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Lars Brownworth, Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire That Rescued Western Civilization, Random House, 2009, 315 pp., \$69.99 (Hardcover), \$24.46 (Audiobook), \$11.99 (Kindle)

Jean Raspail wrote the most prophetic book of this century, The Camp of the Saints. It ends with the last remnant of the West about to be overrun. The book’s final words are: “The fall of Constantinople is a personal misfortune that happened to all of us only last week.” Tomorrow, May 29, that colossal misfortune will have taken place exactly 568 years ago, in 1453.

“The West” began with the Greek resistance to Persia and the creation of an intellectual, cultural, and racial tradition. Westerners have always fought each other, but “the West” was once united by the ideal (if not the reality) of Empire and the sense of being part of one civilization.

England, France, Germany, and other proud nations are tribes of a greater people. I would argue that their civilization has been shattered for a millennia now. To some extent, our entire racial history is an attempt to return to Rome and the unity it represented. The last manifestation of that unity was the Eastern Roman Empire. In 1399, when one of the final emperors, Manuel II, was touring Europe begging for help, Europeans remembered that the emperor “sat on the throne of the Caesars, and, no matter how debased that throne had become, its dignity was still unparalleled.” [p. 279]

What we now consider the “East,” including Egypt, Anatolia, and the Levant, was once part of our civilization too. For a millennia after Roman power collapsed in Europe, the Roman ideal continued in Constantinople. We often forget that they were us.

Lars Brownworth, a former academic who has become a full-time historian, writes that on the night of May 28, 1453 — the eve of defeat — Emperor Constantine XI Dragases told his men that they were “worthy heirs of the great heroes of Ancient Greece and Rome.” Also, for the first and last time in Byzantine history, Latin and Greek priests stood together and prayed for the city. Mr. Brownworth, quoting Gibbon, calls it the “funeral oration” for the Roman Empire. Italians and Greeks, Catholics and Orthodox, fought shoulder to shoulder on that last terrible day.

19th-century depiction of Emperor Constantine XI Dragases with classical Greco-Roman armor
19th-century depiction of Emperor Constantine XI Dragases with classical Greco-Roman armor

In Essential Writings on Race, Sam Francis says that, “The concept of the ‘Last Stand,’ in which an outnumbered army . . . face battle against overwhelming odds, usually without any realistic expectation of victory, recurs throughout Indo-European history and legend — at the battles of Marathon and Thermopylae.” It’s hard to think of a more inspiring example than Emperor Constantine charging into the enemy ranks, knowing that after a 53-day siege, all was lost. His body was never found. Like King Arthur, it is said he will come again.

Who needs fantasy when we have history like this? In Psalm 137, the Jewish author curses himself if he should “forget thee, O Jerusalem.” Should we not feel the same way about Constantinople?

History not only inspires us; it cautions us. Few of us reflect on Constantinople. Both white advocates and our opponents too often assume that whites always win. We are always conquerors, never conquered. This justifies stark racial double standards. Christian Lander, author of Stuff White People Like, unwittingly put it best. “It is always OK to make fun of white people because no unhappy ending is possible.”

Lost to the West reminds us this isn’t so. The fall of Constantinople was horrifying. “Women and children were raped, men were impaled, houses were sacked, and churches were looted and burned,” writes Mr. Brownworth. For Eastern Europe, the end of the Roman Empire meant centuries of political slavery under Ottoman oppression. For more than a million whites, losing the Mediterranean meant literal slavery.

Fall of Constantinople by Theophilos Hatzimihail. Constantine is visible on a white horse
Fall of Constantinople by Theophilos Hatzimihail. Constantine is visible on a white horse

There’s something worse than slavery. It’s losing an identity. Occupation means living under alien law, morality, and cultural codes. Even before Constantinople fell, the Ottomans had already occupied Eastern Europe. One of the main reasons Constantinople fell was that the elite forces of the Turkish army were “Christians who had been taken from their families while children and forcibly converted to Islam” and who had become “fanatically loyal” to their new masters. [p. 297] A people can rise from defeat, but not from deconstruction.

Constantinople tells us defeat is possible. It has happened before and the consequences were sickening. We still live with them. The Hagia Sophia, the greatest church of antiquity, is a now mosque. A Turkish ruler with neo-Ottoman pretensions uses Muslim migrants slowly to conquer Europe. The political police in Germany said in 2017 that the largest “right-wing extremist” group in the country was the ultranationalist, arguably terrorist Turkish Grey Wolves. Like the empire in its final years, we are increasingly surrounded in what was once unquestionably “our” land.

July 16, 2016 – At least 500 people gathered in front of the Turkish consulate in Munich after attempted military coup in Turkey. Grey Wolves signs were thrown. (Credit Image: © Michael Trammer / ZUMA Wire)
July 16, 2016 – At least 500 people gathered in front of the Turkish consulate in Munich after attempted military coup in Turkey. Grey Wolves signs were thrown. (Credit Image: © Michael Trammer / ZUMA Wire)

What caused the collapse? The answer is both too broad and too simple: We did. Of course, there was the rise of Islam, disputes between Catholics and Orthodox, and the wisdom or folly of various political and military decisions. Ultimately however, the Ottomans didn’t conquer Constantinople. Europeans destroyed it first.

When Roman authority collapsed in the West, it survived in the East. Technically, the Roman Empire hadn’t ended. In the sixth century, under Justinian and his great general Belisarius, the empire built the Hagia Sophia and reconquered much of the West. However, plague and petty personal disputes limited their accomplishments.

Islam was a powerful new enemy. Yet the decisive blow came when Western European crusaders sacked Constantinople in 1204. After that, it may have been a matter of time before the city fell to the Turks. Nevertheless, three things contributed to the fall, and all apply to our own age.

First, there were white traitors, who put greed ahead of loyalty. Chief among them in 1543 was a Hungarian named Urban, a gunnery expert who served the Byzantines. However, when the nearly exhausted empire couldn’t pay him enough, he went to work for the attacking enemy, Sultan Mehmed II. It was thanks to Urban and his artillery that the Turks breached the walls. White people really are our own worst enemies and Urban’s infamy should equal that of Ephialtes.

Mehmed the Conqueror enters Constantinople, painting by Fausto Zonaro
Mehmed the Conqueror enters Constantinople, painting by Fausto Zonaro

The warriors of the Fourth Crusade who sacked the city were also cultural/racial traitors. This wasn’t a battle between Catholicism and Orthodoxy. Pope Innocent III flatly excommunicated the Catholic crusaders because he knew they had destroyed Christian unity. [p. 261] The Venetian doge Enrico Dandolo manipulated the crusader army into sacking the city for profit, and ensured supremacy for his city. However:

[I]n doing so he had perpetuated one of the great tragedies of human history. Byzantium, the mighty Christian bulwark that had sheltered western Europe from the rising tide of Islam for so many centuries, had been shattered beyond repair—wrecked by men who claimed that they were serving God. Blinded by their avarice and manipulated by the doge, the crusading leaders broke the great Christian power of the East, condemning the crippled remnants—and much of eastern Europe—to five centuries of a living death under the heel of the Turks. [p. 258]

You could say the doge served Venice by destroying Constantinople, but by destroying the empire, he ruined Venice because under Turkish rule it was no longer a gateway to the east. Leaders can’t afford to be individualistic, or even always loyal to their polity. They have to take a racial and civilizational view if they want to serve their people. A victory over a rival polity is self-defeating if it weakens your race and civilization.

The second factor that destroyed the empire was the short-sightedness of selfish elites. If our schools taught heroism instead of shame, our children would know about General Belisarius. However, he could have done far more were it not for the jealousy of the emperor’s wife Theodora, who saw him as a threat. Another general of the time, Narses, was unnecessarily insulted, and then invited the Lombards to invade Italy. [p. 118] The Great Schism itself, which permanently divided the Catholic and Orthodox churches, wasn’t really about theology. It was about two petty men, one a Catholic cardinal and the other the Eastern patriarch, socially snubbing each other. [pp. 223–224] Byzantine history has countless plots, poisonings, and coups that killed successful generals or emperors.

Hagia Sophia, the cathedral of Constantinople at the time of the schism. (Credit Image: Slimm via Wikimedia)
Hagia Sophia, the cathedral of Constantinople at the time of the schism. (Credit Image: Slimm via Wikimedia)

Personal failings are discouraging, but are common in history. Just as we see today, selfish elites displaced the classes who supported the economy and provided troops for the army. After Justinian’s reign, at the close of the sixth century, Mr. Brownworth writes that “the merchants, industrialists, and small landowners that made up the middle class were diminishing as wars and uprisings began to disrupt trade . . . small farms began to disappear, swallowed by the ravenous hunger of the great aristocratic landowners.” [p. 117] Centuries later, in 975, Emperor John I Tzimiskes returned from victories over the Muslims but discovered that the imperial chamberlain (a eunuch) was seizing all the land. He tried to stop him, but the chamberlain poisoned him first. [p. 205] Mr. Brownworth sees similar problems in the empire around 1025, when an “arrogant” and “insulated” educated class deliberately chose weak emperors, driving small farmers almost “to extinction” or serfdom, and spent so much they devalued the currency. [p. 221]

He writes that by 1347, “what was left of Byzantium was devolving into something resembling class warfare.” There were massacres of aristocrats and a pretender, John Cantacuzenus, even invited the Turks to fight for him. As a result, the Turks conquered Adrianople in 1362, the sultan sold the population into slavery, and eventually all Thrace filled with Turkish settlers. [p. 274]

It’s a more dramatic version of what we see today. Our elite is well-educated but not wise; prosperous, but not patriotic. The middle class, the bedrock of the nation, is weakening economically and socially. Elites use foreigners to win domestic power via replacement migration rather than as military auxiliaries. The consequences are the same.

Finally, there was a repeating pattern of trusting blindly in ideology or theology. The Eastern Roman Empire’s temporal power bolstered its spiritual power. Hagia Sophia’s beauty helped convert the Russians, the Bulgarians, and the Serbs. However, some emperors undermined their own legitimacy through religious persecution. In 725, Emperor Leo III gave a sermon explaining the rise of Islam by saying the Orthodox were using graven images. This unleashed a wave of persecution by emperors who thought that destroying Christian images would somehow help the Christian cause. It had no real-world objective beyond guessing the will of God.

Argument about icons before the emperor, from the Skylitzis Chronicle
Argument about icons before the emperor, from the Skylitzis Chronicle

Similarly, the refusal of the western pope and the Byzantine patriarchs to work together ensured their own destruction. Just as there is one God, there can only be one emperor, the sword that will protect the church. However, unnecessary divisions between the Latin and Greek churches led the Pope to proclaim Charlemagne “Holy Roman Emperor” in the West. This undermined the legitimacy of the empire, the papacy, and ultimately of Christianity. Popes in the west became temporal leaders bullied by kings and constantly in search of protectors. Instead of remaining above power politics, popes were mired in the unseemly battles.

Meanwhile, in the east, the worse the situation became, the more stubbornly eastern Christians clung to independence. Mr. Brownworth argues that Christians in Egypt voluntarily surrendered to the first Islamic invaders partly because they were dissatisfied with rule by fellow Christians. They found that “their new masters” were “considerably less tolerant than the orthodox regime they had swept away, but by then it was too late.” [p. 133] The Arab invasions and the population changes that followed wiped out the Hellenized Middle East and North Africa. It is now part of the Islamic world. That is far more serious than any doctrinal dispute.

In the empire’s final days, emperors repeatedly went west to beg for help, only to be told that they must submit to Rome. Some did, but found that their own subjects angrily rejected them. Meanwhile, the West never truly awakened to the threat. Only a few Genoese fought with the Byzantines at Constantinople’s last stand. The West put more effort into sacking the city in the Fourth Crusade than in trying to save it.

Religious authority needs temporal power. When the desperate Byzantines fled to Hagia Sophia in the terrible final hours, no angels fulfilled the prophecy to rescue them. The Turks butchered priests at the altar. Today, Middle Eastern Christianity has been all but wiped out. Under the Tsars, Russia repeatedly tried to retake Constantinople but failed, partly because of opposition from Western powers.

A painting of one of the many sieges of Constantinople
A painting of one of the many sieges of Constantinople

White traitors, myopic elites, and wishful thinking; Constantinople fell because the West failed to act as one. There will always be fights among whites. However, they are not potentially fatal conflicts where the stakes are the continuation of a people and a culture — rather than just an exchange of territory. Western kings never grasped the gravity of the alien threat. Just a few decades before the empire fell, Mr. Brownworth writes, “a concerted effort by Christendom just might have been able to push the Turks out of Europe while they were still fragmented,” but the “European powers” had “a false sense of security.” [p. 281]

It continues today. Demographic trends ensure whites will be minorities within our own countries within this century, even in Europe. Globally, we confront the rising power of China and an enormous African population boom. Few of “our” leaders fight for our race and civilization. “Our” rulers sometimes seem to be deliberately destroying us.

We should have faith in victory, but faith can’t be an excuse for inaction. What the West needs today are men who take the long view. We are doomed if we remain divided. Whites throughout the world share common foes and a common destiny.

The West is one. This won’t always mean political or religious unity. But it does mean that we see each other as comrades and family. It means that we can’t allow rulers who claim to speak in our name to set us at each other’s throats. We can’t afford another Fourth Crusade.

The fight that matters is the fight for our people. We must fight, not because we believe we are superior, but because we know we aren’t invincible. We see the cost of failure. We remember what has been lost in the Levant, northern Africa, Rhodesia, South Africa, and countless other beacons of civilization that have been snuffed out. Few torches remain. We will keep them lit and light new ones.

When Constantinople fell, its legacy lived on in the Renaissance, the Orthodox churches, and in Russia. Its light still shines because the West still lives. However, if we fail now, the darkness will last forever. We’re the heirs of Greece and Rome. That’s not a boast; it’s a challenge to live up to.

(Republished from American Renaissance by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: History • Tags: Byzantine, Constantinople, Islam, Ottoman Empire, Turkey 
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  1. Franz says:

    We’re the heirs of Greece and Rome. That’s not a boast; it’s a challenge to live up to.

    This is not defeatism, but if a teacher in an American school were to say anything like “You white kids are the heirs of Greece and Rome” that teacher would be out of a job. Quick.

    On the other hand he could make up any fantasy about nonwhite greatness and get away with it. Traitors just get paid too much in our world, very probably as they did in Constantinople.

  2. @Franz

    On the other hand he could make up any fantasy about nonwhite greatness and get away with it.

    Or, he/she could tell them the true story about Judas who got paid thirty pieces of silver – but he was a white racist and so he got his just desserts.

    • Agree: Franz
  3. stozi says: • Website

    “When Constantinople fell, its legacy lived on in the Renaissance, the Orthodox churches, and in Russia. Its light still shines because the West still lives. However, if we fail now, the darkness will last forever. We’re the heirs of Greece and Rome. That’s not a boast; it’s a challenge to live up to.”

    – The Renaissance was built on the wealth stolen and craftsmen abducted from Constantinople to Venice at the 4th Crusade. The latter ended its dark age by starting one for the former.

    – This reads like the Hollywood version of Western-European/Orthodox relations. The western lead character learns about the ‘magical victim’, the crimes of his people, but retains a western European centric narrative where those ‘others’ or here semi-others are still scenery. In the quote above, the ‘orthodox churches and Russia’ don’t exactly staunchly consider them/ourselves ‘western’. Think how much things like the 4th crusade, napoleon, hitler, the Harvard team’s shock therapy in 90s Russia, greek debt slavery, heap of filth created in Ukraine, dropping depleted uranium all over Serbia, etc, have endeared us. Keep in mind that Young Russians decreasingly see themselves as western. Let me make a little list of where things went wrong.

    [MORE]

    1a) over 1000s of years before greece or rome, Mesopotamian civilizations held regular debt jubilees, mainly to return smallholding farming families their land and freedom from slavery so they could contribute to the economy and army. Both greece (except under the so-called ‘tyrants’) and rome were far more extractive, allowing oligopolies to concentrate wealth in land. this led to depopulation as people fled.

    1b) what you westerners don’t understand is that, as the work of John Romanides shows, Catholocism was a Frankish perversion of Christianity to ideologically undergird the rise of feudalism that formed the end result of point 1). The byzantines, particularly under Tsar Roman, legislated against userers hoodwinking the freeholders of their land, because they were the backbone of the military.

    2) Catholicism has various perverse misinterpretations of Christianity, like inherited original sin, the idea that the members of the trinity are persons rather than ineffable hyposteses, that priests can’t marry (gee that turned out well. they basically have to marry in orthodoxy), that the great commission can be carried out by the sword, and that we need to justify our faith by proving god exists a la Aquinas. We believe like we believe in a friend, not like we believe in the tooth fairy, because we have built a relationship through prayer. It’s an experience that goes beyond words, and this western theological scholasticism is, in my opinion obscene. Besides, the Term ‘Word of God’ incontrovertibly refers to Christ himself the Logos (word), sort of the ordering and animating principle of creation, which we access in an indescribable experiential way and embody to the best of our ability through a regime of prayer. Scripture is important, but it is no equal to the ‘word of god’ in this sense, sorry protestants. The Soteriology is also different. Everything in the NT is allegory, so this can be hard to figure out, but god didn’t sacrifice his son to pay off a debt to himself, that makes no sense. The point was for god to become man and light the way for man to become god-like. Big topic, moving on. So, you want to drip some crocodile tears about having crushed us and left us for dead and then say we’re all ‘the west’. we don’t want to be part of your heretical filthy west, where today nothing is sacred at all anyway.

    3) Still, for all the pathetic misguidedness and lack of depth of western Christianity (just crack the Cappadocian fathers, Maximus the confessor, Efrem the Syrian, you’ll see what I mean) the guilt is not theirs alone. Unified early Imperial church corrupted the integrity of the universal church in 451 by excommunication the parts of it that had existed longer and at a high level of nuance, intellectual activity, and understanding of Christ’s language and context — the oriental orthodox in Armenia, Ethiopia, Asyria, and Egypt. Specifically, the church became imperial and imperious in contradiction to the essence of its message, (inter alia) that one who lived in poverty among the outcast and suffered a humiliating death is the king of kings. After that, imperial Christianity both RC and EO had its merits, but was really kind of a sad characature of itself, with guilt of this cain-like sin ever just under the surface of its communal consciousness. The orinetal orthodox were then left on their own against islam.

    4) The 4th crusade is a betrayal of similar magnitude. But the list just doesn’t end. Sure, the great white west helped Greece regain independence 200 years ago, but only at the cost of making it deeply, permanently indebt to the likes of Britain, a policy which, however flagrant greek profligacy, remains in force today. What do we get from being part of your west?

    Western ‘civilization’ is the ethos of the rapist, smash and grab, ‘get yours’, and gaslight the victims, while adopting their achievements as your own. This is not just the squaks of pink-buzzcutted fat brown trannie humanities profs obsessing over the legacy of extractive colonialism of Africa etc, but the history of your interaction with the eastern ‘whites’. Russia has the eurasianism of Vernadsky, Trubetskoy and Gumilov, we don’t need ‘whiteness’, it would cause us to disintegrate. We live and mix with our fellow eurasian peoples, with whom we have shared an organic multiethnic state for 1000 years, enriched culturally and genetically.

    Western ‘superiority’ is built on a foundation of sand, and is slipping by the day. largely because you are so lost in sophistry you don’t know which way is up. Here is an attempt at a more grounded modern history of the west:
    https://whattherussia.wordpress.com/2016/06/17/sketch-of-a-brief-history-of-modernity/

    whether you can face reality and build anything back remains doubtful to me, as debt rises and resources and wealth fade, the elites will be at each others throats, while Russia, Iran and China use their experience of existential crisis to quietly navigate through as a confused west runs in circles pissing itself and shrieking to death.

    • Troll: KenR
  4. @Franz

    ““You white kids are the heirs of Greece and Rome””
    Yes, the teacher would likely be in trouble. But, would more than 1% of those white kids even comprehend the ideas of “Greece”, “Rome” or, indeed, “heir” ?
    I fully support the “Western” heritage. I am proud of it. However, I wonder whether things have not gone so far out of control that we need to move the focus even further out. That is, to focus on basic concepts, (within a Western narrative, where that is useful) such as between —
    Rationality & irrationality.
    Reason & superstition.
    Rational will & Vice.
    Loyalty & greed.
    Morality & blind or lying urges.
    And the list can go on.
    Our danger is so great that I fear only a concerted return to first principles can save us.

    • Replies: @Franz
  5. Al Stewart commemorated the event in the rock ballad Constantinople.

    There is also the tradition that Moscow will be the Third Rome. No Al Stewart song about that yet, but I’m hoping!

  6. Samala says:

    “if we fail now, the darkness will last forever…” No, the Chinese/East-Asians are already the new light of humanity, as they were many times in the past.

  7. KenH says:
    @Franz

    On the other hand he could make up any fantasy about nonwhite greatness and get away with it.

    The teacher would immediately qualify for teacher of the year and hailed for fostering a sense of racial pride in non-white pupils. But foster a sense of pride amongst white kids and yes, the teacher would be fired within 24hrs and the FBI might be at his door for “white domestic extremism”.

    • Agree: Franz
  8. Mr. Grey says:

    Islam waged an offensive against the West for 1000 years, from the first Arab attacks in the 7th century against the Romans in Syria, to the Turks final defeat against Austria in 1699. Then include the Armenian genocide and the horrors of Smyrna in 1923, which can be considered the final battle between the Byzantines and the Turks. The West has nothing to apologize for. Islam is not simply a religion like any on other religion, but a sadistic ruling ideology that condemns non-believers to 2nd class citizenship if not slavery.

  9. Franz says:
    @animalogic

    But, would more than 1% of those white kids even comprehend the ideas of “Greece”, “Rome” or, indeed, “heir” ?

    Your response put me in mind of a quote that’s been banging around my head the last few days:

    “The age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators has succeeded, and the glory of Europe is extinguished forever.”

    Edmund Burke laments the execution of Marie-Antoinette (1793)

    Hope he was wrong, but he had the right targets in mind.

  10. Mr. Brownworth writes that “the merchants, industrialists, and small landowners that made up the middle class were diminishing as wars and uprisings began to disrupt trade . . . small farms began to disappear, swallowed by the ravenous hunger of the great aristocratic landowners.”

    Only a few Genoese fought with the Byzantines at Constantinople’s last stand. The West put more effort into sacking the city in the Fourth Crusade than in trying to save it.

    It was a good read, although it is alluding to the genuinely prime, causative factors instead of citing them as primary. Byzantine Grand Strategy was always machavellian, paying one group to attack others, and counting on distant Turkic, Iranic or Caucasian tribes to distract one another.

    The stripping of eastern lands is the prime causative factor of collapse, because in the greed for the few to own it all, and to render the masses as dispossessed helots on centralized estates that had previously been their own homes, the urban elites in walled safety wiped out the morale of their own front line defence force. The admission of Turkic ‘settlers’ in vast numbers runs a close second.. a variant on the modern Republican / CoC ‘Guest worker’ betrayal.

    Byzantium’s reliable provincial foot soldiers that had once been holding back the human wave, from the steppes, were replaced by mercenaries and tribal horsemen, now stationed remotely in urban areas, instead of on the frontiers in fortifications. The Byzantine reliance on hired men bought for specific campaigns replaced the free men (now reduced to helots) rising in defence of their own local homes and cities, supplemented in times of invasion by frontier forces. It turns out, slaves don’t fight for their overseers.

    The Genoese effort at the final battle for Constantinople was something that truly gives the Spartan defence of the Hot Gates a run for its money, but it was also fought by Venetians and mainland Greeks. They stopped untold numbers of human-wave attacks behind ‘walls’ that had to be reconstituted with rubble and bits of wood in between the human waves, and were eventually partially composed of barricades mingled with a vast supply of dead bodies.

    That said, Constantine XI is not the agent of responsibility, merely the final agent of office. By his arrival on the scene, the entire Byzantine empire is functionally a mere city state that by 1453 is no longer defensible, and the city itself is already a literal dependency of the Ottoman Turks. It is not an independent entity at this stage.

    Giustiniani gets no aid from the Genoan’s within Galata / Pera which is the trading post that causes the Genoan interests in the first place..

    The end summary would to me indicate that the moral of the story is, while monetary / economic interests can build an empire, only a consolidated people acting in their own local interests as a paternal duty can actually preserve it.

    • Agree: Tom Marvolo Riddle
  11. Blade says:

    An article by an imbecile. Just skimming, I noticed dozens of incorrect information pieces. But one stands out, so I will respond; supposed rape and killing of children and women. Constantinople had only 35.000 people at the time of its fall if you count 5000 soldiers as well. If Turks indeed massacred people and burnt their neighborhoods this already small number should have been eradicated; then where did all those Greeks who lived in Istanbul for 500 years come from? The reality is that churches that weren’t captured while the battle was ongoing weren’t even converted to mosques. Hagia Sophia became a mosque because it is close to the sea and by the time of its capture Byzantines still hadn’t resigned. This is in accordance with the interpretation of Islamic warfare laws. On the other hand, Muslims weren’t as lucky if their lands were captured by Christians. One look at the fall of Kazan, and you see a massive genocide (the equivalent of 7 million people today if you adjust for world population %). That’s just one example; not even getting into Reconquista, or the fall of the Balkans (where Turks were mass slaughtered in millions).

    There is a reason why Greeks very often switched sides and joined the Ottomans during the conquest of Byzantine territories. They were sick of extractive Byzantine elites, their taxes, incompetence, and corruption. If Turks were indeed the savages this imbecile claims they were, then why would Greeks join them? Not only Greeks, but even European soldiers often fought along with Ottomans, for a fee. Maybe this whole West vs. East thing with regards to Ottomans is in your imagination and the reality is that if it wasn’t for Turks in the past few years, you’d have a few more million Africans and Arabs in Europe through Libya and Syria, thanks to your warmongering elites.

  12. matthias says:

    A juvenile review of a popular history book written by a high school teacher. Brownworth is not an academic. Mr. Hood should read some real history and hold off on this ahistoric, “we wuz Romanz” melodrama. How can white nationalists be so ignorant about their own history?

  13. Excellent article.

    Constantinople tells us defeat is possible. It has happened before and the consequences were sickening. We still live with them. The Hagia Sophia, the greatest church of antiquity, is a now mosque. A Turkish ruler with neo-Ottoman pretensions uses Muslim migrants slowly to conquer Europe.

    Indeed, unless Europe cleans up its act with regards to its policys on immigration and islam, then it is in danger of being demographically corrupted by these racial aliens. Western Europe will have to deal with large numbers of volatile muslim refugees, and Southern Europe will be exposed to invasion by the Turks. If things do not change in the next couple of decades, then Europe may find itself in a dire situation. By that point, it will be necessary to form a grand coalition and wage a great war against the Turks.

    Islam was a powerful new enemy. Yet the decisive blow came when Western European crusaders sacked Constantinople in 1204. After that, it may have been a matter of time before the city fell to the Turks. Nevertheless, three things contributed to the fall, and all apply to our own age.

    The sack of Constantinople in 1204 was a devastating blow for the Byzantines. It decapitated the empire and spread chaos throughout all its territorys, in the Balkans and Anatolia. However, it was a blow from which the Greeks were able to recover. The collapse of the Sultanate of Rum in 1243 was a relief for them, as it secured their Anatolian territorys against the Turks. The Byzantines were even able to retake Constantinople in 1261, which restored their power and integrity. But by this point, they no longer had an overwhelming advantage against their rival empires, and were constantly struggling to stay in control.

    First, there were white traitors, who put greed ahead of loyalty. Chief among them in 1543 was a Hungarian named Urban, a gunnery expert who served the Byzantines. However, when the nearly exhausted empire couldn’t pay him enough, he went to work for the attacking enemy, Sultan Mehmed II.

    The Turks already had the technical know-how of building cannons since 1430. They were more open minded towards gunpower weaponry than most European empires at that time. This gave them an notable advantage during sieges, when they were able to blast apart fortifications resisted conventional attack. What the engineer Orban provided the Turks with was the metallurgical skills to cast high quality cannons that could fire multiple shots without cracking. (Although of course, there were limits to this. Mehmed overused his cannons and they exploded as a result)

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