The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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Jean Raspail, the famed French explorer and writer, has passed away at the age of 94. This man is famous in our circles, not just in France but around the world, for his controversial 1973 novel The Camp of the Saints, which imagined what would happen if 1 million Third-World immigrants suddenly landed on the... Read More
Alain Peyrefitte, a former minister and close collaborator of Charles de Gaulle, meticulously maintained notebooks in which he recorded his many meetings with the great French president. The recordings are gathered in his monumental memoirs, C’était de Gaulle (“That Was De Gaulle”), stretching out to over 1800 pages of sayings and discussions. The work thus... Read More
Colonel Mathieu, leader of the French forces in The Battle of Algiers.
I recently had the pleasure of participating in a podcast with Fróði Midjord discussing the classic 1966 film by Italian director Gillo Pentecorvo, The Battle of Algiers. This was part of Guide to Kulchur’s excellent “Decameron Film Festival,” which is taking advantage of confinement to interview a range of prestigious speakers, from Jared Taylor to... Read More
Adolf Hitler with Finnish military leader Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim (right). The two held Hitler’s only private conversation preserved in an audio recording. Credit: Lehtikuva Oy.
Hitler should have recorded everything
I have a distinct dislike for the journalistic class as a whole. They do not so much report news as collectively make the news, according to a peculiar pack mentality, which combines commonly-agreed designated good guys and bad guys, but also sometimes brutal and erratic shifts collective opinion, not according to the whims of an... Read More
In an address to the nation and the wider francophone world on Thursday (April 16), the Franco-Cameroonian[1] comedian Dieudonné M’bala M’bala called for peace and reconciliation in these anxious times of confinement and coronavirus. Opening his video with his customary “may peace be with you and with your spirit,” Dieudonné recalled the many world leaders... Read More
In the cosmopolitan atmosphere of Hellenistic culture each ethnic community was self-conscious of its historical traditions and of the way in which these traditions related to those of other groups. . . . The work of most of these historians exists now only in quotations and extracts in the writings of later Christian writers .... Read More
The Christian Knight’s Ethos according to Geoffroi de Charny
Geoffroi de Charny was a widely respected French lord of the fourteenth century. A bearer of the royal standard (the Oriflamme) and the first recorded owner of the Turin Shroud, he spent his life fighting in various wars before dying fighting the English and Gascons at the battle of Poitiers in 1356, in his late... Read More
Easter 1942 French postcard reading: “Our Mother, Europe”
Europe is a continent of such heterogeneity – whether in terms of states, languages, nationalities, or geography – that no one has ever really succeeded in organizing it into a coherent geopolitical whole. This is despite the demand among statesmen, businesses, and even many simple inhabitants for a peaceful and rationalized European space. The nineteenth... Read More
The following are extracts from a speech made by Adolf Hitler to business leaders of the Industry Club in Düsseldorf on January 27, 1932.[1] This speech apparently was a “major coup” for Hitler in talking to a skeptical German business elite, which he sought to convert. These are the lengthiest comments by Hitler discussing the... Read More
A Dutch newspaper’s reaction to De Gaulle’s first veto of British membership of the European Community in 1963: “Look, they are part of Europe, you aren’t!” France then had been eager to maintain ties with newly-independent black African countries.
After a great deal of delay and kvetching, Brexit is finally happening. This doesn’t mean all that much in the grand scheme of things. While leftists may hysterically accuse Boris Johnson of being “racist” – seemingly only for speaking humorously of burqas as resembling letter-boxes – the Prime Minister and his multicultural team can be... Read More
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For as long as I have known about him, I have been fascinated by the Japanese writer and artist Yukio Mishima. I think the first time I heard of him was when my favorite history professor, an older fellow specializing in East Asia, spoke in exhilarating terms of Mishima, all the while naughtily adding :... Read More
Josef Thorak, Blondi, Adolf Hitler, Josef Goebbels, and an unidentified female, near the Mooslahnerkopft Tea House. Source: Hitler Archive.
I recently wrote on the role of inspiration and perspiration in men’s careers. I also gave the example of Charles de Gaulle, who definitely hewed closer to the side of perspiration. Through the occasional bold move and the blessings of Fortune, the Frenchman’s decades of labor were rewarded with great moments of glory. Adolf Hitler... Read More
Charles de Gaulle remains the most celebrated French statesman of the twentieth century. Whatever you think of his legacy – and this is open to legitimate debate[2] – he was, among democratic politicians, a truly epic figure. He would prove a source of inspiration for the more thoughtful American statesmen, such as Henry Kissinger and... Read More
Adolf Hitler holding a speech, about 1925.
I can think of only one thing which unites Adolf Hitler and Noam Chomsky: a shared contempt for and critique of capitalist mass-media democracy. Concerning Hitler’s speeches, we usually think of rapturous exhortations to his party-comrades. However, the Führer could sometimes strike a more pedagogical note. Such was the case in a December 1940 speech... Read More
University Using Classics to Promote Left-Wing Agenda
I recently stumbled on a profile of your humble servant on the Pharos website. Pharos is an academic blog which allows you to “learn about and respond to appropriations of Greco-Roman antiquity by hate groups online.” The blog’s name “refers to the Lighthouse of Alexandria, the first such beacon and the symbol of a city... Read More
World War II-era poster celebrating the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor
And the Quest for a New European Spirituality
In November 1940, a six-member delegation of Hitler Youth visited Japan, tasked by Adolf Hitler himself with a single task: “The only thing you need do is thoroughly experience the great spirit of the Japanese people that has arisen in their national polity.”[1] In honor of their visit, the Japanese composed a song entitled Banzai... Read More
Charles de Gaulle, 1922/1924
Reading the letters of the young Charles de Gaulle, I recently came across an interesting passage describing life in interwar Poland. Actually, there is something charming about these letters in general. De Gaulle writes to his “bien chère Maman” (dearest mum or mummy) all the while using the formal vous. After spending half of War... Read More
Prevalence of Sub-Saharan, North African, and Levantine DNA among indigenous Europeans I recently came across a very interesting study on the presence of African and Middle-Eastern genes among indigenous Europeans, performed by a dozen American and European academics. The article, entitled “Gene flow from North Africa contributes to differential human genetic diversity in southern Europe,”... Read More
The recent fire which destroyed much of the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris has led to a great outpouring of emotion. Social media were also ablaze and the government was quickly able to raise a €1 billion in donation pledges to rebuild the iconic monument. Some people I know were quite affected by the sight, being... Read More
Jean-Yves Le Gallou, Academia Christiana. Credit: Wikimedia Commons
An Interview with Jean-Yves Le Gallou
The following is an interview with Jean-Yves Le Gallou, a former French high civil servant, author, and identitarian activist. He was involved with the Nouvelle Droite intellectual movement as early as the 1970s before going on to join the Front National (FN). As a politician, he served as the secretary-general for the FN’s parliamentary group... Read More
Egyptian Races.  Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Inspired by an excellent recent post by Anatoly Karlin, I’d like to add my two cents on the controversial topic of race in the ancient world. This is a sorely under-covered issue which deserves entire PhD theses dedicated to it. For now, a few Internet articles will have to do. I would argue that HBD... Read More
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Probably the single most important political fact about the modern world has been the steady rise of the United States of America. From a geopolitical point of view, the United States really is in a class of its own. While the Soviet Union might have rivaled the U.S. militarily, and while China and the European... Read More
Myth & Reality
Standard narratives of the Third Reich have long emphasized the concept of “subhumans” (Untermenschen) as central to National Socialist thought and policy on race. Here is a typical example from Wikipedia (as of 23 March 2016): The concept of the “subhuman” clearly has a central place in the demonology of anti-Nazism, the claim that Adolf... Read More
PastClassics
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
Talk TV sensationalists and axe-grinding ideologues have fallen for a myth of immigrant lawlessness.
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
How a Young Syndicate Lawyer from Chicago Earned a Fortune Looting the Property of the Japanese-Americans, then Lived...