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I am a jazz artist, I have dedicated my entire adult life to the study of Black American music and culture. Jazz is certainly the most important and maybe, the only significant American contribution to world culture. And the next question is, where is Black American jazz now? Why did Black Americans lose interest in their own fantastic creation?

One answer is that Jazz was born out of resistance. It was fuelled by defiance of the ‘American dream’: instead of seeking mammon, wealth and power, our Black artistic founding fathers sacrificed their lives for the sake of beauty. They literally killed themselves searching for new voices, sounds, colours. They left us with a great legacy but their offspring moved on to new artistic domains such as Hip Hop and Rap.

For the people who made Jazz into an art form, music was a revolutionary spirit. For Bird, Now’s the Time meant that time was ripe for social change. For John Coltrane, Alabama was the appropriate answer to the KKK’s Baptist Church bombing that killed four African-American girls.

When Jazz meant something it wasn’t a language of victimhood. Quite the opposite, Jazz was a message of defiance: everything you can do, we, the Black people, can do better. And that is the truth, no one has managed to do it better than Trane, Bird, Miles, Elvin, Sonny, Blakey, Duke, Ella and many others. These artists did not beg for Wall Street funding, they didn’t ask for others to join their struggle: instead, they made the rest of us beg for their beauty, their art and their spirit to illuminate and liberate us. It didn’t take long before America’s elite realised that Jazz was the best Ambassador for America around the world. And all of this happened while Black Americans were subject to apartheid, especially in the South. It would be reasonable to believe that it was Jazz’s transformation into the ‘Voice of America’ that became a major factor in the liberation of the Black south.

Sadly, Jazz lost its soul a decade or two ago. It went from the voice of resistance to what has gradually been reduced into an ‘academic matter,’ a ‘system of knowledge.’ Nowadays, many young jazz musicians are ‘music college graduates.’ They may be very fast and sophisticated but have very little to say and, in most cases, they prefer not to say anything. Some may believe that saying something defies their ‘artistic objectives’ as it blurs the distinction between art and politics. I am afraid that they are wrong. For Jazz to be a meaningful art form, it better be revolutionary to the core. Jazz is, before anything else, the sound of freedom.

For a while, we have witnessed contemporary Jazz deteriorate into a meaningless technical exercise. Jazz, basically, died on us. Did this artistic demise anticipate the collapse of American civilization and America’s self-image as a ‘free society?’

Why did Jazz die? Because Black Americans lost interest in their original art form. Why did they lose interest? Largely because their art, like every other aspect of the American culture, finance, media, spirit and dream has been occupied.

ORDER IT NOW

Along with other Jazz artists and humanists, I hate racism in all forms. Yet, I want to see people celebrating their symptoms. I am one of those guys who want to see Germans writing philosophy and composing symphonies again. I want to see people celebrating their own unique cultures as long as they don’t do it at the expense of others. More than anything else, I want Black people proud of what they are. I wish that they will, once again, lead us back to the path of beauty that they, more than any other people, introduced to us all. I hope Black America will give us a young Trane, a fresh upcoming Bird, the next Sarah Vaughan, a Miles character. I want to see Black Americans hypnotising us with their talents, celebrating their greatness. I want them to be the American Ambassadors they once were rather than victims of America’s abuse. I guess that instead of sending American soldiers to liberate other people in criminal neocon wars the time is ripe for America to liberate itself.

Watch me Liberating the American People

(Republished from Gilad Atzmon by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Ideology, Race/Ethnicity • Tags: Blacks, Jazz, Race Riots 
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  1. Jazz is certainly the most important and maybe, the only significant American contribution to world culture.

    One could add Blues and Rock’n’Roll.

    And the next question is, where is Black American jazz now? Why did Black Americans lose interest in their own fantastic creation?

    The same question applies to those other genres. How is it that a people so talented and productive in the field of music have given it all up for Hip-Hop?

    One answer is that Jazz was born out of resistance. It was fuelled by defiance of the ‘American dream’ …

    I expect you are right. The one thing that Hip-Hop has in common with the earlier and more noble genres is defiance. Perhaps the thing that has changed is that it is now socially acceptable to rap about shooting cops and screwing ‘ho’s, and so there is no need to show coded defiance by mastery of an instrument and an art form. Sad times indeed.

  2. anon[191] • Disclaimer says:

    Perhaps negroes have lost interest in Jazz because they never had anything to do with the creation of it. It was created by whites, promoted by jews as being negro music which had an appeal because negroes were thought by whites as having a primeval sexual appetite, unrestrained by the straightjacket of white norms and listening to jazz was forbidden in “decent” society. Jazz has been said to be negro music for so long that nobody questions it. If we want to see real negro music we must look at what the most primitive tribes in Africa play even today. Chanting and drumming, music in its most primitive form. The fact that negroes can learn to play sophisticated instruments and play complex pieces isn’t the same as saying that they invented these instruments or created complex music. Compare this to white societies of 1000, 2000 or even 3000 years ago. Complicated musical forms, wind instruments, stringed instruments and percussion instruments and means to write down music. What did negroes have in the past and present, hollowed out gourds with animal hides stretched across the top and chanting. The truest modern form of negro creation would be rap and hip hop. Not much more than chanting to a primitive beat and of course, promoted by the jews as being created by negro geniuses.

    What is a gentleman in the progressive jazz world. A musician who can play but doesn’t.

    • Agree: Hippopotamusdrome
    • Disagree: Escher
    • Thanks: PetrOldSack
  3. @James N. Kennett

    ‘Jazz is certainly the most important and maybe, the only significant American contribution to world culture.’

    ‘One could add Blues and Rock’n’Roll.’

    Abstract expressionism. Modern democracy. Mass college education. The last two were pretty much pioneered by America — and have obviously had a major cultural effect.

    • Replies: @Franz
    , @Ann Nonny Mouse
  4. Franz says:
    @Colin Wright

    Abstract expressionism. Modern democracy. Mass college education.

    All three of these are are debits. Save conversations like this for positive contributions, which in any case the USA has stopped even trying to do.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  5. Anonim says:
    @anon

    I can smell a jew like you km away

  6. zylo says:

    You write: “Jazz is certainly the most important and maybe, the only significant American contribution to world culture.”

    You have to be kidding:

    Movie making?

    Video games?

    Telephony?

    Aviation?

    Basketball (invented by a Canadian but in the USA)

    Everything that downflows from the transistor to include modern mobile phones?

    Facebook and associated mediums like Instagram.

    Movements such as “Go West Young Man” which appeal to freedom-loving people. Where is the similarity in any other nation?

    Free speech.

    Freedom of religion.

    Pharmaceuticals at the cutting edge?

    Your thesis that the only thing Americans have invented, which probably has contributed to world culture on a substantial basis, was invented by blacks, may be true, but is dubious. American movies have had a pronounced effect on the world. America has freedom of speech and religion, you cannot seriously downplay the 2nd and 3rd order effects of these freedoms on the world. America is home to aviation, which has changed the world. Prior to that, the steam engine with Robert Fulton. Changing the way that people travel is not minor – it is an epic change to humanity and far, far more important than jazz.

    You write: “It didn’t take long before America’s elite realised that Jazz was the best Ambassador for America around the world.” Really? One would guess that American movies, with there amazing visual impact, would be a more effective Ambassador than music, which is down to an individual’s ear. I could be wrong but people love to watch stuff on screen and America sold one hell of a ride with its movies.

    America has the romance of settlers traveling West, and men risking it all to carve their own. What nation, other than say Aus or SA can compare? You downplay the notion of America as a huge place, where a man could make his own. But didn’t Franklin write about how the colonies were superior to Europe for this very reason? Maybe your life involves sitting in a dark room playing music. I support that and wish you the best. People make beautiful art. But I love being outdoors, away from most people, I love building stuff and not having anyone look over my shoulder. I love freedom to a massive degree and the grandiosity of all that comes with being my own man. A small German town holds zero appeal to me no matter how nice it may be. Where other than America was someone able to be so fully free? You downplay the AMERICAN DREAM which was so influential around the world. How many came to these shores to achieve their self-actualization rather than die a soulless death in their homelands? A slave to village or small city expectations.

    No matter how you look at it, the transistor is a cultural enabler as it changed the way people communicate. You choose not see that American freedoms helped to spur tech forward like no other place. The impact of the transistor on world culture is far beyond any impact of jazz. Jazz has many substitutes, the transistor had none.

    The space race as the continuation of GO WEST YOUNG MAN.

    You have adopted a nonsensical view of what is culture. That’s fine but you should more clearly define what is culture rather than overlook massive advancements that fundamentally changed human behavior like: telephony, aviation, nuclear power. The notion that tech advancement is not cultural is an argument but not one that I would support. This is to say nothing of movie making and video games.

    This past Saturday saw a private company SpaceX launch men into space, while the descendants of jazz broke into Target. Yeah right, tech advancement is not culture. What a joke. You are a bit older, so you probably have low T (and I mention that so you get proper TRT treatment) because low T people make arguments that close them off to criticism. They are not Mike Tyson ready to rumble. Get a script and I say that in a friendly way.

    One final word, that shows your intent is not fully noble (I relate this suspected low T but high intellectual confidence):
    You write: “Along with other Jazz artists and humanists, I hate racism in all forms.”

    Here is a direct challenge to you as a man:
    About 10 years ago a wealthy middle-aged professional woman in Atlanta was selling her luxury condominium. I want to say that she was ~38 and the condo was about $600k but my memory may be wrong. A young male called her for a showing. She agreed. At some point, either upon completing the call or meeting the young man at the reception, she phoned a friend and said she didn’t want to travel upstairs with the young man to show her condominium unit because he was a young black man and she was scared. She informed her friend, however, that she didn’t want to appear racist, therefore, should would show the unit. So she takes the young man upstairs and is promptly raped and murdered. This crime has stuck with me all these years. I cannot help but wonder what were her final thoughts as her worldview was brought home in a sickening and heinous crime. The type of crime that puts stark relief to black people and white people.

    To you: would this woman have been right and justified to be racist to this young man and decline to show him the unit because his overall look and race would suggest there is no chance he could afford it and a very high chance that he may kill her? Is her death the price society must pay for “anti-racism”? Would society not be better off with her alive and having known to be racist at the right time and place? There is also no way around it: race would have to factor into her decision given the extraordinary violence displayed by young black men.

    • Agree: Corporal Punishment
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @Robjil
  7. Jazz died because it’s just random noise.

    Might as well listen to the exhaust system of a small generator.

  8. DaveE says:

    Great piece, Gilad……. thank you so much!

    I would add that, not only is American music (the stuff worth listening to, anyway) predominantly black, it is also predominantly Southern and for largely the same reasons.

    You hit the nail on the head that good music always has a revolutionary spirit behind it. Blacks and Southerners have both been so screwed by the banking swindlers – they earned their right to complain the HARD way.

    I shows, too. Not just in Jazz, either… From Elvis and Sun Studios to Dixieland to Creole to New Orleans to Delta Blues to Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys (“western” swing) to Delbert, Lyle, Joe Ely and a gazillion GREAT bands from Texas….. American music IS and has always been Southern Music.

    Not mention my personal favorite of all, Ray Charles, who fused Southern Gospel with jazz and wrote the book on soulful piano playing.

    Even the cheesiest Nashville sugar-pop had some soul to it – at least in the days of Hank Williams and Johnny Cash. Wasn’t it “Trane” or “Bird” who said something to the effect of “Man, listen to those stories” when he played some country songs on a jukebox?

    I grew up in Jew Jersey and my friends just couldn’t “get” how the Allman Brothers were so much better than Aerosmith….. and they still don’t.

    Anyway thanks again…… and it sure great to read something positive about this sick country’s best (perhaps only) redeeming feature – Southern Black Music.

    • Agree: Tsar Nicholas
  9. , I hate racism in all forms.

    That is meaningless. It’s meaningless because you haven’t provided in the same article your definition of racism.

    It means nothing. It’s clod talk.

  10. T. Weed says:

    Oh, yes. In High school, in the early ’50’s, I heard many great black jazz artists when they came to San Antonio with Jazz At The Philharmonic. We loved them.

    • Replies: @T. Weed
  11. As a “Jazz guitarist” you know that Jazz is non existent without the blues! Or maybe you don’t? No blues, no Jazz! Blues is the greatest black American cultural contribution to the world, no blues, no rock and roll, and everything else in popular music the blues influenced! You are the quintessential “Jazz snob”! And I play jazz guitar myself! Only without the snob factor!

  12. Gilad, how could you leave off your list of great jazz musicians the greatest of them all, Louis Armstrong? His singing, despite his gravelly voice (it was much less gravelly in the 20’s & 30’s; cf. West End Blues: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WPCBieSESI ), was very influential; he taught a generation how to sing jazz. Most people (like me) born in the post WW2 era know him primarily from his early TV appearances (e.g. on the Ed Sullivan Show) and think of him as the odd token Negro on an otherwise white show (like Buckwheat in Our Gang films). On these shows he always sings. But he deserves to be known primarily for his playing which is brilliant, more brilliant than that of any of the musicians on your list. He is the black Heifetz. Cf. Mahogany Hall Stomp

    and Blue Again, a typical Armstrong song with its trite lyrics and fabulous playing before and after them:

    https://genius.com/Louis-armstrong-blue-again-lyrics (this site gets the lyrics wrong in several places: e.g. “it’s new again”)
    There used to be a great website for early jazz, called The Red Hot Jazz Archive (http://www.redhotjazz.com/ ). It offered links to recordings of nearly all the great early jazz musicians. It no longer exists, at least not in its previous form. Hopefully its contents will appear soon on another website. Cf. this site which uses the title but does not provide links to the recordings: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/292http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/292

  13. Anon[375] • Disclaimer says:

    I’m going to give some alternate theories about the Jazz/Blues thing.

    Theory 1: Jazz had heavy white contribution. Especially from Sicilians at the beginning. Black people did use the music to defy and get under the skin of whites. After a while it stopped working, and furthermore the sound of the music itself wasn’t nearly as aggressive and angry as the natural spirit of black animosity.

    Hence, rap took over. Rap is a more authentic portrayal of the black man’s ego, desire to dominate, and anger/hate.

    There is no point to Jazz anymore now that rap exists.

    Theory 2: People, by and large, never really liked Jazz. It was always over-hyped.

    Musicians liked it-and they like basically all music- because it was a bit off the wall, and because they are often high in hypnotizability (“I want to see Black Americans hypnotising us with their talents”), and interested in the weird experiences that might be had from going into a trance while listening to Jazz and on drugs.

    But another key reason some people care about Jazz is ideological. It is a “liberal” thing to do, and it is important to be as liberal as possible. It is not even about the music.

    Jews liked it because they thought that it got under the skin of whites. And because they wanted to boost the existential, biological enemy of the white-skinned homo-sapien. They might not even be conscious of this.

    But the average man never really got into it. The type of Jazz that the everyman likes is cool Jazz, which is more structured and white, and then, only when played as background music.

    The everyman likes low-brow pop, other “cool” music such as electronic, sometimes country, etc. The everyman likes music that can be followed, that is carefully designed to evoke something. Jazz is too chaotic for that.

    Nobody listens to Jazz unless it is forced upon them by liberal cultural elites. There is basically no Jazz in Asia, but there is Rock and classical.

    Theory 3 Jazz is not the only contribution to world culture from the USA.

    American Christian religious culture has been quite important in global Christian culture.

    The greatest American contribution to the world is American agriculture. American agriculture has been incredibly innovative, and has really pushed the boundaries of agriculture worldwide, which has greatly changed the nature of human societies as more people are able to live in cities and suburbs around the world. The capitalist-financial aspect of American agriculture has also been a huge deal.

    Rock music, which is not nearly as black as liberals insist, has been influential.

    Jazz is a VERY weak contribution in comparison.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
  14. @Franz

    ‘All three of these are are debits. Save conversations like this for positive contributions, which in any case the USA has stopped even trying to do.’

    Now you’re moving the goal posts. Nobody said the contributions had to be positive.

    Personally, I can’t stand Jazz, but that doesn’t disprove that it’s an American contribution to modern culture.

    Did I mention cars? Popular ownership of cars is definitely an American contribution — and one with a major cultural impact.

    • Replies: @Franz
  15. @zylo

    ‘… About 10 years ago a wealthy middle-aged professional woman in Atlanta was selling her luxury condominium. I want to say that she was ~38 and the condo was about $600k but my memory may be wrong. A young male called her for a showing. She agreed. At some point, either upon completing the call or meeting the young man at the reception, she phoned a friend and said she didn’t want to travel upstairs with the young man to show her condominium unit because he was a young black man and she was scared. She informed her friend, however, that she didn’t want to appear racist, therefore, should would show the unit. So she takes the young man upstairs and is promptly raped and murdered. This crime has stuck with me all these years. I cannot help but wonder what were her final thoughts as her worldview was brought home in a sickening and heinous crime…’

    The implications of that are obviously politically incorrect. Therefore, it didn’t happen.

  16. T. Weed says:
    @T. Weed

    I should have added that the audience for this jazz was nearly all white.

  17. Dear Gilad

    Along with other Jazz artists and humanists, I hate racism in all forms. Yet, I want to see people celebrating their symptoms. I am one of those guys who want to see Germans writing philosophy and composing symphonies again. I want to see people celebrating their own unique cultures as long as they don’t do it at the expense of others. More than anything else, I want Black people proud of what they are. I wish that they will, once again, lead us back to the path of beauty that they, more than any other people, introduced to us all. I hope Black America will give us a young Trane, a fresh upcoming Bird, the next Sarah Vaughan, a Miles character. I want to see Black Americans hypnotising us with their talents, celebrating their greatness.

    I wish you felt that way about Jewish culture. It is funny my cousin Eric Udel (Blues Brothers) felt they same way about his electric bass. When I was young and used to go to clubs to hear him play, he was the only white playing. The blacks in the audience used to make fun of him. You might feel differently if you played black music in the US. In the UK and Europe you are an anomaly, here you would be resented.

    • Replies: @ariadna
    , @Gilad Atzmon
  18. ariadna says:

    A few points of contention.
    “Jazz was born of resistance/defiance of the American Dream” by blacks who instead of seeking wealth choose to sacrifice themselves for beauty.”
    Reductive, simplistic and false, this espouses the marxist view of art as a direct expression of the artist’s revolt against the “oppressor” — a hopefully unconsciously received idea. It is a view that—surprising from an artist who so often denounces materialism (“Mammon”) — denies art its spirituality and incorporates it into the marxist worldview according to which the defining societal relationship that governs everything is that between the exploited and the exploiter. An amazing thing to do in defiance of the deeply spiritual content of the roots of jazz and all the way to liturgical jazz.
    Musicians, like all artists, do not deliberately “reject wealth” to “seek beauty” on philosophical and/or moral principle as conscious “revolutionaries.” They create art because they can and because their talent, often their genius, impels them to do that above all else. What they consciously sought to “revolutionize” was their own craft, creating music that defies, not “the American dream,” but the music that existed.

    Jazz is an American musical genre created mostly by American blacks deeply immersed in American culture, originating in New Orleans and later thriving in Chicago, NYC and other places, whose roots are in the Negro spirituals, gospel music and blues, and admittedly influenced by military brass band music (white…) — (“Oh, When the Saints…”).
    It is quintessentially American, just as samba —created by blacks brought to Brasil from the same region, West Africa, from which black slaves were brought to the US) — is quintessentially Brazilian, and just as Candombe (with an identical African pedigree) became essentially Uruguayan. None of these was born in a type of hermetically closed African bubble on plantations, and they are as different from each other as any other music. Incidentally, even in far more hermetically closed bubbles, the East European/Russian shtetls whose contribution to music is klezmer, the klezmer music bears the distinct imprint of the local music (Russian or Romanian).

    To believe that music or any art form is simply a by-product of resistance to racial/social oppression is to subscribe to the above-mentioned reductive marxist view of culture. The great attraction of marxism-leninism is that it offers a grossly simplified worldview of thickened contours that can be easily handled. To great intellectual loss.
    None of this takes anything away from the fact that blacks were indeed oppressed in the apartheid that followed slavery, which deeply marked their sense of personal identity. Nevertheless that alone did not … produce jazz. The primary theme in all black music (before rap) was divine redemption, not social liberation, second come the sentimental/erotic themes and only in third place social revolt messages. As for jazz without lyrics it is just… music, beautiful music.

    2. “Jazz is the only significant American contribution to world culture.”
    So: jazz is black and it it the only notable achievement of American culture, is it now?…
    Hard to speculate what can give rise to such a conviction: some ignorance combined with some animus against all those “dead white males” that created the American culture? Shouldn’t one stop to consider (or inform oneself of) for example, the extraordinary body of American literature, even if only a severely truncated list that excludes, stay, some oldies accused of being “more “European than American” in style (Hawthorne) and only starting with Melville, and some modern “ethnic” ones like Roth? Shouldn’t one consider modern architecture, which surely someone visiting the US must have seen? Shouldn’t one consider the youngest art— the movies, some of which are true works of art? And so much more. How in the world can one ignore what the entire world recognizes and admires and why?

    3. Contending that jazz was born and thrived as an expression of black resistance to oppression poses the problem of then explaining its “death” despite the fact that American blacks are now far more radicalized and convinced of being unbearably oppressed than ever. So we get this: “Jazz died because it lost its soul and it was occupied.”
    Any art genre thrives while it is fresh, new and in opposition, not to societal oppression (the Proletcultist refrain) but to the contemporaneous art environment in which it exists and which it defies and challenges.
    “For the people who made jazz into an art form, music was revolutionary spirit.”
    Correct, but not as the author means it. It was NOT “in answer to the Birmingham killings,” it was and ARTISTIC REVOLUTIONARY SPIRIT.

    The demise of jazz was brought about the same two factors that eventually push a genre/trend into desuetude:
    — Wide acceptance and being academized, “elevated” to the status of a museum piece. Worse: it became “chic” among the white elite. It never got much traction among the blue-collar whites and none in the Ozarks.

    — Vulgarization
    Perhaps Atzmon’s statement that jazz died because it was “occupied” can be taken as a dim, unexamined and unelaborated perception of these two factors.

    On being academized:
    The Impressionists were revolutionaries while Manet, Monet, Renoir and others were refused entry in the Salon. Now their paintings hang in the most prestigious world museums. Similarly, you know that jazz passed its zenith when they dedicated a Preservation Hall to it in New Orleans (1961) and when the US Congress officially declared it a “unique form of American music deserving support to preserve.” It is now a butterfly pinned onto a display board and, to coin a phrase, they are pimping the butterfly.

    On Vulgarization:
    Genres that pass away are not only “elevated” by being academized, they are also debased by vulgarization. One can buy mass produced prints os classic painters or you can even make them yourself using paint-by-number kits.
    You may listen to jazz composed long ago and superbly interpreted by new artists and that will never cease to be “beauty.” But you may also hear nice enough “new” jazz created and/or interpreted by artists worldwide, with incorporated alluvia of anything from “Latin” (not the ancient kind) sounds to kletzmer riffs.
    If we are serious about jazz preservation perhaps we should imitate what the French did with respect to champagne, forbidding any and all others who make the delightful bubbly to call it “champagne” but rather describing it as elaborated by the Champenoise method. Call it “jazz inspired”? So, fine, let it go into the world, be fruitful and multiply.

    4. Finally, jazz should be preserved, played, enjoyed and above all respected as part of the American art patrimony, and thanks are due to the many artists like Atzmon who play it so ably. It cannot, however, “drag us back to the path of beauty” (whatever that means) anymore than Atzmon can grandiosely “liberate America.”

  19. Tony Hall says:

    Good back to basics commentary on jazz. Thanks Gilad. I disagree with your overly narrow characterization of the often prolific surges of creativity that developed within the USA, surges of creativity as in jazz that have been in great demand in the rest of the world. I also think you circumscribe too much the role of jazz as the primary, or, even sole platform of Black musical prowess. At the World Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893 Bohemian musician Antonin Dvorak observed

    “I am now satisfied that the future music of this country must be founded upon what are called the Negro melodies. This must be the real foundation of any serious and original school of composers to be developed in the United States. When I first came here last year I was impressed with this idea, and it has developed into a settled conviction. These beautiful and varied themes are the product of the soil. They are American. I would like to trace out the individual authorship of the Negro melodies, for it would throw a great deal of light upon the question I am deeply interested in at present.

    “These are the folk songs of America and your composers must turn to them. All of the great musicians have borrowed from the songs of the common people. Beethoven’s most charming scherzo is based upon what might now be considered a skillfully handled Negro melody. I have myself gone to the simple, half-forgotten tunes of the Bohemian peasants for hints in my most serious work. Only in this way can a musician express the true sentiment of his people. He gets into touch with the common humanity of his country.

    “In the Negro melodies of America, I discover all that is needed for a great and noble school of music. They are pathetic, tender, passionate, melancholy, solemn, religious, bold, merry, gay or what you will. It is music that sets itself to any mood or any purpose. There is nothing in the whole range of composition that cannot be supplied with themes from this source. The American musician understands these tunes, and they move sentiment in him. They appeal to his imagination because of their associations.

    “When I was in England, one of the ablest musical critics in London complained to me that there was no distinctively English school of music, nothing that appealed particularly to the British mind and heart. I replied to him that the composers of England had turned their backs upon the fine melodies of Ireland and Scotland, instead of making them the essence of an English school. It is a great pity that English musicians have not profited out of this rich store. Somehow, the old Irish and Scotch ballads have not seized upon or appealed to them. I hope it will not be so in this country, and I intend to do all in my power to call attention to these treasures of melody which you have.

    “Among my pupils in the National Conservatory of Music I have discovered strong talents. There is one young man upon whom I am building strong expectations. His compositions are based upon Negro melodies, and I have encouraged him in this direction. The other members in the composition class seem to think that it is not in good taste to get ideas from the old plantation songs, but they are wrong, and I have tried to impress upon their minds the fact that the greatest composers have not considered it beneath their dignity to go to the humble folk songs for motifs.

    “I did not come to America to interpret Beethoven or Wagner for the public. That is not my work, and I would not waste any time on it. I came to discover what young Americans had in them and help them to express it. When the Negro minstrels are here again I intend to take my young composers with me and have them comment on the melodies.”

    https://archive.schillerinstitute.com/educ/dunbar.html

    Compare your views of Negro Melodies Gilad with those of Dvorak. I see a lot of similarity. Now consider the low and vulgar expression of “Negro Melodies” as handled in the Great Bill Gates, Mandatory Vaccine Television special, One World, Together At Home. It features sold-out hacks like Mick Jagger, LLcool J, Common, Beyonce, Maluma, Michelle Obama, Elton John, and Oprah as they prepare the ground for the forthcoming Black Lives Matter psy op in which we are now engulfed. What a come down for the tradition of artistic creativity charted for America by the ultimate Bohemian of the real Bohemia.

  20. Robjil says:
    @zylo

    Free speech is not found in our MSM in the west anymore.

    It is only found on sites like this and books from non- MSM controlled sites.

    Free speech is Athenian debate.

    These days Athenian debate is forbidden for many subjects. The big 6 is the most forbidden of all. It is a hot cake for jail time, job less time or ostracize time for any Galileo who treads this in our MSM.

    The closing down of human mind on Athenian Debate started on 12. 23. 1913.

    Fiat money holders had to protect themselves from any scrutiny.

    The big 6 was the big ticket after WWII.

    The latest gimmick is that one can not mention Soros as doing anything bad in the world. It is Anti-Semitic to do so. Why? ADL says so. ADL uses the big 6 umbrella to silence the crimes of big criminals who happen to be Jewish or have Jewish origins.

    It is a cruel racket for our planet. People in high places should not be protected when they are doing massive havoc to our planet.

  21. ariadna says:
    @Fran Taubman

    1. You are a nice cousin to have, Fran. Why were the blacks laughing at your cousin? Did he check his fly?
    2. You are wrong about Atzmon. He played in the US a zillion times and was only resented by a small but determined group you would heartily approve of. They are not art critics but they were incensed by his obstinate habit of making less than admiring remarks about Israel’s politics and what he calls “Jewishness.” You, yourself, would not want him to play music unless he shut up, would you? He should only only open his mouth to insert the sax in it, right?

    • LOL: Zumbuddi
    • Replies: @Fran Taubman
  22. Jazz is certainly the most important and maybe, the only significant American contribution to world culture.

    Gadzooks! I thought it was Western movies. The more you live the more you learn.

    • Replies: @Zumbuddi
  23. Zumbuddi says:
    @Brás Cubas

    Hollywood Jews learned filmmaking from Germans and Italians.

    Had it not been for FDR’s federal government essentially hiring Warner bros studio to do war propaganda, the nascent studio would have failed financially.

    It is uncontested that Warners learned from Germans and stole from Edison.

    • Replies: @Fran Taubman
  24. Jazz is certainly the most important and maybe, the only significant American contribution to world culture.

    Delusional boomer.

    I’m not sure if you are suffering from dementia or negro worship. Either way, you have to be mentally deficient in some way to think that in its 300+ years America’s only contribution to world culture is jazz.

    • Replies: @DextersLabRat
  25. @ariadna

    1. You are a nice cousin to have, Fran. Why were the blacks laughing at your cousin? Did he check his fly?

    That is just stupid. When he played in the early and late eighties, Jazz musicians were know for their heroin use. It was a drug culture. People would just point and say who is whitey with the base.
    He stood out. We both grew up in Baltimore and he stood out. He passes away last year.

    • Replies: @ariadna
  26. @Zumbuddi

    What did they steal from Edison?
    Gosh Jews are everywhere aren’t they what an odd group. Stealing and looting their way around the world.

    • Agree: Zumbuddi, schnellandine
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @anarchyst
  27. @Anon

    To the average layman, Jazz is boring and dissonant. I do think that some of the most incredible musical talents have come out of Jazz though. Jazz drummers in particular seem like they are on another level, and some of the best rock & roll drummers have a Jazz background.

    • Replies: @Anon
  28. Anon[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    I would assume that good musicians coming from Jazz has to do with the fact that musicians, for all of time, have always learned all music styles they possibly can, and there might have been a time that performing Jazz was just an interesting and new thing to do, since it was one of the first genres to incorporate so much “showing off.”

    Nowadays, there are more “showoff” genres than before.

  29. @DextersLabRat

    Sorry, I realize this was really harsh and mean. I don’t want to spread that kind of energy around. I was being an asshole, please accept my apologies. You’re not mentally deficient, I just really disagree with you re: jazz.

  30. @Colin Wright

    You could have added, those things that allow people to travel through the air without touching the ground. American invention, I think.

  31. Biff says:
    @anon

    Compare this to white societies of 1000, 2000 or even 3000 years ago. Complicated musical forms, wind instruments, stringed instruments and percussion instruments and means to write down music.

    You’re a dolt.. Modern(Western) music only dates back to the early 1700’s. It was modernized by Johann S. Bach who standardized pitch – A/440. He died in 1750. You can go back a few hundred more years to the beginnings of the Gregorian Chant, but that’s about it. Western music is not that old. Other music standards did develop thousands of years ago in Asia and the Far East, but that’s someone else’s gig….

    • Agree: Iris
    • Replies: @ariadna
    , @Loup-Bouc
    , @Loup-Bouc
  32. Biff says:
    @Ann Nonny Mouse

    You could have added, those things that allow people to travel through the air without touching the ground. American invention, I think.

    You wouldn’t believe how many countries/peoples around the globe claim to have invented the airplane. Even little New Zealand has claimed that once. I wonder what the truth is?

  33. @Ann Nonny Mouse

    ‘You could have added, those things that allow people to travel through the air without touching the ground. American invention, I think.’

    I missed a bunch.

    Our fluorescence was spectacular. I’ve a dark suspicion it’s over, though.

    Inshallah, I’ll be proved mistaken about that last.

  34. @Fran Taubman

    ‘What did they steal from Edison?
    Gosh Jews are everywhere aren’t they what an odd group. Stealing and looting their way around the world.’

    Fran, go away.

    At best, at the moment we have more important things to worry about than a group making up two tenths of one percent of humanity and their issues.

    At worst, they’re part of the problem.

    Either way, it would behoove you to shut up.

  35. ariadna says:
    @Fran Taubman

    De mortuis nihil nisi bene. I am sure he “stood out.”
    You both grew up in Baltimore and he stood out but you didn’t? Bummer.

  36. Loup-Bouc says:

    From 1953 until 1956 (my 13th through 16th years), I was a jazz musician. Then I grew up. I saw that near-all jazz is not music, but show-off blather and that even jazz MUSIC cannot satisfy the ART-need of a markedly intelligent soul. [I do NOT use the term “soul” to denote some widely-hallucinated non-physical substance, but, rather, a capacity and yearning for uplifting psychic experience like real orgasm (an event astronomically rare in humans), an experience rendered by TRUE MUSIC, the incidence of which approaches the rarity of unconditional love.]

    So, when I grew up, I apprehended that TRUE music is the specially organized, organically complex sonic construction epitomized in certain polyphonic or contrapuntal works of certain European composers of the second half of the 15th century CE through the first half of the 18th century CE and, occasionally, later, even in the 20th century CE (like some compositions of Anton Webern). Then when I became a real adult, I appreciated that one need not search for TRUE Music beyond the works of Johann Sebastian Bach (arguably the greatest human ever).

    For a rather brief time (about three years, 1958, 1959, 1960, and most of 1961), I studied music at the Philadelphia Musical Academy and was a published composer of serious music. Then I apprehended that Johann Sebastian Bach wrote all that TRUE music was and that anything “new” was redundant. Eventually, after journeying through a few occupations (cab-driving, plumbing, pipe organ building, carpentry, social work, I settled in law, then, two decades later, medicine.

    Never again did I try to write music. Seldom could I listen to aught but Renaissance polyphony, some 17th, early 18th Century French baroque contrapuntal music, and the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Never since my16th year, did I listen to jazz. Never could I endure hearing any but a very few pieces of “classical music.”

    Much “classical music” is like most jazz, or stews made for gluttons — tripe-soups, like popular standards symphonies cooked for fur-coated rich chicks who sit in “pit” rows or chic boxes & common folk who pretend to being culturally uplifted (like biscuits made with bleached white flour “enriched” with fake vitamins) — though glop served dulls the mind (like gulps of cheap wine) & puffs the gut but feeds neither heart nor imagination.

    Examples of such “classical” gruel:

    (1) Beethoven’s piano music & his orchestral works save his 9th symphony
    (2) Brahms, Dvorzak, Wagner, Mahler, Borodin, Sibelius, Tchaikovsky
    (3) the Pachelbel “Canon” — near-endless repetition of vacant prettiness (always in the same key, not bearing 1 micro-instant’s modulation) & not a canon since its ground base never canonizes & its upper-voice “imitations” bear many tens of sequences of 4 or more successive intervals of the 3rd)

    Examples (1) & (2) are mostly bloated homophonies like sodden corpses wearing sugar-hats & sometimes pretend to tell stories or emotions. The Pachelbel “canon” attained not even the glory of “Three Blind Mice” & begs being shot by a cannon, never heard again.

    Each TRUE MUSIC piece is unique & complex (even if simple), its every line & phrase — often even every note — vital, organically so, yet vital also in relation to all the rest. No line (or “voice”) could have been otherwise. Each is necessary (every note of it), yet each could have been sufficient alone, like Gregorian chant, needing no accompaniment.

    A healthy organism bears no chemistry or physiological function that is not both necessary & sufficient. Its every internal event is essential, not surplus or redundancy; and without it the organism would either not exist or would die. Yet, its every atom, molecule, or chemical or physiological event itself, alone, is sufficient for itself.

    TRUE music is the same. It is a healthy sonic organism, its every sonic molecule & its every atom & its every line & phrase & meter & speed & rhythm & silence both organically necessary and organically sufficient — no sound just accompaniment that, alone, would plummet deadly impotent.

    Bach’s music is a sublime example: Separate lines sounding simultaneously & symbiotically but independently (even if only one line occurs, as in his unaccompanied violin or cello sonatas). No melody propped on filler-backing. Every line & every phrase utterly essential yet enough alone.

    Bach near-never presents sequences of three or more, repetitions that lull the anticomplex ear into comfortable, sedated rest. Near-always, Bach’s phrases either do not repeat or repeat just once, then metamorphose.

    Bach’s lines & their ingredients do not happen just linearly forward. They live backward, upside down, inside out, in greater or lesser pitch-intervals & time-spans……like the internal events of a healthy organism. They modulate through many, distant tonalities, oft surprisingly, but always fated as the inevitable eye-blink that accompanies a sneeze.

    [MORE]

    Bach’s music is very complex — even (& miraculously) in his unaccompanied violin sonatas, whose seeming monodies produce polyphonies (in the fully-attending ear). But the complexity is like nature’s nature’s organisms. Each piece is a living creature acting complexly as its nature prescribes.

    Bach’s unaccompanied violin sonatas bear complex simplicity like ameba’s. An ameba is intensely complex though it consists of just one cell. Its one cell’s operations & manifestations are stunningly diverse & near-infinitely metamorphic. Yet always it follows the program of its genes. Just so many of Bach’s “simpler” pieces.

    In every living cell, a complex chemical/bioenergetic event — the Krebs cycle — occurs in a complex sequence that changes ever as the cell matures & journeys toward death.

    Sugars, fatty acids, and amino acids merge to form acetyl co-enzymeA (a form of acetic acid). The co-enzymeA condenses with oxaloacetate to form citrate (salt of citric acid). Then, through a process of 4 oxidation-reduction reactions (involving entries of H2O & exits of carbon dioxide [hydrations & dehydrations]), the citrate transforms into other acids, till the transformations produce oxaloacetate again, as at the start, when it combined with entering co-enzymeA.

    Again & again & again, acetyl co-enzymeA enters & merges with the oxaloacetate. Again & again & again the acetyl co-enzymeA condenses with oxaloacetate, forms citrate, and recommences the cycle.

    The Krebs cycle produces energy, almost mysteriously as photosynthesis supplies the power of life of plants. The energy both creates life & burns it up, like the great god Shiva.

    The Krebs cycle happens in every cell. Each cell-species (liver, heart, thymus, kidney, pancreas, muscle, bone, mucous-membrane, colon, marrow, lung……..) has its own Krebs cycle. The whole array is an immense, kaleidoscopic, complex, organic counterpoint, like TRUE music, like Bach’s complex contrapuntal works. The whole produces, and reflects as, one of the vital energy-forms of the creature the cells compose.

    TRUE music occurs as a vertical/horizontal/internal/external/inside/outside/forward/backward, ever-changing yet magnificently ordered complex dialectic of interacting moving shapes. TRUE music, like Bach’s, lives as moving multiplicities of molecular shapes — like the Krebs cycle’s music of molecular transformations & the complexly manifesting organic energy produced.

    A TRUE-music composer gives birth to a child when she conceives a piece of TRUE music. And she nurtures the child in laboring to prefect the piece, or to discover how the piece needs to be perfected.

    When conception creates a child-to-be in a mother-to-be, the conceived life (the fertilized ovum) is like a single cell (like an ameba). The mother’s body feeds the life with the mother’s blood. The mother’s body nurtures the new life with water & sugar & fatty acids & amino acids that come together to energize the cell & keep it energized & developing, almost as the mother’s food supplies the mother’s cells the water & sugars & fatty acids & amino acids that form the co-enzymeA that commence the Krebs cycles of all cells of the mother’s body.

    TRUE music is born & nurtured like a child, till it becomes the independent organism it must be: A complex of cells of myriad kinds interacting holistically, symbiotically — an organism of kaleidoscopic life, a life of myriad organic multiplicities of molecular shapes & movements that ears can SEE & eyes HEAR & heart & hormones feel.

    Organic multiplicities of moving molecular shapes, kaleidoscopic shapes, dancing with each other, like symbiotic organisms: THAT is TRUE music. Though they are not feelings, the moving shapes live in feelings — just as feelings reflect the moving shapes of TRUE music.

    Sadness (the PURE feeling, sadness) is a sound — a moving sonic shape. It is a curve crescenting down, like the shapes of a brow furrowing from grief or like the lips of a woman bewailing the death of her beloved or her infant child. And if TRUE music bears such a sound, it may evoke sadness; but if “music” TRIES to CAUSE or MIMIC sorrow, it is not music.

    Organic multiplicities of moving molecular shapes, kaleidoscopic shapes, dancing with each other, like symbiotic organisms: THAT is TRUE music, like Bach’s music.

    TRUE music sounds a dance of shapes that live in eyes & ears & lungs & nerves & heartbeats of those whose minds & feelings hear TRUE music: the music of Bach & Johannes Ockeghem & Josquin Des Prez & Anton Webern.

    TRUE music is like PURE passion, like truly making love. But it is not an expression of feeling or emotion; and if it purports to stand for feeling or emotion (or tell a story, even an emotional one), then it strays far from being TRUE music.

    TRUE music stirs feelings & emotions, but just as does seeing a beautiful beast being beautiful & a beast, or as does apprehending the wonder & complexity — the miracle — of the anatomy & physiology & biochemistry of a living creature or losing oneself in the infinite arrays of moving colored shapes of a kaleidoscope. TRUE music is like magnificent architecture that inspires unbearable awe though it (the architecture, itself) neither is nor portrays feeling or emotion.

    JUST SO, true music becomes one’s whole being and life — bone, flesh, blood, breath, sense, imagination… — and one’s mind becomes lost in it — not as if entranced just neuro-hormonally (as by a sexual drum-beat or the mere sounds of bagpipes playing tunes), but as if the music becomes one’s mind and one’s mind lives in the music, as sometimes a mother may live reflectively in and through her child and what and how her child senses, thinks, and perceives.

    How can TRUE music be “shapes like feelings” but not try to express or represent feelings (or emotions), as romantic music does? To see how, distinguish feelings from emotions.

    Emotions are judgments reacting to external events or internal feelings, as if emotions “represent” or “express” feelings. Emotions occur in the frontal lobe, in quite the place that produces logic.

    Feeling is NOT a thing of judgment. Feeling (hunger, thirst, fear, pain, anger, lust, empathy, joy, pure love…) are biochemical/physiological/bioenergetic events, like heartbeats or flows of hormone or instances of the Krebs cycle.

    Feeling is like a piece of architecture. Emotion is a judgment reacting to that architecture.

    TRUE music is like an instance of pure feeling or a piece of architecture. It may stir feeling or emotion, but it is neither.

    TRUE music occurs as kaleidoscopic architecture formed with sound. If it creates a curve crescenting down, it creates that moving shape for its own sake, not to mimic the lips of a woman bewailing the death of her child & not to stir her into wailing. If the shape moves a listener to tears, it moves the listener to tears because of the listener’s reaction associating the down-curving shape with an unbearable sense of love lost, not because the music designs to stir sadness, for TRUE music cannot bear or form from any such design.

    A mountain’s granite crags reach beyond the clouds. A mountain goat leaps down the rocks fearlessly with blithe grace. Seeing the sight, you feel awe. But neither mountain nor goat sought to inspire any feeling in you.

    TRUE music is the mountain & the goat. Like the mountain’s & the goat’s, TRUE music’s every atom, every instant, is organic necessity interacting in inevitability with every other atom, every instant, yet its every atom is its own inevitability, sufficient unto itself.

    Now, Gilad Atzmon’s jazz performance:

    Mr. Atzmon’s jazz-performance is at least quasi-contrapuntal, rather than the typical jazz-junk consisting of primitive “melody” propped-up by chunks of chords & percussion-beats (of drums, cymbals, cow-bells…….). But such is the only positive reaction his performance deserves.

    If it is “music,” Mr. Atzmon’s performance is not Black music, but a mutation of music typical of Arab countries, even somewhat like some Klezmer (Yiddish) music — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkmFgQ9fM94 AND https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jhy9DTAyRa0 . The Klezmer-music resemblance is ironic, because of Mr. Atzmon’s Jew-hatred and attempt of disassociating himself from Jewry by engaging in constant self-loathing — see my comments # 88 & 110 posted under Mr. Atzmon’s article “Pilpul for Beginners,” Unz Review, https://www.unz.com/gatzmon/pilpul-for-beginners/#comment-3911804 .

    Clearly Mr. Atzmon’s performance is improvisational. But it is not MUSIC, improvised or not.

    Mr Atzmon’s performance is a one-chord-based, haphazard agglomeration of equally haphazard melismas. It lacks modulation or discernable, logically developing form. Hence, after about a minute or two, it is utterly boring — despite loud and near-crazed. Compare, e.g., Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Musical Offering,” several sub-pieces of which Bach improvised, for Frederick the Great of Prussia, on a theme Frederick presented to Bach without notice and required Back develop, INSTANTLY, into complex fugues & canons, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23yNGer9Wqs

    Mr. Atzmon tries, frantically, to become what he is not and cannot be — a non-Jew and creator of true music.

  37. FemCrim says:

    As much as I hate to admit it, the American people are just too stupid to liberate. And I have not yet read the article. I shall see.

  38. Loup-Bouc says:
    @Biff

    Actually, @anon’s assertion is correct. Even in the time of ancient Egypt, the Uganda and Buganda civilizations developed a complex music set on scales bearing more than the 12 pitches of Western music. And those early East Africans used numerous tonal instruments and also non-tonal percussion devices (drums, etc.).

    No music can compete with Johann Sebastian Bach’s works, not even any other Western music. But you err sorely with your dismissal of early East African music, as if it were a mish-mash of drum-beats and artless singing.

    When I studied music at the Philadelphia Musical Academy (1958-1961), I wrote a paper concerning ancient Ugandan & Bugandan music. As I researched that music, I felt astonished by the technical advancement and number of varied instruments and the complexity of the scales and forms.

    Here, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_9CjOeha3g (near the end of the video) and here, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyZnN6B4n8Y , you can hear music very like that of ancient Uganda and Buganda, which was absorbed into the music of the courts of Egyptian Pharos. You will hear multi-tone complex scales and complex forms.

    Here, https://fsu.digital.flvc.org/islandora/object/fsu:181690/datastream/PDF/view , you can peruse an exposition of Ugandan and Bugandan music that reflects the musical art of the ancients of the Uganda and Buganda people of the southern reach of the ancient Egyptian empire.

  39. Loup-Bouc says:
    @Biff

    I committed a serious error with the first sentence of my comment of June 7, 2020 at 3:25 am GMT (comment # 40), which comment replied to your comment of June 7, 2020 at 1:53 am GMT (comment # 32). I meant to write: Actually, @anon’s assertion is not correct.

    @anon’s comment shows ignorance of the ancient music of the East African Black civilization of the south of the ancient Egyptian empire, the music of ancient Uganda and ancient Buganda.

    Sorry for the error.

  40. @James N. Kennett

    For a Palestinian to be in solidarity with himself /herself, he or she must obtain first a kosher certificate,,, the same applies to Black America and all other oppressed discourses that were unfortunate enough to become subject to Jewish solidarity

  41. @Fran Taubman

    Darling, I have played Jazz in every corner of the USA,,, and I also, many years ago played Jewish music all over America… Beautiful music by your cousin I must say… A lot of great Jews in Jazz, certainly some of them are my heroes (Michael Brecker, David Liebman, Stever Grosamn to mention a few),,, in the old days , i believe, Jews saw jazz as path towards humanity… as time went by, some realised that it is much easier to judify the universe rather than assimilating into it……

    • Replies: @Fran Taubman
  42. Franz says:
    @Colin Wright

    Now you’re moving the goal posts. Nobody said the contributions had to be positive.

    Agreed, I was questioning most of the points. But whatever contributions the US makes is being smothered in the current era. Threatening large parts of the world after shipping much of the industrial base offshore is bad enough. Now those we have been threatening (China, Iran, Russia…) see the internal troubles and are firing back. And we truly deserve some of the schadenfreude.

    We forget the Austo-Hungarian Empire and the fact it was Europe’s largest land empire, and became first a joke and then extinct within a very short time. When it broke up there was only relief. I am worried we aren’t many missteps from joining the Dead Empire’s Club.

  43. CamFree says:

    Why did Jazz die? And how did new artistic domains such as Hip Hop and Rap become occupied?

  44. Stealth says:

    Nobody listens to jazz because it’s less enjoyable than muzak. If white people had invented jazz, it wouldn’t have had the chance to die out because nobody would have taken it seriously in the first place.

    they made the rest of us beg for their beauty, their art and their spirit to illuminate and liberate us. It didn’t take long before America’s elite realised that Jazz was the best Ambassador for America around the world.

    Get off your knees.

    • Agree: Ko
  45. anon[370] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve heard Atzmon play.
    Good thing he writes books for a living

    • Replies: @Stealth
  46. Ko says:

    “Jazz is certainly the most important and maybe, the only significant American contribution to world culture.”

    Your sentence is the most bullshit filled idea I’ve seen written in five years.

    • Replies: @Gilad Atzmon
  47. Stealth says:
    @anon

    In his defense, he’s playing jazz, and there’s not much you can do to make jazz music interesting that won’t completely bastardize it. It’s the dullest, least stimulating music on the planet. And I do mean that. Other than “Linus and Lucy,” composed by someone who wasn’t even black, I can’t think of any piece of jazz music that entertains me more than the sound of an air conditioner would.

    • Replies: @Stealth
  48. Stealth says:
    @Stealth

    Despite disliking jazz in general, I do find Atzmon to be a talented musician.

    • Agree: Gilad Atzmon
  49. Dumbo says:

    Jazz is OK but it’s not classical music (high culture), and neither it’s rock’n’roll (popular culture). It’s something somewhere in-between, which accounts for its low popularity, because it doesn’t appeal to the masses and only to a small part of the cultural elites.

    I like Cole Porter and some early Miles Davis (even though he reportedly said in an interview, “If somebody told me I only had one hour to live, I’d spend it choking a White man.”).

    And then I also like old black singers such as Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone, Sarah Vaughan. But go figure, they mostly sang songs created by Jews and Gay Anglos, and not by Blacks.

    I think jazz was popular only for a brief period, for the wrong reasons, not for the music necessarily but because it made white people feel better about themselves. Just as rap and hip hop today are more because of the attitude than for the music (well, I think. I personally can’t stand it).

    Anyway, I know very little about music and I am even a bit tone deaf, so take this with a grain of salt.

  50. @Ann Nonny Mouse

    In addition to @schnelladine and @Biff, I will put my 2 cents worth in. It is contested, but if I reacll correctly, what is not contested is that the Wright Brothers survived, as did their aircraft, and was flown a second time the same day.
    Many were successful at flying, but not landing. For those that survived the landing, the aircraft did not.

  51. @Ko

    Fine ,,, point at a single AMERICAN art form that is as significant as Jazz…

    • Replies: @Ko
    , @Colin Wright
  52. @anon

    You are right: Charlie Parkerstein, John Levi Coltrane , Oscar Moishe Pterson… the truth is that from the very begining it was Jews who made it into business and collected the money and controled the industry…

    • Replies: @Loup-Bouc
  53. Ko says:
    @Gilad Atzmon

    “… significant American contribution to world culture.”

    matter of importance is debatable, but jazz is far from leading, or the only,

    Literature: Whitman, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Pound, James, Dickenson, Hemingway, Kerouac, Oneil, Faulkner, Baldwin, Cullen, Transcendentalism, Individualism, Resistance, Twain, disillusionment, Tim O’Brien, Russell Banks, Annie Dillard, even Journalism. So much more.

  54. Loup-Bouc says:
    @anon

    You know nothing of Black African music [see my comment of June 7, 2020 at 3:25 am GMT (comment # 40) as corrected by my comment of June 7, 2020 at 4:13 am GMT (comment # 41)]. You know nothing of the real Black music of American Black slaves or the Blacks of Jim Crow America — just as you know nothing of ANY music, surely TRUE MUSIC.

    You do not account the how swing, be bop, and modern Jazz (like Mr. Atzmon’s and John Coltrane’s) differ significantly from their Black music sources — the primitive, but sophisticated, Blues (at its best, accompanied by three-finger-picking guitar playing), or old-time Black spirituals music, or Black chain-gang music, or the ragtime Black musicians played on post-Reconstruction plantations and on squalid Black Ghetto city streets or in upscale White brothels, soon coopted by Whites, or even early Dixieland jazz, like ragtime, soon coopted by Whites.

    [MORE]

    This is real Black American music:
    *

    [I knew Lightnin’ Hopkins & played guitar with him once. (My instruments were classical guitar, double-bass, and harpsichord. But blues guitar is easy for a classical guitar player.) I knew Blacks very well, from when my parents put me in an orphanage when I was 6 & then, during 20th through 22nd years & again during my 24th through 27th years, when I lived in a Black ghetto of Philadelphia.]
    *

    [I knew Mississippi John Hurt. A truly sweet man and fine mujsician]
    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    *

    [The Mississippi Fred piece, not the White trash that follows if one permits]
    *

    You asserted:

    The truest modern form of negro creation would be rap and hip hop.

    That crap is not music. It is grating noise and abysmally bad pseudo-poetry uttered by crass idiots, many of whom appear to be quasi-psychopathic — those who glorify rape and violent crime.

    Taisez-vous, Monsieur ou Madame Crétin

    • Replies: @anarchyst
  55. @Gilad Atzmon

    The resentment came out with Gershwin’s success with Porky and Bess and Rhapsody in Blue. Blacks felt that he got all the commercial acclaim for their music.

    BTW. Eric’s father served with my father during WW2. He lost his leg in the Pacific as a fighter pilot, for those on UR that claim Jews never were the fighters during the war, that they had desk jobs. He went on to be a photographer.

    • Thanks: Tony Hall
  56. Loup-Bouc says:
    @Gilad Atzmon

    You hasten to intrude Jew-hate into this thread, Mr. Atzmon — Jew-hating, self-loathing Jew. See my comments # 88 & 110 posted under your article “Pilpul for Beginners,” Unz Review (18 May 2020), https://www.unz.com/gatzmon/pilpul-for-beginners/#comment-3911804 .

    The matter is Jazz music, its sounds, its creators, its performers — not the business activities of oft-unscrupulous music-promoters.

    And greedy, rip-off music-promoters have included Blacks (like Motown’s Berry Gordy & Smokey Robinson, who worked Black musicians nearly to death and paid them pittances).

    Jews do not hold a monopoly of viciously greedy capitalism.

    How very sad you are.

    • Replies: @Gilad Atzmon
  57. Are you ignorant of the fact that some musicians you listed probably sold their souls to the devil for fame and fortune ?

    • Replies: @Gilad Atzmon
  58. @Gilad Atzmon

    ‘…point at a single AMERICAN art form that is as significant as Jazz…’

    Your logic here is faulty. For the sake of argument, Jazz could be our most important contribution. That does nothing to demonstrate that it is our only contribution, which is what you suggested.

    I could argue that democracy was the most important contribution the ancient Greeks made. I have not thereby demonstrated that they didn’t come up with Euclidean geometry.

  59. I haven’t read all the comments so I apologize if I’m repeating what’s already been said. I wish I had a dime for every time someone claims jazz is dead. I understand the point that jazz has been taken over by our higher learning(?) institutions who now have tried to turn teaching jazz into a recipe paint by the numbers sort of thing. But we live in a recipe culture so this isn’t surprising and may not be the end of the world! Having said that I agree somewhat that the way jazz is taught in colleges may not be the best way. It might be the best way for some yet not for others. Forty or so years ago I was lucky enough to find a great private teacher who just had a knack for zeroing in on what was important, and was a much different approach than what is taught in college. He changed everything for me. He did not give me a recipe rather he gave me an understanding of how music works. But another consideration is that it takes a long time to become really good at playing jazz, longer than a four year college stint. There is no one way that jazz is taught that I ever heard of. Maybe the younger players just need more time before they meet your standards?

    Did blacks lose interest in jazz or did people lose interest in jazz. Ask yourself this. How many people can make a living playing be-bop? Not too many I’m sure. And everyone likes to eat. Still I don’t think jazz is dead, there’s still an audience for it if small. If you frequent saxophone forums you’ll see there’s still plenty of interest in learning to play jazz as well as people who still listen to the great players. And quite a few are self taught, no university involved. A monumental task to teach yourself to be sure. So I say all is not lost. Cheer up, man. Every few years someone comes along and announces jazz is dead. If it’s really dead why do people keep having to come back every few years to make this sad announcement?

  60. @Ko

    “… significant American contribution to world culture.”

    matter of importance is debatable, but jazz is far from leading, or the only,

    Literature: Whitman, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Pound, James, Dickenson, Hemingway, Kerouac, Oneil, Faulkner, Baldwin, Cullen, Transcendentalism, Individualism, Resistance, Twain, disillusionment, Tim O’Brien, Russell Banks, Annie Dillard, even Journalism. So much more.’

    I’d say the US has dominated world culture at least since World War Two — for better or for worse.

    We still do. Look at the rather absurd way so many nations are aping our George Floyd lunacy. Can anyone seriously even imagine the reverse — the US falling over itself to imitate some nonsense inflaming Europe or China?

  61. @Ko

    No sir,,, I was very clear,,, I asked you to point at an AMERICAN art form as opposed to some sporadic cultural heros …

    In the world of culture, Greece gave us the Tragedy, Germans gave us the symphony, Britain gave us modern theatre and Black America gave us Jazz,,,do I have to explain what is the difference between an art form and a list of sporadic cultural voices who operate within given artistic mediums?

    • Agree: Biff
  62. @sojournerholmes

    For some of the reasons i can’t watch the video, but R&R is far from being the devil as far as I can tell,,,, I actually had a lot of fun playing and recoding with some of the greatest R&R heroes of our time… from Robert Wyatt to Ian Dury to Pink Floyd and I learned a lot…

  63. @Loup-Bouc

    I saw you comment (88),,, may be you shpud read the quote you picked by me again as it will save me from addressing your rant (I don’t argue that Ron , Shamir or Spinoza performed pilipul, I argue that they were PROBABLY subject to pilpul indoctrination, but rebelled against it.) However, i can’t see how I intriduce any form of hatred as this kind of feelings is foreign to me and my work… I often ridicule Jewish tribalism and culture but never do anything that resmbles hatfulness of any kind.

    Also the above article is dealing solely with Jazz as an artistic domain.. the Jazz industry and its corrosive impact is a very painful topic and it deserves a separate piece or even a book…

    However since you referred to Jews and capitalism,, I suggest when you have a second just look at Werner Sombart’s https://www.amazon.com/Jews-Modern-Capitalism-Werner-Sombart/dp/161427763X

    • Replies: @Loup-Bouc
  64. Loup-Bouc says:
    @Gilad Atzmon

    I don’t argue that Ron , Shamir or Spinoza performed pilipul….

    And I did not say you did.

    However, i can’t see how I intriduce any form of hatred as this kind of feelings is foreign to me and my work… I often ridicule Jewish tribalism and culture but never do anything that resmbles hatfulness of any kind.

    Then I urge that you struggle to say what you mean — and READ what you ought to see.

    March Hare: “Then you should say what you mean.”
    Alice: “I do…”… “at least—at least I mean what I say—that’s the same thing, you know.”
    Hatter: “Not the same thing a bit ! … You might just as well say that ‘I see what I eat’ is the same…as ‘I eat what I see’ ! ”
    March Hare: “You might just as well say…that ‘I like what I get’ is the same…as ‘I get what I like’!”

    Language does not convey meaning (as if thoughts played cargo of a ship of syntax). Language constitutes meaning (as lust whelps hunger and hunger lusts).

    If you say you did not mean what you have written, you had three thoughts, acted three meanings: You wrote one. You thought (“meant”) another. You said a third (that you meant not what you wrote).

    As “red ball” is not “red plus ball,” it is not a conveyance of an idea of a red ball or of the proposition “red plus ball.” The phrase “red ball” means itself, the special idea it is, including what it takes from, and gives, its setting (shape, color, music, milieu), human and else.

    Did you read (in this thread) my comment of June 7, 2020 at 2:44 am GMT (comment # 37 of this thread)? You have not READ my other-thread comments you may think you have “read”?

    • Replies: @anon
  65. anon[361] • Disclaimer says:
    @Loup-Bouc

    waiting for Loup-Bouc’s lengthy correction in
    5
    4
    3
    2
    1

    • LOL: Fran Taubman
  66. Anonymous[589] • Disclaimer says:
    @James N. Kennett

    Black MUSIC, Sports, Movies Labor/Capital worth BILLIONS is controlled by the chosen tribe..to benefit…NOT Blacks..

  67. wildbeard says:

    I wish we had a place in Africa where American Blacks could be free.

  68. anarchyst says:
    @Fran Taubman

    Jews stole the motion picture technology from Edison. Since they would be prosecuted for patent infringement in New York, they fled to hollywood to continue their criminal behavior.

    • Replies: @Fran Taubman
  69. anarchyst says:
    @Loup-Bouc

    “Rap” is merely more proof of my assertion that “behind every negro, there is a jew”.

    It is the sleazy scumbag, slimeball jew record producers and promoters that elevated “rap” as an “art form”.

    Actually, “rap” is a debasement of the culture, something the jews excel at.

    From debasing women, calling them “hoes”, promoting rape, sodomy and worse, to openly advocating “cop killing” and “outright murder of whites”, it is easy to see that “rap” is just another vehicle to debase the ordinary white culture.

    Once again, it is jews that are using blacks to debase the culture, not unlike the phony “civil-rights (for some)” movement that was totally spearheaded and run by jews.

    • Replies: @Loup-Bouc
  70. Loup-Bouc says:
    @anarchyst

    Have your considered seeking psychoanalytic or, better, characteranalytic psychiatric help? You would benefit from it (as would public safety benefit from your benefit).

    • Replies: @anarchyst
  71. @anarchyst

    That is so stupid. First of all Edison stole most of his patents from workers in his company. Then he tried to control the entire movie industry buying out competitions and suing other start up companies. It wasn’t the equipment, he wanted to control the content, and make Eastman Kodak only sell film to his company. He created an illegal monopoly. He wanted the films to represent his values. Hello what is wrong with that picture. No pun intended.
    Edison was a big swindler and not that honorable a man. Good on the Jews for breaking the monopoly.
    Edward Meyerbridge invented the motion picture concept, and he didn’t have a patent.

    • Replies: @anarchyst
    , @CBTerry
  72. anarchyst says:
    @Loup-Bouc

    Ha Ha. Your hasbara or IDF unit 8200 identity has been exposed.
    “Rap” is a jewish invention, once again used to debase society using their “pets” (negroes)

  73. anarchyst says:
    @Fran Taubman

    You make an excellent point about Edison taking credit for “inventions” created by others.

    Please keep in mind that Edison developed the first modern-day “research laboratory” in which his employees were “paid” to come up with “solutions”.

    Since he signed his employees’ checks, he took credit for the work of his employees.

    Edison’s employees that worked for him could have gone elsewhere; he must have paid them well to keep them.

    Even today, many companies take credit for their employees’ innovations, no different than Edison.

    Edison was a good huckster and promoter and was not an honest man.

    He screwed Nikola Tesla out of an agreed amount after Tesla solved his generator problems, Tesla being a true scientist and engineer, unlike Edison.

    Fair??

    Good question.

    • Agree: Fran Taubman
    • Replies: @Fran Taubman
  74. @anarchyst

    Yeah just leave your Jew hatred out of the movie monopoly Edison tried to create. Banning content he did not like, which had very little to do with his mechanical invention of the kaleidoscope. Edison decided what he thought movies should be and used his patents and money to beat down competition.

    There were many inventors outside of his company that were forced to sign over their patents for minor upgrades by Edison that allowed him to acquire the rights. Many inventors were shafted by him. He had a lot of money to fight. I am glad he lost his “movie monopoly”. I think the Jews made movies a lot more fun and entertaining then Edisons.

    • Troll: schnellandine
    • Replies: @anarchyst
  75. anarchyst says:
    @Fran Taubman

    Not “jew hatred” but awareness of jewish behavior, schemes and scams. Being wary of those who would do you harm is self preservation. Especially those who recite the Kol Nidre “prayer, absolving themselves of the need of “fair play” for us gentiles.

    I have lent a helping hand to people who have needed it without ever asking a person’s ethnicity or jewishness.

    Yes, I have helped many jews as well, not caring about their status as jews.

    The only negative attitudes I have ever received was from jews and blacks, despite helping them with my time and money. In these cases, I perceived that I was “required” to help them. They “expected” help, not offering any payment (which, on principle, I would have refused to take.)

    I would even help YOU, Ms. Taubman, if the need was there.

    It’s the HUMAN thing to do.

    As to Edison’s movies, I have to agree that jews made more “entertaining” movies, but along with that came the smut industry, which is totally jew-owned.

    When it comes to patent infringement and theft, many companies and individuals of the day did just that, as well-not just Edison.

    Regards,

  76. CBTerry says:
    @Fran Taubman

    My understanding is that, while the patent may be under the name of the inventor, it belongs to the corporation for whom the inventor was working.
    It has been years since I dabbled in law, and I would appreciate a correction if warranted.

    • Replies: @Fran Taubman
  77. @CBTerry

    My understanding is that, while the patent may be under the name of the inventor, it belongs to the corporation for whom the inventor was working.

    Yes that is true that it belongs to the company. I worked for a R & D company designing medical equipment and patents were issued to the company. I have patents that were shared by 4 people.
    But in the case of Edison his business was invention, he was not a manufacturing company. So inventors were hired to be inventors. At times Edison’s competitors were bought out because he was wealthy. Edison made patents a competition, and he stole inventions from others outside his company.

  78. No offense, but Jazz itself is not important. Jazz was chosen as the face of defiance, just like rock was later. It was marketing, just like Flappers and Woodstock.

    There’s lots of American roots music that is as good as jazz and much more authentic. I’d also take Samuel Barber over any jazz composer. Jazz is elevator music.

  79. pl25 says:

    Great article from the fence-rider Gilad.

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