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New Word You Can't Say: "Yellow"
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Asian-American grievance-mongers and “diversity” bureaucrats in Atlanta need to justify their existence and their salaries.

They found the perfect opportunity. Cry “yellow!”:

Asian-American activists offended that MARTA re-named the train line into the heart of Atlanta’s Asian community the “yellow line” will take their objections to the transit agency’s chief on Friday.

“Yellow,” as a term for skin color, carries a generally negative, racist connotation among Asians.

MARTA officials were warned by an employee before the name change last October that Atlanta’s burgeoning Asian community would find the term for the line to Doraville offensive.

“Historically, it has had a derogatory intent,” said John Park, an attorney with the nonprofit Center for Pan Asian Community Services in Doraville, just down the hill from the Marta station. “It physically paints a very unattractive picture. I don’t consider myself ‘yellow.’”

Park and other Asian activists plan to meet Friday with MARTA CEO Beverly Scott. They hope MARTA will change the line’s name from yellow to gold.

Scott said Monday that she will go into the meeting with an open mind. “There are very few things in this life that are absolute,” she said.

While Scott did not “in any way want to minimize” the concerns, she said that one MARTA employee’s complaint was not indicative of everybody’s feelings. She added that by the time it was raised, MARTA was ending a year-long process to implement the change. “Everything was printed, we were ready to go,” she said.

The ethnic sensitivity police waited a year to start whining. Now, they’ll spare no expense to disrupt the taxpayer-funded project to assuage hurt feelings and indulge a manufactured outrage:

“Anybody who rides MARTA knows that the line going up through that area is heavily Asian,” said Robert Bullard, director of the Environmental Justice Resource Center at Clark Atlanta University. “These are always sensitive issues. Anticipation of concern and sensitivity, and the outreach, probably should have been done before.”

Scott said she heard complaints from the employee and a few advocacy group leaders. At a recent community forum, she asked some Asian-Americans if they were offended and said they told her they weren’t. She noted that Asian and American cities that have public transit call some routes yellow lines. However, she stressed that she is ready to listen.

MARTA employs 13 people in its diversity office. They focus on equal opportunity in employment and disadvantaged business and perform some community outreach.

Did you catch that? “13 people in its diversity office.” Color me exasperated.

***

Flashback: Dallas county official: “Black hole” is racist!

Flashback: Remember former NAACP leader Rev. Joseph Lowery’s race-based benediction at Obama’s inauguration?

“We ask you to help us work for that day when black will not be asked to give back, when brown can stick around, when yellow will be mellow, when the red man can get ahead, man, and when white will embrace what is right,” Lowery said.

(Republished from MichelleMalkin.com by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Political Correctness, Race relations