The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
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Sociology

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Levine and Norenzayan 1999 - The Pace of Life in 31 Countries Hilarious that the country with the most accurate clocks was... Switzerland.
I have managed to find 3 polls querying people on their attitudes towards radical life extension. By far the most comprehensive one is PEW's August 2013 Living to 120 and Beyond project. The other two are a poll of CARP members, a Canadian pro-elderly advocacy group, and by Russia's Levada Center. While PEW and Levada... Read More
A few months late, but worth posting anyway.
Here it is. Or just skip the graphics and download the data in Excel here. I can't say I care much about most of it. Of course most people everything think corruption is "increasing," because they are a grumpy lot. What does matter is the number of people who report paying a bribe in the... Read More
"The Otherness of Self" by Xin Liu, published in 2002. Rating: 1/5. I don’t want to sound overly demanding, but really, unless a writer is the next Kant or Heidegger, he owes it to his readers to make his prose at least minimally engaging. With this book on too many occasions I was under the... Read More
Chinese Characteristics by Arthur Henderson Smith, published in 1894. It is available free here. Rating: 5/5.
I am currently (re)reading The National System of Political Economy by Friedrich List (published in 1841), and this jumped out at me: In no European kingdom is the institution of an aristocracy more judiciously designed than in England for securing to the nobility, in their relation to the Crown and the commonalty, individual independence, dignity,... Read More
Happy International Women's Day!
One of the books I've been reading lately is Steven Pinker's massive door-stopper The Better Angels of Our Nature. Incidentally, I found it a very interesting read with tons of cool factoids, although it could have done with a third of its text and a tiny fraction of its liberal sanctimonious. But that's for the... Read More
Believe it or not but some people call me a Russophobe. Even more shockingly, perhaps, I plead guilty (at least in the sense that I do not have a very high opinion of the Russian people). There are only two logical alternatives: (1) Claims that Russia really is as good as Western Europe and the... Read More
At least according to ultra-leftist Stieg Larsson (of Girl with the Dragon Tattoo fame).
From the rhetoric, you'd think the People's Republic of Berkeley was a sickle short of Communism. In reality however the university itself is fairly standard, probably no more radical than any other in the US. I sat in on a political economy class today (full of PE majors who are in general quite leftist) and... Read More
Alexey Kovalev, a moderate Russian liberal, writes: [tweet "When I left [Russia], each time I crossed the road could have been my last. But now almost everybody makes way. So things are changing." You don't often hear such positive sentiments from liberals, who tend to be negative and critical (which is not always a bad... Read More
In the discussion at the previous post, in which I took exception to Ron Unz's theory of the East Asian Exception, he alerted me to so additional work on the matter he'd done as a Harvard freshman on Chinese IQ. You can read his summary of Social Darwinism and Rural China as well as Steve... Read More
In a 2010 paper on time preferences*, the authors Mei Wang et al. conducted an experiment in which participants could choose either $3400 now or $3800 a month later. Now I would choose the latter option but maybe it's just because I'm intelligent and have been living in the West for quite a while. In... Read More
Commentator AP writes: He is correct in every respect. Russian women achieved the vote in 1917. Criticize them as you will - and I do - the Bolsheviks early on inserted equity feminism into the foundations of Russian society. This was a generation or two ahead of similar developments in the West. And it was... Read More
The question of Indian IQ is a big puzzle. Far trickier than China's IQ which I think I've basically figured out (101-102 today; 106-108 genetic ceiling).
As human capital is so important for prosperity, it behoves us to know China's in detail to assess whether it will continue converging on developed countries. Until recently the best data we had were disparate IQ tests (on the basis of which Richard Lynn's latest estimate is an IQ of 105.8 in his 2012 book... Read More
The reason that some go on about Jewish financial dominance is that because in some sense it actually exists (although unlike the anti-Semites/ZOG'ers I see no evidence that it is achieved with under-handed, coordinated, or conscious methods on the part of Jews as a group). The blogger race/history/evolution notes recently compiled two tables analyzing the... Read More
In recent days Ron Unz's article Race, IQ, and Wealth (The American Conservative) has been making the rounds in the HBDsphere. Broadly speaking it argues for the predominance of cultural and environmental factors as opposed to genetic in forming IQ. It is fairly long but it's also one of the best statements of that position... Read More
(1) Mass shootings of this type account for far less than 1% of US homicides. As such it is pointless and bizarre to try to make some kind of anti-guns point with them. (2) They are a relatively new phenomenon; even the term "postal killings", describing mass shootings at postal offices, was first coined in... Read More
While writing this post on Da Russophile about why Russians do not (for the most part) hate Jews - a post that will also be of interest to AKarlin readers - I came across very interesting historical data on literacy and educational accomplishment by ethnic groups in the USSR. Per 100 people of respective nationality... Read More
And no, I ain't talking of that von Neumann crap. :) Game theory as developed by Heartiste and Co (1, 2, 3, 4). Before we start, there are two concepts we must avail ourselves of: Female hypergamy: Woman's tendency to mate up the social hierarchy. Soft polygamy: See picture right, as helpfully illustrated by yours... Read More
The Economist lies about Russia, it has beef with France, and in general it is far more useful as a barometer of Anglo-Saxon elite opinion than as a good source of objective information on the real world. Nonetheless, it does have the occasional gold nugget, and even one gold vein - its Daily Charts blog.... Read More
The second part of my series comparing Russia, Britain, and the US focuses on the people themselves. What are their strengths and foibles? How do they vary by class, region, race, and religion? How do they view each other and other countries and peoples? What do they eat, drink, and watch? Where do they travel... Read More
Depressingly fatalist, morbidly truthful, irresistibly Nietzschean. That's Howard Bloom's "The Lucifer Principle" in a nutshell: a meandering trawl through disciplines such as genetics, psychology and culture that culminates in a theory of evil, purporting to explain its historical necessity, its creative potential and the possibility of it ever being vanquished. The odds do not appear... Read More
My recent post on demographic myths unleashed a lively discussion on the issue of race and IQ in the comments section. I'm not too interested in wading into it: not out of any misplaced respect for political correctness, of course, but simply because though I think there are good arguments for both sides, it misses... Read More
Then you might get something like Peter Turchin's War and Peace and War, which I've finally read on the recommendations of Kolya and TG. Ranging from Ermak's subjugation of the Sibir Khanate to the rise of Rome, Turchin makes the case that the rise and fall of empires is reducible to three basic concepts: 1)... Read More
I finally watched the film Гибель Империи. Византийский урок (Death of an Empire: the Byzantine Lesson), narrated by Archimandrite Tikhon Shevkunov, the father-confessor of Vladimir Putin. This film takes a stylized interpretation of the decline and fall of the Byzantine Empire - the root cause of which is attributed to mystical factors such as loss... Read More
During one conversation at Sean's Russia Blog, the commentator Evgeny referred me to a work by Russian political analyst & nationalist Konstantin Krylov, Поведение ("Behavior"). In it he tries to classify the world's civilizations into four ethical systems (South - tribal, East - collectivist, West - individualist, North - kind of like communism?, and not... Read More
This is my first follow-up post to The Belief Matrix, in which I attempted to advance a universal model for civilizational responses to subsistence crises (The Malthusian Loop) and the Western challenge (The Sisyphean Loop). The first country I'll apply this too is the US, because doing so will allow me to make several important... Read More
Consequent to my post Categorizing the Russia Debate and the lively debate it spawned, it occurred to me that much of Russia's tortured and intriguing history could be rationalized as a self-reinforcing loop within a belief matrix. This can even be extended further to many other societies - I will also have similar posts up... Read More
The classic Marxist argument holds than an emerging bourgeois class, its wealth based on commerce, industry and capital accumulation, was constrained and frustrated in its political ambitions by the nobility. France was divided into Three Estates, the Third Estate which bore the taille (the main direct tax), the nobility (subject only to the capitation poll... Read More
A while ago I wrote Education as the Elixir of Growth on DR, in which I noted that in most countries the educational profile is closely correlated to their level of productivity. The major exceptions are nations with resource windfalls (inflated productivity) and socialist legacies (deflated productivity). Furthermore, the greater the gap between the 'potential... Read More
What are the reasons behind the wealth and poverty of nations? Since this question has exercised the minds of thinkers from Adam Smith to David Landes, Jared Diamond and Richard Lynn, I decided to take a look at it myself. I came to the conclusion that while geography, macroeconomic policies, resource windfalls and the microeconomic... Read More
Anatoly Karlin
About Anatoly Karlin

I am a blogger, thinker, and businessman in the SF Bay Area. I’m originally from Russia, spent many years in Britain, and studied at U.C. Berkeley.

One of my tenets is that ideologies tend to suck. As such, I hesitate about attaching labels to myself. That said, if it’s really necessary, I suppose “liberal-conservative neoreactionary” would be close enough.

Though I consider myself part of the Orthodox Church, my philosophy and spiritual views are more influenced by digital physics, Gnosticism, and Russian cosmism than anything specifically Judeo-Christian.