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It's not often these days that the American media pays attention to what's going on in places like South Africa or Zimbabwe. Once ruled by white minority governments that enforced racial segregation, both countries are now ruled by blacks. That makes the American media happy, so there's no particular reason to pay these two countries... Read More
You really have to feel sorry for the Stupid Party. Even when handed an opportunity to make their Democratic rivals shut up about Republican "insensitivity" and "tolerance for bigotry" and embarrass the Democrats for their own embrace of hatemongers, the Republicans still manage to blow it -- mainly because they refuse to denounce anti-white hatred... Read More
A "racist," immigration expert Peter Brimelow once quipped, is someone who is winning an argument with a liberal. For years, the liberal left has claimed that anyone who opposed immigration was a "racist," a "xenophobe," a "nativist" and all sorts of other unpleasant things to be. Now, the libertarian-neo-conservative right has learned how to sling... Read More
While the multiracial democracy of Zimbabwe is experiencing a virtual breakdown because black mobs, with government encouragement, are seizing white-owned farm lands without compensation to their legal owners, the African continent's other multiracial democracy in South Africa is sporting its own crisis over the supposed "racism" of the country's newspapers. Now the black-controlled government is... Read More
Unknown to most Americans, but widely noticed in the Spanish-language media of immigrant communities, the Clinton administration has endorsed legislation that would grant amnesty to some 500,000 illegal aliens already in the country. The administration's endorsement, announced late last month by Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore, is transparently politically motivated -- Gore needs the vast... Read More
With thousands of black "squatters" seizing every acre of white-owned land they can squat on, with at least five white farmers butchered by black terrorists since February, with most of the white population seriously thinking about or actually trying to flee the country, and with Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe doing nothing whatsoever to curtail the... Read More
It's going to be a close fight to keep the Confederate flag flying above South Carolina's capitol, with the NAACP economic boycott of the state, Big Business pressure to abandon the flag as a symbol of the state's heritage and the naked political hunger of many Republicans. But even if the flag in Columbia vanishes,... Read More
White Southerners who defend the Confederate flag are generally accused of wanting to fight "the war" all over again. In fact, most of them just want to defend the heritage the flag symbolizes, but if it's a war you're looking for, the enemies of the Confederate flag, white as well as black, are eager to... Read More
Despite Virginia Gov. James Gilmore's bleating about the joys of "diversity," the race warriors of the NAACP in the Old Dominion are doing all they can to bring to Virginia the same racial bitterness they've already injected into South Carolina. Virginia has been more accommodating to black "sensitivities" about its Confederate heritage than any other... Read More
Winners take what they want; losers take what they can get. In California, the losers are white people, now known, at least to some, as "European-Americans," and what they can get is their own month, at least in an obscure school district. Everywhere else in the state -- and, before too long, the nation --... Read More
The great South Carolina battle over the Confederate flag ended last week, not with a bang but -- quite literally -- a whimper. House Majority Leader Richard Quinn, the Republican who led the movement to remove the flag from the capitol dome where it has flown since 1962, actually burst into tears. "My vote was... Read More
With both George W. Bush and Al Gore running around the country gobbling tacos and jabbering in pidgin Spanish, the 2000 presidential race is beginning to look more like a Cisco Kid rerun than an American election. The reason for all the pandering to Hispanics is that one of the common assumptions of both parties... Read More
One reason there's not much of a debate about the mass immigration that has swept into the country during the last 30 years is that most of the eggheads who expound on immigration harbor the fond illusion that the immigrants will assimilate -- that is, learn the English language, adopt Western and American values and... Read More
One of the most deeply cherished superstitions of modern science -- and, through science, law and public policy -- is that "race" doesn't exist. Because of that belief, supported by generations of social scientists, a good deal of what reformers thought was progress has turned out to be a nightmare. But at the end of... Read More
If you read the New York Times last week, you may well know all about the ethnic tensions that mar the Pacific paradise of Fiji, where the native islanders are locked in a bitter and somewhat violent conflict with Indians and other foreign newcomers. All most interesting, no doubt, and well worth the front-page attention... Read More
For all the happy chatter about the election of a new ruling party in Mexico for the first time in more than 70 years, you'd think something was actually about to change in El Basketcasa Grande south of border. The Mexican president-elect, Vicente Fox, is supposed to clean up corruption, modernize the economy and democratize... Read More
Virtually unknown to (and unwanted by) most Americans, Congress may soon vote to grant a mass amnesty to more than 3 million illegal aliens. The reasons the impending vote is virtually unknown are obvious enough: The backers of the amnesty hope to push it through before anyone notices, and its opponents are afraid of the... Read More
Under Prime Minister Tony Blair and his cohorts, Great Britain is threatening to become almost as totalitarian, if not more, in its reconstruction of history as the United States under Bill Clinton. One such cohort is Ken Livingstone, the new mayor of London, whose contribution to constructing the new order is to propose that the... Read More
As I explained in my 1991 column questioning Miss Iannone's qualifications for the National Humanities Advisory Council, it was not clear to me that she possessed the academic credentials and professional experience the position demanded - credentials and experience that are not a "figleaf" and which a number of paleo-conservative as well as neoconservative academics... Read More
It is no longer news that statues of real, white American heroes are being removed from public places and images of fake, non-white non-heroes being erected. The totalitarian reconstruction of culture, including the historical past, has now become commonplace. Nevertheless, the reasons offered by those waging the cultural and racial warfare remain interesting, if only... Read More
Even as some left-leaning Democrats pronounced to a yawning world that they would vote against it, the confirmation of former Sen. John Ashcroft as President Bush's attorney general appeared certain. Mr. Ashcroft has trod on the liberal toe on several different issues -- abortion, homosexuality, civil rights and just plain "sensitivity" in general. But on... Read More
It probably ought to tell us something that the first foreign leader to visit President George W. Bush was Jean Chrétien of Canada and that the first foreign leader whom President Bush will visit is Vicente Fox of Mexico. What it should tell us is that globalization - the same process that brought us NAFTA,... Read More
President Bush hasn't even met with Mexican President Vicente Foxyet, but at the rate of the concessions he's already made, we'll be lucky if the Gadsden Purchase is still U.S. territory by the time he does meet him at the end of this week. Two weeks ago, with bipartisan support and tacit administration approval, Congress... Read More
Many Americans know about the Texas town of El Cenizo, which not long ago announced it would no longer allow federal immigration laws to be enforced within its precincts and actually outlawed any city employee from enforcing them. Neither the president of the United States nor his attorney general nor even the governor of Texas... Read More
An unusual amount of diplomatic eyewash passed between President George W. Bush and his counterpart from Mexico, Vicente Fox, at last week's summit meeting in San Cristobal, and Americans are probably lucky that that's all that changed hands. Beneath the platitudes, courtesies and outright lies the two presidents told each other, the unmistakable tone was... Read More
The drama of the week consists not in the politics of tax cuts in Washington but rather in the dynamics of raw racial power on the nation's college campuses. David Horowitz, a neo-conservative foe of black racism, has been trying to publish ads against reparations for slavery in college newspapers. Some won't publish the ads... Read More
The news unfit to print for the last couple of weeks has to do with black violence against whites trying to celebrate "Fat Tuesday" in cities all over the country. Known in French as "Mardi Gras" in New Orleans, the day from now on might be better known as Bloody rather than Fat. In Philadelphia,... Read More
Last Friday, March 16, was the 250th anniversary of the birth of James Madison—fourth president of the United States, "Father of the Constitution," the major political theorist of The Federalist Papers and the last U.S. president to lead troops into combat (at the battle of Bladensburg, which he lost, in the War of 1812). But... Read More
"I didn't surrender any heritage," Virginia Gov. James Gilmore whined to the press last week after discarding Virginia's annual proclamation of April as "Confederate History Month" and replacing it with a tribute to black as well as white and Union as well as Confederate participants in his state's civil war. If that's what he does... Read More
You really have to tip your hat to Mexican President Vicente Fox, who seems determined to get the United States to change its immigration laws and take in even more Mexican immigrants than we do already. Ever since his election last summer, Mr. Fox has been pushing a scheme under which the two countries would... Read More
To the disgruntlement of Mississippi's business leaders and political establishment, it looks as though the vast majority of the state's voters next week will reject a proposed new state flag that drops the Confederate Battle Flag design of the current one. Depending on which poll you cite, voters favor the current state banner to the... Read More
After four straight days of anti-white mayhem in Cincinnati, the national media evidently decided that they could no longer keep their lid on one of the nation's largest race riots since the 1960s. Therefore, in place of simple suppression, what the nation's news watchers got was spin—that the oppressed blacks of Cincinnati took to the... Read More
After nearly three years of lies and 200 of libel, American scholarship has decided that Thomas Jefferson probably did not sire children by his slave Sally Hemings after all. The news has yet to be published by the same papers and magazines that in 1998 assured us that Jefferson had "almost certainly" fathered a child... Read More
Perhaps the most revealing comment about last week's Mississippi referendum that overwhelmingly endorsed keeping the state's 107-year-old flag with a Confederate flag design in it came from the editorial page of the Memphis Commercial Appeal, which supported getting rid of the old flag, the day after Mississippians went to the polls. "The vote also exposed... Read More
Perhaps without fully realizing what it was doing, the U.S. Supreme Court last week struck a small blow for American nationhood. By narrowly rejecting—for rather arcane legalistic reasons—the lawsuit of an immigrant woman demanding the right to take a driver's license test in Spanish, it actually helped protect the English language and the national bond... Read More
If there is going to be a white awakening in this country, a realization among whites that they are slowly becoming a subordinate class of citizens and victims of an emerging non-white, racially conscious majority, it may start in Cincinnati. In that city, ripped apart by three days of race riots in April, some whites... Read More
Is Thomas Blanton, convicted last week of first-degree murder in the infamous Birmingham church bombing of 1963, really guilty? Who knows? So politicized have trials involving racial issues become in this country—the murder trial of O.J. Simpson is the archetype—that jury verdicts mean almost nothing today. In the Blanton case, even the chief prosecutor, U.S.... Read More
Speaking before a luncheon hosted by the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith last week, Attorney General John Ashcroft swore eternal enmity to the evil of racial discrimination and its offspring, racial profiling. Discrimination, the attorney general solemnly warned, remains "pervasive," and needs to be combatted "vigorously." That, he continued, is why "racial profiling is an... Read More
With unemployment reaching a new high of 6.4 million last week, President Bush thought it would be a nifty idea to ask Congress to let more illegal immigrants remain in the country. He then met once again (for the fourth time) with Mexico's President Vicente Fox, who once again (for the ten zillionth time) badgered... Read More
In a rare fit of courage, Virginia Gov. James Gilmore last week put his name to a proclamation declaring May to be "European-American Heritage Month," but alas, the fit did not endure. [VDARE note: the Proclamation has now vanished from the gubernatorial website, although Virginia Beer Month and white canes – for the blind –... Read More
The debate over immigration may have smothered in its cradle in Washington and national politics, but in more real places it's still alive and kicking. One such place is Iowa, which for the last nine months has been pregnant with controversy over the issue. Last September, the state's Democratic governor, Tom Vilsack, was infected with... Read More
Antiquarians may recall that, long ago in April, two high Mexican government officials came to the United States and boasted of how much they were going to help us in controlling illegal immigration. Last week the help arrived in the shape of the Mexican government's plan to distribute some 200,000 survival kits to Mexicans who... Read More
"Remember the immigration debate of the '90s?" asks National Review senior editor Ramesh Ponnuru in an article on immigration policy in the magazine's April 2 issue. No, I'm afraid I don't, actually. What I remember was not a debate so much as a smear campaign to label anyone who favored restricting immigration as a "racist,"... Read More
The big news at Ford Motor Company these days is not so much those tires they're going to put on their cars and trucks but rather which colors will make the decision. Last summer, Ford was named the 30th "best company for minorities" in the country by Fortunemagazine, and if the class action lawsuit filed... Read More
While Time magazine's cover story this week gurgled cheerfully over the happy "whole new world" it spies in the disappearance of the U.S. border with Mexico, a more sober article in the June issue of American Demographics analyzes the new borders that are sprouting up—inside what used to be the United States. The second article,... Read More
With Amnesty International having just issued a report that calls the practice of torture in African countries "routine" and with probably hundreds of thousands of Africans living in the most grotesque slavery, African nations are cranking up a demand that Western states should apologize and pay up for all the wickedness they perpetrated on their... Read More
Perhaps the most intriguing thing about the reaction to last week's mayoral election in Los Angeles was that almost no one seemed disturbed by the transparent ethnic and racial lines that the voting followed--while at the same time, almost no one even bothered to deny that voting followed such lines. Nor does it seem to... Read More
Less than a week before Timothy McVeigh entertained the nation with a dose of the hot juice, a beaming Attorney General John Ashcroft popped up before the House Judiciary Committee to announce that a new Justice Department study shows there is "no evidence of racial bias in the administration of the federal death penalty." Since... Read More
If there's a shortage of hate crimes in your community, you can always try to dig one up from the remote past. In Duluth, Minnesota, the closest thing to a hate crime anyone seems able to find is the lynching of three blacks in 1920 by a white mob that believed them guilty of raping... Read More
The biggest problem for the not-very-bustling metropolis of Casa Blanca, Mexico, is, according to a recent story in the New York Times, whether it is going to exist in the near future. "The question we always ask," says one of its dwindling and aging residents, "is, 'Will our community survive?' We are running out of... Read More
Sam Francis
About Sam Francis

Dr. Samuel T. Francis (1947-2005) was a leading paleoconservative columnist and intellectual theorist, serving as an adviser to the presidential campaigns of Patrick Buchanan and as an editorial writer, columnist, and editor at The Washington Times. He received the Distinguished Writing Award for Editorial Writing of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) in both 1989 and 1990, while being a finalist for the National Journalism Award (Walker Stone Prize) for Editorial Writing of the Scripps Howard Foundation those same years. His undergraduate education was at Johns Hopkins and he later earned his Ph.D. in modern history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

His books include The Soviet Strategy of Terror(1981, rev.1985), Power and History: The Political Thought of James Burnham (1984); Beautiful Losers: Essays on the Failure of American Conservatism (1993); Revolution from the Middle: Essays and Articles from Chronicles, 1989–1996 (1997); and Thinkers of Our Time: James Burnham (1999). His published articles or reviews appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, National Review, The Spectator (London), The New American, The Occidental Quarterly, and Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, of which he was political editor and for which he wrote a monthly column, “Principalities and Powers.”