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2018 Jonathan Chait Prize Goes to ... Jonathan Chait for "Julie Swetnick’s Allegations Likely to Finish Off Brett Kavanaugh"
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From New York Magazine:

Julie Swetnick’s Allegations Likely to Finish Off Brett Kavanaugh

By Jonathan Chait @jonathanchait

SEPT. 26, 2018

The Chait Prize is named after Jonathan Chait for his having co-authored with Stephen “Shattered” Glass a memorable article in The New Republic 20 years ago:

Praised Be Greenspan

The chairman of the Federal Reserve has kept interest rates down and the economy on an even keel. …

by Jonathan Chait and Stephen Glass

The New Republic, March 30, 1998, pp. 19-25

… …another bond-trading outfit has turned an empty office into a Greenspan shrine. Dozens of news photographs of Greenspan adorn the walls; glass casing encloses two Bic pens Greenspan supposedly used in 1993. Quotations from more than 30 of his speeches are posted under a sign that reads “Greenspan’s Teachings.” The centerpiece is a red leather chair that sits in the middle of the room, surrounded by blue velvet ropes. A placard perched on the armrest says Greenspan sat in the chair in 1948–at the time, he was still in college. “Some nights when we’ve lost money,” trader Brent Donalds confides, “I come in here and sit in the chair and think. It gives me inspiration.”

 
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  1. It turns out the “brights” aren’t all that bright. Going their entire lives without ever having thier views challenged by teachers, the media, or their peers tends to atrophy their critical thinking skills.

  2. Punditry is the greatest job in America. You get paid handsomely with zero consequences if your prattle turns out wrong.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    @MG


    Punditry is the greatest job in America. You get paid handsomely with zero consequences if your prattle turns out wrong.
     
    Maybe the pundit faces zero consequences, but others aren't so lucky. Think about the thousands of soldiers who have been killed and wounded from the pundits' post 9-11 wars. Ditto the same fate for hundreds of thousands of civilians.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    , @donut
    @MG

    TV weatherman ain't bad either . Weather person I mean .

    Replies: @Ragno

    , @Art Deco
    @MG

    The job is to write to space and deadline, not to be right about anything. (Christopher Hitchens excluded mathematics and science from his repertoire, not wishing to utter any blatant howlers). If you have the facility to be consistently engaging (and few people do), you've got the job. Well-informed professionals who can write will generally produce occasional journalism, not columns, and usually stick to their last. Producing scheduled commentary damaged the quality of Charles Kruathammer's output and utterly ruined Paul Krugman's.

    Replies: @Lowe

  3. Punditry is the greatest job in America. You get paid to sound off and there are zero consequences to your words. If anything, failure is rewarded.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  4. Anon[229] • Disclaimer says:

    New York Magazine is more diverse than you’d expect for such a publication, so I frequently check it out. Their layout on their web top page shows titles but no bylines. It cracks me up the number of times I’ll look at an unhinged title and guess, correctly, “Jonathan Chait?”

  5. Sailer deals in Hate facts, Glass dealt in Chait facts.

    Obviously you’re the bad guy, Steve.

  6. istevefan says:
    @MG
    Punditry is the greatest job in America. You get paid handsomely with zero consequences if your prattle turns out wrong.

    Replies: @istevefan, @donut, @Art Deco

    Punditry is the greatest job in America. You get paid handsomely with zero consequences if your prattle turns out wrong.

    Maybe the pundit faces zero consequences, but others aren’t so lucky. Think about the thousands of soldiers who have been killed and wounded from the pundits’ post 9-11 wars. Ditto the same fate for hundreds of thousands of civilians.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @istevefan

    Pundits have consequences - often very bad - for other people.

  7. 2018 Jonathan Chait Prize Goes to … Jonathan Chait for “Julie Swetnick’s Allegations Likely to Finish Off Brett Kavanaugh”

    I think there is a play about her:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%27Tis_Pity_She%27s_a_Whore

  8. Jonathan Chait seems to live a double life.

    On the one hand, he is a really smart and insightful academic thinker. His books – the Happiness Hypothesis and The Righteous Mind – are both really balanced and deep. And in his Unorthodox Academy project he persuasively articulates the dangers of the leftist monoculture to academia.

    On the other hand, when it comes to his popular punditry he is the hackiest of all partisan hacks.

    Its hard to reconcile the two personas. I guess punditry pays well and he knows what the lefties want to hear, so he figures he might as well go full hack mode.

    Also he’s one of the gayest sounding straight guys I’ve ever heard, so that’s a little confusing, too.

    • LOL: IHTG
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Hypnotoad666

    Alternative hypothesis: Jonathan Chait isn't Jonathan Haidt.

    But it's easy to get people with similar names confused, which US Senators should keep in mind.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hypnotoad666

    , @J.Ross
    @Hypnotoad666

    There's a normality of gay voices in the coastal urban communications and academic world. Even nominally heterosexual males embrace effeminate voices. NPR is viscerally irritating for many reasons but one of them is the reliability of soft gay voices (they have like three guys who have normal voices and they're all older. Robert Siegal retired).

    Replies: @fred c dobbs

  9. Chait’s New Republic fiasco is absent from his Wikipedia entry.

  10. The Democrats etc. need an application of Diax’s Rake: “Never believe something just because you want it to be true.”

    (From Neal Stephenson’s truly excellent 2008 novel Anathem. Stephenson is one of those authors who somehow manages to get some truth in there without getting the SJWs upset; I’m in the process of rereading Reamde, and it still boggles my mind how he got away with the main villain being a black Muslim terrorist…)

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @cthulhu

    In Snow Crash, he had negative-sounding comments thought about Cacausians.

    Replies: @cthulhu, @Desiderius

  11. Steve Forbes said his dad told him: “There is more money in giving advice than in taking it”.

    • Replies: @MG
    @MarkinLA

    His dad must have read Bertrand Russell:

    “First of all: what is work? Work is of two kinds: first, altering the position of matter at or near the earth’s surface relatively to other such matter; second, telling other people to do so. The first kind is unpleasant and ill paid; the second is pleasant and highly paid. The second kind is capable of indefinite extension: there are not only those who give orders but those who give advice as to what orders should be given. Usually two opposite kinds of advice are given simultaneously by two different bodies of men; this is called politics. The skill required for this kind of work is not knowledge of the subjects as to which advice is given, but knowledge of the art of persuasive speaking and writing, i.e. of advertising.”

    , @Sean
    @MarkinLA

    Speaking is a rest from the really hard work: listening to other people talk.

  12. I wasn’t aware that Chait was involved with Stephen Glass, co-authoring articles. Why didn’t he get the condemnation and blackballing that Glass so justly deserved?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    I think Chait only co-authored one article with Glass, although it's the article I read at a newsstand in 1998 and went "Huh?" Presumably, Chait wrote the boring parts and Glass reported the crazy stuff about the Alan Greenspan Shrine. The joke is that Chait didn't notice that all the stuff he researched was boring while Glass constantly came up with crazy fun stuff.

    In the movie "Shattered Glass" I think they made Chait's character a girl.

    Replies: @Noumenon72

  13. @Hypnotoad666
    Jonathan Chait seems to live a double life.

    On the one hand, he is a really smart and insightful academic thinker. His books - the Happiness Hypothesis and The Righteous Mind - are both really balanced and deep. And in his Unorthodox Academy project he persuasively articulates the dangers of the leftist monoculture to academia.

    On the other hand, when it comes to his popular punditry he is the hackiest of all partisan hacks.

    Its hard to reconcile the two personas. I guess punditry pays well and he knows what the lefties want to hear, so he figures he might as well go full hack mode.

    Also he's one of the gayest sounding straight guys I've ever heard, so that's a little confusing, too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross

    Alternative hypothesis: Jonathan Chait isn’t Jonathan Haidt.

    But it’s easy to get people with similar names confused, which US Senators should keep in mind.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    But it’s easy to get people with similar names confused, which US Senators should keep in mind.
     
    John Cornyn, Jon Corzine, Jeremy Corbyn

    Rod Dreher, Ross Douthat

    And, of course, Steve Sailer and Steven Seiler:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/by-the-way-this-is-not-me/

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Steve Sailer

    Oops. My Bad.

    I'm not sure which one I should apologize to.

  14. @Daniel H
    I wasn't aware that Chait was involved with Stephen Glass, co-authoring articles. Why didn't he get the condemnation and blackballing that Glass so justly deserved?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I think Chait only co-authored one article with Glass, although it’s the article I read at a newsstand in 1998 and went “Huh?” Presumably, Chait wrote the boring parts and Glass reported the crazy stuff about the Alan Greenspan Shrine. The joke is that Chait didn’t notice that all the stuff he researched was boring while Glass constantly came up with crazy fun stuff.

    In the movie “Shattered Glass” I think they made Chait’s character a girl.

    • Replies: @Noumenon72
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks for explaining the joke. I didn't get that the "Chait Award" is supposed to be about printing things people tell you that are not true. It was unclear to me because I didn't understand that the point was "Steven Glass made up this section". I thought the point was "Chait wrote something and something is wrong with it that's similar to what he wrote about Swetnick."

  15. @Steve Sailer
    @Hypnotoad666

    Alternative hypothesis: Jonathan Chait isn't Jonathan Haidt.

    But it's easy to get people with similar names confused, which US Senators should keep in mind.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hypnotoad666

    But it’s easy to get people with similar names confused, which US Senators should keep in mind.

    John Cornyn, Jon Corzine, Jeremy Corbyn

    Rod Dreher, Ross Douthat

    And, of course, Steve Sailer and Steven Seiler:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/by-the-way-this-is-not-me/

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Reg Cæsar

    Robert Spencer, Richard Spencer

    Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe

    Raymond Chandler, and Raymond Carver

    True Story: I discovered Raymond Carver when I tried to order a Chandler book and got the wrong author. But Carver is the far superior writer so that worked out okay, though.

  16. @Hypnotoad666
    Jonathan Chait seems to live a double life.

    On the one hand, he is a really smart and insightful academic thinker. His books - the Happiness Hypothesis and The Righteous Mind - are both really balanced and deep. And in his Unorthodox Academy project he persuasively articulates the dangers of the leftist monoculture to academia.

    On the other hand, when it comes to his popular punditry he is the hackiest of all partisan hacks.

    Its hard to reconcile the two personas. I guess punditry pays well and he knows what the lefties want to hear, so he figures he might as well go full hack mode.

    Also he's one of the gayest sounding straight guys I've ever heard, so that's a little confusing, too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @J.Ross

    There’s a normality of gay voices in the coastal urban communications and academic world. Even nominally heterosexual males embrace effeminate voices. NPR is viscerally irritating for many reasons but one of them is the reliability of soft gay voices (they have like three guys who have normal voices and they’re all older. Robert Siegal retired).

    • Replies: @fred c dobbs
    @J.Ross

    VD Hanson was the first I recall writing on that @ 10 years ago. .....about the time I began noticing "Why does everyone under 30 or so these days sound like a pack of homos?" (Hanson's argument is much better laid out and less abrasive, of course. LOL. Below-----)

    "Today’s male’s voice is often far more feminine than that of 50 years ago. Sort of whiney, sort of nasally, sort of fussy. Being overexact, sighing, artificially pausing, all that seems part of the new elite parlance. In terms of vocabulary, the absolute (“he’s no damn good,” “she’s a coward,” “he ran the business to hell”) is avoided. Pejoratives and swearing resemble adolescent temper tantrums rather than threats that might well presage violence."

    and in similar vein......

    "Something has happened to the generic American male accent. Maybe it is urbanization; perhaps it is now an affectation to sound precise and caring with a patina of intellectual authority; perhaps it is the fashion culture of the metrosexual; maybe it is the influence of the gay community in arts and popular culture.

    Maybe the ubiquitous new intonation comes from the scarcity of salty old jobs in construction, farming, or fishing. But increasingly to meet a young American male about 25 is to hear a particular nasal stress, a much higher tone than one heard 40 years ago, and, to be frank, to listen to a precious voice often nearly indistinguishable from the female.

    I confess over the last year, I have been interviewed a half-dozen times on the phone, and had no idea at first whether a male or female was asking the questions."

    Replies: @Desiderius

  17. @cthulhu
    The Democrats etc. need an application of Diax’s Rake: “Never believe something just because you want it to be true.”

    (From Neal Stephenson’s truly excellent 2008 novel Anathem. Stephenson is one of those authors who somehow manages to get some truth in there without getting the SJWs upset; I’m in the process of rereading Reamde, and it still boggles my mind how he got away with the main villain being a black Muslim terrorist...)

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    In Snow Crash, he had negative-sounding comments thought about Cacausians.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Redneck farmer

    Snow Crash is definitely the most conventional of Stephenson’s novels HBD-wise, but by the time of Cryptonomicon, he was pretty politically incorrect and has maintained that stance since.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Keypusher

    , @Desiderius
    @Redneck farmer

    Good. All those nut job protesters today are Caucasian too. So is Blasey-Ford.

  18. @MarkinLA
    Steve Forbes said his dad told him: "There is more money in giving advice than in taking it".

    Replies: @MG, @Sean

    His dad must have read Bertrand Russell:

    “First of all: what is work? Work is of two kinds: first, altering the position of matter at or near the earth’s surface relatively to other such matter; second, telling other people to do so. The first kind is unpleasant and ill paid; the second is pleasant and highly paid. The second kind is capable of indefinite extension: there are not only those who give orders but those who give advice as to what orders should be given. Usually two opposite kinds of advice are given simultaneously by two different bodies of men; this is called politics. The skill required for this kind of work is not knowledge of the subjects as to which advice is given, but knowledge of the art of persuasive speaking and writing, i.e. of advertising.”

  19. Brent Donalds?

    Could it be that the authors were punking their readers?

    It sounds like they’re making a joke about a dumb goy worshipping a smart Jew.

    Chait might have known more than he let on.

  20. Are Jews more culturally conditioned than others to uncritically believe atrocity stories?

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Henry's Cat

    They’re more culturally conditioned to believe atrocity stories that are in their interests. Atrocity stories that are not in their interests don’t matter. They state their philosophy in the question that a Jew is always supposed to be asking themself: “but is it good for the Jews?” I have Jewish friends and relatives, and admire them for many traits, including their ethnic loyalty. Non Jewish Whites used to have the same self interest and ethnic loyalty, and we need to get back to it.

    , @J.Ross
    @Henry's Cat

    Their holiday cycle and primary scripture largely commemorates mythohistorical atrocities they suffered, nearly suffered, or inflicted on others, so, overwhelmingly yes.

  21. When did newspaper headlines become so dictative?
    I noticed the trend starting in time magazine around 2004 or 2005.
    Is time magazine still in publication?
    I had to end my subscription because I was weary of Joel steins unsolicited opinions inserted into many of the articles.
    “They” still don’t get it. This is a bad headline, it’s annoying, pretentious, and unnecesarily authoritative. Didn’t publications used to have editors who were the smartest person in the room, yet whos only job was to write or tweak headlines?

  22. I wonder if Brent Donalds and Haven Monahan frequent the same social circles.

  23. @Redneck farmer
    @cthulhu

    In Snow Crash, he had negative-sounding comments thought about Cacausians.

    Replies: @cthulhu, @Desiderius

    Snow Crash is definitely the most conventional of Stephenson’s novels HBD-wise, but by the time of Cryptonomicon, he was pretty politically incorrect and has maintained that stance since.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    I'm just finishing Stephenson's Cryptonomicon now. It's really good. It's seems like the best of the five novels by him I've read.

    "Snow Crash" appears to have been influenced by "The Camp of the Saints."

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anon

    , @Keypusher
    @cthulhu

    I detected a definite effort by Stephenson to adapt himself to feminism and the diversity imperative in Seveneves (2015), a terrific book by the way. I’m curious if others who have read it agree.

    Replies: @cthulhu

  24. @cthulhu
    @Redneck farmer

    Snow Crash is definitely the most conventional of Stephenson’s novels HBD-wise, but by the time of Cryptonomicon, he was pretty politically incorrect and has maintained that stance since.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Keypusher

    I’m just finishing Stephenson’s Cryptonomicon now. It’s really good. It’s seems like the best of the five novels by him I’ve read.

    “Snow Crash” appears to have been influenced by “The Camp of the Saints.”

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Steve Sailer


    I’m just finishing Stephenson’s Cryptonomicon now. It’s really good. It’s seems like the best of the five novels by him I’ve read.
     
    Cryptonomicon is Stephenson's magnum opus; it contains multitudes, and is a geeky joy to read.

    For sheer inventiveness and world-building, though, The Diamond Age might be his best. It has a lousy ending (winding things up isn't Stephenson's strength), but I keep thinking about its themes. There's some seriously prescient stuff there.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson

    , @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer's review of Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon in Taki's Magazine. Can't wait.

  25. @istevefan
    @MG


    Punditry is the greatest job in America. You get paid handsomely with zero consequences if your prattle turns out wrong.
     
    Maybe the pundit faces zero consequences, but others aren't so lucky. Think about the thousands of soldiers who have been killed and wounded from the pundits' post 9-11 wars. Ditto the same fate for hundreds of thousands of civilians.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    Pundits have consequences – often very bad – for other people.

  26. @MG
    Punditry is the greatest job in America. You get paid handsomely with zero consequences if your prattle turns out wrong.

    Replies: @istevefan, @donut, @Art Deco

    TV weatherman ain’t bad either . Weather person I mean .

    • Replies: @Ragno
    @donut


    TV weatherman ain’t bad either .
     
    You get a heckuva lot fewer people killed, for one thing.
  27. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    I'm just finishing Stephenson's Cryptonomicon now. It's really good. It's seems like the best of the five novels by him I've read.

    "Snow Crash" appears to have been influenced by "The Camp of the Saints."

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anon

    I’m just finishing Stephenson’s Cryptonomicon now. It’s really good. It’s seems like the best of the five novels by him I’ve read.

    Cryptonomicon is Stephenson’s magnum opus; it contains multitudes, and is a geeky joy to read.

    For sheer inventiveness and world-building, though, The Diamond Age might be his best. It has a lousy ending (winding things up isn’t Stephenson’s strength), but I keep thinking about its themes. There’s some seriously prescient stuff there.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Diamond Age's ending was terrible (with Snow Crash's not much better), but you're right about the themes. Especially the enclave style breakdown of society.

  28. @donut
    @MG

    TV weatherman ain't bad either . Weather person I mean .

    Replies: @Ragno

    TV weatherman ain’t bad either .

    You get a heckuva lot fewer people killed, for one thing.

  29. Greenspan is a horrible central banker ghoul for the globalizers.

    Globalized central bankers coordinated massive global credit expansion using monetary extremism to buy off certain generational cohorts. These globalized central bankers, in certain nations, used cheap money electronically conjured up out of thin air to satiate the greed and avarice of people born before 1965.

    These globalized central bankers used wage-reducing mass immigration to suppress the labor cost inflation that ordinarily occurs during bouts of monetary extremism.

    Politics in European Christian nations is being driven by mass immigration and monetary policy — or, in other words, DEMOGRAPHY and DEBT.

    Tweet from 2015:

  30. Tweet from 2015:

  31. @MG
    Punditry is the greatest job in America. You get paid handsomely with zero consequences if your prattle turns out wrong.

    Replies: @istevefan, @donut, @Art Deco

    The job is to write to space and deadline, not to be right about anything. (Christopher Hitchens excluded mathematics and science from his repertoire, not wishing to utter any blatant howlers). If you have the facility to be consistently engaging (and few people do), you’ve got the job. Well-informed professionals who can write will generally produce occasional journalism, not columns, and usually stick to their last. Producing scheduled commentary damaged the quality of Charles Kruathammer’s output and utterly ruined Paul Krugman’s.

    • Replies: @Lowe
    @Art Deco

    This is a very good point. Especially the examples of Krauthammer and Krugman. I can only imagine how stupid I would look if I had to try to write commentary on a regular schedule.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  32. @cthulhu
    @Redneck farmer

    Snow Crash is definitely the most conventional of Stephenson’s novels HBD-wise, but by the time of Cryptonomicon, he was pretty politically incorrect and has maintained that stance since.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Keypusher

    I detected a definite effort by Stephenson to adapt himself to feminism and the diversity imperative in Seveneves (2015), a terrific book by the way. I’m curious if others who have read it agree.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Keypusher

    Seveneves has female characters as the leads, but it’s still very HBD oriented - the whole “seven races” is telling, as are the manipulative nature of JBF. And there’s no male-bashing, e.g., Dinah’s appraisal of Markus at the end of the first part.

    That said, I found Seveneves frustrating. Stephenson’s great failing as a writer is his tendency to produce great walls o’ text for exposition; this worked OK in Cryptonomicon due to the episodic nature of the story and the multiple timelines (and the present tense narration helped too, although it’s somewhat of a gimmick and I’m glad Stephenson grew out of it), and the first person structure of Anathem made it much less noticeable, plus Stephenson just did it a lot less in that book (I freely admit that it took me multiple tries to get into that one because so many things were left unexplained, but once I did, it quickly became my favorite of his novels). But in Seveneves, hell, half the book is great walls of expository text, and it gets really tiresome and boring. It’s less annoying in the second part, and is disguised better, but the first part just staggers along barely staying conscious under the weight of all that exposition.

    (And don’t get me started on the character based on Neil TheAss Tyson; the less said about that one, the better...)

  33. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    I'm just finishing Stephenson's Cryptonomicon now. It's really good. It's seems like the best of the five novels by him I've read.

    "Snow Crash" appears to have been influenced by "The Camp of the Saints."

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anon

    Steve Sailer’s review of Neal Stephenson’s Cryptonomicon in Taki’s Magazine. Can’t wait.

  34. The miasma that radiates from Berkeley (HQ of Chait et al) is palpable from must over the hill. Unless you lived it, breathed it for 10 years, you have no idea how it saturates everything. It’s one of the last places in the US with forced busing in the US. Because our zip code was too white, Junior, along with much of the class body, would have been criss-crossing the city every day to go to another school when there was a public school just one a block away. So much for global warming.

  35. This is ridiculous. Swetnick’s allegations on their face were absurd. No college girl who could legally go to a bar and have college guys buy her drinks was hanging out with prep kids in mommy and daddy’s house hoping they don’t come home. She claims to have gone to 10 rape parties but kept going back only avoiding the punch until she was raped herself. She told NOBODY (not friend nor cops) to stay away or about what she had seen. There is zero corroboration, and really nothing concrete that Kavanaugh actually did anyway.

    n 1982 people rightly got arrested for rape. There is this theme under all these anti-Kavanaugh stories that rape was common and not treated seriously. In my northeast college at roughly that time a wrestler was alleged to have forced himself on a female student, his name and face were everywhere, he was arrested and quickly drummed out of school. The northeast was not some hotbed of rape, and fathers and mothers of suburban Maryland would have been outraged to find their daughters so violated.There would have been arrests and prosecutions.

    That Chait did not take a moment to consider facts (or really lack thereof) to back up this story means he is objectively bad at his job. But Paul Krugman once waxed poetic about the wonders of Enron, and a legion of media people spent a decade telling us Obama was wonderful and brilliant, so there is no down side if you are in the club. And now as long as you can slag white guys, who needs facts anyway.

  36. 2018 Jonathan Chait Prize Goes to … Jonathan Chait for “Julie Swetnick’s Allegations Likely to Finish Off Brett Kavanaugh”

    LOL

  37. @Henry's Cat
    Are Jews more culturally conditioned than others to uncritically believe atrocity stories?

    Replies: @Alfa158, @J.Ross

    They’re more culturally conditioned to believe atrocity stories that are in their interests. Atrocity stories that are not in their interests don’t matter. They state their philosophy in the question that a Jew is always supposed to be asking themself: “but is it good for the Jews?” I have Jewish friends and relatives, and admire them for many traits, including their ethnic loyalty. Non Jewish Whites used to have the same self interest and ethnic loyalty, and we need to get back to it.

  38. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Steve Sailer


    I’m just finishing Stephenson’s Cryptonomicon now. It’s really good. It’s seems like the best of the five novels by him I’ve read.
     
    Cryptonomicon is Stephenson's magnum opus; it contains multitudes, and is a geeky joy to read.

    For sheer inventiveness and world-building, though, The Diamond Age might be his best. It has a lousy ending (winding things up isn't Stephenson's strength), but I keep thinking about its themes. There's some seriously prescient stuff there.

    Replies: @Jack Hanson

    Diamond Age’s ending was terrible (with Snow Crash’s not much better), but you’re right about the themes. Especially the enclave style breakdown of society.

  39. Julie Swetnick’s over-the-top accusations helped Brett Kavanaugh because it immediately muddied the “you have to believe all women” plea. That is a very hard thing for some people to overcome, particularly blue pilled conservatives. Most people instantly recognize a BPD hussy like Swetnick for who she is and her performance melded with Ford’s more strategic but equally empty accusations. Sexual assault became gang rape which became a meme.

    One lesson I took away from this whole sorted affair is that when making up such accusations, quantity has a rapidly diminishing effect. By orchestrating, coordinating, and timing the Ford attack it almost caught the Republican Senators off guard. It was a gambit. But when Ramirez and Swetnick came out with their preposterous claims they were easily parried and took the focus away. In another venue such as a workplace or divorce, the defense would have slowed things down but this was never really about Kavanaugh. It was about blocking any Republican nominee and using this as an issue for the election a month later.

    In a pre-internet environment, the tactic would be to drop another story or accusation into the daily news cycle to keep the momentum going and up the pressure. That works if it is a real story but if it is made of whole cloth the attack fails and they lose the end game like what happened here. The country is not only more aware of these types of false accusations they are less humored and sympathetic to them as well.

  40. @Art Deco
    @MG

    The job is to write to space and deadline, not to be right about anything. (Christopher Hitchens excluded mathematics and science from his repertoire, not wishing to utter any blatant howlers). If you have the facility to be consistently engaging (and few people do), you've got the job. Well-informed professionals who can write will generally produce occasional journalism, not columns, and usually stick to their last. Producing scheduled commentary damaged the quality of Charles Kruathammer's output and utterly ruined Paul Krugman's.

    Replies: @Lowe

    This is a very good point. Especially the examples of Krauthammer and Krugman. I can only imagine how stupid I would look if I had to try to write commentary on a regular schedule.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Lowe


    This is a very good point. Especially the examples of Krauthammer and Krugman. I can only imagine how stupid I would look if I had to try to write commentary on a regular schedule.
     
    That's precisely the reason why despite his fairly frequent miscues, I continue to believe that in a just world, M. Sailer would have a syndicated newspaper column instead of a somewhat obscure blog frequented mainly by deplorables. His miscues are no more frequent than his mainstream colleagues', but his moments of genuine insight are quite striking.
  41. @MarkinLA
    Steve Forbes said his dad told him: "There is more money in giving advice than in taking it".

    Replies: @MG, @Sean

    Speaking is a rest from the really hard work: listening to other people talk.

  42. @Keypusher
    @cthulhu

    I detected a definite effort by Stephenson to adapt himself to feminism and the diversity imperative in Seveneves (2015), a terrific book by the way. I’m curious if others who have read it agree.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    Seveneves has female characters as the leads, but it’s still very HBD oriented – the whole “seven races” is telling, as are the manipulative nature of JBF. And there’s no male-bashing, e.g., Dinah’s appraisal of Markus at the end of the first part.

    That said, I found Seveneves frustrating. Stephenson’s great failing as a writer is his tendency to produce great walls o’ text for exposition; this worked OK in Cryptonomicon due to the episodic nature of the story and the multiple timelines (and the present tense narration helped too, although it’s somewhat of a gimmick and I’m glad Stephenson grew out of it), and the first person structure of Anathem made it much less noticeable, plus Stephenson just did it a lot less in that book (I freely admit that it took me multiple tries to get into that one because so many things were left unexplained, but once I did, it quickly became my favorite of his novels). But in Seveneves, hell, half the book is great walls of expository text, and it gets really tiresome and boring. It’s less annoying in the second part, and is disguised better, but the first part just staggers along barely staying conscious under the weight of all that exposition.

    (And don’t get me started on the character based on Neil TheAss Tyson; the less said about that one, the better…)

  43. @J.Ross
    @Hypnotoad666

    There's a normality of gay voices in the coastal urban communications and academic world. Even nominally heterosexual males embrace effeminate voices. NPR is viscerally irritating for many reasons but one of them is the reliability of soft gay voices (they have like three guys who have normal voices and they're all older. Robert Siegal retired).

    Replies: @fred c dobbs

    VD Hanson was the first I recall writing on that @ 10 years ago. …..about the time I began noticing “Why does everyone under 30 or so these days sound like a pack of homos?” (Hanson’s argument is much better laid out and less abrasive, of course. LOL. Below—–)

    “Today’s male’s voice is often far more feminine than that of 50 years ago. Sort of whiney, sort of nasally, sort of fussy. Being overexact, sighing, artificially pausing, all that seems part of the new elite parlance. In terms of vocabulary, the absolute (“he’s no damn good,” “she’s a coward,” “he ran the business to hell”) is avoided. Pejoratives and swearing resemble adolescent temper tantrums rather than threats that might well presage violence.”

    and in similar vein……

    Something has happened to the generic American male accent. Maybe it is urbanization; perhaps it is now an affectation to sound precise and caring with a patina of intellectual authority; perhaps it is the fashion culture of the metrosexual; maybe it is the influence of the gay community in arts and popular culture.

    Maybe the ubiquitous new intonation comes from the scarcity of salty old jobs in construction, farming, or fishing. But increasingly to meet a young American male about 25 is to hear a particular nasal stress, a much higher tone than one heard 40 years ago, and, to be frank, to listen to a precious voice often nearly indistinguishable from the female.

    I confess over the last year, I have been interviewed a half-dozen times on the phone, and had no idea at first whether a male or female was asking the questions.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @fred c dobbs

    Sperm count down by half and still falling.

  44. @Lowe
    @Art Deco

    This is a very good point. Especially the examples of Krauthammer and Krugman. I can only imagine how stupid I would look if I had to try to write commentary on a regular schedule.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    This is a very good point. Especially the examples of Krauthammer and Krugman. I can only imagine how stupid I would look if I had to try to write commentary on a regular schedule.

    That’s precisely the reason why despite his fairly frequent miscues, I continue to believe that in a just world, M. Sailer would have a syndicated newspaper column instead of a somewhat obscure blog frequented mainly by deplorables. His miscues are no more frequent than his mainstream colleagues’, but his moments of genuine insight are quite striking.

  45. @Henry's Cat
    Are Jews more culturally conditioned than others to uncritically believe atrocity stories?

    Replies: @Alfa158, @J.Ross

    Their holiday cycle and primary scripture largely commemorates mythohistorical atrocities they suffered, nearly suffered, or inflicted on others, so, overwhelmingly yes.

  46. @Redneck farmer
    @cthulhu

    In Snow Crash, he had negative-sounding comments thought about Cacausians.

    Replies: @cthulhu, @Desiderius

    Good. All those nut job protesters today are Caucasian too. So is Blasey-Ford.

  47. @fred c dobbs
    @J.Ross

    VD Hanson was the first I recall writing on that @ 10 years ago. .....about the time I began noticing "Why does everyone under 30 or so these days sound like a pack of homos?" (Hanson's argument is much better laid out and less abrasive, of course. LOL. Below-----)

    "Today’s male’s voice is often far more feminine than that of 50 years ago. Sort of whiney, sort of nasally, sort of fussy. Being overexact, sighing, artificially pausing, all that seems part of the new elite parlance. In terms of vocabulary, the absolute (“he’s no damn good,” “she’s a coward,” “he ran the business to hell”) is avoided. Pejoratives and swearing resemble adolescent temper tantrums rather than threats that might well presage violence."

    and in similar vein......

    "Something has happened to the generic American male accent. Maybe it is urbanization; perhaps it is now an affectation to sound precise and caring with a patina of intellectual authority; perhaps it is the fashion culture of the metrosexual; maybe it is the influence of the gay community in arts and popular culture.

    Maybe the ubiquitous new intonation comes from the scarcity of salty old jobs in construction, farming, or fishing. But increasingly to meet a young American male about 25 is to hear a particular nasal stress, a much higher tone than one heard 40 years ago, and, to be frank, to listen to a precious voice often nearly indistinguishable from the female.

    I confess over the last year, I have been interviewed a half-dozen times on the phone, and had no idea at first whether a male or female was asking the questions."

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Sperm count down by half and still falling.

  48. @Steve Sailer
    @Daniel H

    I think Chait only co-authored one article with Glass, although it's the article I read at a newsstand in 1998 and went "Huh?" Presumably, Chait wrote the boring parts and Glass reported the crazy stuff about the Alan Greenspan Shrine. The joke is that Chait didn't notice that all the stuff he researched was boring while Glass constantly came up with crazy fun stuff.

    In the movie "Shattered Glass" I think they made Chait's character a girl.

    Replies: @Noumenon72

    Thanks for explaining the joke. I didn’t get that the “Chait Award” is supposed to be about printing things people tell you that are not true. It was unclear to me because I didn’t understand that the point was “Steven Glass made up this section”. I thought the point was “Chait wrote something and something is wrong with it that’s similar to what he wrote about Swetnick.”

  49. @Steve Sailer
    @Hypnotoad666

    Alternative hypothesis: Jonathan Chait isn't Jonathan Haidt.

    But it's easy to get people with similar names confused, which US Senators should keep in mind.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hypnotoad666

    Oops. My Bad.

    I’m not sure which one I should apologize to.

  50. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    But it’s easy to get people with similar names confused, which US Senators should keep in mind.
     
    John Cornyn, Jon Corzine, Jeremy Corbyn

    Rod Dreher, Ross Douthat

    And, of course, Steve Sailer and Steven Seiler:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/by-the-way-this-is-not-me/

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    Robert Spencer, Richard Spencer

    Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe

    Raymond Chandler, and Raymond Carver

    True Story: I discovered Raymond Carver when I tried to order a Chandler book and got the wrong author. But Carver is the far superior writer so that worked out okay, though.

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