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House Passes UAW Bailout 237-170; Showdown in the Senate
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Act I of Kabuki Auto Bailout Theater is over. The House tonight passed the UAW bailout bill 237-170, with 1 voting present and 26 not voting.

Here are the Republicans in the House who voted yes — 32 pro-bailout, anti-free market Republicans. Remember them:

Barton (TX)

Buyer

Camp (MI)

Capito

Castle

Ehlers

Emerson

English (PA)

Frelinghuysen

Hoekstra

Hunter

King (NY)

Knollenberg

LaHood

LaTourette

Lewis (KY)

Manzullo

McCotter

McCrery

McHugh

Miller (MI)

Murphy, Tim

Porter

Ramstad

Regula

Rogers (MI)

Ryan (WI)

Smith (NJ)

Souder

Upton

Walsh (NY)

Young (AK)

Rep. McCotter voted for massive government intervention to prop up failing industries. Hey, Rep. McCotter: How about revisiting all your high-minded rhetoric about returning to first principles. Ask yourself your own question: “Why is there a Republican Party?”

Republican Joe Barton’s rationale for supporting the bailout? Well, golly gee, we gave so many other industries massive bailouts, it wouldn’t be fair to say no to the carmakers. Crikey:

“It would be an absolute shame to force those companies into bankruptcy,” he said. “If we can give the AIG’s and the Wells Fargos and the JPMorgans of the world — each of those individual companies — between $40 and $45 billion,” then certainly the carmakers deserve a $15 billion bridge loan.

Here are the nays — 150 of them Republicans, 20 Democrats (full roll call vote is here):

Aderholt

Akin

Alexander

Bachmann

Bachus

Barrett (SC)

Bartlett (MD)

Biggert

Bilbray

Bilirakis

Bishop (UT)

Blackburn

Blunt

Boehner

Bonner

Bono Mack

Boozman

Boustany

Boyd (FL)

Brady (TX)

Broun (GA)

Brown (SC)

Brown-Waite, Ginny

Buchanan

Burgess

Burton (IN)

Butterfield

Calvert

Cannon

Cantor

Cardoza

Carter

Chabot

Childers

Coble

Cole (OK)

Conaway

Cooper

Crenshaw

Culberson

Davis (AL)

Davis (KY)

Davis, David

Deal (GA)

Dent

Diaz-Balart, L.

Diaz-Balart, M.

Drake

Dreier

Duncan

Fallin

Feeney

Ferguson

Filner

Flake

Forbes

Fortenberry

Fossella

Foxx

Franks (AZ)

Gallegly

Garrett (NJ)

Gerlach

Giffords

Gingrey

Gohmert

Goode

Goodlatte

Granger

Graves

Hall (TX)

Hastings (WA)

Hayes

Heller

Hensarling

Herger

Herseth Sandlin

Hobson

Hulshof

Inglis (SC)

Issa

Johnson (IL)

Johnson, Sam

Jones (NC)

Jordan

Kagen

King (IA)

Kingston

Kirk

Kline (MN)

Lamborn

Latham

Latta

Lewis (CA)

Linder

LoBiondo

Lucas

Lungren, Daniel E.

Mack

Marchant

Marshall

Matheson

McCarthy (CA)

McCaul (TX)

McHenry

McIntyre

McKeon

McMorris Rodgers

Mica

Miller (FL)

Mitchell

Moran (KS)

Musgrave

Myrick

Neugebauer

Nunes

Paul

Pearce

Pence

Peterson (MN)

Petri

Pickering

Pitts

Platts

Poe

Price (GA)

Putnam

Radanovich

Rahall

Rehberg

Reichert

Reynolds

Rodriguez

Rogers (AL)

Rogers (KY)

Ros-Lehtinen

Roskam

Royce

Sali

Saxton

Scalise

Schmidt

Sessions

Shadegg

Shays

Shimkus

Shuler

Shuster

Simpson

Smith (NE)

Smith (TX)

Stark

Stearns

Sullivan

Terry

Thornberry

Tiahrt

Tiberi

Turner

Walden (OR)

Walz (MN)

Wamp

Weller

Westmoreland

Whitfield (KY)

Wilson (NM)

Wilson (SC)

Wittman (VA)

Wolf

Young (FL)

The good news? Those GOP mavericks in the Senate I’ve been telling you about are ready to rumble with both the Dems and the White House:

A $14 billion rescue package for the nation’s imperiled auto industry sped to approval in the U.S. House Wednesday night, but the emergency bailout was still in jeopardy from Republicans who were setting out roadblocks in the Senate.

Democrats and the Bush White House hoped for a Senate vote as early as Thursday and enactment by week’s end. They argued that the loans authorized by the measure were needed to stave off disaster for the auto industry — and a crushing further blow to the reeling national economy.

The legislation, approved 237-170 by the House, would provide money within days to cash-starved General Motors Corp. and Chrysler LLC. Ford Motor Co., which has said it has enough to stay afloat, would also be eligible for federal aid.

Republicans were preparing a strong fight against the aid plan in the Senate, not only taking on the Democrats but standing in open revolt against their party’s lame-duck president on the measure.

The Republicans want to force the companies into bankruptcy or mandate hefty concessions from autoworkers and creditors as a condition of any federal aid. They also oppose an environmental mandate that House Democrats insisted on including in the measure.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said it represented “tough love” for U.S. auto companies, and “giving a chance — this one more chance — to this great industry.”

The White House, struggling to sell the package to congressional Republicans, said earlier that a carmaker bankruptcy could be fatal to the auto industry and have a devastating impact on workers, families and the economy.

“We believe the legislation developed in recent days is an effective and responsible approach to deal with troubled automakers and ensure the necessary restructuring occurs,” said Dana Perino, the White House press secretary.

Stop the bailout: Yes, we can!

(Republished from MichelleMalkin.com by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Subprime crisis