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Remembering Pearl Harbor: 72 Years
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Never forget:

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A newsreel of the Day of Infamy:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAnOtWm5OrM&fs=1&hl=en_US]

Time has published rare photos from the front.

Stars and Stripes features remembrances from the nation’s oldest vets.

On Saturday, the two oldest veterans in America — a pair of 107-year-olds who fought in the Pacific theater 70 years ago — will meet up to mark the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor and to trade stories.

It’s a heartwarming photo op, but also a sign of the nation’s fading ties to the Greatest Generation and a warning to the Sept. 11 generation that the mantra of “never forget” grows more difficult as the years pass.

The veterans — Richard Overton and Elmer Hill — weren’t at the attack in Hawaii, but passed through the ruined Navy base later on their way to the fight. They survived kamikaze planes and sluggish, island-clearing combat to return home and build new lives in separate parts of Texas.

They’ve never met, but are connected through their shared — and fading — military experiences.

Each man said he doesn’t have anything specific he wants to share with the other.

Each is just happy to meet a fellow World War II veteran.

In Somers Point, NJ, a lone surviving Pearl Harbor vet is the only one in attendance at his South Jersey memorial ceremony.

Check out the Pearl Harbor memorial website.

God bless all our Pearl Harbor vets for their service and sacrifice.

(Republished from MichelleMalkin.com by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Veterans, War