

    University professors among hundreds who object to award of research job to Noah Carl

    Richard Adams Education editor

    ……………………………………..

    A letter protesting about the appointment of Noah Carl to a prestigious research fellowship at St Edmund’s College claims that Carl’s work focuses on “academically discredited lines of inquiry” involving race and genetics.

    One would think that the “Education Editor” would know better than to lard his writing with needless prepositions. The clumsy “A letter protesting about the appointment of…..” should be “A letter protesting the appointment of……”

  42. Mr. Anon says:

    “A careful consideration of Carl’s published work and public stance on various issues, particularly on the relationship between race and ‘genetic intelligence’, leads us to the unambiguous conclusion that his research is ethically suspect and methodologically flawed,” states the letter, which is signed by seven Cambridge professors and more than 700 other academics.

    A careful consideration of the results – results we do not like – indicates to us that the method must be flawed. We don’t know how, but it’s got to be wrong somehow.

    I wonder what the affiliations of those “more than 700 academics” are. A lot of people who likely know nothing about genetics?

  43. @Anon

    The purpose of “Science” was always the naked accumulation of power. As that shifted from the articulation of and control over matter to institutional methods of control, the unexamined implication of “whatever works to increase power for Science” percolated out into whatever mass falsehoods could mulct the Plebs good and proper. Science is working out the implications of its maniacal beginnings.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  44. dearieme says:
    @Jack D

    My favourite university lecturer would say that something was “obvious” and then elaborate that it was obvious in the university sense of the word. If you gave it hours of thought, accompanied by coffee and ice-packs, you would eventually see that it must indeed be true.

  45. @Anon

    It’s the way that a theocracy works, and we most certainly live in a theocracy. All of our leaders (well, the stupid goyim and even a decent number of the choosen peple) adhere to the Cult of Equality.

    The question isn’t whether this type of behavior will continue. It will. The question is what can we do about.

    • Replies: @Anon
  46. Dtbb says:
    @academic gossip

    Remember the “Monty Hall Problem” and all the Phd’s who couldn’t understand it?

  47. For over forty years we have been titillated with tales of ‘diversity’. That there are inherent, substantive differences based on demographics. Yet our scholastic institutions, who are quick to genuflect at the alter of ‘diversity’, show no interest in finding actual differences, qualitative or quantitative, amongst demographic groups.

    Perhaps it’s the fear of unearthing distinctions less than flattering. If anyone discovers any un-PC aspirations, the charge of ‘racial stereotyping’ will surely follow. The ‘diversity’ proposition is that there are inherent distinctions between groups, and surely not all inferences will be positive. There is no ‘diversity’ research because the establishment doesn’t want any facts messing up their scam. Even they know that ‘diversity’ is simply a cover for racial and gender quotas that make them look fair to every group.

    If ‘diversity’ were real, by now there would be catalogs full of demographic differences. We could look up skills or aptitudes and find the demographic group that most excels for that trait.

    Supposedly ‘diversity’ provides the substantive differences between demographic groups that is needed in society. But how can we claim that our differences matter if we can’t name any differences at all?

    There is no ‘diversity’ research.

    The ‘diversity’ movement is a civil rights scam.

  48. JimB says:

    A careful consideration of Carl’s published work and public stance on various issues, particularly on the relationship between race and ‘genetic intelligence’, leads us to the unambiguous conclusion that his research is ethically suspect and methodologically flawed,” states the letter, which is signed by seven Cambridge professors and more than 700 other academics.

    Do tell.

  49. Jim Given says:

    Yes, the usage, “begs the question,” has been repurposed by the semi-literate to mean “calls for the question” or “suggests the question.”

    • Replies: @dearieme
    , @Reg Cæsar
  50. ia says:

    Sort of OT.

    Steve (if you haven’t seen this), you’re catching on at the NYPost and ultra-liberal Park Slope:

    https://nypost.com/2018/09/29/nycs-school-diversity-plan-could-lead-to-another-white-flight/

    One Park Slope dad told me he sees the move as a “prelude to breaking up the specialized high schools.” He added that the plan would “put the academically struggling kids in schools where ‘magic dirt’ makes kids smarter.”

  51. AndrewR says:

    Cambridge = clown college

  52. @Buffalo Joe

    Carl’s views and venues are rather based for a British academic of this millenium.

    http://www.varsity.co.uk/news/16685

    In one of his papers, Dr Carl wrote: “It seems plausible that the higher the percentage of Muslims in the population, the greater the share of citizens susceptible to Islamist radicalisation, and therefore the larger the fraction of the population that the security services should need to monitor.”

    Dr Carl is known to have attended, and later publicly defended, the London Conference on Intelligence – a controversial conference on race intelligence

    In another OpenPsych paper, published in 2016, Dr Carl has claimed that “consensual stereotypes” about particular races and nationalities are “generally found to be quite accurate”

    In an article published earlier this year entitled, ‘How Stifling Debate Around Race, Genes, and IQ Can Do Harm’, Dr Carl also defended recent work linking race and IQ in the book, The Bell Curve,

    “Consensual stereotypes are generally found to be quite accurate” is a nice and meme-able truth. A close relative of “correlation correlates with causation”.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  53. J.Ross says: • Website

    I guess they no longer teach the story of Albert Einstein and tbe ninety-nine Aryan physicists.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
  54. When I touched “Unz” and got here I saw this: Academics Denounce Scholar For Criticizing Israel.
    Mind playin’ tricks on me!

  55. Tiny Duck says:

    He wasn’t criticizing incest and you know it. He was badmouthing People of Color
    If he really was against incest he would have mentioned redneck southern whites

  56. Anon[718] • Disclaimer says:

    Acadogma

  57. Anon[718] • Disclaimer says:
    @theo the kraut

    African society: Dysfunctional.

    Lots of life but useless in dealing with ideas and material.

    First World: Dysfertile.

    Not infertile but unable to create an organic life-sustaining community. More about ideas and material than life.

  58. JLK says:

    Suppressing legitimate science for ideological reasons is academic dishonesty, just like plagiarism is. It’s time to start calling it out for what it is.

  59. careful consideration
    unambiguous conclusion
    ethically suspect
    methodologically flawed

    I accuse Mouhot of plagiarising Sir Humphrey Appleby’s guide to undermining anything that violates the Party line.

    No evidence is required.

    Having carefully and dispassionately considered his statements, I have reached the inescapable, unambiguous and irrefutable conclusion that he is ethically – nay, morally – suspect, and that his analytical method is irremediably flawed.

    At a more profound level, he is guilty of wasting consonants – he sports 2 superfluous consonants in his surname alone, and his writing contains them in their thousands.

    À la lanterne!

  60. SMK says: • Website
    @Buffalo Joe

    Honesty and realism, telling the truth and stating the facts and noting the obvious, is “racist, xenophobic, fascist, and anti-immigration rhetoric.” I’m amazed they didn’t say “Nazi.” Genuine science is “pseudo science.” The inverted world of left-liberals.

  61. OT but this is surely in Steve’s bailiwick

    https://www.collective-evolution.com/2018/12/07/the-clintons-resort-to-groupon-due-to-poor-ticket-sales-tour-tickets-now-half-price-or-less/

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2018/12/08/bill-and-hillary-clinton-using-groupon-to-boost-sagging-ticket-sales/

    https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2018/12/is_the_clinton_stadium_tour_going_to_be_cancelled.html

    http://insider.foxnews.com/2018/12/03/mark-steyn-bill-hillary-clinton-show-ten-dollar-show-toronto

    Mark Steyn reacted to news that ticket prices for an evening with Bill and Hillary Clinton last week in Toronto plummeted to about $10 a piece, a far cry from donations that flowed into their foundation over the years.

    Tucker Carlson reported that the theater in Canada was 83 percent empty, and that ticket prices had been listed in the hundreds, but dropped sharply when they didn’t immediately sell well.

    Steyn said the Clintons are a “contrast” to the late President George H.W. Bush, who was lying in state at the Capitol rotunda on a split-screen.

    He called Bush a “model of a dignified political life” and praised the late Republican’s choice to remain largely out of the spotlight during his successors terms.

    The Clintons, Steyn said, were the opposite: “They’re on a perpetual hamster wheel.”

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  62. So if a couple gets married in Pakistan and then gets a divorce in the U.K., are they still first cousins? Reminds me of a joke about an Arkansas couple… Can we make fun of them?

  63. JimB says:
    @academic gossip

    The worst, almost without exception, are (former, i.e., skill lapsed) theoretical physicists, because they are overconfident in thought-experiments and plausibility arguments as ways of “thinking out reality”, substitute intuitive math shortcuts for fully correct math, and are not used to operating in areas in which they are effectively idiots.

    Given that theoretical physicists haven’t been right about anything for the past forty years, I think we’re talking about delusion, not overconfidence.

  64. @PiltdownMan

    No need for credit, my motives aren’t kosher. I just get my dopamine hit from the drama.

  65. It seems like what’s happening in the West right now has parallels with the Cultural Revolution of China. Back in the 60s, Mao claimed that capitalists and other elements of the previous conservative order were trying to reassert control over China, so Mao’s Red Guards began persecuting any suspected “dissident” elements and literally destroyed a fair amount of pre-Communist Chinese culture (books, temples, artifacts, etc). For roughly a decade, the country was in the grips of ideological insanity and routine purges of dissenters.

    Perhaps the only major difference between China and the present-day West is this.

    In Mao’s China, there was a substantial amount of day-to-day turmoil within the country due to the Red Guards harassing, imprisoning, torturing, and being violent with their ideological “enemies.” The entire public had their daily lives disrupted by all the insanity.

    In today’s West, people go about their lives without any real discomfort. Life is pleasant enough, with most people wasting their free time in consumerism, sports, tv, and “social media.” However, every now and again, someone says the “wrong” thing. Then that individual gets fired, economically ruined, blackballed from society, and subject to a 2-minute hate (often through Twitter). So most Westerners, being quite frightened of being ruined by the Govt-Media-SJW complex, sort of just keep quiet, mouth the correct platitudes, and while away their time in frivolity.

    Life is pretty sweet in the modern-day West – as long as you don’t quibble with the shibboleths propagated by our rulers and their SJWs enforcers. Sometimes you can even see some type of career or social advancement if you say the “right” things. In Mao’s China, the Cultural Revolution created difficulty for the entire population. There was no avoiding day-to-day turmoil.

    I suppose one reason for this is because Western business oligarchs don’t want their day-to-day operations disrupted by insanity. As one man said, “the business of America is business.” In China, the Communist govt didn’t care that much about efficiency or production.

    Another reason is that Westerners (especially Americans) believe that they are entitled to have easy and entertaining lives. They won’t tolerate any disruption to their daily diet of sitcoms, ESPN, and Instagram “selfies.” In China, the peasantry was accustomed to difficulty due to centuries of war, famine, and struggle. The Chinese peasantry was much tougher than the average fat, gluttonous Westerner. If Western govts subject their people to the same intensity of discomfort that Mao inflicted on his people, they’d be thrown out of power.

    Steve Sailer referred to what’s happening in the West as the “Nerf Gun” version of the Cultural Revolution. That sounds about right to me.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  66. @Anon

    Exactly.

    Sort of reminds me of modern day climate science. Research that indicates relative climatic insensitivity to carbon dioxide is written off for its supposed “ties” to “big oil,” even though such a connection doesn’t exist. And lots of models are calibrated to produce results that fall within an “anticipated acceptable range.”

    What’s the point of research when you know already know the answers in advance?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  67. @academic gossip

    Academic, Thank you, thoughtful reply.

  68. Hail says: • Website
    @PiltdownMan


    Noah Carl

    Graph by Noah Carl of % of high-skilled [nationality] living in OECD:

    • Replies: @CJ
  69. @YetAnotherAnon

    yet, those reduced tickets are $10 Canadian.

  70. Mouhot said Carl’s writings included associations between cousin-marriage and electoral fraud within Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in Britain.

    Googling “biradari” brings up numerous newspaper articles as well as academic papers, about the cousin-clan based social organization system. That includes several articles in the British press about voting patterns and bloc votes influencing elections in heavily Pakistani muslim constituencies such as Bradford.

    The topic seems to be well remarked upon in public dialogue in the UK.

    Why are Professor Mouhot and the others shocked, shocked?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  71. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    It’s the way that a theocracy works, and we most certainly live in a theocracy.

    Technically, it’s an Ideocracy… which is getting ever closer to Idiocracy.

  72. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Cousins seem to be a endangered or vanishing breed in the West and even more so in East Asia.

    To have a cousin, you need aunts and uncles. But now, so many kids in the modern world are only-child’s. So, if an only-child parent has a kid, there won’t be any cousins.

    But it seems cousins are alive and well among the Pakistanis.

    Modern World chose cuisines over cousins.

    Save the Cousins(but don’t marry them).

    • Replies: @Hail
    , @Kaganovitch
  73. dearieme says:
    @Jim Given

    And the French are so proud that their nippers study philosophy at secondary school.

    “Petitio principii”, eh Prof Mouhot?

    Maybe you stayed at home with a cold in the nose on the day your class covered it? Yes, that’s sure to be it.

    Anyway, why not stick to sums, old boy? You seem to be jolly good at that.

  74. Look on the bright side. Carl can now become the Nate Silver of the UK.

    For some time now I’ve been saying that people here, since they know things about the world that others don’t, should be getting rich.

    Carl, if he wants to, can do exactly that.

    • Replies: @Anonym
  75. @Anon

    I agree, but consider this.

    Back in 2002, the Bush administration and the Republican establishment started claiming that Saddam Hussein was responsible for the September 11th terrorist attacks. Saddam Hussein was accused of being an ally of Al-Qaeda’s Islamic fundamentalists.

    That was always an interesting claim, as Saddam Hussein’s Baath Party was a totally secular political organization. Saddam Hussein was so committed to secularism in Iraq that he actively promoted the welfare of Iraqi Chaldean Christians, even placing a Christian (Tariq Aziz) into the role as Deputy Prime Minister.

    The claim of an Iraq-9/11 link was particularly ridiculous when you consider that none of the 9/11 hijackers were actually Iraqis. They were almost entirely Saudis, with a few from UAE, Egypt, and Lebanon. Interestingly, all of these countries are American allies.

    The Bush administration and their allies then claimed that Iraq was creating “Weapons of Mass Destruction.” These weapons would be given to Al-Qaeda, which would then destroy American cities and turn them into “mushroom clouds.” It was never explained how Iraq, which was nearly bankrupt from the Gulf War and post-war sanctions, was able to afford these weapons programs.
    United Nations weapons inspectors were sent to Iraq to find WMDs, but found no evidence of any active WMD program.

    Despite all that, the public was extremely supportive of declaring a war on Iraq. At one point, support for the war went as high as 80%. Whites were more supportive of the war than Non-Whites, with White Republicans being the most supportive demographic group. I remember one poll in which 90-95% of White Republicans indicated support for the Iraq War.

    I recall a more recent 2015 poll found the public was about evenly divided on whether the Iraq War was a mistake or not. Another poll found that the majority of Republicans believed WMDs were found in Iraq.

    As America was being stampeded into war with Iraq, there were dissenters who spoke up. For example, anti-war activists staged massive protests, but were shouted down as “unpatriotic” and “Communist.” Certain media personalities (like Phil Donahue and Peter Arnett) spoke up, but got fired. A few entertainers came out against the war, but they were denounced as “out-of-touch Hollywood elites.” You would expect Democratic politicians to dissent from the Iraq War on the basis of facts and logic, but a substantial number (especially party leaders) voted to give Bush the authority to go to war.

    Michael Moore’s documentary Farenheit 9/11 touched on a lot of these issues. If you can’t watch the entire film, this trailer is a quick summary of the first Bush term and the mental atmosphere of America at the time.

    So my point is this.

    On here, there exists this view that somehow Whites (especially White Republicans) are “smart” people who are immune from media propaganda. They’re logical thinkers who base their views on facts, evidence, and data. In contrast, non-whites and liberals are “stupid.”

    There also exists this view that the govt/media ruling class is uniformly liberal and never appeals to racism or nativism. So national policy is always to promote Non-White interests, at the expense of Whites. The ruling class is delicately sensitive to Non-White people, often to a comical degree.

    However, in the real world, life doesn’t quite work that way. In the real world, Whites (including White Republicans) are extremely susceptible to govt/media propaganda. Even the most outlandish nonsensical gibberish can easily be sold to them.

    Why? It’s because the overwhelming majority of Whites (including White Republicans) are low-information buffoons. They spend an enormous percent of their free time watching movies and college football. Rarely do most of them read newspapers. Most of them never read any type of non-fiction book to learn anything. They’re empty-headed. Such people can easily be propagandized.

    Very often, the propaganda has a right-wing bent to it.

    According to our govt/media ruling class, we have to blindly “support the troops” no matter what.

    Whenever any NFL game is on tv, there are always shout outs to “the troops.” Our NFL, which is infinitely compassionate, always shows us videos of soldiers saying “hi” to their families and getting thanked by our sports broadcasters.

    If you oppose of any these wars overseas, you’re being hurtful to “the troops.” We must respect the huge “sacrifices” that “the troops” make for us, so that we may live in “freedom.” The NFL, being full of high-minded patriots who truly love America, never forgets “our boys overseas.”

    If a politician or media figure isn’t sufficiently reverent towards “the troops,” his career is over. If you as an employee go into your office and badmouth “the troops,” your boss will probably fire you.

    People here say that the govt bends over backwards for Muslims, but is that really true? If a Muslim gave a speech in which he equated “the troops” with Al-Qaeda terrorists, what would happen to him? Are there are any prominent Muslim figures in America who are critical of our “War on Terror”? It seems like whenever I see a Muslim on tv, he’s denouncing Al-Qaeda and urging support for America. Remember that Paki guy Humayun Khan? The media celebrated him as hero for fighting in Iraq.

    People here say that the govt bends over for Blacks, but what about Reverend Wright? He claimed the 9/11 attacks were in response to American actions overseas. Obama distanced himself from Wright. Why?

    Watch 2:10-2:50

    Why were Reverend Wright’s statements “controversial”? Why didn’t Obama stand by his Rev? Why didn’t “media liberals” support Wright?

    It’s not like these wars overseas don’t have costs. The Iraq War cost $5 trillion, which is about $50,000 in tax dollars for an average American family. Thousands of troops died in Iraq, with hundreds of thousands more injured or subject to permanent brain damage. As for the Iraqis, over 1+ million Iraqi civilians are dead and millions more Iraqi civilians are injured, displaced, widowed, or orphaned. For some reason, “liberal media” never discuss any of these issues on evening tv. “Liberal media” do, however, love thanking “our boys overseas” for “their service.”

    Borat parodied this very well. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amFRTRMBk1A

    When Sacha Baron Cohen went before the crowd of conservative rodeo fans, he said this.

    May we show our support to our boys in Iraq! May US and A kill every single terrorist! May your George Bush drink the blood of every single man, women, and child of Iraq! May you destroy their country so that for next thousand years not even a single lizard will survive in their desert!

    The crowd cheered wildly. Remember the scene was filmed in 2005, years after it became apparent that there were no WMDs in Iraq. For anyone who believes that most whites are “guilt-ridden” on racial issues, that scene is worth seeing.

    It seems to me that regardless of race or political affiliation, most Americans are buffoons who obey the teevee. They just nod along like empty-headed dummies to whatever the teevee people say, then go back to their Instagram, football, and “Big Bang Theory.”

    Some of what the teevee people propagate could be considered “liberal,” but some of what they propagate is “conservative.” However, almost uniformly, whatever it is they broadcast is comically inane and illogical.

    Some people here claim their favorite movie is Idiocracy. Supposedly, when Non-Whites become the majority of America’s population one day, America will become an Idiocracy.

    I have news for you. America is already an Idiocracy. Our Idiocrats aren’t just “NAMs” or liberals. White Republicans are plenty Idiocratic too.

    When you combine a low-quality citizenry with a corrupt and incompetent class of rulers, you end up with the disaster that is today’s America.

  76. @JohnnyWalker123

    May we show our support to our boys in Iraq! May US and A kill every single terrorist! May your George Bush drink the blood of every single man, women, and child of Iraq! May you destroy their country so that for next thousand years not even a single lizard will survive in their desert!

    America in a nutshell.

  77. @PiltdownMan

    What happened to the Dixie Chicks after they criticized the Iraq War?

    See video below.

    What happened after liberal icon Phil Donahue criticized the Iraq War?

    What happened to CIA agent Valerie Plame after her husband proved the Bush administration was lying about Iraq buying nuclear-weapons grade “yellow cake”?

    Plenty of people on the left have paid a price by going up against right-wing orthodoxy.

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  78. @songbird

    Cousin marriage in the Muslim middle east went up in the later 20th Century as the population grew to declining infant mortality, which meant individuals had more cousins, making cousin marriages easier to arrange. I think it has been declining in the 21st Century, though.

    The Saudi government started getting worried about the health effects of cousin marriage around the turn of the century, although I don’t know much more. As you get rid of mortality from infectious diseases, than the bad effects of inbreeding become more noticeable.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  79. @Anonymouse

    In American English, marrying a first cousin is generally equated with incest. In some other cultures it is not.

    When I’m writing with my Serious Hat on, I usually stick to the neutral term “cousin marriage.” But these jokers deserve the American English term.

  80. Hail says: • Website
    @Anon

    Save the Cousins

    The Rise of the Second and Third Cousins. (Unknown third cousins can come in thick and heavy on 23andMe and other genetic testing services.)

  81. @dearieme

    It’s also worth noting that having done all this Blair then launched aggressive wars against moslem countries – but then he is a bear of little brain.

    Just watch the first minute.

    Remember David Kelly? He was a British-employed biological weapons scientist who exposed the American&British govts were lying about Iraq having WMDs. Then he supposedly “committed suicide.”

  82. Here’s a BBC report on the biradari clan based voting patterns by Pakistanis in Britain. The word biradar comes from the Persian word for brother.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-leeds-31600344

    Here’s a newspaper report from the UK about cousin marriage within biradars.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5927581/The-tragic-truth-cousin-marriages.html

    Noah Carl’s research is on topics that have already been the subject of public discussion in the UK.

  83. J.Ross says: • Website
    @JackOH

    People speaking outside their area of expertise is pretty forgivable in a democratic society where ordinary people are expected to have opinions about foreign policy. What is bringing us closer to conflict is intellectual sabotage.
    Bandy (not Brandy) Yee is allegedly a Yale graduate. She has decided that long-distance diagnosis is psychiatrically legitimate and that political dissent is self-explanatorily madness. She goes on to make plans for everyone, which is cleary not exactly what a fascist would do, because, as stated above, fascists are insane (oh and by the way dissidents are fascists) and Bandy is sane, in fact she is the arbiter of sanity.
    https://www.democracynow.org/2017/12/8/the_dangerous_case_of_donald_trump
    http://archive.is/6goB5

    • Replies: @JackOH
  84. @Steve Sailer

    Cousin marriage in the Muslim middle east went up in the later 20th Century as the population grew to declining infant mortality, which meant individuals had more cousins, making cousin marriages easier to arrange. I think it has been declining in the 21st Century, though.

    The newspaper article I linked to mentions that up to 60% of Pakistanis in the UK are married to cousins.

    I wonder if cousin marriage among Pakistani Muslims is exceptionally high, not just because of the cousin-marriage based biradari clan social system in Pakistan, but because immigration visa rules in the UK give preference to spouses.

    If you’re going to marry, then you might as well marry a cousin back in the homeland, and help her or him emigrate.

    That effect exacerbates the incidence of cousin marriage in the immigrant community. For all I know, the same might be true of some muslim immigrant communities here.

  85. J.Ross says: • Website
    @JohnnyWalker123

    “Nerf gun” is wrong. The “Obama youth” are real enough. The guns and bricks and bike locks and sticks are real enough. The big departure is our comfort (and competence) as a society. Beneath everything they suffered from agitators, they were worried about eating. We are comfortable and stable (and somewhat anaesthetized thereby), but have the agitators.

  86. Anonymous[328] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Some findings can’t be discredited, e.g. Prop 187 hurt the Republicans not only in California but across the country; harsh discipline of school-aged black children programs them to give up, become criminal adults; single-sex education creates rape culture; monoracial workplaces are less innovative; video games create rape culture; fashion magazines aggravate anorexia; if not for redlining blacks would be rich; if not for sexism women would become engineers at the same rate as men; women are paid less than men are for the same job; beauty pageants create rape culture, etc. etc. Discrediting data has never been a problem for any of these popular fairy tales.

    • Replies: @Anon
  87. JackOH says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    JW123, I hate dissing my fellow Americans, and I want to disagree with you, but I really can’t. Sometimes it seems to me the whole of America looks like those empty, overstuffed, chortling faces at the end of Robert Redford’s Quiz Show. (Hope my memory’s okay.) Those are our White folks, too, sporting their muscular IQs and pretty good incomes, and, as you suggest, their opinions are mostly up-chucked stuff from press releases, TV bobbleheads, and the like..

  88. Just want to take this opportunity to accuse Carl of sexism, homophobia, transphobia and Islamophobia, since Mouhot’s clearly slacking.

  89. @Anon

    Cousins seem to be an

    endangered

    or vanishing breed in the West..

    I have 39 first cousins myself, which is not outlandishly high in a traditional society. I never knew any coworkers with even half that amount.

  90. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Looks like Tatiana got too close to the JQ.

    https://twitter.com/account/suspended

    • Replies: @Hail
  91. @JohnnyWalker123

    Your’s may not be a popular point of view here, but it is indubitably true.

    “Plenty of people on the left have paid a price by going up against right-wing orthodoxy.”

    Too true. Except NPR. They didn’t pay a price. When they came out in support of the run up to the war I turned the dial and have never listened to them since.

    (could it be that they’re not really “people on the left”?)

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  92. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Some findings can’t be discredited, e.g.

    That’s how academia works now. Instead of proposing topics for scholars to examine and draw their own conclusions from, academia provides conclusions that any given topic must confirm.

    We now live in a post-hypothesis world. Science is about researchers proposing certain hypotheses(distinct from conclusions) and then gathering up and studying data to see if the hypotheses are true or false. And conclusion is finally drawn from the study.
    But now, never mind coming up with hypotheses. The conclusion are ready-made and iron-clad. One must not think outside the box and just carry out ‘studies’ at arrive at those conclusions.

    Now, what if the facts/data go against the conclusions? Then, it is time for twisted logic. So, if there is evidence of racial differences among races, don’t focus on that and instead fulminate about how such facts might be exploited by ‘white supremacists’. Or say that racial differences don’t matter because no race is 100% pure and because all races are mixed somewhat. All these mental contortions. Never mind that even mixed races are different. If one bunch of whites went off to mate with blacks and if another bunch of whites went off to mate with Asians, both products would be more-mixed, but surely there would be key differences between black-white mixes and yellow-white mixes. But all we get is mental-houdini contortion tricks.

    Academia is now more like professional wrestling than real wrestling. In real wrestling, you do your best to win honestly. Sometimes, your hypothesis pays off, sometimes not. In pro-wrestling, the outcome is all fixed beforehand. So, even if you’re a small weakling faced with a big strong guy, IF the fix says you will win, you win. And that’s that. Academics is like WWE or WWA.

  93. @JohnnyWalker123

    Actually there is very little cheering for “May George Bush drink the blood etc.” line , despite being primed by several previous “support the troops” lines.

  94. JackOH says:
    @J.Ross

    Thanks. I think Heterodox Academy’s blog, written by academics (which I’m not), offers good thoughts on how Clark’s scholarship and appointment ought to have been handled had the quality of Clark’s work been at issue.

    But, it seems to me that open letter objected to the mere existence of Clark’s work, and their alleged concerns over its quality were camouflage for their ideology-driven agenda. The letter’s signatories used their honorifics and university affiliations.

    We do have local professors who’ve participated as appointed and elected officials, and from what I understand, they insist on dropping the honorific in their written and oral communications because they rightly fear they’ll be accused of improperly stepping on toes by using their earned doctorate in biology to compel the public to accept their opinions on a zoning issue.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  95. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Much of academia works like this:

    1. There are certain Sacred Cows.

    2. There are Comfort Thoughts and Trigger Thoughts.

    3. Comfort Thoughts make the Sacred Cows feel warm & fuzzy or righteous & holier-than-thou.
    Trigger Thoughts make the Sacred Cows feel challenged and uneasy.

    4. To appease the Sacred Cows, only Comfort Thoughts are allowed while Trigger Thoughts are
    banned.

    It’s funny. Feminists said NO to the kitchen and making Comfort Food for the family. But they and their allies seem to be baking Comfort Thoughts in the Academia.

    We mock the Hindus for revering cows, but the West has all these Sacred Cows of PC that must never be cut open to examine the meat.

    Get your baloney and feel the comfort.

  96. Hail says: • Website
    @Anon

    What was the final, offending Tweet?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  97. @Jim Given

    Excellent use of “begs the question,” Professor Mouhot.

    Yes, the usage, “begs the question,” has been repurposed by the semi-literate to mean “calls for the question” or “suggests the question.”

    No, the logicians who came up with the term, at least its English translation, didn’t bother to look for a name that doesn’t so obviously fit more common uses as well. They should have trademarked it– but, no, they’d have lost that for its being too generic.

    “Disinterested” gets even worse treatment.

    “Rent-seeking”, on the other hand, has the opposite problem. It’s a grand concept, but the term is too clumsy to make its own meaning clear, let alone be used for more general purposes.

    So, Jim, instead of hectoring us, why not get to work on replacing these terms with something more elegant?

    I make my own share of corrections in comments here, but try to be entertaining rather than insulting about it.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
  98. @Hail

    What was the final, offending Tweet?

    Regis: “Is that your final offending tweet?”

  99. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    https://lukeford.net/blog/?p=125062

    Using this logic, we can’t have Marxist doctors. Maybe they’ll mistreat capitalist patients.
    We can’t have Zionist doctors. Maybe they’ll mistreat Palestinian-Americans. We can’t have radical atheist doctors. Maybe they will mistreat Christians, Muslims, and Jews. We can’t have Evangelical doctors. Maybe they will mistreat atheist patients.

    Btw, McNabb isn’t even Neo-Nazi. That’s shtick they pull at TDS.

  100. @Venator

    It’s his birthdate that makes the difference. The previous generation of STEM majors couldn’t care less about squishy, but his has caught the virus.

  101. @Ibound1

    In other words, they don’t understand logic. Remember the correlation between math ability in children and foot size?

  102. Ibound1 says:

    I did notice that 14 year olds are generally better than 7 year olds in math and are generally a whole lot taller. But your shoe idea has given me a new angle for investigation.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  103. @AndrewR

    NdG Tyson is sensible on most topics other than Trump and (understandably) HBD. He was never a theorist, got as far as a masters degree in some kind of empirical astrophysics, and was never on track to become a STEM-lord. On HBD he seems pretty constrained from both sides, and has not said that it’s wrong, but did the standard goalpost motion of insisting that all other explanations be accounted for first before any discussion can start.

    Tyson (undeservedly) and Coates (somewhat deservedly) get a bad rap around here for being idiots. I think both are obviously pretty bright, just not the brilliant minds the culture would like them to be.

  104. Will anyone stand up for Squire Sebastian Senator? That’s just his first name. How many name fields have room for 24 characters, including spaces?

    https://www.indy100.com/article/mother-family-baby-shower-cancel-rant-name-squire-sebastian-senator-reddit-8675021

    “He’s the first kid ever to come home from school with the nickname ‘Stinky’ and be happy about it.” –top comment

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  105. Noah Carl and Eric Gill. Two Englishmen with three-syllable, eight-letter names ending in L. One criticizes incest, one practiced it.

    https://frostysramblings.wordpress.com/2017/04/27/eric-gill-artist-and-rapist/

    https://www.traditioninaction.org/HotTopics/j006htGill_Morality2_Odou.htm

    Gill was one of the first “Distributists”. He certainly distributed his seed, if not his progeny, to anything with two or four legs and a pulse. And his Laborite descendants distributed his country to Pakis and Bengalis.

    Pervertious Albion.

  106. @academic gossip

    Tyson (undeservedly) and Coates (somewhat deservedly) get a bad rap around here for being idiots.

    I wonder if Tyson is the model for the “genius” Prof Wiseman in PBS’s Curious George series. She’s supposed to know everything, but the best she can do is run the local science museum?

    At least the Professor in Gilligan’s Island had the excuse of being marooned.

    http://curious-george.wikia.com/wiki/Professor_Wiseman

  107. AndrewR says:
    @academic gossip

    If Coates has an IQ above 110 I’d be shocked, and my money is on it being around 105. Obviously people at that IQ can live very happy, healthy, productive lives, but Coates has been… um… promoted above his competence, which probably hasn’t done him any favors overall, and certainly hasn’t done the general public any favors. I admit I’m very biased against him due to his anti-white dogma. I’m more sympathetic to someone like Tomi Lahren who, like Coates, isn’t terribly bright, but, unlike Coates, holds political beliefs that aren’t so starkly in opposition to my existence.

  108. Twinkie says:
    @academic gossip

    Let me guess – your arch nemesis Steven Hsu.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
  109. Anonym says:
    @anony-mouse

    For some time now I’ve been saying that people here, since they know things about the world that others don’t, should be getting rich.

    Just like James Damore. Or Richwine. Or Derbyshire. Or our host.

  110. CJ says:
    @Hail

    Only 25% of highly-skilled Irish live in the OECD? But Ireland is itself in the OECD.

    Now 100% of skilled Guyanans living in the OECD, that I can believe. Anybody who could get out of that ****hole has already done so.

    • Replies: @Hail
  111. @Reg Cæsar

    The old fashioned pseudo-Latin usage of “beg the question” is purely an intellectual virtue signal.

    “Rent-seeking” sounds good as a term and bad as an activity, and is therefore a similar virtue signal on the libertarian/rationalist Internet, but it’s not clear that it points to a genuine concept or is some nefarious thing distinguishable from any other form of self-interested economic behavior. Ownership can be assigned to things that look artificial (what ownership isn’t?) so some distinction is made between “real” and “rent-based” transactions that may have more to do with our attitudes than any economic difference in the operation of the things. It’s a sneer.

    “Disinterested” is useful but it’s hard to come up with an equally short and sweet substitute.

  112. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anon

    The fact that 700 academics signed it proves that social science should be called a social silence, a kind of cult. And most precious academics are more about status and approval than courage and integrity.

    What’s happened is that 700 liberal theologians have declared Noah Carl to be guilty of heresy.

    If he’s lucky he’ll be offered a chance to recant.

  113. dfordoom says: • Website

    migrants from countries with high rates of cousin marriage are more likely to say that family should be one’s main priority in life

    In fact they’re quite correct to put family first. We’re so far gone down the road to decadence that we’ve forgotten how to do that.

    They understand politics better than we do. Politics is about power. If you want to advance the interests of your community (as anyone in a sane society would want to do) then you need to obtain power.

    We live in a fantasy world of liberal illusions like democracy. Only white people are dumb enough to believe such illusions.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    , @AndrewR
  114. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Richard S

    to *university professors must demand a fellow-academic lose his livelihood because badthinkers might draw conclusions we don’t like*

    But wasn’t that the original purpose of universities? To enforce religious orthodoxy and to combat heresy?

    • Replies: @Bill
  115. @Twinkie

    Why guess? In our earlier conversation you were pointed to at least 4-5 specific errors in just a single blogpost of his, several of them idiotic for that material, which is about double his typical rate per post. You say you have an (Ivy League x 2!) graduate level statistics background, and just told us in the top comment of this thread, the way to sort these things out is to deal with the specifics of the argument. But you haven’t done that, instead electing to bring up Hsu several times when he was not named. Either you are unable to understand the points at issue, or you have grasped that my criticisms are probably correct both technically and on the general topic (i.e., that Hsu is bluffing and not competent to operate at the level he pretends, in exactly the high-flying physicist style that I have described here).

    I don’t view Hsu as a nemesis (and it would not be a fair fight on subjects where he functions at idiot level), but you seem to want to view him as the Asian superman he purports to be. I do think he is actively doing harmful and in some cases evil things out of his combination of ignorance and ethnic bias, and to that extent his lack of credibility on certain subjects is important.

    And no, he is not the only example I had in mind.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  116. @academic gossip

    “Rent seeking” sounds like what the landlord does when you are late paying your rent so he comes and knocks on your door. It doesn’t sound terribly nefarious.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
    , @J.Ross
  117. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anonymouse

    Where does incest come into this? Noah Carl’s paper, 128 pages long, does not contain any reference to incest.

    Agreed. In their culture cousin-marriage is not incest.

    He seems merely to making the obvious point that unassimilated Pakistanis in Britain do not consider it electoral fraud to favor their fellow Pakistanis.

    Favouring your own community – isn’t that what we want to see white people doing? A healthy community is one in which the members of that community do favour their own people. If you don’t do that you end up without a community. Which is what has happened to us. The Pakistanis don’t share our taste for self-hatred. They don’t share our enthusiasm for trashing our own traditions.

    A bit of a shocker for white Brits raised on the rule of fair play.

    Fair play is another illusion we need to jettison.

  118. @Ibound1

    Yep. That’s the one.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
  119. dfordoom says: • Website
    @jim jones

    their Imam tells them which way to vote.

    He tells them to vote in the interests of their own families and their own communities. Which is sensible and healthy and moral.

    What amazes me about the iSteve commentariat is how many of them cherish liberal illusions.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
  120. Speaking of people getting ostracized for heretical beliefs, I’m reading Peter Wilson’s book on the Holy Roman Empire right now. He says that the Latin Christian West was a lot less concerned with people’s personal beliefs prior to the High Middle Ages because literacy levels were so low that nobody knew what other folks’ religious opinions were. That changed with increasing literacy as people wrote their opinions down and those opinions could be scrutinized. It’s no coincidence that heresy hunting goes into overdrive around the time the printing press was invented.

    Makes you think about social media. Twitter may be the greatest tool ever devised for rooting out heresy.

  121. @Reg Cæsar

    If only she’d named him after a real senator. How about Incitatus?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  122. @Rosamond Vincy

    Was that Caligula’s horse?

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  123. @academic gossip

    A commenter here was a colleague of Tyson in grad school and feels he has the right job.

    • Replies: @JimS
  124. Hail says: • Website
    @CJ

    Only 25% of highly-skilled Irish live in the OECD? But Ireland is itself in the OECD.

    Since it is a brain-drain graph Noah Carl was going for, it may be: “live abroad in first-world [OECD] countries.” Brains were drained. It seems reasonable that ~25% of Ireland’s high skilled live outside Ireland. I’d guess a lot of those are in the UK.

    Bosnia is the European country with the worst case of brain drain, at 45%.

    The data is from 2010. Note also:

    In order to keep the chart uncluttered, countries with population <500,000 and those for which the y-axis value is <25% are not shown.

  125. snorlax says:
    @Anon

    I started college as an econ major (by far the least SJW-infected, and among the “harder” of the social “sciences”), but switched to CS my sophomore year after figuring out the entire field from left to right and everywhere in between consisted solely of starting from a conclusion then cherry-picking data that seem to support that conclusion.

    • Replies: @Bubba
  126. @Venator

    From my non-expert observations, mathematicians have incredibly sharp, tightly-focused computational skills and, not unrelated, often tend to be completely off their rockers. Their brains are wired in a particular way that allows them unrelenting razor-sharp focus and this often makes them childlike along other dimensions of thinking which require balanced common sense. A mathematician who is only an SJW-fanatic would be on the normal end of the spectrum among mathematicians IMHO.

    • Disagree: PiltdownMan
  127. Excellent use of “begs the question,” Professor Mouhot.

    That’s one of my pet peeves, too, and it’s becoming more common all the time.

  128. @Reg Cæsar

    Yep. May have been a better Senator than some we’ve got now.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  129. dfordoom says: • Website
    @AngryWxGuy

    What’s the point of research when you know already know the answers in advance?

    What’s the main motivation of scientists? Funding. You only get funding if you produce the correct results. So you make sure you get the correct results.

    A disinterested seeking for the truth? Forget it. Give the customer what he wants.

  130. dfordoom says: • Website
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I remember one poll in which 90-95% of White Republicans indicated support for the Iraq War.

    If you suggested invading Ruritania 90-95% of White Republicans would support it. We need to bring Freedom and Democracy to Ruritania.

  131. @Steve Sailer

    That’s a funny image.

    Landlords are not rent-seekers in the economics sense, but I suspect that the associations conjured by the term Rent Seeking include the ancient sentiment against (absentee, large-scale or hereditary) landlords as unproductive or exploitative “rentiers”.

    • Replies: @Bill
  132. @ThreeCranes

    They’re pretty left-leaning, as long as it doesn’t cost them any money.

  133. @dfordoom

    But if you’re in a white population, the fantasy can become reality.

  134. @Venator

    Professor Mouhout is following tradition.

    There’s a long history of high profile French mathematicians being politically “engaged” in what are perceived as righteous causes. The logician/philosopher who was killed in the Resistance (Cavailles) is a national hero and might be the original inspiration. After WW2, causes include communism, opposing the Algeria war, anticolonialism, 1968-ish leftism, Indochina/Vietnam, the anti-nuclear movement and environmentalism. A number of the Fields Medal or similar top level leaders of the French mathematical school were activists in those things so probably, like Chomsky, they dragged a number of their students with them or made it fashionable beyond the already left wing nature of French intelligentsia. There was leftism but not a direct equivalent of this conscious super-leftism in other areas of French science.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  135. According to Razib Khan, cousin marriage is not common amongst Bangladeshis.

    http://www.brownpundits.com/2018/07/04/bhadralok-are-made-not-born/

  136. @academic gossip

    There’s a long history of high profile French mathematicians being politically “engaged” in what are perceived as righteous causes. The logician/philosopher who was killed in the Resistance (Cavailles) is a national hero and might be the original inspiration.

    It goes a long way further back than that.

    Both Blaise Pascal and Rene Descartes were politically controversial in their times, in the 1600s.

    The most famous of all French mathematicians who was politically engaged was, of course, Évariste Galois, who was killed in a duel at age 20, in 1832. Galois, who is a titanic figure in the history of mathematics, founded both group theory and galois theory.

    Wikipedia has a good summary of his political activity.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89variste_Galois

    • Replies: @academic gossip
  137. @academic gossip

    “Rent-seeking” sounds good as a term and bad as an activity, and is therefore a similar virtue signal on the libertarian/rationalist Internet, but it’s not clear that it points to a genuine concept or is some nefarious thing distinguishable from any other form of self-interested economic behavior. Ownership can be assigned to things that look artificial (what ownership isn’t?) so some distinction is made between “real” and “rent-based” transactions that may have more to do with our attitudes than any economic difference in the operation of the things. It’s a sneer.

    It has indeed become that, but wasn’t the rent-seeking model of economic behavior actually formally specified and described by the economist Gordon Tullock in the 1960s?

    The term more commonplace nowadays seems to be “regulatory capture” but the underlying idea is that it is the behavior whereby the “rent-seeker” influences the rules of the game (typically by securing a regulatory monopoly by paying off or influencing lawmakers) to carve out a lucrative monopoly for himself.

    The parallel “Tullock Paradox” is the condundrum of why the cost of doing so is so much lower for the rent-seeker than the outsize profits he realizes.

    It would be natural to assume that politicians/regulators would seek, say, campaign contributions that sucked up a much larger share of the monopoly profits than is actually observed. For example, you would expect big Pharma to pay out billions to secure the legislative favors on medical patent laws that they get, rather than the pittances they actually pay out to gain favorable consideration in the corridors of Capitol Hill.

    The term was coined by the World Bank’s chief economist Anne Kreuger. I remember it was still quite new and fashionable when I first came across it in graduate school circa 1979.

    • Replies: @JackOH
    , @James N. Kennett
  138. dearieme says:
    @James N. Kennett

    “the centenary of votes for women”: strictly, the centenary of the restoration of votes for women. Some women had had the vote until the Great Reform Act of 1832 had disenfranchised them.

  139. JackOH says:
    @PiltdownMan

    PM, we have a local Mr. Big who routinely buys politicians who are indicted and convicted for soliciting and accepting bribes. The amounts are in the thousands or a few tens of thousands. Politicians who don’t play ball for the amounts offered are faced with the prospect Mr. Big will back an opposition candidate and spend whatever it takes to get that more pliant opposition candidate elected.

    I’ve already mentioned a onetime mayor who didn’t play ball. A successful and popular mayor, he spilled his guts in a remarkable series of newspaper interviews in which he said he had a remote car starter installed to guard against an assassination attempt by car bomb.

    I know one of the FBI agents who investigated Mr. Big. That agent told me they had the goods on him and his confederates. Then, out of nowhere, the FBI was told to drop the investigation. Despite the convictions of those who’d accepted Mr. Big’s money, Mr. Big himself eluded prosecution.

    Hope that helps a bit in understanding why the political establishment doesn’t “charge” more for its favors.

  140. @PiltdownMan

    Related, this is an interesting blog by a (literate and educated) Bradford-born Pakistani woman who married – surprise – a cousin.

    https://bollywoodinbritain.wordpress.com/2011/12/01/11-a-suitable-husband/

    Her eloquent promotion of cousin marriage shows a worldview, literate as she is, miles away from that of a Briton. We speak the same language, but we’re a world away.

    Some bits are very iSteve. My emboldening.

    “I wanted a suitor who was well educated; broad minded, with an exciting career, a few stamps in his passport and first class people skills. I hoped he’d be at least moderately good looking and taller than me. There was a supplementary checklist which I’d accumulated through hearsay. I knew, for instance, that it was preferable to make a match where you could live independently, to limit day to day interference from the in-laws, but this wasn’t always possible. I knew it was important to consider the size of the new household. There might be a lot of in-laws to please which might also require extended spells in the kitchen. The mother-in-law’s disposition was also worth mulling over since her willing support could make your new life so much easier. Some of my friends had fretted that a potential suitor might not permit them to work, or he may wish to modify their dress code. As far as I was concerned though, such prerogatives were not even up for negotiation. Besides, I reasoned that these issues wouldn’t matter to the sort of well educated, broad minded suitor I had in mind.

    Meanwhile, mum was set on a wholesome son-in-law with a solid family background, a good degree, a strong sense of responsibility and the sort of traditional career that would always pay the mortgage. We also had to give due consideration to the suitor’s social class. You see, our unions aren’t just marriages; they’re family mergers, so it’s vital to ensure that a lasting bond is truly sustainable. We couldn’t possibly marry beneath us. Nor did we want the pressure of keeping up appearances by securing a match with people way above our station. Mum has several cousins in her ancestral village who never married, because their families were unable to identify men of a suitable social class for them. In a couple of cases, I know that property was also an issue. Promising their daughters outside existing kinship networks, would have resulted in the unwelcome division of the family’s property. You see, the daughter takes a share of her father’s property to her new family. Little wonder then that marriage within the extended family is still so popular….

    I, on the other hand, was very level-headed about choosing a suitable husband. There was no hesitation when the option of marrying my uncle’s youngest son was put to me, despite the irony that I knew my uncle better than I knew his son, whom I’d seen fleetingly five years earlier at a family wedding in Islamabad. Naturally, his profile came with a good character reference, but I knew little about his daily routine, and nothing about the workings of his mind and heart. I knew him from afar, in the same way I knew my neighbour, with nothing more between us than the occasional inconsequential exchange. The solitary spark of romance in this merger was the nostalgia of a childhood in Pakistan, although that seemed a lifetime away now, and my grandparents, the glue that bonded us all, were long gone.

    Rationally though, the arrangement went well beyond the usual union of two individuals, making me something greater than just one half of a couple. Our families shared the same history and I felt relief in such a sense of belonging. I knew that marrying within the family would grant me more security than marrying an outsider ever would. We could also dispense with the usual protracted enquiries since we already knew these people were of good stock. You see, it’s not unheard of for men to have to produce certificates as proof of their qualifications, and wage slips to confirm they really earn what they say they do.

    It was reassuring to be stepping into a familiar arrangement. I would effectively be moving next door, from house number 9 to 11. I liked to think I’d be favoured over the other daughter-in-laws since, unlike them, I already belonged to the family. I could be the daughter my uncle never had, and I would gain a much needed father figure. My uncle was now a widower and there were no interfering sister-in-laws living with him. As the only woman of the household, I would automatically assume a rank which most daughter-in-laws wait a lifetime to ascend. And so I accepted their offer, confident that I was the best candidate for the position.”

    We could also dispense with the usual protracted enquiries” – the marriage adverts in Indian papers have to be seen to be believed.

  141. @JackOH

    “I know one of the FBI agents who investigated Mr. Big. That agent told me they had the goods on him and his confederates. Then, out of nowhere, the FBI was told to drop the investigation. Despite the convictions of those who’d accepted Mr. Big’s money, Mr. Big himself eluded prosecution.”

    Mr Big had obviously bribed someone very high up. From A.G. MacDonnel’s England Their England.

    “To tell you the truth, Mister, I had to do a thing I didn’t like doing. But I had my firm to consider, and I’ve been with them now for one-and-forty years. I couldn’t let them down, now, could I? So what could I do but what I did?”

    “And what was that?”

    “Well, I bribed the chief engineer to certify that the canal was dredged. It was the only way round that nob. He had bribed everyone except the chief. That’s a cardinal rule in life, Mister, and I pass it on to you with pleasure, because I like you. Never bribe if you can possibly help it, but when you do, only bribe the heads. Stick to that and you can’t go wrong.”

    • Replies: @JackOH
  142. AndrewR says:
    @dfordoom

    Democracy can work in a small, homogenous population. Im not sure Iceland, for example, would benefit from fascism or feudalism or whatever alternative you might suggest. But certainly in a place like the UK or US, democracy is easily subverted by hostile minorities

  143. Twinkie says:
    @academic gossip

    I don’t view Hsu as a nemesis (and it would not be a fair fight on subjects where he functions at idiot level)

    In other words, you are better than he is. My “arch nemesis” comment was tongue-in-cheek. But I see that you took it seriously and doubled down.

    In our earlier conversation you were pointed to at least 4-5 specific errors in just a single blogpost of his, several of them idiotic for that material, which is about double his typical rate per post.

    I think you asserted that, but a link would be appreciated. Did you ever level the criticism directly to Hsu and comment on his blog? I’d surely like to read his response.

    You say you have an (Ivy League x 2!) graduate level statistics background

    I studied history. I did take graduate-level statistics classes in my Ph.D. program. I don’t know whether you are familiar with how social science Ph.D. programs are run, but typically a candidate has to select a methodology specialization. I chose econometrics and wargaming (not the roll-the-dice kind or “Call of Duty,” but quantitative simulation of military clashes at larger unit levels).

    just told us in the top comment of this thread, the way to sort these things out is to deal with the specifics of the argument. But you haven’t done that, instead electing to bring up Hsu several times when he was not named.

    I brought up Hsu once on this thread, because I expected a torrent of abuse directed at him from you once I did so. And I was not disappointed. “Idiot,” “harmful,” “ignorant,” and “evil” are pretty strong words, especially when instances of such descriptions have not been cited.

    the high-flying physicist style

    I have a couple of friends who were previously high-level theoretical physicists (and through them casually know several more). They literally smashed atoms for a living. Alas, they no longer practice physics (they are now very rich from their quant work in financial services), but as I recall from my graduate days, my econometrics graduate classes were pretty easy for them, so I am baffled by your obsessive disparagement of the mathematical abilities of high-level physicists.

    you seem to want to view him as the Asian superman he purports to be. I do think he is actively doing harmful and in some cases evil things out of his combination of ignorance and ethnic bias, and to that extent his lack of credibility on certain subjects is important.

    I do not see Hsu as “the Asian superman.” I never wrote anything remotely close to it. I don’t know him at all, and have only read a few things he wrote. From what little I read of him, though, I would say “superman” on one hand and “evil idiot” on the other are likely false choices. He strikes me as a highly accomplished and intelligent person, whose political and cultural views are, nonetheless, not aligned with mine. I think Mr. Unz knows him well, so perhaps he can chime in and clarify whether he is indeed a superman or an evil idiot.

    Nonetheless, your misrepresentation of my view of him is typical of your modus operandi of asserting things without evidence or with very scant, loosely-related evidence. In this you remind me of “Education Realist” (whose mathematical ability you seem to hold in higher regard than Dr. Hsu’s). As an example, I still remember you asserting that “Asians take years of SAT prep” and, when pressed for evidence, putting forth a sentence from a magazine article that stated something to the effect of “a majority of California Asian students answered ‘Yes’ to the question of ‘Have you ever taken a prep course?’” or some such question, which nowhere mentioned duration of prep course-taking. It was straight out of “How to Lie with Statistics.”

    his combination of ignorance and ethnic bias

    So not only is he unprincipled, he is also stupid! I seem to remember you disparaging me similarly and perhaps even suggesting that I should be made unwelcome here (or at least, no longer write here and “get his own blog”). Like “Education Realist” you seem to go out of your way to paint Asians in the least charitable way possible, always assigning the most negative motive you can imagine to them. So the “ethnic bias” you write of strikes me as projection.

  144. @PiltdownMan

    “Regulatory capture” – when different decisions of the US government could affect corporate profits by as much as $1 trillion in an electoral cycle, it looks like a shrewd investment for big business to spend $1 billion funding political campaigns. The best strategy of all is to finance both parties.

  145. @Twinkie

    I have a couple of friends who were previously high-level theoretical physicists (and through them casually know several more). They literally smashed atoms for a living. Alas, they no longer practice physics (they are now very rich from their quant work in financial services), but as I recall from my graduate days, my econometrics graduate classes were pretty easy for them, so I am baffled by your obsessive disparagement of the mathematical abilities of high-level physicists.

    Indeed.

    And in this specific instance, Clement Mouhot just happens to be an associate editor of the Journal of Statistical Physics, so any argument that he doesn’t “get” the statistically based arguments in Noah Carl social science research necessarily fails.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
  146. The original sin was allowing the Pakistanis and Bangladeshis into England in the first place.

    The answer to the mass immigration disaster destroying England is mass deportation.

    When political leaders emerge who start saying this, then you will know that a new political atmosphere is written upon the political winds.

    The English should have never allowed themselves to be swamped by foreigners of any kind.

    The United States is heading for Civil War II over race and ancestry and immigration, and England will also be heading for a civil war.

    Tweet from 2015:

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  147. @Richard S

    American universities went from a split between conservatives and liberals to dominated by conservatives over several decades (1960-1990s)- this is not new, merely open to the public view.

  148. Ragno says:
    @Anon

    Reality is what it is regardless of subjective dogmas. Ideologies are subjective.

    As the late Mr Dick once noted, “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away.”

    Has Philip Dick been discredited by the Academy yet? Individually, leftists love to cite their adoration of the man’s work, but seeing how The Individual has already been discredited, I was just wondering aloud.

  149. Ibound1 says:
    @Rosamond Vincy

    And as a result they have banned any investigation on the study of bone growth.

  150. hhsiii says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    May also be pretty low iq but I don’t think many Americans too much like dictators and thus didn’t really care all that much if Iraq had WMDs. A volunteer army really lowers the level of interest.

    I have seen some say hundreds of thousands of brain injuries but I’m not sure if that is accurate. Not that any is an acceptable price.

  151. @dfordoom

    What about poor little Freedonia?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @dfordoom
  152. @Rosamond Vincy

    May have been a better Senator than some we’ve got now.

    What we have are demiequines– the west ends of eastbound mounts.

    Hippocracy!

  153. @JohnnyWalker123

    Another poll found that the majority of Republicans believed WMDs were found in Iraq.

    There was less evidence of nuclear weapons in 1944 Germany. That didn’t stop our government from lying about that, nor our “citizens” from believing it without reservation. Or us from viewing the liars as heros.

    Whatever the crimes of the Bush Administration, they all have ample precedence.

    Except for the one about “Islam is a peaceful religion.” The bigger crime there is the silence of the opposition.

  154. JimS says:
    @Steve Sailer

    That is pretty much the consensus I’ve found of people who have known him. I’ve only met him in passing, long before I knew who he was, so I cannot say one way or another.

    He is somewhat interesting because he’s the only person I know of to, from what I understand, go to grad school twice in its entirety. From what I’ve heard, he was at Texas, got through the research portion of his dissertation and took some Ph.D.-requiring job (not sure if it was a post doc or teaching job) with the understanding he’d finish/defend his thesis within a year. This is a fairly common thing for people nearing completion to make sure they line up with the job cycle. Then a year came and went, and Texas basically kicked him out for failing to complete within the proscribed timescale. He then went to (I think) Columbia to start an entirely new project and got his Ph.D. there. The most common route by far is to quit as ABD (All But Dissertation), and I can’t recall any other example of someone basically starting over. Grad school can be quite spirit-crushing, so doing it twice takes some determination.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
  155. @academic gossip

    “Disinterested” is useful but it’s hard to come up with an equally short and sweet substitute.

    Oh, but we already have one– “I don’t have a dog in this fight.” Thank the rednecks, or the hillbillies, for this one.

    Whereas “uninterested” means “meh”. Or “feh”. I’m not sure.

  156. @Rosamond Vincy

    What about poor little Freedonia?

    They’ve got one hell of a mascot to protect them. One they share with Duke, Wisconsin-Stout, and Virginia High School. (Yes, Virginia Duke, there is a Virginia Blue Devil.)

    Oh, and don’t forget the Duchy of Grand Fenwick.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  157. @Twinkie

    Like “Education Realist” you seem to go out of your way to paint Asians in the least charitable way possible…

    Maybe he’s married to Atilla the Hen, who’s always ragging Derb for his marital status.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  158. @JohnnyWalker123

    On here, there exists this view that somehow Whites (especially White Republicans) are “smart” people who are immune from media propaganda.

    I have never seen that view expressed here.

  159. @dfordoom

    90-95% of White Republicans

    Why does “White Republicans” sound like the unlikely coalition of Spanish communists and Russian monarchists?

    • Replies: @Hail
  160. @Charles Pewitt

    It was a nation-wrecking mistake to allow Pakistanis & Bangladeshis into Britain.

    Just like it was a nation-wrecking mistake to allow Africans into the British colonies 399 years ago. But Britain’s modern timeline is much more compressed.

  161. @JackOH

    Hope that helps a bit in understanding why the political establishment doesn’t “charge” more for its favors.

    Indeed. Elected officials are essentially fungible in the scenario you describe.

    • Replies: @JackOH
  162. Hail says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    Alternative phrasing:

    Demelinated GOPites [gahhp-ites]

  163. @Reg Cæsar

    “Hell” of a mascot, indeeed.

    Do they have a stirring anthem?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  164. @Reg Cæsar

    Wonder if she has a secret crush on him, and that’s the real reason she resents Mrs. Derb.

  165. Bill says:
    @Simon Tugmutton

    Errrr, aren’t differential equations kind of a workhorse of, like, genetics? And isn’t there a physics dude who is an official good person in the steve-o-sphere?

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  166. Bill says:
    @Anon

    You can’t not have a state religion. If you try to make science your state religion, you get 1) a shitty religion, and 2) science which is deformed in the direction of a religion.

  167. J.Ross says: • Website
    @JackOH

    That’s a good point, there was an anecdote at Heartiste about a guy who left his girlfriend because she found occasion to mention that she was a doctor (medical) on every occasion. Chatting with a grocery store cashier she would bring up, “by the way, I’m a doctor.”

  168. Bill says:
    @dfordoom

    Not really, although they did train people who did those things.

  169. Ibound1 says:
    @J.Ross

    I used that story on some global warming SJWs. They had never heard the story and moreover they did not understand the import of the story. You see the SJWs are right — and the numbers of scientists on their side proves it. The nazis were wrong. See the difference?

  170. @Twinkie

    |1| [claiming] you are better than he is
    |2| I brought up Hsu once
    |3| “Idiot,” “harmful,” “ignorant,” and “evil” … instances of such descriptions have not been cited. |4| obsessive disparagement of the mathematical abilities of high-level physicists.
    |5| [calling Hsu an] “evil idiot”
    |6| [implying that] not only is he unprincipled, he is also stupid!
    |7| [commenter and math teacher] “Education Realist” [has] mathematical ability you seem to hold in higher regard than Dr. Hsu’s
    |8| paint Asians in the least charitable way possible, always assigning the most negative motive

    I’ve itemized the specific falsehoods.

    As suggested earlier, please get a blog instead of multiplying by 3 the number of words in each comment answered, most of the inflation being from off-topic bickering and endlessly refighting lost comment-battles. Wargaming simulation indeed.

    Some of Hsu’s errors in the one blog post are listed at:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/harvard-to-its-asian-rejects-its-not-you-its-your-personalit/#comment-2385095 http://www.unz.com/isteve/harvards-brand-management/#comment-2441826 http://www.unz.com/isteve/harvards-brand-management/#comment-2451277

    I’m not sure why you want a response from Hsu: his error is a fancier version of stating “2+2 = 7”, as there is a mathematical theorem rendering his comments nonsense. When people write things like that we don’t need their counterarguments, it is sufficient to point out the error (and laugh as appropriate, draw conclusions about competence and so forth).

    • Replies: @Bill
    , @Twinkie
  171. Bill says:
    @academic gossip

    Landlords are not rent-seekers in the economics sense

    Landlords are canonical rent-seekers. They expend resources to influence (0ften) zero-sum things like where a subway stop is located, what zoning variance will be granted, which type of real estate will pay what level of taxes, and so on. Landlords are almost as bad as real estate developers as engines of local government corruption.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
  172. @Rosamond Vincy

    “Hell” of a mascot, indeeed.

    I wonder if the Virginia Blue Devils ever took on the Satans of Devils Lake. They’re not that far apart by North Country standards. Just 330 miles. Though the Mexican bus driver might have had trouble with the ice deep in hockey season.

    Devils Lake teams drop Satans name

  173. Bill says:
    @academic gossip

    The error academic gossip points out in those links is pretty shocking. It reveals, on Hsu’s part, a severely flawed understanding of logit, and the error is pretty important to his reasoning, so you can’t really call it nit-picking. Really makes you wonder what else he confidently and erroneously expounds upon.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
  174. @JimS

    Ah, so he does have a PhD (and total of 15 years in grad school and postdocs).

    It looks like he was grad student with outside interests who dragged out his education, maybe because he was aware that affirmative action would provide some second chances. Later on, having pursued the outside interests, such as working in a planetarium and in general not being a pure nerd, turned out to be useful for a nonacademic career, as is often the case. It worked out well for him.

  175. @PiltdownMan

    obsessive disparagement of the mathematical abilities of high-level physicists.

    High-level physicists usually have high-level mathematical ability sufficient to quickly pick up additional math when they need it. That was never at issue.

    The ability that they don’t have is to be competent at the additional math before actually learning it. Often they have reasonable intuition about math that neighbors their fields of expertise. Statistics, of the kind used in social science and economics, is nowhere near the things that physicists know about and so it is not possible to “wing it”.

    The other disability that causes problems here, and is prominent in theoretical physics culture, is the inability to realize that they have limitations in this regard. Physicists (and in Mouhot’s case, some mathematicians) have Gaussian distributions and things with “statistics” in the name as part of their subject, and for most previous math they have seen they could improvise OK, so they assume WE SMART CAN DO. The sad reality is that this doesn’t work with statistics because it’s a different set of concepts than all the math they are used to.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Bill
  176. @PiltdownMan

    “Engaged” in Sartre’s sense, as an obligation of intellectuals. This is a new thing that starts up sometime after WW2, where a lot of top academics have a Chomsky-like dual role as political activists. Before that there were always politically active professors here and there, such as this prime minister:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Painlevé

    I don’t know if Jean Cavailles was who (if anyone) Sartre had in mind but he is the revered archetype of the “engagee” French intellectual.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  177. @Bill

    The error academic gossip points out in those links is pretty shocking. It reveals, on Hsu’s part, a severely flawed understanding of logit, and the error is pretty important to his reasoning, so you can’t really call it nit-picking. Really makes you wonder what else he confidently and erroneously expounds upon.

    Never mind logit, here’s one where Hsu didn’t know that linear regression can be done with more than one variable. Check out section 3.1 of his article Data Mining the University,

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1004.2731.pdf

    Where they write “we then test a range of linear combinations …” Hsu and his coathor, also a physicist, are saying they wrote code to solve an optimization problem obviously equivalent to having software do the regression for them (which would also output other useful information).

    That paper, by the way, was an attempt to prove that physics and math classes have a hard IQ threshold for success, i.e., physics graduates are smarter. Ahem.

    I was not joking or exaggerating when I said Hsu makes these sorts of basic errors in virtually every single statistics post on Asian admission, Caltech and other pet subjects of his. The problem is that he has a widely read blog, journalists on speed-dial to spread the wisdom, and zillion-copy redistribution onto WeChat.

    • Replies: @Bill
  178. hhsiii says:
    @dfordoom

    Maybe he is just selling their votes and could give a rat’s ass about their community.

  179. @Bill

    Errrr, aren’t differential equations kind of a workhorse of, like, genetics?

    If you mean that partial differential equations are merely a tool in applied mathematics with no further theoretical research needed, no. The field is rich with theoretical problems. The foundations of the formal theory, which yields the grab bag of specific tools that non-mathematicians are familiar with, are still being worked on.

    Kind of like how arithmetic operations were figured out a long, long time ago, but number theory is still a rich field in pure mathematics.

    • Replies: @Bill
  180. @academic gossip

    Thank you for the clarification. That is indeed new, and largely a post WWII phenomenon.

  181. JackOH says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    “Mr Big had obviously bribed someone very high up.”

    If bribery or other undue pressure, then, indeed very high up. The alternate theory is that Mr. B. has been turned into a very high-end confidential informant. (The family fortune was estimated at close to a billion dollars about twenty or so years ago.)

  182. @sean42

    Basically nobody in the West born after 1945 has any idea what conservatism is all about, and in a sense conservatives are just liberals on a 20 year time delay.

    Speak for yourself. We know what genuine conservatism is. You have bought into the neo-con con.

  183. @YetAnotherAnon

    They need to go back to Pakistan – every single one of them.

  184. @JohnnyWalker123

    Yep, those White Republicans are our biggest problem, right Johnny? And things were much better when Obama and Hillary destroyed Khadaffy and sent the Africans to Europe. And when Obama lit up Syria and sent the million man march to Germany. Right Johnny? And Democrats are so honest and upright, and are not in favor of open borders, and replacing Americans with foreign-born Democrats, right Johnny?

    George W. Bush was and is a Globalist Leftist, just like George H. W. Bush. If you are in doubt, check the politics of the GWB’s daughters.

    But hey, if you and Michael Moore win the day, you can pat yourself on the back for your commitment to diversity – and that will make your paying the jizyah easy for you.

  185. Twinkie says:
    @academic gossip

    As suggested earlier, please get a blog instead of multiplying by 3 the number of words in each comment answered

    Really? I wrote in my original comment: “Let me guess – your arch nemesis Steven Hsu.” 8 words (7 if you insert “-” between arch and nemesis).

    You wrote in response:

    Why guess? In our earlier conversation you were pointed to at least 4-5 specific errors in just a single blogpost of his, several of them idiotic for that material, which is about double his typical rate per post. You say you have an (Ivy League x 2!) graduate level statistics background, and just told us in the top comment of this thread, the way to sort these things out is to deal with the specifics of the argument. But you haven’t done that, instead electing to bring up Hsu several times when he was not named. Either you are unable to understand the points at issue, or you have grasped that my criticisms are probably correct both technically and on the general topic (i.e., that Hsu is bluffing and not competent to operate at the level he pretends, in exactly the high-flying physicist style that I have described here).

    I don’t view Hsu as a nemesis (and it would not be a fair fight on subjects where he functions at idiot level), but you seem to want to view him as the Asian superman he purports to be. I do think he is actively doing harmful and in some cases evil things out of his combination of ignorance and ethnic bias, and to that extent his lack of credibility on certain subjects is important.

    And no, he is not the only example I had in mind.

    That’s 236 words. You multiplied by close to 30. So why don’t YOU go get a blog of your own and stop commenting here? Or are you one of those people who hold others to more onerous standards and limitations?

    I’ve itemized the specific falsehoods.

    You gave me a list with words. Are you just being cryptic now, because full sentences get you in trouble?

    You know what is missing from your list of “falsehoods”? This:

    As an example, I still remember you asserting that “Asians take years of SAT prep” and, when pressed for evidence, putting forth a sentence from a magazine article that stated something to the effect of “a majority of California Asian students answered ‘Yes’ to the question of ‘Have you ever taken a prep course?’” or some such question, which nowhere mentioned duration of prep course-taking.

    Am I to take the lack of this item in your list of my “falsehoods” as an acknowledgement that you indeed exaggerated/made up your cited assertion?

    As for the dispute between you and Hsu, I really would like to see his response, so it would be much more useful if you commented directly on his blog. But I suggest you refrain from calling him an idiot or an evil person if you are serious about the clash of ideas.

    For the record, I have not followed in detail the Harvard lawsuit, because – as I mentioned repeatedly in the past – I am uninterested in raising the percentage of this ethnic group or that (even if it were my own). I am much more interested in Harvard inculcating a patriotic elite with noblesse oblige even if that meant, let’s say, that 95% of Harvard were to be made up of rural southern and Midwestern whites.

  186. Bubba says:
    @snorlax

    That nutty new 28 year old NY congresswoman/bartender called Occasional Cortex graduated with an economics degree from Brown. And she still didn’t have the sense (as a distinguished Brown alumni) to work in a decent bar with a reputation for servicing high tip drinkers. And it makes me wonder if she reported these measly tips in her IRS returns. I know a few waitresses that were hounded by the IRS for years when they did not report their tips from Denny’s and IHOP.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  187. @Twinkie

    Find a debate style different from “deluge of crud”, or get a blog.

    When 8 separate untruths are quoted from one comment, that obviously is not a vote of confidence in the rest of its contents. It’s a minimalist reply to register disagreement without otherwise feeding the troll. If there is anything there worth answering after the rest of the comment thread runs its course, I might come back and do so toward the end of the commenting window.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  188. Twinkie says:
    @Bubba

    Ocasio-Cortez went to Boston University.

    • Replies: @Bubba
  189. @academic gossip

    The sad reality is that this doesn’t work with statistics because it’s a different set of concepts than all the math they are used to.

    I’m struck by how late statistics arose versus other types of math, but I’m in over my head because I don’t know anything about other types of math.

    Any thoughts on how different statistics is from other types of math and why some of the basic concepts were still left hanging to be developed by Galton in his 60s?

    • Replies: @res
    , @academic gossip
  190. res says:
    @Twinkie

    As for the dispute between you and Hsu, I really would like to see his response, so it would be much more useful if you commented directly on his blog.

    This.

    P.S. BTW, it is Stephen Hsu.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  191. Twinkie says:
    @academic gossip

    When 8 separate untruths are quoted from one comment

    According to you.

    Find a debate style different from “deluge of crud”, or get a blog.

    That’s rich. You engage in the very behavior you accuse me of (only your response had 30 times the words, not 3 times as you accused of mine) and then you lecture about “debate style.”

    You are obviously a reasonably intelligent guy, but you are not intellectually honest or principled.

    It’s a minimalist reply to register disagreement without otherwise feeding the troll.

    No, it’s an attempt to “prove” you are in the right without having to engage the other person in a debate or a discussion. You want to be taken at your word without giving the same courtesy to others. It’s plain hypocrisy.

    • Replies: @Bill
  192. Twinkie says:
    @res

    P.S. BTW, it is Stephen Hsu.

    Thanks for the correction. I obviously don’t know the man well. 🙂

  193. res says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I would be interested in academic gossip’s response to your question as well.

    This book might be worth a look: https://www.amazon.com/History-Statistics-Measurement-Uncertainty-before/dp/067440341X

    I think the fundamental difference between statistics and other forms of math is uncertainty. Some links which may be relevant:
    https://luckytoilet.wordpress.com/2017/09/06/whats-the-difference-between-mathematics-and-statistics/
    https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-mathematics-and-statistics

    Another way of thinking about it is to observe that much of statistics (and probability) was rooted in empirical observations with the formal mathematical underpinnings coming later.

    This brief history of linear regression might also be worth a look: https://amstat.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10691898.2001.11910537#.XA9ci2hKj8A

  194. @YetAnotherAnon

    Thank your for that interesting read. She’s a pragmatic and level-headed young lady. She writes very well, too.

    It saddens me that our modern college education system has ensured that very few young women in our own culture are able think about these matters in such a based, non-ideological manner, and that their ability to express themselves candidly, yet dispassionately has been stamped out of them.

  195. JackOH says:
    @ben tillman

    ben, pretty much so, I suppose.

    Bribery and other irregular pressures and inducements aren’t a one-shot deal as I’ve seen it here. They’re process. For example, you get your claws into a newly elected officeholder. That’s not good enough. You want to get your loyalists into civil service-protected career positions to ensure continuity of decisions that favor your interests. Y’know, just in case your puppet officeholder gets a twinge of conscience, and resigns for “personal reasons” or to “explore career opportunities” in the private sector.

    That, of course, suggests another reason why the price of “turning” an appointed or elected government official can be so low. You already know you control the bureaucrats who nominally report to the official.

    BTW-my thoughts here are taken from accounts derived from FBI transcripts of wiretaps, interviews with public officials, court proceedings, etc., and published in my very gutsy local newspaper.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  196. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Rosamond Vincy

    What about poor little Freedonia?

    They’re next, once the existential threat posed by Ruritania is dealt with.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  197. @dfordoom

    No discussion on the subject can be considered complete without addressing the harsh realities of life in contemporary Ankh-Morpork.

  198. Bill says:
    @academic gossip

    You’re right. That’s much worse. He either hasn’t heard of or hasn’t understood linear regression, either.

    I don’t read his blog, but I read one post about GWAS which I found pretty strange—actually, I find GWAS pretty strange in general. He was claiming that sample sizes considerably smaller than the population of the earth would make GWAS studies powerful enough to identify all the genes contributing to intelligence. This seems wrong, since, first, the sample size you “need” rises as something like the square of the number of right-hand-side variables and, second, the number of RHS variables is all the alleles of all the possibly relevant genes (plus interactions if you believe in non-linear effects).

    • Replies: @res
  199. Bill says:
    @PiltdownMan

    I’m not sure I understand what you are saying. Simon Tugmutton was claiming that Mouhot’s expertise was not relevant to HBD. I was responding that it was relevant for understanding one important aspect of HBD.

    Are you disagreeing with that? Maybe my post wasn’t clear, and you thought I was saying something else? I feel like I am completely missing your point.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  200. Bill says:
    @academic gossip

    The sad reality is that this doesn’t work with statistics because it’s a different set of concepts than all the math they are used to.

    For the example you recently linked for me regarding OLS, I don’t think this is actually true. The geometry of minimizing functions (which is what you need to avoid Hsu’s error in understanding regression) is pretty familiar to physicists from field theory, isn’t it (as I dimly remember undergrad physics)? It must be that he is either a complete idiot or that he just hasn’t read anything at all about regression.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
  201. Bill says:
    @Twinkie

    No, it’s an attempt to “prove” you are in the right without having to engage the other person in a debate or a discussion.

    What are you talking about? He explained, in a way easily accessible to anyone who knows the relevant tools, Hsu’s boneheaded errors in linear regression and logistic regression. Presumably, he has explained other mistakes elsewhere.

    You claimed to have taken graduate level statistics courses because you specialized in econometrics in your degree. Unless you have forgotten most or all of it, you really should be competent to understand Hsu’s mistakes from what academic gossip has said.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  202. res says:
    @Bill

    This seems wrong, since, first, the sample size you “need” rises as something like the square of the number of right-hand-side variables and, second, the number of RHS variables is all the alleles of all the possibly relevant genes (plus interactions if you believe in non-linear effects).

    Read up on compressed sensing (aka L1 penalized regression/regularization, aka LASSO): https://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/253136/compressed-sensing-relationship-to-l1-regularization
    If you and academic gossip are as knowledgeable as you seem to be claiming then surely you have heard of L1 regularization?

    If the number of causal alleles is sparse (compared to total # of alleles) then N does not have to be that large.

    Applying this to genomic data is Hsu’s (et al.) primary contribution in this area. Given the results achieved for height with out of sample validation I think it is fair to say the theory has been borne out in at least one case: http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2017/09/accurate-genomic-prediction-of-human.html

    There is another paper which discusses the sample size implications of considering nonlinear effects if you are interested. AFAICT sample sizes aren’t large enough for that yet.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  203. Twinkie says:
    @Bill

    I’m not talking about his criticism of Hsu. I was referring to his claim of my alleged falsehoods… which is ridiculous since it is he who sometimes makes outlandish assertions and then provides “evidence” that are at best loosely related. I already provided an example (SAT prep and Asians) which he has not disputed (probably because he knows I can dig it up and link it).

    He may understand linear regression, but he either doesn’t understand elementary school math (doubtful) or, more likely, he likes to make assertions based on his particular ethnic biases and then goes about looking for evidences to justify them. And then when he can’t, he just launches into ad hominem instead of admitting that his assertions were unwarranted (or possible/likely, but unproven). In other words, he’s not intellectually honest.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  204. Twinkie says:
    @res

    By the way, one thing that raises a significant red flag about his description of Hsu is that, instead of seeking a rebuttal or response from Hsu, he just launches into calling him an idiot, evil, ethnic chauvinist, etc. all NOT on Hsu’s blog.

    It’s not the behavior of someone who is genuinely interested in dialogue or even debate. It’s all rather stridently personal, like Hsu embarrassed him in the past or something.

  205. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    Maybe we could all look concepts up more often? Michael Hudson is a frequent Unz contributor, he talks about this a lot. How does “stagnation” sound? Does that sound neutral?

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  206. @Bill

    As indicated in my post, I was responding to your statement about differential equations.

    Errrr, aren’t differential equations kind of a workhorse of, like, genetics?

    I must have misunderstood what you meant by that. My response assumed that you meant that the mathematical area of study of differential equations is merely a collection of pragmatic l tools and methods, and that Mouhot was specializing in a field that had run dry, from the viewpoint of mathematician’s interest. I pointed out that it was, in fact, a theoretically rich field, with much interesting work remaining, for a mathematician.

    Your response to my response indicates that you, in fact, intended to convey some other meaning. I would be grateful for a clarification of what you meant by “a workhorse of, like, genetics.”

    • Replies: @Bill
  207. @J.Ross

    Maybe we could all look concepts up more often? Michael Hudson is a frequent Unz contributor, he talks about this a lot. How does “stagnation” sound? Does that sound neutral?

    Uh, I think that was just Mr. Sailer’s usual wry humor.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  208. @Bill

    The mathematical framework of linear regression (OLS only) is comfortable for people in many areas of math/science, certainly including physics. The understanding, use, and interpretation of the regressions as statistical models is foreign and that is what causes the trouble.

    The GWAS results are OK (application of “compressed sensing” theory in signal processing to the genome) but presenting them as original is somewhere on the spectrum from exaggerated to misleading to fraudulent. The novelty, and the importance, is in telling biologists that it can be done. There isn’t any statistical reasoning in this (vs regression), it is pure signal processing.

  209. J.Ross says: • Website
    @PiltdownMan

    I had an inkling but was stupid with anger about something else.

  210. @Steve Sailer

    It’s a good question. Some relevant points we already covered here:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/and-then-they-came-for-tiger-mother-amy-chua/#comment-2534424

    I have some further thoughts about this, and will try to add them after the current troll-fest is over, so that discussion is more consolidated. Otherwise it tends to get disorganized as every contentful post is surrounded by a chain of “Thou, Liar and Rapscallion!”.

  211. Bubba says:
    @Twinkie

    Thank you for the correction. Next time I won’t listen to the MSM and will verify it myself.

  212. Bill says:
    @PiltdownMan

    Differential equations are a workhorse of genetics. Mouhat knows about differential equations. That means he understands a workhorse tool of genetics. That means he (and unlike 99.9% of humanity) is competent to evaluate at least one workhorse tool of genetics. Genetics is an important aspect of HBD. Thus, he is certainly more competent than the vast majority of people to critique HBD.

    That’s what I was saying in the sentence you quote. I have no bug up my butt about the study of differential equations generally. I understand them only at an advanced undergraduate level and thus have no opinion about frontier stuff.

    Mouhot could also be completely full of shit on HBD, of course. I was both annoyed by Tugmutton’s credentialism and by the fact that he had got his credentialism wrong.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  213. @Bill

    Differential equations are a workhorse of genetics. Mouhat knows about differential equations. That means he understands a workhorse tool of genetics. That means he (and unlike 99.9% of humanity) is competent to evaluate at least one workhorse tool of genetics. Genetics is an important aspect of HBD. Thus, he is certainly more competent than the vast majority of people to critique HBD.

    Thank you for the clear explanation. I agree with your conclusion.

    I had earlier speculated that Mouhot might well have the ability to judge the quality of the social science research since he’s an associate editor of the Journal of Statistical Physics, though academicgossip was of the opposite opinion, that the statistical methods used in social sciences is far removed from, say, the mathematics of statistical mechanics and that that might not necessarily be true.

  214. @JackOH

    BTW-my thoughts here are taken from accounts derived from FBI transcripts of wiretaps, interviews with public officials, court proceedings, etc., and published in my very gutsy local newspaper.

    That sounds interesting. Can you post any links?

  215. JimS says:

    It is interesting to consider what Gibbon says, in his chapter on Roman jurisprudence:

    “The freedom of love and marriage was restrained among the Romans by natural and civil impediments. An instinct, almost innate and universal, appears to prohibit the incestuous commerce of parents and children in the infinite series of ascending and descending generations. Concerning the oblique and collateral branches, nature is indifferent, reason mute, and custom various and arbitrary. In Egypt, the marriage of brothers and sisters was admitted without scruple or exception: a Spartan might espouse the daughter of his father, an Athenian, that of his mother; and the nuptials of an uncle with his niece were applauded at Athens as a happy union of the dearest relations. The profane lawgivers of Rome were never tempted by interest or superstition to multiply the forbidden degrees: but they inflexibly condemned the marriage of sisters and brothers, hesitated whether first cousins should be touched by the same interdict; revered the parental character of aunts and uncles, and treated affinity and adoption as a just imitation of the ties of blood.”

    I think that time has shown that nature is not indifferent and reason is not mute on the subject, as shown by the evidence shown on this blog, repeatedly. But more to the point, the Romans looked down on consanguinity as discussed here. Did they have some intuition that the Greeks and Egyptians did not? Their empire was far greater and longer-lasting than the others. Is the establishment of family beyond the closeness of cousins a prerequisite for such an empire?

  216. @Bill

    Landlords are canonical rent-seekers. They expend resources to influence (0ften) zero-sum things like where a subway stop is located, what zoning variance will be granted, which type of real estate will pay what level of taxes, and so on. Landlords are almost as bad as real estate developers as engines of local government corruption.

    Those examples are ordinary subsidy chasing, not the mysterious “economic rent” (AFAICT).

    Monopoly rent is another term for a monopoly (or its profits), but the economic friction involved in “rent-seeking” that monopoly is not so easily distinguishable from, for example, advertising or bidding. Those activities eat resources for the sole purpose of determining who gets something, and produce nothing but the decision on who wins. Getting a multi-year contract to be the sole widget supplier to Walmart is a temporary monopoly, but economic theory does not appear to define it as “rent”.

    “Zero sum” is another phrase that is often used as a pseudo-concept. Given the competition in all things economic, virtually everything is zero-sum in a suitable sense, which is often the most relevant sense even when things are not zero-sum from another point of view.

    As conversational terms, and sometimes in academic literature, these are fuzzy metaphors that don’t necessarily point to anything specific, or if they do, indicate stuff that has a better description by more pedestrian terms that don’t carry value judgements.

    • Replies: @Bill
  217. Bill says:
    @academic gossip

    No, you are taking the word rent too narrowly. Look at the word “rent.” The phrase “monopoly rent” is a metaphor on ground rents, i.e. the historical thing the word “rent” points to. There is nothing really mysterious. An economic rent is a payment to a non-produced factor. Ground rent is the canonical example (outside the Netherlands or Dubai where ground is sometimes produced). Monopoly rent is another.

    Getting a multi-year contract to be the sole widget supplier to Walmart is a temporary monopoly, but economic theory does not appear to define it as “rent”.

    Filling in some details in my head that you are not filling in, the temporary stream of excess profits from this would be called a quasi-rent. A quasi-rent is a payment received today for a factor which was not produced today (but which was produced in the past). The supplier in your example had to invest in production and logistics in the baseline period in order to be able to handle Walmart’s volume, and they enjoy a stream of “excess” profits over the course of the contract to reimburse them. In the long run, no rent. In the short run (post-investment) a quasi-rent.

    One can have arguments about whether a certain payment is, in fact, a rent, a quasi-rent, or something else. That one can have such arguments not only does not prove that these terms are undefined, it is pretty strong evidence that they are not.

    “Zero sum” is another phrase that is often used as a pseudo-concept. Given the competition in all things economic, virtually everything is zero-sum in a suitable sense, which is often the most relevant sense even when things are not zero-sum from another point of view.

    That’s just gibber-jabber. Value is relative to how we value is a point too dumb to be worth making. Weirdly, two paras prior, you demonstrate knowledge of what zero sum means ” activities eat resources for the sole purpose of determining who gets something,” so I’m kind of baffled.

    Rent, quasi-rent, and rent-seeking are positive (rather than normative) terms which are well-defined within the relevant discourse. You are either prissily complaining that you don’t like the subject of the discourse or misunderstanding.

    That the glibertarian clown show runs with these terms and uses them in annoyingly inappropriate ways doesn’t change this. Physics terms do not magically lose their meanings because they are deployed by 9/11 Truthers or fans of perpetual motion machines.

    • Replies: @academic gossip
  218. @Bill

    Thanks for the answer. I don’t have time to follow up point by point at the moment but wanted to mention the following. From consulting a fair number of economics papers and survey articles on “rent seeking”, two things were apparent:

    1. It is a concept that has been enmeshed in controversies and definitional disputes from the beginning.

    2. The term was meant to sound bad and to evoke the idea of a rentier, although of course it also has a neutral use as a defined term within theoretical economic models.

    I think that there is a useful concept somewhere in there that is not fully captured in the present definitions. Several different matters intermixed that can be separated or dropped (particularly the question of whether something is “productive”).

  219. @Twinkie

    As for the dispute between you and Hsu, I really would like to see his response

    There is no dispute, and no serious response that he could give other than admitting the error(s). It really is just a more sophisticated version of 2+2=7 in light of standard theory expounded in many statistics and econometrics books.

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