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Supposedly, the debate-watching party at the Miami HQ of ¡Jeb¡

Any comments on the debate?

 
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  1. Hepp says:

    Every single word thus far in the undercard debate has been about ISIS. Our obsession with this region of lunatics on the other side of the world is bizarre.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Ripple Earthdevil
  2. Glossy says: • Website

    When I switched to CNN the first thing I saw was Lindsey Graham talking about princess bride, princess buttercup and someone getting into bed with someone. That was so disturbing! That voice, that face, those words.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
  3. newrouter says:

    “Our obsession with this region of lunatics on the other side of the world is bizarre.”

    san bernardino is “down the street” from mr. sailer

    • Replies: @Hepp
    , @NOTA
  4. I accidentally turned on the undercard debate and had to turn it off when Lindsey strode onto the stage. What keeps his candidacy alive? Is he funded by CHEWPAC? (Closeted Homosexuals for Eternal War.)

    • Agree: Hail
  5. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Hepp

    Our obsession

    Donor’s obsession.

    It’s all about deposing Assad and getting the US to attack Hizbollah.

    I doubt they could get support for it if they were honest but the actual reason is better than all the BS reasons they’ve made up to try and con people into war with Syria.

    • Replies: @Kaz
    , @Mr. Anon
  6. Glossy says: • Website
    @Harry Baldwin

    He apologized to the Muslim world for Donald Trump, then promised to shoot down Russian planes in Syria and to send US ground troops there. In the end he drawled “please make me president” in a southern belle type voice. I’m now watching the pundits. They’re praising him.

  7. The Z Blog says: • Website

    I was tempted to throw my TV out the window in order to keep myself from tuning into this thing. I resisted, but when I went to grab a drink, the TV threw itself out the window.

  8. Hepp says:
    @newrouter

    Funny, how did they get here? Seems like a simple problem with a simple solution.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Dirk Dagger
  9. Kaz says:
    @anon

    If America supported Assad instead of stepping on his neck while he was dealing with the rebels would ISIS be where it is now, would there be a Syrian refugee crisis?

    • Replies: @Romanian
  10. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    That manlet Rand Paul needs to get off the stage. Nobody under 6 ft. has been president since the 19th century.

  11. NOTA says:
    @newrouter

    Why are we willing to let two whackjobs with guns determine our political agenda or foreign policy?

  12. Dirk Dagger [AKA "Chico Caldera"] says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Carter wasn’t even 5′ 10″ … a submarine officer. JFK & Nixon were both 6′ too, though it was close.

  13. @Hepp

    You can’t hold back the tide or migrants.

  14. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Presidents under 6 feet since 1900:

    William McKinley 5 ft 7 in
    Theodore Roosevelt 5 ft 10 in
    William Howard Taft 5 ft 11 1⁄2 in
    Woodrow Wilson 5 ft 11 in
    Calvin Coolidge 5 ft 10 in
    Herbert Hoover 5 ft 11 1⁄2 in
    Harry S. Truman 5 ft 9 in
    Dwight D. Eisenhower 5 ft 10 1⁄2 in
    Richard Nixon 5 ft 11 1⁄2 in
    Jimmy Carter 5 ft 9 1⁄2 in
    George W. Bush 5 ft 11 1⁄2 in

  15. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I was exaggerating , but manlets like Paul don’t win against taller candidates.

  16. SNL needs to bring Ana Gasteyer out of retirement to portray Carly Fiorina.

  17. @Lot

    The short/tall dichotomy is interesting but is only part of the picture. Statistics are misleading. It could be said that only two of the last ten presidents were liked by their mothers-in-law. Astonishingly, each of those two were very bad for the country. Similarly, it could be said that only four of the last ten presidents had children who would be, overall, considered to be very good citizens by their less fortunate American neighbors. Surprisingly, half of those four were terrible presidents. The short guys – Carter and Truman – did well in the military, and were admired by their fellow officers, I think; but neither one was all that well liked by real soldiers and real sailors while they enjoyed their senile years in the White House in the years when being an American president was a comparative walk in the park, at least for the un-empathetic sort of person who usually got the job. It is a complicated world that we live in.

  18. iffen says:

    When is the last time that we had a whale as our President?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @snorlax
    , @DWB
  19. @Anonymous

    GWB was about 5″ shorter than Kerry.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Kyle a
  20. Bugg says:

    Marco Rubio makes me want to punch him in the face. “Teacher, you didn’t give us homework!” Yes, this guy who cannot manage his own checking account, give him the keys to the Oval Office.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
  21. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Where do they find all of these rhinocucks to fill the audience? Hewitt thinks he’s a conservative I take it? Yet he is worried that Americans will be talking about their security and stopping the settlement of foreigners into their country on Christmas. Kasich wants American troops on the ground in Iraq and Syria. The chumps in Republican Party love the reemergence of the Islamic threat so they can talk tough about foreign policy. But preventing noneuropeans from replacing Americans that’s not a serious proposal. Marco Rubio is certainly the most diengenious candidate.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  22. TangoMan says:

    “It’s not about religion, it’s about security.”

    This needs to be debunked. Issues need not be about religion when religious differences are minor and the expressed religions all share the same root and trunk, but if we hold to this model of religious plurality with respect to Islam, and we see the problems associated with Islam in the ME, in Africa, in Europe, all with societies with more Islamic penetration, then where is it we want our society to go as Muslims grow as a proportion of the American population? Will America be the same when we’re 10% Muslim, 30% Muslim?

    It’s not really about security, it’s about Islam.

  23. Ivy says:

    Our group says there are some good debaters, and that Cruz has a smirking face that should be punched. How soon will Carson fall asleep and fade away?

  24. TangoMan says:

    “Boots on the ground.”

    Hasn’t Kasich seen the game of “whack a mole.” ISIS is simply the latest iteration of an idea.

  25. D. K. says:
    @Lot

    How tall was Ronald Reagan, when he was first inaugurated, 17 days before his 70th birthday? Adults start to shrink vertically at about age 30; those who live to a ripe old age shrink about 3% from what they were in their twenties.

  26. @Anonymous

    FDR wasn’t exactly tall in the wheelchair saddle.

  27. iffen says:
    @Anonymous

    At least he has gotten rid of the bad poodle cut.

  28. @TangoMan

    Regarding the life with different Muslim population percentages, I’m sure a lot of people have seen this email/meme analysis that started floating around a few years ago. It’s easy to pick at these kinds of glorified chain letters, but in this particular case, is it incorrect?

    • Replies: @TangoMan
  29. Beach says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Is he funded by CHEWPAC?

    Brilliant! If that’s not a thing, it should be.

  30. anon • Disclaimer says:

    #MakeCarsonAwakeAgain

    • Replies: @Harold
  31. TangoMan says:

    Surveillance.

    There are no rattlesnake bites up in Nome, Alaska because they don’t have rattlesnakes up there. Stop importing Muslims into the US and you reduce the need for surveillance, after all, it’s not Sven from Minnesota who is conducting jihad.

    Every sacred principle must be abandoned in order to keep the Rube Goldberg invention of multiculturalism semi-functional.

  32. Bert says:

    It’s pretty funny how much Carson has fizzled out. He makes Al Gore look positively compelling by comparison.

  33. So far…
    *Cruz & Rand – solid, articulate. Good call out of Rubio’s open borders record
    *Invisible – Christie, Carly, Kasich
    *Asleep – Carson
    *Timorous, feeble no matter the substance (terrible, nervous body language, deer in the headlights looks & weasel-like retorts ) – !Jeb!
    *Glib, smarmy….presents Bush/Cheney/Neocon 3.0 platform – Rubio
    *Ok, but seems blasse, some occasional strong counter punches – Trump.

    The crowd is biased towards Rubio & Bush – no surprise there given the host’s hotel venue.

    Overall, Cruz may win this debate. Trump is holding his own but needs to better prepare for these events. He should be scoring knockouts against Rubio & the Hive.

  34. wiseguy says:

    Trump mocking the crowd booing him: hopefully viewers will understand that he was implying the audience is filled with obvious establishment plants.

    • Replies: @Hail
  35. Ivy says:

    Wolf Blitzer is a fellow traveler with Journolisters and Cabalisters.
    He comes across as using his moderator role in a thinly disguised attempt to sow doubt about Republicans. That is par for the course for CNN.

  36. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Manlets never learn.

  37. TangoMan says:
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    People shape culture. As the Muslim proportion of the US population grows, there will be more Muslim influence on American culture. So far, at least, Muslims immigrating to the US have been of higher SES than those migrating to Europe, and even with this benefit, we already have erosion of civil rights in order to accommodate Muslim interests and the threats arising from Muslim presence, so if the future influence is to be the same, better or worse, I can’t see up tapping future immigrants who are better than present, I don’t think it’s plausible that we can even maintain the same caliber of immigrants because most of what we’ve been seeing of late have been refugees, not Muslim engineering professors, so the composition of the Muslim community is going to be diluted with low human capital immigrants and we’re going to follow the European model of disaffected 2nd generation kids who turn to more radical Islam because they’re not integrating to success in the US.

    Who needs that future when it can be aborted right now and thus this leaves us to deal with the more manageable problem of existing Muslim-Americans, and keep in mind that it is because of this population that there are calls for increasing the scope of the Surveillance State.

    • Agree: Auntie Analogue
  38. anon • Disclaimer says:

    #MakeRubioStraightAgain

  39. JZ says:

    The audience is atrocious. Stacked with RNC establishment hacks. You’d think Trump is running last in the polls given this rigged format.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
  40. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    GWB was around 6 ft though, so he wasn’t a manlet. And Kerry had that awkward Frankenstein thing going on. But Kerry definitely would have destroyed a manlet like Paul.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    , @athEIst
  41. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I am struck by the fact that Trump has set the terms of the debate. Even when Trump is being attacked, it’s for being too strong on immigration/terrorism/Islam.

    • Replies: @jon
  42. Hail says: • Website

    Trump has said that all the interventions and meddling have been wrongheaded, wrong, should’ve invested those trillions in the USA.

    Fiorina replies: “Wow! That’s just what Obama thinks. I am amazed that a Republican candidate would say that…”

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  43. Taco says:

    Chris Christie:

    To the people at home, if your eyes are glazing over like mine, you can see what its like on the floor of the US Senate. They argue over how many angels can dance on the head of a pin because they dont know what its like to hold an executive position and make executive decisions. For seven years I held an executive decision. I made those executive decisions.

    Decisions like, do I eat 3 eclairs, or 4?

    Believe me, I made the tough decisions. I ate all 4 eclairs.

    • Replies: @jon
    , @athEIst
  44. Hail says: • Website
    @wiseguy

    the audience is filled with obvious establishment plants.

    Rence Priebus (RNC Chair) warmed up the crowd with a spiel full of transparent swipes at Trump.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  45. @Lot

    But just about everybody was at least average in height.

    I wonder how much prejudice against the below average in height hurt Howard Dean in 2004?

    It seemed to hurt Michael Dukakis in his tank misadventure.

    Movie stars were very tall in 1939 relative to the population, but not anymore.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @D. K.
    , @SFG
  46. Hepp says:

    On foreign policy, Cruz, Trump, Paul, and Carson are sane.

    Rubio, Bush, and Kasich are still defending the freedom agenda.

    Fiorina and Christie are closer to the insane wing.

    The sane people are winning, and doing so without elite and establishment support. That’s encouraging.

    • Agree: gruff
    • Replies: @Taco
  47. Taco says:

    Kasich/Fiorina:

    Trump is EXTREME!! We can’t say mean things about Muslims!

    Also, it is long past time that we had a world war with Russia.

    • Replies: @epebble
  48. Hail says: • Website

    “It’s time to punch Russia in the nose.”
    –John Kasich, then spoke about Russia “threatening our most precious allies in Eastern Europe”.

    Kasich’s father was of Czech descent, while his mother was of Croatian ancestry.

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Hunsdon
  49. Burt says:

    Trump has been exposed. Looks like he’s about to flame out

  50. TangoMan says:

    Christie would shoot down Russian planes and Trump is the reckless one?

    • Agree: Taco
    • Replies: @Taco
  51. Taco says:
    @TangoMan

    Christie would shoot down Russian planes and Trump is the reckless one?

    NO KIDDING!

    Trump wants to keep Muslims out of America.

    Christie/Fiorina/Kasich/Jeb/Cruz/Rubio wants to provoke WWIII with Russia.

    Which one of these two positions is scarier?

  52. MKP says:

    Carly Fiorina turns every answer to every question into a rant on how much she hates the awful Hillary Clinton. Her handlers have clearly informed her that her path to victory lies in trashing Hillary, selling herself as the one to attack Hillary, and coming across as the sharp-but-competent post-menopausal woman, in contrast to the loud, squawking, bumbling one.

    Watching Jeb looking uncomfortable, knowing he has no chance, and hating every minute of it almost makes the whole thing worthwhile. I hope his worthless ass cries himself to sleep every night.

    Rand Paul is doing pretty good, IMO. He has a fan section in the audience that clearly agrees with his non-interventionist talk.

    All of the ones talking about “we can’t be the world’s police, solving every problem” are looking pretty sensible (and getting pretty good response from the audience). The intervention-mongers are on their heels and struggling to explain themselves. Good news – again, just in my opinion.

    Kasich’s hand waving is getting really weird. Don’t you think they would have convinced him to tone it down a bit?

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  53. Taco says:
    @Hepp

    On foreign policy, Cruz, Trump, Paul, and Carson are sane.

    Cruz is not sane.

    Anyone who is running for President of the United States who doesn’t realize that Assad is not in fact a radical shiite, and is basing his foreign policy around the doctrine of “What Netanyahu wants, Netanyahu gets” is not sane.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
  54. Bugg says:

    Carly-I will be Nurse Ratchet!

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe
  55. I’m finding Rubio’s hyper energetic speaking style increasingly grating, especially as he keeps interlarding his speech with pre-fab boilerplate. I liked that he got his ass kicked on his Gang of Eight participation.

    Carly is also grating. Sounds like the spinster headmistress of a private girls’ academy hectoring an assembly of senior girls on how standards have been slipping.

    I’m glad Rand Paul is still in the debates because I agree with a lot of what he says about our foreign policy. The crazy war-talk from most of the others is alarming.

    Kasich sounds like a crazy old coot, so it’s funny he acts like he’s the only reasonable person on stage.

    Jeb is pathetic. He keeps mentioning that Trump gets his foreign policy views “from the shows.” Why doesn’t Trump remind the audience that Jeb gets his foreign policy views from Paul Woldfowitz.

    I think Ben Carson is campaigning for Surgeon General. I’m okay with that. Do we have a Surgeon General at the moment? Don’t recall hearing of one.

  56. Hail says: • Website

    “We have a country or we don’t have a country….We either have a border, or we don’t.” “Walls work. You just have to speak to the folks in Israel. ” [Applause]
    –Trump

  57. @Hail

    Yeah, that made me despise her even more. Go Trump!

  58. Taco says:

    “i’m a former federal prosecutor”

    I’m starting to wonder if Chris Christie has some sort of weird verbal tick where he can’t start a sentence without saying this phrase.

    I saw a fellow giving a presentation once who uttered a bizarre guttural sound, “YARSH” instead of saying “umm” or “uhh”. It was very distracting.

  59. TangoMan says:

    Rubio on immigration, Cruz too. Steve came up with a great line about white ladies voting for Obama – “Don’t be so black, be more like Barack.” Rubio/Cruz need to break free of the “race traitor” concerns, of the model put forth by Lee Kuan Yew that in a multicultural society people always align with tribe. These guys need to prove that they’re American before they’re Hispanic, that they have no special concerns for Hispanic illegals just because they’re Hispanic. “I will not put interests of blood before the interests of America and I call on all Hispanics to stand with me.”

    That’s how you stop the bleeding and you co-opt Trump’s anti-immigration message but make it your own.

    Of course, this presumes that they see the need to stop immigration altogether, which they don’t.

  60. Jefferson says:
    @Glossy

    “When I switched to CNN the first thing I saw was Lindsey Graham talking about princess bride, princess buttercup and someone getting into bed with someone. That was so disturbing! That voice, that face, those words.”

    Lindsey Graham is a Homosexual. He might as well just come out of the closet. What does he have to lose?

    • Replies: @jon
    , @Hibernian
    , @athEIst
  61. C says:
    @Burt

    lolwut?

    Please tell me this is sarcasm.

    Amazingly, he appears to be the most level-headed candidate while at the same time refusing to be bullied in any way at all. I expected more bluster, but he just goes about being sensible (spend money in the U.S. , secure the border, calling out CNN for their attacks) while putting anyone who crosses him in their place.

    • Agree: tbraton
  62. Hail says: • Website
    @Harry Baldwin

    I’m glad Rand Paul is still in the debates because I agree with a lot of what he says about our foreign policy. The crazy war-talk from most of the others is alarming.

    Rand Paul just called for no Muslim refugee settlement in the YSA, and called for Muslim refugees to be accommodated in nearby, Muslim states. Sensible.

    Rand Paul has the most sense, maybe even more than Trump, on this.

    But…

    Immigration Grade from NumbersUSA:
    Trump: A-
    Paul: C-
    Bush: C-
    Rubio: D

    Paul and Jeb “Act of Love” Bush have the same grade??

    • Replies: @Paulestinian
  63. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Dean’s problem was that he has no neck and looked bad in suits and dress shirts. He looks like a high school wrestling coach and gym teacher, and that screaming episode confirmed for everyone that he didn’t just look like one, but actually sounded and acted like the obnoxious wrestling/gym coach everyone remembers from high school.

  64. MKP says:

    Several of the middling lights have done their homework. Carson’s compares middle east policy to an emergency on an airplane – “secure your own mask before helping your neighbor. Well, we need to take care of our own people before we solve everyone else’s problems.” Sounds kinda hokey, but it will stick in people’s memory.

    Rand Paul sticks it to Marco Rubio on refugees (can’t recall the exact words, but Rubio looks nervous and stammers a bit).

    Rand Paul and Donald Trump are both doing well trashing the money and lives we’re wasting in the M.E., all of which have achieved nothing. Both get applause when they talk about the problems in the M.E. being intractable and our country wasting time and money trying to referee it.

    Christie sounds like the pig-faced idiot he is when he talks about “punchin’ ole Russia in da nose!” but his willingness to say “no refugees at all” is a worthwhile moment. His NJ governor background has apparently led to a weird combination of sensible response to massive immigration by radicalized foreigners, combined with aggressive, moronic dick-swinging when it comes to international relations. Invade the world without the invite the world (or course, he couldn’t pull that off, even if it were desirable).

    Dana Bash still looks good.

  65. Ivy says:

    Reps now modeling House of Commons debating, so the Dem backbenchers will need to get the same opportunity to open up when they are on.

  66. Taco says:

    Fiorina:

    In order to get China to support us, we have to first retaliate against them, second we must seriously threaten their trade interests, third we have to ask for their support.

    I can’t even I just can’t even

    • Replies: @epebble
  67. Taco says:

    Chris Christie:

    We must do something about corrupt oligarchs in China!

    Hey Chris… How about corrupt oligarchs here?

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  68. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Hugh Hewitt made his broadcast career by working for the Ziocon cause. His broadcast career was facilitated by the Salem Network, supposedly a Christian Radio Network, which focuses most of its coverage on the unintelligible politics in Israel’s neighborhood.

  69. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    I think Ben Carson is campaigning for Surgeon General. I’m okay with that. Do we have a Surgeon General at the moment? Don’t recall hearing of one.

    As long as ex-presidents are happy to be operated on by the Surgeon General I am happy with that idea.

  70. tbraton says:
    @Lot

    I’m a little surprised by TR’s 5’10.” I always had the impression that TR was tallish, but after reading Gore Vidal’s “Empire,” I was left with the impression that he was smaller than I thought. I guess that oversized head made it hard to judge his height.

  71. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Burt

    Was his fly undone?

    Ohhh, I get it. His hair was on fire and the fire is about to go out.

  72. anon • Disclaimer says:

    They ought to have to wear a hat saying which country has paid them to attack which other country and for how much.

  73. Jefferson says:
    @Bugg

    “Marco Rubio makes me want to punch him in the face. “Teacher, you didn’t give us homework!” Yes, this guy who cannot manage his own checking account, give him the keys to the Oval Office.”

    From what I have read on political websites, in Marco Rubio’s household he spends way more money than what he makes per year. If you are going to run for president claiming to be a fiscal conservative, start in your personal life first. Don’t live like you make over $1 million dollars a year if you are only pulling in half or a quarter of that per year.

  74. jon says:
    @anonymous

    I am struck by the fact that Trump has set the terms of the debate. Even when Trump is being attacked, it’s for being too strong on immigration/terrorism/Islam.

    I haven’t been following closely, but so far I have noticed that at least Christie and Kasich are on board with the immigration moratorium. Hilariously quick change of position considering how much shit the Donald took last week in the press.

    • Replies: @SFG
  75. Mr. Blank says:

    It’s pretty amazing how lousy Jeb looks next to his brother, given that his brother was no great shakes to begin with. Dubya’s secret seems to have been that he had a very clear understanding of his own limitations, and knew how to play to his own strengths. Jeb seems to have no such understanding. Years of being told he’s the “smarter Bush brother” seem to have given him a false confidence about his political skills.

    Like I’ve said before, Jeb seems to have a political skillset that was finely tuned to handle the peculiar political environment of Florida, but just doesn’t translate outside the state.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    , @Thea
  76. jon says:
    @Taco

    Believe me, I made the tough decisions. I ate all 4 eclairs.

    We don’t expect our politicians to be model’s of health & fitness, but I do think there comes a point where it makes someone unelectable. Christie has probably reached that point.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  77. MKP says:

    Closings statements

    PAUL: biggest threat is our debt, we borrow far too much, right and left come together in secret agreement to spend big $, I’ll say no to all and be truly fiscally conservative:

    KASICH: [not going to dignify his idiocy]

    CHRISTIE: 9/11, spent my life protecting our country, I will protect America

    FIORINA: 9/11 too. I put into place security procedures in my company. Al Qaeda had Hewlett-Packard’s corporate campus next on their hit list. I hate Hillary, and I can beat Hillary.

    BUSH: Who will keep us safer? Stumbles over his own words like an damn fool. His owners must be groaning. This was the part you could totally rehearse for, keep in mind.

    RUBIO: Can’t stand him, but a decent speech for the yokels. American dream must expand, we must rebuild and keep us safe, remain the strongest nation on earth. I have to say, he’d pound Hillary into sand in a general.

    CRUZ: Judgment, trust, etc. Obama doesn’t like America, I will be like the new Reagan. Cut taxes, help business, defeat Islamic terror.

    CARSON: Traveled the world, thank God I was born in America. Pretty good God / Mom / Apple Pie bit.

    TRUMP: Our country doesn’t win anymore. We don’t win on trade, military, ISIS, taking care of veterans. Somewhat rambling bit, but compelling way of getting his point across.

    My take: Cruz did well, Trump did as expected and didn’t have the horrible stumble some were hoping for, Paul made some excellent points. Rubio was up and down, but is slick enough to avoid any damage. Bush, Kasich and Fiorina sound awful, in my opinion, and won’t last much longer. But I’ve been wrong before.

  78. asdf says:

    Whatever happens, Jeb is dead man walking. Hope he sticks it out long. No more Bush. Ever.

    (where’s Whiskey these days anyway? too much sorrow?)

    • Replies: @Kyle a
    , @Whiskey
  79. Jefferson says:
    @JZ

    “The audience is atrocious. Stacked with RNC establishment hacks. You’d think Trump is running last in the polls given this rigged format.”

    This is how you know the audience at GOP debates are rigged by The Establishment, Lindsey Graham gets a lot of standing ovations at these debates even though he is polling at zero percent nationwide. How is it possible that Donald Trump the leading Republican candidate gets more boos than zero percent Lindsey Graham at these debates?

  80. D. K. says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The top Hollywood box-office star of 1939– as well as both 1940 and 1941– was Mickey Rooney. According to both Wikipedia.org and IMDb.com, he stood just 5′ 2″ tall. I assume that that figure refers to his physical prime, in the 1940s (he was born in 1920), rather than when he died, last year. He appeared in films in ten consecutive decades– the last of which is set to premier next April, 89 and a half years after his first Hollywood short. Less than a year after his debut, he became the lead and title character in the long-running ‘Mickey McGuire” series (billed under that name; he took on the name Mickey Rooney in 1932). Best of all, in 1942, he married for the first time– to a 19-year-old would-be-starlet named Ava Gardner! This is my favorite quote by the Mick: “I lost $2 at Santa Anita and I’ve spent $3 million trying to get it back.”

    • Replies: @Richard A.
  81. @MKP

    Rand Paul is a youthful looking 52. He might be setting himself up decently for a future run.

  82. Luke Lea says: • Website

    I thought it was Bush’s strongest showing.

  83. TangoMan says:

    I want to see Bush demoted to the undercard debates before he drops out. A nice topping of humiliation as the capstone to the Bush Dynasty.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  84. Jefferson says:
    @Mr. Blank

    ‘It’s pretty amazing how lousy Jeb looks next to his brother, given that his brother was no great shakes to begin with. Dubya’s secret seems to have been that he had a very clear understanding of his own limitations, and knew how to play to his own strengths. Jeb seems to have no such understanding. Years of being told he’s the “smarter Bush brother” seem to have given him a false confidence about his political skills.

    Like I’ve said before, Jeb seems to have a political skillset that was finely tuned to handle the peculiar political environment of Florida, but just doesn’t translate outside the state.”

    The reason George W. Bush was so popular among White Southern voters is because he gave them the impression that he is a simple modest Redneck just like them. You could see George W. Bush having dinner with blue collar White Southerners at a Cracker Barrel in Arkansas or Tennessee for example. He never came off as a blue blood white collar snob elitist like his brother Jeb Bush and Mitt Romney.

  85. If you discard all the acceptable positions of the Republican candidates and the Democrat candidates you may be able to find some solutions.

    BTW, how tall is Putin?

  86. SFG says:
    @Anonymous

    I don’t know what his T level is, but at least he seems less prone than some of the others to start stupid wars.

  87. SFG says:
    @jon

    Exactly. Trump will fall, but has hopefully pushed the others far enough to the right we’ll be able to stop amnesty for another four years.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    , @Rifleman
  88. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    W. was under 6′. And Rand Paul was great going after Rubio on immigration and Christie on wanting to start a war with Russia.

  89. SFG says:
    @Bugg

    Weren’t you listening to his closing statement? He’s from Ohio!

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    , @Reg Cæsar
  90. @MKP

    Dana Bash still looks good.

    Dana Bash’s face is too small for her features. It’s the opposite problem than the one that Rosie O’Donnell suffers from.

    • Replies: @Ivy
  91. SFG says:
    @Hail

    Czech and Croatian…I can see why he would want to punch Russia in the nose.

    I still don’t think we should. Them having as many nukes as us and all that.

    • Replies: @Hail
  92. @jon

    Didn’t he get gastric bypass surgery or something in preparation for this run? Whatever it was, he beat it. Geez, even Teddy Kennedy ws able to slim down a bit when he had to.

    • Replies: @jon
  93. SFG says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Why do we care?

    I mean, really. Why does it affect their ability to do their job?

    And…what is with this manliness business? Yes, I know, traditional gender roles are the basis of Western Civ. But the more macho he is, the more likely he is to get us into a war, which means lots of dead soldiers and lost money. Probably on behalf of Israel, which I know everyone here is so fond of.

  94. @MKP

    I have to say, he’d pound Hillary into sand in a general.

    Yes, and then govern with the same policies.

    • Replies: @MKP
  95. @SFG

    How did Kasich fail to mention even once that his dad was a mailman? Is he losing it? That’s his ace in the hole!

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Jonathan Silber
  96. Unless you’re super short like 5/6 – no one cares how tall a President is. If you do, you’re an idiot. We want people with strong minds and good judgement. We’re not electing a basketball team.

    Perot was pretty short and he didn’t lose because he was shorter than fat boy Clinton.

    Because of the TV, the real physical barriers are (1) baldness (2) facial hair (3) a high pitched voice and (4) being fat.

    With the exception of Harding pretty much every president from TR to Ike would’ve never been nominated today based on their looks. Of course, Taft could’ve gone on a diet.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Bill Jones
  97. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Harry Baldwin

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Glossy
    , @SF
  98. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Trump: let’s spend the money that we would have spent on wars, on our own people, be that on health care, or infrastructure, or whatever!!
    Go Donald

  99. Jefferson says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “Rand Paul is a youthful looking 52. He might be setting himself up decently for a future run.”

    Or maybe it is a generational thing. On average a 52 year old in 2015 does not look as ancient a dinosaur as a 52 year old in 1965 for example. It is probably advancements in cosmetics and people living healthier lifestyles compared to back than. It seems like 50 years ago everybody and their mama smoked cigarettes and drank alcohol at the same time, hence speeding up the aging process.

  100. Are the republicans seriously intent on picking a candidate from this coterie of clowns or is someone even worse already selected and waiting in the wings?

    Like someone from the military?

    • Replies: @Matthew Kelly
    , @G Pinfold
  101. anon • Disclaimer says:

    Like many here I’m not a fan of many Rubio policies, but have to say I think he may be the smoothest presidential candidate I’ve ever seen. It seems he can do a coherent paragraph or two on whatever the topic is with perfect modulation throughout. It’s really quite uncanny.

    I’d also say Rand Paul did very well tonight. His only flub was probably bringing up Christie’s bridge scandal. Seemed ill-timed after the momentum he had with all his prior applause lines.

    And finally, it also is kind of funny how little personal antagonisms have apparently developed within the group. Mainly, Rand Paul vs. Christie & Jeb vs. Trump. (And I think Trump lowered his ‘seems presidential’ stature with a few of his ungracious targetings of Jeb.) (But as for Jeb, if he doesn’t catch on pretty soon that it just ain’t gonna happen, he may be in need of some psych attention.)

    Final Five: Trump, Rubio, Cruz, Rand Paul, Christie

  102. jon says:
    @Jefferson

    What does he have to lose?

    He’s only at one percent because of rounding, so …

  103. MKP says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    “Yes, and then govern with the same policies.”

    Oh, I agree. I’m not going to vote for Rubio. Just noting that he has the political skills and would beat her in a battle of optics.

    “Dana Bash’s face is too small for her features. It’s the opposite problem than the one that Rosie O’Donnell suffers from.”

    Come on, man. You’d nail her.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  104. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    Wouldn’t be a crazy VP pick for Trump. Smart, good debater, rural, sitting senator, physician, not a businessman.

  105. @Harry Baldwin

    Jeb is pathetic. He keeps mentioning that Trump gets his foreign policy views “from the shows.”

    I too thought that was weird. Does Bush think the American people are going to attack Trump for forming his opinions the same way they do? He might as well be calling out Trump for using the wrong fork at dinner.

  106. Hunsdon says:
    @Anonymous

    “Goal shifting, it’s the shifting, the shifting ooooof the goals!”

  107. @Dave Pinsen

    Damon Runyon is helping with Rubio’s debate prep?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  108. Glossy says: • Website
    @Dave Pinsen

    I think I’d be able to guess from Rubio’s speaking cadence that he’s Hispanic if I didn’t know his last name or who he was. The rhythm of his speech hints at it.

  109. @Steve Sailer

    He could pass for early 40s. Looks very good for his age.

  110. Hunsdon says:
    @Hail

    Gee, you’d almost think that listening to people who carry an extraneous ethnic grievance might be a bad idea for US foreign policy.

    Naaaah!

    • Agree: Hail
  111. Hail says: • Website
    @SFG

    Do Croatians actually hate Russians?

    Suppression of Prague Spring, 1968, Kasich (b.1952) will remember it well.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  112. Bliss says:

    The good news is that Trump, Cruz and Rand Paul were emphatically against the current bipartisan regime-change policy in Syria……and the post-debate polls show that together they are getting >80% of the votes:

    http://drudgereport.com/nowlv.htm

    Trump-Cruz looks like the most likely ticket.

  113. @Harry Baldwin

    I agree that Fiorina is just annoying. She talks over everyone a lot too.

    Rand Paul makes a lot of sense on foreign policy and the surveillance state. Too bad he’s weak on immigration though.

    Jeb took some shots at Trump, but I don’t think he’ll see any bump from this more aggressive debate.

    Kasich was forgettable.

    Rubio took a lot of hits tonight.

    Trump did fine. He should maintain his poll numbers.

    Cruz had some nice hits on Marco Rubio and was decent.

    Christie sounded tough, but that didn’t help him much in previous debates.

    Carson was witty and seemed more point, so maybe his slide in the polls will stop.

    I don’t think there will be much movement in the polls after this, except maybe Rubio could lose a little support. Christie might gain a little in New Hampshire, but not neccessarily nationwide.

  114. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    He does look like he’s about 40.

    Do you really think he can overcome his height and be president in the future? Everything is so TV and media driven now. His voice is not commanding either.

  115. @SFG

    I think Trump has the best chance of winning this. Trump is at 40% in the polls now in the Republican primary.

    • Replies: @SFG
  116. @MKP

    Jeb screwed up during the closing statements.

    Cruz did a pretty good closing.

    Trump got his point across.

  117. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    Do you really think it’s personal with him? I imagine it’s just him conforming and sucking up to the establishment.

    • Replies: @Hail
  118. @SFG

    Weren’t you listening to his closing statement? He’s from Ohio!

    Funny, that didn’t help Taft in 1912.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @AP
  119. @MKP

    Did you notice that Fiorina wore a cross?

    Yes, Jeb looked very uncomfortable. To a lesser extent, so did Rubio.

    Rand Paul got a good hit against Rubio.

    Kasich seems to have a problem with weird body movements. I think he does that when he gets agitated. He was worse in the last debate though.

    It’s insane how belligerent some of these people are with regards to Russia. Christie said he’d shoot down a Russian plane if neccessary. Fiorina was very confrontational too. Trump, Cruz, and Paul were good.

    Carson said he wanted boots on the ground. Not good.

    Trump made some excellent points about the destruction and financial waste of the Iraq War. Rand Paul was intelligent when discussing how arming the “rebels” has been a disaster (in both Syria and Libya). Cruz said he wants an America first foreign policy.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  120. @Hail

    During his speech, Priebus made it a point to talk about how the Republican party is targeting minority voters (Hispanic, black, Asian, etc) much more effectively than 2012.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  121. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Paul was scrappy tonight, but he might be too much of a manlet to succeed:

  122. @Honesthughgrant

    Because of the TV, the real physical barriers are (1) baldness (2) facial hair (3) a high pitched voice and (4) being fat.

    Carly and Hillary are strong on #1 and #2, but they’ll never get past #3.

  123. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    Michael Brendan Dougherty also pointed out Rubio starts sentences with “For”. He speaks in essays, which doesn’t make him sound smart, just rehearsed.

  124. @JohnnyWalker123

    Did you notice that Fiorina wore a cross?

    Maybe to ward off Wolf Blitzer?

  125. Hail says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    If the “Republican Establishment” really wants to “punch Russia in the nose,” that is bad news, indeed.

  126. @JohnnyWalker123

    During his speech, Priebus made it a point to talk about how the Republican party is targeting minority voters (Hispanic, black, Asian, etc) much more effectively than 2012.

    Isn’t Trump doing as well as any of the others by not targeting them?

    The trick with these groups is to stop them from voting Democrat. It’s a bit much to ask them to vote Republican.

    • Agree: TangoMan
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  127. @MKP

    Not saying it’s a deal breaker. Just nit-picking.

  128. @Jefferson

    “On average a 52 year old in 2015 does not look as ancient a dinosaur as a 52 year old in 1965 for example. It is probably advancements in cosmetics and people living healthier lifestyles compared to back than.”

    Vanity things not done in 1965:

    Hair coloring (this got its start in the 1940’s but looked bad with the early formulations, got much better right around the early 1960’s and has since improved by leaps & bounds). Tanning salons; topical tanning lotions. Botox. Electrolysis, laser hair removal. Collagen injections. Human growth hormone. Cosmetics for men – not including stage makeup. Face lifts (& artifices that induce temporary face lift) and lots of other cosmetic surgical procedures. Vastly improved cosmetic dentistry.

    But hair coloring is Number One – it’s why almost all women “of a certain age” no longer look like women “of a certain age” looked in 1965; and today increasing numbers of men also use hair coloring and have hair transplants or wear well-fitted “hair replacement technology.”

    Of course there’s also genes: if you think candidates today aren’t picked, at least in some significant part, because their genes gave them telegenic good looks, then perhaps you might think again. There’s an abundance of data showing that good looking people are more popular, more successful, earn more, advance faster to better positions, have greater life-satisfaction, and other advantages and opportunities over other than good-looking people.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
  129. @Reg Cæsar

    Trump is actually doing considerably better with blacks.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    , @Mr. Anon
  130. Jefferson says:
    @Auntie Analogue

    “Tanning salons; topical tanning lotions.”

    For many people too much tanning speeds up the wrinkles/aging process, not delay it if you are not already naturally olive skin and your natural skin tone is paler than sour cream.

  131. SF says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Maybe because English isn’t his first language. I don’t know. He was born in Florida, but his parents still probably spoke a lot of Spanish at home.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  132. @Lot

    To be fair, Taft was 6 feet wide.

    Oh, I see Steve beat me to it.

  133. Jefferson says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Trump is actually doing considerably better with blacks.”

    I remember seeing a poll on Fox News where Donald Trump’s approval rating among Blacks was at 18 percent. Mitt Romney won what 4 to 5 percent of the Black vote?

    • Replies: @tbraton
    , @AP
  134. @Harry Baldwin

    I’ve noticed this myself. Rubio appears to be a not very bright. He has been coached to memorize a variety of “conservative” republican-pleasing catchphrases. He strings these catchphrases together as circumstances warrant, reciting with a flat monotone. He then pauses with a pleased half smile on his face as if waiting to be praised for being a good boy who’s memorized his lesson well.

    After his election in 2010 he was riding high as the tea party fox news favorite and then sold out for a few sheckels to shill for Zuckerberg’s amnesty PAC

    • Replies: @AP
  135. anon • Disclaimer says:

    If donors didn’t filter pols on the basis of their willingness to do what they’re told then politicians wouldn’t be such pathetic specimens.

  136. @SFG

    what is with this manliness business?

    According to Strauss and Howe, we’re near the peak of the gender differentiation cycle. Or would be if the Boomers and their sycophants hadn’t been furiously trying to suppress it.

  137. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @SF

    I don’t think that’s it. I think he’s affected a State of the Union speaking style in an attempt to make him seem more presidential.

  138. Glaivester says: • Website
    @MKP

    Dana Bash looks like a younger version of Andrea Mitchell.

  139. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Jefferson

    It’s partly a class thing. Affluent, successful people tend to look younger, maybe partly due to a correlation with better genetics, and partly due to healthier habits. The venture capitalist Fred Wilson, for example, looks at least 10 years younger than his age at 54. Same with Mark Cuban, who’s 57.

    • Replies: @BB753
  140. Looking at the fundraising appeal in the right column, I just realized that…

    iSteve! looks like ¡Jeb!

    Coincidence?…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  141. @Drapetomaniac

    Is there worse than Yeb or Lindsey Fredo Graham?

  142. The Internet doesn’t work the way Trump seems to think it does. He needs some tech-savvy advisors to educate him in this regard.

  143. @European-American

    We’re about the same height and weight on similar paleo diets.

  144. @Hepp

    They’re not just not on the other side of the world anymore and there are more pouring in.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  145. 22pp22 says:

    As someone who has never spent more than a month at a time in the US, I would like to ask my fellow Sailerites if they think Trump has a realistic chance of becoming President.

  146. BB753 says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Wealthy people age better due to less stress, better medical care and better nutrition. By stress I mean not only physical stress caused by hard manual labor and also lack of sleep and rest, but also psychological stress caused by financial worries, living in bad housing conditions in gritty neighborhoods and long commutes to work.
    Being poor takes a toll on you. Rich people look different, much healthier and more relaxed.

  147. @JohnnyWalker123

    Really? Do you know of any jewish neo-con who has endorsed Graham? I think it’s his immediate family (and probably only some of them) who supports him.

  148. @Reg Cæsar

    Maybe Kasich is secretly angling for the Supreme Court?

  149. @BB753

    Romney looked amazing for 65 in 2012.

    McCain didn’t look so amazing at 72 in 2008, but getting whomped on by Communist jailers for a few years is harder than trying to talk Frenchmen into Mormonism (not that that’s easy).

  150. TangoMan says:
    @22pp22

    Ceterus paribus, yes he could do it, however there is many a slip betwixt cup and lip.

    He needs to convert enthusiasm to actual votes in the primary and the general and it’s an open question as to how deeply his supporters are engaged with the political system.

    Is Trump interested in mastering the minutia of policy? Open question and the answer will affect his electability.

    How committed is he to the policies he espouses? Talking tough in general is different from talking tough in specifics and from implementing the tough talk as tough policy which will be carried out. The principal reason he’s garnering support is for his tough policies but he’s reluctant to be specific and if he backtracks in the specifics, then his support would decline.

    What seems to be happening is a battle over direction. Establishment favors set policies and new policies designed to bring in minority voters (at the expense of white voters) and Trump’s policies seem to bring in white voters from (at the expense of immigrants) and rely on a different set of policies. If Trump is true to his statements, then 8 years from now the Republicans could be a reoriented party. There is a lot of inertia working against that type of transformation and this pits a large base of voter interest against a small base of establishment interest. Even if Trump wins he needs to tap into the Republican networks to staff positions all through the Executive and if they all work against his vision, reform dies on the vine.

  151. @22pp22

    “As someone who has never spent more than a month at a time in the US, I would like to ask my fellow Sailerites if they think Trump has a realistic chance of becoming President.”

    My dear 22p22, here’s your answer:

    Have you noticed the Establishment’s increasing vehemence in denouncing and vilifying Trump, as Trump’s numbers continue to climb? Because the Establishment is scared sh_tless that Donald Trump has an excellent change of being elected by the fed-up-with-the-Establishment American people.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    , @AP
  152. Polynikes says:

    If nothing else Trump brought some real debate back to the debates. Box checking demographics like Fiornia and Carson along with smooth talking establishment guys like Walker and Rubio have risen in the polls only to fall once their lack of substance was exposed. Guys of more substance like Rand and Cruz (more raw intelligence than substance but still…) have generally endured or gone up in the polls a bit.

    With real debate, one time media gaffes have mattered less. It’s been interesting.

    I think this probably hands the election to Hillary, but they should be a little embarrassed (they won’t) at their lack of substance.

    At this point I think Trump might be the only one to go on the attack with Hillary and win. Rubio will get hit over the head with “republicans are racist”, he’ll backtrack and lose the republican base. Trump will go for the throat and drive her unlikeability ratings up helping to erode her base. It’s a long shot but she’s susceptible there.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    , @Harry Baldwin
  153. TangoMan says:

    At some point Trump needs to pull a version of the Rocky switcheroo (Rocky went from boxing southpaw to righthanded) and Trump needs to suddenly come out as a policy dork to show that he gets all myriad minutia of policy at the federal and international level. He didn’t come out looking good on the Nuclear Triad question.

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams
    , @jon
    , @iffen
  154. rvg says:

    Can anybody answer why crime rates for things for roberries and burglaries ave not decreased in the same manner as murders and rapes? Even in cities have become more Asian like Arcadia, which according to this forum means that all crimes should be falling due to Asians having higher IQs.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
  155. TangoMan says:
    @Polynikes

    Hilary might (should) be in prison by next November.

    You’re right though, Trump has the demeanor to destroy Hillary and unlike McCain pulling his punches against Obama because McCain didn’t want to be perceived as a racist, for Trump this would be a do or die opportunity and he’s not going to want to lose.

  156. Mr. Anon says:
    @anon

    “It’s all about deposing Assad and getting the US to attack Hezbollah.

    I doubt they could get support for it if they were honest but the actual reason is better than all the BS reasons they’ve made up to try and con people into war with Syria.”

    I know more care about Hezbollah than I do about ISIS.

  157. Mr. Anon says:
    @Ripple Earthdevil

    “They’re not just not on the other side of the world anymore and there are more pouring in.”

    And none of the Republican candidates (save perhaps Trump) would do a damned thing to stop them pouring in either.

  158. Mr. Anon says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    “Trump is actually doing considerably better with blacks.”

    You mean: Trump is actually doing considerably better with the blacks.

  159. Mr. Anon says:
    @22pp22

    “As someone who has never spent more than a month at a time in the US, I would like to ask my fellow Sailerites if they think Trump has a realistic chance of becoming President.”

    A lot of Democrats are saying they hope that Trump will be the Republican nominee, as they are sure he will be easy to beat.

    Of course, Democrats thought the same thing about Ronald Reagan in 1980.

  160. @Hail

    He has an A- voting record, He’s definetely an ally since he actually listens to dissident right.

    It’s unfortunate he and Trump have to fight, but I thought the issues he brought up were legitimate. I think it;’s fair to say killing terrorists family is a bad policy.

    I wish he’d stronger and talk about previous jihadists we funded and then had to fight, but he did a good job. Calling Rubio ‘open borders’ isn’t really true but is good politics because it firmly shows Paul is on the right of Rubio on the issue, plus he needs SOMETHING to seem right wing on that isn’t taxes and spending.

    • Agree: Hail
  161. @TangoMan

    [Trump] didn’t come out looking good on the Nuclear Triad question.

    Trump works because he says what ordinary people think they’d say if they were running for president. That’s part of why they like him. Not knowing what the “nuclear triad” is doesn’t degrade him in their eyes—they don’t know what it is either, so who cares?

    • Agree: Kylie
  162. G Pinfold says:
    @Drapetomaniac

    Are the republicans seriously intent on picking a candidate from this coterie of clowns or is someone even worse already selected and waiting in the wings?
    Like someone from the military.

    I’m sure ambitious, popular colonels are having secret dinners as we speak, but I’m not sure that is what you have in mind.

  163. Kyle a says:
    @Steve Sailer

    But Bush wore six inch stilettos that his brother gave him.

  164. Kyle a says:
    @asdf

    Don’t forget about Jeb’s mestizo son. They are already priming the pumps.

  165. Hibernian says:
    @Jefferson

    That might not be too popular in South Carolina.

  166. SFG says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Sure, but just wait until the Democrats get their teeth into him in the general election and point out all the times he was for immigration before he was against it.

  167. Rifleman says:
    @SFG

    Exactly. Trump will fall, …

    People are going to be saying that mid way through Trump’s second term.

    Trump is the next US president, deal with it.

  168. tbraton says:
    @Jefferson

    Remember that Romney was running against the half-black Obama, who received a substantially higher percentage of the black vote than the normally high (90%) black vote for Democratic candidates. If Trump succeeds in getting the nomination, it appears that his likely opponent will be Hilary Clinton, who, despite the fact that she is married to our “first black President,” is white. Thus, there is a great likelihood that Trump will get a larger share of the black vote than Romney got in 2012. I don’t think the percentage of blacks voting in 2016 will be nearly as high as in 2012, and the percentage of blacks voting for Clinton will probably not approach Obama’s astronomical percentage of the black vote in 2012. That translates into fewer black votes for Clinton on two counts in 2016.

  169. Stan says:

    Rush Limbaugh, leader of the cuckservatism on radio, came out in support of Ted Cruz on his December 14 radio show. He tried to imply Trump was an establishment Republican because he called Cruz a”maniac” and had the “wrong temeperament” to be president. Rush took a few calls and was mildly shocked by Trump supporters calling to denounce him for siding with Cruz.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  170. @rvg

    Perhaps it is because the percent of Hispanics has increased while the percent of Blacks has stayed the same. Hispanics’ non-violent crime rate is fairly close to the comparable Black rate for such crimes. But for the Big Two, rape and murder, the Hispanic rate is much lower. This is why El Paso, with 90% Mexicans and almost no Blacks, is touted for being a “safe” city.

  171. jon says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Whatever it was, he beat it.

    That was a legit laugh-out-loud.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  172. anon • Disclaimer says:

    Concerning the discussion of candidate appearance, it must be said that while Cruz has all his hair and isn’t obese, he is still a very tough guy to look at. There hasn’t been a prez in the TV age that looks as odd as him. It may be a deal breaker.

    And let me add that though Carly wasn’t blessed with good-looking genes too much more than Cruz, she and her stylists have really made the most of what she was given. She, especially with her stylish new hair style, actually looks kind of attractive at times.

    Also, Rubio is a good looking guy but has big ears.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  173. Romanian says:
    @Kaz

    Yes, there would be. He’s pruning his garden at our expense just like Castro did at yours. If you specifically supported him in exchange for keeping Syrians in the country and stamping down on flows of people through his territory, that’s an explicit exchange. But Assad makes out like a bandit from his countrymen leaving. Remember that he’s a minority leader.

    • Replies: @5371
  174. jon says:
    @22pp22

    if they think Trump has a realistic chance of becoming President.

    I think Trump has a very good chance of getting the Republican nomination, and anyone who represents either of the two parties has a realistic chance of becoming President.

    If you look at past elections, even in a blowout like Reagan v. Mondale, Mondale still got 40% of the vote. Just by winning the nomination, Trump will have a built-in 40-45% of the vote. Then we’re just a terrorist attack or economic bubble away from President Trump.

  175. jon says:
    @TangoMan

    At some point Trump needs to pull a version of the Rocky switcheroo (Rocky went from boxing southpaw to righthanded) and Trump needs to suddenly come out as a policy dork to show that he gets all myriad minutia of policy at the federal and international level.

    I’ve been kind of expecting this, actually. Once it gets to the general, I think he will switch tactics and start looking more like a serious, informed candidate. But that’s just a guess on my part.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  176. @BB753

    A wealthy friend of mine told me that money can’t buy happiness, but it can make you less nervous.

    • Agree: BB753
  177. “Dubya’s secret seems to have been that he had a very clear understanding of his own limitations, and knew how to play to his own strengths.”

    I think Dubya’s secret is that he is an extremely charismatic, confident alpha male.

    I didn’t think this when he was president. I never thought he was much of a speaker. I thought his eyes were too close together to be very good looking or charismatic. In fact, I don’t think this quality was very evident when he was president (or when he was on tv as president).

    But I recently saw a picture of him when he was younger (35?). He was extremely charismatic, confident, and dominant. It reminded me of James Caan, or Warren Beatty, guys like them.

    In the picture, Bush looked like a smug, rich jerk. But he had the extra quality of being one of those guys who, in spite of your not liking him, you wish he would invite you to his yacht party.

    Every social group (from junior high school on up) has that kind of guy. He isn’t necessarily rich (though Bush was). He isn’t necessarily a great athlete. And he isn’t necessarily the best looking. But he’s got some ineffable quality where you hope he likes you.

    joeyjoejoe

    • Replies: @Difference Maker
  178. @Auntie Analogue

    I watched the debate on CNN, a liberal network, and continued through some of the post debate wrap-up. Then I switched to Fox, the neocon network, to hear what their pudits have to say. Charles “the Sage” Krauthammer was on with Bill “Gasbag” O’Reilly, and Krauthammer was so apoplectic about Trump I switched back to CNN for a more balanced perspective.

  179. AP says:
    @Jefferson

    One would think this improvement would be because the mass immigration that Trump opposes brings downs unskilled poor working wages. But in reality, this may simply be attributable to the fact that Trump won’t be competing against a black man.

  180. @Polynikes

    Trump will go for the throat and drive her unlikeability ratings up helping to erode her base.

    The Trump technique, “You know, I like Hillary. She’s a nice person. A very nice person. But let’s face it, as secretary of state she was a disaster. Probably the worst secretary of state in our history. And honestly, that face, that voice–do we want to look at that for the next four years? Do we want to listen to that? I don’t think so.”

    • Replies: @Kylie
  181. Anonymouse says: • Website

    What little we saw (via home computer): 2 played the religious card. Carly with prominent crucifix on her neck. Nice skin. Carson had us pray momentarily (Cute!). Actual administrations of Pres. Clinton, Pres. Cruz, Pres. Rubio, Pres. Paul or Pres. Trump would be functionally identical in foreign affairs: perserving the Deep State. The notion that raison d’etat justifies the doings of a nation over time thus perserving it comforts me. We Americans may yet thank ISIS dartboard attacks in the Homeland for resolving the immigration debate. Didn’t get to see/hear Trump do his schtick.

  182. AP says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Taft couldn’t win only because Roosevelt split the Republican vote by going on his own.

    Kasich is boring and unattractive, yet also uncontroversial. Having him on the ticket can bring Ohio, a key swing state, and thus win the election.

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe
  183. AP says:
    @Auntie Analogue

    Because the Establishment is scared sh_tless that Donald Trump has an excellent change of being elected by the fed-up-with-the-Establishment American people.

    I think the Establishment simply doesn’t want to throw a winnable general election to the Democrats, at a time when the Democrats have swung to the left. Even Bernie can beat Trump. If Trump is the nominee we are one major Hillary-scandal away from having a Bernie presidency. This is what the Establishment fears most.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    , @Harry Baldwin
  184. @Anonymous

    Jimmy Carter was also less than 6 feet tall.

  185. AP says:
    @jesse helms think-alike

    I’ve noticed this myself. Rubio appears to be a not very bright. He has been coached to memorize a variety of “conservative” republican-pleasing catchphrases. He strings these catchphrases together as circumstances warrant, reciting with a flat monotone.

    Several people here have noticed this. Any estimates of Rubio’s IQ? I’d guess it’s around 115, though I don’t know the guy that well. He’d be putty in the hands of much-smarter neocons.

    The thing is, he’s got to impress voters with average IQs of around 100. His style might be effective with them.

    • Replies: @Hail
  186. @D. K.

    In the ‘Mickey McGuire” series, Billy Barty played Mickey’s little brother. Barty as an adult was only 3′ 9″ tall.

    • Replies: @D. K.
  187. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    I think Trump’s Muslim ban stuff is overkill, but why does Jeb say we need Muslim immigration for us to work with Muslim nations?

    Trump never said ban diplomats and heads of state.

    And besides, most of communication is done electronically.

    China doesn’t allow Muslim immigration, but it does trade and diplomacy with the Middle East.

    Israel doesn’t allow Muslim immigration but has close ties with Saudis and Turkey and Egypt.

    Besides, it’s the Muslim allies of the US that did most to aid and abet ISIS: Saudis and Turks. And ISIS got so much US weaponry.

    Prior to 65 immigration law, US banned most immigration, but it worked with China in the war against Japan in WWII.

    Why do we need to allow immigration from a nation to work diplomatically with it?

    It makes no sense.

    Nixon met with Mao when two nations didn’t trade people.

    If anything, relations are worse now even though so many people go back and forth.

  188. 5371 says:
    @Romanian

    Assad has no ability to stop people leaving Syria. Obviously not from the parts of the country he does not control, and almost as obviously not from those he does, with so many other more urgent calls on his attention and resources. In any case, those “refugees ” who come to Europe from Syria have almost always spent some time in Turkey or other near eastern countries beforehand, and many of the “refugees” have never been in Syria. To blame Assad for the folly of Merkel etc. is, to put it mildly, ridiculous.

    • Replies: @Romanian
  189. @Anonymous

    said: “I was exaggerating ,. . .

    No, you were lying then and lying now; flinging dung just to see it flung.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  190. Thea says:
    @Mr. Blank

    Yes, Florida is like a foreign country demographically. A third world one actually.

    Whether it was Rove or W who understood that they needed to appeal to small town & rural whites the move was genius. Jeb seems to believe those votes were his already and he needed to go bring in Hispanics to the mix.

    Ahmadinejad did the same thing in Iran, incidentally. He won by getting votes in smaller towns & rural areas while the cosmopolitan Iranians were less enthusiastic.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  191. Mr. Anon says:
    @TangoMan

    “I want to see Bush demoted to the undercard debates before he drops out. A nice topping of humiliation as the capstone to the Bush Dynasty.”

    Yes, that would be fitting.

    Actually, I’d like to see Bush stay in the race as long as possible. I’d like to see all of them stay in the race as long as possible, so that they squander the maximum amount of donor money. Maybe then they’ll have less to spend against Trump.

  192. SF says:

    Ted Cruz’ biggest problem is that he looks too much like Count Dracula. His thin lips give off a slightly feminine vibe.

  193. iSteveFan says:
    @SF

    Ted Cruz’ biggest problem is that he looks too much like Count Dracula. His thin lips give off a slightly feminine vibe.

    I think Cruz sort of looks like Pat Buchanan from 20 years ago.

    • Replies: @Blobby5
  194. @jon

    “Once it gets to the general, I think he will switch tactics and start looking more like a serious, informed candidate. But that’s just a guess on my part.”

    Or maybe he’s giving it all he’s got right now?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  195. Romanian says:
    @5371

    Of course, we all know that! But the Syrians are the casus belli for Merkel’s war on Europe. Remove them from the equation and it would have been harder to justify taking fake Syrians. She would have to trawl elsewhere.

    I think Assad could dedicate resources to stop people from leaving the parts of Syria he controls if someone one the outside were to make it attractive for him, financially and from a security perspective, to do it. But he has no reason to. Every Sunni that leaves, especially young, male and jobless is one less potential enemy or breeder of enemies. An Alawite controlled Syria would always be a powder keg, so long as Alawites are such a minority. Demographic change takes a long time, but yields dividends.

    Look at how Lebanon went from being all Christian to nearly all Muslim, to a tenuous balance of the two, within the lifetime of your grandfathers.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Lebanon#Christians

  196. Romanian says:
    @SF

    I thought Dracula stereotypes had a widow’s peak, like many of us in the region actually do. The lips thing is new. His problem is not being very handsome, not even in a manly not-pretty way. He looks like someone’s accountant. Of course, none of them beat Mitt.

  197. AndrewR says:
    @Anonymous

    Presumably you’d be ok with the entire population of Bosnia resettling in your area?

  198. AndrewR says:
    @Thea

    Conventional wisdom says that the Iranian president is primarily a puppethead who can’t do anything without the backing of Supreme Leader.

    But I’d enjoy reading an informed analysis of whether the US president had any more power than the Iranian president does (obviously controlling for discrepancies population, economic power, military power, etc).

    My best guess is no.

    • Replies: @Thea
  199. DWB says: • Website
    @iffen

    Projecting into 2016, I suspect a tailor who can let out extra-large pantsuits will be on speed-dial in DC.

    • Replies: @iffen
  200. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @hoodathunkit

    Don’t take it personally. Just because manlets can’t be president doesn’t mean they’re bad people.

  201. Kylie says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Another legit laugh-out-loud.

    Thanks. Anything that can get me to laugh when discussing a US presidential election is welcome.

  202. @AP

    But in reality, this may simply be attributable to the fact that Trump won’t be competing against a black man.

    It’s more than that, though. Blacks love Trump. You know how many rap tunes mention him by name? Check out “67 Times Rappers Name Dropped ‘Donald Trump’ ” as published by the ancient and venerable Huffington Post:

    Rappers love Donald Trump.

    Despite his many controversial stances in his presidential campaign platform, his name is synonymous with extreme wealth in the hip-hop world. Since the 1980s, rappers have mentioned Trump in their lyrics — in some cases have named entire songs after him.

    Full article is here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/hip-hops-25-year-obsession-with-donald-trump_55d61727e4b055a6dab3524a

  203. Thea says:
    @AndrewR

    Yeah, by the 1979 constitution I don’t think the president or maglis (Iranian congress) can pass laws if the ayatollah disagrees. I think they have power on issues he doesn’t care about, whatever those issues may be ( road construction?)

    Iran is considered the most democratic nation in the region. Competition includes Afghanistan, so that doesn’t mean much.
    What would happen if a US president went off script? The donors can drop him, but once he is in, he may actually get some executive orders through before getting shot

  204. Whiskey says: • Website
    @asdf

    Hate Bush, Love Trump! Heck Trump is correct, if you invade, do it WWII style. Win. Total warfare and not PC driven agendas. Trump famously said he’d stake the Iraqis oil if he had to invade, and I agree.

    Bush, however, compared to Gore and Kerry, was the lesser of two evils. By being weak and cuckservative, he bought us time. Imagine a two term Gore followed by Obama in two terms. We’d be majority Muslim by now, a nation of 500 million, mostly Africans and ME Muslims here. It would be Sharia Law, public stonings and hangings, booze, pork, dogs all banned and the place run like the Taliban.

    EVEN a cuckservative is preferable to an Obama. Why? Because a cuckservative will be too weak, caught between the base and his votes, and the donor class, to truly open the borders on a massive scale. Not so an Obama. And give Obama types 16 years and they WILL make the US into a nation of 500 million plus, nearly all Muslims.

    OT or perhaps not, today’s FT has another series on ISIS funding. Basically nothing new, ISIS funds itself like ME regimes have done since Sargon. Tax farming. Fighters come in, with tax collectors, take a hefty percentage, some of which they keep to themselves, and the rest goes to ISIS. Very little is spent on state upkeep, health, roads, schools, etc. If anything. Interestingly, about $500 million a year goes directly to the top ISIS leadership from oil sales, which has the Assad regime collaborating btw, as well as Turkey where the oil is shipped.

  205. @Taco

    “radical shiite”, couldn’t it be argued that all Muslims are radical, it is just the degree and allegiance that fluctuates? so, any foreign intervention or allegiance with Muslim countries helps some kind of radical group. a sane foreign policy allows Muslims to blow each other up overseas, keeps any immigrant Muslims from entering our borders, and closely monitors and marginalizes any U.S. Muslims who show any impetus to act on their radical beliefs.

    • Replies: @Taco
  206. First of all, who cares about the boring “debate.” What I want are IQ estimates of the candidates! Debate performance should provide a window. I’m no Pumpkin Person in finding usable data to regress to scores, but I’ll venture the opinion that Chris Christie is dumb – and makes the most of it by a virulent anti-intellectualism. I feel no confidence in judging Trump, but I’m inclined to think he’s not the brightest bulb. I base this mostly on his being uninformed, as per the incredible stupidity of his answer about the missile defense system. Rubio looks most intelligent.

    I will deign to mention one item of content. Trump’s plan to take revenge against the families of terrorists must astound even the most jaded. This leads me to want to classify Trump’s ideology. Which ideology would take such a position? I can’t think of one. Trump must be totally nonideological – for better or worse. A pure Demagogist (http://juridicalcoherence.blogspot.com/2012/03/150-taxonomy-of-political-ideologies.html).

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Romanian
  207. iffen says:
    @DWB

    Only to let Hil and Bill wear the same pair of pants at the same time.

  208. @Honesthughgrant

    “We want people with strong minds and good judgement. ”

    Do you have any evidence at all to support this astonishing statement?

  209. tbraton says:

    I watched the entire Republican debate last night, and I was puzzled by a certain erroneous statement made by Gov. Chris Christie about his service as U.S. Attorney for N.J. In earlier debates, Christie emphasized the point that he was appointed by GWB on September 10, 2001, the day before 9/11, the “day that changed everything.” I later came across a comment or article pointing out his falsehood, and I posted about it on unz.com. Therefore, last night, I was especially attuned to Christie’s remarks to see how he would handle the situation. Initially, early in the debate, Christie made a garbled reference to his service as U.S. Attorney, which left some doubt as to what he was saying. As a result, I was astounded when he opened up his closing remarks by repeating the same falsehood.

    Here is what the transcript shows about Christie’s closing remarks:

    “CHRISTIE: On September 10th, 2001, I was named chief federal prosecutor in New Jersey and on September 11th, 2001, my wife and my brother who are in the audience tonight went through the World Trade Center and to their offices just blocks away from the Trade Center.”

    This is what Wikipedia says about Christie’s appointment:

    “On December 7, 2001, President George W. Bush appointed Christie the U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey.[35]”

    I am surprised that the MSM has let this utter falsehood to pass without comment or criticism. I suspect Trump might make use of Christie’s blatant lie at a future debate if it appears that Christie is gaining traction from his current low position in the polls. Otherwise, it appears that Trump sees Christie’s presence in the nominating contest as benefitting him since it draws votes that would otherwise go other candidates.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    , @Auntie Analogue
  210. I’m inclined to think [Trump is] not the brightest bulb. I base this mostly on his being uninformed, as per the incredible stupidity of his answer about the missile defense system.

    Yeah, it’s not like we could estimate the guy’s intelligence based on his reliable history of doing something that requires great intelligence, like running a huge company. It makes more sense to use a reliable metric, like how he answered one unscripted question on a TV show.

    I suppose we could get a pretty good idea of his intelligence if we could somehow get him to attempt to do some thing that would require near-superhuman attention to detail and brilliant planning—I dunno, think we could talk the guy into trying to singlehandedly disrupt the entire Republican establishment and challenge the reigning nationwide conventional wisdom on, like, everything in about six months? If someone were somehow able to do that, I’d be convinced he must be a pretty smart guy. I mean, maybe not, like blogger smart, but definitely up there.

    Trump’s plan to take revenge against the families of terrorists must astound even the most jaded.

    People who aren’t aware that innocent people have died in every war ever fought? Yeah, I’m sure those people were scandalized.

    • Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond
  211. AP says:
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    I’ll venture the opinion that Chris Christie is dumb – and makes the most of it by a virulent anti-intellectualism.

    He went to law school at Seton Hall (ranked in the 60’s nationwide). Has anyone dug out his LSAT score? I suspect he’s not that dumb. I earlier speculated that Rubio had an IQ of 115 but that he speaks very well. He graduated from law school near the top of his class from the University of Miami, ranked about the same as Christie’s Seton Hall . So I think I underestimated his intelligence, although his presentation probably exceeds his ability.

    Average IQ of attorneys (per quick google search) is 114.5. These guys went to above-average but not first-tier schools, and have been rather successful in life, so probably the low 120s for them.

    Cruz is probably the most intelligent of the candidates.

  212. Hail says: • Website
    @AP

    Any estimates of Rubio’s IQ?

    How did it happen that in 2000, both candidates’ SAT scores were “released”? (Who was “releasing” them?)

  213. iffen says:
    @TangoMan

    One has to play stupid to win the Republican primary?

  214. tbraton says:

    This is too funny. I am listening to ATC on NPR, and they have a segment in which two reporters are analyzing last night’s Republican debate. One reporter referred to Trump’s proposal to build “the most beautiful wall in the world” to keep out Mexican and other illegal migrants from crossing our southern border and dismissed Trump’s proposal as being unnecessary in light of the fact that statistics show that Mexicans have actually been returning to Mexico in recent years. I believe Mitt Romney referred to such behavior as “self deportation” during the 2012 Presidential campaign and was mocked endlessly by the MSM for his “frivolous” proposal.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  215. D. K. says:
    @Richard A.

    . . . and, as far as I know, Billy Barty never managed to bang Ava Gardner!?!?!

  216. AnAnon says:
    @SFG

    “And…what is with this manliness business?” – In this particular case, cancer from the dark bowels of the internets.

  217. tbraton says:
    @tbraton

    BTW here is the document that is the authority for footnote 35 of the Wikipedia account I cited in my previous message that conclusively establishes that Christie was nominated on December 7, 2001, more than 3 months after the “iconic” date of September 10, 2001 that he has falsely cited in several debates, including last night’s debate in Las Vegas:

    “For Immediate Release
    Office of the Press Secretary
    December 7, 2001

    Nominations
    President Bush to Nominate Three Individuals and Nominates One Individual to Serve in His Administration

    President George W. Bush today announced his intention to nominate three individuals and his nomination of one individual to serve in his administration.

    The President intends to nominate Alberto Faustino Trevino to be Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development for Policy Development and Research. Trevino has served as the Principal and Managing Director of the Urban Interface Group and Alberto F. Trevino Advisors, a management firm working in strategic planning, investment analysis, housing and education, since 1975. He was Vice President of the Walt Disney Company from 1974 to 1975 where he developed strategies and concepts for EPCOT, and from 1973 to 1974, he was Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

    The President intends to nominate W. Roy Grizzard to be Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy. Grizzard has been Commissioner of the State of Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired. From 1987 to 1995, he was Personnel Administrator for Employee Relations and Special Staffing for Henrico County Public Schools, and from 1968 to 1987, Grizzard was a teacher and assistant principal with Henrico County Public Schools. He received a bachelor’s degree and Master’s degree from Virginia Commonwealth University and doctorate degree from Nova Southeastern University.

    The President intends to nominate Victoria Lipnic to be Assistant Secretary of Labor for the Employment Standards Administrator. Lipnic has been a professional staff member and Counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Education and the Workforce since 2000. From 1994 to 2000, she was an attorney in the Employment and Labor Law Department of the U.S. Postal Service, and she was previously an attorney in private practice. From 1984, to 1989, Lipnic was at the Department of Commerce, first as Special Assistant to the Director of Business Liaison and then as Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary for Trade Development. She is a graduate of Allegheny College and George Mason University Law School.

    The President intends to nominate Christopher J. Christie to be United States Attorney for the District of New Jersey. Christie has been a partner with Dughi, Hewitt and Palatucci of Cranford, New Jersey since 1987. He is a graduate of the University of Delaware and Seton Hall University School of Law.

    ###”

  218. BobX [AKA "Bob who~thinks Rand is no Ron"] says:

    Rand banging on about Trump needing to get rid of the 1st amendment was ridiculous. The notion that foreign nationals outside US borders have a 1st amendment right to project their jihadist agenda into the US over the internet is highly specious. Blackholing the IPs of nations (or terrorists) we are at war with in no way conflicts with the 1st amendment. Perhaps VPN & anonymization tools make it difficult to stop, but that was not the argument he was making. A citizen VPN tool for US citizens to circumvent the blocking when in a blocked area should be no problem.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Constitution_is_not_a_suicide_pact

    • Replies: @NOTA
  219. @tbraton

    Might it have been that President Bush intimated privately to Christie on 10 September 2001 that he would appoint him U.S. attorney but did not publicly appoint Christie to the post until 7 Decemeber 2001? Such an instance would have been would have been far from the first or the last time that conversations between or among public figures don’t appear in the public record.

    • Replies: @tbraton
  220. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Stan

    Rush never endorses a candidate in the primary, and, the day after the mainstream media made this claim, he corrected them on the air. Rush respects Cruz and Trump, for different reasons. He respects Cruz’s intellect and his pugnaciousness in the Senate. He respects Trump’s ability to manhandle the media, and the way he’s brought attention to the immigration issue.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  221. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @jon

    It was funny. But it only seems to be the case when comparing Christie to his opponents, rather than to Christie pre-op. I’d guess he’s lost over 100lbs since the photo below was taken.
    https://twitter.com/JasonFebery/status/676966071593775107

  222. @SF

    in profile Cruz looks like a young tricky Dick, which may be one reason why he sets off such visceral hatred among the left. I think the left mainly fears him because he’s conservative and of far above average intelligence. They realize he might actually take steps to dismantle the freakshow that they’ve built

    in response to AP; I dont believe Rubio has as high as a 115 IQ. I think he fit the suit that needed filling of a young fresh faced Republican Hispanic to run for the Florida Senate seat. I dont think he has had many original ideas of his own. He fit the mold that his stringpullers had made. Just like young barack filled the role of cool imaginary AA friend that progressives whites wish they had

    • Replies: @DWB
    , @Stephen R. Diamond
  223. Kristen says:

    My state, Colorado, has the most incompetent Republican leadership imaginable; competence being measured by promoting candidates that match the will of the people, and not the narrow self-interest of the political class. These hacks HATE Trump and are doing all they can to sabotage the caucuses. They’ve consistently pushed the dullest, most easily-controlled, Dem-lite candidates, thus giving voters little opportunity to vote for individuals who reflect their values and ideals.

    Because they’ve been so self-promoting, they’re in a little bubble that’s about to burst. And because they’ve believed they could choose candidates better than voters, they’ve pushed aside candidates who could have enlarged the party by bringing in Independent and non-aligned voters — they deserve to wallow in oblivion.

    But … amazingly … at the very time they’ve been ruining the state party’s viability, Trump appeared. What he has given voice to is the disgust that many R voters feel toward their own elected officials and the dim-witted party hacks who foisted them on voters.

    Trump’s debate performance was good enough to assuage any doubts that fence-sitters may have had. His wasn’t a do-or-die debate, but one in which he had to protect his popular gains. He did that. Now he’ll go back to reaching past the party hacks to people who could vote for him, such as non-voters and Independents, not establishment Republicans.

    But Trump still has to get past the devious hacks in primaries and caucuses. Can he do it?

  224. @Bugg

    “Carly-I will be Nurse Ratchet!”

    Nearly any woman in the White House would be Nurse Ratchet.

    Sorry if that makes me a “misogynist,” but I just call ’em as I see ’em.

    • Replies: @iffen
  225. LondonBob says:

    For me it says a lot of depressing things about the American electorate that Rand Paul doesn’t get more traction.

    I hope you guys elect Trump but let’s face it a lot of the criticism aimed at him are valid. Their policies aren’t that different but Rand’s rationally and carefully argued case gets him nowhere.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    , @TangoMan
    , @anon
  226. MarkinLA says:
    @AP

    I think the Establishment simply doesn’t want to throw a winnable general election to the Democrats,

    What do I, the average American, win with the Establishment’s pick of Rubio or Jeb?

    • Replies: @AP
  227. MarkinLA says:
    @LondonBob

    Rand has too much open-borders libertarianism in him. He also went after the black vote with the nonsense about black over representation in prison being racist.

    • Replies: @Paulestinian
  228. DWB says: • Website
    @jesse helms think-alike

    Interesting.

    In my most humble opinion, Cruz looks more like the scrubbed-up Oswald Cobblepot from the second Batman movie.

  229. @jesse helms think-alike

    You’re a person who shouldn’t assess the IQs of those you have strong opinions about. You are so obviously biased that it’s a joke.

  230. @22pp22

    As someone who’s been following U.S. politics very closely since I was a teenager during the 1980s (and who has learned to be extremely skeptical of so-called “insurgent candidacies” of either the right or left), I think Trump can (and likely will) win. I could go on for paragraphs and never really explain it. Suffice it to say that the man and the moment have met. An Electoral College-worthy majority of the citizenry are tired of P.C. bullshit, and Trump is our tribune.

    • Replies: @iffen
  231. AP says:
    @MarkinLA

    What do I, the average American, win with the Establishment’s pick of Rubio or Jeb?

    Not much. But the alternative (Hillary) is even worse.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    , @MKP
  232. Romanian says:
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    I will deign to mention one item of content. Trump’s plan to take revenge against the families of terrorists must astound even the most jaded. This leads me to want to classify Trump’s ideology.

    I suggest simply calling him old school and a pragmatist with regards to the logical conclusion of any cultural understanding of the region. I don’t follow how that can astound you, unless you were very sheltered. Retaliation against families is an important tool in dissuading fearless and clannish people from aggression and also preventing the cycle of vengeance that always starts when you kill someone’s cousin, brother, uncle, son in these cultures. It was universal across history until the Europeans outbred to the degree that the clan faded in importance and revenge outside of narrow familial lines or nobility groups became rare enough to make it a plot device. Every Muslim ruler who did not have the religious claim of a Caliph knew how you keep the clans in line, by using the implied threat against the family to force the familial authorities to keep the young hotheads on the straight and narrow and by making an example when things go wrong. Murder might be a bit extreme, but dispossession, exile etc etc could be frequently used and praised as merciful. It’s not about punishing the transgressor, just like justice is not about revenge – it’s about establishing a credible threat to use legitimately discouraging means to dissuade would-be offenders. If their death doesn’t scare them, then maybe that of their family.

    It is the logic of the entirety of human history – every tribe destroyed, every city razed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Anon87
    , @NOTA
  233. Blobby5 says:
    @iSteveFan

    How dare you! Pat B.is a beautiful man, maybe Cruz looks more like Count Chocula.

  234. MarkinLA says:
    @AP

    Not really. Obama is only allowed to have his amnesty because Boehner and Mcconnell let him by playing that silly political theater. It still isn’t law. The same would happen under Hillary. With Rubio or Jeb we would have an amnesty in a week.

    • Replies: @AP
  235. @Romanian

    Farook borrowed $28,000 just before his terrorist spree and gave a big chunk of it to his mother in cash. He’s getting his 72 virgins presently, so can we demand the cash back from his mom?

  236. TangoMan says:
    @LondonBob

    I hope you guys elect Trump but let’s face it a lot of the criticism aimed at him are valid. Their policies aren’t that different but Rand’s rationally and carefully argued case gets him nowhere.

    My argument to Palin critics was that if you want a politician who is not part of the political class, then you’re going to have to accept a lot of stylistic errors and the same applies to Trump critics.

    Politics is played in a certain style and career politicians are adept in practicing this style and the audience, which is trained to favor this style, mostly responds positively because they see the familiar script being played out. Why the audience is surprised that they get a corrupt political class is something that I don’t understand.

    The difference between Rand and Trump is that people seem to trust Trump will follow through on his statements whereas Rand won’t – Trump has lost a lot by taking his positions, Rand hasn’t. The question becomes how does a politician convey to his audience that he believes what he’s saying and here Trump seems to have a winner method.

  237. @AP

    “Kasich is boring and unattractive, yet also uncontroversial. Having him on the ticket can bring Ohio, a key swing state, and thus win the election.”

    I genuinely do not believe Trump will need Kasich to carry Ohio against Hillary. He’s going to do very well in the Midwest. He may well carry Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota. Even Illinois may be vulnerable. I’d be shocked if he lost Ohio.

  238. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @LondonBob

    The media are an active player in all this. No-one is going to get past them who isn’t a bruiser with rhino skin.

  239. @anon

    I agree with you that Cruz is oddly unattractive, plus he has a grating, nasal voice. These things matter, unfortunately. As much as I disagree with the direction in which Obama has taken the country, I understand how the low-information voter long found him likeable due to his attractive smile and generally pleasant voice (when he’s not hectoring us). I think the likeability has worn thin, but it helpd carry him into the White House.

  240. @AP

    Obviously it’s hard to restrain a black from yanking that Democrat lever, but given the choice between a shrill, ball-breaking old white woman and a no-bullshit, kick-ass, rich old white guy, a lot of black men are going to prefer the latter. They may decide that while this country’s got 99 problems, a bitch ain’t one of them.

    • Replies: @AP
  241. Romanian says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I wonder why that’s not a thing among more suicide-by-jihad types if Americans just write off the debt to Jihadis.

    Generally, in European countries, the inheritance thing also works for certain kinds of debt, if you also inherited the collateral or the asset the money was used to purchase. The Bank transfers the debt either to your co-guarantor, often a family member, or to the inheritor(s). Often, the last part means that the asset will be sold either way, because the law does not let you dispose of your entire estate the way you want. There are things called successor reserves meant to endow your kids and spouse with a minimum of your estate unless you simply leave them all of it or don’t have a will. If a few people have to share the house and the mortgage, then it’s more likely they’ll simply sell the house, extinguish the debt and split the rest, either proceeds or residual debt. Not a lawyer, btw, but I’ll ask one in the morning. This is interesting stuff.

    You should not only get the money back, but deport the entire family, including the 6 month old (what will knowing what her parents did do to her relationship with her country?) and ban all of their members to an Nth degree to be determined later from ever stepping foot in the US. Do this a few times, then kick it up a notch and start deporting not just the family, but also everyone who attends the same mosque.

  242. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    Why not deport her too? Like the master negotiator he is, that could be the policy Trump settles on after his outrageous opening gambit.

  243. @Steve Sailer

    Or maybe he’s giving it all he’s got right now?

    I have a feeling you’re right. He’s not holding anything back. He thinks he knows as much about the issues as he needs to.

    • Replies: @NOTA
  244. Too bad ¡Jeb! is going nowhere: America is ready for a Special Needs president.

  245. AP says:
    @MarkinLA

    Rubio or Jeb’s amnesty would probably be accompanied by policies resulting in substantial reduction in inflows. Remember that the Republican Establishment wants immigration to bring down wages and perhaps keep the blacks in line. Democrats want it to replace the native population with one that will be solidly Democratic. One of these is clearly worse.

    And then we have the Supreme Court….

  246. @Dave Pinsen

    I also listened to that Limbaugh show nad can verify that you are correct. I don’t agree with Limbaugh on everything, but I wouldn’t call him a cuck. He’s very astute in his analysis of the treasonous Republican establishment and has been great on the immigration issue.

    • Agree: Dave Pinsen
  247. @AP

    I think the Establishment simply doesn’t want to throw a winnable general election to the Democrats

    The pundits on Fox News tell me that the establishment is terrified that Trump will cost Republicans the 2016 election. No, what they are really afraid of is that he’ll win it. The Republican Party serves the interests of donors and consultants. It is committed to three things: tax relief for the donor class, free trade to further enrich the donor class, and open borders to keep labor costs low for the donor class. It is fairly reliable on a couple of other issues that it uses to get votes from the base, mainly opposition to abortion and gun control. It can’t give in to the base’s desire for border control as that’s non-negotiable with the donors, so it’s up to the consultants to persuade candidates that Republicans need to attract Hispanic voters and that the only way to do that is through amnesty.

    If Trump were to demonstrate that the Republican Party could win elections without promoting the interests of donors, but rather the interests of the base, it would break the iron rice bowls of the establishment. Donors would flee the party and leave consultants without credibility. It would spell the end of the GOP as we know it.

    Go Trump!

    • Agree: tbraton, Hail
  248. @22pp22

    One more adherent to Islam going jihadal in America makes a Trump presidency likely, two more, spaced roughly evenly, makes it highly probable, three more spaced about evenly between now and next November makes it a mathematical certainty.

    And then we will see whether Trump has the courage to discipline the treasonous factions that comprise the majority of the federal bureaucracy. I suspect he does.

  249. tbraton says:
    @Auntie Analogue

    “Might it have been that President Bush intimated privately to Christie on 10 September 2001 that he would appoint him U.S. attorney but did not publicly appoint Christie to the post until 7 Decemeber 2001?”

    Your point might have some validity if Christie had actually said what you proposed, but, as he stated clearly in the very first sentence of his closing remarks last night:

    “CHRISTIE: On September 10th, 2001, I was named chief federal prosecutor in New Jersey ”

    As the White House document I posted shows beyond any doubt, Christie was not “named” U.S. Attorney by President George W. Bush until December 7, 2001, nearly three months later. What he stated last night and in previous debates was totally false. I seem to recall at the very first debate he talked about being U.S. Attorney on 9/11, which is not possible if GWB did not announce that he “intends to nominate” Christie as U.S. Attorney until December 7, 2001 .

    Christie had these other things to say at last night’s debate which strongly implied that he was on the job as U.S. Attorney chasing the bad guys from 9/11 on:

    “Now, I spent seven years of my life in the immediate aftermath of September 11th doing this work, working with the Patriot Act, working with our law enforcement, working with the surveillance community to make sure that we keep America safe.”

    “The fact is, for seven years, I had to make these decisions after 9/11, make a decision about how to proceed forward with an investigation or how to pull back, whether you use certain actionable intelligence or whether not to. And yet they continue to debate about this bill and in the subcommittee and what — nobody in America cares about that.”

    (BTW this is what Wikipedia says about Christie’s service as U.S. Attorney for N.J.:

    “U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey
    In office
    January 17, 2002 – December 1, 2008
    Appointed by George W. Bush”

    Note that service from January 2002 until December 2008 constitutes nearly 7 years of service, as Christie repeatedly stated in the debates.)

    BTW this is what Christie stated in his closing statement at the first Republican debate held in Cleveland back in August:

    “I was appointed United States attorney on September 10, 2001. And I spent the next seven years of my career fighting terrorism and putting terrorists in jail.”

    The inescapable impression that Christie has falsely and repeatedly tried to convey in the debates is that he was U.S. Attorney from September 10, 2001, the day before the attacks on 9/11, and the record clearly shows that his claims are totally false.

  250. AP says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    I agree that Trump can use Omarosa and sell the idea of Mexicans taking jobs from blacks to get much more of the black vote than previous Republican candidates had gotten. Maybe even 20% of the black vote compared to Romney’s 5%. This would, at best, probably compensate for losses among Latinos.

  251. athEIst says:
    @Anonymous

    Kerry had that awkward Frankenstein thing going on.

    +1

  252. Anon87 says:
    @Romanian

    I think the War Nerd wrote about this in the American Conservative, and the reason guerrilla warfare was a non factor in the past. It was suicide for a city/tribe/culture.

  253. athEIst says:
    @Taco

    I made the tough decisions.
    Like should I close 1 lane today or 2?

  254. AP says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    The Republican Party serves the interests of donors and consultants. It is committed to three things: tax relief for the donor class, free trade to further enrich the donor class, and open borders to keep labor costs low for the donor class. It is fairly reliable on a couple of other issues that it uses to get votes from the base, mainly opposition to abortion and gun control.

    This is an accurate description. Compare this to whom the Democratic Party serves and what Democratic rule means, and the Republican Party comes off as being a lesser evil. Importing workers for the purpose of driving down wages is not as bad as importing people for the purpose of replacing the native population with one that will vote differently.

    If Trump were to demonstrate that the Republican Party could win elections without promoting the interests of donors, but rather the interests of the base, it would break the iron rice bowls of the establishment.

    I am reminded of the Spartan reply to Phillip II of Macedon – “if.”

    I really doubt that Trump can win the general election; at least, it will be much harder for him to win than it would be for someone like Rubio to win. Trump will lose the minority vote as badly or worse than did Romney (he will get more of the black vote but the loss of Latino votes will be greater) and will lose many white and Asian voters who would have gone for a “safe” or bland Republican such as Bush or Rubio; Trump would face much worse attacks from the mass media and these would certainly have an effect. Trump’s losses among minorities and moderates would likely exceed the additional voter turnout among the base (which would probably be most evident in safely red states anyways, and therefore wouldn’t help him much).

    I could be wrong, of course. In 2008 I had thought the Democrats were foolish to run a pot-smoking black guy with the middle name “Hussein.” But there was an economic crisis, he had the media on his side, he had a compelling story, and he helped some people to feel good about themselves for voting for him.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    , @TangoMan
  255. NOTA says:
    @BobX

    Americans getting to decide what we want to read without censorship is absolutely what the first amendment is about. Any way of shutting down parts of the internet that was workable for preventing Americans from reading things that might radicalize them would amount to censoring some internet content. Though I expect Trump understands about as much about the workings of the internet as more-pr-less every other politician, so who knows what he was trying to propose.

  256. NOTA says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Yeah, that’s what worries me.

  257. athEIst says:
    @Jefferson

    What does he have to lose?
    His senate seat? Were talking South Carolina.

  258. @Daniel Williams

    Yeah, it’s not like we could estimate the guy’s intelligence based on his reliable history of doing something that requires great intelligence, like running a huge company.

    That’s one reason I find Trump hard to assess: I simply don’t know how much g is needed to augment a fortune as a real-estate developer. I suspect a standard deviation above the mean would suffice, given sufficient drive and energy. And, I suspect, greed(which, incidentally, correlates with clannishness) plays a necessary role . [Trump has the profile of the complete cronyist.]

    I think you probably conflate the impressiveness of an accomplishment with its diagnostic significance. Maybe it bears repeating: IQ isn’t everything; or even most of everything.

    The Information subtest of the WAIS has high g content (second only to Vocabulary). Knowing what “triad system” refers to seems a piece of information that a person who was aspiring to “commander in chief” would reliably have encountered and retained.

    Yet I do think his response is more revealing about his character than his intellect. That he would try to fake knowledge like a dishonest schoolboy, showing such contempt for the intelligence of his audience (although deserved), indicates psychopathic tendencies.

    In sum, yes, I think you gain knowledge of people by looking at small things that happen to be highly diagnostic.

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams
  259. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    If Trump were to demonstrate that the Republican Party could win elections without promoting the interests of donors, but rather the interests of the base, it would break the iron rice bowls of the establishment. Donors would flee the party and leave consultants without credibility. It would spell the end of the GOP as we know it.

    Money corrupts everything!

  260. epebble says:
    @Taco

    “Also, it is long past time that we had a world war with Russia.”

    That is one way to counter Global Warming! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_winter

  261. NOTA says:
    @Romanian

    I have a radical proposal: Instead of adopting the legal system of a middle eastern tyrant, how about we stick to the kind of legal system that the civilzed countries have, where guilt or innocence is an individual thing, and you don’t get punished for the actions of your family members or co-religionists. That’s worked out pretty well for western civilization so far, after all, and the threat posed by terrorists is tiny compared to the cost of wrecking our justice system.

    • Replies: @Romanian
  262. @joeyjoejoe

    The day I understood why people liked Bush was the day I watched his press conference. He has command presence

    • Replies: @Difference Maker
  263. NOTA says:
    @AP

    After 8 years of Bush as president, in the middle of a terrifying global economic meltdown with associated bailouts of the most important and connected oligarchs, Bozo the Clown could have won the Democrat. Obama beating Romney in 2012 was a much more impressive accomplishment, both because the situation was much less positive for him, and because Romney was a much more attractive candidate than McCain on almost every level.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @epebble
  264. TangoMan says:
    @AP

    But there was an economic crisis, he had the media on his side, he had a compelling story, and he helped some people to feel good about themselves for voting for him.

    I just read somewhere that Trump, all by his lonesome, soaked up XX times as much media coverage as all of the other Republican candidates combined. The guts of what’s going on here is that coverage of Trump results in people engaging with the media. Clinton, Hillary Clinton, who’s that? If this dynamic remains in place during the general election, Trump would be getting multiples of free air time compared to Clinton, if she’s not in prison at that point.

  265. epebble says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    “Do we have a Surgeon General at the moment? Don’t recall hearing of one.”

    Current SurGen is Vice Admiral Dr. Vivek H. Murthy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivek_Murthy

  266. AP says:
    @NOTA

    I agree. However, by 2012 Obama had already been president and the massive teenage pot-smoking and the middle name and all it represented could no longer be issues.

  267. epebble says:
    @Taco

    She said that? Wow!,

    Best comment by someone on why she is “uniquely qualified” – She destroyed HP, got fired from HP, lost US Senate race against a weak incumbent. That means she is uniquely qualified for the highest and most difficult political office.

    BTW, her semi-foot-long cross was a shouting advertisement: Vote for me, you religious folks.

  268. epebble says:
    @NOTA

    Equally interesting is his recent interview where he surveyed the current Republican slate and said he is confident he can win in 2016, if he were to run. http://www.fox5ny.com/news/32713634-story

    I think he may be right. The race seems to be Hillary’s to lose.

  269. @Anonymous

    That manlet Rand Paul needs to get off the stage. Nobody under 6 ft. has been president since the 19th century.

    You mean “nobody” other than Teddy Roosevelt, Taft, Wilson, Coolidge, Hoover, Truman, Eisenhower, Carter, and George W Bush.

  270. @Stephen R. Diamond

    I think you probably conflate the impressiveness of an accomplishment with its diagnostic significance.

    You appear to think that Trump’s status is an accomplishment, rather than the culmination of innumerable triumphs and sound decisions that all require incredible intelligence on Trump’s part in order to be understood as a whole.

    You ever heard that expression “life is an IQ test”? Well, Trump is doing really well on that test. Like, Von Neumann good.

  271. @Daniel Williams

    Trump has put a lot of effort into buying and building golf courses over the last couple of decades. He typically devotes Sundays to playing his home club and then visiting other golf courses. My impression is that his golf ventures have proven harder than he expected, but he’s getting steadily better at it. Having Bill Clinton make Trump Westchester his home club is indicative that indeed Trump tends to take care of details for his customers in a thorough manner.

    On the other hand, his personality gets in the way of his achieving as much success (e.g., hosting the U.S. Open) as fast as he would like. The powers that be in golf like understatement and WASP subtlety, and tend to see Trump as Rodney Dangerfield’s nouveau riche character in “Caddy Shack.” (This suggests that Trump’s public personality is authentic: he can’t turn it off and on to suit his interests.)

    Overall, the golf course business has proven a multi-decade learning process for Trump. He’s still learning in his late 60s, which shows good flexibility of mind. On the other hand, it also suggests that it has taken him awhile to fully master a business that looks a lot like his core business, but is actually pretty different.

    • Replies: @Wade
  272. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @tbraton

    That “Mexicans are returning in great numbers” line is media disingenuity: that figure is for legal Mexican nationals, actual illegal entries are way up this year.

  273. @MarkinLA

    Again, his voting record is A- from numbersUSA and like his dad he’s no open borders libertarian. It’d really be great if Rand got some traction, his “performance” did pretty with millennials but not convinced they’ll vote since they’ve got Sanders. It was good to see him hut Rubio on Gang of 8 and plausibly seemed strong on defense with the border/immigration which I don’t think the general public knew about him until now.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  274. MKP says:
    @AP

    “Not much. But the alternative (Hillary) is even worse.”

    Well, that’s not enough. I’ll vote for Trump and take my chances.

  275. Romanian says:
    @Steve Sailer

    http://news.yahoo.com/exclusive-san-bernardino-shooters-buried-quiet-funeral-following-003855115.html

    Apparently, they have to exceed the general 24h prescription for burials because of police procedures and the difficulty of finding a cemetery willing to received them.

    In the past, the threat of desecration and irreligious disposal of the body, leading to issues in the afterlife, would also be a factor keeping people in line.

    Any thoughts?

  276. Romanian says:
    @NOTA

    I thought the whole point of the discussion on restricting immigration is that the presence of incompatible cultures allowed to roam free would lead to the loss of exactly the thing that you consider makes countries civilized, like certain rights, presumptions, procedures, attitudes, customs, informal institutional commons, social capital. The “this is why we can’t have nice things” argument. Getting rid of equality before the law and other principles, especially in a discriminatory manner, is perfectly in keeping with that trend. It’s actually a multicultural enrichment inspired by the newcomers.

    Not all of the things that make a developed society are as important, which is why you find such variation in the world. When the South Africans abolished slavery but realized what their destiny was under “one man, one vote” they chose to prioritize their property rights and their safety over the equitable sharing of power.

    The existential threat posed by terrorist is just one side of the coin. As the recent Marginal Revolution posts also did not notice, terrorism is different from murder because, irrationally, the population treats it differently.

    http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2015/11/is-it-worse-if-foreigners-kill-us.html

    It is a stress factor that undermines the targeted society ultimately delegitimizes the government that can’t handle it. Look at how Americans reacted after 9/11, when terrorists killed “just” a tenth of the US annual gun deaths. And look at how perceptions on safety shift after every terrorist attack.

    • Replies: @AnAnon
  277. Wade says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve,

    I haven’t seen you comment much on Trump’s possible IQ. Wouldn’t the fact that Trump was accepted by and graduated from the Wharton School of Business count in favor of him having a relatively high IQ? Also, his children have gone there too.

    I’m not an expert on these things but to judge from his schooling and life accomplishments, I’d proffer a guess of an IQ in the range of 125 – 130. I think the fact that he sometimes behaves as a buffoon in public probably has more to do with his high energy level combined with the fact that he craves public attention. Also, he’s the kind of low-anxiety guy that simply doesn’t flinch when people laugh at or criticize him. Why would he bother changing his persona when criticism doesn’t sting? He seems capable too of laughing at himself which is quite unlike Jeb Bush who seems stiff and needs to lighten up.

    Someone suggested he might be a psychopath. I doubt it. He is higher on the dark triad than the average person, probably a bit up on the narcissistic leg of the triad, not so much the psychopathy leg. Is there any evidence he’s Machiavellian?

    The fact that he’s not a policy wonk and doesn’t do that great in the debates seems more in keeping with the notion that his talent lies more with getting people to respect and follow him. This is the opposite of the sort of smart person who becomes an academic. It’s a different kind of smarts but one that is still g-loaded. I think if Trump had a low IQ, or even something in the range of 100 – 115 he wouldn’t have come this far in life. Other people smarter than he would’ve been able to outwit and cheat him.

  278. AnAnon says:
    @Romanian

    “irrationally, the population treats it differently.” – Nothing irrational about it, a foreign tribe coming in and murdering members of your tribe has been an existential threat to your tribe for basically all of human history. Everyone that didn’t care got wiped out, and everyone who did care did something about it and survived to the present day.

    • Replies: @Romanian
  279. iffen says:
    @Kevin O'Keeffe

    She’s going to need a face transplant if she wants to be nurse Ratchet.

    Sorry if that makes me a “misogynist,” but I just call ‘em as I see ‘em. Too

  280. @Wade

    Trump’s undergraduate academic career (2 years at Fordham, 2 years at Wharton/U of Penn, no honors) is very similar in outline to Obama’s (2 years at Occidental, 2 years at Columbia).

  281. tbraton says:

    I don’t know if anyone has already posted this, but here is a story from the Baltimore Sun re the TV ratings for the Republican debate in Las Vegas the other night:

    “Tuesday night’s GOP debate on CNN was another ratings juggernaut with an audience of 18 million viewers, according to Nielsen Fast National ratings.

    That makes it the the third-most-watched presidential primary debate in TV history, and second in CNN history. (CNN’s September debate scored higher, with 23.1 million.)

    Tuesday’s debate, moderated by Wolf Blitzer, averaged 5.6 million viewers in the 25-to-54 age demographic.

    CNN also live-streamed the production to CNN.com, its mobile apps and connected TVs. CNN had 3.1 million live streams, peaking at 9:45 p.m. with 815,000 concurrent streams.

    Tuesday’s ratings continue to make the GOP debates the most valuable franchise on American television this side of “Sunday Night Football” on NBC.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  282. @tbraton

    Thanks, I’ll post.

    • Replies: @tbraton
  283. tbraton says:
    @Steve Sailer

    If I recall correctly, I think it was CNN which handled the second debate (following the first debate on Fox, which got those record ratings), and CNN tried to take advantage of the new-found popularity of Republican debates (especially with Trump on the stage) by adding a third hour to the debate to make more advertising dollars, which earned Trump’s ire. He and Dr. Carson raised a big stink, with the result that subsequent debates were held to the originally planned two hours. It is a reflection of Trump’s good judgment, based on his experience in TV, that two hours was the maximum people were willing to watch. I thought the debate the other night was just the right length. My only complaint was that there were still too many candidates on the stage, but the last guy to make the cut was Rand Paul, who made a very valuable contribution. The debate served the very good purpose of showing the American public what a deranged group of candidates we have, ready to start WWIII in Syria without thinking. Then there is Hillary in the other debate, who is probably worse. How did we ever arrive at such a point of insanity?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Romanian
  284. @tbraton

    Dr. Paul made a valuable contribution.

    • Replies: @tbraton
  285. Taco says:
    @Ron Mexico

    Alawites aren’t even actually Muslims.

  286. tbraton says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The funny thing is that at the beginning of the year Rand Paul (your reference to “Dr. Paul” briefly knocked me offstride until I remembered that Sen. Paul is also Dr. Paul—the reason I refer to Rand Paul is to distinguish him from his father, Dr. Ron Paul, another “Dr. Paul”) was my favorite in the early field. In fact, I spent much of 2014 defending him on TAC from the attacks whenever he trimmed his sails in the foreign policy field. I was predicting that Trump wouldn’t even run, just as I had correctly predicted on TAC in connection with the 2012 campaign. When he announced, I shrugged it off as another bad call by me, but I didn’t think much of his campaign. Then, out of the blue, he launched an attack on Sen. John McCain and his phony status as a “war hero.” That certainly got my attention. From there on, he sort of stole Rand Paul’s thunder, point by point, debate by debate/. Only recently did Rand Paul rediscover his anti-war roots, but I think it is much too late. Besides, standing next to Donald Trump clearly reveals that Rand Paul, like every other candidate on the stage the other night, simply lacks the stature to be President. In fact, I have concluded that, even if he remained true to his original principles, I doubt if Rand Paul stood a chance of securing the nomination. Ironically, I think it takes an oversized personality like Trump to successfully sell the anti-war program to the American public. Whereas Rand Paul may have the more articulate message, Trump is by far the better messenger. The one thought that recently crossed my mind is that Rand Paul might make a good running mate for Trump, but I quickly dismissed the idea. Kentucky is probably safe ground for any Republican, and I am not sure what appeal Rand Paul has in other states. I would think Trump might look to someone else who is going to bring strength to the ticket. (Definitely not Paul Ryan, who helped Mitt Romney in no way in 2012.) I am still drawing a blank as to who that might be. If I had to guess, I would bet on Ted Cruz as the default favorite because Texas is so big, especially if Cruz does well in Iowa and other states. My gut says no to Cruz, but my brain tells me otherwise.

  287. Romanian says:
    @AnAnon

    I wouldn’t take kindly to it either, but I was responding to the assertion of the tiny terrorist threat, which is factually true if you’re an accountant.

  288. Romanian says:
    @tbraton

    What was his contribution? I might be a fan of American politics, but I’m not going to devote two hours to watching the debates in the primaries of another country and it wasn’t so obvious to me from the post-show commentary I’ve read.

    • Replies: @tbraton
  289. @Anonymous

    Lion of the Blogosphere has pointed out that Ted Cruz ain’t all that tall either.

  290. iffen says:
    @Kevin O'Keeffe

    I could go on for paragraphs and never really explain it.

    I’m with you when you are right Kev.

  291. tbraton says:
    @Romanian

    Here is a link to the transcript of the debate: http://time.com/4150816/republican-debate-las-vegas-transcript/

    You can scroll quickly through and read Rand Paul’s comments. You could also click on my screenname, “tbraton,” and check out my messages which quote Rand Paul from that debate.

    • Replies: @Romanian
  292. @tbraton

    Trumps fearlessness (recklessness?) in verbalizing whatever he comes to mind, the uncensored expression of his id if you will, can be argued to be largely responsible for his popularity..

    Calling McCain a phony war hero is one example. For decades the accepted narrative was “John McCain war hero” full stop, no qualifier permitted. Before the downfall of America a hero was a soldier who killed many enemy in battle, now it’s someone whose been tortured by the enemy. McCain deserves a pension and health care, he is no hero. The Left’s perversion of the definition of heroism is one of their most egregious crimes. Trump felt no fear in articulating what many people have thought and felt over the years but were too cowed to express. Furthermore when attacked on the subject he refused to back down.

    Similarly the commonsense idea that admitting muslims to America may be dangerous and should be curtailed, something that has crossed the mind of any sane person in recent years, was taboo until Trump said it.

    • Replies: @tbraton
  293. tbraton says:
    @jesse helms think-alike

    “Calling McCain a phony war hero is one example. For decades the accepted narrative was “John McCain war hero” full stop, no qualifier permitted. Before the downfall of America a hero was a soldier who killed many enemy in battle, now it’s someone whose been tortured by the enemy. McCain deserves a pension and health care, he is no hero.”

    I was relatively late to the McCain issue since I only explored it around 2000 when he first ran for President. I found the clear answer was provided by McCain himself in a personal interview he gave to U.S. News & World Report back in early 1973, just a couple of months after he was released from captivity in North Vietnam. (There were many who served in the military who were on McCain’s case from 1973 on. I only came to the issue 27 years later.) In that interview, McCain openly admitted that he revealed information to the North Vietnamese in order to get hospital treatment for the injuries he suffered as a result of the shoot down of his plane over North Vietnam. His admitted behavior was in clear violation of the Code of Military Conduct then in effect. He was taken to a hospital about a month or so after being captured and was there being treated for about six weeks. His own account in U.S. News was completely contradicted by the subsequent Silver Star citation he received. That citation referred to the fact he was tortured at the same time he was being treated for his injuries at the N.V. hospital. (McCain did not mention any torture by the N.V. until at least a year later, and there were no witnesses to that alleged torture.) When I finally got around to reading his 1973 U.S. News interview in 2000, I had no problem concluding that he was not in any way a “war hero.” Now Trump later dropped the issue. But, if he is elected President, he has the power to order the release of the records pertaining to McCain’s service record, which have been sealed up to now. If he does that, I firmly believe McCain will be destroyed as a “war hero,” upon which his entire political career was based.

  294. Svigor says:

    Trump works because he says what ordinary people think they’d say if they were running for president. That’s part of why they like him. Not knowing what the “nuclear triad” is doesn’t degrade him in their eyes—they don’t know what it is either, so who cares?

    It probably plays well with Trump’s supporters. If they wanted another teacher’s pet who knows all the insider jargon, alternatives are myriad. They don’t.

    What a stupid, tendentious fucking question anyway. Who gives a shit whether a candidate loves bombers, missiles, or subs the best? That’s what the joint chiefs are for.

    I’m sure Lindsie could’ve answered without being told what the triad is.

  295. @Svigor

    Who gives a shit whether a candidate loves bombers, missiles, or subs the best?

    No, the actual content isn’t important. But either is the definition of Apocrypha on (older versions of) the WAIS. It indicates that he’s low IQ, not that he is missing this particular item of supposedly vital information.

    And if people don’t care, why didn’t the lying creature ask for the definition? His effort to fake knowledge was nauseating.

    • Replies: @anon
  296. @Paulestinian

    There’s quite a bit I like about Rand Paul. However, I soured on him when he made that ostentatious and absurd effort to ingratiate himself with blacks. That really made me doubt his judgment and trustworthiness. A few pro forma gestures I can understand, but not the full kowtowing.

  297. Romanian says:
    @tbraton

    Thank you very much. That was very considerate of you.

    He was pretty good, but still no Trump. However, Trump was pretty incoherent on the Internet thing, which will come back to bite him.

  298. @Wade

    Trump made a fool of Ali G. He’s street smart. G.W. Bush and Obama are not.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUTnu1MaeX0

  299. He’s street smart. G.W. Bush and Obama are not.

    Do you think IQ tests measure street smarts? (Serious question.)

    Personally, I think street smarts are mostly characterological. Negroes have a lot of “street smarts” (at least relative to their IQ).

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  300. tbraton says:
    @Svigor

    “I’m sure Lindsie could’ve answered without being told what the triad is.”

    Well, Lindsey is a military genius. After all, he served as a lawyer in the Judge Advocate General Corps, and that makes him as tough a warrior as they come, all 5’5″ of him, which makes him as tall as Nicole Scherzinger and Lena Meyer-Landrut. http://how-tall.com/Lindsey%20Graham I believe that may be the reason he likes standing next to Sen. John McCain. He doesn’t look quite so small standing next to another little man. Small men, big talk. I think it’s called a “Napoleonic complex.” The only thing lacking is the genius and smarts of Napoleon. I don’t know what the expression is when you have all the faults and none of the virtues of Napoleon.

    Marco Rubio knew what the answer was and actually defined what the “triad” is at the debate, before launching into an unhinged exposition of what he would he would do as commander-in-chief. His knowing what the “triad” was hardly gave me any confidence that he had the necessary judgment to keep us from plunging into WWIII.

  301. tbraton says:
    @tbraton

    Well, it turns out that there is another Lindsey Graham, http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3790405/bio
    I know with absolute certainty, if the election came down to a contest between the two Lindseys, which one I would be voting for. I am impressed by the fact that she “graduated summa cum laude in three years from Fordham University where she studied Theater Performance and Broadcast Journalism,” as well as being Miss New Hampshire for 2009. The latter fact would certainly give her a leg up in that early primary state. Damn, I would even be willing to waive the Constitutional requirement of being at least 35 years of age.

    • Replies: @5371
  302. @tbraton

    Napoleon was actually just under 5′ 8″ tall. The french unit of measure “pied du roi” in use at the time is equal to 1.06 standard feet giving rise to the confusion when his height is mentioned without noting the different units of measure.

    For that era Napoleon was slightly above average height. The popular image of the short Napoleon came from British cartoonists. British newspapers of the day had illustrations depicting him as an insane blood thirsty midget despite the artist having never laid eyes on him. The whole concept of the the Napoleon syndrome is based on this fallacy but is nonetheless accurate at times.

    For comparison Admiral Nelson, the hero of Trafalgar, was 5’4″ yet is never thought of as short.

  303. @Stephen R. Diamond

    Do you think IQ tests measure street smarts?

    Of course not, look at all the high-IQ people who believe in absurd things.

  304. @tbraton

    His knowing what the “triad” was hardly gave me any confidence that he had the necessary judgment to keep us from plunging into WWIII.

    Of course not. It’s a necessary condition (or, more exactly, a correlate of a necessary condition), not a sufficient one. [Woodrow Wilson was fairly smart, but that didn’t keep us out of the first world war.]

    But I have to ask: do you actually trust Trump with nuclear war?

    • Replies: @anon
    , @tbraton
    , @Reg Cæsar
  305. @Daniel Williams

    Wasn’t it Pumpkin’s Person’s expression – life is an IQ test. In any event, I strongly disagree. The proof is that income correlates with IQ only .4. Most decisions in most people’s lives don’t require or even benefit much from high IQ. Among the rich, I suspect that it varies according to field. Maybe the life of a Silicon Valley is something of an IQ test (I don’t know), but real estate developers are pretty dumb. They’re rent seekers, you know.

    The claim that “life is an IQ test” is an obstacle to a precise understanding of g. G, as Spearman already recognized, is the capacity to grasp relationships and educe correlates. This ability is critical for civilization and was very important primordially, but consider, do you think it would be very important under Mad Max conditions? Or would psychopathic temperament and physical strength be key?

    While I’m at it, I have a hunch about “street smarts”? Apart from character correlates, I think it depends cognitively on episodic memory. People who are street smarts have good episodic memory – or that’s my thought. Episodic memory is orthogonal to g, and is omitted from IQ tests. (It isn’t quite considered a cognitive ability.)

    You heard it first here!

  306. @Wade

    Is there any evidence he’s Machiavellian?

    No, Trump has nothing up his sleeve, a real-estate developer who suddenly wants to stop migration.

    His delight in insult and his readiness to lie support the psychopathy leg.

  307. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    But I have to ask: do you actually trust Trump with nuclear war?

    Most of the others are openly calling for a military confrontation with Russia.

  308. tbraton says:
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    “But I have to ask: do you actually trust Trump with nuclear war?”

    Compared to those other clowns on the stage (and the undercard debate, as well), with the exception of Rand Paul, most certainly. He was the only one at the debate (again Paul excepted) who spoke with any appreciation of the absolute horror that nuclear war would entail. He and Paul are the only candidates who speak cautiously about our involvement in Syria. (Both are opposed to establishing illegal “fly zones” in Syria.) Hell, I would certainly trust Trump over Hillary, who not only pushed for the invasion of Libya and the overthrow of Qaddafi but stated while she was SOS that, if Iran were to acquire one nuclear weapon, she would “totally destroy” Iran. I don’t know about you, but that comment alone makes me extremely uncomfortable with having that utterly incompetent, totally untrustworthy, harpy as President with her finger on the nuclear trigger.

    BTW the highly overrated Hugh Hewitt probably prided himself on the “gotcha” question to Trump about the “triad,” but that idiot revealed his own stupidity when he earlier erroneously referred to Dr. Ben Carson as a “neurologist,” rather than a “neurosurgeon.” Even worse, he referred to him as a “neurologist surgeon.” I would bet the man on the street is much more likely to know the difference between “neurologist” and “neurosurgeon” than to know the meaning of “triad.” And, btw, what was the purpose of Hewitt’s question? He asked Trump which leg of the triad he would prioritize. He was asking whether Trump had any preference among the three legs of the triad, each of which entails use of nuclear weapons. What difference does it make whether the end of the world comes about because of nuclear weapons dropped from planes, shot from nuclear missile subs or shot from land-based missiles? I find it interesting and very revealing that Hewitt awarded Chris Christie the “gold” for winning the debate (with the silver to Jeb!!!—ha, ha, ha), twitchy.com/2015/12/16/hugh-hewitt-scores-the-gopdebate/ , even though it was Christie, apparently to show his NJ fatboy toughness, who made the most reckless comment about shooting down Russian planes that would fly in the illegal (no UN Security Council authorization, no Congressional declaration of war, no permission of the Syrian government) no-fly zone the U.S. established in Syria, prompting Rand Paul’s spot-on remark that if you’re looking for the candidate who is going to start WWIII, “you’ve got your man.”

    BTW you noted in your response that “It’s a necessary condition (or, more exactly, a correlate of a necessary condition), not a sufficient one. [Woodrow Wilson was fairly smart, but that didn’t keep us out of the first world war.]”

    What makes knowledge of what the “triad” is “a necessary condition (or, more exactly, a correlate of a necessary condition)” of whether a candidate has the essential judgment requisite to avoid plunging the U.S. into WWIII? You answer sounds like a lot of meaningless gobbledygook to me. As I pointed out, Rubio was able to define “triad,” but that alone did not give me confidence that the young, inexperienced and rather shallow first-term Senator has the judgment to make decisions involving war and peace. You cite the example of Wilson. But Wilson won reelection in 1916 campaigning on the claim that “he kept us out of war” (WWI having started in August 1914, two years before) and promptly asked Congress to declare war against Germany a month after being inaugurated for a second term. That sounds very much like “bait and switch” to me. He and his party was soundly repudiated by the country in the 1920 election. His irresponsible action in getting the U.S. involved in WWI led to the later rise of Adolph Hitler and WWII in my judgment.

  309. He and his party was soundly repudiated by the country in the 1920 election.

    Thanks to women. Illinois’s women helped give Hughes a resounding landslide in 1916, in their first presidential election. But the West, where women had voted longer and were thus more corrupted, stayed with Tommy W.

    The ladies are really into normalcy.

  310. @Stephen R. Diamond

    But I have to ask: do you actually trust Trump with nuclear war?

    Oh, come on. He’s nowhere nearly as insane and amoral as Harry Truman.

  311. 5371 says:
    @tbraton

    The more famous Lindsey Graham would very much like to be the less famous one.

  312. @Steve Sailer

    Autobiographical memory – memory for events, as opposed to the semantic memory measured by IQ tests. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Episodic_memory

    The distinction between episodic and semantic memory is owed to psychologist Elvin Tulving. Presumably only humans have episodic memory: the ability to recall that on Monday you happened to go grocery shopping.

  313. Joe Walker says: • Website
    @SFG

    Hopefully a truly manly president would be willing and able to stand up to Israel and its agents in the United States.

    • Disagree: Stephen R. Diamond
  314. @Stephen R. Diamond

    Maybe the life of a Silicon Valley is something of an IQ test

    But Carly Fiorina convinces otherwise.

  315. @Difference Maker

    The Bush who was actually liked that is. The Bush who was actually President

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