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From ABC News:

FBI Recommends No Charges Should Be Filed Against Hillary Clinton

Now back to the big breaking news on how many points there were on a Donald Trump-tweeted star … For example, from today’s Washington Post:

For the fourth straight day, Trump faces criticism on Star of David tweet

Donald Trump tweeted an image that came from a June 15 tweet by @FishBoneHead1, an account with a penchant for memes that mock Muslims, black Democrats and more. Trump later deleted the tweet and uploaded it with a circle instead of a red Star of David. (Twitter screengrab)

By Sean Sullivan July 5 at 6:44 PM

 
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  1. Steve, FBI Director Coomey delivered a measured indictment of Hillary’s incompetence, without recommending an indictment. He actually said that in many cases this type of activity would result in sanctions or have other consequences. But that’s the real world and this is Obama World. But, on a positive note it gives her opposition plenty of ammo.

    • Replies: @Blah
    @Buffalo Joe

    I would only pray a Trump campaign had someone competent enough to make the argument you do.

    Replies: @jon

    , @whorefinder
    @Buffalo Joe

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Seriously, after Orlando and San Bernadino, the FBI's reputation should have been on extremely shaky ground. Unfortunately, the news media wasn't smart enough the notice that the FBI should have nipped those thugs in the bud---they even had the suspects on their radar, but didn't bother following up. And the public---especially the right wing/Trump wing---is too enamored of the cops/law enforcement to admit the gross incompetence displayed.

    This non-indictment for her crimes is just proof how much the FBI is nothing more than a controlled entity of the political hacks in Washington. Historically, this will mark a point where future scholars will say that the FBI officially became merely a secret police organization without any fidelity to principles or law, only to their political leaders.

    And Comey's reputation is truly trashed---he will come out extremely poorly in terms of how historians note his character. He's now a known yes-man for the power brokers and the money men.

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations---where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free---the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically. But there is a profound disconnect in this country between the massive fuckups and corruption of the G-Men--stretching at least back to Hoover refusing to investigate or even admit organized crime existed, on the fear of being outed as a homosexual---and the public/media perception of them.

    The FBI guys are hacks.

    Replies: @fnn, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Stan Adams, @Buffalo Joe, @EriK, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    , @Diversity Heretic
    @Buffalo Joe

    Bizarely, the fact that she does as she pleases and gets away with it strengthens her support with much of her constituency

    Replies: @TontoBubbaGoldstein, @Dennis Dale

    , @JimB
    @Buffalo Joe

    This is such an incongruous outcome I can only think the NSA has something on Comey. We've entered an age where basically any public official can be blackmailed or neutralized by Big Brother. (I think this was the topic of a not too long ago iSteve post.)

    Democracy is over. Do what you're told.

    Replies: @Pericles

    , @Lagertha
    @Buffalo Joe

    I am stunned! My ancestors who fought for Independence (against Bolsheviks in 1917) and to retain Independence in WW2, would be fracking appalled by this BS call today in the USA! This is all major BS; more like cowed American people in positions of leadership people, who are forced/compromised people, and sort of in milquetoast positions in government (now) like Comey, who have to think about their petty lives if they disagree against "the authorities" who will wreck their lives if they digress? Could he/his children have been threatened? - this was the position, according to my grandfather, an officer in WW2.....threaten people and their children to get your way.

    My grandfather's squad just corralled all the Reds out of his (they were natives of his country, but they were fracking Communists...dirt, as far as he was concerned) country to the border of his beloved Karelia, USSR thereafter, and said, "Walk east, may God save you from your stupidity." I kid you not! That was a real quote! I remember I was 10 when he said this to me over breakfast in the 70's. I have a crazy and interesting family...very large, very large family. Ok, said too much.

    Also. The whole Star of David today stuff, is "Disruption Porn," - the "Kitchen Sink" stuff I expected.

    - Staying in WW2 vibe, while I still have enough energy & 50% sense, (I am 99% ok for you guys that care) Jews were never "given up" by the Finns when Finns reluctantly (but strategically) had to figure out how to buy weapons (from Germany) to fight Stalin, Finland lost 18 Jewish students who could not get out of Germany, back to Finland, in time as things got worse in 1943.

    Weirdly, in the main cemetery : Hietalahden Hautausmaa (where my father's ashes are & where I must bring my mother's ashes when the time comes), there are very distinct areas: The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier which is combined with the Finnish Presidents & Mannerheim....the place the tour buses come and see - and oh yeah, Wirkkala's scuplture is not far. And, next to this spot: are the Nazis. The men whose bodies were not called back. Finns are Lutheran, so you don't desecrate dead bodies.

    And, finally, across the beautiful park, over a 8' wide garden path, there is the Jewish cemetery. So, all these headstones with crosses, Stars of David and Swastikas are all in less than a half acre...kid you not! I have taken many American GI's there over the years as no tram or bus comes there,
    so close to the center of the Helsinki, or where the Cruise Ships dock.
    a

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Thea

    , @gda
    @Buffalo Joe

    No one up until now has really emphasized how absolutely extraordinary Coomey's statements were in eviscerating Hillary. Remember - he didn't have to call her an untrustworthy, careless and an incompetent liar time after time. He said things which we would normally NEVER hear the head of the FBI (or equivalent) say about a Presidential nominee outside a courtroom.

    Now imagine if the investigation had proceeded in the "normal" way - that is, if Coomey had made a recommendation to the DOJ and they then turned around and made the political decision we all knew they would. Nothing from Coomey, stonewall from DOJ.

    The Machiavellian machinations of the Clintons know no bounds. Bill took out the AG, making Coomey the sacrificial lamb. Amazing to watch as he managed to cut his own throat while his hands were tied, but not before blackening her reputation forevermore and offering a washload of ammunition to Trump.

    She will need to deal with that, as well as with the backlash from the FBI and the constant fear that Moscow (or any given foreign power you care to name) will either release the 30,000 "private" emails she deleted or use them as blackmail against her.

    It will take a mighty effort by the MSM to make this pig into a princess. Hillary - the first female POTUS without security clearance.

    Oh look. Trump likes Sadaam.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  2. I don’t get it. Just the fact that she went about creating her own server was a violation of the law and showed forethought of trying to avoid Federal Records requirements.

    • Agree: NickG
    • Replies: @e
    @Blah

    I call it the "John Roberts' Solution."

    Replies: @415 reasons

    , @Truth
    @Blah


    Blah says:

    July 5, 2016 at 3:29 pm GMT

    I don’t get it...
     
    Full stop.

    It's about 11:56 PM, in the greater notion of things, Old Sport. If you don't get it by now...
    , @Das
    @Blah

    This investigation wasn't about federal records requirements. Colin Powell also apparently used a personal email account and never turned over copies of his emails to the government.

    It was about whether Clinton intentionally sent classified information over unsecured email. Under the statute, sloppy handling of classified information doesn't rise to the level of a criminal act. You actually have to show intent, which made it quite unlikely that they would ever bring charges.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Stan Adams, @Auntie Analogue

    , @Stephen R. Diamond
    @Blah

    There are no criminal penalties attached to violating the Freedom of Information Act.

    Replies: @Blah

    , @Anonymous
    @Blah

    It's called conspiracy. It's when a group of people plan to commit a crime, such as avoiding Federal records archiving and protection laws, avoiding FOIA requirements, and of course, violating laws concerning protection of classified information. What Comey failed to say was that there was zero question that Hillary Rodham Clinton and her staff did willfully and knowingly set up those servers in violation of Federal laws; regardless of whether she knew the classification of any particular e-mail.

  3. @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, FBI Director Coomey delivered a measured indictment of Hillary's incompetence, without recommending an indictment. He actually said that in many cases this type of activity would result in sanctions or have other consequences. But that's the real world and this is Obama World. But, on a positive note it gives her opposition plenty of ammo.

    Replies: @Blah, @whorefinder, @Diversity Heretic, @JimB, @Lagertha, @gda

    I would only pray a Trump campaign had someone competent enough to make the argument you do.

    • Replies: @jon
    @Blah


    I would only pray a Trump campaign had someone competent enough to make the argument you do.
     
    This is Trump's initial response on his website: https://www.donaldjtrump.com/press-releases/donald-j.-trump-statement-on-hillary-clintons-bad-judgment-and-the-rigged-s

    Some highlights:


    He confirmed that her email could easily have been hacked by hostile actors, and confirmed that those she emailed with were hacked. Our adversaries almost certainly have a blackmail file on Hillary Clinton, and this fact alone disqualifies her from service.
     

    It has also been revealed that Hillary Clinton lied when she said that she did not send classified information. The FBI Director confirmed that over 100 emails were deemed classified at the time they were sent, including emails classified as top secret.
     

    Bill Clinton didn’t accidentally run into the Attorney General on the airport tarmac last week in Phoenix. Hillary Clinton didn’t accidentally sneak into the FBI during one of the country’s biggest holiday weekends to testify on her illegal activities, something that wouldn’t be afforded to others under investigation (and on a Saturday of all days). It was no accident that charges were not recommended against Hillary the exact same day as President Obama campaigns with her for the first time. Folks – the system is rigged
     
    (all emphasis mine).

    I thought it was pretty good, for a start.

  4. Meh, the fix is and always was in. There we have it. A watershed moment this, we are no longer, even in trying to fake it, a nation of laws. In our face, against written law, Clinton broke that law and there they all are, installers of the fix, the brokers of dozens of obstructions to justice and violations of protocol and conflict of interest, flipping the bird right in our faces with a collective “Fuck You”. We are now Venezuela.

    Enjoy the decline.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Jim Christian

    This is the way things work in Chicago. The politically connected (Daley's nephew for manslaughter, Alderman Vrdolyak for bribery) get slaps on the wrist, if even that.

    , @Connecticut Famer
    @Jim Christian

    Nah, no surprises. And it says here that she knew it from Day One. "Venezuela?" Personally I like "Chicago" but...point taken. Would love to have been a fly on the ceiling of that airplane within which the Husband of Record and Lynch had their "impromptu" meeting.

    The next sound that you hear will be that of a toilet being flushed.

    , @Neoconned
    @Jim Christian

    I could have told you from the start she wasn't going to get indicted for 1 simple reason:

    James Comey answers to Loretta Lynch, who wants to keep her job, and wouldn't keep it if Trump wins. And she answers directly to Barack Obama -- who would have pardoned her anyways even if she had been indicted....

    We are at a watershed moment. If you believe in "the system" -- you're a full. We are not a nation of laws. We are only a nation of laws when you are not an oligarch and don't have some type of political sway.

    Life isn't fair....and politics even less fair.

    Those who cheat in our type of cronyist corrupt system, wins.

    All Hillary has to do is win Obama's 2012 map or most of it and she's president.

    The GOP should cut its losses, give up on trying to be a national party and attempt to pursue a new secession once the municipal bond market collapses in a few decades and the states go their separate ways because no one can figure out a funding mechanism to keep us all together....

    , @Diversity Heretic
    @Jim Christian

    Well put--the fix was always in. There was simply no way that a Democratic Administration could let its front-runner get this far and then recommend an indictment. If there were going to be an indictment it would have happened in 2015 while there was still time for other candidates to enter. Once the primaries started, it was all for show.

    I think about a year ago Greg Hood wrote that Hillary's lawlessness and that "bird in the face" that you referenced, were actually strengths to a major part of her constituency. The fact that she flouted the rules and won will make her even more popular in the wreckage of a Republic that we now inhabit.

    , @Realist
    @Jim Christian

    This country is on a shit slide and there is no stopping it.

    But who cares America let's watch Dancing with the Dickheads or America Has Idiots.

    , @Jack D
    @Jim Christian

    Don't be silly. If you were a lower level Federal employee, whether Republican or Democrat, male or female, black or white, they would have treated you exactly the same way. The Goddess of Justice wears a blindfold.

    And if you believe that, I have a bridge that I would like to sell to you.

    Replies: @Das

  5. At this point, everything the Dems do now makes voters lean harder into Trump. It’s like every lie or misguidance they’ve used for years not only doesn’t work, it fuels the fire in the belly of the Trump train.

    Hillary have become the Blanche DuBois of our political process, and Trump is our Kowalski. I wonder what the broken bottle is going to be, before the final reeming?

    • Replies: @Psmith
    @V Vega


    At this point, everything the Dems do now makes voters lean harder into Trump.
     
    I like Trump too, but let's not get carried away here. Hillary is still well ahead in the polls.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @ChrisD

    , @Realist
    @V Vega

    "At this point, everything the Dems do now makes voters lean harder into Trump."

    In your dreams. You underestimate the stupid in this country.

  6. e says:

    Listening to Comey’s tone as he listed Hillary’s ” extreme pattern of carelessless” and that of the entire Dept. of State, then hearing him say “we can’t find precedent” for criminal charges to be brought = cognitive dissonance.

    Those covering the Director say he almost always takes questions. Instead, he ran off that lecturn with a rabbit’s speed.

    There are no men of honor in our government and none of intestinal fortitude.

    All that matters is “FBI Director recommends no charges” and for most main stream media outlets, that’s all they wanted to be able to say. One commentator after another on, yes, Fox, have listed all kids of cases in which “extreme carelessness” has resulted in charges with convictions. The statute calls for imprisonment of 1-10 years for “gross negligence” and the Director conveniently didn’t mention that judges use “extreme negligence” synonymously with “gross negligence.”

    The Elites must have even Comey shaking in his boots.

    • Replies: @guest
    @e

    Two takeaways from Comey's speech:

    1). he said she was extremely careless, which is synonymous with negligence, and negligence is criminal;

    2). he said failure to pursue charges is not to suggest that in similar circumstances a person engaged in this activity would face no consequences, which is as good as saying Clinton gets off because she's Clinton.

    That's all you need to know.

  7. JsP says:

    looks like the establishment is getting tired of pretending to play by the rules.

    The FBI knows she broke the law, has “evidence she broke the statute” but they can’t recommend prosecution. because… it’s 2016, I guess? Why bother with the charade of her getting away with it anyway?

    They bothered with the charade of voting and look what happened! First trump gets the nomination and then Brexit. Even though voters were explicitly ordered not to vote like that!

    We’re going to have to just drop the meddlesome institutions of democracy, rule of law, etc. It’s just all becoming so inefficient and tedious.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @JsP

    "The FBI knows she broke the law, has “evidence she broke the statute” but they can’t recommend prosecution. because… it’s 2016, I guess? Why bother with the charade of her getting away with it anyway?"

    It's the power elites way of saying FUCK YOU!

  8. Absolutely amazing.

  9. The only incentive for the masses to obey the law now is a gun in the face. We might as well go ahead and break up the nation.

  10. res says:

    Unbelievable (well, except that most of us probably expected this). The particularly nice touch is releasing this news just after July 4th. What a country…

    One thing confuses me. Why is the FBI making a judgment on what a reasonable prosecutor would do? It seems to me the FBI would be more focused on determining the facts of the case while leaving the prosecutor’s decision to the … prosecutor. (I assume this is a political move taking the responsibility for the decision out of Lynch’s hands. Is there a precedent showing the FBI taking this role in previous cases?)

    This link shows Trump’s tweets in response: http://www.cnbc.com/2016/07/05/fbi-director-james-comey-has-concluded-the-investigation-into-clintons-emails.html

    Does anyone have a link to the FBI report?

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @res

    "One thing confuses me. Why is the FBI making a judgment on what a reasonable prosecutor would do? It seems to me the FBI would be more focused on determining the facts of the case while leaving the prosecutor’s decision to the … prosecutor. "

    Exactly. Actually, there were two things about Comey's decision that stood out for me. First, by citing the absence of intention, he basically rewrote the statute that requires merely "gross negligence." Secondly, as you point out, he was making a decision that a prosecutor normally makes. While Comey was a former prosecutor as U.S. Attorney for NY, he is not now a prosecutor. The fact that Obama planned travel to NC to campaign with Hillary yesterday indicates that Comey must have been coordinating his decision with the White House. I wonder whether criticism of the FBI's role in the recent Orlando mass slaying played any role in this. Since he essentially laid out the case for prosecuting Hillary, Comey should have recommended prosecution and left it up to the lawyers at the DOJ to make the decision not to prosecute, instead of making that decision himself.

    Replies: @guest

  11. A political appointee like the FBI director may say this, but I bet the agents below him are seething. A lot of them are likely to be Republicans, and I’m willing to be there are going to be some interesting leaks from Hillary’s emails leading up to the election.

  12. So stupidity is now a criminal defense?

    • Replies: @mtn cur
    @Jack Hanson

    Yes!

  13. Blah says:

    Comey: “All the cases prosecuted involved some combination of clearly intentional and willful mishandling of classified information, or vast quantities of materials exposed in such a way as to support an inference of intentional misconduct, or indications of disloyalty to the United States, or efforts to obstruct justice. We do not see those things here.”

    Again, just the sheer fact that she went about setting up a home brew server was an intentional act, intentional misconduct and an effort to obstruct justice. No?

  14. @Jim Christian
    Meh, the fix is and always was in. There we have it. A watershed moment this, we are no longer, even in trying to fake it, a nation of laws. In our face, against written law, Clinton broke that law and there they all are, installers of the fix, the brokers of dozens of obstructions to justice and violations of protocol and conflict of interest, flipping the bird right in our faces with a collective "Fuck You". We are now Venezuela.

    Enjoy the decline.

    Replies: @Flip, @Connecticut Famer, @Neoconned, @Diversity Heretic, @Realist, @Jack D

    This is the way things work in Chicago. The politically connected (Daley’s nephew for manslaughter, Alderman Vrdolyak for bribery) get slaps on the wrist, if even that.

  15. I only follow the election news indirectly because I value my brain cells. Are they seriously still talking about that star or is this one of your idées fixes?

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @kihowi

    They're still very much talking about it.

    I do wonder, though, who chose the timing of the announcement. Normally shit like this gets dropped on a Friday, especially before a holiday weekend. They had their chance to do that exactly one business day ago. Was the timing of the announcement pushed back by the Clinton/Lynch meeting kerfuffle, or was this a subtle "fuck you" from a political appointee bending to political pressure but not all that happy about it?

  16. Thea says:

    I used to work for a company that had a contract with the military. Every year we had to watch a video & pass an online quiz about how to handle data. If we detoured from their rules, we faced a possible fine, jail time plus loss of a job, even if it was a mistake or nothing bad happened.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Thea

    Thea, you are one of the little people (like the rest of us). But for Dems in power, well, "it is good to be the King" has never been truer.

    Now how many Americans think that the Clintons are our betters?

    Replies: @The most deplorable one

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Thea

    Me too. And I will repeat that it is difficult to get information off the secret internet (Siprnet). Classified machines on the Siprnet have USB ports disabled. They are not connected in any way with the unclass internet. The only way to get classified information from the Siprnet is to burn it to a CD, which is what Snowden did. But doing so makes the CD a Secret artifact and it is ILLEGAL to put a Secret CD in an unclass machine because, by that quaint thing we like to call law, doing so makes the heretofore unclass machine now Secret.

    This is drilled yearly into everyone who has a clearance along with the warning that screwing up could mean the loss of your clearance, and since you probably cannot be on the job without a clearance, the loss of your clearance means the loss of your job.

    I am extremely disappointed in Director Comey. I had read that he was a stand up guy.

    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/237930/

  17. This couldn’t possibly be political. We all know the US government is the least corrupt organization in human history.

  18. @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, FBI Director Coomey delivered a measured indictment of Hillary's incompetence, without recommending an indictment. He actually said that in many cases this type of activity would result in sanctions or have other consequences. But that's the real world and this is Obama World. But, on a positive note it gives her opposition plenty of ammo.

    Replies: @Blah, @whorefinder, @Diversity Heretic, @JimB, @Lagertha, @gda

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Seriously, after Orlando and San Bernadino, the FBI’s reputation should have been on extremely shaky ground. Unfortunately, the news media wasn’t smart enough the notice that the FBI should have nipped those thugs in the bud—they even had the suspects on their radar, but didn’t bother following up. And the public—especially the right wing/Trump wing—is too enamored of the cops/law enforcement to admit the gross incompetence displayed.

    This non-indictment for her crimes is just proof how much the FBI is nothing more than a controlled entity of the political hacks in Washington. Historically, this will mark a point where future scholars will say that the FBI officially became merely a secret police organization without any fidelity to principles or law, only to their political leaders.

    And Comey’s reputation is truly trashed—he will come out extremely poorly in terms of how historians note his character. He’s now a known yes-man for the power brokers and the money men.

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations—where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free—the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically. But there is a profound disconnect in this country between the massive fuckups and corruption of the G-Men–stretching at least back to Hoover refusing to investigate or even admit organized crime existed, on the fear of being outed as a homosexual—and the public/media perception of them.

    The FBI guys are hacks.

    • Replies: @fnn
    @whorefinder


    After the Whitey Bulger revelations—where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free—the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically.
     
    Also Ruby Ridge and the Branch Davidians.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @whorefinder


    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?
     
    Yes we can!

    Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel

    , @Stan Adams
    @whorefinder

    J. Edgar Hoover, the guy who founded the FBI, was a closet case who wore frilly pink undies under his trousers. What does that tell us?

    Meyer Lansky had a snapshot of Hoover hoovering his lover boy, Clyde Tolson. The blackmail threat led Hoover to regard the Mafia as untouchable.

    In J. Edgar (2011), starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Hoover, Armie Hammer played Tolson. Hammer said in an interview he was pleased to take part in the desecration of Hoover's memory by exposing his hidden gayness to the moviegoers of the world.

    (Hoover had an extensive file on Armand Hammer - Armie's great-great grandfather - who, as Steve has noted, was a Marxist billionaire.)

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @cthulhu

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @whorefinder

    Whorefinder, Just watched a documentary on Bulger's 16 years on the lam. I was startled by what appeared to be documentable complicity by the agency.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    , @EriK
    @whorefinder

    Famous But Incompetent

    , @Anonymous
    @whorefinder

    Yeah, but everybody liked the X-Files.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @whorefinder

    "Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?"

    The FBI was rotten almost all the way back to its founding, ever since Hoover took it over and made it his own private Gestapo. Is there any high-profile case they haven't botched, other than the entrapment capers where they controlled the outcome anyway? I suppose they had some success against the mafia, thanks to RICO (which will probably be used against the citizenry someday).

    A lot of what the Feds seem to do now is entrapment - inducing random muslim losers who couldn't string two fire-crackers together to accept a fake bomb and pledge to blow up something. Convictions and promotions ensue.

    Replies: @Bugg

  19. Nothing to see here, folks. Move along…

    It’s now official: The entire country has become Chicago.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    what did you expect with a black prez?

    , @Dennis Dale
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Looks like Obama got to be mayor of Chicago after all.

    , @Wade
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This is also what happens when the Democrat party becomes a permanent majority party through mass immigration. All the Social Justice Warriors of the left should take note that a society that is destined to resemble Mexico demographically will unmercifully begin to function like it too.

  20. OT:

    I notice an interesting demographic disparity between the Google Doodle version of the Juno probe team and the Google Image Search version.

    • Replies: @Hacienda
    @Seth Largo

    NASA is anti-Chinese. You can't expect many Asians to work for an organization
    that places guilt by association.

  21. OT in a way, but a testament to how corrupt our elites have become:

    http://www.boston.com/news/politics/2016/07/04/trumps-pocahontas-attack-rooted-warren-heritage-issue

    This purports to be reportage on the Warren heritage issue.

    At no point does it even raise the factual question as to whether she does have that heritage. It takes her own report as Gospel.

    The entire article would not be changed a jot if it were written by Elizabeth Warren’s own staff, which, for all one could gather, it may have been.

    The Globe does not allow comments on the article, of course. My impression is that they have stopped all comments altogether. Comments are False, Trollish…and embarrassing.

    There is no integrity anywhere, it seems. As I’ve said before, if you’ve convinced yourself that The Next Hitler is on the rise, what standard won’t you throw out the window in your fight for Justice?

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @candid_observer


    The Globe does not allow comments on the article, of course. My impression is that they have stopped all comments altogether. Comments are False, Trollish…and embarrassing.
     
    One the of the British papers ended online commenting with something similar - "So we asked you what you thought of online comments and you told us you didn't want to be able to tell us what you think anymore." Right.
    , @Flip
    @candid_observer

    The take on Warren from a commenter on Razib Khan's site:

    Elizabeth Warren is not Cherokee, never was. She is whiter than Queen Elizabeth. She lied about being an Indian to get a job.

    Lizzie wanted a job as a law prof at Harvard Law School. Her problem is that her JD is from Rutgers. Rutgers is ranked 92nd out of the 200 law schools. In ordinary circumstances, Harvard will trash can a resume from a Rutgers grad. According to Wikipedia: “As of 2011, she was the only tenured law professor at Harvard who had attended law school at an American public university.” Rutgers, like I said is 92nd. Berkley, Michigan, and Virginia are tied for 8th (84 places ahead of Rutgers) and none of their grads has a job at Harvard.

    I would guess that Lizzie started the Indian scam long before she got a job at Harvard. She was on the faculty at Texas (#15), Michigan(#8), and Pennsylvania(#7) before she worked at Harvard. I doubt that any of those schools would touch a Rutgers grad either

    Harvard will not hire a Rutgers grad without an extraordinary circumstance like race quotas. Being a Federal Court of Appeals Judge, or writing the leading academic treatise on some large area of the law would also work. Warren’s only shot was to be an Indian (she was even less plausible as a Black or a Mexican), so she did it, and got away with it. She is not the only one in Academia who pulled that stunt. Remember War Churchill.

    Harvard will never confess. They are embarrassed that they got flimflammed so easily. It would seem to be ordinary due diligence to check with the tribe when a potential hire is claiming tribal affiliation, but they didn’t. My guess would be that PC prevents them from asking or checking. There have been a number of other recent prominent racial misrepresenters, such as Shaun King of Black Lives Matter and Rachel Dolezal of the NAACP.

    I just want to add, that I am not saying that Rutgers grads are in anyway inferior to graduates of higher ranked schools. They are not. Law school attendance has about zip to do with intellectual ability. Law schools are really caught up with snobbery and rankings. always have been. They have to, they just trade schools with intellectual pretensions.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @Jim Christian

  22. At the end of the Stonecutters episode of The Simpsons the group was quite demoralized after realizing that they were chained to the whims of Homer. He was the chosen one, and as Stonecutters they were obliged to obey him. Moe came up with a solution:

    Moe: “But what if we don’t wanna be Stonecutters no more?

    What if we don’t wanna be Americans no more?

    America: You broke it, you bought it. Have fun! We’ll make our own country — with blackjack, and hookers.

  23. “Although there is evidence of potential violations of the statutes regarding the handling of classified information, our judgment is that no reasonable prosecutor would bring such a case.

    To be clear, this is not to suggest that in similar circumstances, a person who engaged in this activity would face no consequences.”

    http://www.politico.com/story/2016/07/fbi-recommends-no-charges-against-clinton-in-email-probe-225102

    Translation: too big to jail.

  24. @Blah
    I don't get it. Just the fact that she went about creating her own server was a violation of the law and showed forethought of trying to avoid Federal Records requirements.

    Replies: @e, @Truth, @Das, @Stephen R. Diamond, @Anonymous

    I call it the “John Roberts’ Solution.”

    • Replies: @415 reasons
    @e

    That is, the law is clear, and it was clearly violated, but the political consequences are so untenable that nothing can be done.

  25. Credit where it’s due: a couple of Jews (Ibrahim is Coptic Christian, but it’s Horowitz’ site) are giving Jorge Bergoglio (the anti-Pope) a drubbing:

    http://nypost.com/2016/07/04/pope-francis-star-is-fading-back-home-and-heres-why-it-matters/
    http://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/262921/pope-francis-jihad-christianity-raymond-ibrahim

    I knew Jorge was bad, but I didn’t know he was this bad. Francis the Venal.

  26. @Jim Christian
    Meh, the fix is and always was in. There we have it. A watershed moment this, we are no longer, even in trying to fake it, a nation of laws. In our face, against written law, Clinton broke that law and there they all are, installers of the fix, the brokers of dozens of obstructions to justice and violations of protocol and conflict of interest, flipping the bird right in our faces with a collective "Fuck You". We are now Venezuela.

    Enjoy the decline.

    Replies: @Flip, @Connecticut Famer, @Neoconned, @Diversity Heretic, @Realist, @Jack D

    Nah, no surprises. And it says here that she knew it from Day One. “Venezuela?” Personally I like “Chicago” but…point taken. Would love to have been a fly on the ceiling of that airplane within which the Husband of Record and Lynch had their “impromptu” meeting.

    The next sound that you hear will be that of a toilet being flushed.

  27. On topic, my theory is busted. Now we see if those FBI guys make good on their word and take Hillary’s dirty laundry to the networks.

  28. Laws are for little people …

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @Whiskey

    Are you still sticking by your prediction that Obama declares martial law and becomes El Presidente for live?

  29. The subject of this investigation is a woman who worked as an attorney on the Watergate prosecution team — and was removed for doing deceptive work. (Too bad the Washington Post doesn’t assign some crack Woodsteins to that story.)

    She was dating a guy named Bill — who had been kicked out of his Rhodes scholarship at Oxford for raping a student. (Too bad Rolling Stone doesn’t publish a dramatic story about that. Bill was a real, hillbilly Haven Monahan.)

    Wonderful people run our world.

    • Agree: advancedatheist
    • Replies: @JsP
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Where's Christopher Hitchens when you need him?

    I despise almost everything about him but boy did he hate the Clintons.

    Alexander Cockburn said his obsession stemmed from Bill's behavior at Oxford with a woman or two Hitchens knew. Figures it'd take something personal for Christopher to be on the side of truth and justice but we certainly do find ourselves in want of a cocktail circuit bootlicker willing to take on our First Family.

  30. Yes, the entire country has become Chicago . . .

    There they were . . . Number 17 . . . the Spread Eagle!

  31. http://www.frontpagemag.com/point/263408/fbi-hillary-lied-and-illegally-sent-classified-daniel-greenfield

    Coomey:

    Although we did not find clear evidence that Secretary Clinton or her colleagues intended to violate laws governing the handling of classified information, there is evidence that they were extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.

    “‘extremely careless’ in her handling of ‘very sensitive, highly classified information.’”

    Trump should write that down on an index card and use it as a prop in the debates. In fact, he should carry it with him from now until the polls close on election day, and he should make a show of pulling it out and reading from it every time he talks about Hillary. The idea being, that these are Hussein’s FBI director’s words, and he wants to make sure he gets the quotes right every time.

    He should call her “extremely careless” Hillary from now on. His catchphrase can be “Obama’s FBI director said she was extremely careless with very sensitive, highly classified information.” Then he can say, “wait, here, let me quote Obama’s FBI director, to make sure I’ve got that right,” and read from the card. Then wrap up with “Secretary Clinton is too crooked and incompetent to be PotUS. She’s too crooked and incompetent to be the president of Venezuela.”

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @Svigor

    That quote is chilling.

    It is framed rhetorically as two things in relative apposition. "Although A...B."

    It is in fact two separate sentences/concepts:

    1) "We did not find evidence" of intent (which could well be deliberate).

    2) "There is evidence" of mishandling very sensitive highly classified information.

    A friend tells me that when he was in crypto school for his branch of the military, it was explained to him that he could do jail time for mangling or misplacing any page in his thick series of training manuals. Including the one that said "This page intentionally left blank."

    Of course he was one of the Little People.

    Also third in line to be destroyed if his ship were captured (after the codebooks were thrown overboard, weighted, and the machines were destroyed, the captain would then shoot him in the head).

    Of course they didn't tell him that in crypto school.

  32. The only surprise here is that people are surprised.

    I remember starting an OJ Simpson verdict pool with a bunch of (very caucasian) colleagues from Connecticut, and being the jaded NYC resident, I started the pool off with “not guilty” on Day 1 at 42 minutes into deliberations. When asked why I chose a seemingly impossible outcome, I said “look at the jury and tell me why it will not turn out that way.”

    I think the jury actually took something like three or four hours, but the really memorable thing was seeing one woman walking around with a very dropped-jaw look of surprise. As long as these sorts are voters, the criminal elite will always get their way.

    • Replies: @Lugash
    @The Alarmist

    Going a bit OT... but watching Dominick Dunne during the OJ verdict is still amazing. He's literally mouth agape for 5 minutes.

    Angry at Hilary's verdict, but not surprised.

  33. My theory: Bill promised Loretta Lynch and a few of her cronies some positions in a Clinton administration if they dropped the investigation; also, Bill convinced Lynch that Donald Trump’s “xenophobia” and “Islamophobia” was a bigger issue that Hillary’s law breaking.

  34. JsP says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    The subject of this investigation is a woman who worked as an attorney on the Watergate prosecution team -- and was removed for doing deceptive work. (Too bad the Washington Post doesn't assign some crack Woodsteins to that story.)

    She was dating a guy named Bill -- who had been kicked out of his Rhodes scholarship at Oxford for raping a student. (Too bad Rolling Stone doesn't publish a dramatic story about that. Bill was a real, hillbilly Haven Monahan.)

    Wonderful people run our world.

    Replies: @JsP

    Where’s Christopher Hitchens when you need him?

    I despise almost everything about him but boy did he hate the Clintons.

    Alexander Cockburn said his obsession stemmed from Bill’s behavior at Oxford with a woman or two Hitchens knew. Figures it’d take something personal for Christopher to be on the side of truth and justice but we certainly do find ourselves in want of a cocktail circuit bootlicker willing to take on our First Family.

  35. I don’t know how this election is going to go. But I will say this; it’ll be epic if Trump beats the odious Clinton Clan. Nobody on Earth deserves an ignominious comeuppance – delivered by the likes of Donald Trump – more than they do.

  36. Donald Trump sending the Clinton Clan packing would be a story for the ages.

    Even better if Nate Silver and the world are shocked, shocked, because Real Clear Average Hillary +6.

  37. And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway. All of this was because the Clintons wanted to peddle the influence of Hillary’s potential Presidency in exchange for swag bags, IOW, yet another disastrous consequence of democracy and voting and elections.

    The only bright spot is that Comey’s presser announcing a no indict recommendation sounded more like the case that Trump’s Attorney General can use to issue an indictment.

    Also, I don’t understand how HRC doesn’t get indicted yet Edward Snowden, whose only “sin” was telling us what our own intelligence apparati are up to with regards to them snooping on us, did get indicted and still has outstanding felony charges. Except of I do understand, going back to my point, that we live under the rule of men, not laws.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    , @Tex
    @countenance

    I think it is something of a truism that monarchy, being about bloodlines, drives towards the rule of the most inbred. Democracy on the other hand relies on lots of hot air, naturally it drives toward the rule of the biggest liars.

    So if I have to choose which I find more of a liability in a leader, congenital defects or compulsive mendacity, I'd say dishonesty as a lifestyle is more likely to be a deal-breaker.

    , @War for Blair Mountain
    @countenance

    Countenance

    You are among the reasons I have extreme hatred of the fashy Alt Right. To the extent that your enthusiasm for Monarchy...Pinochet....and Franco....the Alt Right must never be supported and encouraged to grow as a movement.

    The US is not a Democracy...in fact it is a Plutocracy-Oligarchy, which has nothing to do with Democracy.


    We had an alternative to your Pinochet-Franco Land Owner Oligarchy in the late 19th-early 20th century labor revolts in the US which gave us such wonderfull things such as the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Sikh Exclusion Act(yes there was a Sikh Exclusion Act to keep the Sikhs out of California).


    Steve


    You really need to let this post go through because the fashy haircut Alt Right really does push some very immoral violently anti-labor forms of top-down political-economic organization.

    Replies: @andy russia, @Cagey Beast, @Pericles, @BB753

    , @Realist
    @countenance

    Democracies have never worked. And probably never will. When idiots are allowed to vote bad things happen. A Meritocracy would be much better.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain, @dfordoom

  38. @Buzz Mohawk
    Nothing to see here, folks. Move along...

    It's now official: The entire country has become Chicago.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Dennis Dale, @Wade

    what did you expect with a black prez?

  39. @Jim Christian
    Meh, the fix is and always was in. There we have it. A watershed moment this, we are no longer, even in trying to fake it, a nation of laws. In our face, against written law, Clinton broke that law and there they all are, installers of the fix, the brokers of dozens of obstructions to justice and violations of protocol and conflict of interest, flipping the bird right in our faces with a collective "Fuck You". We are now Venezuela.

    Enjoy the decline.

    Replies: @Flip, @Connecticut Famer, @Neoconned, @Diversity Heretic, @Realist, @Jack D

    I could have told you from the start she wasn’t going to get indicted for 1 simple reason:

    James Comey answers to Loretta Lynch, who wants to keep her job, and wouldn’t keep it if Trump wins. And she answers directly to Barack Obama — who would have pardoned her anyways even if she had been indicted….

    We are at a watershed moment. If you believe in “the system” — you’re a full. We are not a nation of laws. We are only a nation of laws when you are not an oligarch and don’t have some type of political sway.

    Life isn’t fair….and politics even less fair.

    Those who cheat in our type of cronyist corrupt system, wins.

    All Hillary has to do is win Obama’s 2012 map or most of it and she’s president.

    The GOP should cut its losses, give up on trying to be a national party and attempt to pursue a new secession once the municipal bond market collapses in a few decades and the states go their separate ways because no one can figure out a funding mechanism to keep us all together….

  40. It would make you yearn for the days of J Edgar Hoover, who was determined never to let politicians interfere in his work. He gets a lot of bad press these days, but a lot of it is just because he was determined to keep the FBI completely independent.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    @Rob McX


    It would make you yearn for the days of J Edgar Hoover, who was determined never to let politicians interfere in his work. He gets a lot of bad press these days, but a lot of it is just because he was determined to keep the FBI completely independent.

     

    Except Hoover was determined to keep the very existence of the Mafia secret. Heck, in the 1940s he enlisted the Mafia into capturing German spies and saboteurs on American soil, and then refused up until the 1960s to admit they existed or go after them. It took the Kefauver Hearings and the Mclellan Hearings (with Joe Valachi squealing in detail) and RFK going after his family's enemies before Hoover finally gave up the ghost and admitted organized crime existed.

    Hoover made his bones going after lone psychos in the 1930s such as Dillinger, and got big headlines, despite barely being able to catch them. But he made sure the FBI carefully avoided any organized group with power. His failure to catch most of the commies who infiltrated Hollywood and the federal government is pretty darning proof he was incompetent at anything more than catching a flashy lone bank robber.

    In short, the FBI has been rotten going back to the start. Just very good with their image.

    Replies: @guest

  41. @V Vega
    At this point, everything the Dems do now makes voters lean harder into Trump. It's like every lie or misguidance they've used for years not only doesn't work, it fuels the fire in the belly of the Trump train.

    Hillary have become the Blanche DuBois of our political process, and Trump is our Kowalski. I wonder what the broken bottle is going to be, before the final reeming?

    Replies: @Psmith, @Realist

    At this point, everything the Dems do now makes voters lean harder into Trump.

    I like Trump too, but let’s not get carried away here. Hillary is still well ahead in the polls.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    @Psmith

    She's within the error of margin and losing outside of the error in some polls. And its July.

    Some of you people are typing with a rope around your neck I think.

    , @ChrisD
    @Psmith

    Polls mean very little, Psmith. See Brexit vote for example. Trump will win in a landslide.

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

  42. re: Hillary being above the law

    Hubris ALWAYS ends in Nemesis.

    This will not end well for the USA. Fvck the democrats but they will be destroyed along with the GOPe as we enter “INTERESTING TIMES.”

    Dan Kurt

  43. It is sad that every institution is corrupted.
    Comey was likely faced with uncooperative DOJ. Everyone said he would balk. However, faced with a choice of playing along or ruining his career, he chose the path of least resistance. Or maybe it didn’t even get that complicated. Indicting candidate of Democrat party,in power,is a tall order. Too tall for Comey.

    She is clearly guilty, his statement says as much. In today’s world, this is probably as good as it gets. He is probably correct — no reasonable prosecutor would try HRC. This may be better in the long run. She is the weakest candidate to run against. This battle will need to be won at ballot box.

    • Agree: Wade
    • Replies: @Wade
    @pepperinmono

    A consolation of this, for me, is knowing that the Democrat party is now blissfully uniting behind Hillary and that there is no chance of Bernie or Joe Biden taking her place on the debating stage against Trump.

    I believe that Trump can defeat Hillary although it will be a tough fight to the finish. At least we now know he's not aiming at a moving Democratic target which until now I was worried about.

  44. Hilary’s campaign slogan should be “Rules are for the little people.” It’s clearly what she and her strongest supporters think, and real crimes are speaking ill of Mexicans or Muslims.

  45. @Blah
    I don't get it. Just the fact that she went about creating her own server was a violation of the law and showed forethought of trying to avoid Federal Records requirements.

    Replies: @e, @Truth, @Das, @Stephen R. Diamond, @Anonymous

    Blah says:

    July 5, 2016 at 3:29 pm GMT

    I don’t get it…

    Full stop.

    It’s about 11:56 PM, in the greater notion of things, Old Sport. If you don’t get it by now…

  46. @Jim Christian
    Meh, the fix is and always was in. There we have it. A watershed moment this, we are no longer, even in trying to fake it, a nation of laws. In our face, against written law, Clinton broke that law and there they all are, installers of the fix, the brokers of dozens of obstructions to justice and violations of protocol and conflict of interest, flipping the bird right in our faces with a collective "Fuck You". We are now Venezuela.

    Enjoy the decline.

    Replies: @Flip, @Connecticut Famer, @Neoconned, @Diversity Heretic, @Realist, @Jack D

    Well put–the fix was always in. There was simply no way that a Democratic Administration could let its front-runner get this far and then recommend an indictment. If there were going to be an indictment it would have happened in 2015 while there was still time for other candidates to enter. Once the primaries started, it was all for show.

    I think about a year ago Greg Hood wrote that Hillary’s lawlessness and that “bird in the face” that you referenced, were actually strengths to a major part of her constituency. The fact that she flouted the rules and won will make her even more popular in the wreckage of a Republic that we now inhabit.

  47. It only shows the system is a fraud, a joke where the laws are only applicable to the little people. Those who are part of the club so to speak like the Clintons can do as they please.

    Slick sold the Chinese our missile technology and nothing happened to him.

    Hillary went one step further and put everything for sale via the foundation and ran a illegal e-mail server, deliberately put SCI and SAP info on it, which is a felony under Federal law, yet she and the e-mail administrator and those who put the SAP and SCI info on the server had nothing happen.

    What a joke.

    We don’t have the rule of law, we are no better than any bananaland republic.

    The United States died today.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @rod1963


    The United States died today.
     
    No. Not even close. The United States died in 1861. Then it's stumbling zombie corpse was killed again in 1913.

    And for those surprised at Comey's corruption, need I remind you the FBI has long been simply a bagman/hit squad for the political elites? Ruby Ridge? Waco? OK City? TWA 800? 9/11? LaVoy Finicum? And this hardly even scratches the surface. There was the briefest flicker of integrity with ABSCAM, but the scent of truth was so odious and terrifying in DC that the impulse to pursue it was fiercely extinguished, never to rear its ugly head again.

    Replies: @Kylie

  48. I wonder what tomorrow’s Chilcot Report on the Iraq war will say? Though as Tony Blair’s been all over the UK media lately, I presume he won’t be arrested.

    OT

    another good Guardian article on why Remain lost the UK referendum.

    http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jul/05/how-remain-failed-inside-story-doomed-campaign

    “Straw* commissioned a subsequent analysis, dated April 2016, which showed a discrepancy between the party’s metropolitan, university-educated, middle-class voters and its lower-income, working-class supporters, who were far more sceptical about the case for remaining. It was this undefended flank that the leave side was targeting with promises to control immigration and divert EU subscription payments to the NHS. The remainers’ warning not to gamble with economic security was failing to resonate. “Emotional fear wasn’t credible because they felt their lives were already shit,” as one senior campaign source told me.”

    “There were people turning up who had never voted before,” Straw said after the defeat. “They did it this time because they were very angry with what they felt had been done to them in their communities over decades – the decline of industry, the rapid increase in people coming to this country, the levels of austerity. In a general election they might think it doesn’t matter who you vote for because they’re all the same. In the referendum they recognised this could lead to something different. Maybe they didn’t anticipate all the consequences. But there was a sense that you could change things.”

    People had many motives to vote leave, but the most potent elements were resentment of an elite political class, rage at decades of social alienation in large swaths of the country, and a determination to reverse a tide of mass migration. Those forces overwhelmed expert pleas for economic stability.

    *Will Straw, policy wonk with no experience outside of student politics and think-tanks, put in charge of the Remain campaign by who knows what forces, is the son of Jack Straw, Labour Foreign Secretary 2001-2005.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Anonymous Nephew

    That's (((Will Straw))) and (((Jack Straw))). FYI.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

  49. Bugg says:

    Famous, But Incompetent.

    Did anyone really think Comey, a DC establishment fixture, was going to take a torch to his career?

    She did all that. And much much more than Petraeus and John Deutsch ever did.And how is Snowden on the lam? Why have any laws at all?

    But the only way for this to end happily is Trump putting a stake through her ice cold heart.Fingers crossed. Rise up,and wise up, ye white trash!

    • Replies: @Honorary Thief
    @Bugg

    The sad thing is that it could have helped his career. The Republicans could have made him the Attorney General, backed a run for office or just given him a nice sinecure making seven figures at a friendly bank.

  50. Oh, and after a bit of reflection, I think if the FBI says there is nothing to see here, then there is nothing to see. They also investigated Omar Mateen three times before his rampage.. Look, is that the Star of David on a squirrel?

  51. Paul Ryan helps our Trump with some advice.

    Ryan to Trump: ‘Anti-Semitic images’ have no place in campaign

    http://www.politico.com/story/2016/07/paul-ryan-trump-tweet-225099

    • Replies: @Honorary Thief
    @Anonymous

    He's such a little wienie lol.

  52. @countenance
    And people why I'm a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It's because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway. All of this was because the Clintons wanted to peddle the influence of Hillary's potential Presidency in exchange for swag bags, IOW, yet another disastrous consequence of democracy and voting and elections.

    The only bright spot is that Comey's presser announcing a no indict recommendation sounded more like the case that Trump's Attorney General can use to issue an indictment.

    Also, I don't understand how HRC doesn't get indicted yet Edward Snowden, whose only "sin" was telling us what our own intelligence apparati are up to with regards to them snooping on us, did get indicted and still has outstanding felony charges. Except of I do understand, going back to my point, that we live under the rule of men, not laws.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Tex, @War for Blair Mountain, @Realist

    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.

    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy – I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the “enlightened” dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of “their” patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    • Agree: Kylie, Bill, dfordoom
    • Replies: @Patrick Harris
    @Twinkie

    Our democracy is certainly decadent, but the trouble with hereditary monarchy is that you can't manufacture the sacred aura or sense of noblesse oblige that surrounds it out of whole cloth. If a personal form of rule ever comes to the United States, it will be wrapped in republican forms and will be far less benign than the Hapsburgs ever were.

    Replies: @Ye Antient Oliphant, @Thea

    , @pepperinmono
    @Twinkie

    Try Democracy: The God That Failed by Hans-Hermann Hoppe. He has some alt- right sympathies I believe.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    , @John Derbyshire
    @Twinkie

    The trouble with Austria-Hungary was that a majority of those subjects were neither Austrian nor Hungarian.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Hacienda
    @Twinkie

    I like the idea of bringing back a figurehead monarchy to Korea (Confucian). The Japanese royal family seems to have a positive influence on moderating Japanese culture. There's nothing moderating Korean culture these days.

    , @countenance
    @Twinkie

    The Dark Enlightenment is not a worldview that people can be talked into or convinced to be believed purely abstractly or rhetorically. It takes events and circumstances making people ask themselves WTF. And there have been a lot of those in the last 14 months. The only reason they haven't begat more converts to the Dark Enlightenment and #NRx is because Trump came along and temporarily gave some of us the impetus to give this voting thing one more chance.

    Re your other point about monarchs and their "skin in the game" long term:

    https://countenance.wordpress.com/2014/10/20/the-god-that-costs/

    Replies: @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta

    , @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    @Twinkie

    What do you think of the baby Crown Prince George?
    Perhaps it's time to give a different King George another crack at it?
    Sure he's still a baby, but I doubt he could be any more immature and prone to tantrum than our recent Congresses...

    As unpopular as King George was in the Colonies there were still plenty of Loyalists. With the support of 9% of American citizens that Congress enjoys, is it perhaps possible that King George was actually more popular than the Republic our current Constitution has delivered?

    , @Barnard
    @Twinkie

    The current monarchs of Europe seem very content to be figureheads with no real power and support multiculturalism and EU displacing the native populations of their countries. What makes you think it would be any different in the United States?

    , @pepperinmono
    @Twinkie

    Try Democracy:The God That Failed by Hans-Hermann Hoppe. He has some alt-right sympathies I believe.

    , @Auntie Analogue
    @Twinkie


    "I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the 'enlightened' dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I."

     

    My dear Twinkie, Mr. Derbyshire's reply to your sentiment was spot on.

    It's a pity my late Slovak grandparents - all four of them - are not here for you to ask them how much they enjoyed their hardscrabble existence in virtual slavery under the oppressive Hungarian end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, whose rulers forbade schooling in my grandparents' language; forced schooling only in Hungarian; forcibly conscripted Slovaks into the army (my childhood parish here in the U.S. had old men who'd been conscripted into WWI service in the Central Powers' Austro-Hungarian Army); and enforced rigorous discrimination against Slovaks in education, employment, promotion, property ownership, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, political and civil service officeholding (for the lower orders of which the Hungarians interposed Jews to insulate their aristocratic selves from the Slovaks, thus deflecting Slovak protest away from the Hungarian monarchy into Slovak anti-Semitism), and in countless other ugly ways.

    The current strain of alt-right-trad romanticism for monarchy is frightfully myopic. Monarchy is a crapshoot, and there's just one thing you should know about craps: its odds are stacked overwhelmingly with the house.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Rob McX, @avraham, @AP

    , @Captain Tripps
    @Twinkie


    I am increasingly amenable to monarchy – I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the “enlightened” dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I.
     
    "Many forms of Government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed it has been said that democracy is the worst form of Government except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.…"

    W. Churchill, House of Commons, 11 November 1947

    I understand the frustration many express by revisiting monarchy (or more appropriately enlightened autocracy) as an alternative to our current governance, but I can't go there. Our Republic (and it is s republic, not a democracy) is the best system (of all the flawed systems there are) available for the common man to have reasonable chance at having a say in his own governance.

    Problem is, most people can't or won't take the time to exercise their civic duty to the proper extent. Representative government is messy and lots of work, and with inconclusive outcomes; and you need to stay informed of the issues to have a good position on a desired policy framework; sometimes your party will win a policy debate, sometimes you'll lose. That can be very frustrating to many who want a clean, clear simple solution to hard, complex governance problems. Sometimes issues are clear-cut, such as existential threats that everyone needs to close ranks against, but most of the time, that is not the case.

    Having said that, since most folk don't take the time or don't care about the day-to-day requirement to stay on top of all the issues, they default to bread and circuses. So, as most here have already pointed out, we are in the gradual slide down to the worst form of governance, some type of dictatorship or despotic oligarchy (history doesn't necessarily repeat, but it does closely rhyme).

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    , @Antonymous
    @Twinkie

    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots). Kings are as beholden to idea men and advisors as any democratically-elected leader, see the various Rasputins of history. But the Church prevented undue influence of religiously foreign agents, which then appears as an ethnic line-in-the-sand. Without a doubt the United States' democracy (/oligarchy) would be better off without overreaching Saudi, Turkish, and Israeli influences -- those that might have been prevented by Church interference -- but the nostalgia for aristocracy misses the importance of a strong religion.

    Could we ever get back to that level of religious intrusion and would we want to? I suspect poverty, circumscribed lives, and particularly child mortality rates played in to the centrality of church doctrine. People needed belief in the afterlife and religious purpose. Most of us, the fortunate of today, cannot generate that fervor from the comfort of our couch. And without an overriding check on a monarch, we're back to the usual problems of corruption, undue influence, and narcissistic leaders.

    Replies: @AP, @ben tillman

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy – I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the “enlightened” dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of “their” patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.
     
    North Korea's hereditary monarchy is into its 3rd king. If there's a sense of duty to the kingdom's subjects, it's not immediately apparent. Unless the kingdom's monarchs feel a duty to starve as many of them to death as possible.
  53. @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, FBI Director Coomey delivered a measured indictment of Hillary's incompetence, without recommending an indictment. He actually said that in many cases this type of activity would result in sanctions or have other consequences. But that's the real world and this is Obama World. But, on a positive note it gives her opposition plenty of ammo.

    Replies: @Blah, @whorefinder, @Diversity Heretic, @JimB, @Lagertha, @gda

    Bizarely, the fact that she does as she pleases and gets away with it strengthens her support with much of her constituency

    • Replies: @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    @Diversity Heretic

    Too a large extent, the same is true for Trump.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    , @Dennis Dale
    @Diversity Heretic

    There's a convergence here of three effects: the halo effect Hillary's long had on Democrats and women now of a certain age, the existential fear of Trump, with Hillary his last obstacle, and a third more disturbing, general radicalization and hardening of attitudes on the Left, demonstrated sickeningly in the way the Orlando massacre was immediately co-opted into the narrative agenda as "homophobia". I wouldn't think it would be possible to get blood on your hands after the fact, but this looks like that.

    When ISIS complained--it would be comic if it wasn't all so gruesome--about losing the narrative overnight to the gays and not getting credit for the worst terrorist attack on US soil since 9/11 it immediately established a hierarchy of life-value: terrorists would have to target explicitly straight white Americans to have any effect. We've been slow-walked to the point this profound betrayal that should make one's blood boil barely raises an eyebrow in the corrupted, jaded msm.

    The Left has its heels dug in treacherously deep now.

  54. Patrick Harris says:
    @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    Our democracy is certainly decadent, but the trouble with hereditary monarchy is that you can’t manufacture the sacred aura or sense of noblesse oblige that surrounds it out of whole cloth. If a personal form of rule ever comes to the United States, it will be wrapped in republican forms and will be far less benign than the Hapsburgs ever were.

    • Replies: @Ye Antient Oliphant
    @Patrick Harris

    Monarchy and aristocracy either exist or they don't. It's strange to want to create them where they don't. And where they do, the titles and courtesies are just public recognition of actual power (not just an 'aura') held by certain people. These flummeries aren't necessary though. There are landowners in Latin American 'Republics' who hold more real feudal power than any titled European.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Pericles

    , @Thea
    @Patrick Harris

    You mean the Clintons and Bushes?

  55. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    Try Democracy: The God That Failed by Hans-Hermann Hoppe. He has some alt- right sympathies I believe.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @pepperinmono

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau said: "In a monarchy, no amount of wealth can place a commoner above a prince while in a monarchy, by contrast, great wealth can place a commoner above the law".

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

  56. I suppose that, should Donald Trump be assassinated in full public view at one of his rallies, after a thorough investigation, the FBI will announce that he committed suicide.

  57. Tex says:
    @countenance
    And people why I'm a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It's because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway. All of this was because the Clintons wanted to peddle the influence of Hillary's potential Presidency in exchange for swag bags, IOW, yet another disastrous consequence of democracy and voting and elections.

    The only bright spot is that Comey's presser announcing a no indict recommendation sounded more like the case that Trump's Attorney General can use to issue an indictment.

    Also, I don't understand how HRC doesn't get indicted yet Edward Snowden, whose only "sin" was telling us what our own intelligence apparati are up to with regards to them snooping on us, did get indicted and still has outstanding felony charges. Except of I do understand, going back to my point, that we live under the rule of men, not laws.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Tex, @War for Blair Mountain, @Realist

    I think it is something of a truism that monarchy, being about bloodlines, drives towards the rule of the most inbred. Democracy on the other hand relies on lots of hot air, naturally it drives toward the rule of the biggest liars.

    So if I have to choose which I find more of a liability in a leader, congenital defects or compulsive mendacity, I’d say dishonesty as a lifestyle is more likely to be a deal-breaker.

  58. If I had to use one word that best describes the Obama Administration, it would be nonfeasance. He has consistently failed to use his power as the country’s top cop to enforce laws his does not like or are problematic for his cohorts, this just being the latest example. Executive affirmative action, or in his case, inaction.

  59. The president and anyone under his protection is above the law. If there was any question about this it was removed by the Dubya and Obamba administrations. So why did the FBI (pretend to) conduct this investigation? For that matter, why was the Brexit vote not stolen? Anybody? Bueller?

  60. Oh. That big breaking news.

    I thought you were referring to the successful arrival at Jupiter of the Junior probe designed by NASA’s team of black rocket scientists, led by Morgan Freeman.

    • Replies: @Wally
    @Kylie

    That's funny.

    Like most Hollywood blacks, Freeman can barely remember the script in between his wife beating episodes, his sexual affairs with his grandchildren, and his alcoholism & cocaine use

    The man is thick as a brick.

    , @countenance
    @Kylie

    Hide this from SJWs. The Juno team at JPL celebrating.

    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160705142348-juno-nasa-celebrate-exlarge-169.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @anon, @Anonym, @Wilkey, @Wilkey

    , @Lot
    @Kylie

    Here's the Google Doodle.

    https://www.google.com/doodles/juno-reaches-jupiter

    1/3 black, 1/3 white women, 1/6 white male, 1/6 asian male

    Replies: @Kylie

  61. The way I read this is that Hillary! was deemed Too Big To Fail.

  62. Art says:

    This is just like the OJ Simpson trail. The local court failed to deliver justice and in the eyes of everyday people, the justice system did wrong big time – as a result the legal system lost its luster with We the People.

    It is obvious, this time the US Federal justice system boomed. It did NOT deliver justice – it sheltered the mighty – the commanding authority sheltered the powerful.

    Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton, Lynch, Coomey, and Obama are all dishonest elitist trash.

    Honesty is of zero importance to those political rats. They just shovel out their brainstem political pop and the MSM shoves it down our throats.

    How does President Ratchet sound? She has lots of feel good pills for you America.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Art


    " ... as a result the legal system lost its luster with We the People."
     
    Hey, at least we still have Judge Judy (Judge Rinder in the UK )! There is still justice for the little people.
  63. @Kylie
    Oh. That big breaking news.

    I thought you were referring to the successful arrival at Jupiter of the Junior probe designed by NASA's team of black rocket scientists, led by Morgan Freeman.

    Replies: @Wally, @countenance, @Lot

    That’s funny.

    Like most Hollywood blacks, Freeman can barely remember the script in between his wife beating episodes, his sexual affairs with his grandchildren, and his alcoholism & cocaine use

    The man is thick as a brick.

  64. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    The trouble with Austria-Hungary was that a majority of those subjects were neither Austrian nor Hungarian.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @John Derbyshire

    Francis Ferdinand had plans for an Austria-Hungary-Serbia, although that would have left out the Poles and other minorities. I think the advocates of Greater Serbia targeted him for assassination because they feared that his solution would defuse their own grievances against the Hapsburgs. How to govern a multi-racial, polyglot empire is very tricky and it's sad to see that Dual Monarchy models have to be considered for the United States.

    Replies: @AP

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @John Derbyshire

    I wonder if there are any takeaway lessons for America.

    Replies: @Lot

  65. Thank goodness CNN is covering the real news!

    Economist Marianna Koli has lived in the UK since moving from her native Finland when she was 18. Days after the Brexit vote, she experienced what she says was her first racist incident in 16 years.

    “I was walking in my local high street, talking to a friend of mine — we were speaking English — and a chap just behind me shouted ‘I like your accent‘ in a very loud voice — I did feel it was a bit threatening.

    “It very clearly wasn’t intended as a compliment. He was saying ‘I see you, I’ve noticed you, that you are foreign, and I would like to tell you that you are foreign.”

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/07/01/europe/brexit-racist-attacks/index.html

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Grumpy

    Grumpy, She heard what she wanted to hear. He probably said I like your ass. You know men are always verbally raping and ogling women.

  66. We’ve now gotten to the point where, just as in the old Soviet Union, every official statement by an agent of the government was a lie — and everybody knew it was a lie. And every government official was corrupt, and everybody knew they were corrupt.

    But they just shrugged, said “What can you can do about it?” and poured another shot of vodka.

  67. Das says:
    @Blah
    I don't get it. Just the fact that she went about creating her own server was a violation of the law and showed forethought of trying to avoid Federal Records requirements.

    Replies: @e, @Truth, @Das, @Stephen R. Diamond, @Anonymous

    This investigation wasn’t about federal records requirements. Colin Powell also apparently used a personal email account and never turned over copies of his emails to the government.

    It was about whether Clinton intentionally sent classified information over unsecured email. Under the statute, sloppy handling of classified information doesn’t rise to the level of a criminal act. You actually have to show intent, which made it quite unlikely that they would ever bring charges.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Das

    Wrong, Tonto. There is nothing about intent in the law. You would know this if you ever had a security clearance. People have lost their jobs, and some have gone to jail, for much less than what HRC did.

    I know a Navy commander who got in a lot of hot water, as in written up, for accidentally sending a Confidential (below Secret) document in an unclass email. Hillary was sending SCI info over an unclass network. There is no way that Secret emails/data just hop over onto an unclass network; there is an air gap between them, it takes deliberate work to transfer stuff (you basically have to burn a CD), and everyone knows it is prohibited. I hope the intel community does Watergate level drip drip leaks on her until November.

    Replies: @Blah

    , @Stan Adams
    @Das

    John Deutch (CIA director in 1995-96) got in trouble for keeping classified material on his home computer:
    http://fas.org/irp/cia/product/ig_deutch.html

    In the end, Janet Reno declined to prosecute. His security clearances were revoked.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    , @Auntie Analogue
    @Das


    "Colin Powell also apparently used a personal email account and never turned over copies of his emails to the government.

    "It was about whether Clinton intentionally sent classified information over unsecured email. Under the statute, sloppy handling of classified information doesn’t rise to the level of a criminal act. You actually have to show intent."

     

    My dear Das, the law that Hillwhorey's deliberate use of a private server violated and the classified e-mails she sent through it also violated was not on the books during Colin Powell's term as Secretary of State. The law subsequently enacted - the one Hillwhorey violated - does not require intent, and it doesn't even require "carelessness."

    Replies: @Das

  68. @John Derbyshire
    @Twinkie

    The trouble with Austria-Hungary was that a majority of those subjects were neither Austrian nor Hungarian.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @JohnnyWalker123

    Francis Ferdinand had plans for an Austria-Hungary-Serbia, although that would have left out the Poles and other minorities. I think the advocates of Greater Serbia targeted him for assassination because they feared that his solution would defuse their own grievances against the Hapsburgs. How to govern a multi-racial, polyglot empire is very tricky and it’s sad to see that Dual Monarchy models have to be considered for the United States.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Diversity Heretic

    He proposed not an Austria-Hungary-Serbia but an Austria-Hungary-Slavia. Apparently, he had been making plans to have troops ready to crush a Hungarian uprising, had the Hungarians objected to giving up their grip on the Slavs whom they ruled after he declared the state's new form. He was killed by a Serb extremist who preferred a greater Serbia rather than a multiethnic Hapsburg state. So the Slavophile was murdered by the Serb.

    Karl basically followed Franz-Ferdinand's plan, but because the country was at war, internal military conflict with Hungary was impossible, so improvement for the Slavs stuck in Hungary was put on hold. The Czechs, Poles, Slovenes and Ukrainians were set for autonomy on the other hand.

    History showed that it was better to be part of a second-tier Great Power than individual tiny states. The latter were inevitably dominated by Berlin and Moscow much more totally than they had been by Vienna.

  69. Das says:

    In most cases of people sending classified information over unsecured channels, they lose their job and their security clearances. Only in rare cases do they face criminal charges.

    The Petraeus case was unique because they actually have a taped interview showing that he knew that the information he was giving his mistress was classified.

    It was pretty unlikely that they would find evidence that Clinton was intentionally leaking classified information, and wasn’t just incompetent.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Das

    The sheer volume of the material, together with the fact that she bought or rented a server of her own, as opposed to using gmail, Yahoo, etc., is massive circumstantial evidence of intent to decieve, conceal, and evade. This is elementary, Watson.

  70. She should skip the presidency, head to Hollywood.
    She is the classic screen white male villain, over the top, to say the least.
    I’d love to hear Barbara Walters ask her:
    If you were a swamp what kind of swamp would you be, Hillary?

  71. Let’s put this “fix” on a timeline and in perspective.

    1. According to James Comey, the Director of the FBI, the Hildebeast intended to violate the laws associated with retaining government records but did not intend to get caught. She also shredded her daily schedules as the Secretary of State so no one could know who she talked to or who talked to her. However, she likewise did not intend to get caught. Therefore, she had no criminal intent (what criminal intends to get caught?). Because she did get caught, she is only guilty of being stupid and incompetent for being caught … no enough to keep her from becoming the next President of the United States.

    (In my 20-years in the military, I saw many careers ruined by people who accidentally left classified information on a desk or on a copier in secure military facilities. I cannot fathom what would have happened to me if I had loaded over 2,000+ classified documents on a non-secure server exposed to the Internet … and the emails were hacked and downloaded.)

    2. Bill Clinton, who made Loretta Lynch’s career, adjusted his take off from Chicago to arrange a “chance” walk on to Ms. Lynch’s private plane for a secret, 20-minute talk … while both he and the Hildebeast are “people of interest” in ongoing FBI criminal investigations. They allegedly talked about grandchildren for 20-minutes. “Nothing to see here, folks … move along.”

    3. Ms. Lynch admits her bad judgment and declared that she won’t let it happen again … not because something happened but because it looks bad. She says she will not recuse herself as the Attorney General from the investigations but will accept whatever recommendation the FBI forwards. [?]

    4. Hussein Obama exposes his hand (and the fix) by prematurely taking the Hildebeast on Air Force 1 en route to a campaign event in which he would campaign for the Hildebeast. Obama certainly realized the political damage if he had been en route with Hillary and the FBI announced it would indict Hillary. Now, we all now know he knew he was safe. He knew the outcome before it was announced. Indeed, he knew it from the beginning of the investigation.

    5. Finally, James Comey, the Director of the FBI, announces that Hillary is stupid and incompetent but did not have intent to do harm. Therefore, he will not indict Hillary for systematically and willfully violating US law. Notice the dissimulation here. Hillary violated the laws through her willful acts and intended to violate the laws through her willful acts … but she did not intend to do harm by intending to and violating the laws through her acts. (I guess that means Edward Snowden is off scot-free now, right?)

    6. Comey also lied in his excusatory for Hillary. He said there is no evidence on the email servers of hacking (i.e. no proven harm done by Hillary or anyone else) … while admitting that proves nothing because good hackers would not have left evidence. However, how does this explain the arrest and extradition of Guccifer from Romania for hacking and post emails from Hillary’s email server?

    QED: The “fix” was on from the beginning. Bill, Hillary, Lynch, Obama, and Comey all knew the outcome before the investigation started.

    Conclusion: The Soviet Union was often criticized as a Third-World country with nuclear weapons. It’s now official. We are also a Third-World country with nuclear weapons and a privately owned central bank recklessly printing money for the banksters controlling our government … and hoping no one notices.

    “Move along, folks … nothing to see here. Why don’t you argue over legalizing pedophilia or something else … you know, WW-P. It’s next.”

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @TheJester

    Something, We are actually becoming a Banana Republic with a nuclear arsenal. I could always picture Obama in one of those uniforms that the Central American dictators wore, lots of medals, (well he does have a Nobel medal), the cartoon tall brim hat and the rope braids....maybe a sword.

    , @Anon
    @TheJester

    It's only a third-world country when you have people with a third-world mentality in charge. It doesn't have to be that way.

  72. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    I like the idea of bringing back a figurehead monarchy to Korea (Confucian). The Japanese royal family seems to have a positive influence on moderating Japanese culture. There’s nothing moderating Korean culture these days.

  73. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    The Dark Enlightenment is not a worldview that people can be talked into or convinced to be believed purely abstractly or rhetorically. It takes events and circumstances making people ask themselves WTF. And there have been a lot of those in the last 14 months. The only reason they haven’t begat more converts to the Dark Enlightenment and #NRx is because Trump came along and temporarily gave some of us the impetus to give this voting thing one more chance.

    Re your other point about monarchs and their “skin in the game” long term:

    https://countenance.wordpress.com/2014/10/20/the-god-that-costs/

    • Replies: @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    @countenance

    I'm no democracy enthusiast. Indeed I wouldn't mind the enlightened undemocratic hereditary rule of a family like that of Lee Kwan Yew. Unfortunately I fear we'd more likely end up with gross incompetence like from the Krazy Kim Il Sung Klan or the perhaps worse, the Krooked & Korrupt Klinton Konglomerate.

  74. ‘Well done, Bill’.

  75. @Kylie
    Oh. That big breaking news.

    I thought you were referring to the successful arrival at Jupiter of the Junior probe designed by NASA's team of black rocket scientists, led by Morgan Freeman.

    Replies: @Wally, @countenance, @Lot

    Hide this from SJWs. The Juno team at JPL celebrating.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @countenance

    I dunno. There is one chick in the picture, but she is white so probably doesn't count.

    Very impressive achievement.

    Replies: @Matthew Kelly, @snorlax

    , @anon
    @countenance

    I don't believe that for a second. That looks NOTHING like their Google Doodle.

    , @Anonym
    @countenance

    Tell that to google's homepage.

    , @Wilkey
    @countenance

    They're celebrating because they've just helped NASA accomplish it's primary mission of helping Muslims feel good about themselves.

    , @Wilkey
    @countenance

    They're celebrating because they've just helped NASA accomplish it's primary mission of helping Muslims feel good about themselves.

  76. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    What do you think of the baby Crown Prince George?
    Perhaps it’s time to give a different King George another crack at it?
    Sure he’s still a baby, but I doubt he could be any more immature and prone to tantrum than our recent Congresses…

    As unpopular as King George was in the Colonies there were still plenty of Loyalists. With the support of 9% of American citizens that Congress enjoys, is it perhaps possible that King George was actually more popular than the Republic our current Constitution has delivered?

  77. @Blah
    I don't get it. Just the fact that she went about creating her own server was a violation of the law and showed forethought of trying to avoid Federal Records requirements.

    Replies: @e, @Truth, @Das, @Stephen R. Diamond, @Anonymous

    There are no criminal penalties attached to violating the Freedom of Information Act.

    • Replies: @Blah
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    Section 1924 of Title 18 has to do with deletion and retention of classified documents. "Knowingly" removing or housing classified information at an "unauthorized location" is subject to a fine or a year in prison.

  78. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    The current monarchs of Europe seem very content to be figureheads with no real power and support multiculturalism and EU displacing the native populations of their countries. What makes you think it would be any different in the United States?

  79. @countenance
    @Twinkie

    The Dark Enlightenment is not a worldview that people can be talked into or convinced to be believed purely abstractly or rhetorically. It takes events and circumstances making people ask themselves WTF. And there have been a lot of those in the last 14 months. The only reason they haven't begat more converts to the Dark Enlightenment and #NRx is because Trump came along and temporarily gave some of us the impetus to give this voting thing one more chance.

    Re your other point about monarchs and their "skin in the game" long term:

    https://countenance.wordpress.com/2014/10/20/the-god-that-costs/

    Replies: @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta

    I’m no democracy enthusiast. Indeed I wouldn’t mind the enlightened undemocratic hereditary rule of a family like that of Lee Kwan Yew. Unfortunately I fear we’d more likely end up with gross incompetence like from the Krazy Kim Il Sung Klan or the perhaps worse, the Krooked & Korrupt Klinton Konglomerate.

  80. Some columnists posters here were dead certain she would be indicted. (I expressed complete certainty that she would not.) Draw your conclusions.

    What happens is actually the best that could be expected for Clinton opponents. The FBI chief basically said she was incompetent. [Come on, don’t be idiots – Clinton wasn’t a spy.]

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    Even you don't believe what you wrote. The feds don't sanction a prestigious criminal ergo "now we have them right where want them"-- yeah yeah. It was good that Ted Kennedy got away with letting a woman drown, because it "prevented" him from becoming President... Another fine pseudo-logical excuse for not having the sac to apply the law evenly and disinterestedly. Excuse-making is all the rage now.

    , @Das
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    Right. In the last year suddenly every right-wing blogger and commenter became an expert on federal classification law.

    Meanwhile, people who are actually lawyers were saying all along that because of the way that the law is written, it was very unlikely that they would bring charges.

    But now, of course, everyone who insisted indictments were imminent is now going to insist that the FBI director who publicly humiliated Clinton on TV today was secretly in the tank for her all along and suppressed the charges.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Mr. Anon

    , @ATX Hipster
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    She may not have intended to be a spy, but pissing all over the notion of information security had the same effect. She either knowingly put national security at risk because she felt that her last name put her above it, or she is too stupid and incompetent to understand the importance of information handling procedures that the government expects 19 year-olds to be able to comply with. Those are the only possibilities.

    If she was one of those 19 year-olds, she would be in prison after a brief semblance of a trial, despite having a much more plausible claim to have made an honest mistake.

    , @Anonym
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    I don't believe I gave an opinion one way or another. However, I thought it likely that being the Democrat nominee would make it very hard to convict Bill's wife of anything. Approximately half the country will vote for, and if it's corruption they want, well then, who is to say they are wrong?

    It is very lucky that the US has such great generals, the Atlantic and the Pacific, and that due to nuclear weapons, developed nations no longer duke it out.

    Replies: @ATX Hipster

  81. It is sad that every institution is corrupted . Is there anything the 4 Supreme Court justices wouldn’t vote for to advance their cause? Comey likely faced an uncooperative DOJ. Everyone said he would balk. Big talk! When faced with playing along or ruining his career, he chose the path of least resistance. Or maybe it wasn’t even that complicated. Indicting the candidate of the Democrat Party, in power, is a tall order. Taller than Comey.

    She is clearly guilty, his statement says as much. In today’s world, this is probably as good as it gets. He is probably correct–no reasonable prosecutor WOULD try HRC.
    This may be better in the long run. She is the weakest candidate to run against. This battle will need to be won at the ballot box.

  82. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    Try Democracy:The God That Failed by Hans-Hermann Hoppe. He has some alt-right sympathies I believe.

  83. @John Derbyshire
    @Twinkie

    The trouble with Austria-Hungary was that a majority of those subjects were neither Austrian nor Hungarian.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @JohnnyWalker123

    I wonder if there are any takeaway lessons for America.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I wonder if there are any takeaway lessons for America.
     
    - Don't conquer Bosnia and threaten Serbia.

    - Multi-national, multi-lingual, multi-ethnic armies are inferior to national armies.

    - Elderly aristocrats do not make good generals in 20th century war.

    - In the long-run being a small country versus the center of an empire is not so bad, even if the loss of status is humiliating at first.

    The rapid collapse of the Austrian military and government in October 1918 is a fascinating event.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  84. jon says:
    @Blah
    @Buffalo Joe

    I would only pray a Trump campaign had someone competent enough to make the argument you do.

    Replies: @jon

    I would only pray a Trump campaign had someone competent enough to make the argument you do.

    This is Trump’s initial response on his website: https://www.donaldjtrump.com/press-releases/donald-j.-trump-statement-on-hillary-clintons-bad-judgment-and-the-rigged-s

    Some highlights:

    He confirmed that her email could easily have been hacked by hostile actors, and confirmed that those she emailed with were hacked. Our adversaries almost certainly have a blackmail file on Hillary Clinton, and this fact alone disqualifies her from service.

    It has also been revealed that Hillary Clinton lied when she said that she did not send classified information. The FBI Director confirmed that over 100 emails were deemed classified at the time they were sent, including emails classified as top secret.

    Bill Clinton didn’t accidentally run into the Attorney General on the airport tarmac last week in Phoenix. Hillary Clinton didn’t accidentally sneak into the FBI during one of the country’s biggest holiday weekends to testify on her illegal activities, something that wouldn’t be afforded to others under investigation (and on a Saturday of all days). It was no accident that charges were not recommended against Hillary the exact same day as President Obama campaigns with her for the first time. Folks – the system is rigged

    (all emphasis mine).

    I thought it was pretty good, for a start.

  85. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Stephen R. Diamond
    Some columnists posters here were dead certain she would be indicted. (I expressed complete certainty that she would not.) Draw your conclusions.

    What happens is actually the best that could be expected for Clinton opponents. The FBI chief basically said she was incompetent. [Come on, don't be idiots - Clinton wasn't a spy.]

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Das, @ATX Hipster, @Anonym

    Even you don’t believe what you wrote. The feds don’t sanction a prestigious criminal ergo “now we have them right where want them”– yeah yeah. It was good that Ted Kennedy got away with letting a woman drown, because it “prevented” him from becoming President… Another fine pseudo-logical excuse for not having the sac to apply the law evenly and disinterestedly. Excuse-making is all the rage now.

  86. Hillary’s incompetence is so bad that I have wondered if she did this on purpose to leak false information knowing that someone would hack into her server. On second thought, nah, she is just incompetent.

  87. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:

    In the larger scheme of things Hillary Clinton’s email server in her gold-plated outhouse in Springs East Hampton is a minor issue. By many orders of magnitude, the way bigger issue is this:Why is Hillary Clinton even a viable POTUS candidate in 2016?

    Well here is the answer:The passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act. The passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act has allowed the Democratic Party to import Hillary Clinton’s high fertility,highly racialized nonwhite Democratic Party Voting Bloc which will be enthusiastically voting Whitey into a racial minority on Nov 8 2016. This is what White Guy Trump Bros and Donald Trump should be making very loud noises about…day and night.

    It’s what Hillary Clinton gets away with legally that’s the problem. And this is a direct consequence of the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act. Hillary’s toilet email server?….One big Yawn….

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Well at least you didn't do an Ann Coulter and refer to it as "Teddy Kennedy's" law.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Actually, prior to 1965, there was unlimited immigration from Latin America and the Caribbean. The 1965 immigration act put a quota on the number of immigrants who could come from the Western hemisphere.

    The 1965 act also emphasized family reunification. Mostly so white European countries (with large immigrant populations) would continue to dominate the migration flow.

    If immigration has been so dominated by non-white countries in the last several decades, it's because their birthrates have been so high and their per capita GDPs were low. So oligarchs imported huge amounts of cheap labor from these places. If there were large pools of low-cost labor in Europe, those nations would've dominated the migration flow (as they did in the past).

    I wouldn't blame the 1965 act. I'd blame uneven global growth rates and the oligarch's need for cheap labor.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

  88. @countenance
    @Kylie

    Hide this from SJWs. The Juno team at JPL celebrating.

    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160705142348-juno-nasa-celebrate-exlarge-169.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @anon, @Anonym, @Wilkey, @Wilkey

    I dunno. There is one chick in the picture, but she is white so probably doesn’t count.

    Very impressive achievement.

    • Replies: @Matthew Kelly
    @Jim Don Bob

    USA Today headline: "More white women does not equal tech diversity"
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/2015/02/12/women-of-color-diversity-tech-silicon-valley-nicole-sanchez/23298945/

    (h/t Breitbart http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2016/02/08/report-anti-white-agenda-revealed-at-githubs-diversity-team/)

    So, no, being a white woman doesn't count any more. Unless you're Hillary or someone else involved in the white-to-black/brown wealth transfer.

    , @snorlax
    @Jim Don Bob

    Also, on the far right, a South Asian and an East Asian man, and (far right, background, in shadow, blonde hair) another woman.

  89. @countenance
    @Kylie

    Hide this from SJWs. The Juno team at JPL celebrating.

    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160705142348-juno-nasa-celebrate-exlarge-169.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @anon, @Anonym, @Wilkey, @Wilkey

    I don’t believe that for a second. That looks NOTHING like their Google Doodle.

  90. Das says:
    @Stephen R. Diamond
    Some columnists posters here were dead certain she would be indicted. (I expressed complete certainty that she would not.) Draw your conclusions.

    What happens is actually the best that could be expected for Clinton opponents. The FBI chief basically said she was incompetent. [Come on, don't be idiots - Clinton wasn't a spy.]

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Das, @ATX Hipster, @Anonym

    Right. In the last year suddenly every right-wing blogger and commenter became an expert on federal classification law.

    Meanwhile, people who are actually lawyers were saying all along that because of the way that the law is written, it was very unlikely that they would bring charges.

    But now, of course, everyone who insisted indictments were imminent is now going to insist that the FBI director who publicly humiliated Clinton on TV today was secretly in the tank for her all along and suppressed the charges.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    @Das

    A lot of right wingers have expertise in national security and handling classified documents, and don't have PhDs in Transgender Muslim Skateboarding.

    Keep on insisting the Emperor has clothes, tho.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Das

    "Right. In the last year suddenly every right-wing blogger and commenter became an expert on federal classification law."

    I've been required to take training on how to handle ITAR-restricted information. According to the law, putting that information into circulation can get you convicted. A few years ago, a retired U. Tenn professor was convicted and sent to jail for just such a violation. The governing statute does not require intent. And that isn't even classified information.

    What Hillary did clearly violated the law. Comey even outlined how she did so.

    "Meanwhile, people who are actually lawyers were saying all along that because of the way that the law is written, it was very unlikely that they would bring charges."

    What people? Which lawyers? Democratic Party functionaries?

    "But now, of course, everyone who insisted indictments were imminent is now going to insist that the FBI director who publicly humiliated Clinton on TV today was secretly in the tank for her all along and suppressed the charges."

    Maybe. Or he was subborned or intimidated.

  91. Yoni Netanyahu looks a lot like young George W Bush in this photo:

    Here are a few more photos:

    As a child with Bibi:

    With his wife and dog:

    Mug shot with an angry glare:

    • Replies: @donut
    @Lot

    What's the point ? He's dead and the world is better for it .

  92. From the story:
    Although the FBI did not find evidence that Clinton or her colleagues intended to violate laws, Comey chastised Clinton’s actions as “extremely careless.”

    Hooray! Mens Rea lives, if you are powerful enough.

  93. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @countenance
    And people why I'm a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It's because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway. All of this was because the Clintons wanted to peddle the influence of Hillary's potential Presidency in exchange for swag bags, IOW, yet another disastrous consequence of democracy and voting and elections.

    The only bright spot is that Comey's presser announcing a no indict recommendation sounded more like the case that Trump's Attorney General can use to issue an indictment.

    Also, I don't understand how HRC doesn't get indicted yet Edward Snowden, whose only "sin" was telling us what our own intelligence apparati are up to with regards to them snooping on us, did get indicted and still has outstanding felony charges. Except of I do understand, going back to my point, that we live under the rule of men, not laws.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Tex, @War for Blair Mountain, @Realist

    Countenance

    You are among the reasons I have extreme hatred of the fashy Alt Right. To the extent that your enthusiasm for Monarchy…Pinochet….and Franco….the Alt Right must never be supported and encouraged to grow as a movement.

    The US is not a Democracy…in fact it is a Plutocracy-Oligarchy, which has nothing to do with Democracy.

    We had an alternative to your Pinochet-Franco Land Owner Oligarchy in the late 19th-early 20th century labor revolts in the US which gave us such wonderfull things such as the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Sikh Exclusion Act(yes there was a Sikh Exclusion Act to keep the Sikhs out of California).

    Steve

    You really need to let this post go through because the fashy haircut Alt Right really does push some very immoral violently anti-labor forms of top-down political-economic organization.

    • Replies: @andy russia
    @War for Blair Mountain

    +1000

    , @Cagey Beast
    @War for Blair Mountain

    You're quite right, the Alt-Right posturing about dead dictators and pan-White imperialism is annoying and childish. I'm also really sick of their jokes about WW2 and Latin American concentration camps and torture. It's more noise from the weirdo teen, prank caller demographic that makes up their keyboard foot soldiers. That comically self-sabotaging Republican media consultant who looks like Elmer Fudd was right about that at least. The Real Rick Wilson or something?

    Replies: @andy russia, @TheJester

    , @Pericles
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Hey, wanna buy a Che Guevara T-shirt?

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    , @BB753
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Fair enough, but what you wrote was totally unrelated to Countenance's actual post.

  94. Dang, I was worried for a moment – until Comey issued his recommendation. I thought that truth, justice, and the American Way would rise from the ashes and my respect for the rule of law would find new sustenance; but, alas, all is in vain. If this connivance doesn’t show her as she is, then we the people are, indeed, dead in the water. Such a trash-heap of vanity among our so-called leaders – the White Trash and Bastard Blacks are running the asylum.

  95. David Duke weighs in on the world-shaking tweet:

    • Replies: @Honorary Thief
    @Dave Pinsen

    Who is this "Hillary" and what's an email?

  96. @Lot
    Yoni Netanyahu looks a lot like young George W Bush in this photo:

    http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41801000/jpg/_41801962_yoni.jpg


    Here are a few more photos:

    As a child with Bibi:

    http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/c9/cb/da/c9cbdaf146d8266360bc16bd31e22f20.jpg


    With his wife and dog:

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/64/0f/48/640f482eb3f137e1a1637dc5744567fd.jpg


    Mug shot with an angry glare:

    http://megafon-news.co.il/asys/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/225162_10151015271272076_745292066_n1.jpg

    Replies: @donut

    What’s the point ? He’s dead and the world is better for it .

  97. The missing emails reminds me of Filegate? Remember? Hillary was front and center on that one too.

    And whatever happened to Craig Livingstone?

  98. The missing emails remind me of Filegate. Remember how they turned up on the third floor of the White House? Hillary was front and center on that one too.

    And whatever happened to Craig Livingstone?

    • Replies: @fnn
    @Connecticut Famer


    And whatever happened to Craig Livingstone?
     
    You have a good memory.
  99. @Buzz Mohawk
    Nothing to see here, folks. Move along...

    It's now official: The entire country has become Chicago.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Dennis Dale, @Wade

    Looks like Obama got to be mayor of Chicago after all.

  100. From George Saunders’ article in the latest New Yorker (with the priceless title “Who Are All These
    Trump Supporters?”):
    “I had to pull an older white woman out of a moblet of slapping young women of color, after she’d been driven down to one knee and had her glasses knocked off. When I told the young African-American woman who’d given the first slap that this was exactly the kind of thing the Trump movement loved to see and would be happy to use, she seemed to suddenly come back to herself and nearly burst into tears. The slapped woman was around sixty, tall, lean, sun-reddened,
    scrappy, a rancher, maybe, and we stood there a few minutes, recovering ourselves.”

    So the New Yorker thinks young black women should refrain from beating the hell out of a 60-year-old white woman — not because it’s a crime, but because it might give Trump something he could use.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Tom Scarlett

    Judging from what you see on the internet, black women think that gathering in a mob and beating someone up is perfectly acceptable in a civilized society. And does society ever tell them it's savage behavior?

    , @Pericles
    @Tom Scarlett

    "Now, now, Shaniqua, beating that woman in broad daylight will just help Trump. Take her into the alley."

  101. @Jim Christian
    Meh, the fix is and always was in. There we have it. A watershed moment this, we are no longer, even in trying to fake it, a nation of laws. In our face, against written law, Clinton broke that law and there they all are, installers of the fix, the brokers of dozens of obstructions to justice and violations of protocol and conflict of interest, flipping the bird right in our faces with a collective "Fuck You". We are now Venezuela.

    Enjoy the decline.

    Replies: @Flip, @Connecticut Famer, @Neoconned, @Diversity Heretic, @Realist, @Jack D

    This country is on a shit slide and there is no stopping it.

    But who cares America let’s watch Dancing with the Dickheads or America Has Idiots.

  102. @V Vega
    At this point, everything the Dems do now makes voters lean harder into Trump. It's like every lie or misguidance they've used for years not only doesn't work, it fuels the fire in the belly of the Trump train.

    Hillary have become the Blanche DuBois of our political process, and Trump is our Kowalski. I wonder what the broken bottle is going to be, before the final reeming?

    Replies: @Psmith, @Realist

    “At this point, everything the Dems do now makes voters lean harder into Trump.”

    In your dreams. You underestimate the stupid in this country.

  103. @countenance
    And people why I'm a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It's because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway. All of this was because the Clintons wanted to peddle the influence of Hillary's potential Presidency in exchange for swag bags, IOW, yet another disastrous consequence of democracy and voting and elections.

    The only bright spot is that Comey's presser announcing a no indict recommendation sounded more like the case that Trump's Attorney General can use to issue an indictment.

    Also, I don't understand how HRC doesn't get indicted yet Edward Snowden, whose only "sin" was telling us what our own intelligence apparati are up to with regards to them snooping on us, did get indicted and still has outstanding felony charges. Except of I do understand, going back to my point, that we live under the rule of men, not laws.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Tex, @War for Blair Mountain, @Realist

    Democracies have never worked. And probably never will. When idiots are allowed to vote bad things happen. A Meritocracy would be much better.

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @Realist

    Realist

    Former Reagan Youth such as you and countenance along with the whole repellant Ronnie Reagan worshipping crowd drove the blue collar Native Born White American Working Class into the arms of the Democratic Party...that's what your anti-commie Oligarch Worshipping did.


    What you and countenance call "Democracy" are what Noam Chomsky and Edward Herman call Demonstration Elections...US version....that are nothing more than a ratification of economic arrangements divinely ordained by US Plutocrats-Oligarchs.


    Perhaps you and countenance-question diversity can tell us what Oligarch-Land-Owners you would like to Lord over the Native Born White American White Serfs. The one with the large orange helmut on?...You know, Nancy Reagan used to rub black-Oxford shoe polish into Ronnie's hair every morning....We ended up with a bona fide potted plant for a POTUS from 1981-1988.


    Springs East Hampton has been renamed the Monica Lewinsky Blvd by the locals in honor of the time that POTUS Bill Clinton hid in a wealthy Democratic Party donors home after getting good blow from Monica in the Oval Office. Democratic Party Family Values!!! Springs East Hampton has been colonized by two megafauna pest species:1)the lymes disease carrying white cotton tail deer and 2)Bill and Hillary's La Raza Mexican Democratic Party Voting Bloc. Boston Red Sox Slugger Carl Yastremski's high school...Bridgehampton High School...is now majority La Raza Mexican Megfauna Pest Species Democratic Party Voting Bloc.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @dfordoom
    @Realist


    Democracies have never worked. And probably never will. When idiots are allowed to vote bad things happen. A Meritocracy would be much better.
     
    The problem is that when you propose a "meritocracy" what you get is something like the EU. Unelected, unaccountable, faceless bureaucrats who are far worse (and far nastier) than even the worst democratically elected leaders.

    Monarchy isn't the best alternative. It's the only viable alternative.

    Replies: @Realist

  104. A kinder, gentler Trump can now refer to “Extremely Careless Hillary” instead of “Crooked Hillary”…

  105. @Jim Christian
    Meh, the fix is and always was in. There we have it. A watershed moment this, we are no longer, even in trying to fake it, a nation of laws. In our face, against written law, Clinton broke that law and there they all are, installers of the fix, the brokers of dozens of obstructions to justice and violations of protocol and conflict of interest, flipping the bird right in our faces with a collective "Fuck You". We are now Venezuela.

    Enjoy the decline.

    Replies: @Flip, @Connecticut Famer, @Neoconned, @Diversity Heretic, @Realist, @Jack D

    Don’t be silly. If you were a lower level Federal employee, whether Republican or Democrat, male or female, black or white, they would have treated you exactly the same way. The Goddess of Justice wears a blindfold.

    And if you believe that, I have a bridge that I would like to sell to you.

    • Agree: ATX Hipster
    • Replies: @Das
    @Jack D

    If you were a lower level employee you would have been fired, lost your security clearance, and made ineligible for employment in jobs that handle classified information.

    The issue is that there's no administrative sanction that can prevent someone from being elected president.

  106. Not identical but compare this guy’s treatment to Hillary and especially Michigan gov Snyder (lead in Flint water).

    LANDLORD SENTENCED TO JAIL FOR LYING ABOUT LEAD PAINT HAZARDS
    https://www.justice.gov/archive/opa/pr/2002/March/02_enrd_140.htm

  107. @countenance
    @Kylie

    Hide this from SJWs. The Juno team at JPL celebrating.

    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160705142348-juno-nasa-celebrate-exlarge-169.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @anon, @Anonym, @Wilkey, @Wilkey

    Tell that to google’s homepage.

  108. @Stephen R. Diamond
    Some columnists posters here were dead certain she would be indicted. (I expressed complete certainty that she would not.) Draw your conclusions.

    What happens is actually the best that could be expected for Clinton opponents. The FBI chief basically said she was incompetent. [Come on, don't be idiots - Clinton wasn't a spy.]

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Das, @ATX Hipster, @Anonym

    She may not have intended to be a spy, but pissing all over the notion of information security had the same effect. She either knowingly put national security at risk because she felt that her last name put her above it, or she is too stupid and incompetent to understand the importance of information handling procedures that the government expects 19 year-olds to be able to comply with. Those are the only possibilities.

    If she was one of those 19 year-olds, she would be in prison after a brief semblance of a trial, despite having a much more plausible claim to have made an honest mistake.

  109. Lot says:

    I’m with Bernie: I’m sick of hearing about Hillary’s e-mail. And I don’t even think her being indicted, mug-shotted, etc would have hurt her.

    In any case, Trump wins the election if the issues on the popular mind are black crime, mass migration of violent and low-IQ peoples, and Muslim terrorism. Anything else dominating the news is bad for Trump. (Gun control relates to all three themes, so it is a good issue).

    Lion OTB has a post wondering if the Brexit poll miss means Trump will do much better than in the polls. He states the poll average had Brexit losing by 2 instead of winning by 4, a six-point miss. He actually might be understating the poll miss, the averages I saw had Brexit at -4, not -2, for a huge 8 point miss.

    Here is the bad news for us: The “Shy Tory” effect is extremely present in the UK, but there is no “Shy GOP” effect in US polling. Basically, in a majority of UK national elections going back to the 70’s, there has been a significant bias against the Tories. There just is not any similar and long-standing effect here in the USA.

    On the other hand, there was a huge miss in favor of the left in Ireland recently, polls showed the gay marriage referendum passing by a much smaller margin than its actual 62-38 win.

    The data out there thus suggest, but not very strongly, that social desirability bias may understate Trump’s support.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Lot



    Here is the bad news for us: The “Shy Tory” effect is extremely present in the UK, but there is no “Shy GOP” effect in US polling.

     

    You sure about that? I could easily see that Trump's support in national polls could be skewed by people not wanting to admit that they plan to vote for him - because the media have painted him as The Other.

    Replies: @Realist

  110. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    “I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the ‘enlightened’ dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I.”

    My dear Twinkie, Mr. Derbyshire’s reply to your sentiment was spot on.

    It’s a pity my late Slovak grandparents – all four of them – are not here for you to ask them how much they enjoyed their hardscrabble existence in virtual slavery under the oppressive Hungarian end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, whose rulers forbade schooling in my grandparents’ language; forced schooling only in Hungarian; forcibly conscripted Slovaks into the army (my childhood parish here in the U.S. had old men who’d been conscripted into WWI service in the Central Powers’ Austro-Hungarian Army); and enforced rigorous discrimination against Slovaks in education, employment, promotion, property ownership, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, political and civil service officeholding (for the lower orders of which the Hungarians interposed Jews to insulate their aristocratic selves from the Slovaks, thus deflecting Slovak protest away from the Hungarian monarchy into Slovak anti-Semitism), and in countless other ugly ways.

    The current strain of alt-right-trad romanticism for monarchy is frightfully myopic. Monarchy is a crapshoot, and there’s just one thing you should know about craps: its odds are stacked overwhelmingly with the house.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    @Auntie Analogue

    > forcibly conscripted Slovaks into the army<

    that's why my maternal grandfather left Stará Ľubovňa for america

    , @Rob McX
    @Auntie Analogue

    I agree. Look at the monarchies that have survived in Europe - the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden...not exactly beacons of hope for indigenous Europeans. Of course people will argue that these are monarchies in name only. But if that's the case, it's because the monarchs were unable or unwilling to resist the rise of modern democracy and the rule of the open-borders elites.

    Replies: @Thea

    , @avraham
    @Auntie Analogue

    Thank you for finally pointing that out. I was too chicken to point out on this site that monarchy was not always a bed of roses. Or rather it always was a bed of roses together with the thorns. I did point out on Amerika Steven Brett's blog that in Athens there was a clear distinction between a tyrant and a monarch or king. In Sparta you had kings with constitutional powers - and their powers were limited by the Ephors and the other king. When Athens removed its tyrants it was clear they were against tyrants, not kings. Still its democracy had problems because of lack of limits of power on the people. In any case the problems will not be solved by a return to monarchy but by constitutional government and the Law of God in the Bible.

    , @AP
    @Auntie Analogue

    What you described was awful, but:

    1. By losing Austria-Hungary, central Europe instead dealt with the Nazi nightmare for a few years, followed by decades of Bolshevism. It wasn't a happy story.

    2. Austria-Hungary had been changing, albeit in an evolutionary rather than revolutionary direction. The situation you described would not have lasted.

    3. Hungary was much more repressive than Austria; Slovaks unfortunately were on the wrong side of the dual monarchy.

    Robert Musil wrote very nicely about Austria-Hungary:

    https://musilreader.wordpress.com/tag/kakania/

  111. @Stephen R. Diamond
    Some columnists posters here were dead certain she would be indicted. (I expressed complete certainty that she would not.) Draw your conclusions.

    What happens is actually the best that could be expected for Clinton opponents. The FBI chief basically said she was incompetent. [Come on, don't be idiots - Clinton wasn't a spy.]

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Das, @ATX Hipster, @Anonym

    I don’t believe I gave an opinion one way or another. However, I thought it likely that being the Democrat nominee would make it very hard to convict Bill’s wife of anything. Approximately half the country will vote for, and if it’s corruption they want, well then, who is to say they are wrong?

    It is very lucky that the US has such great generals, the Atlantic and the Pacific, and that due to nuclear weapons, developed nations no longer duke it out.

    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    @Anonym

    Except for the 'great generals' bit, spot on.

    Replies: @Anonym

  112. @Jack D
    @Jim Christian

    Don't be silly. If you were a lower level Federal employee, whether Republican or Democrat, male or female, black or white, they would have treated you exactly the same way. The Goddess of Justice wears a blindfold.

    And if you believe that, I have a bridge that I would like to sell to you.

    Replies: @Das

    If you were a lower level employee you would have been fired, lost your security clearance, and made ineligible for employment in jobs that handle classified information.

    The issue is that there’s no administrative sanction that can prevent someone from being elected president.

  113. @Lot
    I'm with Bernie: I'm sick of hearing about Hillary's e-mail. And I don't even think her being indicted, mug-shotted, etc would have hurt her.

    In any case, Trump wins the election if the issues on the popular mind are black crime, mass migration of violent and low-IQ peoples, and Muslim terrorism. Anything else dominating the news is bad for Trump. (Gun control relates to all three themes, so it is a good issue).


    Lion OTB has a post wondering if the Brexit poll miss means Trump will do much better than in the polls. He states the poll average had Brexit losing by 2 instead of winning by 4, a six-point miss. He actually might be understating the poll miss, the averages I saw had Brexit at -4, not -2, for a huge 8 point miss.

    Here is the bad news for us: The "Shy Tory" effect is extremely present in the UK, but there is no "Shy GOP" effect in US polling. Basically, in a majority of UK national elections going back to the 70's, there has been a significant bias against the Tories. There just is not any similar and long-standing effect here in the USA.

    On the other hand, there was a huge miss in favor of the left in Ireland recently, polls showed the gay marriage referendum passing by a much smaller margin than its actual 62-38 win.

    The data out there thus suggest, but not very strongly, that social desirability bias may understate Trump's support.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    Here is the bad news for us: The “Shy Tory” effect is extremely present in the UK, but there is no “Shy GOP” effect in US polling.

    You sure about that? I could easily see that Trump’s support in national polls could be skewed by people not wanting to admit that they plan to vote for him – because the media have painted him as The Other.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @cthulhu

    That's just whistling past the graveyard of American stupidity.

  114. @Jim Don Bob
    @countenance

    I dunno. There is one chick in the picture, but she is white so probably doesn't count.

    Very impressive achievement.

    Replies: @Matthew Kelly, @snorlax

    USA Today headline: “More white women does not equal tech diversity”
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/2015/02/12/women-of-color-diversity-tech-silicon-valley-nicole-sanchez/23298945/

    (h/t Breitbart http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2016/02/08/report-anti-white-agenda-revealed-at-githubs-diversity-team/)

    So, no, being a white woman doesn’t count any more. Unless you’re Hillary or someone else involved in the white-to-black/brown wealth transfer.

  115. @Das
    @Blah

    This investigation wasn't about federal records requirements. Colin Powell also apparently used a personal email account and never turned over copies of his emails to the government.

    It was about whether Clinton intentionally sent classified information over unsecured email. Under the statute, sloppy handling of classified information doesn't rise to the level of a criminal act. You actually have to show intent, which made it quite unlikely that they would ever bring charges.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Stan Adams, @Auntie Analogue

    Wrong, Tonto. There is nothing about intent in the law. You would know this if you ever had a security clearance. People have lost their jobs, and some have gone to jail, for much less than what HRC did.

    I know a Navy commander who got in a lot of hot water, as in written up, for accidentally sending a Confidential (below Secret) document in an unclass email. Hillary was sending SCI info over an unclass network. There is no way that Secret emails/data just hop over onto an unclass network; there is an air gap between them, it takes deliberate work to transfer stuff (you basically have to burn a CD), and everyone knows it is prohibited. I hope the intel community does Watergate level drip drip leaks on her until November.

    • Replies: @Blah
    @Jim Don Bob

    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/437479/fbi-rewrites-federal-law-let-hillary-hook

  116. @pepperinmono
    @Twinkie

    Try Democracy: The God That Failed by Hans-Hermann Hoppe. He has some alt- right sympathies I believe.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau said: “In a monarchy, no amount of wealth can place a commoner above a prince while in a monarchy, by contrast, great wealth can place a commoner above the law”.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @Cagey Beast

    Darn it, I should have said "In a monarchy, no amount of wealth can place a commoner above a prince while in a republic, by contrast, great wealth can place a commoner above the law”.

  117. @Psmith
    @V Vega


    At this point, everything the Dems do now makes voters lean harder into Trump.
     
    I like Trump too, but let's not get carried away here. Hillary is still well ahead in the polls.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @ChrisD

    She’s within the error of margin and losing outside of the error in some polls. And its July.

    Some of you people are typing with a rope around your neck I think.

  118. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @Realist
    @countenance

    Democracies have never worked. And probably never will. When idiots are allowed to vote bad things happen. A Meritocracy would be much better.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain, @dfordoom

    Realist

    Former Reagan Youth such as you and countenance along with the whole repellant Ronnie Reagan worshipping crowd drove the blue collar Native Born White American Working Class into the arms of the Democratic Party…that’s what your anti-commie Oligarch Worshipping did.

    What you and countenance call “Democracy” are what Noam Chomsky and Edward Herman call Demonstration Elections…US version….that are nothing more than a ratification of economic arrangements divinely ordained by US Plutocrats-Oligarchs.

    Perhaps you and countenance-question diversity can tell us what Oligarch-Land-Owners you would like to Lord over the Native Born White American White Serfs. The one with the large orange helmut on?…You know, Nancy Reagan used to rub black-Oxford shoe polish into Ronnie’s hair every morning….We ended up with a bona fide potted plant for a POTUS from 1981-1988.

    Springs East Hampton has been renamed the Monica Lewinsky Blvd by the locals in honor of the time that POTUS Bill Clinton hid in a wealthy Democratic Party donors home after getting good blow from Monica in the Oval Office. Democratic Party Family Values!!! Springs East Hampton has been colonized by two megafauna pest species:1)the lymes disease carrying white cotton tail deer and 2)Bill and Hillary’s La Raza Mexican Democratic Party Voting Bloc. Boston Red Sox Slugger Carl Yastremski’s high school…Bridgehampton High School…is now majority La Raza Mexican Megfauna Pest Species Democratic Party Voting Bloc.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Reagan didn't drive blue collar workers to the Dems; on the contrary, he pulled them back ("Reagan Democrats").

    Reagan may have dropped the hammer on the air traffic controllers, but he stood up for unionized manufacturing workers with tariffs and threats of tariffs against Japan. He knew that if a blue collar worker had his economic security covered by his private sector job, he'd be less reliant on the government for that, and more likely to vote GOP for patriotic and cultural reasons.

    That's a lesson W. and Fox News never grokked.

    There was a rare Republican victory in a Congressional seat in an outer borough of NYC a few years ago, and the rally for the winner was disrupted by some hippy. A middle aged guy in khakis who was built like a brick sh*t house bodily removed him. Turned out he was a former Marine who retired from the NYPD on "disability" -- that's the 21st Century equivalent of a Reagan Dem, but there aren't enough cop jobs and disability/retiree slots to sustain the GOP electorate. That's why the GOP needs more good-paying private sector jobs.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

  119. @Das
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    Right. In the last year suddenly every right-wing blogger and commenter became an expert on federal classification law.

    Meanwhile, people who are actually lawyers were saying all along that because of the way that the law is written, it was very unlikely that they would bring charges.

    But now, of course, everyone who insisted indictments were imminent is now going to insist that the FBI director who publicly humiliated Clinton on TV today was secretly in the tank for her all along and suppressed the charges.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Mr. Anon

    A lot of right wingers have expertise in national security and handling classified documents, and don’t have PhDs in Transgender Muslim Skateboarding.

    Keep on insisting the Emperor has clothes, tho.

  120. @Seth Largo
    OT:

    I notice an interesting demographic disparity between the Google Doodle version of the Juno probe team and the Google Image Search version.

    Replies: @Hacienda

    NASA is anti-Chinese. You can’t expect many Asians to work for an organization
    that places guilt by association.

  121. @whorefinder
    @Buffalo Joe

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Seriously, after Orlando and San Bernadino, the FBI's reputation should have been on extremely shaky ground. Unfortunately, the news media wasn't smart enough the notice that the FBI should have nipped those thugs in the bud---they even had the suspects on their radar, but didn't bother following up. And the public---especially the right wing/Trump wing---is too enamored of the cops/law enforcement to admit the gross incompetence displayed.

    This non-indictment for her crimes is just proof how much the FBI is nothing more than a controlled entity of the political hacks in Washington. Historically, this will mark a point where future scholars will say that the FBI officially became merely a secret police organization without any fidelity to principles or law, only to their political leaders.

    And Comey's reputation is truly trashed---he will come out extremely poorly in terms of how historians note his character. He's now a known yes-man for the power brokers and the money men.

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations---where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free---the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically. But there is a profound disconnect in this country between the massive fuckups and corruption of the G-Men--stretching at least back to Hoover refusing to investigate or even admit organized crime existed, on the fear of being outed as a homosexual---and the public/media perception of them.

    The FBI guys are hacks.

    Replies: @fnn, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Stan Adams, @Buffalo Joe, @EriK, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations—where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free—the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically.

    Also Ruby Ridge and the Branch Davidians.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @fnn

    To be fair to the FBI, it was BATF that cooked up Ruby Ridge and the Branch Davidians, although the FBI was happy to join the party and kill American citizens who had not been convicted of anything. Maybe that's where BHO got the idea for his executive execution of Americans by drone strikes.

    Trial! We don't need no stinkin' trial!

  122. @Stephen R. Diamond
    @Blah

    There are no criminal penalties attached to violating the Freedom of Information Act.

    Replies: @Blah

    Section 1924 of Title 18 has to do with deletion and retention of classified documents. “Knowingly” removing or housing classified information at an “unauthorized location” is subject to a fine or a year in prison.

  123. @Connecticut Famer
    The missing emails remind me of Filegate. Remember how they turned up on the third floor of the White House? Hillary was front and center on that one too.

    And whatever happened to Craig Livingstone?

    Replies: @fnn

    And whatever happened to Craig Livingstone?

    You have a good memory.

  124. @Thea
    I used to work for a company that had a contract with the military. Every year we had to watch a video & pass an online quiz about how to handle data. If we detoured from their rules, we faced a possible fine, jail time plus loss of a job, even if it was a mistake or nothing bad happened.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Jim Don Bob

    Thea, you are one of the little people (like the rest of us). But for Dems in power, well, “it is good to be the King” has never been truer.

    Now how many Americans think that the Clintons are our betters?

    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    This comes to mind:

    https://theconservativetreehouse.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/hillary-clinton-laws-are-for-little-people.jpg?w=640

  125. @Auntie Analogue
    @Twinkie


    "I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the 'enlightened' dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I."

     

    My dear Twinkie, Mr. Derbyshire's reply to your sentiment was spot on.

    It's a pity my late Slovak grandparents - all four of them - are not here for you to ask them how much they enjoyed their hardscrabble existence in virtual slavery under the oppressive Hungarian end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, whose rulers forbade schooling in my grandparents' language; forced schooling only in Hungarian; forcibly conscripted Slovaks into the army (my childhood parish here in the U.S. had old men who'd been conscripted into WWI service in the Central Powers' Austro-Hungarian Army); and enforced rigorous discrimination against Slovaks in education, employment, promotion, property ownership, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, political and civil service officeholding (for the lower orders of which the Hungarians interposed Jews to insulate their aristocratic selves from the Slovaks, thus deflecting Slovak protest away from the Hungarian monarchy into Slovak anti-Semitism), and in countless other ugly ways.

    The current strain of alt-right-trad romanticism for monarchy is frightfully myopic. Monarchy is a crapshoot, and there's just one thing you should know about craps: its odds are stacked overwhelmingly with the house.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Rob McX, @avraham, @AP

    > forcibly conscripted Slovaks into the army<

    that's why my maternal grandfather left Stará Ľubovňa for america

  126. @Jim Don Bob
    @Das

    Wrong, Tonto. There is nothing about intent in the law. You would know this if you ever had a security clearance. People have lost their jobs, and some have gone to jail, for much less than what HRC did.

    I know a Navy commander who got in a lot of hot water, as in written up, for accidentally sending a Confidential (below Secret) document in an unclass email. Hillary was sending SCI info over an unclass network. There is no way that Secret emails/data just hop over onto an unclass network; there is an air gap between them, it takes deliberate work to transfer stuff (you basically have to burn a CD), and everyone knows it is prohibited. I hope the intel community does Watergate level drip drip leaks on her until November.

    Replies: @Blah

  127. @Cagey Beast
    @pepperinmono

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau said: "In a monarchy, no amount of wealth can place a commoner above a prince while in a monarchy, by contrast, great wealth can place a commoner above the law".

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    Darn it, I should have said “In a monarchy, no amount of wealth can place a commoner above a prince while in a republic, by contrast, great wealth can place a commoner above the law”.

  128. @The Alarmist
    The only surprise here is that people are surprised.

    I remember starting an OJ Simpson verdict pool with a bunch of (very caucasian) colleagues from Connecticut, and being the jaded NYC resident, I started the pool off with "not guilty" on Day 1 at 42 minutes into deliberations. When asked why I chose a seemingly impossible outcome, I said "look at the jury and tell me why it will not turn out that way."

    I think the jury actually took something like three or four hours, but the really memorable thing was seeing one woman walking around with a very dropped-jaw look of surprise. As long as these sorts are voters, the criminal elite will always get their way.

    Replies: @Lugash

    Going a bit OT… but watching Dominick Dunne during the OJ verdict is still amazing. He’s literally mouth agape for 5 minutes.

    Angry at Hilary’s verdict, but not surprised.

  129. Comey said that no reasonable prosecutor would bring a case. He is right about that. Hillary wouldn’t be prosecuted unless they had video of her running someone down in her car, and even then, only if she backed over the guy a couple of times.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Jean Cocteausten

    Wrong. The person HRC ran over would have to have been a teenage illegal transgendered disabled Syrian refugee who was studying astrophysics for HRC to be in trouble.

  130. @whorefinder
    @Buffalo Joe

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Seriously, after Orlando and San Bernadino, the FBI's reputation should have been on extremely shaky ground. Unfortunately, the news media wasn't smart enough the notice that the FBI should have nipped those thugs in the bud---they even had the suspects on their radar, but didn't bother following up. And the public---especially the right wing/Trump wing---is too enamored of the cops/law enforcement to admit the gross incompetence displayed.

    This non-indictment for her crimes is just proof how much the FBI is nothing more than a controlled entity of the political hacks in Washington. Historically, this will mark a point where future scholars will say that the FBI officially became merely a secret police organization without any fidelity to principles or law, only to their political leaders.

    And Comey's reputation is truly trashed---he will come out extremely poorly in terms of how historians note his character. He's now a known yes-man for the power brokers and the money men.

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations---where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free---the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically. But there is a profound disconnect in this country between the massive fuckups and corruption of the G-Men--stretching at least back to Hoover refusing to investigate or even admit organized crime existed, on the fear of being outed as a homosexual---and the public/media perception of them.

    The FBI guys are hacks.

    Replies: @fnn, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Stan Adams, @Buffalo Joe, @EriK, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Yes we can!

    • Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Si se puede!

  131. This really is an irrelevant distraction to me, and not in the way that Steve means it. Hillary is bad because she’s in the pocket of neocons and banksters, not because of anything that happened to any e-mails or, to take another distraction, to ambassador Stevens.

    The policies she supports, the crowd that’s gathered around her, will kill thousands of American soldiers and hundreds of thousands of Middle Easterners if she wins. This will increase the incidence of terrorism and refugee flows. THAT’s what’s important.

    Her computer illiteracy or carelessness are utterly irrelevant. I bet that no foreign intelligence service learned anything new from this, but even if they did, that would also be irrelevant next to the policies which Hillary supports.

    • Replies: @Glossy
    @Glossy

    This issue trivializes Hillary's badness. Most people have been unintentionally careless with work-related info. Very few people have been instrumental in starting wars that killed hundreds of thousands.

    Stevens was an employee who died on her watch. Again, stuff that happens in real life. Her actual badness transcends that by light years. When you emphasize pedestrian stuff like those e-mails you distract people from what a monster she really is.

  132. @Diversity Heretic
    @Buffalo Joe

    Bizarely, the fact that she does as she pleases and gets away with it strengthens her support with much of her constituency

    Replies: @TontoBubbaGoldstein, @Dennis Dale

    Too a large extent, the same is true for Trump.

    • Agree: gruff
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    Nope. Hillary gets a pass because regardless of her corrupt betrayal of America for personal enrichment she advances the cult-Marx agenda.

    If Hillary drank the blood of an entire middle school of children (livestreamed, and on tape) the Democrat party whores would defend her. Trump has nothing like that to help him. Paul Ryan can't wait for the next Trump 'incident' to denounce him, just like the rest of the Repub-i-stablishment.

  133. @candid_observer
    OT in a way, but a testament to how corrupt our elites have become:

    http://www.boston.com/news/politics/2016/07/04/trumps-pocahontas-attack-rooted-warren-heritage-issue

    This purports to be reportage on the Warren heritage issue.

    At no point does it even raise the factual question as to whether she does have that heritage. It takes her own report as Gospel.

    The entire article would not be changed a jot if it were written by Elizabeth Warren's own staff, which, for all one could gather, it may have been.

    The Globe does not allow comments on the article, of course. My impression is that they have stopped all comments altogether. Comments are False, Trollish...and embarrassing.

    There is no integrity anywhere, it seems. As I've said before, if you've convinced yourself that The Next Hitler is on the rise, what standard won't you throw out the window in your fight for Justice?

    Replies: @Lurker, @Flip

    The Globe does not allow comments on the article, of course. My impression is that they have stopped all comments altogether. Comments are False, Trollish…and embarrassing.

    One the of the British papers ended online commenting with something similar – “So we asked you what you thought of online comments and you told us you didn’t want to be able to tell us what you think anymore.” Right.

  134. @Auntie Analogue
    @Twinkie


    "I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the 'enlightened' dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I."

     

    My dear Twinkie, Mr. Derbyshire's reply to your sentiment was spot on.

    It's a pity my late Slovak grandparents - all four of them - are not here for you to ask them how much they enjoyed their hardscrabble existence in virtual slavery under the oppressive Hungarian end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, whose rulers forbade schooling in my grandparents' language; forced schooling only in Hungarian; forcibly conscripted Slovaks into the army (my childhood parish here in the U.S. had old men who'd been conscripted into WWI service in the Central Powers' Austro-Hungarian Army); and enforced rigorous discrimination against Slovaks in education, employment, promotion, property ownership, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, political and civil service officeholding (for the lower orders of which the Hungarians interposed Jews to insulate their aristocratic selves from the Slovaks, thus deflecting Slovak protest away from the Hungarian monarchy into Slovak anti-Semitism), and in countless other ugly ways.

    The current strain of alt-right-trad romanticism for monarchy is frightfully myopic. Monarchy is a crapshoot, and there's just one thing you should know about craps: its odds are stacked overwhelmingly with the house.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Rob McX, @avraham, @AP

    I agree. Look at the monarchies that have survived in Europe – the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden…not exactly beacons of hope for indigenous Europeans. Of course people will argue that these are monarchies in name only. But if that’s the case, it’s because the monarchs were unable or unwilling to resist the rise of modern democracy and the rule of the open-borders elites.

    • Replies: @Thea
    @Rob McX

    Prince Phillip is a hoot.

  135. @Anonymous Nephew
    I wonder what tomorrow's Chilcot Report on the Iraq war will say? Though as Tony Blair's been all over the UK media lately, I presume he won't be arrested.

    OT

    another good Guardian article on why Remain lost the UK referendum.

    http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jul/05/how-remain-failed-inside-story-doomed-campaign


    "Straw* commissioned a subsequent analysis, dated April 2016, which showed a discrepancy between the party’s metropolitan, university-educated, middle-class voters and its lower-income, working-class supporters, who were far more sceptical about the case for remaining. It was this undefended flank that the leave side was targeting with promises to control immigration and divert EU subscription payments to the NHS. The remainers’ warning not to gamble with economic security was failing to resonate. “Emotional fear wasn’t credible because they felt their lives were already shit,” as one senior campaign source told me."

    “There were people turning up who had never voted before,” Straw said after the defeat. “They did it this time because they were very angry with what they felt had been done to them in their communities over decades – the decline of industry, the rapid increase in people coming to this country, the levels of austerity. In a general election they might think it doesn’t matter who you vote for because they’re all the same. In the referendum they recognised this could lead to something different. Maybe they didn’t anticipate all the consequences. But there was a sense that you could change things.”

    People had many motives to vote leave, but the most potent elements were resentment of an elite political class, rage at decades of social alienation in large swaths of the country, and a determination to reverse a tide of mass migration. Those forces overwhelmed expert pleas for economic stability.
     

    *Will Straw, policy wonk with no experience outside of student politics and think-tanks, put in charge of the Remain campaign by who knows what forces, is the son of Jack Straw, Labour Foreign Secretary 2001-2005.

    Replies: @Lurker

    That’s (((Will Straw))) and (((Jack Straw))). FYI.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @Lurker

    aka Wiki - "Straw's maternal grandfather's mother came from an Eastern European Jewish family" - so not very.


    This article is quite funny, in that in the Jewish Chronicle you can stereotype and remark on his features with a smile on your face.

    http://www.thejc.com/lifestyle/how-jewish-is/how-jewish-jack-straw


    "Straw was brought up in Buckhurst Hill, Essex, where there is a synagogue. He went to Leeds University, one of our more haimishe institutes of higher education where he read law (noch). Having qualified, he branched out into media (as a researcher for World in Action) and then went into politics. If there was a classic Jewish career path, this would be it.

    Although Straw's great grandmother was Jewish, it was the wrong one - on his mother's father's side. So Straw is not halachically Jewish. Indeed, in a speech given in 1995, he said: "I come from Jewish stock although I'm Christian now." So even if he looks like a shul warden, he doesn't want to be one of us."
     

    Replies: @Lurker

  136. @Glossy
    This really is an irrelevant distraction to me, and not in the way that Steve means it. Hillary is bad because she's in the pocket of neocons and banksters, not because of anything that happened to any e-mails or, to take another distraction, to ambassador Stevens.

    The policies she supports, the crowd that's gathered around her, will kill thousands of American soldiers and hundreds of thousands of Middle Easterners if she wins. This will increase the incidence of terrorism and refugee flows. THAT's what's important.

    Her computer illiteracy or carelessness are utterly irrelevant. I bet that no foreign intelligence service learned anything new from this, but even if they did, that would also be irrelevant next to the policies which Hillary supports.

    Replies: @Glossy

    This issue trivializes Hillary’s badness. Most people have been unintentionally careless with work-related info. Very few people have been instrumental in starting wars that killed hundreds of thousands.

    Stevens was an employee who died on her watch. Again, stuff that happens in real life. Her actual badness transcends that by light years. When you emphasize pedestrian stuff like those e-mails you distract people from what a monster she really is.

  137. @Bugg
    Famous, But Incompetent.

    Did anyone really think Comey, a DC establishment fixture, was going to take a torch to his career?

    She did all that. And much much more than Petraeus and John Deutsch ever did.And how is Snowden on the lam? Why have any laws at all?

    But the only way for this to end happily is Trump putting a stake through her ice cold heart.Fingers crossed. Rise up,and wise up, ye white trash!

    Replies: @Honorary Thief

    The sad thing is that it could have helped his career. The Republicans could have made him the Attorney General, backed a run for office or just given him a nice sinecure making seven figures at a friendly bank.

  138. @Anonymous
    Paul Ryan helps our Trump with some advice.

    Ryan to Trump: 'Anti-Semitic images' have no place in campaign

    http://www.politico.com/story/2016/07/paul-ryan-trump-tweet-225099
     

    Replies: @Honorary Thief

    He’s such a little wienie lol.

  139. @Das
    @Blah

    This investigation wasn't about federal records requirements. Colin Powell also apparently used a personal email account and never turned over copies of his emails to the government.

    It was about whether Clinton intentionally sent classified information over unsecured email. Under the statute, sloppy handling of classified information doesn't rise to the level of a criminal act. You actually have to show intent, which made it quite unlikely that they would ever bring charges.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Stan Adams, @Auntie Analogue

    John Deutch (CIA director in 1995-96) got in trouble for keeping classified material on his home computer:
    http://fas.org/irp/cia/product/ig_deutch.html

    In the end, Janet Reno declined to prosecute. His security clearances were revoked.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Stan Adams


    "In the end, Janet Reno declined to prosecute. [John Deutch's] security clearances were revoked."
     
    Yes, but the access of a sitting President will not be rvoked, and she have the final say as to who is on the Kill List. Paybacks are a bitch, Osama bin Donald.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  140. @Dave Pinsen
    David Duke weighs in on the world-shaking tweet:

    https://twitter.com/crampell/status/750447860768968704

    Replies: @Honorary Thief

    Who is this “Hillary” and what’s an email?

  141. Lot says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    @John Derbyshire

    I wonder if there are any takeaway lessons for America.

    Replies: @Lot

    I wonder if there are any takeaway lessons for America.

    – Don’t conquer Bosnia and threaten Serbia.

    – Multi-national, multi-lingual, multi-ethnic armies are inferior to national armies.

    – Elderly aristocrats do not make good generals in 20th century war.

    – In the long-run being a small country versus the center of an empire is not so bad, even if the loss of status is humiliating at first.

    The rapid collapse of the Austrian military and government in October 1918 is a fascinating event.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Lot

    All good points.

    Unfortunately, America seems to be doing the complete opposite of that.

    1. We conquered Yugoslavia and did a lot worse than threaten the Serbs.

    2. America is creating an increasingly multi-national, multi-lingual, multi-ethnic army. Also, multi-gendered and multi-sexual orientation.

    3. The neoconservatives run our foreign wars. They're sort of like elder aristocrats, but less patriotic and less competent.

    4. We're determined to make our country absolutely massive sized, mostly through promoting immigration. We're also determined to expand our sphere of influence - through wars, stationing troops overseas, and free trade deals.

    So we're like Austria-Hungary, but a lot worse.

    One day, the rapid collapse of the American military and government will one day be viewed as a fascinating event by future Chinese historians.

    In conclusion, we're screwed.

  142. @candid_observer
    OT in a way, but a testament to how corrupt our elites have become:

    http://www.boston.com/news/politics/2016/07/04/trumps-pocahontas-attack-rooted-warren-heritage-issue

    This purports to be reportage on the Warren heritage issue.

    At no point does it even raise the factual question as to whether she does have that heritage. It takes her own report as Gospel.

    The entire article would not be changed a jot if it were written by Elizabeth Warren's own staff, which, for all one could gather, it may have been.

    The Globe does not allow comments on the article, of course. My impression is that they have stopped all comments altogether. Comments are False, Trollish...and embarrassing.

    There is no integrity anywhere, it seems. As I've said before, if you've convinced yourself that The Next Hitler is on the rise, what standard won't you throw out the window in your fight for Justice?

    Replies: @Lurker, @Flip

    The take on Warren from a commenter on Razib Khan’s site:

    Elizabeth Warren is not Cherokee, never was. She is whiter than Queen Elizabeth. She lied about being an Indian to get a job.

    Lizzie wanted a job as a law prof at Harvard Law School. Her problem is that her JD is from Rutgers. Rutgers is ranked 92nd out of the 200 law schools. In ordinary circumstances, Harvard will trash can a resume from a Rutgers grad. According to Wikipedia: “As of 2011, she was the only tenured law professor at Harvard who had attended law school at an American public university.” Rutgers, like I said is 92nd. Berkley, Michigan, and Virginia are tied for 8th (84 places ahead of Rutgers) and none of their grads has a job at Harvard.

    I would guess that Lizzie started the Indian scam long before she got a job at Harvard. She was on the faculty at Texas (#15), Michigan(#8), and Pennsylvania(#7) before she worked at Harvard. I doubt that any of those schools would touch a Rutgers grad either

    Harvard will not hire a Rutgers grad without an extraordinary circumstance like race quotas. Being a Federal Court of Appeals Judge, or writing the leading academic treatise on some large area of the law would also work. Warren’s only shot was to be an Indian (she was even less plausible as a Black or a Mexican), so she did it, and got away with it. She is not the only one in Academia who pulled that stunt. Remember War Churchill.

    Harvard will never confess. They are embarrassed that they got flimflammed so easily. It would seem to be ordinary due diligence to check with the tribe when a potential hire is claiming tribal affiliation, but they didn’t. My guess would be that PC prevents them from asking or checking. There have been a number of other recent prominent racial misrepresenters, such as Shaun King of Black Lives Matter and Rachel Dolezal of the NAACP.

    I just want to add, that I am not saying that Rutgers grads are in anyway inferior to graduates of higher ranked schools. They are not. Law school attendance has about zip to do with intellectual ability. Law schools are really caught up with snobbery and rankings. always have been. They have to, they just trade schools with intellectual pretensions.

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    @Flip

    For me, the fact about Warren that really sealed the deal in my disdain for her is her contribution to a book of recipes, Pow Wow Chow. Her recipes were supposedly passed down to her from her Cherokee ancestor:

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2012/05/18/did-elizabeth-warren-plagiarize-pow-wow-chow-recipes/

    But three of these recipes were in fact obviously in large part plagiarized, word for word, from recipes others had written, and which were obviously not native American in origin.

    Now I could sort of understand how someone might have heard from their family that they had certain ancestry, realized that it would be to their advantage to declare it, and decided not to question the matter very closely. Sort of understand it: I would never do it myself, and if my kids had been tempted to do it, I would have told them it was simply dishonest to do it without knowing for sure; and I would hold in very low esteem anybody who actually did it under those circumstances.

    But how do you forgive Warren's outright plagiarism in these circumstances? She obviously knew she was lying about the origin of those recipes, and she didn't even blanch at the plagiarism. Who, looking at this sort of scandalous and venal lying and dissembling, can possibly believe a single word the woman has to say about her ancestry, or anything else?

    She lies with ease and abandon.

    The bizarre thing is that she is touted as the embodiment of purity, the woman who speaks truth to power, among national Democrats. It is just one more act.

    Moral of the lesson: Never give up your cynicism; it is your only reliable guide in this world.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Chief Seattle

    , @Jim Christian
    @Flip

    Belichik LOVES Rutgers football. Lots of guys on the Patriots came through Rutgers. The Patriots are curiously quite White and have always been considered smarter, rather than tougher as the AFC Championships and Super Bowl wins pile up. And then there's Brady, the very-White Gronk, Edleman(Jew) and mostly White Offensive line. Curious, no?

  143. I worked for the intelligence community (as a technical person, not a “spook”) in the late ’80s and much of the ’90s.

    Had I done what Hillary did, I am quite certain I would have gone to jail.

    I was in fact present at a meeting when an intelligence breach occurred. Although the breach was not my fault, I pointed it out immediately, and the meeting was immediately ended. I had a clear legal obligation to point out the security breach — again, even though I was not the cause of that breach.

    One of my co-workers in fact went to jail for security violations.

    I agree with other commenters here that Hillary’s unbridled militarism is a much serious crime than her malfeasance concerning classified information.

    On the other hand, Comey does nicely demonstrate how corrupt the system is: he admits massive breaches on her part, but she gets away scot-free.

    Any ordinary American should feel like throwing up. We’re not citizens; we’re just peasants serving the elite.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    • Replies: @Honorary Thief
    @PhysicistDave

    It's amazing how fast the anti-war left was dumped down the memory hole.

    Replies: @Dew

  144. JimB says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, FBI Director Coomey delivered a measured indictment of Hillary's incompetence, without recommending an indictment. He actually said that in many cases this type of activity would result in sanctions or have other consequences. But that's the real world and this is Obama World. But, on a positive note it gives her opposition plenty of ammo.

    Replies: @Blah, @whorefinder, @Diversity Heretic, @JimB, @Lagertha, @gda

    This is such an incongruous outcome I can only think the NSA has something on Comey. We’ve entered an age where basically any public official can be blackmailed or neutralized by Big Brother. (I think this was the topic of a not too long ago iSteve post.)

    Democracy is over. Do what you’re told.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @JimB

    For what it's worth, it's congruous with a number of other odd legal events in the last few years, like Lois Lerner, gay marriage, obamacare and so on.

  145. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @whorefinder


    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?
     
    Yes we can!

    Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel

    Si se puede!

  146. @Thea
    I used to work for a company that had a contract with the military. Every year we had to watch a video & pass an online quiz about how to handle data. If we detoured from their rules, we faced a possible fine, jail time plus loss of a job, even if it was a mistake or nothing bad happened.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Jim Don Bob

    Me too. And I will repeat that it is difficult to get information off the secret internet (Siprnet). Classified machines on the Siprnet have USB ports disabled. They are not connected in any way with the unclass internet. The only way to get classified information from the Siprnet is to burn it to a CD, which is what Snowden did. But doing so makes the CD a Secret artifact and it is ILLEGAL to put a Secret CD in an unclass machine because, by that quaint thing we like to call law, doing so makes the heretofore unclass machine now Secret.

    This is drilled yearly into everyone who has a clearance along with the warning that screwing up could mean the loss of your clearance, and since you probably cannot be on the job without a clearance, the loss of your clearance means the loss of your job.

    I am extremely disappointed in Director Comey. I had read that he was a stand up guy.

    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/237930/

  147. @whorefinder
    @Buffalo Joe

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Seriously, after Orlando and San Bernadino, the FBI's reputation should have been on extremely shaky ground. Unfortunately, the news media wasn't smart enough the notice that the FBI should have nipped those thugs in the bud---they even had the suspects on their radar, but didn't bother following up. And the public---especially the right wing/Trump wing---is too enamored of the cops/law enforcement to admit the gross incompetence displayed.

    This non-indictment for her crimes is just proof how much the FBI is nothing more than a controlled entity of the political hacks in Washington. Historically, this will mark a point where future scholars will say that the FBI officially became merely a secret police organization without any fidelity to principles or law, only to their political leaders.

    And Comey's reputation is truly trashed---he will come out extremely poorly in terms of how historians note his character. He's now a known yes-man for the power brokers and the money men.

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations---where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free---the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically. But there is a profound disconnect in this country between the massive fuckups and corruption of the G-Men--stretching at least back to Hoover refusing to investigate or even admit organized crime existed, on the fear of being outed as a homosexual---and the public/media perception of them.

    The FBI guys are hacks.

    Replies: @fnn, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Stan Adams, @Buffalo Joe, @EriK, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    J. Edgar Hoover, the guy who founded the FBI, was a closet case who wore frilly pink undies under his trousers. What does that tell us?

    Meyer Lansky had a snapshot of Hoover hoovering his lover boy, Clyde Tolson. The blackmail threat led Hoover to regard the Mafia as untouchable.

    In J. Edgar (2011), starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Hoover, Armie Hammer played Tolson. Hammer said in an interview he was pleased to take part in the desecration of Hoover’s memory by exposing his hidden gayness to the moviegoers of the world.

    (Hoover had an extensive file on Armand Hammer – Armie’s great-great grandfather – who, as Steve has noted, was a Marxist billionaire.)

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Stan Adams

    Strike one great from great-great grandfather.

    My ungood.

    , @cthulhu
    @Stan Adams

    Citations please. While it is strongly suspected that Hoover and Tolson were lovers, there is zero documentary evidence, just circumstantial evidence. The report of Hoover's cross-dressing goes back to a single uncorroborated source, and is generally thought to be untrue by those who have done actual research on Hoover's life.

    JEH did plenty enough bad shit to demonstrate that he was despicable; we don't need dubious claims too.

    And I'm not providing citations since any semi-competent person can find the evidence online in a trice.

  148. @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    @Diversity Heretic

    Too a large extent, the same is true for Trump.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Nope. Hillary gets a pass because regardless of her corrupt betrayal of America for personal enrichment she advances the cult-Marx agenda.

    If Hillary drank the blood of an entire middle school of children (livestreamed, and on tape) the Democrat party whores would defend her. Trump has nothing like that to help him. Paul Ryan can’t wait for the next Trump ‘incident’ to denounce him, just like the rest of the Repub-i-stablishment.

  149. @whorefinder
    @Buffalo Joe

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Seriously, after Orlando and San Bernadino, the FBI's reputation should have been on extremely shaky ground. Unfortunately, the news media wasn't smart enough the notice that the FBI should have nipped those thugs in the bud---they even had the suspects on their radar, but didn't bother following up. And the public---especially the right wing/Trump wing---is too enamored of the cops/law enforcement to admit the gross incompetence displayed.

    This non-indictment for her crimes is just proof how much the FBI is nothing more than a controlled entity of the political hacks in Washington. Historically, this will mark a point where future scholars will say that the FBI officially became merely a secret police organization without any fidelity to principles or law, only to their political leaders.

    And Comey's reputation is truly trashed---he will come out extremely poorly in terms of how historians note his character. He's now a known yes-man for the power brokers and the money men.

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations---where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free---the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically. But there is a profound disconnect in this country between the massive fuckups and corruption of the G-Men--stretching at least back to Hoover refusing to investigate or even admit organized crime existed, on the fear of being outed as a homosexual---and the public/media perception of them.

    The FBI guys are hacks.

    Replies: @fnn, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Stan Adams, @Buffalo Joe, @EriK, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    Whorefinder, Just watched a documentary on Bulger’s 16 years on the lam. I was startled by what appeared to be documentable complicity by the agency.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Buffalo Joe

    Here's another blast from the FBI past:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/28/nyregion/tapes-depict-proposal-to-thwart-bomb-used-in-trade-center-blast.html?pagewanted=all&pagewanted=print
    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/31/nyregion/bomb-informer-s-tapes-give-rare-glimpse-of-fbi-dealings.html?pagewanted=all&pagewanted=print

    The FBI knew of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing plot months in advance, and even had a chance to stop it ... but did nothing.

    The memory hole is clogged with many such stories.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  150. @PhysicistDave
    I worked for the intelligence community (as a technical person, not a "spook") in the late '80s and much of the '90s.

    Had I done what Hillary did, I am quite certain I would have gone to jail.

    I was in fact present at a meeting when an intelligence breach occurred. Although the breach was not my fault, I pointed it out immediately, and the meeting was immediately ended. I had a clear legal obligation to point out the security breach -- again, even though I was not the cause of that breach.

    One of my co-workers in fact went to jail for security violations.

    I agree with other commenters here that Hillary's unbridled militarism is a much serious crime than her malfeasance concerning classified information.

    On the other hand, Comey does nicely demonstrate how corrupt the system is: he admits massive breaches on her part, but she gets away scot-free.

    Any ordinary American should feel like throwing up. We're not citizens; we're just peasants serving the elite.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    Replies: @Honorary Thief

    It’s amazing how fast the anti-war left was dumped down the memory hole.

    • Replies: @Dew
    @Honorary Thief

    Exactly. Hillary has policies that are making the neo-cons blush. Hardly a peep from the mainstream left. They were all over Dubya but I doubt they are going to rip Hillary a new one.

    The anti-war left was a huge in the 2000's and was a significant factor in Obama winning the election. They got quiet afterwards even though Obama and Hillary helped orchestrate a moronic regime change in Libya (which opened Europe to refugees) among other things.

  151. @fnn
    @whorefinder


    After the Whitey Bulger revelations—where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free—the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically.
     
    Also Ruby Ridge and the Branch Davidians.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    To be fair to the FBI, it was BATF that cooked up Ruby Ridge and the Branch Davidians, although the FBI was happy to join the party and kill American citizens who had not been convicted of anything. Maybe that’s where BHO got the idea for his executive execution of Americans by drone strikes.

    Trial! We don’t need no stinkin’ trial!

  152. @Grumpy
    Thank goodness CNN is covering the real news!

    Economist Marianna Koli has lived in the UK since moving from her native Finland when she was 18. Days after the Brexit vote, she experienced what she says was her first racist incident in 16 years.

    "I was walking in my local high street, talking to a friend of mine -- we were speaking English -- and a chap just behind me shouted 'I like your accent' in a very loud voice -- I did feel it was a bit threatening.

    "It very clearly wasn't intended as a compliment. He was saying 'I see you, I've noticed you, that you are foreign, and I would like to tell you that you are foreign."
     
    http://www.cnn.com/2016/07/01/europe/brexit-racist-attacks/index.html

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Grumpy, She heard what she wanted to hear. He probably said I like your ass. You know men are always verbally raping and ogling women.

  153. @Jean Cocteausten
    Comey said that no reasonable prosecutor would bring a case. He is right about that. Hillary wouldn't be prosecuted unless they had video of her running someone down in her car, and even then, only if she backed over the guy a couple of times.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Wrong. The person HRC ran over would have to have been a teenage illegal transgendered disabled Syrian refugee who was studying astrophysics for HRC to be in trouble.

  154. This really is an irrelevant distraction to me, and not in the way that Steve means it. Hillary is bad because she’s in the pocket of neocons and banksters, not because of anything that happened to any e-mails or, to take another distraction, to ambassador Stevens.

    Didn’t they get Capone on tax evasion first?

  155. Must be nice for her knowing that whatever you do short of directly murdering someone (though failing to act to prevent multiple deaths apparently is okay) you will get off for.

    I don’t think this country could stand another ‘historic first’.

  156. @Buffalo Joe
    @whorefinder

    Whorefinder, Just watched a documentary on Bulger's 16 years on the lam. I was startled by what appeared to be documentable complicity by the agency.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    Here’s another blast from the FBI past:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/28/nyregion/tapes-depict-proposal-to-thwart-bomb-used-in-trade-center-blast.html?pagewanted=all&pagewanted=print
    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/31/nyregion/bomb-informer-s-tapes-give-rare-glimpse-of-fbi-dealings.html?pagewanted=all&pagewanted=print

    The FBI knew of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing plot months in advance, and even had a chance to stop it … but did nothing.

    The memory hole is clogged with many such stories.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Stan Adams

    There are perverse incentives for that sort of thing, since budgets tend to get massively increased immediately following terror attacks, while there aren't any rewards for stopping them.

  157. @TheJester
    Let's put this "fix" on a timeline and in perspective.

    1. According to James Comey, the Director of the FBI, the Hildebeast intended to violate the laws associated with retaining government records but did not intend to get caught. She also shredded her daily schedules as the Secretary of State so no one could know who she talked to or who talked to her. However, she likewise did not intend to get caught. Therefore, she had no criminal intent (what criminal intends to get caught?). Because she did get caught, she is only guilty of being stupid and incompetent for being caught ... no enough to keep her from becoming the next President of the United States.

    (In my 20-years in the military, I saw many careers ruined by people who accidentally left classified information on a desk or on a copier in secure military facilities. I cannot fathom what would have happened to me if I had loaded over 2,000+ classified documents on a non-secure server exposed to the Internet ... and the emails were hacked and downloaded.)

    2. Bill Clinton, who made Loretta Lynch's career, adjusted his take off from Chicago to arrange a "chance" walk on to Ms. Lynch's private plane for a secret, 20-minute talk ... while both he and the Hildebeast are "people of interest" in ongoing FBI criminal investigations. They allegedly talked about grandchildren for 20-minutes. "Nothing to see here, folks ... move along."

    3. Ms. Lynch admits her bad judgment and declared that she won't let it happen again ... not because something happened but because it looks bad. She says she will not recuse herself as the Attorney General from the investigations but will accept whatever recommendation the FBI forwards. [?]

    4. Hussein Obama exposes his hand (and the fix) by prematurely taking the Hildebeast on Air Force 1 en route to a campaign event in which he would campaign for the Hildebeast. Obama certainly realized the political damage if he had been en route with Hillary and the FBI announced it would indict Hillary. Now, we all now know he knew he was safe. He knew the outcome before it was announced. Indeed, he knew it from the beginning of the investigation.

    5. Finally, James Comey, the Director of the FBI, announces that Hillary is stupid and incompetent but did not have intent to do harm. Therefore, he will not indict Hillary for systematically and willfully violating US law. Notice the dissimulation here. Hillary violated the laws through her willful acts and intended to violate the laws through her willful acts ... but she did not intend to do harm by intending to and violating the laws through her acts. (I guess that means Edward Snowden is off scot-free now, right?)

    6. Comey also lied in his excusatory for Hillary. He said there is no evidence on the email servers of hacking (i.e. no proven harm done by Hillary or anyone else) ... while admitting that proves nothing because good hackers would not have left evidence. However, how does this explain the arrest and extradition of Guccifer from Romania for hacking and post emails from Hillary's email server?

    QED: The "fix" was on from the beginning. Bill, Hillary, Lynch, Obama, and Comey all knew the outcome before the investigation started.

    Conclusion: The Soviet Union was often criticized as a Third-World country with nuclear weapons. It's now official. We are also a Third-World country with nuclear weapons and a privately owned central bank recklessly printing money for the banksters controlling our government ... and hoping no one notices.

    "Move along, folks ... nothing to see here. Why don't you argue over legalizing pedophilia or something else ... you know, WW-P. It's next."

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Anon

    Something, We are actually becoming a Banana Republic with a nuclear arsenal. I could always picture Obama in one of those uniforms that the Central American dictators wore, lots of medals, (well he does have a Nobel medal), the cartoon tall brim hat and the rope braids….maybe a sword.

  158. @whorefinder
    @Buffalo Joe

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Seriously, after Orlando and San Bernadino, the FBI's reputation should have been on extremely shaky ground. Unfortunately, the news media wasn't smart enough the notice that the FBI should have nipped those thugs in the bud---they even had the suspects on their radar, but didn't bother following up. And the public---especially the right wing/Trump wing---is too enamored of the cops/law enforcement to admit the gross incompetence displayed.

    This non-indictment for her crimes is just proof how much the FBI is nothing more than a controlled entity of the political hacks in Washington. Historically, this will mark a point where future scholars will say that the FBI officially became merely a secret police organization without any fidelity to principles or law, only to their political leaders.

    And Comey's reputation is truly trashed---he will come out extremely poorly in terms of how historians note his character. He's now a known yes-man for the power brokers and the money men.

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations---where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free---the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically. But there is a profound disconnect in this country between the massive fuckups and corruption of the G-Men--stretching at least back to Hoover refusing to investigate or even admit organized crime existed, on the fear of being outed as a homosexual---and the public/media perception of them.

    The FBI guys are hacks.

    Replies: @fnn, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Stan Adams, @Buffalo Joe, @EriK, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    Famous But Incompetent

  159. @Stan Adams
    @whorefinder

    J. Edgar Hoover, the guy who founded the FBI, was a closet case who wore frilly pink undies under his trousers. What does that tell us?

    Meyer Lansky had a snapshot of Hoover hoovering his lover boy, Clyde Tolson. The blackmail threat led Hoover to regard the Mafia as untouchable.

    In J. Edgar (2011), starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Hoover, Armie Hammer played Tolson. Hammer said in an interview he was pleased to take part in the desecration of Hoover's memory by exposing his hidden gayness to the moviegoers of the world.

    (Hoover had an extensive file on Armand Hammer - Armie's great-great grandfather - who, as Steve has noted, was a Marxist billionaire.)

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @cthulhu

    Strike one great from great-great grandfather.

    My ungood.

  160. @Tom Scarlett
    From George Saunders' article in the latest New Yorker (with the priceless title "Who Are All These
    Trump Supporters?"):
    "I had to pull an older white woman out of a moblet of slapping young women of color, after she’d been driven down to one knee and had her glasses knocked off. When I told the young African-American woman who’d given the first slap that this was exactly the kind of thing the Trump movement loved to see and would be happy to use, she seemed to suddenly come back to herself and nearly burst into tears. The slapped woman was around sixty, tall, lean, sun-reddened,
    scrappy, a rancher, maybe, and we stood there a few minutes, recovering ourselves."

    So the New Yorker thinks young black women should refrain from beating the hell out of a 60-year-old white woman -- not because it's a crime, but because it might give Trump something he could use.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Pericles

    Judging from what you see on the internet, black women think that gathering in a mob and beating someone up is perfectly acceptable in a civilized society. And does society ever tell them it’s savage behavior?

  161. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Thea

    Thea, you are one of the little people (like the rest of us). But for Dems in power, well, "it is good to be the King" has never been truer.

    Now how many Americans think that the Clintons are our betters?

    Replies: @The most deplorable one

    This comes to mind:

  162. @e
    @Blah

    I call it the "John Roberts' Solution."

    Replies: @415 reasons

    That is, the law is clear, and it was clearly violated, but the political consequences are so untenable that nothing can be done.

  163. What we should really be concerned about is that while Hillary Clinton was being paid as Secretary of State, she apparently spent most of her time loafing and writing tens of thousands of e-mails to personal friends and family members. Did she have any time left over for affairs of state?

  164. @Das
    In most cases of people sending classified information over unsecured channels, they lose their job and their security clearances. Only in rare cases do they face criminal charges.

    The Petraeus case was unique because they actually have a taped interview showing that he knew that the information he was giving his mistress was classified.

    It was pretty unlikely that they would find evidence that Clinton was intentionally leaking classified information, and wasn't just incompetent.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    The sheer volume of the material, together with the fact that she bought or rented a server of her own, as opposed to using gmail, Yahoo, etc., is massive circumstantial evidence of intent to decieve, conceal, and evade. This is elementary, Watson.

  165. @Lot
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I wonder if there are any takeaway lessons for America.
     
    - Don't conquer Bosnia and threaten Serbia.

    - Multi-national, multi-lingual, multi-ethnic armies are inferior to national armies.

    - Elderly aristocrats do not make good generals in 20th century war.

    - In the long-run being a small country versus the center of an empire is not so bad, even if the loss of status is humiliating at first.

    The rapid collapse of the Austrian military and government in October 1918 is a fascinating event.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    All good points.

    Unfortunately, America seems to be doing the complete opposite of that.

    1. We conquered Yugoslavia and did a lot worse than threaten the Serbs.

    2. America is creating an increasingly multi-national, multi-lingual, multi-ethnic army. Also, multi-gendered and multi-sexual orientation.

    3. The neoconservatives run our foreign wars. They’re sort of like elder aristocrats, but less patriotic and less competent.

    4. We’re determined to make our country absolutely massive sized, mostly through promoting immigration. We’re also determined to expand our sphere of influence – through wars, stationing troops overseas, and free trade deals.

    So we’re like Austria-Hungary, but a lot worse.

    One day, the rapid collapse of the American military and government will one day be viewed as a fascinating event by future Chinese historians.

    In conclusion, we’re screwed.

  166. @Flip
    @candid_observer

    The take on Warren from a commenter on Razib Khan's site:

    Elizabeth Warren is not Cherokee, never was. She is whiter than Queen Elizabeth. She lied about being an Indian to get a job.

    Lizzie wanted a job as a law prof at Harvard Law School. Her problem is that her JD is from Rutgers. Rutgers is ranked 92nd out of the 200 law schools. In ordinary circumstances, Harvard will trash can a resume from a Rutgers grad. According to Wikipedia: “As of 2011, she was the only tenured law professor at Harvard who had attended law school at an American public university.” Rutgers, like I said is 92nd. Berkley, Michigan, and Virginia are tied for 8th (84 places ahead of Rutgers) and none of their grads has a job at Harvard.

    I would guess that Lizzie started the Indian scam long before she got a job at Harvard. She was on the faculty at Texas (#15), Michigan(#8), and Pennsylvania(#7) before she worked at Harvard. I doubt that any of those schools would touch a Rutgers grad either

    Harvard will not hire a Rutgers grad without an extraordinary circumstance like race quotas. Being a Federal Court of Appeals Judge, or writing the leading academic treatise on some large area of the law would also work. Warren’s only shot was to be an Indian (she was even less plausible as a Black or a Mexican), so she did it, and got away with it. She is not the only one in Academia who pulled that stunt. Remember War Churchill.

    Harvard will never confess. They are embarrassed that they got flimflammed so easily. It would seem to be ordinary due diligence to check with the tribe when a potential hire is claiming tribal affiliation, but they didn’t. My guess would be that PC prevents them from asking or checking. There have been a number of other recent prominent racial misrepresenters, such as Shaun King of Black Lives Matter and Rachel Dolezal of the NAACP.

    I just want to add, that I am not saying that Rutgers grads are in anyway inferior to graduates of higher ranked schools. They are not. Law school attendance has about zip to do with intellectual ability. Law schools are really caught up with snobbery and rankings. always have been. They have to, they just trade schools with intellectual pretensions.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @Jim Christian

    For me, the fact about Warren that really sealed the deal in my disdain for her is her contribution to a book of recipes, Pow Wow Chow. Her recipes were supposedly passed down to her from her Cherokee ancestor:

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2012/05/18/did-elizabeth-warren-plagiarize-pow-wow-chow-recipes/

    But three of these recipes were in fact obviously in large part plagiarized, word for word, from recipes others had written, and which were obviously not native American in origin.

    Now I could sort of understand how someone might have heard from their family that they had certain ancestry, realized that it would be to their advantage to declare it, and decided not to question the matter very closely. Sort of understand it: I would never do it myself, and if my kids had been tempted to do it, I would have told them it was simply dishonest to do it without knowing for sure; and I would hold in very low esteem anybody who actually did it under those circumstances.

    But how do you forgive Warren’s outright plagiarism in these circumstances? She obviously knew she was lying about the origin of those recipes, and she didn’t even blanch at the plagiarism. Who, looking at this sort of scandalous and venal lying and dissembling, can possibly believe a single word the woman has to say about her ancestry, or anything else?

    She lies with ease and abandon.

    The bizarre thing is that she is touted as the embodiment of purity, the woman who speaks truth to power, among national Democrats. It is just one more act.

    Moral of the lesson: Never give up your cynicism; it is your only reliable guide in this world.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @candid_observer

    Elizabeth Warren plagiarizing recipes for Pow-Wow-Chow! Priceless!

    , @Chief Seattle
    @candid_observer

    From personal experience, I'm not sure the recipe gaff is hard evidence. I was thoroughly convinced that green bean casserole (the kind you eat on thanksgiving with French's onion rings) was a family recipe. Not that my parents ever said so directly, it just seemed implied. The weathered 3x5 index card that we pulled out every year was infallible proof in my mind. It was a shock when I learned otherwise. My wife still makes fun of me for it.

  167. @Stan Adams
    @whorefinder

    J. Edgar Hoover, the guy who founded the FBI, was a closet case who wore frilly pink undies under his trousers. What does that tell us?

    Meyer Lansky had a snapshot of Hoover hoovering his lover boy, Clyde Tolson. The blackmail threat led Hoover to regard the Mafia as untouchable.

    In J. Edgar (2011), starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Hoover, Armie Hammer played Tolson. Hammer said in an interview he was pleased to take part in the desecration of Hoover's memory by exposing his hidden gayness to the moviegoers of the world.

    (Hoover had an extensive file on Armand Hammer - Armie's great-great grandfather - who, as Steve has noted, was a Marxist billionaire.)

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @cthulhu

    Citations please. While it is strongly suspected that Hoover and Tolson were lovers, there is zero documentary evidence, just circumstantial evidence. The report of Hoover’s cross-dressing goes back to a single uncorroborated source, and is generally thought to be untrue by those who have done actual research on Hoover’s life.

    JEH did plenty enough bad shit to demonstrate that he was despicable; we don’t need dubious claims too.

    And I’m not providing citations since any semi-competent person can find the evidence online in a trice.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  168. @e
    Listening to Comey's tone as he listed Hillary's " extreme pattern of carelessless" and that of the entire Dept. of State, then hearing him say "we can't find precedent" for criminal charges to be brought = cognitive dissonance.

    Those covering the Director say he almost always takes questions. Instead, he ran off that lecturn with a rabbit's speed.

    There are no men of honor in our government and none of intestinal fortitude.


    All that matters is "FBI Director recommends no charges" and for most main stream media outlets, that's all they wanted to be able to say. One commentator after another on, yes, Fox, have listed all kids of cases in which "extreme carelessness" has resulted in charges with convictions. The statute calls for imprisonment of 1-10 years for "gross negligence" and the Director conveniently didn't mention that judges use "extreme negligence" synonymously with "gross negligence."

    The Elites must have even Comey shaking in his boots.

    Replies: @guest

    Two takeaways from Comey’s speech:

    1). he said she was extremely careless, which is synonymous with negligence, and negligence is criminal;

    2). he said failure to pursue charges is not to suggest that in similar circumstances a person engaged in this activity would face no consequences, which is as good as saying Clinton gets off because she’s Clinton.

    That’s all you need to know.

  169. @whorefinder
    @Buffalo Joe

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Seriously, after Orlando and San Bernadino, the FBI's reputation should have been on extremely shaky ground. Unfortunately, the news media wasn't smart enough the notice that the FBI should have nipped those thugs in the bud---they even had the suspects on their radar, but didn't bother following up. And the public---especially the right wing/Trump wing---is too enamored of the cops/law enforcement to admit the gross incompetence displayed.

    This non-indictment for her crimes is just proof how much the FBI is nothing more than a controlled entity of the political hacks in Washington. Historically, this will mark a point where future scholars will say that the FBI officially became merely a secret police organization without any fidelity to principles or law, only to their political leaders.

    And Comey's reputation is truly trashed---he will come out extremely poorly in terms of how historians note his character. He's now a known yes-man for the power brokers and the money men.

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations---where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free---the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically. But there is a profound disconnect in this country between the massive fuckups and corruption of the G-Men--stretching at least back to Hoover refusing to investigate or even admit organized crime existed, on the fear of being outed as a homosexual---and the public/media perception of them.

    The FBI guys are hacks.

    Replies: @fnn, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Stan Adams, @Buffalo Joe, @EriK, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    Yeah, but everybody liked the X-Files.

  170. @Das
    @Blah

    This investigation wasn't about federal records requirements. Colin Powell also apparently used a personal email account and never turned over copies of his emails to the government.

    It was about whether Clinton intentionally sent classified information over unsecured email. Under the statute, sloppy handling of classified information doesn't rise to the level of a criminal act. You actually have to show intent, which made it quite unlikely that they would ever bring charges.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Stan Adams, @Auntie Analogue

    “Colin Powell also apparently used a personal email account and never turned over copies of his emails to the government.

    “It was about whether Clinton intentionally sent classified information over unsecured email. Under the statute, sloppy handling of classified information doesn’t rise to the level of a criminal act. You actually have to show intent.”

    My dear Das, the law that Hillwhorey’s deliberate use of a private server violated and the classified e-mails she sent through it also violated was not on the books during Colin Powell’s term as Secretary of State. The law subsequently enacted – the one Hillwhorey violated – does not require intent, and it doesn’t even require “carelessness.”

    • Replies: @Das
    @Auntie Analogue

    I mean, the statute in question is called the the Espionage Act, not the Proper Handling of Classified Materials Act. It was originally meant to go after spies.

    The Act was interpreted very narrowly in the 1941 Supreme Court case Gorin v. US to apply only in cases when the person acts in bad faith to harm national security. Since then, it's been stretched increasingly to prosecute individuals who leak classified documents to the press, but this has not been without controversy. (Ask the Snowden fans, who insisted that the Act did not apply to him.)

    In this case, there isn't really evidence that Clinton intended to leak any information at all, which would make a prosecution a bigger stretch.

    Can you point to the prosecutions that have occurred of officials for bungling security procedures in the handling of classified information with no intent to leak?

    "Politics aside, it is difficult to find prior cases where the unwise handling of classified information led to a federal indictment. For the last 20 years, the federal statutes have been used when there were intentional unauthorized disclosures. The Department of Justice appears to have gone after "leakers," but not bunglers."

    http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202737626175/Clintons-Email-Unwise-But-Likely-Not-Criminal?slreturn=20160606020845#ixzz3ySsO9919

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @guest, @guest

  171. @Stan Adams
    @Buffalo Joe

    Here's another blast from the FBI past:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/28/nyregion/tapes-depict-proposal-to-thwart-bomb-used-in-trade-center-blast.html?pagewanted=all&pagewanted=print
    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/31/nyregion/bomb-informer-s-tapes-give-rare-glimpse-of-fbi-dealings.html?pagewanted=all&pagewanted=print

    The FBI knew of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing plot months in advance, and even had a chance to stop it ... but did nothing.

    The memory hole is clogged with many such stories.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    There are perverse incentives for that sort of thing, since budgets tend to get massively increased immediately following terror attacks, while there aren’t any rewards for stopping them.

  172. @Patrick Harris
    @Twinkie

    Our democracy is certainly decadent, but the trouble with hereditary monarchy is that you can't manufacture the sacred aura or sense of noblesse oblige that surrounds it out of whole cloth. If a personal form of rule ever comes to the United States, it will be wrapped in republican forms and will be far less benign than the Hapsburgs ever were.

    Replies: @Ye Antient Oliphant, @Thea

    Monarchy and aristocracy either exist or they don’t. It’s strange to want to create them where they don’t. And where they do, the titles and courtesies are just public recognition of actual power (not just an ‘aura’) held by certain people. These flummeries aren’t necessary though. There are landowners in Latin American ‘Republics’ who hold more real feudal power than any titled European.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Ye Antient Oliphant

    What is aristocracy except a protected class delimited by descent?

    "It’s strange to want to create them where they don’t [exist]." Well, now you somehow have them.

    , @Pericles
    @Ye Antient Oliphant

    Let me fix that for you.

    "There are landowners in American ‘Republics’ who hold more real feudal power than any titled European."

  173. Anybody here actually surprised by this? Expected something different? She knew all along it would get taken care of. That’s why she always laughed it off as a ridiculous idea that she was in any sort of trouble. She’s laughing right now.

  174. @Psmith
    @V Vega


    At this point, everything the Dems do now makes voters lean harder into Trump.
     
    I like Trump too, but let's not get carried away here. Hillary is still well ahead in the polls.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @ChrisD

    Polls mean very little, Psmith. See Brexit vote for example. Trump will win in a landslide.

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    @ChrisD

    Every blue-collar guy n' gal in America has watched management skate blithely through some sort of ethical or policy violation that would have condemned one of the hoi polloi to the unemployment line. Now they see "management" doing the same thing on a national scale. However, in this case, Joe & Jane Sixpack have an opportunity to give "management" a taste of their own medicine. They will take great pleasure in doing so.

    Trump will add the Great Lakes Rustbelt to the Romney states and win in a landslide.

    It's always darkest before The Don.

  175. @Rob McX
    @Auntie Analogue

    I agree. Look at the monarchies that have survived in Europe - the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden...not exactly beacons of hope for indigenous Europeans. Of course people will argue that these are monarchies in name only. But if that's the case, it's because the monarchs were unable or unwilling to resist the rise of modern democracy and the rule of the open-borders elites.

    Replies: @Thea

    Prince Phillip is a hoot.

  176. @Whiskey
    Laws are for little people ...

    Replies: @iSteveFan

    Are you still sticking by your prediction that Obama declares martial law and becomes El Presidente for live?

  177. @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, FBI Director Coomey delivered a measured indictment of Hillary's incompetence, without recommending an indictment. He actually said that in many cases this type of activity would result in sanctions or have other consequences. But that's the real world and this is Obama World. But, on a positive note it gives her opposition plenty of ammo.

    Replies: @Blah, @whorefinder, @Diversity Heretic, @JimB, @Lagertha, @gda

    I am stunned! My ancestors who fought for Independence (against Bolsheviks in 1917) and to retain Independence in WW2, would be fracking appalled by this BS call today in the USA! This is all major BS; more like cowed American people in positions of leadership people, who are forced/compromised people, and sort of in milquetoast positions in government (now) like Comey, who have to think about their petty lives if they disagree against “the authorities” who will wreck their lives if they digress? Could he/his children have been threatened? – this was the position, according to my grandfather, an officer in WW2…..threaten people and their children to get your way.

    My grandfather’s squad just corralled all the Reds out of his (they were natives of his country, but they were fracking Communists…dirt, as far as he was concerned) country to the border of his beloved Karelia, USSR thereafter, and said, “Walk east, may God save you from your stupidity.” I kid you not! That was a real quote! I remember I was 10 when he said this to me over breakfast in the 70’s. I have a crazy and interesting family…very large, very large family. Ok, said too much.

    Also. The whole Star of David today stuff, is “Disruption Porn,” – the “Kitchen Sink” stuff I expected.

    – Staying in WW2 vibe, while I still have enough energy & 50% sense, (I am 99% ok for you guys that care) Jews were never “given up” by the Finns when Finns reluctantly (but strategically) had to figure out how to buy weapons (from Germany) to fight Stalin, Finland lost 18 Jewish students who could not get out of Germany, back to Finland, in time as things got worse in 1943.

    Weirdly, in the main cemetery : Hietalahden Hautausmaa (where my father’s ashes are & where I must bring my mother’s ashes when the time comes), there are very distinct areas: The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier which is combined with the Finnish Presidents & Mannerheim….the place the tour buses come and see – and oh yeah, Wirkkala’s scuplture is not far. And, next to this spot: are the Nazis. The men whose bodies were not called back. Finns are Lutheran, so you don’t desecrate dead bodies.

    And, finally, across the beautiful park, over a 8′ wide garden path, there is the Jewish cemetery. So, all these headstones with crosses, Stars of David and Swastikas are all in less than a half acre…kid you not! I have taken many American GI’s there over the years as no tram or bus comes there,
    so close to the center of the Helsinki, or where the Cruise Ships dock.
    a

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Lagertha

    while I am still on this vibe: Finland was the first country in Europe to allow Jews to own property. This was a method to allow Helsinki (in the early half of the 1800's) to become an organized strong city/the Capital city...a modern city for seafaring and commerce...and more importantly, not to be out-of-the-loop of what's going on in all the Hanseatic trade centers, and the world.

    OK, all my brainy squad, what was the most important product of Finland in the 1800's? Answer: Pitch from tar off of fir trees. Pitch was used to make rigging more smooth and also, to naturally prevent rot. England, among many naval empires, was a big purchaser of pitch.

    , @Thea
    @Lagertha

    In Lake Worth, FL this is a large building emblazoned with "Suomi Talo" on its side.

    I'be never understood how one could leave what I imagine was a beautiful Finland for this crummy place.

    Replies: @Lagertha

  178. @War for Blair Mountain
    @countenance

    Countenance

    You are among the reasons I have extreme hatred of the fashy Alt Right. To the extent that your enthusiasm for Monarchy...Pinochet....and Franco....the Alt Right must never be supported and encouraged to grow as a movement.

    The US is not a Democracy...in fact it is a Plutocracy-Oligarchy, which has nothing to do with Democracy.


    We had an alternative to your Pinochet-Franco Land Owner Oligarchy in the late 19th-early 20th century labor revolts in the US which gave us such wonderfull things such as the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Sikh Exclusion Act(yes there was a Sikh Exclusion Act to keep the Sikhs out of California).


    Steve


    You really need to let this post go through because the fashy haircut Alt Right really does push some very immoral violently anti-labor forms of top-down political-economic organization.

    Replies: @andy russia, @Cagey Beast, @Pericles, @BB753

    +1000

  179. @Lagertha
    @Buffalo Joe

    I am stunned! My ancestors who fought for Independence (against Bolsheviks in 1917) and to retain Independence in WW2, would be fracking appalled by this BS call today in the USA! This is all major BS; more like cowed American people in positions of leadership people, who are forced/compromised people, and sort of in milquetoast positions in government (now) like Comey, who have to think about their petty lives if they disagree against "the authorities" who will wreck their lives if they digress? Could he/his children have been threatened? - this was the position, according to my grandfather, an officer in WW2.....threaten people and their children to get your way.

    My grandfather's squad just corralled all the Reds out of his (they were natives of his country, but they were fracking Communists...dirt, as far as he was concerned) country to the border of his beloved Karelia, USSR thereafter, and said, "Walk east, may God save you from your stupidity." I kid you not! That was a real quote! I remember I was 10 when he said this to me over breakfast in the 70's. I have a crazy and interesting family...very large, very large family. Ok, said too much.

    Also. The whole Star of David today stuff, is "Disruption Porn," - the "Kitchen Sink" stuff I expected.

    - Staying in WW2 vibe, while I still have enough energy & 50% sense, (I am 99% ok for you guys that care) Jews were never "given up" by the Finns when Finns reluctantly (but strategically) had to figure out how to buy weapons (from Germany) to fight Stalin, Finland lost 18 Jewish students who could not get out of Germany, back to Finland, in time as things got worse in 1943.

    Weirdly, in the main cemetery : Hietalahden Hautausmaa (where my father's ashes are & where I must bring my mother's ashes when the time comes), there are very distinct areas: The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier which is combined with the Finnish Presidents & Mannerheim....the place the tour buses come and see - and oh yeah, Wirkkala's scuplture is not far. And, next to this spot: are the Nazis. The men whose bodies were not called back. Finns are Lutheran, so you don't desecrate dead bodies.

    And, finally, across the beautiful park, over a 8' wide garden path, there is the Jewish cemetery. So, all these headstones with crosses, Stars of David and Swastikas are all in less than a half acre...kid you not! I have taken many American GI's there over the years as no tram or bus comes there,
    so close to the center of the Helsinki, or where the Cruise Ships dock.
    a

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Thea

    while I am still on this vibe: Finland was the first country in Europe to allow Jews to own property. This was a method to allow Helsinki (in the early half of the 1800’s) to become an organized strong city/the Capital city…a modern city for seafaring and commerce…and more importantly, not to be out-of-the-loop of what’s going on in all the Hanseatic trade centers, and the world.

    OK, all my brainy squad, what was the most important product of Finland in the 1800’s? Answer: Pitch from tar off of fir trees. Pitch was used to make rigging more smooth and also, to naturally prevent rot. England, among many naval empires, was a big purchaser of pitch.

  180. @War for Blair Mountain
    @countenance

    Countenance

    You are among the reasons I have extreme hatred of the fashy Alt Right. To the extent that your enthusiasm for Monarchy...Pinochet....and Franco....the Alt Right must never be supported and encouraged to grow as a movement.

    The US is not a Democracy...in fact it is a Plutocracy-Oligarchy, which has nothing to do with Democracy.


    We had an alternative to your Pinochet-Franco Land Owner Oligarchy in the late 19th-early 20th century labor revolts in the US which gave us such wonderfull things such as the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Sikh Exclusion Act(yes there was a Sikh Exclusion Act to keep the Sikhs out of California).


    Steve


    You really need to let this post go through because the fashy haircut Alt Right really does push some very immoral violently anti-labor forms of top-down political-economic organization.

    Replies: @andy russia, @Cagey Beast, @Pericles, @BB753

    You’re quite right, the Alt-Right posturing about dead dictators and pan-White imperialism is annoying and childish. I’m also really sick of their jokes about WW2 and Latin American concentration camps and torture. It’s more noise from the weirdo teen, prank caller demographic that makes up their keyboard foot soldiers. That comically self-sabotaging Republican media consultant who looks like Elmer Fudd was right about that at least. The Real Rick Wilson or something?

    • Replies: @andy russia
    @Cagey Beast

    republican right: National Socialism is Socialism.

    alt.right: the detestable and odious Cultmarx is Marxism.

    thus, pinochet was good because he gave allende's marxists free helicopter rides over open sea.

    that's what happens when one believes his own bs.

    the right wing has had a bs problem. the alt.right inherited this bs problem from the cucks.

    , @TheJester
    @Cagey Beast

    As a long-standing student of history, my conclusion is that political leaders need to be accessed regarding whether they were the right people for their time and circumstances rather than fit an idealized model or expectation.

    In the early Soviet era, it was a contest between Stalin and Trotsky. Stalin wanted to cut deals with Western industrial powers to develop (primarily) Russia, Ukraine, and the oil fields of Buku. Trotsky was willing to sacrifice the Soviet republics in the pursuit of permanent, world-wide revolution under the Dictatorship of the Proletariat (which he wanted to lead). Who was the lesser of two evils in the post-Lenin era?

    In the post WWI-era, it was a contest between the Nazis and the Communists in Germany (lest not forget the latter wanted to take the globalist Soviet revolution to Berlin, Paris, and London). Would it have been better for Western Civilization if the atheistic, corporatist Communists had won and taken the revolution to Paris and London?

    In Spain, it was a context between the Catholic Church and landowners against the (sometime) alliance between the anarchists and Communists. Would it have been better for Spain for the anarchists and/or Communists to have won?

    What is best must often be assessed in terms of what is practical and possible given the circumstances rather than an idealized utopia (which unfortunately usually turns into a bloody dystopia)?

  181. @War for Blair Mountain
    In the larger scheme of things Hillary Clinton's email server in her gold-plated outhouse in Springs East Hampton is a minor issue. By many orders of magnitude, the way bigger issue is this:Why is Hillary Clinton even a viable POTUS candidate in 2016?


    Well here is the answer:The passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act. The passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act has allowed the Democratic Party to import Hillary Clinton's high fertility,highly racialized nonwhite Democratic Party Voting Bloc which will be enthusiastically voting Whitey into a racial minority on Nov 8 2016. This is what White Guy Trump Bros and Donald Trump should be making very loud noises about...day and night.


    It's what Hillary Clinton gets away with legally that's the problem. And this is a direct consequence of the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act. Hillary's toilet email server?....One big Yawn....

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @JohnnyWalker123

    Well at least you didn’t do an Ann Coulter and refer to it as “Teddy Kennedy’s” law.

  182. @Jim Don Bob
    @countenance

    I dunno. There is one chick in the picture, but she is white so probably doesn't count.

    Very impressive achievement.

    Replies: @Matthew Kelly, @snorlax

    Also, on the far right, a South Asian and an East Asian man, and (far right, background, in shadow, blonde hair) another woman.

  183. The ghost of Walt reaches from the grave to inflict anti-semitism on impressionable toddlers:

    It’s a six-pointed star!

  184. @Kylie
    Oh. That big breaking news.

    I thought you were referring to the successful arrival at Jupiter of the Junior probe designed by NASA's team of black rocket scientists, led by Morgan Freeman.

    Replies: @Wally, @countenance, @Lot

    Here’s the Google Doodle.

    https://www.google.com/doodles/juno-reaches-jupiter

    1/3 black, 1/3 white women, 1/6 white male, 1/6 asian male

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Lot

    Google et al aren't fooling us. But we're not their intended audience anyway. This is indoctrination for kids. All the left has to do us ceaselessly promote images like this. Then when the real world of accomplishment looks so much whiter, so much more masculine, so much more normal, it also looks so much more racist, sexist and exclusive.

  185. @War for Blair Mountain
    In the larger scheme of things Hillary Clinton's email server in her gold-plated outhouse in Springs East Hampton is a minor issue. By many orders of magnitude, the way bigger issue is this:Why is Hillary Clinton even a viable POTUS candidate in 2016?


    Well here is the answer:The passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act. The passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act has allowed the Democratic Party to import Hillary Clinton's high fertility,highly racialized nonwhite Democratic Party Voting Bloc which will be enthusiastically voting Whitey into a racial minority on Nov 8 2016. This is what White Guy Trump Bros and Donald Trump should be making very loud noises about...day and night.


    It's what Hillary Clinton gets away with legally that's the problem. And this is a direct consequence of the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act. Hillary's toilet email server?....One big Yawn....

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @JohnnyWalker123

    Actually, prior to 1965, there was unlimited immigration from Latin America and the Caribbean. The 1965 immigration act put a quota on the number of immigrants who could come from the Western hemisphere.

    The 1965 act also emphasized family reunification. Mostly so white European countries (with large immigrant populations) would continue to dominate the migration flow.

    If immigration has been so dominated by non-white countries in the last several decades, it’s because their birthrates have been so high and their per capita GDPs were low. So oligarchs imported huge amounts of cheap labor from these places. If there were large pools of low-cost labor in Europe, those nations would’ve dominated the migration flow (as they did in the past).

    I wouldn’t blame the 1965 act. I’d blame uneven global growth rates and the oligarch’s need for cheap labor.

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @JohnnyWalker123

    And you obviously haven't a clue about the 1965 Immigration Reform Act and the 51 years of US Immigration Policy afterwards.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  186. gda says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, FBI Director Coomey delivered a measured indictment of Hillary's incompetence, without recommending an indictment. He actually said that in many cases this type of activity would result in sanctions or have other consequences. But that's the real world and this is Obama World. But, on a positive note it gives her opposition plenty of ammo.

    Replies: @Blah, @whorefinder, @Diversity Heretic, @JimB, @Lagertha, @gda

    No one up until now has really emphasized how absolutely extraordinary Coomey’s statements were in eviscerating Hillary. Remember – he didn’t have to call her an untrustworthy, careless and an incompetent liar time after time. He said things which we would normally NEVER hear the head of the FBI (or equivalent) say about a Presidential nominee outside a courtroom.

    Now imagine if the investigation had proceeded in the “normal” way – that is, if Coomey had made a recommendation to the DOJ and they then turned around and made the political decision we all knew they would. Nothing from Coomey, stonewall from DOJ.

    The Machiavellian machinations of the Clintons know no bounds. Bill took out the AG, making Coomey the sacrificial lamb. Amazing to watch as he managed to cut his own throat while his hands were tied, but not before blackening her reputation forevermore and offering a washload of ammunition to Trump.

    She will need to deal with that, as well as with the backlash from the FBI and the constant fear that Moscow (or any given foreign power you care to name) will either release the 30,000 “private” emails she deleted or use them as blackmail against her.

    It will take a mighty effort by the MSM to make this pig into a princess. Hillary – the first female POTUS without security clearance.

    Oh look. Trump likes Sadaam.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @gda

    gda, I like your phrase...."Bill took out the AG while making Comey the sacrificial lamb. Amazing to watch as he cut his own throat with his hands tied." And so true. Comey is finished, after all he called his possible next boss incompetent, while Lynch may get to hang around ( Lynch-hang, is that racist?) and who knows, Supreme Court nominee?

  187. @Cagey Beast
    @War for Blair Mountain

    You're quite right, the Alt-Right posturing about dead dictators and pan-White imperialism is annoying and childish. I'm also really sick of their jokes about WW2 and Latin American concentration camps and torture. It's more noise from the weirdo teen, prank caller demographic that makes up their keyboard foot soldiers. That comically self-sabotaging Republican media consultant who looks like Elmer Fudd was right about that at least. The Real Rick Wilson or something?

    Replies: @andy russia, @TheJester

    republican right: National Socialism is Socialism.

    alt.right: the detestable and odious Cultmarx is Marxism.

    thus, pinochet was good because he gave allende’s marxists free helicopter rides over open sea.

    that’s what happens when one believes his own bs.

    the right wing has had a bs problem. the alt.right inherited this bs problem from the cucks.

    • Agree: mtn cur
  188. @kihowi
    I only follow the election news indirectly because I value my brain cells. Are they seriously still talking about that star or is this one of your idées fixes?

    Replies: @Wilkey

    They’re still very much talking about it.

    I do wonder, though, who chose the timing of the announcement. Normally shit like this gets dropped on a Friday, especially before a holiday weekend. They had their chance to do that exactly one business day ago. Was the timing of the announcement pushed back by the Clinton/Lynch meeting kerfuffle, or was this a subtle “fuck you” from a political appointee bending to political pressure but not all that happy about it?

  189. @ChrisD
    @Psmith

    Polls mean very little, Psmith. See Brexit vote for example. Trump will win in a landslide.

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

    Every blue-collar guy n’ gal in America has watched management skate blithely through some sort of ethical or policy violation that would have condemned one of the hoi polloi to the unemployment line. Now they see “management” doing the same thing on a national scale. However, in this case, Joe & Jane Sixpack have an opportunity to give “management” a taste of their own medicine. They will take great pleasure in doing so.

    Trump will add the Great Lakes Rustbelt to the Romney states and win in a landslide.

    It’s always darkest before The Don.

  190. @countenance
    @Kylie

    Hide this from SJWs. The Juno team at JPL celebrating.

    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160705142348-juno-nasa-celebrate-exlarge-169.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @anon, @Anonym, @Wilkey, @Wilkey

    They’re celebrating because they’ve just helped NASA accomplish it’s primary mission of helping Muslims feel good about themselves.

  191. @countenance
    @Kylie

    Hide this from SJWs. The Juno team at JPL celebrating.

    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160705142348-juno-nasa-celebrate-exlarge-169.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @anon, @Anonym, @Wilkey, @Wilkey

    They’re celebrating because they’ve just helped NASA accomplish it’s primary mission of helping Muslims feel good about themselves.

  192. @whorefinder
    @Buffalo Joe

    Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?

    Seriously, after Orlando and San Bernadino, the FBI's reputation should have been on extremely shaky ground. Unfortunately, the news media wasn't smart enough the notice that the FBI should have nipped those thugs in the bud---they even had the suspects on their radar, but didn't bother following up. And the public---especially the right wing/Trump wing---is too enamored of the cops/law enforcement to admit the gross incompetence displayed.

    This non-indictment for her crimes is just proof how much the FBI is nothing more than a controlled entity of the political hacks in Washington. Historically, this will mark a point where future scholars will say that the FBI officially became merely a secret police organization without any fidelity to principles or law, only to their political leaders.

    And Comey's reputation is truly trashed---he will come out extremely poorly in terms of how historians note his character. He's now a known yes-man for the power brokers and the money men.

    After the Whitey Bulger revelations---where the FBI was working hand in glove with organized crime and allowing it to get off scot-free---the FBI should have become a distrusted organization and looked at skeptically. But there is a profound disconnect in this country between the massive fuckups and corruption of the G-Men--stretching at least back to Hoover refusing to investigate or even admit organized crime existed, on the fear of being outed as a homosexual---and the public/media perception of them.

    The FBI guys are hacks.

    Replies: @fnn, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Stan Adams, @Buffalo Joe, @EriK, @Anonymous, @Mr. Anon

    “Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?”

    The FBI was rotten almost all the way back to its founding, ever since Hoover took it over and made it his own private Gestapo. Is there any high-profile case they haven’t botched, other than the entrapment capers where they controlled the outcome anyway? I suppose they had some success against the mafia, thanks to RICO (which will probably be used against the citizenry someday).

    A lot of what the Feds seem to do now is entrapment – inducing random muslim losers who couldn’t string two fire-crackers together to accept a fake bomb and pledge to blow up something. Convictions and promotions ensue.

    • Replies: @Bugg
    @Mr. Anon

    2 things in recent history should give us all great pause about the Famous But Incompetent:
    1. Summer of 2001 -they had 20th hijacker Zaccarias Mossoaui and his computer with the 9/11 plot on it in custody.There was intelligence that a big plot was afoot, even with Gorelick's Wall, known to all. Instead of looking at said computer and interrogating the living daylights out of him, the Minnesota FBI field office, after much pointless discussion and angst, wrote a long pointless memo.
    2. The official story of the Tsarnaev brothers is simply an embarrassment from beginning to end.

    The agency lost it's footing after things shifted from going after Italian mobsters to terrorism. And even there, among and between the messes they made with mob informants like Whitey Bulger and Greg Scarpa,they weren't quite all that even then.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  193. is that the guy who said alt.righters were w***g to anime?

    so s**ual practices _can_ be good or bad, after all. it’s like 1933 or something, I can’t even, wow just wow, etc.

  194. @Realist
    @countenance

    Democracies have never worked. And probably never will. When idiots are allowed to vote bad things happen. A Meritocracy would be much better.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain, @dfordoom

    Democracies have never worked. And probably never will. When idiots are allowed to vote bad things happen. A Meritocracy would be much better.

    The problem is that when you propose a “meritocracy” what you get is something like the EU. Unelected, unaccountable, faceless bureaucrats who are far worse (and far nastier) than even the worst democratically elected leaders.

    Monarchy isn’t the best alternative. It’s the only viable alternative.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @dfordoom

    "The problem is that when you propose a “meritocracy” what you get is something like the EU."

    I said Meritocracy not Idiotocracy,

    Monarchies are also unelected, and unaccountable.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @ben tillman

  195. Das says:
    @Auntie Analogue
    @Das


    "Colin Powell also apparently used a personal email account and never turned over copies of his emails to the government.

    "It was about whether Clinton intentionally sent classified information over unsecured email. Under the statute, sloppy handling of classified information doesn’t rise to the level of a criminal act. You actually have to show intent."

     

    My dear Das, the law that Hillwhorey's deliberate use of a private server violated and the classified e-mails she sent through it also violated was not on the books during Colin Powell's term as Secretary of State. The law subsequently enacted - the one Hillwhorey violated - does not require intent, and it doesn't even require "carelessness."

    Replies: @Das

    I mean, the statute in question is called the the Espionage Act, not the Proper Handling of Classified Materials Act. It was originally meant to go after spies.

    The Act was interpreted very narrowly in the 1941 Supreme Court case Gorin v. US to apply only in cases when the person acts in bad faith to harm national security. Since then, it’s been stretched increasingly to prosecute individuals who leak classified documents to the press, but this has not been without controversy. (Ask the Snowden fans, who insisted that the Act did not apply to him.)

    In this case, there isn’t really evidence that Clinton intended to leak any information at all, which would make a prosecution a bigger stretch.

    Can you point to the prosecutions that have occurred of officials for bungling security procedures in the handling of classified information with no intent to leak?

    “Politics aside, it is difficult to find prior cases where the unwise handling of classified information led to a federal indictment. For the last 20 years, the federal statutes have been used when there were intentional unauthorized disclosures. The Department of Justice appears to have gone after “leakers,” but not bunglers.”

    http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202737626175/Clintons-Email-Unwise-But-Likely-Not-Criminal?slreturn=20160606020845#ixzz3ySsO9919

    • Replies: @Auntie Analogue
    @Das


    "Can you point to the prosecutions that have occurred of officials for bungling security procedures in the handling of classified information with no intent to leak?"

     

    My dear Das, you ever heard the name Petraeus? Did his extracurricular bedpal-journalist leak any of the classified matter he'd shown to her?

    Look round the intertubes, there are quite a few cases of prosecution of mishandling classified matter without intent. Prosecutions are pursued, often by military courts martial or at other federal judicial levels, in cases that occur at much lower, much less sensitive levels that are far more "need to know" compartmentalized-secure than at the "need to know all" level of Secretary of State. Hillwhorey's vast "need to know" compass makes her case far more grave than that of, say, an Army E-4 who left low-level, highly-compartmentalized classified matter on a workplace Xerox machine.

    Hillwhorey is a candidate for the highest, most powerful post in the land - in the world. With that in mind - at that crucially high level - does "extremely careless" and "lied repeatedly" about "extremely careless" carry no extra gravity? Moreover, there was unmistakable intent on her part: Hillwhorey knew she was using a private server when she knew very well that she must not do so or be in violation of the law.
    , @guest
    @Das

    I predict you will see a swarm of articles titled something like "Why Patraeus Was Charged but Clinton Wasn't." None of them will say it's because Patraeus was a spy.

    , @guest
    @Das

    Oh, and Comey himself said that we're not to conclude that someone else doing the same thing under similar circumstances wouldn't be prosecuted. He didn't add, "So long as they're also spies."

  196. @Das
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    Right. In the last year suddenly every right-wing blogger and commenter became an expert on federal classification law.

    Meanwhile, people who are actually lawyers were saying all along that because of the way that the law is written, it was very unlikely that they would bring charges.

    But now, of course, everyone who insisted indictments were imminent is now going to insist that the FBI director who publicly humiliated Clinton on TV today was secretly in the tank for her all along and suppressed the charges.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson, @Mr. Anon

    “Right. In the last year suddenly every right-wing blogger and commenter became an expert on federal classification law.”

    I’ve been required to take training on how to handle ITAR-restricted information. According to the law, putting that information into circulation can get you convicted. A few years ago, a retired U. Tenn professor was convicted and sent to jail for just such a violation. The governing statute does not require intent. And that isn’t even classified information.

    What Hillary did clearly violated the law. Comey even outlined how she did so.

    “Meanwhile, people who are actually lawyers were saying all along that because of the way that the law is written, it was very unlikely that they would bring charges.”

    What people? Which lawyers? Democratic Party functionaries?

    “But now, of course, everyone who insisted indictments were imminent is now going to insist that the FBI director who publicly humiliated Clinton on TV today was secretly in the tank for her all along and suppressed the charges.”

    Maybe. Or he was subborned or intimidated.

  197. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Actually, prior to 1965, there was unlimited immigration from Latin America and the Caribbean. The 1965 immigration act put a quota on the number of immigrants who could come from the Western hemisphere.

    The 1965 act also emphasized family reunification. Mostly so white European countries (with large immigrant populations) would continue to dominate the migration flow.

    If immigration has been so dominated by non-white countries in the last several decades, it's because their birthrates have been so high and their per capita GDPs were low. So oligarchs imported huge amounts of cheap labor from these places. If there were large pools of low-cost labor in Europe, those nations would've dominated the migration flow (as they did in the past).

    I wouldn't blame the 1965 act. I'd blame uneven global growth rates and the oligarch's need for cheap labor.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    And you obviously haven’t a clue about the 1965 Immigration Reform Act and the 51 years of US Immigration Policy afterwards.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @War for Blair Mountain

    There was no limit on Latin American and Caribbean immigration before the 1965 act. Much of the surge in immigration from that region started in the late 70s. Mostly because oligarchs wanted cheap labor and disliked hiring well-paid American laborers.

    Refugee acts substantially increased Asian immigration after the end of the Vietnam War. Refugee acts later brought in many Africans after that.

    Changes to H1b visa laws increased Indian subcontinental migration dramatically in the 90s.

    Immigration from mainland China was kept very low by the Communist government until the 80s.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

  198. @Lurker
    @Anonymous Nephew

    That's (((Will Straw))) and (((Jack Straw))). FYI.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    aka Wiki – “Straw’s maternal grandfather’s mother came from an Eastern European Jewish family” – so not very.

    This article is quite funny, in that in the Jewish Chronicle you can stereotype and remark on his features with a smile on your face.

    http://www.thejc.com/lifestyle/how-jewish-is/how-jewish-jack-straw

    “Straw was brought up in Buckhurst Hill, Essex, where there is a synagogue. He went to Leeds University, one of our more haimishe institutes of higher education where he read law (noch). Having qualified, he branched out into media (as a researcher for World in Action) and then went into politics. If there was a classic Jewish career path, this would be it.

    Although Straw’s great grandmother was Jewish, it was the wrong one – on his mother’s father’s side. So Straw is not halachically Jewish. Indeed, in a speech given in 1995, he said: “I come from Jewish stock although I’m Christian now.” So even if he looks like a shul warden, he doesn’t want to be one of us.”

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Anonymous Nephew

    Some years ago Jack Straw is reputed to have said "The English, as a race, are not worth saving."

  199. @Diversity Heretic
    @Buffalo Joe

    Bizarely, the fact that she does as she pleases and gets away with it strengthens her support with much of her constituency

    Replies: @TontoBubbaGoldstein, @Dennis Dale

    There’s a convergence here of three effects: the halo effect Hillary’s long had on Democrats and women now of a certain age, the existential fear of Trump, with Hillary his last obstacle, and a third more disturbing, general radicalization and hardening of attitudes on the Left, demonstrated sickeningly in the way the Orlando massacre was immediately co-opted into the narrative agenda as “homophobia”. I wouldn’t think it would be possible to get blood on your hands after the fact, but this looks like that.

    When ISIS complained–it would be comic if it wasn’t all so gruesome–about losing the narrative overnight to the gays and not getting credit for the worst terrorist attack on US soil since 9/11 it immediately established a hierarchy of life-value: terrorists would have to target explicitly straight white Americans to have any effect. We’ve been slow-walked to the point this profound betrayal that should make one’s blood boil barely raises an eyebrow in the corrupted, jaded msm.

    The Left has its heels dug in treacherously deep now.

  200. @JsP
    looks like the establishment is getting tired of pretending to play by the rules.

    The FBI knows she broke the law, has "evidence she broke the statute" but they can't recommend prosecution. because... it's 2016, I guess? Why bother with the charade of her getting away with it anyway?

    They bothered with the charade of voting and look what happened! First trump gets the nomination and then Brexit. Even though voters were explicitly ordered not to vote like that!

    We're going to have to just drop the meddlesome institutions of democracy, rule of law, etc. It's just all becoming so inefficient and tedious.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1Npo0cmp-VY

    Replies: @Realist

    “The FBI knows she broke the law, has “evidence she broke the statute” but they can’t recommend prosecution. because… it’s 2016, I guess? Why bother with the charade of her getting away with it anyway?”

    It’s the power elites way of saying FUCK YOU!

  201. @dfordoom
    @Realist


    Democracies have never worked. And probably never will. When idiots are allowed to vote bad things happen. A Meritocracy would be much better.
     
    The problem is that when you propose a "meritocracy" what you get is something like the EU. Unelected, unaccountable, faceless bureaucrats who are far worse (and far nastier) than even the worst democratically elected leaders.

    Monarchy isn't the best alternative. It's the only viable alternative.

    Replies: @Realist

    “The problem is that when you propose a “meritocracy” what you get is something like the EU.”

    I said Meritocracy not Idiotocracy,

    Monarchies are also unelected, and unaccountable.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Realist


    Monarchies are also unelected, and unaccountable.
     
    Actually they're not quite unaccountable. A king is very much aware that he has to account to his posterity, to his heirs and to history.

    And kings who have failed have more often than not paid for their failure with their lives.

    Kings are in fact accountable to their subjects. Very few kings have ever lost the confidence of their country and of their subjects and survived as king.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    , @ben tillman
    @Realist


    Monarchies are also unelected, and unaccountable.
     
    Kings have been elected in some times and places. This was common in the middle ages among Germanic tribes and was continued into the Holy Roman Empire.

    From Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince-elector

    The German practice of electing monarchs began when ancient Germanic tribes formed ad hoc coalitions and elected the leaders thereof. Elections were irregularly held by the Franks, whose successor states include France and Germany. The French monarchy eventually became hereditary, but the German monarchy remained elective. While all free men originally exercised the right to vote in such elections, suffrage eventually came to be limited to the leading men of the realm. In the election of Lothar II in 1125, a small number of eminent nobles chose the monarch and then submitted him to the remaining magnates for their approbation.

    Soon, the right to choose the monarch was settled on an exclusive group of princes, and the procedure of seeking the approval of the remaining nobles was abandoned. The college of electors was mentioned in 1152 and again in 1198. The composition of electors at that time is unclear, but appears to have included representatives of the church and the dukes of the four nations of Germany: the Franks (Duchy of Franconia), Swabians (Duchy of Swabia), Saxons (Duchy of Saxony) and Bavarians (Duchy of Bavaria).
  202. @cthulhu
    @Lot



    Here is the bad news for us: The “Shy Tory” effect is extremely present in the UK, but there is no “Shy GOP” effect in US polling.

     

    You sure about that? I could easily see that Trump's support in national polls could be skewed by people not wanting to admit that they plan to vote for him - because the media have painted him as The Other.

    Replies: @Realist

    That’s just whistling past the graveyard of American stupidity.

  203. I hope Putin releases all 33,000 of Hillary’s deleted emails before the election.

  204. @Das
    @Auntie Analogue

    I mean, the statute in question is called the the Espionage Act, not the Proper Handling of Classified Materials Act. It was originally meant to go after spies.

    The Act was interpreted very narrowly in the 1941 Supreme Court case Gorin v. US to apply only in cases when the person acts in bad faith to harm national security. Since then, it's been stretched increasingly to prosecute individuals who leak classified documents to the press, but this has not been without controversy. (Ask the Snowden fans, who insisted that the Act did not apply to him.)

    In this case, there isn't really evidence that Clinton intended to leak any information at all, which would make a prosecution a bigger stretch.

    Can you point to the prosecutions that have occurred of officials for bungling security procedures in the handling of classified information with no intent to leak?

    "Politics aside, it is difficult to find prior cases where the unwise handling of classified information led to a federal indictment. For the last 20 years, the federal statutes have been used when there were intentional unauthorized disclosures. The Department of Justice appears to have gone after "leakers," but not bunglers."

    http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202737626175/Clintons-Email-Unwise-But-Likely-Not-Criminal?slreturn=20160606020845#ixzz3ySsO9919

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @guest, @guest

    “Can you point to the prosecutions that have occurred of officials for bungling security procedures in the handling of classified information with no intent to leak?”

    My dear Das, you ever heard the name Petraeus? Did his extracurricular bedpal-journalist leak any of the classified matter he’d shown to her?

    Look round the intertubes, there are quite a few cases of prosecution of mishandling classified matter without intent. Prosecutions are pursued, often by military courts martial or at other federal judicial levels, in cases that occur at much lower, much less sensitive levels that are far more “need to know” compartmentalized-secure than at the “need to know all” level of Secretary of State. Hillwhorey’s vast “need to know” compass makes her case far more grave than that of, say, an Army E-4 who left low-level, highly-compartmentalized classified matter on a workplace Xerox machine.

    Hillwhorey is a candidate for the highest, most powerful post in the land – in the world. With that in mind – at that crucially high level – does “extremely careless” and “lied repeatedly” about “extremely careless” carry no extra gravity? Moreover, there was unmistakable intent on her part: Hillwhorey knew she was using a private server when she knew very well that she must not do so or be in violation of the law.

  205. The solution in this case is to ignore the news and just keep telling people that Hillary should be in jail… say it over and over again the way the MSM says Trump is a racist… eventually some people will believe it…

  206. @Anonymous Nephew
    @Lurker

    aka Wiki - "Straw's maternal grandfather's mother came from an Eastern European Jewish family" - so not very.


    This article is quite funny, in that in the Jewish Chronicle you can stereotype and remark on his features with a smile on your face.

    http://www.thejc.com/lifestyle/how-jewish-is/how-jewish-jack-straw


    "Straw was brought up in Buckhurst Hill, Essex, where there is a synagogue. He went to Leeds University, one of our more haimishe institutes of higher education where he read law (noch). Having qualified, he branched out into media (as a researcher for World in Action) and then went into politics. If there was a classic Jewish career path, this would be it.

    Although Straw's great grandmother was Jewish, it was the wrong one - on his mother's father's side. So Straw is not halachically Jewish. Indeed, in a speech given in 1995, he said: "I come from Jewish stock although I'm Christian now." So even if he looks like a shul warden, he doesn't want to be one of us."
     

    Replies: @Lurker

    Some years ago Jack Straw is reputed to have said “The English, as a race, are not worth saving.”

  207. There is evidence to support a conclusion that any reasonable person in Secretary Clinton’s position, or in the position of those government employees with whom she was corresponding about these matters, should have known that an unclassified system was no place for that conversation.

    In case anyone was wondering whether Comey was trying to underplay the situation, start reading this at “…any” instead of “There is evidence to support a conclusion that…” and see how that sounds…

    None of these e-mails should have been on any kind of unclassified system, but their presence is especially concerning because all of these e-mails were housed on unclassified personal servers not even supported by full-time security staff, like those found at Departments and Agencies of the U.S. Government—or even with a commercial service like Gmail.

    “Your sons were fighting overseas while Clinton was exposing them to harm by sending Top Secrets over email less secure than your Hotmail or Gmail…”

    …even if information is not marked “classified” in an e-mail, participants who know or should know that the subject matter is classified are still obligated to protect it.

    He meant to say “…obligated to protect it unless they aren’t.”

    While not the focus of our investigation, we also developed evidence that the security culture of the State Department in general, and with respect to use of unclassified e-mail systems in particular, was generally lacking in the kind of care for classified information found elsewhere in the government.

    But don’t worry because at this time next year the whole government will be run on the same standard!!

    With respect to potential computer intrusion by hostile actors, we did not find direct evidence that Secretary Clinton’s personal e-mail domain, in its various configurations since 2009, was successfully hacked. But, given the nature of the system and of the actors potentially involved, we assess that we would be unlikely to see such direct evidence. We do assess that hostile actors gained access to the private commercial e-mail accounts of people with whom Secretary Clinton was in regular contact from her personal account.

    Is this paragraph constructed to be unquotable on purpose or is that somehow an accident?

    we did not find direct evidence that Secretary Clinton’s personal e-mail domain, in its various configurations since 2009, was successfully hacked. But, given the nature of the system and of the actors potentially involved, we assess that we would be unlikely to see such direct evidence.

    I.e., we found evidence that people were trying to hack her email, and they were probably successful, but didn’t find the smoking gun…

    Although there is evidence of potential violations of the statutes…

    “Ladies and gentelmen of the jury, in closing, I hasten to point out that the prosecution has failed to present any evidence of murder, only evidence of a potential murder. In light of the fact that evidence of murder cannot be presented without a prior determination of murder, you must acquit.”

    To be clear, this is not to suggest that in similar circumstances, a person who engaged in this activity would face no consequences. To the contrary, those individuals are often subject to security or administrative sanctions. But that is not what we are deciding now.

    Ah, the solution is obvious… She can be POTUS but with no access to classified information!

  208. @Lot
    @Kylie

    Here's the Google Doodle.

    https://www.google.com/doodles/juno-reaches-jupiter

    1/3 black, 1/3 white women, 1/6 white male, 1/6 asian male

    Replies: @Kylie

    Google et al aren’t fooling us. But we’re not their intended audience anyway. This is indoctrination for kids. All the left has to do us ceaselessly promote images like this. Then when the real world of accomplishment looks so much whiter, so much more masculine, so much more normal, it also looks so much more racist, sexist and exclusive.

  209. @War for Blair Mountain
    @Realist

    Realist

    Former Reagan Youth such as you and countenance along with the whole repellant Ronnie Reagan worshipping crowd drove the blue collar Native Born White American Working Class into the arms of the Democratic Party...that's what your anti-commie Oligarch Worshipping did.


    What you and countenance call "Democracy" are what Noam Chomsky and Edward Herman call Demonstration Elections...US version....that are nothing more than a ratification of economic arrangements divinely ordained by US Plutocrats-Oligarchs.


    Perhaps you and countenance-question diversity can tell us what Oligarch-Land-Owners you would like to Lord over the Native Born White American White Serfs. The one with the large orange helmut on?...You know, Nancy Reagan used to rub black-Oxford shoe polish into Ronnie's hair every morning....We ended up with a bona fide potted plant for a POTUS from 1981-1988.


    Springs East Hampton has been renamed the Monica Lewinsky Blvd by the locals in honor of the time that POTUS Bill Clinton hid in a wealthy Democratic Party donors home after getting good blow from Monica in the Oval Office. Democratic Party Family Values!!! Springs East Hampton has been colonized by two megafauna pest species:1)the lymes disease carrying white cotton tail deer and 2)Bill and Hillary's La Raza Mexican Democratic Party Voting Bloc. Boston Red Sox Slugger Carl Yastremski's high school...Bridgehampton High School...is now majority La Raza Mexican Megfauna Pest Species Democratic Party Voting Bloc.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Reagan didn’t drive blue collar workers to the Dems; on the contrary, he pulled them back (“Reagan Democrats”).

    Reagan may have dropped the hammer on the air traffic controllers, but he stood up for unionized manufacturing workers with tariffs and threats of tariffs against Japan. He knew that if a blue collar worker had his economic security covered by his private sector job, he’d be less reliant on the government for that, and more likely to vote GOP for patriotic and cultural reasons.

    That’s a lesson W. and Fox News never grokked.

    There was a rare Republican victory in a Congressional seat in an outer borough of NYC a few years ago, and the rally for the winner was disrupted by some hippy. A middle aged guy in khakis who was built like a brick sh*t house bodily removed him. Turned out he was a former Marine who retired from the NYPD on “disability” — that’s the 21st Century equivalent of a Reagan Dem, but there aren’t enough cop jobs and disability/retiree slots to sustain the GOP electorate. That’s why the GOP needs more good-paying private sector jobs.

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @Dave Pinsen

    Your wrong and here is why:

    During the Reagan Years the Democrats were still pulling in large numbers of White Working Class Blue Collar types to keep the Democratic Party Viable. My brother had his wedding reception at the big Holloday Inn Buffalo. The White Guys at the service desk...car jockeys...maintenance were laid off steel workers. They had violent hatred of Reagan. Which is not to say that Blue Collar White Guys were not voting for Reagan. We are talking about shifting percentages. Reagan didn't deliver a fatal blow to the Democratic Party. But the Reagan Administration did deliver a fatal death blow to a large and healthy Majority Blue Collar White Union Movement...

    Replies: @Marcus, @Charles Erwin Wilson

  210. @Tom Scarlett
    From George Saunders' article in the latest New Yorker (with the priceless title "Who Are All These
    Trump Supporters?"):
    "I had to pull an older white woman out of a moblet of slapping young women of color, after she’d been driven down to one knee and had her glasses knocked off. When I told the young African-American woman who’d given the first slap that this was exactly the kind of thing the Trump movement loved to see and would be happy to use, she seemed to suddenly come back to herself and nearly burst into tears. The slapped woman was around sixty, tall, lean, sun-reddened,
    scrappy, a rancher, maybe, and we stood there a few minutes, recovering ourselves."

    So the New Yorker thinks young black women should refrain from beating the hell out of a 60-year-old white woman -- not because it's a crime, but because it might give Trump something he could use.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Pericles

    “Now, now, Shaniqua, beating that woman in broad daylight will just help Trump. Take her into the alley.”

  211. @JimB
    @Buffalo Joe

    This is such an incongruous outcome I can only think the NSA has something on Comey. We've entered an age where basically any public official can be blackmailed or neutralized by Big Brother. (I think this was the topic of a not too long ago iSteve post.)

    Democracy is over. Do what you're told.

    Replies: @Pericles

    For what it’s worth, it’s congruous with a number of other odd legal events in the last few years, like Lois Lerner, gay marriage, obamacare and so on.

  212. @candid_observer
    @Flip

    For me, the fact about Warren that really sealed the deal in my disdain for her is her contribution to a book of recipes, Pow Wow Chow. Her recipes were supposedly passed down to her from her Cherokee ancestor:

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2012/05/18/did-elizabeth-warren-plagiarize-pow-wow-chow-recipes/

    But three of these recipes were in fact obviously in large part plagiarized, word for word, from recipes others had written, and which were obviously not native American in origin.

    Now I could sort of understand how someone might have heard from their family that they had certain ancestry, realized that it would be to their advantage to declare it, and decided not to question the matter very closely. Sort of understand it: I would never do it myself, and if my kids had been tempted to do it, I would have told them it was simply dishonest to do it without knowing for sure; and I would hold in very low esteem anybody who actually did it under those circumstances.

    But how do you forgive Warren's outright plagiarism in these circumstances? She obviously knew she was lying about the origin of those recipes, and she didn't even blanch at the plagiarism. Who, looking at this sort of scandalous and venal lying and dissembling, can possibly believe a single word the woman has to say about her ancestry, or anything else?

    She lies with ease and abandon.

    The bizarre thing is that she is touted as the embodiment of purity, the woman who speaks truth to power, among national Democrats. It is just one more act.

    Moral of the lesson: Never give up your cynicism; it is your only reliable guide in this world.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Chief Seattle

    Elizabeth Warren plagiarizing recipes for Pow-Wow-Chow! Priceless!

  213. @Ye Antient Oliphant
    @Patrick Harris

    Monarchy and aristocracy either exist or they don't. It's strange to want to create them where they don't. And where they do, the titles and courtesies are just public recognition of actual power (not just an 'aura') held by certain people. These flummeries aren't necessary though. There are landowners in Latin American 'Republics' who hold more real feudal power than any titled European.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Pericles

    What is aristocracy except a protected class delimited by descent?

    “It’s strange to want to create them where they don’t [exist].” Well, now you somehow have them.

  214. @Ye Antient Oliphant
    @Patrick Harris

    Monarchy and aristocracy either exist or they don't. It's strange to want to create them where they don't. And where they do, the titles and courtesies are just public recognition of actual power (not just an 'aura') held by certain people. These flummeries aren't necessary though. There are landowners in Latin American 'Republics' who hold more real feudal power than any titled European.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Pericles

    Let me fix that for you.

    “There are landowners in American ‘Republics’ who hold more real feudal power than any titled European.”

  215. @War for Blair Mountain
    @countenance

    Countenance

    You are among the reasons I have extreme hatred of the fashy Alt Right. To the extent that your enthusiasm for Monarchy...Pinochet....and Franco....the Alt Right must never be supported and encouraged to grow as a movement.

    The US is not a Democracy...in fact it is a Plutocracy-Oligarchy, which has nothing to do with Democracy.


    We had an alternative to your Pinochet-Franco Land Owner Oligarchy in the late 19th-early 20th century labor revolts in the US which gave us such wonderfull things such as the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Sikh Exclusion Act(yes there was a Sikh Exclusion Act to keep the Sikhs out of California).


    Steve


    You really need to let this post go through because the fashy haircut Alt Right really does push some very immoral violently anti-labor forms of top-down political-economic organization.

    Replies: @andy russia, @Cagey Beast, @Pericles, @BB753

    Hey, wanna buy a Che Guevara T-shirt?

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @Pericles

    Pericles


    A few weeks ago one of Steve's readers posted a very interesting comment on isteve.com He wrote that he sat next to a White South American upper class elite on a passenger jet he was. After the long conversation with this woman, he came away with a cold,creepy ,feeling..and he felt that there was something very corrupt,spiritually rotten about these kind of creatures south of the border. And he said that there was something very wrong with these people, and that he wouldn't want to live in a society dominated and run by these creatures.


    Historically, Working Class Human Beings have had very good reasons to revolt against Monarchs...Plutocrats....and Oligarchs.


    And this brings me to my next point. There is a subset of the Alt Right....and I hope its a very small subset of the Alt Right....that sees the future emergence of a US version of a Franco and Pinochet Strongman as something that would be wonderfull. It wouldn't be wonderfull for The White Working Class...it would be a Hell-0n-death-squadron Earth. Franco defended with extreme violence the interests of Land-Owning Oligarchs in Spain...Pinochet was pure unadulturated violence in his defense of the creepy, monumentally greedy creatures that one of Steve's Readers sat next to on that passenger jet.

    To the Alt Right Pinochet Enthusiasts

    Allende was bumped off by Nixon and Kissinger. The Nixon Administration started the process of race-replacing White Male Gruman Engineers and Technicians with legal immigrant Chinese and Hindu -Sihk Engineers. And as a consequence, the area surrounding Gruman Corp where Donald Trump held his mass rally two months ago...I was there by the "MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!!!" large banner in the old LEM building.....has been annexed by India. This is what the anti-commie crusade of Nixon-Kissinger did to the very exact streets the two characters in that Billy Joel 1978 Hit "Eddy and Brenda" roamed and romanced on during High School. And this I know for a fact.......


    Allende posed 0 threat to the White American Working Class. Bumping off Allende with White Working Class Tax $$$$$$$$ is the kind of Socialism much enamoured of by a certain subset of the Alt Right.

  216. @Realist
    @dfordoom

    "The problem is that when you propose a “meritocracy” what you get is something like the EU."

    I said Meritocracy not Idiotocracy,

    Monarchies are also unelected, and unaccountable.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @ben tillman

    Monarchies are also unelected, and unaccountable.

    Actually they’re not quite unaccountable. A king is very much aware that he has to account to his posterity, to his heirs and to history.

    And kings who have failed have more often than not paid for their failure with their lives.

    Kings are in fact accountable to their subjects. Very few kings have ever lost the confidence of their country and of their subjects and survived as king.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @dfordoom

    dforman


    You are using Dark Age Europe as a model to understand 2016. Moreover, we know what how history turned out during this thousand years of historical morphing.

    The Dark-Enlightenment-Alt Right is offering a false choice to The Historic White American Working Class. History has already provided an experiment for the other option:the late 19th -pre-WW2 Nativist White Working Class Labor Movement that terrified White Liberal Academics such as Historian C Van Woodward.

    Dark-Enlightenment-Alt Right is loserism....

  217. In summary: Too big to jail.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Pericles

    "In summary: Too big to jail."

    Can't they build a bigger cell?

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

  218. As disgusted as I am by Comey’s actions, it is probably the case that this will help Trump more than the likely course of events if Hillary had been indicted:

    Obama does not much like the Clintons. Biden has publicly said he wishes he had gotten into the race. If Hillary were to be indicted, it would be natural for Obama and the Democratic establishment to force her out of the race (presumably in exchange for a Presidential pardon).

    Biden would be the obvious “white knight” to step in and get the nomination. The media would paint Uncle Joe as the clean, moderate alternative to Hillary and Trump.

    Biden would win.

    Comey has now handed Trump a lot of rhetorical ammo against Hillary.

    I don’t know if Trump can pull this off, but I would certainly rather run against Hillary than against any clean Democratic candidate.

    (Of course, if Comey had any integrity as a human being, he would have recommended indictment, even knowing DOJ would not indict.)

    Dave

    • Replies: @guest
    @PhysicistDave

    Did you ever wonder why Biden never was president, as long as he's been around? He tried before, you know, and failed. I don't see why he'd be so successful now, except that Trump is unpredictable and could crash and burn. Uncle Joe only got to be VP as a consolation prize and because Obama was woefully inexperienced. It's not because he had any chance of being elected president himself.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  219. There was no indictment because the head of the FBI does not want to die by suicide by two shots to the back of the head.

    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    @avraham

    Actually, these days it's a gym accident. Previously it was suicide by nail gun but that was getting a bit obvious.

  220. So they got Comey to slip the shiv into the process by going beyond his brief and speaking to the merits of prosecutability rather than letting it become a decision by the DoJ prosecutors.

    That makes the issue of Loretta Lynch’s suborning by Bill moot, as also avoiding any potential criticism of the administration’s impartiality had the DoJ lawyers made the decision not to prosecute.

    Very nicely done.

    After all, James Comey is a standup guy as we all know. Indeed, who could possibly more of a stand up guy than a 6’8″ Republican FBI boss?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @PiltdownMan

    This.

    It works out nicely for certain people...

  221. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    I am increasingly amenable to monarchy – I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the “enlightened” dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I.

    “Many forms of Government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed it has been said that democracy is the worst form of Government except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.…”

    W. Churchill, House of Commons, 11 November 1947

    I understand the frustration many express by revisiting monarchy (or more appropriately enlightened autocracy) as an alternative to our current governance, but I can’t go there. Our Republic (and it is s republic, not a democracy) is the best system (of all the flawed systems there are) available for the common man to have reasonable chance at having a say in his own governance.

    Problem is, most people can’t or won’t take the time to exercise their civic duty to the proper extent. Representative government is messy and lots of work, and with inconclusive outcomes; and you need to stay informed of the issues to have a good position on a desired policy framework; sometimes your party will win a policy debate, sometimes you’ll lose. That can be very frustrating to many who want a clean, clear simple solution to hard, complex governance problems. Sometimes issues are clear-cut, such as existential threats that everyone needs to close ranks against, but most of the time, that is not the case.

    Having said that, since most folk don’t take the time or don’t care about the day-to-day requirement to stay on top of all the issues, they default to bread and circuses. So, as most here have already pointed out, we are in the gradual slide down to the worst form of governance, some type of dictatorship or despotic oligarchy (history doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does closely rhyme).

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @Captain Tripps

    Didn't Churchill also say that the US will always do the right thing, "after they've exhausted all the alternatives".

  222. @War for Blair Mountain
    @JohnnyWalker123

    And you obviously haven't a clue about the 1965 Immigration Reform Act and the 51 years of US Immigration Policy afterwards.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    There was no limit on Latin American and Caribbean immigration before the 1965 act. Much of the surge in immigration from that region started in the late 70s. Mostly because oligarchs wanted cheap labor and disliked hiring well-paid American laborers.

    Refugee acts substantially increased Asian immigration after the end of the Vietnam War. Refugee acts later brought in many Africans after that.

    Changes to H1b visa laws increased Indian subcontinental migration dramatically in the 90s.

    Immigration from mainland China was kept very low by the Communist government until the 80s.

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @JohnnyWalker123

    You are missing the crucial point. The demographics of legal immigrants was changed by the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act...this was front and center in the debate. And everyone was reassured by Ted Kennedy that there was nothing to worry about Whites would still remain a majority into the future.


    But when Greedy White Male CEOs such as the psychopathically greedy Gruman Corp Execs who had large homes in Fiddlers Green Llyod Neck....down the road from Caumsett State Park.....figured out the wealth transferring dimension of nonwhite legal immigants they lobbied for massive increases Asian Legal Immigrant Engineers.


    The passage of The 1965 Immigration Act was the funadamental policy transformation that had to take place first.

    One of the very nasty consequences of the passage of The 1965 Immigration Reform Act was that it allowed for an increase in the Asian population in the US...this small expeditionary force of Asians was a powerful political force that used it's wealth to buy political influence. All Asian SUNY Stony Brook....on 25 a hundred yards west of Renaisance Technology Hedge Fund....was the consequence.



    What should have happened in 1965 was the defeat of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act +an implementation of a National Origins Immigration Policy that excluded all nonwhites. This would have been the ticket to prevent the post-1965 racial transformation of the US.


    Just keep this in mind:the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act was a direct consequence of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act for Blacks....Which was a direct consequence of integrating the US Military....and this was a direct consequence of the Cold War-Anti-Commie Crusade(A Hamilton College Professor of History wrote an extensively documented book about this....he gave a two hour talk about this on a Cspan during the book festival week).


    Steve


    You gotta let this post go through since johnnywalker123 raises a very serious question that deserves a serious answer.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JohnnyWalker123

  223. Bee says:

    I think the larger point is that Donald Trump has re-tweeted white supremacist accounts something like a half dozen times by now, so he certainly had this coming. Perhaps now he won’t do it again.

    As for Hillary, did people think that she was going to get indicted, then of course drop out of the race, and then Donald Trump would simply assume the presidency, against token opposition? Was there no scenario other than this fantasy?

  224. @candid_observer
    @Flip

    For me, the fact about Warren that really sealed the deal in my disdain for her is her contribution to a book of recipes, Pow Wow Chow. Her recipes were supposedly passed down to her from her Cherokee ancestor:

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2012/05/18/did-elizabeth-warren-plagiarize-pow-wow-chow-recipes/

    But three of these recipes were in fact obviously in large part plagiarized, word for word, from recipes others had written, and which were obviously not native American in origin.

    Now I could sort of understand how someone might have heard from their family that they had certain ancestry, realized that it would be to their advantage to declare it, and decided not to question the matter very closely. Sort of understand it: I would never do it myself, and if my kids had been tempted to do it, I would have told them it was simply dishonest to do it without knowing for sure; and I would hold in very low esteem anybody who actually did it under those circumstances.

    But how do you forgive Warren's outright plagiarism in these circumstances? She obviously knew she was lying about the origin of those recipes, and she didn't even blanch at the plagiarism. Who, looking at this sort of scandalous and venal lying and dissembling, can possibly believe a single word the woman has to say about her ancestry, or anything else?

    She lies with ease and abandon.

    The bizarre thing is that she is touted as the embodiment of purity, the woman who speaks truth to power, among national Democrats. It is just one more act.

    Moral of the lesson: Never give up your cynicism; it is your only reliable guide in this world.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Chief Seattle

    From personal experience, I’m not sure the recipe gaff is hard evidence. I was thoroughly convinced that green bean casserole (the kind you eat on thanksgiving with French’s onion rings) was a family recipe. Not that my parents ever said so directly, it just seemed implied. The weathered 3×5 index card that we pulled out every year was infallible proof in my mind. It was a shock when I learned otherwise. My wife still makes fun of me for it.

  225. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    @War for Blair Mountain

    There was no limit on Latin American and Caribbean immigration before the 1965 act. Much of the surge in immigration from that region started in the late 70s. Mostly because oligarchs wanted cheap labor and disliked hiring well-paid American laborers.

    Refugee acts substantially increased Asian immigration after the end of the Vietnam War. Refugee acts later brought in many Africans after that.

    Changes to H1b visa laws increased Indian subcontinental migration dramatically in the 90s.

    Immigration from mainland China was kept very low by the Communist government until the 80s.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    You are missing the crucial point. The demographics of legal immigrants was changed by the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act…this was front and center in the debate. And everyone was reassured by Ted Kennedy that there was nothing to worry about Whites would still remain a majority into the future.

    But when Greedy White Male CEOs such as the psychopathically greedy Gruman Corp Execs who had large homes in Fiddlers Green Llyod Neck….down the road from Caumsett State Park…..figured out the wealth transferring dimension of nonwhite legal immigants they lobbied for massive increases Asian Legal Immigrant Engineers.

    The passage of The 1965 Immigration Act was the funadamental policy transformation that had to take place first.

    One of the very nasty consequences of the passage of The 1965 Immigration Reform Act was that it allowed for an increase in the Asian population in the US…this small expeditionary force of Asians was a powerful political force that used it’s wealth to buy political influence. All Asian SUNY Stony Brook….on 25 a hundred yards west of Renaisance Technology Hedge Fund….was the consequence.

    What should have happened in 1965 was the defeat of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act +an implementation of a National Origins Immigration Policy that excluded all nonwhites. This would have been the ticket to prevent the post-1965 racial transformation of the US.

    Just keep this in mind:the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act was a direct consequence of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act for Blacks….Which was a direct consequence of integrating the US Military….and this was a direct consequence of the Cold War-Anti-Commie Crusade(A Hamilton College Professor of History wrote an extensively documented book about this….he gave a two hour talk about this on a Cspan during the book festival week).

    Steve

    You gotta let this post go through since johnnywalker123 raises a very serious question that deserves a serious answer.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @War for Blair Mountain

    I don't think Asian immigrants are the problem, at least compared to Hispanics. At least they are net contributors. We are probably better off with Asian engineers spending their money and paying taxes over here than having the work outsourced to Asia. It's never going to be 1963 again but that doesn't mean we have to take people with zero skill or potential whose descendants will be a drag on society forever.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Sure, but you do realize the immigration from Latin America was uncapped until 1965? If not for the 1965 act, we'd have an open border with every country in the Western hemisphere.


    The 1965 act had nothing to do with the surge of Latinos or Carribbeans into the U.S

    Also, Asian immigration has been driven very high by the expansion of H1b visas in the 90s, as well as post-Vietnam refugee programs.
    .

  226. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Reagan didn't drive blue collar workers to the Dems; on the contrary, he pulled them back ("Reagan Democrats").

    Reagan may have dropped the hammer on the air traffic controllers, but he stood up for unionized manufacturing workers with tariffs and threats of tariffs against Japan. He knew that if a blue collar worker had his economic security covered by his private sector job, he'd be less reliant on the government for that, and more likely to vote GOP for patriotic and cultural reasons.

    That's a lesson W. and Fox News never grokked.

    There was a rare Republican victory in a Congressional seat in an outer borough of NYC a few years ago, and the rally for the winner was disrupted by some hippy. A middle aged guy in khakis who was built like a brick sh*t house bodily removed him. Turned out he was a former Marine who retired from the NYPD on "disability" -- that's the 21st Century equivalent of a Reagan Dem, but there aren't enough cop jobs and disability/retiree slots to sustain the GOP electorate. That's why the GOP needs more good-paying private sector jobs.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    Your wrong and here is why:

    During the Reagan Years the Democrats were still pulling in large numbers of White Working Class Blue Collar types to keep the Democratic Party Viable. My brother had his wedding reception at the big Holloday Inn Buffalo. The White Guys at the service desk…car jockeys…maintenance were laid off steel workers. They had violent hatred of Reagan. Which is not to say that Blue Collar White Guys were not voting for Reagan. We are talking about shifting percentages. Reagan didn’t deliver a fatal blow to the Democratic Party. But the Reagan Administration did deliver a fatal death blow to a large and healthy Majority Blue Collar White Union Movement…

    • Replies: @Marcus
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Reagan eviscerated the middle and lower classes like no one before him, but they voted for him in large numbers due to his lovable grandpa act and patriotic rhetoric. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joseph-a-palermo/the-reagan-centennial-cel_b_819163.html

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Your reply is the most pathetic response to a post since I last saw a Tiny Dick, Suck Dick or no-dick Nick Diaz post. You cite the sentiments of a gaggle of Luddites from a wedding to support your position?

    Stay on the porch Spanky.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

  227. @Lagertha
    @Buffalo Joe

    I am stunned! My ancestors who fought for Independence (against Bolsheviks in 1917) and to retain Independence in WW2, would be fracking appalled by this BS call today in the USA! This is all major BS; more like cowed American people in positions of leadership people, who are forced/compromised people, and sort of in milquetoast positions in government (now) like Comey, who have to think about their petty lives if they disagree against "the authorities" who will wreck their lives if they digress? Could he/his children have been threatened? - this was the position, according to my grandfather, an officer in WW2.....threaten people and their children to get your way.

    My grandfather's squad just corralled all the Reds out of his (they were natives of his country, but they were fracking Communists...dirt, as far as he was concerned) country to the border of his beloved Karelia, USSR thereafter, and said, "Walk east, may God save you from your stupidity." I kid you not! That was a real quote! I remember I was 10 when he said this to me over breakfast in the 70's. I have a crazy and interesting family...very large, very large family. Ok, said too much.

    Also. The whole Star of David today stuff, is "Disruption Porn," - the "Kitchen Sink" stuff I expected.

    - Staying in WW2 vibe, while I still have enough energy & 50% sense, (I am 99% ok for you guys that care) Jews were never "given up" by the Finns when Finns reluctantly (but strategically) had to figure out how to buy weapons (from Germany) to fight Stalin, Finland lost 18 Jewish students who could not get out of Germany, back to Finland, in time as things got worse in 1943.

    Weirdly, in the main cemetery : Hietalahden Hautausmaa (where my father's ashes are & where I must bring my mother's ashes when the time comes), there are very distinct areas: The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier which is combined with the Finnish Presidents & Mannerheim....the place the tour buses come and see - and oh yeah, Wirkkala's scuplture is not far. And, next to this spot: are the Nazis. The men whose bodies were not called back. Finns are Lutheran, so you don't desecrate dead bodies.

    And, finally, across the beautiful park, over a 8' wide garden path, there is the Jewish cemetery. So, all these headstones with crosses, Stars of David and Swastikas are all in less than a half acre...kid you not! I have taken many American GI's there over the years as no tram or bus comes there,
    so close to the center of the Helsinki, or where the Cruise Ships dock.
    a

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Thea

    In Lake Worth, FL this is a large building emblazoned with “Suomi Talo” on its side.

    I’be never understood how one could leave what I imagine was a beautiful Finland for this crummy place.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Thea

    Lake Worth was established by Finns from both Brooklyn, NY and Minnesota, mostly (early immigrants from Finland going through Ellis Island) as a retirement community from the cold, snowy North. Majority of these retirees from the Mid West and North East, were loggers, miners, farmers....not elite, and not wealthy. So, Lake Worth was "as good as it gets." I actually, know a few seniors there now - the richer ones, live in Palm Beach.

    Of course, Karelians, who were forced to give up their farms after the border moved west in 1945, decided to leave Finland all together; it was too heartbreaking to re-settle in Finland, or be anywhere near Russia again - this was over 200,000 people who had to be evacuated.

    Ergo, the Finnish communities in the regions I mentioned, attracted the Karelians since other Finns were already there, living in communities where the language was spoken. Lake Worth sort of sprung up in the late 50's-60's, more or less established by the Brooklyn Finns. And, that group, that originally settled in Sunset Park, has completely disappeared from Brooklyn.

    I'm not sure Lake Worth will still be even a minor Finnish community in 30 years or so. I rarely meet people of Finnish origin who speak the language. Life in Finland got much better in the 60's, like all the other Nordic countries. And, now, with their famed social welfare benefits, they are attracting hoards of economic migrants - but there are no simple jobs there, nor enough stoop labor jobs. I mean, corporate jobs giant, Nokia, was epic fail. Things are not rosy there, and I resent MSM constantly saying Finland is wealthy.

  228. @Patrick Harris
    @Twinkie

    Our democracy is certainly decadent, but the trouble with hereditary monarchy is that you can't manufacture the sacred aura or sense of noblesse oblige that surrounds it out of whole cloth. If a personal form of rule ever comes to the United States, it will be wrapped in republican forms and will be far less benign than the Hapsburgs ever were.

    Replies: @Ye Antient Oliphant, @Thea

    You mean the Clintons and Bushes?

  229. @War for Blair Mountain
    @Dave Pinsen

    Your wrong and here is why:

    During the Reagan Years the Democrats were still pulling in large numbers of White Working Class Blue Collar types to keep the Democratic Party Viable. My brother had his wedding reception at the big Holloday Inn Buffalo. The White Guys at the service desk...car jockeys...maintenance were laid off steel workers. They had violent hatred of Reagan. Which is not to say that Blue Collar White Guys were not voting for Reagan. We are talking about shifting percentages. Reagan didn't deliver a fatal blow to the Democratic Party. But the Reagan Administration did deliver a fatal death blow to a large and healthy Majority Blue Collar White Union Movement...

    Replies: @Marcus, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Reagan eviscerated the middle and lower classes like no one before him, but they voted for him in large numbers due to his lovable grandpa act and patriotic rhetoric. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joseph-a-palermo/the-reagan-centennial-cel_b_819163.html

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @Marcus

    Marcus

    I want to get your opinion about a very serious raging historical debate.


    Did Nancy Reagan lovingly rub black oxford shoe polish into Ronnie's La Brea Tar Pit Black slicked back hair very morning....or...did Nancy Reagan rub turpentine lovingly into Ronnie's hair every morning before the morning watering in the Oval Office every day?

    We had a bona fide potted plant for a POTUS from 1981-1989.

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Marcus

    Thanks for poking your head up out of the fever swamps. Your reference is the Huffington Post? No bias there, right? When your temperature drops below 105 degrees Fahrenheit please try again.

    Replies: @Marcus

  230. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @Pericles
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Hey, wanna buy a Che Guevara T-shirt?

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    Pericles

    A few weeks ago one of Steve’s readers posted a very interesting comment on isteve.com He wrote that he sat next to a White South American upper class elite on a passenger jet he was. After the long conversation with this woman, he came away with a cold,creepy ,feeling..and he felt that there was something very corrupt,spiritually rotten about these kind of creatures south of the border. And he said that there was something very wrong with these people, and that he wouldn’t want to live in a society dominated and run by these creatures.

    Historically, Working Class Human Beings have had very good reasons to revolt against Monarchs…Plutocrats….and Oligarchs.

    And this brings me to my next point. There is a subset of the Alt Right….and I hope its a very small subset of the Alt Right….that sees the future emergence of a US version of a Franco and Pinochet Strongman as something that would be wonderfull. It wouldn’t be wonderfull for The White Working Class…it would be a Hell-0n-death-squadron Earth. Franco defended with extreme violence the interests of Land-Owning Oligarchs in Spain…Pinochet was pure unadulturated violence in his defense of the creepy, monumentally greedy creatures that one of Steve’s Readers sat next to on that passenger jet.

    To the Alt Right Pinochet Enthusiasts

    Allende was bumped off by Nixon and Kissinger. The Nixon Administration started the process of race-replacing White Male Gruman Engineers and Technicians with legal immigrant Chinese and Hindu -Sihk Engineers. And as a consequence, the area surrounding Gruman Corp where Donald Trump held his mass rally two months ago…I was there by the “MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!!!” large banner in the old LEM building…..has been annexed by India. This is what the anti-commie crusade of Nixon-Kissinger did to the very exact streets the two characters in that Billy Joel 1978 Hit “Eddy and Brenda” roamed and romanced on during High School. And this I know for a fact…….

    Allende posed 0 threat to the White American Working Class. Bumping off Allende with White Working Class Tax $$$$$$$$ is the kind of Socialism much enamoured of by a certain subset of the Alt Right.

  231. @Rob McX
    It would make you yearn for the days of J Edgar Hoover, who was determined never to let politicians interfere in his work. He gets a lot of bad press these days, but a lot of it is just because he was determined to keep the FBI completely independent.

    Replies: @whorefinder

    It would make you yearn for the days of J Edgar Hoover, who was determined never to let politicians interfere in his work. He gets a lot of bad press these days, but a lot of it is just because he was determined to keep the FBI completely independent.

    Except Hoover was determined to keep the very existence of the Mafia secret. Heck, in the 1940s he enlisted the Mafia into capturing German spies and saboteurs on American soil, and then refused up until the 1960s to admit they existed or go after them. It took the Kefauver Hearings and the Mclellan Hearings (with Joe Valachi squealing in detail) and RFK going after his family’s enemies before Hoover finally gave up the ghost and admitted organized crime existed.

    Hoover made his bones going after lone psychos in the 1930s such as Dillinger, and got big headlines, despite barely being able to catch them. But he made sure the FBI carefully avoided any organized group with power. His failure to catch most of the commies who infiltrated Hollywood and the federal government is pretty darning proof he was incompetent at anything more than catching a flashy lone bank robber.

    In short, the FBI has been rotten going back to the start. Just very good with their image.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @guest
    @whorefinder

    One thing I can say for Hoover is that I think he, or at least his organization, was behind McCarthy. That is to say, they leaked him the dirt on the 57 (or whatever) names. Though McCarthy failed spectacularly, that was the one, true backlash against the Progressive (i.e. communist) State since WWI, or before. Certainly since the New Deal, which killed the Republic.

    The unfortunate part was how they focused on foreign elements infiltrating our government. Really, it was the other way around. Our guys helped establish the Soviet Union, then tried to remold us in its image.

  232. Bugg says:
    @Mr. Anon
    @whorefinder

    "Can we all please stop pretending now that the FBI is competent and uncorrupt?"

    The FBI was rotten almost all the way back to its founding, ever since Hoover took it over and made it his own private Gestapo. Is there any high-profile case they haven't botched, other than the entrapment capers where they controlled the outcome anyway? I suppose they had some success against the mafia, thanks to RICO (which will probably be used against the citizenry someday).

    A lot of what the Feds seem to do now is entrapment - inducing random muslim losers who couldn't string two fire-crackers together to accept a fake bomb and pledge to blow up something. Convictions and promotions ensue.

    Replies: @Bugg

    2 things in recent history should give us all great pause about the Famous But Incompetent:
    1. Summer of 2001 -they had 20th hijacker Zaccarias Mossoaui and his computer with the 9/11 plot on it in custody.There was intelligence that a big plot was afoot, even with Gorelick’s Wall, known to all. Instead of looking at said computer and interrogating the living daylights out of him, the Minnesota FBI field office, after much pointless discussion and angst, wrote a long pointless memo.
    2. The official story of the Tsarnaev brothers is simply an embarrassment from beginning to end.

    The agency lost it’s footing after things shifted from going after Italian mobsters to terrorism. And even there, among and between the messes they made with mob informants like Whitey Bulger and Greg Scarpa,they weren’t quite all that even then.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Bugg

    "2. The official story of the Tsarnaev brothers is simply an embarrassment from beginning to end. "
    I have suspicions that the Tsarnaevs might have been cultivated as entrapment targets by the feds, except the bomb brothers played the FBI and turned the fake "bomb-plot" into a real one. That might explain the cops-gone-wild over-the-top manhunt for them, and the fact that one of thier pals ended up getting interrogated to death in his living room. The way the FBI handled the aftermath rather smacked of a cover-up.

  233. @Auntie Analogue
    @Twinkie


    "I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the 'enlightened' dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I."

     

    My dear Twinkie, Mr. Derbyshire's reply to your sentiment was spot on.

    It's a pity my late Slovak grandparents - all four of them - are not here for you to ask them how much they enjoyed their hardscrabble existence in virtual slavery under the oppressive Hungarian end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, whose rulers forbade schooling in my grandparents' language; forced schooling only in Hungarian; forcibly conscripted Slovaks into the army (my childhood parish here in the U.S. had old men who'd been conscripted into WWI service in the Central Powers' Austro-Hungarian Army); and enforced rigorous discrimination against Slovaks in education, employment, promotion, property ownership, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, political and civil service officeholding (for the lower orders of which the Hungarians interposed Jews to insulate their aristocratic selves from the Slovaks, thus deflecting Slovak protest away from the Hungarian monarchy into Slovak anti-Semitism), and in countless other ugly ways.

    The current strain of alt-right-trad romanticism for monarchy is frightfully myopic. Monarchy is a crapshoot, and there's just one thing you should know about craps: its odds are stacked overwhelmingly with the house.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Rob McX, @avraham, @AP

    Thank you for finally pointing that out. I was too chicken to point out on this site that monarchy was not always a bed of roses. Or rather it always was a bed of roses together with the thorns. I did point out on Amerika Steven Brett’s blog that in Athens there was a clear distinction between a tyrant and a monarch or king. In Sparta you had kings with constitutional powers – and their powers were limited by the Ephors and the other king. When Athens removed its tyrants it was clear they were against tyrants, not kings. Still its democracy had problems because of lack of limits of power on the people. In any case the problems will not be solved by a return to monarchy but by constitutional government and the Law of God in the Bible.

  234. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @avraham
    There was no indictment because the head of the FBI does not want to die by suicide by two shots to the back of the head.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one

    Actually, these days it’s a gym accident. Previously it was suicide by nail gun but that was getting a bit obvious.

  235. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    • Replies: @grapesoda
    @The most deplorable one

    No, it's fake.

    http://sourceplanet.net/news/is-guccifer-dead-no-romanian-hacker-with-access-to-clinton-emails/

    http://www.snopes.com/guccifer-missing-from-jail-cell/

  236. @Captain Tripps
    @Twinkie


    I am increasingly amenable to monarchy – I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the “enlightened” dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I.
     
    "Many forms of Government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed it has been said that democracy is the worst form of Government except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.…"

    W. Churchill, House of Commons, 11 November 1947

    I understand the frustration many express by revisiting monarchy (or more appropriately enlightened autocracy) as an alternative to our current governance, but I can't go there. Our Republic (and it is s republic, not a democracy) is the best system (of all the flawed systems there are) available for the common man to have reasonable chance at having a say in his own governance.

    Problem is, most people can't or won't take the time to exercise their civic duty to the proper extent. Representative government is messy and lots of work, and with inconclusive outcomes; and you need to stay informed of the issues to have a good position on a desired policy framework; sometimes your party will win a policy debate, sometimes you'll lose. That can be very frustrating to many who want a clean, clear simple solution to hard, complex governance problems. Sometimes issues are clear-cut, such as existential threats that everyone needs to close ranks against, but most of the time, that is not the case.

    Having said that, since most folk don't take the time or don't care about the day-to-day requirement to stay on top of all the issues, they default to bread and circuses. So, as most here have already pointed out, we are in the gradual slide down to the worst form of governance, some type of dictatorship or despotic oligarchy (history doesn't necessarily repeat, but it does closely rhyme).

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    Didn’t Churchill also say that the US will always do the right thing, “after they’ve exhausted all the alternatives”.

  237. @Art
    This is just like the OJ Simpson trail. The local court failed to deliver justice and in the eyes of everyday people, the justice system did wrong big time – as a result the legal system lost its luster with We the People.

    It is obvious, this time the US Federal justice system boomed. It did NOT deliver justice – it sheltered the mighty – the commanding authority sheltered the powerful.

    Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton, Lynch, Coomey, and Obama are all dishonest elitist trash.

    Honesty is of zero importance to those political rats. They just shovel out their brainstem political pop and the MSM shoves it down our throats.

    How does President Ratchet sound? She has lots of feel good pills for you America.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    ” … as a result the legal system lost its luster with We the People.”

    Hey, at least we still have Judge Judy (Judge Rinder in the UK )! There is still justice for the little people.

  238. @Das
    @Auntie Analogue

    I mean, the statute in question is called the the Espionage Act, not the Proper Handling of Classified Materials Act. It was originally meant to go after spies.

    The Act was interpreted very narrowly in the 1941 Supreme Court case Gorin v. US to apply only in cases when the person acts in bad faith to harm national security. Since then, it's been stretched increasingly to prosecute individuals who leak classified documents to the press, but this has not been without controversy. (Ask the Snowden fans, who insisted that the Act did not apply to him.)

    In this case, there isn't really evidence that Clinton intended to leak any information at all, which would make a prosecution a bigger stretch.

    Can you point to the prosecutions that have occurred of officials for bungling security procedures in the handling of classified information with no intent to leak?

    "Politics aside, it is difficult to find prior cases where the unwise handling of classified information led to a federal indictment. For the last 20 years, the federal statutes have been used when there were intentional unauthorized disclosures. The Department of Justice appears to have gone after "leakers," but not bunglers."

    http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202737626175/Clintons-Email-Unwise-But-Likely-Not-Criminal?slreturn=20160606020845#ixzz3ySsO9919

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @guest, @guest

    I predict you will see a swarm of articles titled something like “Why Patraeus Was Charged but Clinton Wasn’t.” None of them will say it’s because Patraeus was a spy.

  239. @Stan Adams
    @Das

    John Deutch (CIA director in 1995-96) got in trouble for keeping classified material on his home computer:
    http://fas.org/irp/cia/product/ig_deutch.html

    In the end, Janet Reno declined to prosecute. His security clearances were revoked.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    “In the end, Janet Reno declined to prosecute. [John Deutch’s] security clearances were revoked.”

    Yes, but the access of a sitting President will not be rvoked, and she have the final say as to who is on the Kill List. Paybacks are a bitch, Osama bin Donald.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @The Alarmist

    How ironic that, back in the '70s, DownHillary cut her political teeth on the Watergate Committee working to take down President Nixon.

    Over-the-Hillary makes good ol' Tricky Dick look like a Boy Scout.

  240. @Das
    @Auntie Analogue

    I mean, the statute in question is called the the Espionage Act, not the Proper Handling of Classified Materials Act. It was originally meant to go after spies.

    The Act was interpreted very narrowly in the 1941 Supreme Court case Gorin v. US to apply only in cases when the person acts in bad faith to harm national security. Since then, it's been stretched increasingly to prosecute individuals who leak classified documents to the press, but this has not been without controversy. (Ask the Snowden fans, who insisted that the Act did not apply to him.)

    In this case, there isn't really evidence that Clinton intended to leak any information at all, which would make a prosecution a bigger stretch.

    Can you point to the prosecutions that have occurred of officials for bungling security procedures in the handling of classified information with no intent to leak?

    "Politics aside, it is difficult to find prior cases where the unwise handling of classified information led to a federal indictment. For the last 20 years, the federal statutes have been used when there were intentional unauthorized disclosures. The Department of Justice appears to have gone after "leakers," but not bunglers."

    http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202737626175/Clintons-Email-Unwise-But-Likely-Not-Criminal?slreturn=20160606020845#ixzz3ySsO9919

    Replies: @Auntie Analogue, @guest, @guest

    Oh, and Comey himself said that we’re not to conclude that someone else doing the same thing under similar circumstances wouldn’t be prosecuted. He didn’t add, “So long as they’re also spies.”

  241. @PhysicistDave
    As disgusted as I am by Comey's actions, it is probably the case that this will help Trump more than the likely course of events if Hillary had been indicted:

    Obama does not much like the Clintons. Biden has publicly said he wishes he had gotten into the race. If Hillary were to be indicted, it would be natural for Obama and the Democratic establishment to force her out of the race (presumably in exchange for a Presidential pardon).

    Biden would be the obvious "white knight" to step in and get the nomination. The media would paint Uncle Joe as the clean, moderate alternative to Hillary and Trump.

    Biden would win.

    Comey has now handed Trump a lot of rhetorical ammo against Hillary.

    I don't know if Trump can pull this off, but I would certainly rather run against Hillary than against any clean Democratic candidate.

    (Of course, if Comey had any integrity as a human being, he would have recommended indictment, even knowing DOJ would not indict.)

    Dave

    Replies: @guest

    Did you ever wonder why Biden never was president, as long as he’s been around? He tried before, you know, and failed. I don’t see why he’d be so successful now, except that Trump is unpredictable and could crash and burn. Uncle Joe only got to be VP as a consolation prize and because Obama was woefully inexperienced. It’s not because he had any chance of being elected president himself.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @guest

    guest wrote to me:


    Did you ever wonder why Biden never was president, as long as he’s been around? He tried before, you know, and failed. I don’t see why he’d be so successful now, except that Trump is unpredictable and could crash and burn.
     
    Yeah, Biden's not very good as a campaigner. But, the media would have fallen all over themselves to portray him as the Savior that would save us from our deep national tragedy.

    In short, Biden needed a miracle: DOJ indicting Hillary.

    But, Comey short-circuited that. And, so, Trump has a chance.

    Indicting Hillary would have been the best chance Biden has ever had, and the Dems' best bet to hold the White House this year.

    I still think Comey is slime, but this is the best outcome for Trump.

    Dave

    Replies: @guest

  242. @Thea
    @Lagertha

    In Lake Worth, FL this is a large building emblazoned with "Suomi Talo" on its side.

    I'be never understood how one could leave what I imagine was a beautiful Finland for this crummy place.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    Lake Worth was established by Finns from both Brooklyn, NY and Minnesota, mostly (early immigrants from Finland going through Ellis Island) as a retirement community from the cold, snowy North. Majority of these retirees from the Mid West and North East, were loggers, miners, farmers….not elite, and not wealthy. So, Lake Worth was “as good as it gets.” I actually, know a few seniors there now – the richer ones, live in Palm Beach.

    Of course, Karelians, who were forced to give up their farms after the border moved west in 1945, decided to leave Finland all together; it was too heartbreaking to re-settle in Finland, or be anywhere near Russia again – this was over 200,000 people who had to be evacuated.

    Ergo, the Finnish communities in the regions I mentioned, attracted the Karelians since other Finns were already there, living in communities where the language was spoken. Lake Worth sort of sprung up in the late 50’s-60’s, more or less established by the Brooklyn Finns. And, that group, that originally settled in Sunset Park, has completely disappeared from Brooklyn.

    I’m not sure Lake Worth will still be even a minor Finnish community in 30 years or so. I rarely meet people of Finnish origin who speak the language. Life in Finland got much better in the 60’s, like all the other Nordic countries. And, now, with their famed social welfare benefits, they are attracting hoards of economic migrants – but there are no simple jobs there, nor enough stoop labor jobs. I mean, corporate jobs giant, Nokia, was epic fail. Things are not rosy there, and I resent MSM constantly saying Finland is wealthy.

  243. @Buzz Mohawk
    Nothing to see here, folks. Move along...

    It's now official: The entire country has become Chicago.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Dennis Dale, @Wade

    This is also what happens when the Democrat party becomes a permanent majority party through mass immigration. All the Social Justice Warriors of the left should take note that a society that is destined to resemble Mexico demographically will unmercifully begin to function like it too.

  244. Dew says:
    @Honorary Thief
    @PhysicistDave

    It's amazing how fast the anti-war left was dumped down the memory hole.

    Replies: @Dew

    Exactly. Hillary has policies that are making the neo-cons blush. Hardly a peep from the mainstream left. They were all over Dubya but I doubt they are going to rip Hillary a new one.

    The anti-war left was a huge in the 2000’s and was a significant factor in Obama winning the election. They got quiet afterwards even though Obama and Hillary helped orchestrate a moronic regime change in Libya (which opened Europe to refugees) among other things.

  245. @Anonym
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    I don't believe I gave an opinion one way or another. However, I thought it likely that being the Democrat nominee would make it very hard to convict Bill's wife of anything. Approximately half the country will vote for, and if it's corruption they want, well then, who is to say they are wrong?

    It is very lucky that the US has such great generals, the Atlantic and the Pacific, and that due to nuclear weapons, developed nations no longer duke it out.

    Replies: @ATX Hipster

    Except for the ‘great generals’ bit, spot on.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @ATX Hipster

    Except for the ‘great generals’ bit, spot on.

    I can't for the life of me find it, but I was quoting what I thought I read on here.

    "America is defended by two great generals, General Atlantic and General Pacific."

    I did not mean that the USA has great generals, just that the US is very fortunate it doesn't find itself in a position where it is right next to another neighbor of similar size with a credible army.

  246. Wade says:
    @pepperinmono
    It is sad that every institution is corrupted.
    Comey was likely faced with uncooperative DOJ. Everyone said he would balk. However, faced with a choice of playing along or ruining his career, he chose the path of least resistance. Or maybe it didn't even get that complicated. Indicting candidate of Democrat party,in power,is a tall order. Too tall for Comey.

    She is clearly guilty, his statement says as much. In today's world, this is probably as good as it gets. He is probably correct -- no reasonable prosecutor would try HRC. This may be better in the long run. She is the weakest candidate to run against. This battle will need to be won at ballot box.

    Replies: @Wade

    A consolation of this, for me, is knowing that the Democrat party is now blissfully uniting behind Hillary and that there is no chance of Bernie or Joe Biden taking her place on the debating stage against Trump.

    I believe that Trump can defeat Hillary although it will be a tough fight to the finish. At least we now know he’s not aiming at a moving Democratic target which until now I was worried about.

  247. @War for Blair Mountain
    @JohnnyWalker123

    You are missing the crucial point. The demographics of legal immigrants was changed by the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act...this was front and center in the debate. And everyone was reassured by Ted Kennedy that there was nothing to worry about Whites would still remain a majority into the future.


    But when Greedy White Male CEOs such as the psychopathically greedy Gruman Corp Execs who had large homes in Fiddlers Green Llyod Neck....down the road from Caumsett State Park.....figured out the wealth transferring dimension of nonwhite legal immigants they lobbied for massive increases Asian Legal Immigrant Engineers.


    The passage of The 1965 Immigration Act was the funadamental policy transformation that had to take place first.

    One of the very nasty consequences of the passage of The 1965 Immigration Reform Act was that it allowed for an increase in the Asian population in the US...this small expeditionary force of Asians was a powerful political force that used it's wealth to buy political influence. All Asian SUNY Stony Brook....on 25 a hundred yards west of Renaisance Technology Hedge Fund....was the consequence.



    What should have happened in 1965 was the defeat of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act +an implementation of a National Origins Immigration Policy that excluded all nonwhites. This would have been the ticket to prevent the post-1965 racial transformation of the US.


    Just keep this in mind:the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act was a direct consequence of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act for Blacks....Which was a direct consequence of integrating the US Military....and this was a direct consequence of the Cold War-Anti-Commie Crusade(A Hamilton College Professor of History wrote an extensively documented book about this....he gave a two hour talk about this on a Cspan during the book festival week).


    Steve


    You gotta let this post go through since johnnywalker123 raises a very serious question that deserves a serious answer.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JohnnyWalker123

    I don’t think Asian immigrants are the problem, at least compared to Hispanics. At least they are net contributors. We are probably better off with Asian engineers spending their money and paying taxes over here than having the work outsourced to Asia. It’s never going to be 1963 again but that doesn’t mean we have to take people with zero skill or potential whose descendants will be a drag on society forever.

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @Jack D

    Jack D

    You have reduced the US to an economic proposition "nation"....actually not quite, since you know that the territory in the US that the Chinese and Hindus are carving out for themselves are areas where the White Natives become the racial foreigner. These are areas where the Chinese and Hindu Majorities will make certain that the new racial order of things remains a permanent state of affairs.

    Asian legal immigrants since 1965 are of 0 benefit to the Historic Native White Working Class....0. What's the benefit of a 20-50 year waiting list to get into the Adirondacks behind millions of Chinese,Hindus, and Sihks in the Tri-state area?


    You claim that we can't go back to 1963 demographically in the US. That all depends on what the Historic Native White Working Class thinks is in its interests. If there is a will..there is a way....Many things are possible including a 1963 racial demographics in the US.

    I can summarize your point of view as followes:full speed ahead with Asian Racial Identity Politics...but I won't give permission for Whitey to do the same thing. Well, Whitey doesn't need your permission.

    Steve

    Let my freaking post go through....

  248. @TheJester
    Let's put this "fix" on a timeline and in perspective.

    1. According to James Comey, the Director of the FBI, the Hildebeast intended to violate the laws associated with retaining government records but did not intend to get caught. She also shredded her daily schedules as the Secretary of State so no one could know who she talked to or who talked to her. However, she likewise did not intend to get caught. Therefore, she had no criminal intent (what criminal intends to get caught?). Because she did get caught, she is only guilty of being stupid and incompetent for being caught ... no enough to keep her from becoming the next President of the United States.

    (In my 20-years in the military, I saw many careers ruined by people who accidentally left classified information on a desk or on a copier in secure military facilities. I cannot fathom what would have happened to me if I had loaded over 2,000+ classified documents on a non-secure server exposed to the Internet ... and the emails were hacked and downloaded.)

    2. Bill Clinton, who made Loretta Lynch's career, adjusted his take off from Chicago to arrange a "chance" walk on to Ms. Lynch's private plane for a secret, 20-minute talk ... while both he and the Hildebeast are "people of interest" in ongoing FBI criminal investigations. They allegedly talked about grandchildren for 20-minutes. "Nothing to see here, folks ... move along."

    3. Ms. Lynch admits her bad judgment and declared that she won't let it happen again ... not because something happened but because it looks bad. She says she will not recuse herself as the Attorney General from the investigations but will accept whatever recommendation the FBI forwards. [?]

    4. Hussein Obama exposes his hand (and the fix) by prematurely taking the Hildebeast on Air Force 1 en route to a campaign event in which he would campaign for the Hildebeast. Obama certainly realized the political damage if he had been en route with Hillary and the FBI announced it would indict Hillary. Now, we all now know he knew he was safe. He knew the outcome before it was announced. Indeed, he knew it from the beginning of the investigation.

    5. Finally, James Comey, the Director of the FBI, announces that Hillary is stupid and incompetent but did not have intent to do harm. Therefore, he will not indict Hillary for systematically and willfully violating US law. Notice the dissimulation here. Hillary violated the laws through her willful acts and intended to violate the laws through her willful acts ... but she did not intend to do harm by intending to and violating the laws through her acts. (I guess that means Edward Snowden is off scot-free now, right?)

    6. Comey also lied in his excusatory for Hillary. He said there is no evidence on the email servers of hacking (i.e. no proven harm done by Hillary or anyone else) ... while admitting that proves nothing because good hackers would not have left evidence. However, how does this explain the arrest and extradition of Guccifer from Romania for hacking and post emails from Hillary's email server?

    QED: The "fix" was on from the beginning. Bill, Hillary, Lynch, Obama, and Comey all knew the outcome before the investigation started.

    Conclusion: The Soviet Union was often criticized as a Third-World country with nuclear weapons. It's now official. We are also a Third-World country with nuclear weapons and a privately owned central bank recklessly printing money for the banksters controlling our government ... and hoping no one notices.

    "Move along, folks ... nothing to see here. Why don't you argue over legalizing pedophilia or something else ... you know, WW-P. It's next."

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Anon

    It’s only a third-world country when you have people with a third-world mentality in charge. It doesn’t have to be that way.

  249. @res
    Unbelievable (well, except that most of us probably expected this). The particularly nice touch is releasing this news just after July 4th. What a country...

    One thing confuses me. Why is the FBI making a judgment on what a reasonable prosecutor would do? It seems to me the FBI would be more focused on determining the facts of the case while leaving the prosecutor's decision to the ... prosecutor. (I assume this is a political move taking the responsibility for the decision out of Lynch's hands. Is there a precedent showing the FBI taking this role in previous cases?)

    This link shows Trump's tweets in response: http://www.cnbc.com/2016/07/05/fbi-director-james-comey-has-concluded-the-investigation-into-clintons-emails.html

    Does anyone have a link to the FBI report?

    Replies: @tbraton

    “One thing confuses me. Why is the FBI making a judgment on what a reasonable prosecutor would do? It seems to me the FBI would be more focused on determining the facts of the case while leaving the prosecutor’s decision to the … prosecutor. ”

    Exactly. Actually, there were two things about Comey’s decision that stood out for me. First, by citing the absence of intention, he basically rewrote the statute that requires merely “gross negligence.” Secondly, as you point out, he was making a decision that a prosecutor normally makes. While Comey was a former prosecutor as U.S. Attorney for NY, he is not now a prosecutor. The fact that Obama planned travel to NC to campaign with Hillary yesterday indicates that Comey must have been coordinating his decision with the White House. I wonder whether criticism of the FBI’s role in the recent Orlando mass slaying played any role in this. Since he essentially laid out the case for prosecuting Hillary, Comey should have recommended prosecution and left it up to the lawyers at the DOJ to make the decision not to prosecute, instead of making that decision himself.

    • Replies: @guest
    @tbraton

    But he couldn't leave it up to the DOJ because it's run by a person with the wrong gender, skin color, and political background. The decision not to prosecute had to be delivered by a white, male Republican to demonstrate that it's non-partisan, beyond politics, or whatever it is they're calling it these days. Why Comey went along with it, who knows? Maybe he's one of those stupid, " for the sake of the Republic" people.

  250. @rod1963
    It only shows the system is a fraud, a joke where the laws are only applicable to the little people. Those who are part of the club so to speak like the Clintons can do as they please.

    Slick sold the Chinese our missile technology and nothing happened to him.

    Hillary went one step further and put everything for sale via the foundation and ran a illegal e-mail server, deliberately put SCI and SAP info on it, which is a felony under Federal law, yet she and the e-mail administrator and those who put the SAP and SCI info on the server had nothing happen.

    What a joke.

    We don't have the rule of law, we are no better than any bananaland republic.

    The United States died today.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    The United States died today.

    No. Not even close. The United States died in 1861. Then it’s stumbling zombie corpse was killed again in 1913.

    And for those surprised at Comey’s corruption, need I remind you the FBI has long been simply a bagman/hit squad for the political elites? Ruby Ridge? Waco? OK City? TWA 800? 9/11? LaVoy Finicum? And this hardly even scratches the surface. There was the briefest flicker of integrity with ABSCAM, but the scent of truth was so odious and terrifying in DC that the impulse to pursue it was fiercely extinguished, never to rear its ugly head again.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Stan d Mute

    "'The United States died today.'

    No. Not even close. The United States died in 1861. Then it’s stumbling zombie corpse was killed again in 1913."

    Exactly. The rot set in long, long ago.

    And 1920 was the year of its death rattle.

    I don't understand white men vis-à-vis non-whites and women at all. Their attitude and actions become less comprehensible to me as time passes, not more.

  251. @Pericles
    In summary: Too big to jail.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “In summary: Too big to jail.”

    Can’t they build a bigger cell?

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Kylie

    Have you seen her hips?

    Replies: @Kylie

  252. @Realist
    @dfordoom

    "The problem is that when you propose a “meritocracy” what you get is something like the EU."

    I said Meritocracy not Idiotocracy,

    Monarchies are also unelected, and unaccountable.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @ben tillman

    Monarchies are also unelected, and unaccountable.

    Kings have been elected in some times and places. This was common in the middle ages among Germanic tribes and was continued into the Holy Roman Empire.

    From Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince-elector

    The German practice of electing monarchs began when ancient Germanic tribes formed ad hoc coalitions and elected the leaders thereof. Elections were irregularly held by the Franks, whose successor states include France and Germany. The French monarchy eventually became hereditary, but the German monarchy remained elective. While all free men originally exercised the right to vote in such elections, suffrage eventually came to be limited to the leading men of the realm. In the election of Lothar II in 1125, a small number of eminent nobles chose the monarch and then submitted him to the remaining magnates for their approbation.

    Soon, the right to choose the monarch was settled on an exclusive group of princes, and the procedure of seeking the approval of the remaining nobles was abandoned. The college of electors was mentioned in 1152 and again in 1198. The composition of electors at that time is unclear, but appears to have included representatives of the church and the dukes of the four nations of Germany: the Franks (Duchy of Franconia), Swabians (Duchy of Swabia), Saxons (Duchy of Saxony) and Bavarians (Duchy of Bavaria).

  253. @Jack Hanson
    So stupidity is now a criminal defense?

    Replies: @mtn cur

    Yes!

  254. @gda
    @Buffalo Joe

    No one up until now has really emphasized how absolutely extraordinary Coomey's statements were in eviscerating Hillary. Remember - he didn't have to call her an untrustworthy, careless and an incompetent liar time after time. He said things which we would normally NEVER hear the head of the FBI (or equivalent) say about a Presidential nominee outside a courtroom.

    Now imagine if the investigation had proceeded in the "normal" way - that is, if Coomey had made a recommendation to the DOJ and they then turned around and made the political decision we all knew they would. Nothing from Coomey, stonewall from DOJ.

    The Machiavellian machinations of the Clintons know no bounds. Bill took out the AG, making Coomey the sacrificial lamb. Amazing to watch as he managed to cut his own throat while his hands were tied, but not before blackening her reputation forevermore and offering a washload of ammunition to Trump.

    She will need to deal with that, as well as with the backlash from the FBI and the constant fear that Moscow (or any given foreign power you care to name) will either release the 30,000 "private" emails she deleted or use them as blackmail against her.

    It will take a mighty effort by the MSM to make this pig into a princess. Hillary - the first female POTUS without security clearance.

    Oh look. Trump likes Sadaam.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    gda, I like your phrase….”Bill took out the AG while making Comey the sacrificial lamb. Amazing to watch as he cut his own throat with his hands tied.” And so true. Comey is finished, after all he called his possible next boss incompetent, while Lynch may get to hang around ( Lynch-hang, is that racist?) and who knows, Supreme Court nominee?

  255. @PiltdownMan
    So they got Comey to slip the shiv into the process by going beyond his brief and speaking to the merits of prosecutability rather than letting it become a decision by the DoJ prosecutors.

    That makes the issue of Loretta Lynch's suborning by Bill moot, as also avoiding any potential criticism of the administration's impartiality had the DoJ lawyers made the decision not to prosecute.

    Very nicely done.

    After all, James Comey is a standup guy as we all know. Indeed, who could possibly more of a stand up guy than a 6'8" Republican FBI boss?

    Replies: @bomag

    This.

    It works out nicely for certain people…

  256. Here is a true story from a guy I worked with years ago:

    In the mid 70’s, I was working for SDC (System Development Corp.) in Colorado Springs, CO. Our project had to do with developing an operating system for NORAD in the Cheyenne Mountain complex. One day an employee, while removing a classified document from a safe in his office was called to the hall just outside his door. As the safe had been closed, he placed the document on top of the safe and stepped into the hall. An Air Force security officer happened by on a random inspection tour and spotted the document. Even though the employee was just outside the door, he was judged as “losing control” of a classified document. His security clearance was pulled and he was fired on the spot. Too bad his name wasn’t Clinton.

  257. @War for Blair Mountain
    @countenance

    Countenance

    You are among the reasons I have extreme hatred of the fashy Alt Right. To the extent that your enthusiasm for Monarchy...Pinochet....and Franco....the Alt Right must never be supported and encouraged to grow as a movement.

    The US is not a Democracy...in fact it is a Plutocracy-Oligarchy, which has nothing to do with Democracy.


    We had an alternative to your Pinochet-Franco Land Owner Oligarchy in the late 19th-early 20th century labor revolts in the US which gave us such wonderfull things such as the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Sikh Exclusion Act(yes there was a Sikh Exclusion Act to keep the Sikhs out of California).


    Steve


    You really need to let this post go through because the fashy haircut Alt Right really does push some very immoral violently anti-labor forms of top-down political-economic organization.

    Replies: @andy russia, @Cagey Beast, @Pericles, @BB753

    Fair enough, but what you wrote was totally unrelated to Countenance’s actual post.

  258. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @Jack D
    @War for Blair Mountain

    I don't think Asian immigrants are the problem, at least compared to Hispanics. At least they are net contributors. We are probably better off with Asian engineers spending their money and paying taxes over here than having the work outsourced to Asia. It's never going to be 1963 again but that doesn't mean we have to take people with zero skill or potential whose descendants will be a drag on society forever.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    Jack D

    You have reduced the US to an economic proposition “nation”….actually not quite, since you know that the territory in the US that the Chinese and Hindus are carving out for themselves are areas where the White Natives become the racial foreigner. These are areas where the Chinese and Hindu Majorities will make certain that the new racial order of things remains a permanent state of affairs.

    Asian legal immigrants since 1965 are of 0 benefit to the Historic Native White Working Class….0. What’s the benefit of a 20-50 year waiting list to get into the Adirondacks behind millions of Chinese,Hindus, and Sihks in the Tri-state area?

    You claim that we can’t go back to 1963 demographically in the US. That all depends on what the Historic Native White Working Class thinks is in its interests. If there is a will..there is a way….Many things are possible including a 1963 racial demographics in the US.

    I can summarize your point of view as followes:full speed ahead with Asian Racial Identity Politics…but I won’t give permission for Whitey to do the same thing. Well, Whitey doesn’t need your permission.

    Steve

    Let my freaking post go through….

  259. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:

    Steve

    Why won’t you let my response to Pericles go through?

  260. Like Cankles was planning on keeping Comey around, lol.

    I wouldn’t blame the 1965 act. I’d blame uneven global growth rates and the oligarch’s need for cheap labor.

    Nobody can control global growth rates or what oligarchs “need.” We can, however, control our laws and our immigration policies.

  261. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @dfordoom
    @Realist


    Monarchies are also unelected, and unaccountable.
     
    Actually they're not quite unaccountable. A king is very much aware that he has to account to his posterity, to his heirs and to history.

    And kings who have failed have more often than not paid for their failure with their lives.

    Kings are in fact accountable to their subjects. Very few kings have ever lost the confidence of their country and of their subjects and survived as king.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    dforman

    You are using Dark Age Europe as a model to understand 2016. Moreover, we know what how history turned out during this thousand years of historical morphing.

    The Dark-Enlightenment-Alt Right is offering a false choice to The Historic White American Working Class. History has already provided an experiment for the other option:the late 19th -pre-WW2 Nativist White Working Class Labor Movement that terrified White Liberal Academics such as Historian C Van Woodward.

    Dark-Enlightenment-Alt Right is loserism….

  262. I don’t think Asian immigrants are the problem, at least compared to Hispanics. At least they are net contributors. We are probably better off with Asian engineers spending their money and paying taxes over here than having the work outsourced to Asia. It’s never going to be 1963 again but that doesn’t mean we have to take people with zero skill or potential whose descendants will be a drag on society forever.

    I approve of this policy…for Israel.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Svigor

    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/chinese-kaifeng-jews-seek-new-lives-israel-n527876

  263. Here is an interesting take on Comey (http://spectator.org/the-queens-gambit). I would like to think he is this smart.

    • Replies: @guest
    @Jim Don Bob

    That's a good example of retarded Machiavellianism. Surely had Comey recommended prosecution the MSN would've tarred him as a Republican hack, and the new Kenneth Starr. But who cares? The headline "FBI Recommends Clinton Indictment" is worth it. Also, should the Justice Department decline to go through with it, we could say it's because Lynch is a bloody Democrat. That cuts both ways. The MSM won't go along with it, but they never go along with us, anyway

    What did Coney trade for nonaction? The chance on live tv to lay out in excruciating detail Clinton's perfidy. Okay, but was anyone laying attention? Will they remember that, or the headline, "Clinton Cleared by FBI?" Which the public will interpret as Clinton Innocent, or at least We'll Never Know for Sure, But All Politicians Are Crooked, Aren't They?

    I wouldn't trade all the tea in China for a chance at having the head of the FBI recommend the opposition's candidate go to jail after for all intents and purposes it's too late to run a replacement. That's a political gift from God. You don't trade it for a chance to nudge-nudge, wink-wink the nation into believing she's guilty although you won't bring her in because...she's Clinton.

    It could've been worse. He didn't have to make it so obvious. But there's no secret gambit. Or if there is, it won't work. This is not a Pyrrhic victory for Clinton. It's a plain, old victory, and a huge one.

  264. @War for Blair Mountain
    @JohnnyWalker123

    You are missing the crucial point. The demographics of legal immigrants was changed by the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act...this was front and center in the debate. And everyone was reassured by Ted Kennedy that there was nothing to worry about Whites would still remain a majority into the future.


    But when Greedy White Male CEOs such as the psychopathically greedy Gruman Corp Execs who had large homes in Fiddlers Green Llyod Neck....down the road from Caumsett State Park.....figured out the wealth transferring dimension of nonwhite legal immigants they lobbied for massive increases Asian Legal Immigrant Engineers.


    The passage of The 1965 Immigration Act was the funadamental policy transformation that had to take place first.

    One of the very nasty consequences of the passage of The 1965 Immigration Reform Act was that it allowed for an increase in the Asian population in the US...this small expeditionary force of Asians was a powerful political force that used it's wealth to buy political influence. All Asian SUNY Stony Brook....on 25 a hundred yards west of Renaisance Technology Hedge Fund....was the consequence.



    What should have happened in 1965 was the defeat of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act +an implementation of a National Origins Immigration Policy that excluded all nonwhites. This would have been the ticket to prevent the post-1965 racial transformation of the US.


    Just keep this in mind:the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act was a direct consequence of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act for Blacks....Which was a direct consequence of integrating the US Military....and this was a direct consequence of the Cold War-Anti-Commie Crusade(A Hamilton College Professor of History wrote an extensively documented book about this....he gave a two hour talk about this on a Cspan during the book festival week).


    Steve


    You gotta let this post go through since johnnywalker123 raises a very serious question that deserves a serious answer.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JohnnyWalker123

    Sure, but you do realize the immigration from Latin America was uncapped until 1965? If not for the 1965 act, we’d have an open border with every country in the Western hemisphere.

    The 1965 act had nothing to do with the surge of Latinos or Carribbeans into the U.S

    Also, Asian immigration has been driven very high by the expansion of H1b visas in the 90s, as well as post-Vietnam refugee programs.
    .

  265. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:

    Johnny Walker123

    The passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act provided the ideological Civil Rights Zeitgiest for the subsequent increases in nonwhite legal immigrants. Law School Constitutional liberal Scholars are already busy making the Constitutional legal case against a return to a National Origins Immigration Policy. These Creatures reared their ugly heads when Trump called for a temporary ban on Muslim Legal Immigrants. The ideological zeitgeist of the passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act was to make it a Policy mandate to radically change the racial demographics of the US in a way that reduces Whitey to a violently persecuted racial minority in the US. The Obama Administration feels it has a mandate to import nonwhites into White Suburban Communities across the US.

    The Zeitgeist of the passage of The 1965 Immigration Reform Act has become the National Religion for the MEGA-CEO owners of the Democratic Party and the nonwhite Democratic Party Voting Bloc which understands this obvious framing of the National Origins in the US the moment they step off a large passenger jet at JFK International Airport in NYC…and they understand this framing of the National Question when they make arrangements to come to the US through post-1965 family reunification policy.

    Oh yeah…The Bracero Program…

  266. @The most deplorable one
    Is this a lesson in revenge?

    http://christiantimesnewspaper.com/breaking-romanian-hacker-with-access-to-clinton-emails-found-dead-in-jail-cell/

    Replies: @grapesoda

  267. @Svigor

    I don’t think Asian immigrants are the problem, at least compared to Hispanics. At least they are net contributors. We are probably better off with Asian engineers spending their money and paying taxes over here than having the work outsourced to Asia. It’s never going to be 1963 again but that doesn’t mean we have to take people with zero skill or potential whose descendants will be a drag on society forever.
     
    I approve of this policy...for Israel.

    Replies: @Jack D

  268. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @Marcus
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Reagan eviscerated the middle and lower classes like no one before him, but they voted for him in large numbers due to his lovable grandpa act and patriotic rhetoric. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joseph-a-palermo/the-reagan-centennial-cel_b_819163.html

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Marcus

    I want to get your opinion about a very serious raging historical debate.

    Did Nancy Reagan lovingly rub black oxford shoe polish into Ronnie’s La Brea Tar Pit Black slicked back hair very morning….or…did Nancy Reagan rub turpentine lovingly into Ronnie’s hair every morning before the morning watering in the Oval Office every day?

    We had a bona fide potted plant for a POTUS from 1981-1989.

    • Agree: Marcus
  269. @The Alarmist
    @Stan Adams


    "In the end, Janet Reno declined to prosecute. [John Deutch's] security clearances were revoked."
     
    Yes, but the access of a sitting President will not be rvoked, and she have the final say as to who is on the Kill List. Paybacks are a bitch, Osama bin Donald.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    How ironic that, back in the ’70s, DownHillary cut her political teeth on the Watergate Committee working to take down President Nixon.

    Over-the-Hillary makes good ol’ Tricky Dick look like a Boy Scout.

  270. Yes to the notion that the Cold War, and the US/Western responses to it, i.e. fighting the challenge of monoculture Soviet inspired Third World nationalism with rather decadent multiculturalism that put Third Worlders first over native Westerners, as the main driver for where we are at. Of course other things mattered, including but not limited to the pill, condom, anonymous urban living making women disconnected and not really dependent on male peers and husbands, with late marriage if it all leading to a lifetime of female complaints about the quality of their men. And mass media catering to the lowest common denominator of female gripes about their men, and being the Church of Multiculturalism to fight Soviet Third World Monoculture nationalism (think Commie Cuba or Vietnam).

    BUT, and its a big BUT … the Soviets WERE a threat, not the least to the power and money of the elites; and defense spending like under Reagan put a LOT of Blue Collar Whites and Middle Class Whites to work. That’s why Clinton killed that spending for the Peace Dividend which meant the money went from middle/working class Whites to Upper Class ones studying feminism or deconstructionism or whatnot.

    This was the problem with the Roman Republic in the later days. They had too many wars all the time, and emergency dictator powers handed to people like Caesar ended up being permanent. The Swiss solved that problem by creating a federated military, dependent on the local cantons, but then they had the advantage of living in the most defensible place in Europe.

    It tends to be the case that ONLY when real enemies who have the real power to overthrow elites do elites then make common cause with their people; otherwise they hate and despise them and prefer foreigners constantly.

  271. @Svigor
    http://www.frontpagemag.com/point/263408/fbi-hillary-lied-and-illegally-sent-classified-daniel-greenfield

    Coomey:

    Although we did not find clear evidence that Secretary Clinton or her colleagues intended to violate laws governing the handling of classified information, there is evidence that they were extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.
     
    "'extremely careless' in her handling of 'very sensitive, highly classified information.'"

    Trump should write that down on an index card and use it as a prop in the debates. In fact, he should carry it with him from now until the polls close on election day, and he should make a show of pulling it out and reading from it every time he talks about Hillary. The idea being, that these are Hussein's FBI director's words, and he wants to make sure he gets the quotes right every time.

    He should call her "extremely careless" Hillary from now on. His catchphrase can be "Obama's FBI director said she was extremely careless with very sensitive, highly classified information." Then he can say, "wait, here, let me quote Obama's FBI director, to make sure I've got that right," and read from the card. Then wrap up with "Secretary Clinton is too crooked and incompetent to be PotUS. She's too crooked and incompetent to be the president of Venezuela."

    Replies: @Olorin

    That quote is chilling.

    It is framed rhetorically as two things in relative apposition. “Although A…B.”

    It is in fact two separate sentences/concepts:

    1) “We did not find evidence” of intent (which could well be deliberate).

    2) “There is evidence” of mishandling very sensitive highly classified information.

    A friend tells me that when he was in crypto school for his branch of the military, it was explained to him that he could do jail time for mangling or misplacing any page in his thick series of training manuals. Including the one that said “This page intentionally left blank.”

    Of course he was one of the Little People.

    Also third in line to be destroyed if his ship were captured (after the codebooks were thrown overboard, weighted, and the machines were destroyed, the captain would then shoot him in the head).

    Of course they didn’t tell him that in crypto school.

  272. @War for Blair Mountain
    @Dave Pinsen

    Your wrong and here is why:

    During the Reagan Years the Democrats were still pulling in large numbers of White Working Class Blue Collar types to keep the Democratic Party Viable. My brother had his wedding reception at the big Holloday Inn Buffalo. The White Guys at the service desk...car jockeys...maintenance were laid off steel workers. They had violent hatred of Reagan. Which is not to say that Blue Collar White Guys were not voting for Reagan. We are talking about shifting percentages. Reagan didn't deliver a fatal blow to the Democratic Party. But the Reagan Administration did deliver a fatal death blow to a large and healthy Majority Blue Collar White Union Movement...

    Replies: @Marcus, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Your reply is the most pathetic response to a post since I last saw a Tiny Dick, Suck Dick or no-dick Nick Diaz post. You cite the sentiments of a gaggle of Luddites from a wedding to support your position?

    Stay on the porch Spanky.

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Charles Erwin Wilson


    It's a pathetic-lame responses to you because you heart and soul...that's if creatures like you have a soul...are completely aligned with the Greedy Cheating Mega-CEOs. These were Native Born White American Men with families to support.

    By the way, economic nationalist Donald Trump has talked about bringing American Steel back.


    I make no apologies for being an Economic Nationalist and a White Nationalist.


    Give me real life working class stories about the consequences of globalized labor markets(neo-liberal-economics)any day of the year over the mountains of intellectual and mathematical sewage know as econometrics.


    Steve


    Let this freaking post go through....and let my other responses go through that are now currently be held in is isteve.com limbo....

    Replies: @Marcus

  273. @Marcus
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Reagan eviscerated the middle and lower classes like no one before him, but they voted for him in large numbers due to his lovable grandpa act and patriotic rhetoric. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joseph-a-palermo/the-reagan-centennial-cel_b_819163.html

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Thanks for poking your head up out of the fever swamps. Your reference is the Huffington Post? No bias there, right? When your temperature drops below 105 degrees Fahrenheit please try again.

    • Replies: @Marcus
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    It's all verifiable. Some of it began under Carter, but Reagan really started the transformation of the US into a Latin American country by transferring wealth from the middle and lower classes to an unaccountable plutocracy intent on maximizing its profits at all costs (including immigration and outsourcing): the US was a creditor nation with a huge middle class and a trade surplus before his administration, it probably never will be again. http://www.exile.ru/print.php?ARTICLE_ID=7362&IBLOCK_ID=35

  274. @Kylie
    @Pericles

    "In summary: Too big to jail."

    Can't they build a bigger cell?

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Have you seen her hips?

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Point taken.

    She doesn't need a bigger cell. She needs a gulag.

  275. @whorefinder
    @Rob McX


    It would make you yearn for the days of J Edgar Hoover, who was determined never to let politicians interfere in his work. He gets a lot of bad press these days, but a lot of it is just because he was determined to keep the FBI completely independent.

     

    Except Hoover was determined to keep the very existence of the Mafia secret. Heck, in the 1940s he enlisted the Mafia into capturing German spies and saboteurs on American soil, and then refused up until the 1960s to admit they existed or go after them. It took the Kefauver Hearings and the Mclellan Hearings (with Joe Valachi squealing in detail) and RFK going after his family's enemies before Hoover finally gave up the ghost and admitted organized crime existed.

    Hoover made his bones going after lone psychos in the 1930s such as Dillinger, and got big headlines, despite barely being able to catch them. But he made sure the FBI carefully avoided any organized group with power. His failure to catch most of the commies who infiltrated Hollywood and the federal government is pretty darning proof he was incompetent at anything more than catching a flashy lone bank robber.

    In short, the FBI has been rotten going back to the start. Just very good with their image.

    Replies: @guest

    One thing I can say for Hoover is that I think he, or at least his organization, was behind McCarthy. That is to say, they leaked him the dirt on the 57 (or whatever) names. Though McCarthy failed spectacularly, that was the one, true backlash against the Progressive (i.e. communist) State since WWI, or before. Certainly since the New Deal, which killed the Republic.

    The unfortunate part was how they focused on foreign elements infiltrating our government. Really, it was the other way around. Our guys helped establish the Soviet Union, then tried to remold us in its image.

  276. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Marcus

    Thanks for poking your head up out of the fever swamps. Your reference is the Huffington Post? No bias there, right? When your temperature drops below 105 degrees Fahrenheit please try again.

    Replies: @Marcus

    It’s all verifiable. Some of it began under Carter, but Reagan really started the transformation of the US into a Latin American country by transferring wealth from the middle and lower classes to an unaccountable plutocracy intent on maximizing its profits at all costs (including immigration and outsourcing): the US was a creditor nation with a huge middle class and a trade surplus before his administration, it probably never will be again. http://www.exile.ru/print.php?ARTICLE_ID=7362&IBLOCK_ID=35

  277. @tbraton
    @res

    "One thing confuses me. Why is the FBI making a judgment on what a reasonable prosecutor would do? It seems to me the FBI would be more focused on determining the facts of the case while leaving the prosecutor’s decision to the … prosecutor. "

    Exactly. Actually, there were two things about Comey's decision that stood out for me. First, by citing the absence of intention, he basically rewrote the statute that requires merely "gross negligence." Secondly, as you point out, he was making a decision that a prosecutor normally makes. While Comey was a former prosecutor as U.S. Attorney for NY, he is not now a prosecutor. The fact that Obama planned travel to NC to campaign with Hillary yesterday indicates that Comey must have been coordinating his decision with the White House. I wonder whether criticism of the FBI's role in the recent Orlando mass slaying played any role in this. Since he essentially laid out the case for prosecuting Hillary, Comey should have recommended prosecution and left it up to the lawyers at the DOJ to make the decision not to prosecute, instead of making that decision himself.

    Replies: @guest

    But he couldn’t leave it up to the DOJ because it’s run by a person with the wrong gender, skin color, and political background. The decision not to prosecute had to be delivered by a white, male Republican to demonstrate that it’s non-partisan, beyond politics, or whatever it is they’re calling it these days. Why Comey went along with it, who knows? Maybe he’s one of those stupid, ” for the sake of the Republic” people.

  278. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots). Kings are as beholden to idea men and advisors as any democratically-elected leader, see the various Rasputins of history. But the Church prevented undue influence of religiously foreign agents, which then appears as an ethnic line-in-the-sand. Without a doubt the United States’ democracy (/oligarchy) would be better off without overreaching Saudi, Turkish, and Israeli influences — those that might have been prevented by Church interference — but the nostalgia for aristocracy misses the importance of a strong religion.

    Could we ever get back to that level of religious intrusion and would we want to? I suspect poverty, circumscribed lives, and particularly child mortality rates played in to the centrality of church doctrine. People needed belief in the afterlife and religious purpose. Most of us, the fortunate of today, cannot generate that fervor from the comfort of our couch. And without an overriding check on a monarch, we’re back to the usual problems of corruption, undue influence, and narcissistic leaders.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Antonymous


    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots)
     
    These are not mutually exclusive. Religion was one element of the traditions that limited a monarch's power.

    Another important factor - the upbringing and the character of the rulers. Hereditary, ruling monarchs, being born into their positions and viewing their countries to a certain extent as their patrimonies (inherited from ancestors, to be handed down to descendants) will naturally be different types of people than those who come to power through elections. The latter process involves manipulation, selling (lying? though with a free press, not ridiculously so), appealing to the average. Elected rulers may be smarter and more ambitious, but also nastier with a higher likelihood of having psychopathic traits.

    It should be noted that a traditional central European monarchic system differed further down, also. Nobles were essentially a service class, working hard as administrators, officers, etc. (it was not a closed system - commoners could be made nobles if they distinguished themselves).

    Replies: @Antonymous, @scrivener3

    , @ben tillman
    @Antonymous


    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots).
     
    Absolutely, and this is a point Brian Tierney makes in The Crisis of Church and State 1050-1300.

    https://www.amazon.com/Crisis-Church-State-1050-1300-documents/dp/0802067018
  279. @Jim Don Bob
    Here is an interesting take on Comey (http://spectator.org/the-queens-gambit). I would like to think he is this smart.

    Replies: @guest

    That’s a good example of retarded Machiavellianism. Surely had Comey recommended prosecution the MSN would’ve tarred him as a Republican hack, and the new Kenneth Starr. But who cares? The headline “FBI Recommends Clinton Indictment” is worth it. Also, should the Justice Department decline to go through with it, we could say it’s because Lynch is a bloody Democrat. That cuts both ways. The MSM won’t go along with it, but they never go along with us, anyway

    What did Coney trade for nonaction? The chance on live tv to lay out in excruciating detail Clinton’s perfidy. Okay, but was anyone laying attention? Will they remember that, or the headline, “Clinton Cleared by FBI?” Which the public will interpret as Clinton Innocent, or at least We’ll Never Know for Sure, But All Politicians Are Crooked, Aren’t They?

    I wouldn’t trade all the tea in China for a chance at having the head of the FBI recommend the opposition’s candidate go to jail after for all intents and purposes it’s too late to run a replacement. That’s a political gift from God. You don’t trade it for a chance to nudge-nudge, wink-wink the nation into believing she’s guilty although you won’t bring her in because…she’s Clinton.

    It could’ve been worse. He didn’t have to make it so obvious. But there’s no secret gambit. Or if there is, it won’t work. This is not a Pyrrhic victory for Clinton. It’s a plain, old victory, and a huge one.

  280. I have little to add to the chorus, except to say that I saw my original career torpedoed on the merest suspicion of far less. That this country has devolved into a feckless banana republic is a point that needn’t be belabored.

  281. @Bugg
    @Mr. Anon

    2 things in recent history should give us all great pause about the Famous But Incompetent:
    1. Summer of 2001 -they had 20th hijacker Zaccarias Mossoaui and his computer with the 9/11 plot on it in custody.There was intelligence that a big plot was afoot, even with Gorelick's Wall, known to all. Instead of looking at said computer and interrogating the living daylights out of him, the Minnesota FBI field office, after much pointless discussion and angst, wrote a long pointless memo.
    2. The official story of the Tsarnaev brothers is simply an embarrassment from beginning to end.

    The agency lost it's footing after things shifted from going after Italian mobsters to terrorism. And even there, among and between the messes they made with mob informants like Whitey Bulger and Greg Scarpa,they weren't quite all that even then.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    “2. The official story of the Tsarnaev brothers is simply an embarrassment from beginning to end. ”
    I have suspicions that the Tsarnaevs might have been cultivated as entrapment targets by the feds, except the bomb brothers played the FBI and turned the fake “bomb-plot” into a real one. That might explain the cops-gone-wild over-the-top manhunt for them, and the fact that one of thier pals ended up getting interrogated to death in his living room. The way the FBI handled the aftermath rather smacked of a cover-up.

  282. AP says:
    @Auntie Analogue
    @Twinkie


    "I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the 'enlightened' dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I."

     

    My dear Twinkie, Mr. Derbyshire's reply to your sentiment was spot on.

    It's a pity my late Slovak grandparents - all four of them - are not here for you to ask them how much they enjoyed their hardscrabble existence in virtual slavery under the oppressive Hungarian end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, whose rulers forbade schooling in my grandparents' language; forced schooling only in Hungarian; forcibly conscripted Slovaks into the army (my childhood parish here in the U.S. had old men who'd been conscripted into WWI service in the Central Powers' Austro-Hungarian Army); and enforced rigorous discrimination against Slovaks in education, employment, promotion, property ownership, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, political and civil service officeholding (for the lower orders of which the Hungarians interposed Jews to insulate their aristocratic selves from the Slovaks, thus deflecting Slovak protest away from the Hungarian monarchy into Slovak anti-Semitism), and in countless other ugly ways.

    The current strain of alt-right-trad romanticism for monarchy is frightfully myopic. Monarchy is a crapshoot, and there's just one thing you should know about craps: its odds are stacked overwhelmingly with the house.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Rob McX, @avraham, @AP

    What you described was awful, but:

    1. By losing Austria-Hungary, central Europe instead dealt with the Nazi nightmare for a few years, followed by decades of Bolshevism. It wasn’t a happy story.

    2. Austria-Hungary had been changing, albeit in an evolutionary rather than revolutionary direction. The situation you described would not have lasted.

    3. Hungary was much more repressive than Austria; Slovaks unfortunately were on the wrong side of the dual monarchy.

    Robert Musil wrote very nicely about Austria-Hungary:

    https://musilreader.wordpress.com/tag/kakania/

  283. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Kylie

    Have you seen her hips?

    Replies: @Kylie

    Point taken.

    She doesn’t need a bigger cell. She needs a gulag.

  284. AP says:
    @Antonymous
    @Twinkie

    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots). Kings are as beholden to idea men and advisors as any democratically-elected leader, see the various Rasputins of history. But the Church prevented undue influence of religiously foreign agents, which then appears as an ethnic line-in-the-sand. Without a doubt the United States' democracy (/oligarchy) would be better off without overreaching Saudi, Turkish, and Israeli influences -- those that might have been prevented by Church interference -- but the nostalgia for aristocracy misses the importance of a strong religion.

    Could we ever get back to that level of religious intrusion and would we want to? I suspect poverty, circumscribed lives, and particularly child mortality rates played in to the centrality of church doctrine. People needed belief in the afterlife and religious purpose. Most of us, the fortunate of today, cannot generate that fervor from the comfort of our couch. And without an overriding check on a monarch, we're back to the usual problems of corruption, undue influence, and narcissistic leaders.

    Replies: @AP, @ben tillman

    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots)

    These are not mutually exclusive. Religion was one element of the traditions that limited a monarch’s power.

    Another important factor – the upbringing and the character of the rulers. Hereditary, ruling monarchs, being born into their positions and viewing their countries to a certain extent as their patrimonies (inherited from ancestors, to be handed down to descendants) will naturally be different types of people than those who come to power through elections. The latter process involves manipulation, selling (lying? though with a free press, not ridiculously so), appealing to the average. Elected rulers may be smarter and more ambitious, but also nastier with a higher likelihood of having psychopathic traits.

    It should be noted that a traditional central European monarchic system differed further down, also. Nobles were essentially a service class, working hard as administrators, officers, etc. (it was not a closed system – commoners could be made nobles if they distinguished themselves).

    • Replies: @Antonymous
    @AP


    "European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots)"

    These are not mutually exclusive. Religion was one element of the traditions that limited a monarch’s power.

    Another important factor – the upbringing and the character of the rulers. Hereditary, ruling monarchs, being born into their positions and viewing their countries to a certain extent as their patrimonies (inherited from ancestors, to be handed down to descendants) will naturally be different types of people than those who come to power through elections.
     
    I agree with you and should have included the word "just" -- monarchies were not just kept in check by blood and soil. But patrimony is weak sauce for binding a people over centuries, too likely to be rationalized away unless there's an external check (like the church). See the expansionist empires of Denmark, Spain, and the Hapsburgs into European lands. Blood and soil becomes quite a different thing in an empire, partic. when the royals have intermarried extensively (nearly every royal house has German or Austrian blood). The Church served as bulwark against aristocratic excesses -- ultimately the Hapsburg dynasty funded and expanded western enlightenment culture, but much of the music, architecture, and learning was based on religious themes.

    I look at our aristocratic equivalent, the Bushes and other founding WASPs, selling their patrimony (and ours) for self-interest and globalist kudos. How would this differ under a non-democratic system? How do monarchic empires differ from an EU-type situation with minimal representation and no meaningful dissent? There must be an equally powerful check on hereditary dynasties or the first "cuck" king (or Merkel) can send the country spiraling.

    Replies: @AP

    , @scrivener3
    @AP

    I don;t care if I live under a limited monarchy (like certain times in Great Britain), a limited Republic, like early US, a limited democracy (don't know if that is workable) or government by people chosen by lot, if limited in powers.

    Government uses legitimate force, up to and including deadly force, It causes people to do things against their best judgement and will. If you believe people are bad and would do evil selfish things unless restrained in almost all areas by force, then you need a strong unlimited government, but you get the problem of why the people running the government are not bad also.

    For example, the rationale for forcing people into social security is that people would squander their retirement while young and be left with not enough when old. Now, the politicians have take n stupendous sums from us in the name of planning better for our future . . . and squandered it all while the program was young.

  285. AP says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    @John Derbyshire

    Francis Ferdinand had plans for an Austria-Hungary-Serbia, although that would have left out the Poles and other minorities. I think the advocates of Greater Serbia targeted him for assassination because they feared that his solution would defuse their own grievances against the Hapsburgs. How to govern a multi-racial, polyglot empire is very tricky and it's sad to see that Dual Monarchy models have to be considered for the United States.

    Replies: @AP

    He proposed not an Austria-Hungary-Serbia but an Austria-Hungary-Slavia. Apparently, he had been making plans to have troops ready to crush a Hungarian uprising, had the Hungarians objected to giving up their grip on the Slavs whom they ruled after he declared the state’s new form. He was killed by a Serb extremist who preferred a greater Serbia rather than a multiethnic Hapsburg state. So the Slavophile was murdered by the Serb.

    Karl basically followed Franz-Ferdinand’s plan, but because the country was at war, internal military conflict with Hungary was impossible, so improvement for the Slavs stuck in Hungary was put on hold. The Czechs, Poles, Slovenes and Ukrainians were set for autonomy on the other hand.

    History showed that it was better to be part of a second-tier Great Power than individual tiny states. The latter were inevitably dominated by Berlin and Moscow much more totally than they had been by Vienna.

  286. @ATX Hipster
    @Anonym

    Except for the 'great generals' bit, spot on.

    Replies: @Anonym

    Except for the ‘great generals’ bit, spot on.

    I can’t for the life of me find it, but I was quoting what I thought I read on here.

    “America is defended by two great generals, General Atlantic and General Pacific.”

    I did not mean that the USA has great generals, just that the US is very fortunate it doesn’t find itself in a position where it is right next to another neighbor of similar size with a credible army.

  287. @guest
    @PhysicistDave

    Did you ever wonder why Biden never was president, as long as he's been around? He tried before, you know, and failed. I don't see why he'd be so successful now, except that Trump is unpredictable and could crash and burn. Uncle Joe only got to be VP as a consolation prize and because Obama was woefully inexperienced. It's not because he had any chance of being elected president himself.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    guest wrote to me:

    Did you ever wonder why Biden never was president, as long as he’s been around? He tried before, you know, and failed. I don’t see why he’d be so successful now, except that Trump is unpredictable and could crash and burn.

    Yeah, Biden’s not very good as a campaigner. But, the media would have fallen all over themselves to portray him as the Savior that would save us from our deep national tragedy.

    In short, Biden needed a miracle: DOJ indicting Hillary.

    But, Comey short-circuited that. And, so, Trump has a chance.

    Indicting Hillary would have been the best chance Biden has ever had, and the Dems’ best bet to hold the White House this year.

    I still think Comey is slime, but this is the best outcome for Trump.

    Dave

    • Replies: @guest
    @PhysicistDave

    "Indicting Hillary would have been the best chance Biden has ever had"

    True.

  288. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Your reply is the most pathetic response to a post since I last saw a Tiny Dick, Suck Dick or no-dick Nick Diaz post. You cite the sentiments of a gaggle of Luddites from a wedding to support your position?

    Stay on the porch Spanky.

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    Charles Erwin Wilson

    It’s a pathetic-lame responses to you because you heart and soul…that’s if creatures like you have a soul…are completely aligned with the Greedy Cheating Mega-CEOs. These were Native Born White American Men with families to support.

    By the way, economic nationalist Donald Trump has talked about bringing American Steel back.

    I make no apologies for being an Economic Nationalist and a White Nationalist.

    Give me real life working class stories about the consequences of globalized labor markets(neo-liberal-economics)any day of the year over the mountains of intellectual and mathematical sewage know as econometrics.

    Steve

    Let this freaking post go through….and let my other responses go through that are now currently be held in is isteve.com limbo….

    • Replies: @Marcus
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Before Reagan, business owners felt a sense of responsibility to the community as a whole, and even if they had other ideas, there were strong deterrent. Wages were reasonable, healthcare easily available and things like outsourcing and downsizing were unheard of. After 1981, profit motive was promoted as the greatest good, and Repugnican cronies were put in charge of regulatory agencies, hence we were deindustrialized and became a debtor nation with a permanent black hole in the form of a bloated military budget. A major reason why we can't defend ourselves now is the sense of community and social responsibility was annihilated in the 80s.

  289. @AP
    @Antonymous


    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots)
     
    These are not mutually exclusive. Religion was one element of the traditions that limited a monarch's power.

    Another important factor - the upbringing and the character of the rulers. Hereditary, ruling monarchs, being born into their positions and viewing their countries to a certain extent as their patrimonies (inherited from ancestors, to be handed down to descendants) will naturally be different types of people than those who come to power through elections. The latter process involves manipulation, selling (lying? though with a free press, not ridiculously so), appealing to the average. Elected rulers may be smarter and more ambitious, but also nastier with a higher likelihood of having psychopathic traits.

    It should be noted that a traditional central European monarchic system differed further down, also. Nobles were essentially a service class, working hard as administrators, officers, etc. (it was not a closed system - commoners could be made nobles if they distinguished themselves).

    Replies: @Antonymous, @scrivener3

    “European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots)”

    These are not mutually exclusive. Religion was one element of the traditions that limited a monarch’s power.

    Another important factor – the upbringing and the character of the rulers. Hereditary, ruling monarchs, being born into their positions and viewing their countries to a certain extent as their patrimonies (inherited from ancestors, to be handed down to descendants) will naturally be different types of people than those who come to power through elections.

    I agree with you and should have included the word “just” — monarchies were not just kept in check by blood and soil. But patrimony is weak sauce for binding a people over centuries, too likely to be rationalized away unless there’s an external check (like the church). See the expansionist empires of Denmark, Spain, and the Hapsburgs into European lands. Blood and soil becomes quite a different thing in an empire, partic. when the royals have intermarried extensively (nearly every royal house has German or Austrian blood). The Church served as bulwark against aristocratic excesses — ultimately the Hapsburg dynasty funded and expanded western enlightenment culture, but much of the music, architecture, and learning was based on religious themes.

    I look at our aristocratic equivalent, the Bushes and other founding WASPs, selling their patrimony (and ours) for self-interest and globalist kudos. How would this differ under a non-democratic system? How do monarchic empires differ from an EU-type situation with minimal representation and no meaningful dissent? There must be an equally powerful check on hereditary dynasties or the first “cuck” king (or Merkel) can send the country spiraling.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Antonymous

    Traditional monarchies and aristocracies were opposed to nationalism. The original conservative vs. liberal conflict pitted Church and Aristocracy (conservatives) vs. the People (liberals). The later group ultimately won and took over the world, and then split into class-based (socialism) vs. nation-based populism (nationalism). Since the remnants of the aristocracy could find a place for themselves within nationalism, in intact monarchies such as Russia or Germany they tended to try to appropriate nationalism for themselves, rather than fight this modern idea that got such a grip on the masses.

    Austria-Hungary's territory did not correspond to what could be a considered a modern nation, and it retained the elements of the old pre-nationalist conservative cultural plurality. This was different from modern multiculturalism, which tends to blend all cultures together. Instead in emphasized local traditions (and aristocracies), bound by feudalistic, bureaucratic and Church ties.

    Replies: @AP

  290. @AP
    @Antonymous


    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots)
     
    These are not mutually exclusive. Religion was one element of the traditions that limited a monarch's power.

    Another important factor - the upbringing and the character of the rulers. Hereditary, ruling monarchs, being born into their positions and viewing their countries to a certain extent as their patrimonies (inherited from ancestors, to be handed down to descendants) will naturally be different types of people than those who come to power through elections. The latter process involves manipulation, selling (lying? though with a free press, not ridiculously so), appealing to the average. Elected rulers may be smarter and more ambitious, but also nastier with a higher likelihood of having psychopathic traits.

    It should be noted that a traditional central European monarchic system differed further down, also. Nobles were essentially a service class, working hard as administrators, officers, etc. (it was not a closed system - commoners could be made nobles if they distinguished themselves).

    Replies: @Antonymous, @scrivener3

    I don;t care if I live under a limited monarchy (like certain times in Great Britain), a limited Republic, like early US, a limited democracy (don’t know if that is workable) or government by people chosen by lot, if limited in powers.

    Government uses legitimate force, up to and including deadly force, It causes people to do things against their best judgement and will. If you believe people are bad and would do evil selfish things unless restrained in almost all areas by force, then you need a strong unlimited government, but you get the problem of why the people running the government are not bad also.

    For example, the rationale for forcing people into social security is that people would squander their retirement while young and be left with not enough when old. Now, the politicians have take n stupendous sums from us in the name of planning better for our future . . . and squandered it all while the program was young.

  291. @Cagey Beast
    @War for Blair Mountain

    You're quite right, the Alt-Right posturing about dead dictators and pan-White imperialism is annoying and childish. I'm also really sick of their jokes about WW2 and Latin American concentration camps and torture. It's more noise from the weirdo teen, prank caller demographic that makes up their keyboard foot soldiers. That comically self-sabotaging Republican media consultant who looks like Elmer Fudd was right about that at least. The Real Rick Wilson or something?

    Replies: @andy russia, @TheJester

    As a long-standing student of history, my conclusion is that political leaders need to be accessed regarding whether they were the right people for their time and circumstances rather than fit an idealized model or expectation.

    In the early Soviet era, it was a contest between Stalin and Trotsky. Stalin wanted to cut deals with Western industrial powers to develop (primarily) Russia, Ukraine, and the oil fields of Buku. Trotsky was willing to sacrifice the Soviet republics in the pursuit of permanent, world-wide revolution under the Dictatorship of the Proletariat (which he wanted to lead). Who was the lesser of two evils in the post-Lenin era?

    In the post WWI-era, it was a contest between the Nazis and the Communists in Germany (lest not forget the latter wanted to take the globalist Soviet revolution to Berlin, Paris, and London). Would it have been better for Western Civilization if the atheistic, corporatist Communists had won and taken the revolution to Paris and London?

    In Spain, it was a context between the Catholic Church and landowners against the (sometime) alliance between the anarchists and Communists. Would it have been better for Spain for the anarchists and/or Communists to have won?

    What is best must often be assessed in terms of what is practical and possible given the circumstances rather than an idealized utopia (which unfortunately usually turns into a bloody dystopia)?

  292. @PhysicistDave
    @guest

    guest wrote to me:


    Did you ever wonder why Biden never was president, as long as he’s been around? He tried before, you know, and failed. I don’t see why he’d be so successful now, except that Trump is unpredictable and could crash and burn.
     
    Yeah, Biden's not very good as a campaigner. But, the media would have fallen all over themselves to portray him as the Savior that would save us from our deep national tragedy.

    In short, Biden needed a miracle: DOJ indicting Hillary.

    But, Comey short-circuited that. And, so, Trump has a chance.

    Indicting Hillary would have been the best chance Biden has ever had, and the Dems' best bet to hold the White House this year.

    I still think Comey is slime, but this is the best outcome for Trump.

    Dave

    Replies: @guest

    “Indicting Hillary would have been the best chance Biden has ever had”

    True.

  293. @Stan d Mute
    @rod1963


    The United States died today.
     
    No. Not even close. The United States died in 1861. Then it's stumbling zombie corpse was killed again in 1913.

    And for those surprised at Comey's corruption, need I remind you the FBI has long been simply a bagman/hit squad for the political elites? Ruby Ridge? Waco? OK City? TWA 800? 9/11? LaVoy Finicum? And this hardly even scratches the surface. There was the briefest flicker of integrity with ABSCAM, but the scent of truth was so odious and terrifying in DC that the impulse to pursue it was fiercely extinguished, never to rear its ugly head again.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “‘The United States died today.’

    No. Not even close. The United States died in 1861. Then it’s stumbling zombie corpse was killed again in 1913.”

    Exactly. The rot set in long, long ago.

    And 1920 was the year of its death rattle.

    I don’t understand white men vis-à-vis non-whites and women at all. Their attitude and actions become less comprehensible to me as time passes, not more.

  294. @War for Blair Mountain
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Charles Erwin Wilson


    It's a pathetic-lame responses to you because you heart and soul...that's if creatures like you have a soul...are completely aligned with the Greedy Cheating Mega-CEOs. These were Native Born White American Men with families to support.

    By the way, economic nationalist Donald Trump has talked about bringing American Steel back.


    I make no apologies for being an Economic Nationalist and a White Nationalist.


    Give me real life working class stories about the consequences of globalized labor markets(neo-liberal-economics)any day of the year over the mountains of intellectual and mathematical sewage know as econometrics.


    Steve


    Let this freaking post go through....and let my other responses go through that are now currently be held in is isteve.com limbo....

    Replies: @Marcus

    Before Reagan, business owners felt a sense of responsibility to the community as a whole, and even if they had other ideas, there were strong deterrent. Wages were reasonable, healthcare easily available and things like outsourcing and downsizing were unheard of. After 1981, profit motive was promoted as the greatest good, and Repugnican cronies were put in charge of regulatory agencies, hence we were deindustrialized and became a debtor nation with a permanent black hole in the form of a bloated military budget. A major reason why we can’t defend ourselves now is the sense of community and social responsibility was annihilated in the 80s.

  295. @Twinkie
    @countenance


    And people why I’m a neoreactionary and a hereditary monarchist. It’s because we were told that democratic republicanism meant rule of law and not rule of men. Well, we wound up getting both at the same time anyway.
     
    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy - I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the "enlightened" dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of "their" patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    Replies: @Patrick Harris, @pepperinmono, @John Derbyshire, @Hacienda, @countenance, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Barnard, @pepperinmono, @Auntie Analogue, @Captain Tripps, @Antonymous, @Johann Ricke

    As a committed (small r) republican, I used to scoff at people who claimed to be hereditary monarchists in this day and age. But no longer. I am increasingly amenable to monarchy – I think it was very unfortunate and tragic that the “enlightened” dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary was destroyed by World War I. I think something like that would work well in the United States. At minimum, rulers of such monarchy seemed to have a strong sense of duty to their subjects and had long-term views of “their” patrimony and are thus less liable to rob tomorrow for today.

    North Korea’s hereditary monarchy is into its 3rd king. If there’s a sense of duty to the kingdom’s subjects, it’s not immediately apparent. Unless the kingdom’s monarchs feel a duty to starve as many of them to death as possible.

  296. AP says:
    @Antonymous
    @AP


    "European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots)"

    These are not mutually exclusive. Religion was one element of the traditions that limited a monarch’s power.

    Another important factor – the upbringing and the character of the rulers. Hereditary, ruling monarchs, being born into their positions and viewing their countries to a certain extent as their patrimonies (inherited from ancestors, to be handed down to descendants) will naturally be different types of people than those who come to power through elections.
     
    I agree with you and should have included the word "just" -- monarchies were not just kept in check by blood and soil. But patrimony is weak sauce for binding a people over centuries, too likely to be rationalized away unless there's an external check (like the church). See the expansionist empires of Denmark, Spain, and the Hapsburgs into European lands. Blood and soil becomes quite a different thing in an empire, partic. when the royals have intermarried extensively (nearly every royal house has German or Austrian blood). The Church served as bulwark against aristocratic excesses -- ultimately the Hapsburg dynasty funded and expanded western enlightenment culture, but much of the music, architecture, and learning was based on religious themes.

    I look at our aristocratic equivalent, the Bushes and other founding WASPs, selling their patrimony (and ours) for self-interest and globalist kudos. How would this differ under a non-democratic system? How do monarchic empires differ from an EU-type situation with minimal representation and no meaningful dissent? There must be an equally powerful check on hereditary dynasties or the first "cuck" king (or Merkel) can send the country spiraling.

    Replies: @AP

    Traditional monarchies and aristocracies were opposed to nationalism. The original conservative vs. liberal conflict pitted Church and Aristocracy (conservatives) vs. the People (liberals). The later group ultimately won and took over the world, and then split into class-based (socialism) vs. nation-based populism (nationalism). Since the remnants of the aristocracy could find a place for themselves within nationalism, in intact monarchies such as Russia or Germany they tended to try to appropriate nationalism for themselves, rather than fight this modern idea that got such a grip on the masses.

    Austria-Hungary’s territory did not correspond to what could be a considered a modern nation, and it retained the elements of the old pre-nationalist conservative cultural plurality. This was different from modern multiculturalism, which tends to blend all cultures together. Instead in emphasized local traditions (and aristocracies), bound by feudalistic, bureaucratic and Church ties.

    • Replies: @AP
    @AP

    I just remembered Werfel's quote about Austria-Hungary, an attempt to approximate "God's reign upon the Earth, in the unity of all peoples" being the antithesis of the "nation-state which is, in its very essence, demonic, and as such, idolatrous and menacing."

    This unity was a Christian unity - that is, it preserved local differences while promoting harmony between the discrete parts. The Christian Heaven has been compared to a symphony: each soul like a unique instrument, in harmony with all the rest in order to produce beauty. The Hapsburg ideal was supposed to be something like that, for its peoples.

    (Of course A-H fell short of this ideal, just as the USA for example falls short of the Capitalist ideal, various socialist countries of idealistic socialism, and so on. Systems built by people are inherently flawed).

  297. AP says:
    @AP
    @Antonymous

    Traditional monarchies and aristocracies were opposed to nationalism. The original conservative vs. liberal conflict pitted Church and Aristocracy (conservatives) vs. the People (liberals). The later group ultimately won and took over the world, and then split into class-based (socialism) vs. nation-based populism (nationalism). Since the remnants of the aristocracy could find a place for themselves within nationalism, in intact monarchies such as Russia or Germany they tended to try to appropriate nationalism for themselves, rather than fight this modern idea that got such a grip on the masses.

    Austria-Hungary's territory did not correspond to what could be a considered a modern nation, and it retained the elements of the old pre-nationalist conservative cultural plurality. This was different from modern multiculturalism, which tends to blend all cultures together. Instead in emphasized local traditions (and aristocracies), bound by feudalistic, bureaucratic and Church ties.

    Replies: @AP

    I just remembered Werfel’s quote about Austria-Hungary, an attempt to approximate “God’s reign upon the Earth, in the unity of all peoples” being the antithesis of the “nation-state which is, in its very essence, demonic, and as such, idolatrous and menacing.”

    This unity was a Christian unity – that is, it preserved local differences while promoting harmony between the discrete parts. The Christian Heaven has been compared to a symphony: each soul like a unique instrument, in harmony with all the rest in order to produce beauty. The Hapsburg ideal was supposed to be something like that, for its peoples.

    (Of course A-H fell short of this ideal, just as the USA for example falls short of the Capitalist ideal, various socialist countries of idealistic socialism, and so on. Systems built by people are inherently flawed).

  298. @Antonymous
    @Twinkie

    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots). Kings are as beholden to idea men and advisors as any democratically-elected leader, see the various Rasputins of history. But the Church prevented undue influence of religiously foreign agents, which then appears as an ethnic line-in-the-sand. Without a doubt the United States' democracy (/oligarchy) would be better off without overreaching Saudi, Turkish, and Israeli influences -- those that might have been prevented by Church interference -- but the nostalgia for aristocracy misses the importance of a strong religion.

    Could we ever get back to that level of religious intrusion and would we want to? I suspect poverty, circumscribed lives, and particularly child mortality rates played in to the centrality of church doctrine. People needed belief in the afterlife and religious purpose. Most of us, the fortunate of today, cannot generate that fervor from the comfort of our couch. And without an overriding check on a monarch, we're back to the usual problems of corruption, undue influence, and narcissistic leaders.

    Replies: @AP, @ben tillman

    European hereditary monarchies were kept in check, not by allegiance to blood and soil, but by the parallel power of the Catholic Church (or reformation offshoots).

    Absolutely, and this is a point Brian Tierney makes in The Crisis of Church and State 1050-1300.

  299. @Flip
    @candid_observer

    The take on Warren from a commenter on Razib Khan's site:

    Elizabeth Warren is not Cherokee, never was. She is whiter than Queen Elizabeth. She lied about being an Indian to get a job.

    Lizzie wanted a job as a law prof at Harvard Law School. Her problem is that her JD is from Rutgers. Rutgers is ranked 92nd out of the 200 law schools. In ordinary circumstances, Harvard will trash can a resume from a Rutgers grad. According to Wikipedia: “As of 2011, she was the only tenured law professor at Harvard who had attended law school at an American public university.” Rutgers, like I said is 92nd. Berkley, Michigan, and Virginia are tied for 8th (84 places ahead of Rutgers) and none of their grads has a job at Harvard.

    I would guess that Lizzie started the Indian scam long before she got a job at Harvard. She was on the faculty at Texas (#15), Michigan(#8), and Pennsylvania(#7) before she worked at Harvard. I doubt that any of those schools would touch a Rutgers grad either

    Harvard will not hire a Rutgers grad without an extraordinary circumstance like race quotas. Being a Federal Court of Appeals Judge, or writing the leading academic treatise on some large area of the law would also work. Warren’s only shot was to be an Indian (she was even less plausible as a Black or a Mexican), so she did it, and got away with it. She is not the only one in Academia who pulled that stunt. Remember War Churchill.

    Harvard will never confess. They are embarrassed that they got flimflammed so easily. It would seem to be ordinary due diligence to check with the tribe when a potential hire is claiming tribal affiliation, but they didn’t. My guess would be that PC prevents them from asking or checking. There have been a number of other recent prominent racial misrepresenters, such as Shaun King of Black Lives Matter and Rachel Dolezal of the NAACP.

    I just want to add, that I am not saying that Rutgers grads are in anyway inferior to graduates of higher ranked schools. They are not. Law school attendance has about zip to do with intellectual ability. Law schools are really caught up with snobbery and rankings. always have been. They have to, they just trade schools with intellectual pretensions.

    Replies: @candid_observer, @Jim Christian

    Belichik LOVES Rutgers football. Lots of guys on the Patriots came through Rutgers. The Patriots are curiously quite White and have always been considered smarter, rather than tougher as the AFC Championships and Super Bowl wins pile up. And then there’s Brady, the very-White Gronk, Edleman(Jew) and mostly White Offensive line. Curious, no?

  300. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Blah
    I don't get it. Just the fact that she went about creating her own server was a violation of the law and showed forethought of trying to avoid Federal Records requirements.

    Replies: @e, @Truth, @Das, @Stephen R. Diamond, @Anonymous

    It’s called conspiracy. It’s when a group of people plan to commit a crime, such as avoiding Federal records archiving and protection laws, avoiding FOIA requirements, and of course, violating laws concerning protection of classified information. What Comey failed to say was that there was zero question that Hillary Rodham Clinton and her staff did willfully and knowingly set up those servers in violation of Federal laws; regardless of whether she knew the classification of any particular e-mail.

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