The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
A Question of Law ...
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Derek Chauvin was convicted three times because George Floyd is not just a man, he is also the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost of our new state religion.

 
Hide 87 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Cortes says:

    He’s once, twice, three times our Saviour…

    • LOL: Wilkey, The Alarmist
  2. Mike Tre says:

    Well, what are you going to do about it whitey?

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @interesting
  3. AndrewR says:

    How much of the last 11 months can be explained by the elites simply exploiting an otherwise unremarkable case for political gain, and how much can be explained by Floyd filling the vacuum left by removing Jesus from Christianity? Everyone on this site is surely familiar with the idea that “anti-racism” and its sister pathologies are all part of a memeplex that has largely descended from Christianity and has mostly replaced it as national religion and state ideology.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
  4. Marquis says:

    You’ll get your answer on race when you see what happens with the other non-white cops involved. If Chauvin is guilty of intentional murder, they’re surely accomplices.

  5. Guilty of:

    • cooking.
    • cooking a hamburger.
    • cooking to a temp > 180 degrees F.
    • eating.
    • eating dinner.
    •’eating red meat
    • eating a hamburger.
    • putting ketchup on a burger.
    • putting mayo atop ketchup.
    • putting the burger on bread.
    • putting the burger on a bun.
    • putting the burger on a toasted bun.

  6. Arclight says:

    The left really has a knack for making martyrs of people that really have almost nothing to recommend them. Is it because they just totally have their blinders on and any person mistreated by a cop is automatically apotheosized, or is it an extreme form of gaslighting to subjugate the masses by forcing them to participate in a lie?

  7. ic1000 says:
    @Arclight

    > is it an extreme form of gaslighting to subjugate the masses by forcing them to participate in a lie?

    I don’t see much subjugation. From Co-President Harris and President Biden on down, the participation looks downright joyous.

    • Replies: @Arclight
    , @Reg Cæsar
  8. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    What’s the deal with that by the way, how do you get convicted of two types of murder and also manslaughter for the death of the same man?

    I’ve been wondering that, too.

    • Replies: @Dube
    , @James Forrestal
  9. Schroedinger’s state of mind…It’s obvious that the simulation has entered a quantum state whereby a homicide can be both negligent and intentional at the same time.

  10. Tim says:
    @Marquis

    No, I don’t think they will be convicted of anything. The mob is a mob, but–hey, look a squirrel.

    Besides they’re not white, they’re–whatever.

    I think the interesting thing is going to be whether the DOJ charges them with civil rights violations. My guess is the DOJ will talk about it, “investigate” but when they see that no one cares, will drop it.

  11. Dr. Doom says:

    The blacks have to be the worst “victims” ever.
    No one really believes they are innocent.

    This attempt to intimidate White Americans is selling a lot of guns.
    The time has come to lock and load those guns.

    We are not kulaks. We are not victims.
    The White Man ruled the world before, he can rule his lands again.

    The Stupid Failed State has just signed their Death Warrant.
    THEY JUST SAID THAT VIOLENCE WORKS AND LAWS DO NOT MATTER…

  12. Arclight says:
    @ic1000

    Really? I think they are pretty successfully beating down corporations for not supporting the *right* political causes even on issues like voter ID that has widespread support, every school, large business, and public agency feels compelled to hire diversity staff, woke loyalty oaths are required in higher ed, and those of us who interact with government as part of our jobs have to pay lip service to the gods of diversity and inclusion to even get a meeting.

    There are a fair number of people that find this grating but have no choice but to go along with it to preserve their livelihoods and social standing. You can openly talk about any doubts you have about DIE or BLM with close friends, but certainly not in a casual social setting where people you do not know well might hear.

  13. There’s a whole literature on whether “X fired the gun at Y” is or isn’t the same event as “X killed Y.” UNZ readers are the type to mock academic philosophers who discuss the question of how to distinguish events (Is “Julian’s defeat in Mesopotamia” the same event as “Julian’s failure to restore paganism” and are either the same as “Julian’s worst day ever”?) as the pinheaded activities of girly men, and yet, here we are.

    But off the top of my non-legal head, I assume this leaves sentencing up to the judge (or jury, however they do it in MN) and/or allows one or two verdicts to be overturned without resulting in a new trial. Really more straightforward than all the dog whistling people have been trying to find in the judge’s rulings — like Trump’s 4D chess, the judge is really trying to give the appellate court grounds to reverse, etc.

  14. i wondered the same thing. you have 1 fatality, but 3 charges. how does that work? was the prosecution trying to offer the jury 1 of 3 options? the prosecution has a history of overcharging in these cases, so if they overcharge with murder one but can’t prove murder one, they can’t get the defendant on anything. but if they offer the jury several different charges, maybe they can convince the jury to convict on 1 of them.

    i could see a manslaughter conviction. but how do you get charged with 2 counts of murder for 1 fatality, plus manslaughter.

    but i’m not a lawyer. so can any lawyer explain this? wonder what Cernovich thinks.

  15. In a city 20% non-White the jury was 50% POC. In the account of the testimony I read the weight of Floyd’s lungs was never mentioned. So, the prosecution got the jury it wanted and the defense apparently never mentioned the strongest evidence that Floyd killed himself.

    Zimmerman was found not guilty, but he had a better lawyer.

  16. @Arclight

    The left sacralizes people they think are oppressed. People earn intersectional Pokemon points by their characteristics of oppression. The more dysfunctional, the more oppressed. Floyd earned points by being colored, a druggie, an incompetent counterfeiter, a career criminal and best of all dying of a drug overdose while in the custody of a white policeman.

    Colored people, criminals, the LGBT, child molesters, pornographers and whores, the mentally ill, the morbidly obese, drug abusers and alcoholics, the homeless, et al all earn the intersectional Pokemon points for their various dysfunctions which are blamed on oppression by white males. Seems like a jump in logic, but there you go.

    Do they actually believe this nonsense? The foot soldiers, the useful idiots, the typical Democrats and mediaites probably do. At least they say they do. The actual Ruling Class wouldn’t touch losers like Floyd with a 10 foot pole.

  17. Anon7 says:

    They’ve leveled up. Triple penalties show that Black Lives Matter. New normal.

    Every small town in America needs more blacks. There just aren’t enough to go around. Steve’s Most Important Graph in the World isn’t producing quickly enough.

  18. @Mike Tre

    Sit back and watch the death rates in inner cities explode while cops no longer police them. If I was a cop there is no way I’m doing anything in the “wrong areas”, you wanna pass a fake $20? Fine by me, have at it. You wanna do a home invasions and point your “piece” at the pregnant woman’s belly? Fine, don’t call 911, you deal with it.

    But remember, you wanted this.

    And you?

    P.S. It’s my humble opinion that Chauvin WAS guilty of reckless homicide but not the charges as filed.

  19. Here we go.

    Again.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  20. @Arclight

    If there is a sin that defines the left, it is envy. Hence communism, hence the tendency to make martyrs of reprobates–they are only willing to make saints out of those that don’t threaten their own ego.

    • Agree: sayless
    • Replies: @Goingblankagain
    , @res
  21. @prime noticer

    It’s just garden variety, prosecutorial abuse.

    Each trivial element of the “crime” is itself punishable by jail time. Lots of little elements aggregate to lots of prison time.

    Or the defendant can take a plea.

  22. 22pp22 says:

    The USA has a spectacularly feral black underclass that is now motorised and above the law.

    The USA has just abolished itself.

  23. Handle says:

    The jury is not asked to “pick one of three”, just to find whether the particular elements of each charge were proved to be facts beyond a reasonable doubt. For related charges with overlap in the elements, the judge selects the single most serious guilty verdict as the basis for sentencing.

  24. Anonymous[299] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve been complaining about the government charging people with the same crime multiple times, for years..

  25. @gandydancer

    “In a city 20% non-White the jury was 50% POC. ..”

    According to wikipedia Minneapolis is (as of 2019) 60% Non-Hispanic White.

  26. Wilkey says:
    @AndrewR

    Christianity actually had some sexiness to it. I mean, the Virgin Mary is hot. All those chaste nuns in their habits, and Catholic school girls in their school girl uniforms? YES.

    If George Floyd had a mother I’m pretty damn sure she wasn’t a virgin and if George Floyd had a daughter she may be rich now, but I’m damn sure I don’t want to see her in a Catholic school girl uniform.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  27. @Arclight

    Spotlighting suspect characters as the primary victims is a feature, not a bug. What use is having power if you can’t force feed a shit sandwich to the people you hate.

  28. @Marquis

    Luckily we have the fiasco up in Brooklyn Center, MN to provide the perfect distraction.

    I surmise that unless the Knappy Headed Ho Muddy Waters riles up the BLM insurrectionists about Chauvin’s accomplices. It’s safe to assume they’ll be safe from being sacrificed.

    As for the rest of the WYTEs it appears the killing fields and Uyghurs re-education concentration camps are in the works for those unwilling to bend the knee and kiss the black boot.

  29. Anonymous[363] • Disclaimer says:

    • Replies: @Rouetheday
    , @Louis Renault
  30. @James J O'Meara

    Please provide relevant case law where the results were overturned by the appellate courts. Generally in cases like these, from my limited knowledge about it, cases are rarely overturned unless there’s outright misfeasance on the part of the prosecutor or the judge.

    Maybe Steve can drum up examples.

  31. @James B. Shearer

    The Black percentage of Minneapolis has increased dramatically in the last two decades alone. Ah for the good old days, when the only Black person from Minneapolis was Prince.

  32. @interesting

    Chauvin wasn’t guilty of anything other than being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

    Other than that I agree with you on violence increasing exponentially in Wakandan ghettos.

    • Agree: donut
  33. @SimpleSong

    they are only willing to make saints out of those that don’t threaten their own ego.

    Contrast the endless adultory articles about “stunning”, “glamorous” Michelle Obama with the fact Melania probably received less media attention than any first lady since Mamie Eisenhower.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  34. @Wilkey

    …if George Floyd had a daughter she may be rich now, but I’m damn sure I don’t want to see her in a Catholic school girl uniform.

    Especially with black patent leather shoes.

  35. He should have been found guilty of only one of the three. There were three to allow the jury leeway in case the most severe charge was not warranted but a lesser charge was.

    Besides, Maxine Waters has issued a fatwah: “Guilty Guilty Guilty”

  36. @ic1000

    I don’t see much subjugation. From Co-President Harris and President Biden on down, the participation looks downright joyous.

    Should Doug Emhoff suffer an untimely demise, Kamala could be the first president or leader of any country to commit suttee while in office.

    I hope it’s on YouTube. Timothy Leary backed down from his promise to put his suicide online.

  37. Lot says:

    He will not be sentenced for killing St George three times.

    The purpose of concurrent conviction on all the “lesser included offenses” is to ensure if an element of the greater offense is reversed on appeal, but all the elements of the lesser offenses are affirmed, the lesser offenses conviction stands. That happens often and is standard procedure.

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
  38. @gandydancer

    Zimmerman’s defense counsel was not facing a 10 lawyer (12?) dream team of top criminal lawyers acting as prosecutors…kind of like the O.J. Simpson prosecution in reverse.
    Chauvin’s lawyer was basically on his own. The prosecution took advantage of that, with frequent last-minute document dumps.
    Chauvin’s attorney was outgunned, pure and simple. Even if the conviction is reversed, Chauvin will still face federal charges, and the Dems will pursue him until something sticks. Pretty much everybody associated with his defense will also be doxed and hunted down, expert witnesses, attorney, secretaries, investigators, etc.

    Look, if you are a true progressive, breaking the rules is OK. The rules themselves, whether set forth in the Constitution, or in statute, are themselves illegitimate, so all’s fair.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @gandydancer
  39. Dube says:
    @Anonymous

    Here’s an explanation for the three charges of guilt, courtesy of NYT:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/20/us/chauvin-guilty-verdict-sentencing.html?action=click&module=Spotlight&pgtype=Homepage

    When juries can choose among different counts and instead pick “all of the above,” it raises questions of how one act can meet the definition of three separate crimes. In this case, Mr. Chauvin was found guilty of:

    1) causing the death of a human being, without intent, while committing or attempting to commit an assault (second-degree murder);

    2) unintentionally causing a death by committing an act that is eminently dangerous to other persons while exhibiting a depraved mind, with reckless disregard for human life (third-degree murder);

    3) and creating an unreasonable risk, by consciously taking the chance of causing death or great bodily harm to someone else (manslaughter).

    Neither murder charge required the jury to find that Mr. Chavin intended to kill Mr. Floyd. Nor did the manslaughter charge. So the jury could have determined a state of mind for Mr. Chauvin (the legal term of art is “mens rea”) that would cover all three charges.

    The separate acts the jury had to find Mr. Chauvin committed also seem compatible with one another. To streamline the language a bit, “committing an assault” and “committing an act that is eminently dangerous to other persons” and “creating an unreasonable risk” can all go together.

    In fact, “eminently dangerous” is a synonym for unreasonably risky. And both coexist easily with committing an assault.

    An appeals court could disagree with this analysis and throw out one or more of the counts.

  40. I’ve been talking about St. Floyd for the past year.

    Y’all owe me royalties.

  41. @Hapalong Cassidy

    Ah for the good old days, when the only Black person from Minneapolis was Prince.

    Who chose to live in Chaska.

    The 5 largest ethnic groups in Chaska, MN are White (Non-Hispanic) (82.7%), White (Hispanic) (6.9%), Asian (Non-Hispanic) (3.53%), Two+ (Non-Hispanic) (2.75%), and Black or African American (Non-Hispanic) (2.21%). 0% of the people in Chaska, MN speak a non-English language, and 97.2% are U.S. citizens.

    Data USA: Chaska MN

    • Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost
  42. @Hapalong Cassidy

    There was always a significant black population in Minneapolis, however. Mostly on the north side, near other white ethnics. The Somali population has been the biggest contributor to the increase in city blacks, but they’re a somewhat different animal—less outright riots, more graft and corruption.

  43. @Reg Cæsar

    Prince was a pretty conservative guy on a lot of issues, like a lot of gifted people who know how much hard work is required to succeed. In addition to his well known conversion to the Jehovah’s Witnesses, he said when Reagan defeated Carter that it was good to have a president with balls again.

  44. @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    I recall a case back in the 80s in Florida where a cop’s conviction for killing some black was overturned on appeal when it was determined the jury convicted out of fear that there’d be a riot if they voted for acquittal. Can’t recall the name or particulars, but I don’t think there was rioting after the successful appeal.

    Don’t know if something like that will happen here, but legally Florida in the 80s was a distant galaxy far far away.

    • Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost
  45. “The purpose of concurrent conviction on all the “lesser included offenses” is to ensure if an element of the greater offense is reversed on appeal, but all the elements of the lesser offenses are affirmed, the lesser offenses conviction stands. That happens often and is standard procedure.”

    i thought that was the point of multiple life sentences, or sentences of 200 years and stuff like that. that’s how James Fields got 400 years for ‘killing’ some fat woman.

    so basically they do sentence you 3 or 4 times for killing 1 person one time. in case one of the life sentences is later removed by some politicians or lawyers 20 years from now. you’re still in for forever. getting 100 years taken off your sentence has no practical effect for you. you need the entire 300 years wiped out or whatever the number happens to be.

    here, if the murder 2 charge is later overturned, there’s no way on earth they’re letting Chauvin then get a simple 10 year sentence for manslaughter. anyway, it’s amazing how lots of these stone cold killers never get a 300 year sentence if they’re political allies to the government, but political enemies can get those kinds of sentences any time. tons of democrat voting africans who are stone cold killers get like 30 years sentences for outright, red handed, they admitted it murder, then walk after only 20 years.

  46. @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    “Please provide relevant case law where the results were overturned by the appellate courts.”

    Dude, chill out. What part of “off the top of my non-legal head, I assume” don’t you understand? Just having a conversation here; don’t worry, Schlomo, I won’t be charging you for it.

  47. @Dube

    When the lawyer-DAs pile on the bogus charges, the juries should acquit (nullify).

  48. @interesting

    Yes, these verdicts made all of us less safe.

  49. Anon[295] • Disclaimer says:
    @James J O'Meara

    There’s a whole literature on whether “X fired the gun at Y” is or isn’t the same event as “X killed Y.”

    What literature is that?

    What light can it shed on this situation?

  50. Anon[263] • Disclaimer says:

    Maybe the jury was sending a secret “hostage video” message by returning a verdict that will keep them alive, while at the same time making the verdict logically ridiculous and nonsensical.

  51. @Dube

    The second degree murder count is a type of felony murder. It doesn’t require intent to kill. It transfers the intent of the perpetrator from the felony he did intend to commit to the homicide.

    In this case the underlying felony was attempted assault. But under the common-law doctrine of merger, the underlying felony for a felony murder cannot be a felony that is part of homicide. Assault is always a part of homicide, so should not be permitted to serve as the underlying felony for felony murder. I’m sure Minnesota’s statutes or case law address this, but as with everything with this case, it seems fishy.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  52. Why didn’t the defense follow this playbook?

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  53. our new state religion

    This is my country.

    But it’s not my state and sure as hell not my religion.

    Nor is it yours.

  54. @Percy Gryce

    What’s fishy about it?

    It’s 100% Grade A red meat. Nobody is under any illusion as to what is taking place. There’s no need for them to hide anymore.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  55. @additionalMike

    Unlike the O. J. Simpson lawyers, I consider the George Floyd prosecution team actually immoral.

    The former merely helped a guilty man to avoid justice, but the latter were working on putting an innocent man in prison for the rest of his life. That’s actually evil.

  56. @James J O'Meara

    I actually think those academic discussions are interesting and uxeful. The problem is not theorizing about law but the practical application, in which prosecutors pile on multiple charges to get something to stick. Also, getting lost in questions about state of mind or the relationship between another felony and a killing can obscure the central factual question of whether A actually caused B’s death beyond a reasonable doubt–a question that seems to have been misplaced in this trial.

  57. Anonymous[381] • Disclaimer says:
    @reiner Tor

    Unlike the O. J. Simpson lawyers, I consider the George Floyd prosecution team actually immoral.

    The former merely helped a guilty man to avoid justice, but the latter were working on putting an innocent man in prison for the rest of his life. That’s actually evil.

    • Agree

  58. @Goingblankagain

    See Sailer’s First Law of Female Journalism.

  59. @James B. Shearer

    According to wikipedia Minneapolis is (as of 2019) 60% Non-Hispanic White.

    According to the Census , 63.6%. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/minneapoliscityminnesota

    According to Data USA, 68.4%. https://datausa.io/profile/geo/hennepin-county-mn

    I stand somewhat corrected, but that’s not the jury pool, where the White percentage ought to be higher.

    My point stands. Chauvin’s lawyer let himself (and Chauvin) be rolled.

  60. @gandydancer

    … those numbers are for Hennepin County, not Minneapolis, and I don’t know the boundaries of the jury pool, so there’s that. But the ME was the Hennepin County ME.

  61. @James J O'Meara

    I assume this… allows one or two verdicts to be overturned without resulting in a new trial. Really more straightforward than all the dog whistling people have been trying to find in the judge’s rulings — like Trump’s 4D chess, the judge is really trying to give the appellate court grounds to reverse, etc.

    Not clear what you are trying to say here. Trump wasn’t playing 4D Chess and the judge is unlikely to have wanted anything overturned.

    There is this about the judge: “The judge said he would allow photos and descriptions of Floyd’s upbringing, but he told the prosecution to keep it brief.”

    So apparently Floyd’s baby pictures were allowed into evidence?

    There’s no sign in that account that Chauvin’s lawyer said “boo!”, so the issue may not even be preserved for appeal.

    As if the higher courts are likely to be better.

  62. @reiner Tor

    You encapsulate this case in a sentence. To anyone with an inquiring, independent cast of mind the total corruption of the US “Justice System” is there for all to see. But, of course, the aim of the US “Education System” is not to promote independent inquiry.

  63. They should have rounded it out by also convicting Chauvin of first degree murder and attempted murder.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  64. @prime noticer

    i could see a manslaughter conviction. but how do you get charged with 2 counts of murder for 1 fatality, plus manslaughter.

    One of the “murder” counts wasn’t murder, but felony murder, which isn’t actually murder. It’s intended for accomplices in committing a felony who don’t actually commit the murder — think the charge against Greg McMichael — and it was blatantly misused here.

    The manslaughter and murder-2 charges require different levels of intent, I think. I would have thought the jury instructions would have covered that, but apparently not.

  65. @interesting

    There is no such crime as “reckless homicide”.

    And there is reasonable doubt that anything Chauvin did contributed in a material way to Floyd’s death.

    So he’s not guilty of anything he was charged with.

  66. @JohnnyWalker123

    The life of the Black girl dressed in pink that Makiyah Bryant was trying to stab Doesn’t Matter.

    Crump is on the case.

  67. @additionalMike

    Chauvin’s lawyer was basically on his own. The prosecution took advantage of that, with frequent last-minute document dumps.

    I know Chauvin’s wimp of a lawyer whined about that, but did he demand continuances so that he could properly examine the discovery material? And preserve the issue for appeals?

    Reread my initial post. A battalion of prosecutors is relevant to exactly none of the points I made about Nelson’s performance.

    Btw, the Governor of Florida (R) appointed a special prosecutor (R) just for Zimmerman, and the so-called judge was even worse than Chauvin’s, so there’s that.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @Hibernian
  68. @Anonymous

    “… embraced as a universal symbol of the need to overhaul BLACK PEOPLE”.

    There, I fixed it for ya, Associated Press. You’re welcome.

  69. @Percy Gryce

    Why didn’t the defense follow this playbook?

    Indeed. I saw no mention of Nelson even mentioning the weight of Floyd’s lungs, whereas he should have pounded on the pulmonary edema as the explanation of Floyd’s difficulty breathing, and pounded, and pounded.

  70. @Anonymous

    He was respected so much that a different judge and jury sent him to prison for 5 years for aggrevated robbery with a weapon in 2007.

  71. @gandydancer

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t believe that Trayvon Martin was proclaimed a deity, he was merely canonized. At the time it was also occasionally permitted not to celebrate him, whereas by 2020-21 loud participation in the Two Minutes Hate against Derek Chauvin has already become mandatory. So I think Chauvin’s chances were always way worse than those of Zimmerman.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  72. @reiner Tor

    You’re missing the point, which is that the wimpy cuckish defense tossed whatever chance he had down the crapper.

    Nelson will have more cases before Minneapolis judges, and he wasn’t about to piss them off by putting up too obstreperous a fight. The union was paying him, not Chauvin.

  73. @gandydancer

    I stand somewhat corrected, but that’s not the jury pool, where the White percentage ought to be higher.

    Are you suggesting that white Minneapolis jurors would have been less likely to convict Chauvin on all counts than blacks? I seriously doubt it. In addition to how totally Woke they would be, they would be justifiably in fear for their lives, their employment, their social standing, and that of their children and parents for as long as all shall live. It’s easy to call them cowards, but they had a gun at their heads, and I mean that more literally than figuratively.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @gandydancer
  74. @reiner Tor

    There were plenty of eye witnesses and video recordings too.

    However I would agree that Chauvin is to some extent a proxy for police brutality in general. Even his surname could hardly have been selected at random.

    And this jury was a proxy for the general public and has delivered a verdict that police brutality is something up with which the public will not put anymore.

    Eventually Chauvin’s conviction will probably be downgraded to manslaughter–which would be fairer to him–once the heat has blown over.

    In the meantime, Chauvin supporters will gain nothing by wearing their “I am a Chauvinist” badges.

  75. res says:
    @SimpleSong

    That is an interesting take I had not seen before. Thanks. Perhaps a slightly different take would be “he is a saint and I am even better”?

  76. res says:
    @Dube

    Contrast that NYT excerpt with Lot’s response which actually makes sense. Any lawyers care to elaborate?

  77. @Nikolai Vladivostok

    They should have rounded it out by also convicting Chauvin of first degree murder and attempted murder.

    Throw in genocide while you’re at it.

    You’re lucky you’re in America, not Vladivostok:

    Russian activist in jail for giant duck protest

  78. Hibernian says:
    @Marquis

    I think one of the other three is white. One is East Asian and was handling crowd control. How he could be charged as an accomplice to murder I don’t understand. Why not the dispatcher too? I believe this dude is vulnerable because of previous complaints. The two who were holding Floyd for Chauvin had just passed their probations.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
  79. Hibernian says:
    @gandydancer

    I know Chauvin’s wimp of a lawyer whined about that, but did he demand continuances so that he could properly examine the discovery material? And preserve the issue for appeals?

    Could the whining be construed as an objection which would preserve the issue for appeal?

    In the Jason Van Dyke/ Laquan Mc Donald case, Van Dyke’s lawyers (Think there were two.) seemed mediocre. Also, one of the experts was the same in both cases. (The retired cop to whose old California address a pig’s head was delivered.) He was poor. In addition this expert was not available to rebut the last minute prosecution carbon monoxide “evidence.” (Expert opinion by a government staff doctor.) They need to pay the expert witnesss enough to stay in town until the trial is over, or get a local one or at least one from not too far away.

    The police unions would do well to charge higher dues and hire better lawyers. Also, these two cases plainly show “He was just doing his job.” won’t cut it.

    • Replies: @anon
  80. anon[332] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hibernian

    The police unions would do well to charge higher dues and hire better lawyers. Also, these two cases plainly show “He was just doing his job.” won’t cut it.

    What is your own opinion of Nelson’s performance?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  81. @Desiderius

    Yeah, DaDa-logic is officially approved now. Will be interesting to see how that will work out. – All the world’s a stage and the new rules state that whoever enters center stage and is white can be shot at as long a the reasons given for the happy shootings with a worm gun (Johnny Rotten) can be looked upon as woke. Hugo Ball would not believe what’s going on here.

  82. Hibernian says:
    @anon

    Very poor, which maybe I hadn’t quite made perfectly clear. He should be handling real estate closings.

    • Agree: gandydancer
  83. @Hibernian

    I believe this dude is vulnerable because of previous complaints.

    Chauvin had two upheld complaints in 20 years, both minor. He had a bravery citation, too, for a shootout. AFAIK nothing about the complaints was brought up at trial. Or the citation, though Floyd’s baby pictures, or somesuch, were let in. (Something about “spark of life”, iirc. At the stage of the trial where you are supposed to be determining guilt or innocence, not considering sentencing based on victim impacts. Unbelievable.)

    The two who were holding Floyd for Chauvin had just passed their probations.

    No, they hadn’t. Lane was on his 4th shift. The other probably about the same.

    Could the whining be construed as an objection which would preserve the issue for appeal?

    Maybe, at least as to the instances whined about. But the appeal is likely to get short shrift unless — or even if — it is an active embarrassment to the appeals court to ignore what the prosecution did. For that Nelson need to draw attention to EVERY INSTANCE of the prosecution doing this to make it a public scandal. But he didn’t have the gumption or stones to do that.

  84. @Harry Baldwin

    Are you suggesting that white Minneapolis jurors would have been less likely to convict Chauvin on all counts than blacks?

    Absolutely. His chances may have been slim, but evey extra black juror reduced them. And race wasn’t the only demographic dimension in which Nelson fucked up.

  85. @Anonymous

    “Dube’s” link to the Sulzberger Blog is a decent explanation of the hegemonic semitic narrative on the issue. Leaving aside the obvious point that Floyd clearly died of opioid-induced non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema [rather than having his tiny, frail Black body crushed to death by the overwhelming weight of Officer Chauvin’s 150-lb frame, as The Narrative would have you believe] the really questionable part here is the way they came up with the “2nd degree murder” canard.

    Generally speaking, first degree murder involves both intent and premeditation; second degree means intent but no premeditation.

    So where does the second degree murder charge come from? After all, the prosecution never claimed that Chauvin intended to cause Floyd’s overdose. Apparently it’s a “felony murder” charge. If you cause someone else’s death while committing another felony, they can charge you with second (or first) degree murder without specific evidence of intent or premeditation to kill that particular person. Say, if you’re robbing a bank and a security guard pulls a gun or makes some other move to stop you, and you shoot him dead, you can’t plead self defense, because, well — you were robbing the place. And you can’t claim you didn’t intend to kill him, because when you decide to commit an armed robbery, you’re effectively deciding to kill anyone who stands in your way, even if you didn’t know it would be that specific guy.

    But in Chauvin’s case? The prosecution claims that Chauvin assaulted Floyd (with fentanyl, apparently), and Floyd died as a result of that separate [?] felony, therefore felony murder:

    1) causing the death of a human being, without intent, while committing or attempting to commit an assault (second-degree murder)

    I mean, I’m not an attorney, but aren’t they just finessing the whole concept of intent/ mens rea in a rather blatant manner? The alleged “assault” is an inseparable aspect of the supposed “murder,” not a separate felony. If any assault automatically equates to “intent” to murder [because felony assault]… didn’t they just effectively eliminate the entire concept of manslaughter?

    For any goy unlucky enough to be targeted by a major “news” media narrative, anyway.

  86. @Arclight

    The “left” really has a knack for making martyrs of people that really have almost nothing to recommend them…

    …is it an extreme form of gaslighting to subjugate the masses by forcing them to participate in a lie?

    It’s partly a humiliation ritual, and partly a loyalty test. Compare to Havel’s greengrocer in The Power of the Powerless
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_of_the_Powerless#Havel’s_greengrocer

    Or to the ancient Chinese example of “Point deer, make horse”:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_of_the_Powerless#Havel’s_greengrocer

    Personality cults of are a somewhat similar phenomenon. Stories about the Great Leader are often ridiculously implausible — but you wouldn’t want to point out their defects in public. Or, as in Solzhenitsyn’s famous anecdote, be the first one to stop clapping. Fortunately, we don’t see that sort of over-the-top worship of leaders in America. Well, at least not of “our” leaders…

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/watch-netanyahu-get-26-standing-ovations-during-his-speech-to-congress
    https://mondoweiss.net/2015/03/netanyahus-consisted-standing/

    Well, at least it’s not mandatory

    https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/unenthused-rand-paul-lifelessly-applauds-netanyahu-speech-brendan-bordelon/
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-03-03/rand-paul-s-israel-problem-summed-up-in-one-amazing-gif

    Huh. Good thing he didn’t stop clapping completely…

    So when they’re looking for anecdotes to illustrate the desired narrative of “White cop kills innocent Black man because anti-melanotic hatred,” they intentionally choose weak ones. Look at the Andre Hill one from December, for instance:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killing_of_Andre_Hill
    Pretty obviously a bad shoot — and the guy was literally wearing a BLM shirt when he was shot. It got some coverage initially, and the cop was charged, but the narrative wasn’t really pushed much at the national level, and they didn’t really try to incite riots over it. At the national level, it just faded away.

    Weak/ implausible narratives actually make better loyalty tests. Plus the way these narratives are constructed, they need to have “two sides.” Instead of a single “party line,” you have a managed dialectic [commonly known as a “kosher sandwich” or “Bagelian dialectic”], which makes people feel as if they have a “choice.” This one, or that one, goy! If they tried to construct a narrative that focused on an incident where the White cop was obviously at fault, then it would be hard to get enough people to back the “other” side. Having the hegemonic narrative and the facts on the same side makes it too unbalanced.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments have been licensed to The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Commenting Disabled While in Translation Mode
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
The Shaping Event of Our Modern World
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement
Becker update V1.3.2
The JFK Assassination and the 9/11 Attacks?