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Wimpy Professors Are the Culprits
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No matter how you slice or dice it, today’s universities, particularly in the humanities and social sciences, are intellectual wastelands often more committed to propagating the Leftist faith than knowledge. The campus vocabulary says it all: trigger warnings, safe spaces, micro-aggressions, social justice warriors, cultural appropriation, speech codes, and disinviting –while many instructors are obsessed with the Procrustean bed of race, class and gender. Further add the well-paid diversity and inclusion apparatchiki, ever-expanding definitions of sexual harassment and Stalinist measures to impose gender equality and on and on.

Conceivably, as the stench may become unbearable a distinguished board of inquiry will try to explain this debacle mess and there will be no shortage of possible culprits. Fortunately, no need to wait decades for the verdict—the faculty was responsible even if they did not personally inflict the evils. More precisely, all of this happened thanks to cowardly professors, nearly all of whom enjoyed tenure, saw the disaster in the making, and all could have helped strangle the evil it in the cradle.

The accused professors will naturally offer the time-honored defenses —I had no idea what was happening, I myself was unable to stop it, I remained silent in order to hide two white male libertarians in my basement, or I was only following orders from administrators. Lies, all lies and I’d bet my last dollar that every academic on today’s campus knows these excuses to be bogus.

This is a serious indictment so let me first explain how professors could have successfully resisted the barbarians. Begin with the obvious—preventing academically weak affirmative action admittees from dumbing down the classroom (and, for good measures, serving as useful idiots in campus demonstrations). Yes, professors cannot dictate admission policy but they have absolute power to flunk dummies (regardless of race or sex) and, no doubt, after a point the Office of Admission social engineers would realize that it’s pointless to lower standards if dimwits quickly flunk out despite all the tutoring and remedial courses. Ditto for the hiring and firing of colleagues– complain all you want about wild-eyed feminists, but these ideologues were mostly hired by white male professors who knew what they were getting and, for good measures, these allegedly “blameless” academics awarded them tenure, signed off on sabbaticals and authorized research funds for released time to write yet more rants masquerading as scholarship.

What about all the wacko courses inflicted on hapless students? Since every regular course required faculty approval, professors themselves hold the smoking gun as the course catalogue fills up with the likes of courses on Queer Theory or—and to be specific—UCLA’s “Aliens, Psychics and Ghosts.” And don’t argue that this pedagogical nonsense slipped under the radar—course syllabi are routinely reviewed in hiring, promotion and salary increases. A professor serving on the promotion and tenure committee could always vote “no” on some fuzzy-brained ideologue up for tenure unwilling to teach according to minimal professional standards.

Going one step further, the proliferation of trendy, intellectually light weight departments such as Black or Chicano Studies requires faculty approval and must be justified on scholarly grounds, not the number of rioting students in the President’s office. A faculty committee reviewing a possible Department of Native American Studies (almost guaranteed to become a hotbed of racial activism) can surely reject the request by noting that this new department substantially overlaps with courses in the Anthropology Department.

Finally, the entire administration, from Chancellor to Assistant Dean of Minority Outreach to a significant extent ultimately depends on professorial acquiescence. No University President could remain in office facing a clear-cut faculty revolt nor could the Assistant Dean and his aides survive a faculty report documenting gross bureaucratic mismanagement. Similarly, widespread faculty objection would doom any administrative effort to require that all courses—even those in science and engineering—to include material on the contributions of women and minorities.

In sum, the tenured faculty has, or perhaps had, all the power necessary to kill today’s PC madness, if it wanted to. This is not a question of the Right resisting the Left; even most those on the Left understand the evils of speech codes, mandated sensitivity training, Stasi-like bias response teams to monitor professors for the slightest offense, creating entire departments only to celebrate iffy grievances and all the rest that defines the contemporary Politically Correct university.

So, why did all these professors go AWOL when the barbarians were on the march? And keep in mind that nearly all of these would-be guardians of life of the mind enjoyed tenure. Admittedly, at least some professors actually wanted a PC-dominated university but I’d guess that most of these were hired after Political Correctness was already in place and thus supported it to further their own careers.

No doubt, this sheepishness was just all too easy. Why invite trouble by flunking unqualified students preoccupied with “offensiveness”? Nobody will complain (let alone know) if you bestow charity “B-‘s” for terrible work and invisibly shift the curve to pass everyone. Nor will anybody notice if your lectures skip topics that affront the social justice crowd. It’s hard enough climbing up the academic career ladder without picking fights with administrators mindlessly pushing the diversity agenda. As the Chinese proverb says, the nail that sticks out gets hammered down.

ORDER IT NOW

Moreover, if the aversion to PC nonsense cannot be stomached, there’s always the option of safely expressing opposition, perhaps anonymously, in the outside world. Not all that different from decades back when small town closeted gays periodically took a San Francisco vacation for a week of debauchery to get it out of his system. Become a keyboard warrior to expose campus PC idiocy or attend conventions of the National Association of Scholars to achieve cathartic release with like-minded heretics (though even here, take my word for it, taboos exist regarding “controversial” topics). Or financially support campus-oriented free speech organizations. All good therapy but none substitute for courage when tough choices are to be made inside the university.

But fear not, there is some hope. Successful resistance begins by recognizing that the fight must be social—you need colleagues who chime in publicly when you object to hiring an incompetent whose qualification is entirely biological. Few can stand alone and be stigmatized as the department’s racist, misogynist, homophobe, etc. when cowardice goes unnoticed.

Those wanting to resist the barbarians should study military history demonstrating how small groups of men risked their lives, even facing almost certain death, not for some abstract idea like “freedom” but out of deep loyalty to their comrades-in-arms. Today this tradition lives on in elite military units such as the Navy Seals but the model is certainly appropriate for the contemporary academy. As per elite military units, require courage-demonstrating initiation rituals, for example, giving a speech to the full department (to be videotaped) on why diversity and intellectual excellence are incompatible. Afterwards this band of brothers will organize a little private welcoming ceremony, offer toasts, and present the new recruit with his official membership certificate suitable for framing and an “offensive” lapel pin to intimidate snowflakes, cupcakes, social justice warriors, Stalinist administrators, professional victims and anybody else who identifies with a category whose name ends in “community.”

Better yet, each of these sworn enemies of PC faith will post a sign in their office: “We will defend the Life of the Mind so mess with us at your own risk. We know the location of your safe spaces, and if you continue to destroy the university, we will violate these spaces, burn your coloring books, melt you crayons and drown your puppies. Is that clear?”

When PC administration with their army of snowflakes, cupcakes, sensitivity counselors and assorted social justice warriors insist that the sign is threatening “hate” and should be removed immediately, the response should be what the Spartans told the Persians at Thermopylae when asked to surrender their weapons: Molon labe—come take them.

 

 

 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Academia, Political Correctness 
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  1. CanSpeccy says: • Website

    Yes the faculty are mostly a depraved lot. But the intelligence destroying PC lies, bullying and bullshit comes from the top down and is ruthlessly enforced. Faculty have no choice but to submit, quit, or suffer the humiliation and stress of being squeezed out.

  2. How many people attracted to teaching and researching at a university or college are also inclined to re-enact the Alamo or Thermopylae? And then go home and explain to the wife that he’s risking what could be a relatively comfortable existence for his family for, well, what, intellectual rigor? Integrity of scholarship? Not likely. My own solution is for heretics of the present PC religion to found their own institutions–a new Church, if you will

  3. JohnDough says:

    Good article. Professors certainly are the “(Fill in the blank) in the woodpile!”

  4. uslabor says:

    “No matter how you slice or dice it, today’s universities, particularly in the humanities and social sciences, are intellectual wastelands often more committed to propagating the Leftist faith than knowledge.”

    Well, the sentence should finish “…..the Leftist AND knowledge.

    To be a human being is essentially to be a lefty, if to be a lefty means to want to live one’s life without the threat of death or to be asked to kill others in the advancement of one’s boss’s commercial interests . The fine arts, dance, music, and academia at it’s most elementary level is a celebration of life. When one is a child we are not afraid of including all people in our daily lives. We only hate Mexicans, Arabs, Black people and others when we learn how to fear them. Fine art becomes corrupted when it is employed to be propaganda for commercialism, or war.

    Of course Humanities and Social Sciences are committed to the Leftist faith in Knowledge, just as getting an MBA is a step toward a career in the business world, or joining the US military is the beginning of a career in killing for commercial reasons. Do we really need an article on Unz.com to tell us that?

  5. I know some academics.

    A portion want revenge for an unhappy childhood. Not a large proportion, but the most dedicated and driven ideologues.

    Allied with them are the nurturers, the sympathizers, who want everybody to be happy, to dry the tears from every eye.

    The largest group just want to tend to their studies, to be left alone.

    A very small proportion give a fig for civilization.

    A perfect set of circumstances for the ideologues to take over.

  6. Jayzerbee says:

    Such a screed as this suggests something other than resentment at tenured faculty is at work, specifically ignorance and rank stupidity. Assertion piled on top of assertion says less about the subject and more about the failings of the author, who seems to have a rather ugly and demanding personality–you know, “my way or the highway.” I can hear the jackboots now.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
    , @Wally
  7. “Triggering”

    The irony is that the phrase “trigger” came from “trigger therapy” or “trigger massage” which is a form of pressure point massage. The technique involves pushing on specific points in the muscles which are locked up or seized in tension. The masseuse doesn’t knead the muscle, just uses the thumb or the rounded end of a dowel to apply steady pressure which, by a mechanism still not entirely understood, causes the knot to let go. This is what happens when you get Rolfed. Ira Rolf refined the massage technique into a system.

    The technique was originally discovered by Wilhelm Reich, the renegade Freudian analyst. During a therapy session with a patient Reich observed the patient literally knotted up in anguish when recalling some psychically charged event from their past. At some point he reached over and–taboo–massaged the patient who exploded in a cathartic release of tears etc.

    Reich decided to explore the phenomenon and came to the realization that almost all psychic pain is accompanied by a corresponding physical blockage, a frozen part of the body. It’s as though the body had clenched up to lock in the anguish. He called it “body armor” and observed that many of his neurotic subjects betrayed a curious immobility along with an inability to emote or express themselves freely.

    Trigger point therapy is very painful. The tense muscle don’t want to relax. However, once released, the patient experiences a profound sense of relief and peace, almost as though they’d been reborn.

    So even though triggering is painful because it evokes disturbing memories, it is ultimately beneficial because going through the pain releases the patient from neurotic bondage to events from his past which he endured at a time of his life when he had no control over events. Similarly, traumatic events involving injuries: auto accidents, wounds from combat or sports, beatings by a parent etc. can become deeply embedded in the body as the muscles surrounding the damaged area tighten in order to immobilize the area so that the damage can heal. When massaged, the patient lets go the psychic trauma as well as the physical tension.

    In other words, triggering is ultimately beneficial and necessary to growth–the very opposite interpretation given to the term by today’s students. Today’s students want to remain cocooned in the psychic shell of their body armor, developed no doubt from long hours immobile in front of a computer screen or hand-held devise. Interacting with a computer is a one-way street. The user has complete control over the content he wishes to engage in. “Rolfing” them would mean breaking them out of their bodily and psychic armor, which is, as Rolf and Reich discovered, painful, akin to deprogramming. Since this can’t be imposed upon them we can only hope that the urge to grow will impel these kids beyond the current limits of their self-imposed prisons.

    • Replies: @Albert Hazread
    , @SR
  8. berserker says:

    Thank you for putting the blame squarely where it belongs: at the feet of pusillanimous faculty with tenure.
    – You may know about Gad Saad at Concordia University. He discusses this issue. He has a YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLH7qUqM0PLieCVaHA7RegA

  9. @Diversity Heretic

    Exactly. Most students don’t want the PC crap, which survives by taking money from them to subsidize the evil. Found new.

  10. markflag says:

    Excellent column with many truths. Gender Studies and Film. Were my child to announce he (especially) or she (oh sh it) were majoring in GSF I would put a stop on the tuition check. Look kid, major in STEM. Major in Chinese. But you are not majoring in GSF on my dime.

    The number of vice-presidents or deans for gay, chicano, black, athletically untalented, left-handed students has rocketed. Soon? Snowflake protector. Correct spelling or grammar and chaos breaks loose. Faculty friends at a very high profile university wait until the last half-hour of the deadline to submit grades at which point they turn off their computers and go on vacation. It isn’t so much that the kids e-mail or call whining it is when the parents go to bat and contribute their opions (Do you KNOW how much I am paying for my child to go to . . . . and you are giving her a C?????)

    The sad thing about universities is they caved to the inmates. Why is a certain ability in at least one other language not required in most universities? Some students can go through college without a single science course that is not geared to high school juniors. As a chemistry major I still had to take some liberal arts courses. Took art history. Loved it. Great professor. Have not looked at Thomas Eakins in the same way since.

  11. polistra says:

    You’ve missed the most powerful elements of all.

    ACCREDITATION and grants.

    Accrediting agencies enforce the worst demonic leftist lunacy. Faculty and administrators can’t depart from psychotic standards if they want their courses and degrees to be accepted by other universities and employers. Researchers don’t dare admit biological facts about gender and race if they want to get grants.

    I used to work in the technical end of research, and I’ve seen good professors performing studies that produced unfashionably factual results. The profs recognized the facts but had to cancel the studies because funding would be impossible.

  12. macilrae says:

    Partly this has come about from the pressure to open higher education to everybody. Allow me to quote Britain’s Tony Blair:

    We believe there is no greater ambition for Britain than to see a steadily rising proportion gain the huge benefits of a university education as school standards rise, meeting our goal of 50% of young adults progressing to higher education by 2010. An ambitious goal because we are ambitious for Britain.

    Setting aside the question of where this “steadily rising proportion” of the population would ever find jobs you only have to look at the array of new, rubbish degree courses on offer and the caliber of person hired by the universities to conduct them to realize how devalued our education system has become. Once you have professors of Gender Studies and Political Science you are going to have a problem with these people as they seek ‘relevance’ by asserting themselves outside the lecture halls.

    • Agree: CanSpeccy, dfordoom
  13. Pretty good article except for this, which I suspect is rot. And particularly sappy romantic rot at that. This is the 21st century; people should’ve been long disabused of such inane notions.

    Today this tradition lives on in elite military units such as the Navy Seals…

    The ” elite military units” are statist institutions and as such they are essentially parasitic, not heroic.

    “Military life in general depraves men. It places them in conditions of complete idleness, that is, absence of all rational and useful work; frees them from their common human duties, … also puts them into conditions of servile obedience to those of higher ranks than themselves.”

    ― Leo Tolstoy Resurrection Or, The Awakening, 1899

    He wasn’t just blowing smoke, either. he learned from experience what it was all about. In 1851 Tolstoy and his older brother went to the Caucasus where he joined the Russian army as an artillery officer.

    In 1854, during the Crimean War Tolstoy transferred to Wallachia to fight against the French, British and Ottoman Empire and defend Sevastopol.

    A standing military force, with an overgrown Executive will not long be safe companions to liberty. The means of defence against foreign danger have been always the instruments of tyranny at home. Among the Romans it was a standing maxim to excite a war, whenever a revolt was apprehended. Throughout all Europe, the armies kept up under the pretext of defending, have enslaved the people.

    James Madison, Speech, Constitutional Convention (1787-06-29), from Max Farrand’s Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, vol. I [1] (1911), p. 465

    As far as “professors” are concerned, one could do worse than read Upton Sinclair’s “The Goosestep” and “The Goslings.”

    Or one could check out Lucian’s comments on the subject of “salaried intellects,” aka “professors.”:

    Let me remind you then, to begin with, that you are no longer free-born, no longer a man of family. Birth, freedom, ancestry, all these you will leave on the other side of the door, when you enter upon the fulfilment of your servile contract; for Freedom will never bear you company in that ignoble station. You are a slave, wince as you may at the word; and, be assured, a slave of many masters; a downward-looking drudge, from morning till night serving for sorry wage.

    Lucian of Samosata, THE DEPENDENT SCHOLAR, ~150 AD

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
  14. @uslabor

    What article in UR tries to teach the lesson you try to articulate? Certainly not the one on which you are purporting to comment. Your rhetoric has gone a bit adrift as often happens when kds barely out of kindergarten try mouthing smething against their pparents that they have picked up in the sandpit. One day sonny, your reading list may introduce you to some of the great lefties like Lenin, Stalin, Mao, Hugo Chavez, right down to the low grade leaders of exploitative public sector unions and the Arthur Scargills who would willingly close dosn their countries’ economies.

    • Replies: @uslabor
  15. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Universities are businesses whose mission are to take in as much money as possible. Want to get an easy degree in Chicano studies? You got it, just step up and sign on the dotted line. Graduates will get a job in some government agency as an affirmative quota hire and that beats doing the grunge work. Outside of the actual hard sciences most of the intellectual class, if one can call it that, have degenerated into pathetic bleating sheep. Most that I’ve met are disgusting physical cowards who are scared of everything. They’re an evolutionary dead-end. Much of what they do is disconnected from anything that is productive or creative of value. Since there apparently is plenty of money floating around to support all this it’ll continue until such time as the subsidy runs out.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
  16. @Jayzerbee

    I think you should not consider it as piled up (mere) assertions but as, by analogy with court cases, expert evidence. By all means suggest how you would cross examine him but my looking back over many decades supports much of what he says, not least because, at least in Australia, it extends back to the days when universties had not been radically chsnged by admission of students of less than 1sd anove average intelligence. (Perhaps it should be put the other way round: what has been created ab initio or by reshaping is universities or faculties which don’t deserve the name).

  17. @CanSpeccy

    Is that “no choice” really supported by your experience and reliable hearsay or observation? Surely you underestimate the protection given by tenure. Of course many, perhaps most, of the best acafemics don’t want to be diverted into mastering time consuming acafemic politics or even spending the time to be sure their understanding of a colleauge’s complaints is sound. That’s more than enough reason for the professorial sub-dean of engineering who is concentrating on securing a $2 million capital grant to support research to avoid getting involved in the rights and wrongs which seems to have started with a hissy-fit in the Department of Social Work.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  18. every prof is afraid of offending 1 race, guess what race that is? and it isn’t about them being wimps. it literally is their livelihood if they speak up.

    that is how you take over future generations and their thought process. through higher ed.

    • Replies: @tjm
  19. Pandos says:

    Schools exists to pay teachers. Teachers are the praetorian guard of the state.

  20. Sparkon says:

    #13 macilrae says:

    Partly this has come about from the pressure to open higher education to everybody.

    Yes, I think this is correct. I would add Title IX specifically, and intercollegiate sports, in general as further causes of the stupefaction–dumbing down, if you will– of higher education.

    Let’s also include the effects of Gov. Ronald Reagan’s actions against what had been the nation’s premier educational system in California because of the dispute over People’s Park in Berkeley.

    However, Governor Ronald Reagan had been publicly critical of university administrators for tolerating student demonstrations at the Berkeley campus. He had received popular support for his 1966 gubernatorial campaign promise to crack down on what the public perceived as a generally lax attitude at California’s public universities. Reagan called the Berkeley campus “a haven for communist sympathizers, protesters, and sex deviants.”
    […]
    The May 1969 confrontation in People’s Park grew out of the counterculture of the 1960s, pitting flower children against the Establishment. Berkeley had been the site of the first large-scale antiwar demonstration in the country on September 30, 1964.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People’s_Park_%28Berkeley%29

    Ronald Reagan launched political career using the Berkeley campus as a target

    In some sense, said Colvig, “Reagan’s bark was worse than his bite about the university. He wanted to establish a special process to select faculty in several disciplines. In other words, he wanted to set a political standard for appointing faculty members. This idea was widely opposed, and it went away. Often, nothing came of these things. But sometimes it did. The financial cuts were real, and they introduced new special fees that, in effect, were the beginning of charging tuition.”

    http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2004/06/08_reagan.shtml

    Finally, please note that the proverb you cited is Japanese, not Chinese.

    出る釘は打たれる – deru kugi wa utareru

    The nail that sticks out gets hammered down.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  21. Follow the money dude. STUDENT LOANS are the source of the problem.

  22. Sparkon says:

    deru kugi wa utareru

    出る釘は打たれる

    The proverb you cited is Japanese, not Chinese.

    Well, after previewing correctly, the earlier incarnation of my rather long comment disappeared after I hit the “publish comment” button.

    Bah!

    It’s too bad. I’m sure Mr. Unz might have enjoyed reading my comments about conservative icon Gov. Ronald Reagans’ disastrous effects on what had been the nation’s premier education system in California over the dispute at People’s Park in Berkeley.

    I would also mention the impact on education from intercollegiate sports, especially Title IX.

  23. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Price watch: the book

    “Bad Students, not Bad Schools” by Professor Weissberg
    (used) costs $26.13 + $3.99 S&H.
    It is worth much more !!!

  24. Sparkon says:

    Two attempts to post my comment here have disappeared.

    Perhaps this mishap occurred because I included the Japanese characters for deru kugi wa utareru in my post to illustrate that the proverb cited by Mr. Weissberg is Japanese, not Chinese.

    In addition to the nail sticking out getting hammered down. comments with Japanese characters go bye bye at The Unz Review. Who needs stinking foreign languages, anyway? Certainly not Americans.

    I guess Ron Unz hasn’t gotten around to accommodating foreign script in comments at The Unz Review. It’s too bad because the rest of my original, rather long comment described the disastrous effects on what had been the nation’s premier educational system in California that came about because of California governor and conservative icon Ronald Reagan’s actions over the dispute at People’s Park in Berkeley.

    • Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not)
  25. Wally says:
    @Jayzerbee

    What you call “assertions” are actually verifiable facts.

    But no doubt the communist jack boots will be taking Weissberg to one of their ‘re-education’ camps.

    recommended:
    The Purpose of Political Correctness,
    To Hide the Dirty Secrets of Socialism

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2016/12/thomas-dilorenzo/real-purpose-pc/
    and:
    Anti-Trump Hysteria
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2016/12/lew-rockwell/anti-trump-hysteria/
    excerpt:
    In other words, we find in the left every single feature it claims to find in Trump supporters – intolerance, hatred of people unlike themselves, authoritarianism, closed-mindedness, and an appetite for violence.
    and:
    Undercover video shows Democrat operatives admitting they incited violence at Trump rallies
    https://www.conservativereview.com/commentary/2016/10/undercover-video-shows-democrat-operatives-admitting-they-incited-violence-at-trump-rallies

    • Replies: @Anon
  26. Durruti says:

    Robert Weissberg,

    “Wimpy Professors Are the Culprits”

    How dare you sir!!! I take personal umbrage – (something), to that title/observation.

    Nice necessary, and overdue article.

    Personal whining portion of missive:

    As a retarded (er-retired), Prof of History, (Lehigh U – Alma Mater). By the way, we have Henry Kissinger on our Board of Directors (aren’t I, we proud!!!). We (me and my alter ego), witnessed the decline of education (and most everything else), in the United States of America. Education slowly declined, after World War II, until 1975, (the end of the War Against Vietnam), where many of the tragic observations listed by Weissberg, and the Commenters above, accelerated. Did he mention the dumbing down of the curriculum?

    Teaching, occasionally – post retirement – We must struggle to require ‘College Students’ to read even 1 book in their History course (usually US History, or Western-or World Civ). Many students are barely literate (not even at a 3rd grade level). The dumbing down of the University curriculums is a key effort by the New World Order’s ruling Oligarchs to reduce the controlled population to mindless automatons. In this they have mostly succeeded.

    More Personal Stuff:

    Toward our children, – at home, no TV, no dating until graduating from High School (we never got high in school), coupled with required Ballet (for the girl), she also did swim & track, son- swim, wrestling, Hockey, Kick & regular boxing. Daughter turned out to be tougher than son (but that is a long story). Both married, grand children (spoiled brats). Ex can still kick my ass; but you get the point.

    Restore the Republic you fools!

    Durruti

    • Replies: @jacques sheete
  27. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Wally

    Interesting choice of sources. Do you ever get outside your echo chamber?

    In fact, your sources are repeated heaps of crap. “National Socialism was really socialist!” Really? Can Lew Rockwell or you name a single economic program launched by the Nazis that put the means of production in government hands?

    A final point about the excerpt you provide. The difference between the left and right in intolerance is that the left is intolerant of opinions, while the right is intolerant of people. What the right still doesn’t get is that there is a qualitative difference between hating someone because of what they believe and hating someone because they’re black or an immigrant or something else like that.

    As for authoritarianism in the American left, I’d be happy to admit it’s there if someone merely point it out. I’ve not seen it. Nor have I seen a greater appetite for violence among the left than among the right, which is really saying something, since supporters of the left tend to be younger and, therefore, at least among the men, more violence-prone.

  28. @Diversity Heretic

    That’s actually an idea that I’ve toyed with. Not establishing a PC-free college, though my guess is that it’d be pretty successful. (That’s what billionaires should be doing instead of trying to win a NCAA championship.)

    No, just creating a website that lists out the most and least PC institutions – colleges, businesses, networks, etc.

    Perhaps this already exists and I just don’t know about it, but such a website could begin to provide both information for those in need and push-back ability. If less PC businesses start to attract better workers, it will pressure the Facebooks of the world If less PC colleges start to attract better students, it will be noticed.

    Is there already such as a website?

  29. @uslabor

    When one is a child we are not afraid of including all people in our daily lives.

    Actually, children as young as three months fear people of other races. It’s natural. Historically, other races entering your home or town or country meant very bad things were happening.

    We only hate Mexicans, Arabs, Black people and others when we learn how to fear them.

    You project, my friend. I don’t hate Mexicans, Arabs and blacks, though I rightfully fear living around large numbers of blacks (given that blacks commit violent crime at seven times the rate of whites, you’d have to be idiot not to be afraid) and am very concerned about what large scale Muslim immigration will do to the Europe. (See Lebanon for an example of where that ends.)

    I simply want to live among my own. Does loving one’s own family mean that you hate other families. Of course not. Same here. Are blacks shockingly violent for genetic or cultural reasons? Is it white people’s fault? Who cares. That’s why you have different countries. Let blacks succeed or fail in their own country. We can do the same in our own country.

    As for being open, I think the free sharing of ideas, trade, tourism, learning about other cultures and scientific exchanges are wonderful. However, you can have all of those thing while maintaining your own people and culture. It’s called diversity. Try it.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
    , @uslabor
  30. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Wizard of Oz

    Is that “no choice” really supported by your experience and reliable hearsay or observation?

    Yes.

    Here are three cases:

    Marquette University Professor John C. McAdams: to be booted from his tenured position for a blog post that revealed how an instructor in the Philosophy Department bullied a student who wanted to express his opposition to gay marriage in class.

    Professor Sir Tim Hunt, Nobel Laureate: forced to resign his honorary position at University College London by a jackass provost, Professor Michael Arthur, for a humorous comment at a conference about women in science, on the emotional problems that arise in a mixed laboratory (a comment that, according to responsible witnesses, was well received by the largely female audience).

    Professor Jordan Peterson, threatened by the University of Toronto with loss of teaching responsibilities for refusing to use transgender pronouns.

    My own experience as a tenure-track appointee at the University of Toronto, many many years ago revealed that that institution was even then run by the administration not the faculty. I resigned after three days on discovering that the faculty I had joined had been captured by an industry group who owned the dean and everyone else.

    As a consequence of that resignation my other academic appointments, including an adjunct full professorship at Canada’s other leading research university, the University of British Columbia, became null and void — not that that mattered. The faculty with which I was associated at UBC was run top down by a jackass dean too.

    There are other institutions related to academia that are run on similar lines, for example, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, (President, Marcia McNutt — formerly Editor in Chief of the very PC Science Magazine), which like the US National Academy of Sciences is partially funded by the US Government.

  31. joe webb says:

    “… small groups of men risked their lives, even facing almost certain death, not for some abstract idea like “freedom” but out of deep loyalty to their comrades-in-arms. ”

    Exactly. Good piece. Yet….

    The abstract embrace of screwy ideas…in a word, race and gender equality, does not yield friendship and comradeship. All those Others do not show the college perfesser any love. They continue to hate him, only excusing him from the killing fields, at least for a while.

    Only solidarity, in this case Social, not Political, can encourage anybody to stand their ground.
    Standing one’s ground means that your racial brothers and sisters are there with you.

    It’s all Race, Darwin, Tribalism, Evolution, Blood and Soil. The Magic Words of Equality, etc. do not defend against literal attack. Whites are especially vulnerable to Word Magic due to our altruism….Rainbow Logic, etc.

    Arguably, the whole pee-cee thing is the last gasp of Lib-RAd True Belief…like the Ghost Dancers of US injuns that were supposed to be proof against US Army bullets.

    The social and political forces of Trumpian Populism will, if the 4th estate commies keep it up, start sending bullets to today’s Ghost Dancers. Last night I saw on MSNBC the claim…”political sociopath” applied to Trump. Then all the rest of the adjectives that have exhausted their thesaurus pages…Hitlereque mostly….Do these folks think they are bullet-proof?

    Joe Webb

  32. MarkinLA says:
    @anonymous

    Yes and it is a two way street.

    When I was at UCLA everybody knew that two easy upper division A’s were available if you took the two Jazz appreciation classes offered. Everybody has breath requirements that must be fulfilled for graduation and everybody wants a higher GPA. These courses get a lot of students looking for that easy A. Just regurgitate the BS (Jazz history wasn’t BS just not something at the level of a university upper division class) that you have in the purchased notes on the multiple guess tests.

    • Replies: @Wally
  33. MarkinLA says:
    @jacques sheete

    Military life in general depraves men. It places them in conditions of complete idleness, that is, absence of all rational and useful work

    Yes “in general”. Elite military groups like the SEALs are not just sitting around the base. They are in constant training – sometimes with other elite groups from other countries. I doubt these guys are idle.

    • Replies: @Alden
  34. @ThreeCranes

    Yes thanks your comment because it is important, for the Wilhelm Reich’s work is important as is the lessons of his tragic biography.

    How ironic, that the former Freudian and Marxist, Reich, a natural scientist, would be attacked here in the United States by what we would now call the ‘Cultural Marxist Elite”, who burned his books and threw him in jail where he died. …for what? For seeking the truth.

    The truth that Reich recognized was one of the natural health of life in the human being as being self regulating and thus free, something he recognized in the American spirit of the people here, then in the late 1940’s among what might be identified as the ‘deplorables’.

    Reich came to see the problem with the ‘Red Fascists’, the Communists as much as he saw trouble with the “Black Fascists” the Nazi’s. He also saw the problem with religious mysticism as well as atheistic materialism, and was recognizing within his ‘functional studies of nature’, his scientific explorations into nature, that gave a different perspective other than these ‘traps’ as he called them, of thinking and of conditioning. Conditioning of the type that Reich recognized in individuals and society as becoming a means of ‘armoring’ oneself against reality.

    The whole issue is quite fascinating and beyond the scope of this comment, but Reich’s observations about human neurosis and how it exhibits itself in character armoring, the psycho-physical manifestation of what is the muscular armoring and its attendant psychological projections of that fear into projections and attitudes, that then get reinforced and perpetuated into culture, society and politics.

    Its sick manifestation of this chronic armoring manifest in society in its cultural breakdown is what he termed the “Emotional Plague” which is expressed in a many ways, that are often contradictory to one another, but do seem to neatly fit into an either/or dichotomy that thus is ripe for dialectical manipulation and perpetual confusion.

    • Replies: @Albert Hazread
  35. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I simply want to live among my own.

    And if you are a well adapted organism, you probably want to be succeeded by your own, not by the posterity of those of an alien race and culture.

    But the US is following the Roman model of empire. Conquest followed by admission of the conquered to citizenship, followed by mass immigration to the homeland and the elimination of the founding racial group and cultural identity.

    In the American empire, i.e., the Western world, the process of elimination is proceeding rapidly, due to repression of the fertility of the indigenous peoples, and the high fertility of the incoming setters from the imperial periphery. Already, Britain’s capital city, London, is majority not-English, has a second generation Pakistani Muslim mayor who is loudly opposed to a state visit to Britain from the American President.

    It’s a process of self-genocide, for which the forces of political correctness propel.

  36. MarkinLA says:
    @Anon

    left is intolerant of opinions, while the right is intolerant of people.

    I didn’t realize that the white working class and white Christians were opinions. Good to know.

    • Replies: @Anon
  37. gwynedd1 says:

    SJWs are upset because they keep ignoring my nano compliments.

  38. @CanSpeccy

    total control of higher ED is the very first link in the chain. total control of media helps ensure the total control of higher ED.

  39. CCZ says:

    If you want the most disheartening (but sickly outrageous) examples of the humanities and social sciences as post-modern, deconstructionist, inter-sectional, gender-fluid, social justice intellectual wastelands committed to propagating the Leftist faith, scroll through the abstracts of PhD dissertations and published journal articles at:

    Enjoy your journey into the popular world of critical race, critical white, or critical gender studies and the surreal world of critical food, critical dance, critical fat, critical yoga, or critical luxury studies, to name just a few of the “critical [something] studies” taught in modern university humanities and social justice departments.

  40. DaveE says:

    The problem is, we’re fighting an ideology, a very difficult battle.

    The fact is, most of us don’t have the time and/or energy to devote our lives, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to fighting the Cultural Marxists (or any other kind of Marxist), so we just don’t bother.

    Professors, who are said to know “everything about nothing” as the old saying goes, seldom look out the window to see the battle raging in the streets. So they hide in their books….. much safer that way.

    Besides, these “Marxists” have been planning this takeover for what, about 2,700 years or however old the Torah is.

    We may never catch up

    • Replies: @SR
  41. @Sparkon

    Maybe you could have avoided your difficulties with this website by leaving out the High-IQ signalling of insisting on the inclusion of the Japanese characters. There are very few of us common folk in this humble crofter’s cottage named unz.com who can read them.

    You are so much more learned than we; please continue to persist in the honorable path of the true scholar. Eventually, you may learn to bear your erudition with more grace.

  42. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @MarkinLA

    That’s a gross oversimplification. Do you think that, if a white, working class Christian had left wing points of view, leftists would hate that person?

  43. Wally says:
    @Anon

    Same old leftist ‘Nazi’ canard, yawn.

    Yet leftists support Israeli immigration laws which specify JEWS ONLY.

    It’s also revealing that we don’t see leftists criticizing Israel’s very real WALL.

    Former pro basketball player Candice Wiggins says she was hounded out of the WNBA league because she wasn’t gay.
    http://www.breitbart.com/sports/2017/02/21/retired-womens-basketball-star-says-gay-obsessed-wnba-oppresses-heterosexual-players/

    Black Trump Supporter Blasts Sanctuary Cities: “All the Jobs Are Going to Illegals!”
    “When my people do a crime, they get three strikes, your people do a crime, they get amnesty, they get benefits and they’re not paying taxes”
    “Thank God for Trump, thank God for Sessions and you should be ashamed of yourselves, how dare you?”.
    “Sanctuary cities are racist – black communities have been destroyed by illegal immigration”
    http://www.infowars.com/black-trump-supporter-blasts-sanctuary-cities-all-the-jobs-are-going-to-illegals/

    80 Percent Oppose Sanctuary Cities
    http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2017/02/21/poll-80-percent-oppose-sanctuary-cities/
    http://media.breitbart.com/media/2017/02/GettyImages-634957546.jpg
    Mixed race singer & Trump supporter Joy Villa, who wore a ‘Trump’ gown to the Grammy Awards and received violent threats from Leftists said:
    “I was tired of the bullying,” she said in a phone interview. “I was tired of being pushed down so that I couldn’t say my beliefs. And being fearful of losing sales. Losing fans. Losing bookings. Losing contracts and sponsorship. You know, that’s my day to day. And a lot of my friends have the same thing. And we live in Hollywood, which is supposed to be the most open viewpoint city. But the truth is there was a lot of hate and a lot of negativity and I wanted to change the storyline to love and support and unity as an American.
    You can’t even talk about it with other supporters because you feel like, I don’t want people to find out. It was really like a closeted feeling. And I know gay Trump supporters in my community who say, ‘This feels like being closeted again. I feel like I can’t come out of the closet and talk about being a Trump supporter because I will get attacked.’”

    Hurt’s don’t it.

    • Replies: @Anon
  44. Wally says:
    @MarkinLA

    Classes? There are entire majors where you can “just regurgitate the BS”.
    Voila! A degree in ‘Ghetto Dummies Studies’, ‘Lesbians Imitating Men Studies’, etc.

    And then they blame white males when they can’t find employment.

    “the Democrats had to come up with a story as to why they lost the election, and so badly, so they made up a story – RUSSIA. Fake news!”
    – Donald Trump

    • Replies: @Anon
  45. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Wally

    Wally,

    First of all, calling the National Socialist German Workers Party members “Nazis” isn’t a “canard.” It’s a fact.

    But no, it doesn’t hurt at all because you didn’t address a single point I made. So allow me to repeat, since you missed it the first time. I’ll number them to make it easier for you.

    1. Can you name a single economic program launched by the Nazis in Germany in which the means of production were placed in the hands of the government?

    2. Do you think that hating a person because of his color is morally equivalent to hating something because of his point of view?

    3. Can you provide a concrete example of left-wing authoritarianism in the United States?

    I eagerly await your response.

    • Replies: @Wally
  46. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Wally

    Your posts here seem to suggest that IQ has a strong correlation with race.

    Can you provide some concrete data for why you believe this?

    • Replies: @res
    , @Wizard of Oz
  47. Wally says:

    I suggest you merely open your eyes. Reality is the “data”.

    • Replies: @Anon
  48. Wally says:
    @Anon

    1. So you now want to change the subject to NSDAP economics?

    2. Yawn, so now we’re talking about skin color?
    BTW, “Truth is hate to those that hate the truth.”

    3. Yes. Please actually read the article from which this thread stems.

    If illegals make such ‘valuable contributions’, then why do their countries refuse to take them back?

    “I give interracial couples a look. Daggers. They get uncomfortable when they see me on the street.” — Spike Lee

    “We got to do something about these Asians coming in and opening up businesses and dirty shops. They ought to go.” — Marion Barry

    • Replies: @Anon
  49. MarkinLA says:
    @Anon

    Yes, just go to any college campus and listen to the victim class rant. They hate whitey no matter what whitey believes.

    That’s a gross oversimplification.

    So is the idea that the left only hates opinions and the right people.

    • Replies: @Anon
  50. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Wally

    So you don’t have any data. I guess you’re just a racist then.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  51. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Wally

    Wally,

    I must have hit a nerve because you are ducking my questions.

    1. If you don’t know, then say you don’t know. There’s no shame in not knowing the answer.

    2. Your resistance to answer this question suggests you’re ashamed of the answer.

    3. These are not examples of authoritarianism. Again, if you don’t know what a word means, just say so. I’m happy to explain to you.

    • Replies: @res
  52. @uslabor

    I must not be very human, despite my degree, I don’t think that participation in self-hate and self-destruction is necessary to be *complete*. I celebrate life by living and by pursuing beauty as opposed to ugliness, which seems to be a bit at odds with this more recent trend to celebrate ugliness as pretend beauty.

    That said, as a troll, I think you’re doing an okay job.

  53. @Anon

    You mean, the Left always provides us with the wonderful option of submission or death? And we should choose submission?

    How generous!

    And left wing authoritarianism is not evident in spite of actively destroying the lives of individuals, street violence and actual propaganda being broadcast nearly 24/7?

    Truly, blindness is a choice.

    PS: even extreme hard-right individuals offer that option of submit or die.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @uslabor
  54. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @MarkinLA

    I can’t imagine you’ve actually ever been to a college campus. But let’s for a moment say you have and even grant that what you’re saying is true.

    Do you think they would continue to “hate whitey” if they knew for sure that whitey agreed?

    You’re correct that it’s wrong to state that both sides are uniformly a particular way, so I retract that statement. Nevertheless, when the left and right hate, it is almost always a matter of the distinction I originally made. That point I do not retract.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    , @MarkinLA
  55. @Albert Hazread

    I rewrote my comment…..

    Yes thanks your comment because it is important and relevant to the problem at hand, the breakdown of culture evidenced by academia having become totally controlled by the financial oligarchy and its attendant mercenary force of
    sophistry against the truth, for the tragic case of Wilhelm Reich is representative of much of the problem at hand.

    One needs only consider that Reich’s books were burned under court order, and that neither the left nor right truly understands or cares about this insanity, which is the ironic flaw that keeps the mass insanity going.

    Yes Reich discovered triggers within the psychophysical unity of a person, that created a distortion within the life of that person that Reich called in ‘armoring’, a phenomena with physical reality as well as a psychic one that manifested in various ways in culture, which in its pathological presence Reich called the ‘Emotional Plague’.

    Early on, Reich who was once a Marxist, as well a Freudian, came to see the emotional plague reside within the “Red Fascists” as much as the “Black Fascists” who both were intolerant of individual freedom. Reich recognized that chronic armoring projected upon belief systems was a direct threat to the pursuit of knowledge, much less societal sanity. This is why Reich’s work
    was never understood and pursued in a wider sense by those supposedly interested in truth. Because not only was the mind distorted through the initial distortion of perceptions due to armoring of the organism. Thus feelings are deadened which is reflected in various forms of dead thinking systems.

    The analogy is the gulf between analog and digital, but it is more than an analogy, but something very important to deal with, for it has much to do with scientific method and as to who we are as people. Reich discovered a “Functional” approach to science, that did not throw away either the senses, nor hypothesis, but realized that distortions of mysticism and materialism were a danger to mankind, and that such distortions were fully killing both skeptics and idealists, putting them in the same boat as furthering the suicide of mankind and the planet.

    • Replies: @joe webb
  56. @Anon

    So as long as you reject everything you believe in, you’re totally welcome. What absolute hogwash. This kind of nonsense is why despite being a supposed “Person of Color” of no particular faith I’ve utterly rejected the ideas of the left.

    Not being allowed to think and forced to agree to a line is a fate much worse than death.

    • Replies: @Anon
  57. imbroglio says:

    If you’re waiting for Thermopylae, you’re gonna wait a long time.

    The power and money are in administration, the goal of most tenured faculty. And the nice thing about tenure and living a cushy life in a college town is that it allows you the time and $$ to pursue your interests, manias and sexual affairs. I’ve been around academia for a long time and I can count on the thumbs of my two hands the number of faculty who are genuinely devoted to the life of the mind. If the price of go along to get along is support for P.C., big deal. The P.C.’ers, especially the stoodents, don’t respect the faculty. The faculty know it and don’t care.

    The bums of decadence that now inhabit the halls and warrens of academia won’t be thrown out. Academia will collapse from exhaustion as more and more people drift away to find their niches and make their livings without having to endure academia’s exploitation. This includes minorities and the undocumented when the affirmative action gravy train, with its assorted freebies, has at last left the station. Poverty may do what cowardice and lack of character won’t.

  58. @Anon

    He said racist. He won the argument!

    Dude, there’s an entire body of work which you’ve clearly chosen to ignore. Read about HBD if you would like, there are links on this very page. Beyond that, have a nice life.

    • Replies: @Anon
  59. Sparkon says:
    @Eustace Tilley (not)

    Maybe you could have avoided your difficulties with this website by leaving out the High-IQ signalling of insisting on the inclusion of the Japanese characters.

    Ah so. Including a few Japanese characters is “High-IQ signalling,” but writing beautifully, persuasively, densely, or even inscrutably in English is not?

    Please expand on your definition of “High-IQ Signalling” so those who worry about such things will know how to express themselves to your satisfaction, and avoid the horror of being labeled a High-IQ Signaller.

    You may note that my errant comments have finally appeared, kanji, hiragana, and all at #s 21 and 23, above. You may also note that most of my original comment was about the events at People’s Park in Berkeley as pertains to education.

    Did it ever occur to you that Mr. Unz may appreciate learning about this small hiccup in his otherwise smoothly functioning webzine? I certainly appreciate his efforts to provide this forum, and in my own way, I try to help where I can. Perhaps the delay in appearance of my posts with the Japanese characters was due to the moderators taking the time to translate my post to ensure I wasn’t saying something like: Your grandma wears combat boots, or worse.

    For those who are monolingual, Google Translate does a pretty good job, although Japanese is not one of its strong suits.

    The reality is that learning a 2nd language has more to do with starting early in life, than it does with IQ.

    Even for those with higher IQs who start later in life to learn a second language, it’s as much about hard work, and associating with native speakers, as it is about intelligence, or IQ, although I will concede that Japanese is considered among the most difficult languages to learn for native English speakers, according to Uncle Sam.

    Finally, just so you know, my Japanese is really not very good. 1st graders in Japan have to learn 80 kanji, and I’m very rusty and probably not much beyond that these days, so my knowledge is really rather sparse. However, I do understand the language enough to sometimes share what I know with others who may have that irresistible urge and curiosity to learn something new.

    My reaction when I hear or read something from someone who seems smart is to pay attention: there’s always the chance I might learn something.

  60. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    The only part of your post worthy of response is this: “actively destroying the lives of individuals, street violence and actual propaganda being broadcast nearly 24/7?”

    First, individuals have the right to say what they like. They don’t have the right not to suffer social, political, and economic consequences.

    Second, street violence is hardly the sole province of the left.

    Third, I assume you’re making a reference to the media. What specific propaganda are you referring to? Can you provide a specific example?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    , @RadicalCenter
  61. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    No, I’ve read it. I’m just asking Wally to cite some specific examples.

  62. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Beliefs aren’t immutable characteristics.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    , @dfordoom
  63. @Anon

    “Agreement” to leftist canon would entail acceptance of obvious untruths(if only to the lived experience of said whites), self-hate, and reduction of options, i.e. acceptance of need for reparations would involve loss of income. Its plainly ridiculous to expect that whites or anyone would submit meekly to such thought and the idea that one should be hated for disagreeing is frankly, farcical.

    Commitment to such an ideology is exactly why the left has successfully assembled such a large coalition against it. The idea to further double down on this “submit or be destroyed” concept is a sure way to continually increase the number of enemies.

    • Replies: @Anon
  64. @Anon

    First, individuals have the right to say what they like. They don’t have the right not to suffer social, political, and economic consequences.

    You have the right to have any belief, so as long as we can destroy you for it. Gotcha.

    Second, street violence is hardly the sole province of the left.

    Yet only the Left is allowed to commit to such with almost no consequences. Far more resources are invested in seeking even the hoaxes of “hate crime” than toward actual Leftist violence.

    Third, I assume you’re making a reference to the media. What specific propaganda are you referring to? Can you provide a specific example?

    Perhaps even vague awareness of pop culture might enlighten you. That you obviously refuse to see the broadcast of liberal theology in media is a testament to your inability, not yours.

    Beliefs aren’t immutable characteristics.

    Beliefs may very well be due to HBD. There’s certainly a strong hereditary component to it. Secondary, the notion of being able to submit to leftist beliefs or have one’s life be destroyed is a certain way to ensure enmity.

    • Replies: @Anon
  65. BB753 says:

    Lefty professors aren’t wimpy, they are complicit.

  66. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    List of things you get wrong here:

    1. You assume that everyone on the left agrees with reparations
    2. You assume that reparations would result in economic loss because presumably they would come out of the pockets of whites. No realistic reparations plan would do this. It would likely emanate from a tax, and by the way, you can’t provide a blanket exemption from a tax on the basis of race — to do would violate the 14th Amendment, which means black people would pay the atx too.
    3. There are white leftists who aren’t self-hating.
    4. Trump lost the popular vote despite a fragmented left, although I’d argue it’s a fragmented center.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  67. JackOH says:
    @CanSpeccy

    ” . . . [F]aculty I had joined had been captured by an industry group who owned the dean and everyone else.” Yep. Academic freedom at my local Podunk Tech exists as long as one doesn’t cross the department chair, the dean, the provost, clueless trustees who claim some proprietary interest in the substance of scholarship, high-rolling donors and alumni, meddling and profoundly incompetent administrators. Several tenured, mid-career faculty have left and publicly complained that research of any sort was discouraged. In practice, the lower division courses are regarded as High School 2.0 by some students and faculty.

  68. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    You have the right to have any belief, so as long as we can destroy you for it. Gotcha.

    Words have consequences. What’s wrong with that? Would you rather a world in which people could say terrible things and there not be social consequences?

    Yet only the Left is allowed to commit to such with almost no consequences. Far more resources are invested in seeking even the hoaxes of “hate crime” than toward actual Leftist violence.

    You’re joking, right? Did you see the violence meted out to Occupy Wall Street protests?

    Perhaps even vague awareness of pop culture might enlighten you. That you obviously refuse to see the broadcast of liberal theology in media is a testament to your inability, not yours.

    That isn’t an argument.

    Beliefs may very well be due to HBD. There’s certainly a strong hereditary component to it.

    You’d have to prove that, or at least provide some hint of evidence.

    Secondary, the notion of being able to submit to leftist beliefs or have one’s life be destroyed is a certain way to ensure enmity.

    Certainly, but then again, no one is making such a request.

    Essentially, you’re saying, “I should be able to shout the N-word on a street corner and pay no consequences.” Please correct me if I’m wrong.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    , @MarkinLA
  69. @Diversity Heretic

    found their own institutions–a new Church, if you will

    Ironic — the institutions Weissberg describes WERE founded by Church people, to represent their views and values.

    They’ve been taken over by the rigid enforcers of views and values antithetical to their very foundation — much like the USA itself.

    A few weeks ago I visited one of our kid’s alma mater, Carnegie Mellon. In the old days the student center was Skibo, named for Andrew Carnegie’s home town (or something) in Scotland.
    Now, Skibo is gone; a new, bigger building, the Cohon Center, has replaced it.
    Images of Israelis bulldozing Palestinians houses & building Jewish settlements came to mind.

    Similar things have happened at Notre Dame, Georgetown, Catholic U., Fordham.

    YOUR Church is no longer yours to determine.

  70. @Durruti

    We (me and my alter ego), witnessed the decline of education (and most everything else), in the United States of America.

    I’ve noticed that as well and just the other day I remarked that most things written after about 1950 or so are not even worth considering. It’s particularly striking when spending time in a library or an online equivalent such as Mr Unz’s other fabulous site, UNZ.org. where I can can spend hours and days.

    Prior to WW2 we had the likes of Mencken and Nock, but they are no more. The stuff written by the ancients and even our own American “founder” types is far superior to the bulk of what’s produced today.

    Education slowly declined, after World War II…

    Many have made the very valid case never really was intended as education, but mere schooling.

    • Replies: @Durruti
    , @Authenticjazzman
  71. @imbroglio

    I’ve been around academia for a long time and I can count on the thumbs of my two hands the number of faculty who are genuinely devoted to the life of the mind.

    Welcome aboard!

    I can, and have, said the same about the so called “professionals” I’ve spent most of my adult life interacting with. Nary a one could be properly called educated.

  72. res says:
    @Anon

    3. These are not examples of authoritarianism. Again, if you don’t know what a word means, just say so. I’m happy to explain to you.

    How about the actions of Obama’s DoJ in sanctioning the Ferguson PD? Is that authoritarian enough for you? If not, how about you do explain what that word means to you?

    • Replies: @Anon
  73. @Anon

    Words have consequences. What’s wrong with that? Would you rather a world in which people could say terrible things and there not be social consequences?

    Yes. Frankly, the notion of there should be severe consequences for beliefs and words is entirely at odds with any sanity at all.

    Let’s simply edit this to its obvious result. Political opinions have consequences. What’s wrong with that? Would you rather a world in which people could have terrible political opinions and not have consequences?

    Or even:

    Religious beliefs have consequences. What’s wrong with that? Would you rather a world in which people could have terrible religious beliefs and not have consequences?

    Of course, the Left is already trending toward the latter on the second. Very open-minded, very accepting, indeed!

    Historically, many and perhaps most forms of censorship and suppression were not enforced with government fiat but rather through economic and social consequences.

    You’re joking, right? Did you see the violence meted out to Occupy Wall Street protests?

    Do you see the violence committed by anti-Trump individuals and the lack of punishment going their way? I repeat and maintain that far more resources have been put into even hoaxes of “hate crimes” than against actual instances of violence committed by the Left.

    That isn’t an argument.

    Ignorance is not a defense.

    You’d have to prove that, or at least provide some hint of evidence.

    Some hint of evidence.

    https://www.unz.com/jman/the-behavioral-genetics-page/

    Certainly, but then again, no one is making such a request.

    Essentially, you’re saying, “I should be able to shout the N-word on a street corner and pay no consequences.” Please correct me if I’m wrong.

    That is exactly the request that is being made by the Left. Regardless if this was the original intention or not, the trends toward extremism are clear. Given such, we even mildly on the Right can do nothing except to defend ourselves.

    The answer to your question is yes. If I can, and have been, punished for daring to voice “I think traditional gender roles can be beneficial” then I gain a sudden interest in protecting the freedom of speech for individuals speaking racial slurs.

    Objectively, racists have made comments about my driving, in an ultimately harmless manner. “Non-racists” have attempted to destroy my livelihood and family for voicing an opinion that did not agree with them. Needless to say, this has given me a vested interest in seeing that “racists” are protected.

    You’re a Leftist. You presume to be open-minded. Well, realize that this is where my position will remain and if your reaction is essentially – that the world should cause me harm for having these beliefs, then you’ll see how we should logically, refute this.

  74. MarkinLA says:
    @Anon

    Did you see the victim classes ranting at every white on campus the day after the election?

    Do you think they would continue to “hate whitey” if they knew for sure that whitey agreed?

    You mean if whitey just accepted blame for everything, including their lack of academic success? There is no way to placate their hatred of whitey.

    • Replies: @Anon
  75. MarkinLA says:
    @Anon

    Words have consequences. What’s wrong with that? Would you rather a world in which people could say terrible things and there not be social consequences?

    Hell yes. Words don’t mean a damn thing. Debate them.

    You’re joking, right? Did you see the violence meted out to Occupy Wall Street protests?

    They weren’t just “protesting”. They were damaging property and crapping and pissing in the streets.

    Essentially, you’re saying, “I should be able to shout the N-word on a street corner and pay no consequences.” Please correct me if I’m wrong.

    Another straw man. Remember that web page that put out people’s personal information for somebody supposedly posting some alleged thought-crime? He wanted everybody to flood their employer and get them fired. Remember that idiot black diversicrat female that tried to make an issue out of those two programmers at that convention that got one of them fired. Thankfully, the programmer community managed to get her fired.

    http://www.blackenterprise.com/technology/adria-richards-fired-sexist-jokes-tech-conference/

    • Replies: @Anon
  76. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @res

    Well, for one the IQ by nation don’t correct for things like nutrition, which has an obvious impact. Moreover, the list includes South Korea near the very top. Why do you suppose that is? Do you think that would have been the case in 1935? Why or why not?

    What else? I used to teach SAT prep. Give me a chimp and enough #2 pencils and I’ll get that monkey a perfect score. Standardized tests don’t measure anything except how well one takes a standardized test, and that’s a very trainable skill.

    Finally, suppose that 60 to 100% of IQ is due to genes. Given what we know about epigenetics and processes such as methylation, what would make those factors alterable? Smog? Poor nutrition? Leaded gasoline and lead paint in homes? None of that addresses class, which is the single strongest correlate but most researchers correct for that now.

    Start considering those questions and you’ll be closer to the right answer.

    • Replies: @res
    , @Stealth
  77. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @MarkinLA

    Your insistence on being obtuse is tiresome.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    , @res
  78. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @res

    What’s authoritarian about the Obama AG and the Ferguson PD. It had no real policy implications, did it?

    • Replies: @res
  79. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @MarkinLA

    In at least two incidents at OWS events, people who posed no threat and were lawful were sprayed with mace. There’s video.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
  80. @Daniel Chieh

    I think you need to modify some of your positions by way of thinking through some imagined but not unrealistically unlikely cases.

    E.g. Your tennis club has recently begun admitting some black people for the first time. Some of the old members frequently and in the hearing of the new members say that the club has been changed for the worse by “the Niggers” and that noore should be admitted. To me that would be a case for at most two strikes (warnings) and you’re out.

    E.g. one of your sons says nasty things about gays to another son who is gay and his lesbian aunt at family dinnerz. So you tell him to stay away if the initial trial of being alcohol free doesn’t work.

    E.g. Actionable defamation.

    Not that my sympathies do not rest with the spirit of your arguments.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  81. MarkinLA says:
    @Anon

    Your insistence on living in your made up bubble world is tiresome. My guess is that you have never been within 10 miles of the average minority community to know how many of them really feel about whitey.

    • Replies: @Anon
  82. res says:
    @Anon

    Waiting for your concrete data… (but not foolish enough to hold my breath)
    I’ll also note that you only asked for evidence that IQ differed, not for the whys.
    Regarding class as a confounder, take another look at that Steve Sailer link I provided.

    Perhaps you could enlighten us as to the “right answer”?

    BTW, repeatedly asking for evidence/data/etc. and then
    1. Not engaging with the data when presented.
    2. Not providing data of your own.
    Is a great example of what I consider arguing in bad faith. An all too common occurrence in the comments here.

    • Replies: @Anon
  83. res says:
    @Anon

    LOL! Thanks for the excellent example of projection. I enjoyed the chuckle.

  84. Durruti says:
    @jacques sheete

    Nice comments.

    I place them in this order.

    “The stuff written by the ancients and even our own American “founder” types is far superior to the bulk of what’s produced today.” Jefferson, Paine, Franklin, Madison, Henry, the Adams, etc., – do I need a verb? In America the Founders were a group of revolutionary thinkers, often self-educated (are not we all?), who are completely censored/denigrated by the Foreign and domestic Zionist Oligarchs who exercise such a dictatorship over us.

    Ron Paul talks about Liberty, and it is difficult even for his admirers to internalize (truly understand its import).

    “Many have made the very valid case never really was intended as education, but mere schooling.” It is clear that “mere schooling” would be a huge improvement over the thorough brainwashing and outright destruction of the next Generation’s minds, humanity, environment, and Freedoms that is being accomplished by the Power Elite.

    Stiff upper lip.

    Respect All, Bow to None!

  85. @Anon

    Don’t you think there are a priori reasons for expecting to find substantial differences in average IQ (and maybe the sds but leave that complication aside) between different intrabreeding extended families (aka “races” so you can choose to say Igbo and Yoruba and Luo and Kalenjin are different races)?

    We know that natural selection has produced remarkable differences as between such “races” in characteristics that depend on many genes. We know that selection, partly natural and also quasi natural (e.g. you get fed and get mated if you are good at rounding up sheep) applies to animals such as dogs so as to make changes over the generations to their brains.

    So why wouldn’t survival of originally black people from Africa in Ice Age Eurasia have selected for mental characteristics? We know a bit about the low numbers they were reduced to. Then consider specific countriies and their social systems. As Greg Clark’s work has shown, class was critical in the UK. But in India how could there not be different selective pressures relevant to intelligence as between Brahmins (say) and Dalits whose ancestors have removed the “night soil” for 1000 years? (And when you come across an Untouchable diplomat, professor or president of India wouldn’t you expect to find in his DNA evidence that a pretty ancrstress attracted the eye of a randy Brahmin?

    • Replies: @Anon
  86. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @MarkinLA

    I live in one of the largest cities in the US. I teach minority students, mostly black.

  87. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @res

    I did engage the data. From all three links. Try to keep up.

    • Disagree: res
    • LOL: res
    • Troll: res, Daniel Chieh
  88. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    It might have selected for intelligence. I never suggested that it didn’t. The problem is that it selected for increased intelligence. Intelligence is selected for in environments in which being smart is advantageous to survival. Sub-Saharan Africa is a place where intelligence is needed for survival because cultivable crops and herdable livestock are scarce. This is not to say that sub-Saharan Africa selected for intelligence either one way or the other.

    Some events clearly did select for intelligence. Slavery probably selected downward to some extent, but that would leave it necessary to explain the underachievement in IQ of some Africans (in, e.g., Equatorial Guinea, per Lynn and Hakkonen) or the overachievement of others (our familiar Igbo, who are a highly successful ethnic group on a socioeconomic level, particularly as migrants).

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  89. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Your link provides no evidence that beliefs are genetically determined.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
    , @Daniel Chieh
  90. MarkinLA says:
    @Anon

    Is this your answer, that sometimes the authorities screw up or don’t hit the right people in a riot? Really? So there was no property damage by anybody from OWS? When they tell you to disburse, you do so and before the cops get there if you don’t want to take a chance on getting hit or maybe you never thought about that.

    Ever been to a riot just getting started. Well once I was. There was a music/cultural celebration in LA and somebody spread the rumor that the Ramones were going to give a free concert. Unfortunately, the city and police allowed the sale of alcohol. Once drunk and high morons started throwing garbage cans and lighting fires I knew it was time to go. On my way down the hill I saw the LAPD marching up in riot gear. A lot of people probably were unfairly hit but it was well after the police told everybody to leave the area and they had plenty of time to leave. Lots of people complained to the LA Times about police brutality and the rest of the usual complaints. However a lot of people there were calling into the local alternate radio station with the real story that it wasn’t the police that caused all the problems.

    • Replies: @Anon
  91. @CanSpeccy

    Horrible examples indeed. I trust that Australia is still well behind Canada in such leftist pieties. I remember joking naughtily with Australian judges 20 years ago who had assembled courteously but sceptically to hear a senior Canadian female judge lecture them on the importance of diversity on the bench. I think the natural progression of bright women lawyers since the 1960s has probably taken the fervour out of actual and potential campaigners. I hope I am right too that none of Australia’s top eight universities would act Canadian today. The source of differences between Australia and Canada remain an interesting question. I wonder if Australian-Irish, once very Catholic and undereducated provided an irreverent streak of opposition to the leftish PC?
    BTW the unpleasantness directed towards our very amiable and readable leading historian, Geoffrey Blainey in the mid 80s which led him to retire prematurely from his Melbourne University chair is one of Australia’s black marks that frankness demands one acknowledge. But it never caused him to apologise for anything or to cease gathering well deserved honours and acknowledgment.

  92. Alden says:
    @MarkinLA

    Tolstoy did not mean the military did nothing. He meant they all the training, drill, care of armaments,, maintained and housekeeping at an army base was not productive and useful work. It was just busy work.

  93. @Daniel Chieh

    Essentially, you’re saying, “I should be able to shout the N-word on a street corner and pay no consequences.” Please correct me if I’m wrong.

    N-word as in Nazi?

    Why is it OK for AIPAC to place the flag of Israel in the blue-field of the US Stars and Stripes, as the organization does at AIPAC conferences; and it’s OK for many Jewish authors to produce anti-German books with the swastika on the book cover, but it is a “hate crime” to fly the Hakenkreuz in your own home?

    If Israelis wish to impose that rule in Israel, that’s their prerogative. Neither Israelis, nor Jews, nor any minority group should have the right to impose such a taboo in the USA, that bastion of multiculturalism.

    Confederate flag is a different matter: it should not be banned, but whether it is or not is properly a matter for the people of USA to decide.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @joe webb
  94. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @MarkinLA

    Wow, that’s a great story.

  95. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @imbroglio

    I’ve been around academia for a long time and I can count on the thumbs of my two hands the number of faculty who are genuinely devoted to the life of the mind.

    The problem is with today’s academics is the pay. It’s too high.

    During the early post-war era in Britain, university faculty were paid very low salaries. My first job after graduation with a PhD (which was outside the academy) paid twice what an assistant lecturer (assistant professor) earned. As result, British universities of the time were largely staffed by those who were in some degree genuinely devoted to the life of the mind, for the life of the mind was pretty much all that a university career offered. Some of my teachers, in fact, conformed very closely in character to H.L. Mencken’s description of a good school teacher: “a crackpot who thinks that spelling really matters.”

  96. Maxwell says:

    The intellectual class is a bunch of well paid brownnose bootlickers, who only adopt not-completely-right wing ideologies (liberalism) because they don’t just want the money and the power but also to feel good about themselves. Scum, all of them. They have a lot of power, they could, with a well organised strike, change the thinking on all the largest issues. But they don’t. They won’t. Because they work for the criminals. They work for and are paid by the ruling class and they absolutely refuse to even begin to understand what their “morally neutral” work is used for. They would never ever apply the Nuremberg principles to themselves. After all, how should they know how their work is going to be used? There’re so many ways bunker busters or GMOs or robots or personnel management systems or whatever can be used! It’s completely unpredictable! They’re just doing their jobs! And, hey, if a drone, developed by the best engineers and scientists and programmers is used to murder people halfway across the world, or if industrial agricultural technologies are used to impoverish third world farmers, or if a piece of software is used to collect data for advertisers, it’s not their fault! How could they have known! I mean, Luddites did understand this two hundred years ago, but people trained in super rich top-notch universities? Nahh. Impossible. The “moral neutrality” ideology is just so convincing…if you’re paid well enough.

    The after-the-fact rationalisations they come up with are weak and transparent and stupid, and people (the “sheeple” that liberals love to look down on) can sense that, even if they don’t have proper arguments and perspectives – thanks mostly *exactly* to the intellectuals that work primarily to confuse and manipulate them.

    How many engineers have left their work at weapon factories? How many programmers have spoken out against using their work to deskill and disempower workers and centralise control to management? How many psychologists have protested advertising and refined propaganda? How many scientists who work on GMOs consider their effect on agriculture (and afaik, this is probably the area where you’ll see a few actual exceptions). The list is pretty much endless. Intellectuals, including the most respected and definitely the most well paid ones are some of the strongest pillars of empire and imperialism, white supremacism and mass murder and destruction.

    Call me when professors, scientists, engineers and other intellectuals go on a strike against unjust wars that murder millions (instead of indirectly justifying them by calling them “mistakes”), or to raise awareness against AGW, or when fcking scientists and engineers refuse to work on weapons or GMOs or robotics or propaganda. Call me when they stop speaking for power, when they stop lying to the world, and themselves, about what the situation is and what needs to be done. Call me when they come out against poverty and for equality and stop wallowing in their upper-middle-class privilege. Of course people have disdain for intellectuals. They are despicable. Art (big money art, and all mass produced culture) is pretty much the same, or worse.

    • Agree: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  97. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Anon

    Your link provides no evidence that beliefs are genetically determined.

    Here’s a link that does:

    Scott Adams: The scariest thing you will see today.

  98. @Anon

    Your insistence on being obtuse is tiresome.

  99. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @SolontoCroesus

    By the way it’s completely legal to fly a swastika flag here, but good luck getting pizza delivery.

  100. @Wizard of Oz

    The issue is that if sanctions against thought crimes are real and widespread throughout society, then the very thought is effectively banned. This is exceptionally harmful and given the tendency toward escalation, will basically result in an ever-narrowing Overton window.

    Its one thing to attempt to control speech or even thought in the context of a club or the family dinner; to extent it to general society at large is a dangerous precedent that should be resisted as much as possible.

  101. res says:
    @Anon

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/11/us/politics/justice-department-sues-ferguson-over-police-deal.html

    The federal and local authorities had spent months negotiating a settlement that would have prohibited police officers from making arrests without probable cause, installed a federal monitor and barred officers from using stun guns as punishment.

    Even attempted coercion is authoritarian. Particularly note: “installed a federal monitor”

  102. uslabor says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    Surprise, a patronizing ad hominem attack.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  103. @Anon

    Allow me to flavour my small but serious point with anecdote.. when I first paid a return visit to Sri Lanka after many decades about 12 years ago i had my sandals repaired very quickly and competently at a lical shop on the equatorial south coast.. When I said so the locally based Brit who was showing me round he said “Oh,probably Tamils, or maybe Muslims”. The local majority Sinhalese are, by contrast or at least comparison, notoriously lazy. And it is easy to see why. The fish almost leap into their nets to the point where they often have a surplus to market requirements. There are coconuts and a great variety of tropical fruits for the easy picking. They never need to heat their houses. So….

    My picture of equatorial tropical West Africa is one where females could easily feed the family and the males comparative breeding sdvantage was in being fast, strong and aggressive. Maybe finding their way to Sri Lanka over a few dozen generations would modify those characteristics somewhat but they haven’t had that experience or needed to change.

  104. uslabor says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    We all project at some time or another, including you. You simply want to live among your own, well I don’t know who your own are but if that means whites only, tough luck. It ain’t gonna happen, “my friend”.

  105. uslabor says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    I don’t know what you read, Danny Boy, but I never said “the Left ALWAYS provides us with the wonderful option of submission or death.”

    If you you want to choose submission, be my guest, have fun.

  106. Nostalgic for the good old times, where Leftist trolls were not totally retarded.

    Anon saying that right-wing people hate minorities, that you are able to have the opinion you want…as long as it is a leftist opinion. Stalin would have agreed with this one so much…

    Yawn. I think you waste your time answering him. Let him troll so people know how (brain-dead) leftist people really think when they are not BSing with things like tolerance, democracy, etc. If they could, they would reprogram us with their retarded ideas.

    As far as I’m concerned, being an European man, I cannot wait for the Muslims to take over and start giving progressives the multiculturalism they have fought so hard for. They are in for a big surprise. Look at Sweden, rape capital of Europe and, according to United Nations, doomed to be a Third-World country by 2030.

    Imagine how Muslims will treat gays, atheists and feminists (don’t have to imagine, just look at any Muslim country). I will grow a beard and laugh my ass off. He who laughs last laughs best.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  107. @Maxwell

    Kudos for sheer passion, my good man.

  108. @uslabor

    Indeed it wasn’t a decently respectful reply – even the typos were many and uncorrected. But I couldn’t bring myself to be solemn about the huge gaps in your picture of the world. My reaction was John McEnroe’s “you can’t be serious!” but I wanted to add something not merely ad hominem to suggest why I had that reaction and give you pause for thought.

  109. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anon

    First, individuals have the right to say what they like. They don’t have the right not to suffer social, political, and economic consequences.

    I agree entirely. In the good old Stalinist days in the Soviet Union people had the right to express any opinion they wanted to. Of course they’d end up spending a couple of decades in a forced labour camp when they did so, but you have to be prepared to suffer a few social, political, and economic consequences.

    And under the Nazis there was complete freedom of speech. You exercised your freedom of speech and a nice man from the Gestapo would come around at three o’clock in the morning to explain the social, political, and economic consequences to you.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @jacques sheete
  110. @Sparkon

    What is wrong with people paying tuition to attend college?

    • Replies: @Sparkon
  111. @Eustace Tilley (not)

    Right. I’ll guess there are many more unz commenters and readers who would understand some Spanish, German, or French, or even Russian, than would understand any Japanese whatsoever.

    Nothing against Japanese, just being realistic.

  112. Two problems: outside of the STEM fields, the tenured academics almost certainly agreed in a mild way with what was happening. Why would they have destroyed their careers to defy a stronger form of what they agreed with?

    Secondly, talk about sacrifice all you want, but why would an academic nowadays destroy his career in the faint hope of saving a department in which three-quarters of his colleagues and all of the administration oppose his views (if only they knew them?). Wouldn’t his odds be about the same as those of winning a state lottery? But the ticket would be much, much more costly.

    Better to work on some other, more insidious approach, or recognize that the best of Western Culture is too good for the academy and should not be exposed to it.

  113. @Anon

    Where were the nonleft perpetrators of street violence during the latest presidential campaign? Does it honestly seem to you that the phenomenon of street violence and politically directed physical intimidation and threats in the current USA is NOT predominantly committed by leftists?

    • Replies: @Anon
  114. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @dfordoom

    Do you really not understand that legal consequences are different?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  115. @Anon

    To the extent that reparations come from fed income tax revenue, they would be paid very disproportionately by white and Asian people.

    Most African Americans do not earn enough income to pay net federal income tax.
    Most white and Asian Americans do.

    When one takes into account the Orwellian mis-named “refundable earned income tax credit”, millions of African Americans get free money beyond what they paid in fed income tax. For those folks, the eitc giveaway partially or fully offsets what little they pay in fed taxes other than the fed income tax, such as FICA (social security tax) and Medicare.

    So it’s not difficult to have whites pay the bulk of reparations through fed taxes and blacks pay comparatively very little, both in absolute terms and per capita.

    Another reason to oppose that proposed theft.

  116. Stealth says:
    @Anon

    What else? I used to teach SAT prep. Give me a chimp and enough #2 pencils and I’ll get that monkey a perfect score. Standardized tests don’t measure anything except how well one takes a standardized test, and that’s a very trainable skill.

    Troll. Give me a mfing break. SAT coach or not (I suspect not), you’re a liar.

    • Replies: @Anon
  117. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @RadicalCenter

    Yes, that’s precisely what I’m saying.

  118. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Stealth

    Why would I lie to you? I’ve got a wife at home to lie to.

    Any SAT coach worth his salt can raise a student’s score by 100 points at a minimum. Ask around. If you think that means the kids become smarter as a result, then I’ve got some bad news for you.

    Or just think of it the other way around. People wouldn’t pay for SAT coaching if it didn’t work, right? How do you suppose coaching raises scores? By teaching math and vocabulary or by teaching test taking?

  119. @Anon

    Sure, I was a SAT tutor too, in both of the major companies that provide it. You can game the test, but only to an extent. You can increase a student’s score by a hundred, but the notion that you can get a monkey to a perfect score is laughable at best. I was paid pretty damn good money to give a number of classes for quite a few students over the years, and I assure you, there was absolutely no way that I could have gotten all of them to the 90% percentile, no matter what I did.

    If you really are a teacher, you would know that in any class – or tutoring subject – that how far you could push someone and what you could reasonably expect. You take them to the best of their ability. That’s the reality of it.

    At this point, I suspect you’re just being a sophisticated troll. The fact that some things are bendable, does not mean that they cease to exist. There are plenty of reasons.

    I got a perfect score myself. Would someone else have received it if he or she put in the same effort and time? Probably. But part of hereditary influence is the fact that they probably wouldn’t want to put in the same effort.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  120. @Anon

    The simple fact is that it is immaterial whether it is a de jure or de facto punishment. The very existence of the de facto consequence for wrongthink makes it so that actual freedom of speech and thought is impossible.

    If you have any desire to actually engage in a meaningful conversation, you should see how this is easily a problem.

    If there were no legal consequences for being Catholic, for example, but there were enormous economic, social and political consequences – then that would be discriminatory as well. The fact that there is not a law to punish it doesn’t make it any less forbidding.

    • Replies: @Anon
  121. @Anon

    Oh, and I don’t know what outfit you were with, but no test-taking company worth its salt doesn’t teach actual math and vocabulary skills as well. I can go over to my old Kaplan stuff right now and pull out the drill questions; and Kaplan certainly didn’t pay me to go stand in front of students every Saturday merely to how to eliminate and guess at answers.

    I’m not calling you a liar, but some of your suggestions bewilder the imagination.

    Were test taking strategies part of the lesson plan? Absolutely. Do they, by themselves, get someone to a perfect score if the individual wasn’t already an extremely high scorer? Of course not.

    • Replies: @Anon
  122. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anon

    Beliefs aren’t immutable characteristics.

    Agreed. That’s what re-education camps are for!

  123. Stealth says:
    @Anon

    I’m sure SAT coaching can produce marginal improvements, but in your post you stated that a coached individual can get a PERFECT score. While that might be an intentionally hyperbolic claim, it strongly implies that you’re talking about a greater than 100 point difference.

    • Replies: @Anon
  124. dfordoom says: • Website
    @imnobody00

    As far as I’m concerned, being an European man, I cannot wait for the Muslims to take over and start giving progressives the multiculturalism they have fought so hard for. They are in for a big surprise. Look at Sweden, rape capital of Europe and, according to United Nations, doomed to be a Third-World country by 2030.

    Imagine how Muslims will treat gays, atheists and feminists

    I’m also looking forward to observing Sweden’s glorious multicultural future. Couldn’t happen to a nicer bunch of sanctimonious bores.

  125. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anon

    The really funny thing is that Political Correctness is a right-wing ideology. It’s promoted by capitalists to keep the working class divided. If you were an actual Leftist you’d realise that it’s a con.

  126. joe webb says:
    @Albert Hazread

    Reich was a bit nutty…his pyramids, his function of the orgasm, etc. Armoring was taken up by the Body workers, new age folks. This is probably way overrated. Mass Psychology of Fascism can be read for fun.

    He was fundamentally a freudo nut case. Fundamental is genetics, behavioral genetics, Identical Twins separated at birth, etc. studies. biology, biology, biology.

    Reich was a man of his times, and so on. The emotional plague is the Do-Gooding nuttiness of Whites…we luv everybody.

    Joe Webb

  127. Sparkon says:
    @RadicalCenter

    I don’t know, but what’s wrong with giving a free ride to our brightest students? Isn’t that how a meritocracy might operate?

    Before Gov. Reagan, California provided strong incentive to HS students by providing free tuition to the UC system to the top tier of graduating seniors. The top 45% were eligible for a free ride to the Cal State system, and just about anyone else could get into a JC, or community college. There was further aid available, as well, for grad students, who could get welfare and food stamps under certain circumstances I believe. All of these freebies infuriated the near-sighted Mr. McGoo, I mean Reagan, who saw the excesses of a few students as a reflection on the entire student body, and colleges, in general.

    Today, many college graduates in the U.S. are burdened with large debts from student loans: over $100,000, and even more in some cases, and the quality of the education they are getting is questionable.

    Correlation is not necessarily causation, and of course there are any number of other variables in the equation, but don’t you find it at least a little bit curious that, as the cost of education increased, the quality of education declined?

  128. Eagle Eye says:
    @Eustace Tilley (not)

    You should be aware that the Japanese writing system has evolved side-by-side with the Japanese language over 1500 years. One would expect the version written in Japanese to contain information not apparent from a Romanized version.

    If somebody happened to have thought of a poignant line in French, should it have been written phonetically to avoid harmful strain to the slothful minds of rubes? “Poor ancoorahjah layz ohtre“? Or in authentic French: “Pour encourager les autres“?

  129. JackOH says:
    @imbroglio

    “I’ve been around academia for a long time and I can count on the thumbs of my two hands the number of faculty who are genuinely devoted to the life of the mind.”

    Yep. I’ve known two professors who seemed to me to embody scholarliness, one of them a third generation professor whose Mom collected objets d’art, Dad wrote books, all that. Both ran afoul of the academic gamesmen who run our local state university. Most of the profs, I think, are decent sorts who’ve made their compromises with a less selective student body and a truly malignant administration for the sake of a steady paycheck.

    The academic gamesmen I’ve met are pretty nightmarish–arrogant, prickly, kiss-up/kick-down sorts. It took me a while to figure they were riding on the declining capital of their dissertation, the show value of the Ph. D. honorific, and that their real skills were in organizational politicking.

  130. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    I taught for Princeton Review, and our primary strategy was on test taking, not math or vocabulary. Vocabulary was very important for improving verbal scores, undoubtedly, but a student with very rudimentary math schools can improve enormously.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  131. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Stealth

    The lower the initial score, the greater the room for improvement. Low scorers (<500 per section) routinely improved by 100 points or more.

  132. tjm says:
    @Astuteobservor II

    “One race”, bull shit, they are scared of Jews, Latinos, women…

    They are afraid because they are not supported by the school.

    Deans know where the money comes from, rich Jews, and rich Jews are the ones pushing this PC crap upon our society.

  133. @jacques sheete

    ” The stuff written by the ancients and even our own American “founder” types is far superior to the bulk of what’s produced today”.

    Amen, when perusing the “Letters” of our “Founder types”, and each time marveling at the magnificent manner of expresion, the otherworldly vocabulary, one must wonder what actually happened in the last two hundred years to cause such a decline in sophistication and horizon of our otherwise wonderful lingo : English.

    Of course ” what actually happened” is obvious : Unqualified, unread, hundred word vocabulary nitwits standing at the head of classrooms and spewing hatred and acrimony and politicizing ( to the left) every single theme, instead of trying to instill a love of poetic expression and quest for decency in their students.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” society member of forty-plus years and pro jazz artist.

    • Agree: jacques sheete
  134. ” Expression” not “Expresion”.

    Mensa testing did not require proficiency in typing and spelling, and of course everyone knows that English, despite all of it’s wonderful attributes, is not a “Phonetic” lingo, meaning someone can commit zillions of errors simply because all of English spelling is based upon memorization and not on consistant error-free pronunciation such as in Italian or German.
    It is next to impossible to make a spelling mistake in these “Phonetic” languages, whereas in English for example the word Guitar should be, according to it’s spelling be pronounced in a phonetic sense as “Gooey-tar”.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” society member since 1973, and pro jazz artist.

  135. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Daniel Chieh

    You can game the test, but only to an extent. You can increase a student’s score by a hundred, but the notion that you can get a monkey to a perfect score is laughable at best.

    So we have here two experienced SAT test coaches who agree that it’s possible to take a 16- or 17-year old of limited mathematical competence and raise their SAT score by 100 points by a few hours of coaching.

    Now take a child of similar innate ability at the age of five, or better yet, three, and coach them through the entire math curriculum up to, say, fourth-year honors math by the age of 16 and what will they score on the SAT math test then? Eight hundred?

    So much for IQ tests measuring innate potential! But they do a good job of rationalizing the socio-economic advantage of the privately schooled children of the socio-economically advantaged.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Daniel Chieh
  136. @dfordoom

    While your points are valid, there is no need to recruit either the Soviet Union or the Nazis as examples.

    Similar things happened in the US. Just ask any war protester in general, or issei, nisei, sansei and others who were as little as 1/16 Japanese.

  137. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @CanSpeccy

    The good news about the definitely not wimpy Professor John McAdams, booted from Marquette University for his advocacy of free speech, is that he is to receive the Jeane Kirkpatrick Patrick Academic Freedom Award for his “outspoken criticism of political correctness on college campuses.”

  138. @Anon

    I worked for Princeton too, it is the other outfit I mentioned.

    The truth is, too, I can’t tell you for certain if the story we have of students improving from a low base by such an extent is absolutely honest. Its very plausible. Its a story we share all the time in Kaplan and Princeton to parents, especially the 100 points to 500 scorers, but remember that we sponsor the data. We’re not disinterested parties. Its probably true, but we can’t ignore the fact that the outfits are marketing themselves to prospective clients. As you said, no one would use SAT coaches if it wasn’t effective. We must always market ourselves as effective.

    That said, certainly an individual with low scores can improve his or her score to an extent with test-taking strategies, but its only to an extent. But consider how low of a base we’re working from: take, for example, the Reading Comprehension “tip” to read the questions further and then scan the passages.

    Will that help someone who can barely get through the passages? Absolutely. Probably won’t help with inference questions, but it’ll nail at least some of the direct quote questions with a student who won’t even get through the passages otherwise. But such a student isn’t one who will ever get a 700+ on her Reading Comp.

    Will the same strategy help someone, for example, who’s already scoring well? Its debatable, even doubtful. I had my 800 in Reading Comp. I used absolutely none of the strategies, I simply memorized the entire passage; it was easy for me as a prolific reader and being somewhat gifted in that regard.

    I basically used none of the “test taking” strategies I would later teach – I did eliminate and guess on one math problem, which I missed(the curve knocked me back to 1600, but I consider it a shame to this day). Kaplan contacted me afterward since I had a perfect score, I never used their ideas otherwise.

    I don’t have my Princeton teaching guide handy, but I think the notion among teachers has always been: for low aptitude students, focus on test-taking strategies. Those are efforts to hack around weak basic skills. For high aptitude students, focus on problem areas such as specific knowledge, not test taking strategies.

    There’s no notion that we can guarantee in a certain percentile, no matter what we do. There are legal disclaimers against that.

    • Replies: @res
    , @Anon
  139. @CanSpeccy

    Incorrect. Cost of effort to results follow the law of diminishing marginal utility.

    Casual smell test would dismiss that conclusion: Asian immigrants are not socioeconomically privileged versus established elite, but score higher on the SAT and ACT.

    My family, for example, were nobility in China but in the US, the first generation were all lower-middle to middle class, so we had no socioeconomic privilege. Nonetheless, every single male in my extended family has an advanced degree. My brother scored off the charts at age 8 on Cornell-administered IQ tests(actual genius level IQ), and proceeded to ace everything academically and start successful businesses before self-destructing later in age from severe Asperger’s.

    The extremely high rate of academic/economic achievement coupled the unusually high prevalence of mental illness in my family is highly suggestive that it is not merely “socioeconomic” privilege, but something genetic.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  140. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    The simple fact is that it is immaterial whether it is a de jure or de facto punishment. The very existence of the de facto consequence for wrongthink makes it so that actual freedom of speech and thought is impossible.

    It is entirely material. Your freedom of speech involves your relationship to the government:”Congress shall make no law…” Not, “SJWs shall make no law, and not only because law making is a power that lies solely with Congress but also because your First Amendment rights don’t protect you from public or private condemnation. It protects you from government interference, full stop. The laws that prevent you from being criminally persecuted for your beliefs are all laws that apply to the offender and his conduct and not to you or your speech. The law assumes that the offender’s act is independent.

    So that’s not a small difference.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  141. res says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    I don’t have my Princeton teaching guide handy, but I think the notion among teachers has always been: for low aptitude students, focus on test-taking strategies. Those are efforts to hack around weak basic skills. For high aptitude students, focus on problem areas such as specific knowledge, not test taking strategies.

    Did you have any success identifying students who were most likely to improve on their earlier SAT results either before or after (e.g. I would expect substantial improvement in practice tests would be suggestive so before would be more interesting) the class? I can easily see there being an audience which would underachieve their potential absent additional test coaching and/or overall education.

    Being able to identify those most able to benefit would be an important value add for potential customers, but I’m guessing the possibility of decreasing the customer base makes it unlikely for the companies to do the necessary research.

    Do any coaching companies do non-SAT pretests (e.g. perhaps a Raven’s test would be helpful) to assess student potential? How did you identify low/high aptitude students in practice?

    Regarding high aptitude students, I expect most of those have well developed test taking skills already, but, for those that don’t, I would think coaching those skills is a potentially big win. In particular improving time management and instilling familiarity and confidence with the test environment. Filling in and refreshing necessary math skills also comes to mind.

    On a different note, what test taking (or studying) strategies did you use? The two I can think of for me were time management and using the answers to help find the solution (elimination, back solving, and suggestive characteristics of answers). Those are probably less relevant when looking at a perfect score. Did you do that pre or post 1995? One of my regrets is never getting the detailed information to tell me what I missed (that is/was possible, right?).

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Daniel Chieh
  142. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Sure, and as you know, Princeton Review won’t honor the guarantee if any classes are missed.

    I actually used PR to raise my GRE score, which I raised to 750/730/730 from a 700/510 SAT score (I went to college/grad school in the late 80s/early 90s). I mentioned that fact in my cover letter and got an audition, at which I taught how to rack for 8-ball.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  143. joe webb says:
    @SolontoCroesus

    of course you are correct but…let me suggest that you try ‘bait crime’…if you want to get martyred or expose yourself to Whatever.

    .I like Ernst Zundel’s insistence: I am not a neo-nazi, I am a nazi. Good for you Ernst.

    The problem with nazism is that it is utopian, although less so than communism. It also has the general fascism problem of, uh, elections. Since Whites are the only people to have invented elections in politics, they are not going to go for one-party Democratic Centralism (very Jewish ) nor are they going to go for National Emergencies that go on forever.

    Populism is the generally correct ism that fits the White genome. It is not tidy, not Made Flesh from any abstract theory. Populism is driven by an urge to Fairness and Mutuality. It is White.

    Elections are retained but for those who want blood, that too can be accommodated when dealing with Others. Others Out! They do not fit the genetic requirements of Populism….Whiteness, in a word. In other words, Burkeian for our times of Crazy Ideas and indiscriminate altruism.

    Joe Webb

  144. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Daniel Chieh

    Incorrect. Cost of effort to results follow the law of diminishing marginal utility.

    That has nothing to do with what I said.

    What you are saying is that someone who has gone through public or private schooling without much interest in math, could never have learnt math properly even if adequately motivated and coached.

    That is what I would assume to be “incorrect.’

    But either way:

    to say:

    Casual smell test would dismiss that conclusion

    is no argument.

    Also, you are wrong to assume that I deny innate ability.

    There is surely a vast difference between a Newton or a Clerk Maxwell (yes Europeans have the genes to do math too) and the average 800-SAT-scoring entrant to Harvard or CalTech.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  145. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @res

    POE and backsolving are big strategies that are used. Suggestive characteristics are part of POE.

    Personally, I taught during the 1990s.

  146. @Anon

    It remains immaterial, for the same reason why judges struck down literacy tests in polling stations as having disparate impact against blacks voting: because it was a de facto barrier of discrimination, even if it did not de jure mention anything about ethnicity.

    The problem with censorship is consequences of censorship, not the means of implementing said censorship. De facto censorship has the same speech and thought nullifying results, and therefore is harmful no matter what form it comes in.

    There’s really not a lot of complexity to it.

    • Replies: @Anon
  147. @Anon

    I’ll share this commonality with you: all of the degrees and accolades I got did absolutely nothing for me in the real world, beyond the tutoring job that I was doing while making $16/hr as a helpdesk agent. I even get to include my cute full scores in the SAT and GRE in my resume. Its in the last page. I doubt anyone ever looks at it.

    Kaplan and Princeton were making real money, on the other of $3000 per mark. I bet the poor parents thought we were making something that could actually support us.

    Hooray for the education bubble.

    Since then I’ve done really well for myself, but I’m hard pressed to think of any exact instance of how my skills acquired from academia have helped me. Excel? Maybe Excel.

    • Replies: @Anon
  148. @Diversity Heretic

    Agree. Only a small minority of college professors are there for the intellectual rigor and integrity of scholarship, or better yet, a love of teaching and educating young kids. The vast majority are there because of the ease and comfort of the job. They have found a comfortable place to excel in and are not keen on leaving it for the cold and tough world. Not exactly a courageous bunch who are out to set the world right. Leftover mediocrities like these are easily conquered. To expect them to lead the charge against aggressive and organized administrators with a well funded and cohesive plan, especially if they have to risk their livelihood in the process, is asking the impossible. To expect wimps like these to suddenly grow a backbone and do anything more than whimper quietly in complaint over the obvious stupidity of it all, or to expect wimps like these to actually engage in a fight over the the stupidity of it all is utterly ridiculous. Sadly, if these were the only wimps in the world, we would still be in awesome shape. Sadly, the world is full of wimps, which is why we are not.

  149. @res

    Did you have any success identifying students who were most likely to improve on their earlier SAT results either before or after.

    Yes. Every teacher can probably tell you – its the students who actually seem to want to try. As Anon mentioned, the agencies will not honor any guarantees if students miss classes. Students who really have no intention to improve, won’t. Students who want to improve, we can usually do something for.

    Being able to identify those most able to benefit would be an important value add for potential customers, but I’m guessing the possibility of decreasing the customer base makes it unlikely for the companies to do the necessary research.

    Its a business. Its to our benefit to assume that everyone can improve maximally. The very best contracts, which I was part of, is when they can convince a private school to host an entire weekend class. I never looked into the details of the monetary arrangement, but every indication was that Kaplan was getting seriously rich.

    Do any coaching companies do non-SAT pretests (e.g. perhaps a Raven’s test would be helpful) to assess student potential? How did you identify low/high aptitude students in practice?

    Regarding high aptitude students, I expect most of those have well developed test taking skills already, but, for those that don’t, I would think coaching those skills is a potentially big win. In particular improving time management and instilling familiarity and confidence with the test environment. Filling in and refreshing necessary math skills also comes to mind.

    Not that I know of, that would probably decrease the customer base.

    High aptitude students often have issues with time management – you sometimes see problem fixation; they’ll be stuck on a difficult problem and never move on. They often have specific weak spots, especially in mathematics, which they can improve on: matrices, mixture problems, trig, etc. Familiarity with the test format, as you mentioned, is also helpful but that’s something I imagine that any reasonable student would do. Just go to a used bookstore, and pick up some practice tests.

    Truth is, though, high aptitude students are going to have a pretty good base to work from. The success is often self-reinforcing. It feels good to do well, or like me, its painful to make any mistakes.

    On a different note, what test taking (or studying) strategies did you use? The two I can think of for me were time management and using the answers to help find the solution (elimination, back solving, and suggestive characteristics of answers). Those are probably less relevant when looking at a perfect score. Did you do that pre or post 1995? One of my regrets is never getting the detailed information to tell me what I missed (that is/was possible, right?).

    Pre-1995, analogies hooray. Its been a long time but I managed my time well. I did backsolve, but in an unusual manner. Typically I blew through the section, and would return to double-check questions by eliminating every alternative answer. I know which math question I missed, because it was the only one at the back of the section which I put two minutes into it, but could not solve.

    ETS, to my knowledge, does not provide a detailed breakdown on questions you missed.

    For all I know, I guessed wildly and correctly on that coordinate geometry problem and I missed something else. I’ll never know.

    • Replies: @res
  150. @CanSpeccy

    I’m not sure what your position is. If you’re arguing that coaching or environment has some effect, obviously I’m not going to disagree with you. Coaching, teaching, and the like certainly can contribute to test scores.

    What I meant by the law of diminishing utility is that coaching will only help so much, after which increased coaching does much less. By appropriately adjusting the environment, you can probably help someone get to the upper end of his potential, but its limited. 800 is not “competent” mathematical skills. Its the ability to assemble a significant number of concepts, flexibly apply them to a number of questions under a strong time limit, while avoiding answers designed intentionally to mislead.

    No amount of environmental influences will get kid to 800 if he doesn’t have the potential for it, and that potential includes innate interest, attention span, working memory, all of the things we probably call IQ. I’ve worked with a lot of the children of the elite.

    There are those who are clearly intent on success: one of them was the son of a medical doctor, who did not speak English as his first language. He nonetheless labored through vocabulary and scored in the 97% percentile.

    There are those who want to just do okay: I had a guy from a really rich family, great golfer, fun kid to be around. He wanted some help with his math and verbal, but ultimately just wanted to do enough to get into a specific college to collect on a golf scholarship. He hated essays. I managed to barely lift his essays to what he needed them to be, and that was that.

    And then there are those who really just don’t care. I had a number of children of Saudi descent from rich oil families. They don’t even know why they have tutoring, they would rather be driving around in glitz luxury cars. As far as they are concerned, its a punishment from their parents to force them into a classroom.

    All of them have parents who want their children to excel as maximally as possible. Many of them have had tutors their entire lives. Environment and coaching can only do so much. Being a member of the elite also increases the distractions they can bring upon themselves, as the Saudi kids clearly were capable of.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @CanSpeccy
  151. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Again, you are failing to make a distinction between what government does vs. what private citizens do.

    Let’s look at a few examples, OK?

    You say something dumb and are arrested or fined = Your First Amendment right has been violated

    You say something dumb and are shunned by society = Your First Amendment right doesn’t come into play

    You saw something dumb and someone punches you = Your First Amendment right hasn’t been violated, but the person who punched you has committed a crime

    Government imposes a reading requirement on a potential voter = The voter’s rights have been violated and government is to blame; case goes to court

    Person intimidates other person from voting in a non-criminal manner = No crime committed and no rights withheld

    Person intimidates other person from voting in criminal manner = Crime committed and rights withheld but not by government

    These are real distinctions if one believes that the government is separate from the people.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  152. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    PR was my first teaching job, and a year later, I started teaching college at St. John’s in Queens.

    I wasn’t on a teaching fellowship in grad school, so PR gave me classroom experience I badly needed. I’m grateful for that, but if I made more than $15 an hour, it was remarkable. I tutored privately for some time and maybe made $25 per hour, but I haven’t done it in a decade.

  153. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    I had SAT students ranging from “recent immigrants from USSR who could barely score 450 combined” to Upper East Side kiddies. Very broad range of abilities. To stay marginally on topic, the only minority kids I ever taught SATs to were kids whose parents could afford private tutoring, and they were always bright kids. I’ve been teaching in city environments for more than 20 years and can say that I’ve seen comparable ranges of ability in that time in all populations.

  154. @Anon

    The de facto source of it doesn’t really matter. Much of the voter intimidation during the Jim Crow era came from entities unaffiliated with the government and quite a bit of it was nonviolent; this was not seen as acceptable either.

    No matter how you spin it, the fact remains that by imposing “economic, social and political consequences” on people for having thoughts outside of the Overton Window, it serves to have an adverse effect on the action itself.

    The problem with censorship is censorship, not the source of the censorship.

    • Replies: @Anon
  155. res says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    Pre-1995

    Wow. Based on rarity that is seriously impressive. Well done.

  156. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    The de facto source of it doesn’t really matter. Much of the voter intimidation during the Jim Crow era came from entities unaffiliated with the government and quite a bit of it was nonviolent; this was not seen as acceptable either.

    The role of a government, even in a minimalist, Lockean sense, is that it protects you against the aggression of other citizens and foreign nations and that it settles disputes. A literacy test, which was your example, not to mention poll taxes, were ways of denying the vote to black voters that were undertaken by governments, in which cases the Supreme Court could rule (the former, not the latter) that a state government was violating voting rights.

    The other part of that equation was failure to protect citizens from aggression. At the very least, the displaying of a black mannequin with a noose around its neck with a sign on it saying “This N*gger Voted” is suggestive of intimidation, if protected by the First Amendment (as interpreted in [i]Brandenburg v. Ohio[/i]). In such situations, as with KKK marches, it is incumbent upon the government to provide protection proactively. Too often these governments (state, local, etc.) did not.

    No matter how you spin it, the fact remains that by imposing “economic, social and political consequences” on people for having thoughts outside of the Overton Window, it serves to have an adverse effect on the action itself.

    Of course. I’m not disputing that. What I am disputing is that there’s no difference between government doing it and private citizens doing it.

    The problem with censorship is censorship, not the source of the censorship.

    And according to many definitions, only government can “do” censorship. I tend to agree.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  157. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Daniel Chieh

    No amount of environmental influences will get kid to 800 if he doesn’t have the potential for it

    That is based on an implied a tautology: a kid needs potential to demonstrate potential, which is not a proof of anything.

    The contrast I made was between a few hours coaching by a SAT-test coach in a student’s 16 or 17th year, which so you say will boost his or her SAT Math score by 100 points, and competent one-on-one instruction combined with motivation from the age of five or earlier to the age of 16. I’ve witnessed what the latter will do.

    and that potential includes innate interest, attention span, working memory, all of the things we probably call IQ.

    No, what you call IQ is the result of an IQ test. The ability to do math, and even the ability to be a mathematical genius is not necessarily closely related to the result of an IQ test. Richard Feynman, undoubtedly a math genius, is reputed to have had an IQ of only 123, reflecting his low score in all non-mathematical subjects at entry to graduate school at Princeton University.

    Or there is this from Time magazine:

    Motivation, Not IQ, Matters Most for Learning New Math Skills

    And before you tell me that that doesn’t pass the smell test or you offer another unsubstantiated generalization, remember you said the same thing yourself, about yourself, somewhere up this thread!

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  158. @Anon

    In such situations, as with KKK marches, it is incumbent upon the government to provide protection proactively. Too often these governments (state, local, etc.) did not.

    But furthermore, intimidation was also done through implicit denial of employment through sharecropping arrangements: a kind of economic coercion that liberals employ extensively now and is considered as normalized. Less normalized, but still practiced are direct threats: look at all of the threats against Trump, and the very real sense of fear from physical violence that many Trump supporters, including myself have.

    You have to be willfully blind not to see how bad the situation is. I’m not blaming any one person in particular, but the groupthink of the left, due to a sense of basically religious fervor, has radicalized into something very dangerous. Their religion is the Cult of Progress, they despise heretics who prevent their presumed Age of Aquarius, and many of them are in near frenzy to finding sinful wretched Inequality against them.

    I mentioned this before, and is worth repeating: I wouldn’t naturally make common cause with ‘racists.” It wouldn’t be in my self-interest. Heck, I used to go to Stormfront to laugh at them.

    But when I’m tarred with the same brush of “deplorable” for not towing the liberal line and for having heartfelt disagreements, then I suddenly am very interested in enabling deplorables. They do a lot less harm to me and my family. In contrast, they are reasonable people.

    I can live in a world where an extreme right has triumphed. I can’t live in the a world of the extreme left. So “changing my beliefs” is impossible. I’ll gladly die to people who may hate me, but for a sincere and genuine hate that is based out of the notion of order. Order is beautiful, precious and to which I shall gladly sacrifice myself to. But I won’t live in a world where identity is self-determined, where chaos is cherished, and ugliness is forced upon me.

    No. Just no.

    And according to many definitions, only government can “do” censorship. I tend to agree.

    Arguing about the exact definition of words is anal and pointless. You get what I mean. This is not a good situation, and it should not be continued.

    • Replies: @Anon
  159. CCZ says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    Here is some current and future “intellectual rigor.”

    Clemson Doctoral Student Produces Rap Album For Dissertation; It Goes Viral

    Clemson University, Media Release
    Ken Scar, Media Relations
    February 21, 2017

    Clemson University doctoral student A.D. Carson is many things — poet, activist, and rap artist to name a few — but “typical Ph.D. candidate” is not one of them. So when it came to writing a dissertation, he couldn’t simply write a traditional one. Instead, he produced a 34-song rap album that already has the internet buzzing.

    The album, “Owning My Masters: The Rhetorics of Rhymes and Revolutions” uses hip-hop to explore such ideas as identity, justice, economics, citizenship and language. The songs have garnered tens of thousands of views on YouTube, more than 50,000 streams and downloads on SoundCloud and hundreds of thousands of hits on Facebook.,

    Using a music album for a dissertation, as opposed to the usual written document, has never been done at Clemson before, but Carson says it was the only way he could do it.

    At Clemson, Carson discovered that one of his professors, Chenjerai Kumanyika, just happened to be a former hip-hop musician with a Ph.D. in mass communication. Before he became an assistant professor at Clemson, Kumanyika was in the hip-hop group “The Spooks,” which had several gold and platinum records in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

    Kumanyika became a mentor to Carson and provided literature and insight on theory and methodology that informed his dissertation.

  160. @CanSpeccy

    I’ve never said that the SAT is precisely correlated with IQ. And indeed, I’ve said that motivation and eagerness is part of how any teacher considers the potential of a student.

    However, I maintain what I’ve said before: coaching and environment has a significant but declining marginal utility. This is one of those things which should seem plainly obvious – however, if you truly believe that it is possible to guarantee coaching of a student from an early age to get perfect scores on the SAT or anything else, please convince us and open a tutoring package.

    I’m not trying to be sarcastic. Seriously, there’s a lot of money in it.

    As for Dr. Feynman, he was almost certainly joking. Even our honored Mr. Unz commented on it.

    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp/2011/12/richard-feynmans-intelligence/

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/jeffrey-goldberg-is-it-time-for-the-jews-to-leave-europe/#comment-902782

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
    , @CanSpeccy
  161. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    But furthermore, intimidation was also done through implicit denial of employment through sharecropping arrangements: a kind of economic coercion that liberals employ extensively now and is considered as normalized. Less normalized, but still practiced are direct threats: look at all of the threats against Trump, and the very real sense of fear from physical violence that many Trump supporters, including myself have.

    Well, now I guess you have some idea what it feels like to be a “non-model” minority. What do you think other minorities have been living with for years, at the hands of government authorities? None of this is OK, but you’re still equating one’s essential, immutable nature and one’s opinions.

    But when I’m tarred with the same brush of “deplorable” for not towing the liberal line and for having heartfelt disagreements, then I suddenly am very interested in enabling deplorables. They do a lot less harm to me and my family. In contrast, they are reasonable people.

    That’s a mistake on your part, I think. Do you really think Stormfronters would abide your presence here if they got the upper hand?

    I think you are magnifying the size of the type of leftists that would use violence.

    I can live in a world where an extreme right has triumphed. I can’t live in the a world of the extreme left. So “changing my beliefs” is impossible. I’ll gladly die to people who may hate me, but for a sincere and genuine hate that is based out of the notion of order. Order is beautiful, precious and to which I shall gladly sacrifice myself to. But I won’t live in a world where identity is self-determined, where chaos is cherished, and ugliness is forced upon me.

    Well, your love of order is why you’re on the right. I think order is over-rated.

    Arguing about the exact definition of words is anal and pointless. You get what I mean. This is not a good situation, and it should not be continued

    But there are real distinctions to be drawn, both between having your feelings hurt and your face hurt and between the government and a private citizens doing the hurting. To ignore those distinctions helps no one.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  162. @Anon

    Well, now I guess you have some idea what it feels like to be a “non-model” minority. What do you think other minorities have been living with for years, at the hands of government authorities? None of this is OK, but you’re still equating one’s essential, immutable nature and one’s opinions.

    First, one wrong doesn’t solve another.

    Secondly, I disagree. The so-called NAM have benefited for years and decades from an incorrect blank state model. Have there been grave injustices? Absolutely. Does this mean that we need to continue to operate from said incorrect blank state model forever? A ridiculous conclusion. Indeed, in doing so, they have directly penalized myself and my family, so it is in my self-interest to oppose affirmative action.

    However, ultimately, the noble lie of the Enlightement was of equality. Its noble, certainly, but its a lie. And in the end, society does not profit off what is false.

    Well, your love of order is why you’re on the right. I think order is over-rated.

    The simple fact is that said “essential, immutable nature” is often not far from so-called opinion. My love of order may very well be inherited. Obviously I will fight for what I believe must be correct.

    But there are real distinctions to be drawn, both between having your feelings hurt and your face hurt and between the government and a private citizens doing the hurting. To ignore those distinctions helps no one.

    The distinction of being beaten by a government agent versus being beaten by a thug with the government’s consent is not really much different.

    More accurately: being unable to support my family because of economic coercion by the public versus being unable to support my family because of government coercion really doesn’t change the fact that it means that I can’t support my family.

    It ultimately has the same effect. And it is not a trend to be encouraged.

    • Replies: @Anon
  163. @joe webb

    Reich had nothing to do with pyramids Joe…yeah Reich’s did influence a lot of body workers etc, but for the most part they did not have a firm grasp of the depth of what Reich was doing as did
    the rest of psychiatry….

    As ‘regards genetics, behavior genetics’ that was before Reich’s time, plus his work with biology was not of such reductionist swill as we have today….

    If Reich was such a man of his times, why did they burn all his books and few understand what
    he was working with. You obviously do not.

    Yes Reich had flaws, some severe, but he did have a fundamental genius, made mistakes, but made some greater breakthroughs and discovery, that those afraid of love still mock.

    • Replies: @joe webb
  164. @CanSpeccy

    Yes good observation.

    Now here is an important expose by the LaRouche Youth Movement a few years back called
    “The Harvard Yard”

    What is the Harvard Yard?

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  165. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Daniel Chieh

    However, I maintain what I’ve said before: coaching and environment has a significant but declining marginal utility. This is one of those things which should seem plainly obvious

    So many things to you seem plainly obvious, but being plainly obvious to you is not so obviously convincing to others.

    As for Feynman’s IQ, it was not on his report, but his wife’s, that I stated the number was 123. Perhaps his wife was joking. But we do know from the fact that Feynman joked about his IQ, that he thought the IQ testing business was mostly bollocks. His sister, incidentally, claimed to have an IQ of 126, a point higher than her brother.

    However, it is a fact, according to one of the Feynman biography’s, I forget which one, possibly Gleick’s, that Feynman’s grades at entry to graduate school at Princeton University were lower in every subject but math and physics than those of anyone previously admitted. Since math and verbal aptitude test scores seem poorly correlated, it is quite likely that Feynman’s IQ was less than stellar, desite his undisputed mathematical brilliance.

    But it’s hopeless arguing about IQ with IQists. To them, it’s the facts that have to be abandoned if they refute the notion that intelligence is a unitary thing, the mythical, or should we say mystical, g, that can be quantified precisely with a single number determined with an IQ test.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  166. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    So if a blank slate model won’t work then what do you suggest?

    And when do you suppose the injustices meted out to blacks ended?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  167. @joe webb

    I don’t disagree with your judgement about Reich’s error of generalizing clinical psychological insights into political party psycho-types etc. but, nevertheless, trigger point massage is used today to treat patients suffering from chronic pain as well as athletes whose muscles never get a rest. So there’s something to his notion of body armoring.

    Does armor have a psychic counterpart? Dunno, but in my own experience, some trauma can stay in the muscles for years and it seems as though it takes almost as much force to get them to let go as it took to acquire it; there’s a resistance there that is accompanied by fear, what Reichians would call “clinging to one’s pain”–not unlike, I suppose, the way an abused spouse will prefer their known abuser to the unknown, uncertainty of freedom.

    • Replies: @joe webb
  168. Anonymous [AKA "Professor Doom"] says: • Website

    Wait…what?

    The average university teacher is a sub-minimum wage adjunct…that’s who teaches most college courses now. Most of what you say about tenure is simply not accurate, and I’ve documented much of this in my blog Confessions of a College Professor (www.professorconfess.blogspot.com).

    I’ve been at 50 year old state institutions, with 50,000 students, with 50+ faculty in the department, with only one faculty member holding tenure. Believe you me, he fought and fought hard as admin debased education to ridiculous levels (to the point that we had to pass 85% of the students in our class, or else we’d be fired)…but he found himself outvoted on every committee, and it was made clear that any who sided with him would not be coming back next semester.

    I’ve been on hiring committees where we sit there and make the best decision can among the 100s of Ph.D. applicants, only to ultimately have our decision overruled so the Dean’s (utterly unqualified) girlfriend can be a college professor; other hiring committees I’ve been on were similarly bizarre. I could detail more…but I’ve already done so elsewhere.

    I do concede that, years ago, when faculty decided to let administrators full time specialized people (instead of faculty just doing it in addition to their professorial duties), we made a huge mistake. But don’t point at tenured faculty as the problem, because there are just aren’t that many…and admin controls who gets tenure now anyway, so it never again be a factor in the plundering of higher education.

    • Replies: @JackOH
  169. joef says:

    No real surprise here that most professors are either politically correct leftist ideologues, or feckless moderate centrist. They provide college courses in uselessness, charge top dollar for it, and then demand that we pay for it by providing free college tuition to lazy millennials (the vacuous offspring of the progressive baby boomer hippie generation).

    I went to a city college in my youth, and during that time, there was an intentional targeting of white/hispanic/asian (and sometimes black) working class male students who did not repeat (& believe) the left leaning party line. At that time it ruined the college experience for me (& others), where I dropped out, worked in the real world for some time (actually, I worked during college as well), and later went to a private Catholic college where there was a higher expectation on how the professors should treat its students (professors could be respectfully challenged with less likelihood of grade retribution).

    However I am sorry to say that nothing will change and this academic agenda will continue to go on until it cannot (whenever that is?). Then things will fall apart and the useless academics (the ones who do not teach anything of real meaning, consequence, or practicality) will be part of the social die off. They will not be able to reconcile with the irony that the Afro American hatred that they helped to foster (with assistance from the MSM and self serving politicians) is going to be the very Frankenstein Monster that will turn against and destroy them in the end. They believe that this Frankenstein Monster is something they can guide and control, but they will find out that this monster has its own ungovernable motivations.
    It did not have to be this way, but I am afraid we have gone beyond the tipping point in this country.

  170. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Bruce Marshall

    So Isaac Newton didn’t write Newton’s Principia. I dunno. I’m inclined to call fake conspiracy theory on that.

  171. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Daniel Chieh

    however, if you truly believe that it is possible to guarantee coaching of a student from an early age to get perfect scores on the SAT or anything else, please convince us and open a tutoring package.

    I said nothing about guarantees. But the method of training from an early age to achieve high proficiency in math and other subjects does exist, and you’re right, there’s lots of money in it.

    The method is called private education. As developed in England this took one of two forms. Either home schooling with a private tutor, which was how Bertrand Russell was educated prior to entering the university, or at a “public school”, i.e., a private school open to the public — for those that could pay the hefty fees — currently, about $60,000 per year at Eton, for example. At public school, one of the better ones, anyway, a student receives as much one-on-one tutoring as seems worthwhile. That was how the English mathematician G.H. Hardy was educated, with the result that he found doing math as an undergraduate at Cambridge very dull since he knew it all before he got there.

    I’ve known others who suffered as Hardy did. And even with this intensive multi-year method, not everyone turns out to be a genius, although a surprisingly large proportion of those with an academic inclination turn out to be highly competent. That is why, despite the miniscule proportion of the British population that went through the universities 100 years ago, Trinity College Cambridge produced more Nobel Prize winners than any other institution in the world and more than the entire nation of France. But perhaps you think the British aristocracy who mostly supplied the students at Cambridge University had some special genes, a view that, based on my limited contact with the British upper class, I rather doubt.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  172. @Anon

    My answer? Well, I am Confucian so my answer would be to allow roles to develop and be enforced. Societal harmony will increase if expectations and demands are clearly known, and this will work better for the vast majority: so rather than the kakonomic of mutual low expectations, go with the traditional model where people can have strong expectations of each other, bounded by mores and strengthened by rituals.

    It’ll probably fail for some outliers, but it’ll work for most. I’ll much prefer to live in such a world.

    As for the other other, its mostly meaningless to me. Equality is not a positive good in and of itself for me, unlike liberals. So I would say that when underutilization of black talents was ended by overt discrimination, say around the 1960s.

    After that, individuals that could succeed, most likely did. Much as with others in my race, we were certainly “exploited” by society, included the reputed bamboo ceiling. But, so what? In an essentially free market, businesses that could benefit by acquiring lower cost, higher quality minorities would do so. Over time, predictable and stable roles would form. The original white population would have a founder advantage, and well, that’s fine to me.

    If instead, such as in South Africa, resources used for equalization results in a lowered quality of life and dignity, not to much more chaos, then its squandered. It doesn’t promote societal harmony, just the canard of equality. Well, you might as well promote Lord Jesus Christ, the Spaghetti Monster, werewolves or any other fanciful concept then. Sure, this is a fanciful and endearing concept. But, the Easter Bunny is pretty endearing to many too.

    • Replies: @Anon
  173. @CanSpeccy

    I think you overestimate the singular importance I put on the said mystical g. I just think its an useful measure, but obviously I’m not going to dismiss the importance of other personal or environmental traits. The fact that coaching, like many other services and goods, has declining marginal utility is empirically true and reflects what I know. I’ll try to find any sources if I can support it.

    I’ll go and follow to read some of your other posts to try to understand where you are coming from exactly.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  174. @CanSpeccy

    Well, perhaps you’re right. Perhaps if an enormous amount of effort is invested in each student, it can maximize their potential on a level beyond what is generally expected. This doesn’t defy the law of marginal utility; it simply posits that at some exceptional cost level, there remains utility from environmental factors.

    That’ll be interesting if absolutely true. The most obvious reason why this would seem dubious then, is, why hasn’t all of the upper class tried to take advantage of it? Why don’t we have distinguished children of African dictators and Saudi royalty? Or, for that matter, why haven’t the Soviets immediately emulated its essential characteristics and attained similar success? Certainly the Olympic machine proves that there was both the will and resources to attempt such projects.

    Nonetheless, I’ll study more on it. Thanks for sharing.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  175. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    And how do you get to such a system as you propose if the founding ideology of the country is classic liberalism, tabula rasa and all?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  176. JackOH says:
    @Anonymous

    ” . . . [A]dmin debased education to ridiculous levels . . .”. If anyone wants a quick ‘n’ dirty theory of why bazillions for higher education haven’t given us a new Golden Age—that’s it. The admins at my local state university are often incompetent, likewise malicious, and have no idea of the type of people who choose higher education as a career. Professors are treated as fungible commodities, or furniture. I’m not a professor, but I sure as hell know when a line of work is getting stiffed.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  177. joe webb says:
    @ThreeCranes

    your are right about the trigger points, andI commend you for so stating. If you think his idea of ‘armoring’ relates to trigger points, and massage/body work generally, please inform me.

    I use massage and chiropractic and have done so for decades…keeps me young along with no smoke, no drink, and next to no yu know what., plus moderate exercise. (Collagen has worked a miracle on a couple joints.)

    Who then was the guy promoting pyramids as healing structures?

    The notion of armoring, and other stuff from Reich, I took seriously for a while, and now I grant that he was on to something there, but don’t know what.

    Since he went in for freudo-sex-psych…like bad Germans, not getting enough sex, and ergo going after jews, etc. This was total crapola.

    One can ‘armor’ one’s psyche against Truth, both personal and political, but I understood Reich to claim that such armoring would show up in the musculature, etc. I don’t see evidence of that, but I do see simple stress of any type leading to ‘up-tight’ muscles. This is far from Reich and his armoring…I think. JW

  178. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Daniel Chieh

    Daniel,

    I quite accept that coaching must have a declining marginal utility.

    But there’s a big difference between putting someone through hours of coaching every day for an exam at the end of, say, next month, and coaching them over the years in an environment designed to promote the development of all aspects of the mind and body.

    The latter is what constitutes a first rate education and one experienced by only a tiny privileged minority. And of that minority, not all will take to math, that’s for sure, although a surprisingly large proportion will if the encouragement to do so is there.

    Thus, for example, when I attended school in England in the 50’s, I believe more than half of the boys at the decent private (i.e., “public”) schools and the selective entry grammar schools specialized in math and science during their final years. Today the proportion opting to specialize in math is greatly reduced and the level of math achieved in school is much lower than it was, with the result that, a few years ago, Cambridge University lengthened the undergraduate math program by adding a year at the front end.

    Today, among takers of the UK advanced level school leavers’ exams, I think it is only the students in Hong Kong who opt for math in large numbers.

  179. joe webb says:
    @Albert Hazread

    “why did they burn all his books” who burned them? The nazis? never heard of that. JW

  180. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Daniel Chieh

    Why don’t we have distinguished children of African dictators and Saudi royalty?

    I think it is probably difficult to establish the kind of idealistic commitment to learning that characterizes a good school. The tradition must arise from something in the culture.

    Probably the Chinese, and the Brits who emulated the Chinese in developing a highly educated bureaucratic elite, had the right culture, although I doubt that the Brits have much of it today.

    At the English school I attended, we had a few “international students.” I recall one African son of a chief who was a brilliant jumper and pole vaulter (i.e., excellent co-ordination as well as strength and fast muscle), but I don’t know how he was at math.

  181. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @JackOH

    The death of the American University through bureaucratic multiplication is inevitable and an entirely predictable consequence of allowing bureaucratic parasites into the academy. As professor Northcote Parkinson explained:

    (1) An official wants to multiply subordinates, not rivals

    (2) Officials make work for each other

    Inevitably, therefore, the number of bureaucrats in the university rises by 5–7% per year “irrespective of any variation in the amount of work (if any) to be done”.

    In the process, the bureaucracy naturally soaks up resources that would otherwise be put to useful academic purposes, while loading the academic staff with an endless, and endlessly increasing, burden of rules, meetings, restrictions, and useless paper work.

    • Replies: @Authenticjazzman
  182. @Anon

    I’m pretty happy with the traditional norms and values of America even going back a few decades. Classical liberalism and tabula rasa as it might be, there was still enough of a space for people like me to exist. Where notions of essentialism and eternal truths could actually be seen as beautiful, as opposed being endlessly muckraked for potential for offense.

    In the end, like most conservatives, just leave my community in the red states alone and I’ll be happy. Please.

    Its when the left has decided that we are no longer allowed to even have these thoughts, that it basically forces us to fight back. There’s no choice.

    • Replies: @joef
    , @Wizard of Oz
  183. @CanSpeccy

    ” The death of the American Universtiy through bureaucratic multiplication”

    “Bureaucratic muliplication” is a major factor in the “Death of the American University”, however it is not the prime cause thereof, the actual cause being : Communist infiltration.

    Damn I just know why this is such a hard thing to drive home. It probably is related to the PC leftist mind-set prevailing since the fifties that hunting down Nazis is an honorable action, but hunting down Commies is tabu. Sen JM was murdered because of this insane axiom.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” society member of forty-plus years and pro jazz artist.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  184. joef says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    I’m pretty happy with the traditional norms and values of America even going back a few decades. Classical liberalism and tabula rasa as it might be, there was still enough of a space for people like me to exist. Where notions of essentialism and eternal truths could actually be seen as beautiful, as opposed being endlessly muckraked for potential for offense.

    I have been reading your exchange in this article’s comment section with great interest. Alas the progressive new left has always used the deceit that “I do not agree with your ideas, but I will fight for your right to say them”. What we have found out now is that this opinion was held by older sincere Libs who have passed away, and the progressive new left never intended to uphold it. Since they hold the very idea of ‘truth’ as a malleable concept, we shouldn’t have ever really trusted them at their word anyway. The new left just waited underground, while slowly incrementing their dysfunctional progressive agenda, until they became in charge and then attacked us out in the open (with the same levels of intolerance that they accuse everyone else of).

    I personally recall the 80s as somewhat good since you could exist as a Conservative without to much trouble. However when the 90s arrived most of the traditional orientated (WW2 generation) retired from managing this nation. This was replaced by mostly self serving baby boomer hippie generation who were much more adversarial with political disagreement by traditionalist minded people. I believe that the new left never wanted to have a public debate with those who they disagree with. Instead, upon gaining power, they wanted to silence debate by dehumanizing & stigmatizing the opposition.

    And this was not confined solely to the Democratic (New Left Prog) Party. The Republican party (which always had a varied fraction of corporatist in it) became coopted by the neocons. They were even more duplicitous than the Democrats in the fact that they claimed to be acting in the interest of traditional society, but were in fact operating solely for big business interest instead (who only cared about profits even at the expense of traditional values).

    Squeezed between these two new (baby boomer version) political parties, our citizens have been fooled into voting against their own rational self interest for about a quarter century now: with the democrats pushing endless taxation for government transfer payments for entitlements, and the Republicrat pushing for endless cheap labor. That eventually translated to getting paid minimally (or being unemployed), while every cent is open to some type of taxation (income, sales, property, fines, fees, forfeitures). Either way we eventually lose (into personal destitution for the middle class/working class).

    Added to all this was the levels of anti white animosity created among Afro Americans by our social warrior progs, leading to a great amount of social instability. By doing all this, coupled with our unsustainable debt levels (public & private), has created a complicated Gordian Knot for our political/social/economic situation, to almost unsolvable levels.

    In other words, even though our national decline has roughly started about half a century ago when the baby boomer hippie ilk came of age, it accelerated in the last quarter century when they took over the management of this nation.
    So I agree with you, we are forced into the position to either fight back or perish; or we can wait underground until this leftist mess falls apart from lack of ability to sustain itself (in the longterm), and then rebuild from there. The problem is clear, and even if we lose the culture war battle, we will win the war (progressive ideas will eventually collapse because it can only work with very large unsustainable economic inputs).

    • Agree: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Miro23
  185. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Authenticjazzman

    Communist infiltration?

    I don’t think so. It’s top down mind control by the agents of the New World Order, aka, the money power, which is to say the bankers, the global corporations and the dynamic individual members of the plutocracy. These are the people who control the universities by way of lackeys, such as Justin Trudeau, Hillary, and the various self-hating Euro-freaks such as Merkel, Hollande, Blair, etc.

    The agenda includes, climate change terrorism to compel acceptance of declining living standards; anti-anti-racism to facilitate the obliteration of national borders and democratic institutions; homophilia, transgenderism, perversity and population panic to suppress the fertility of the formerly powerful, Western, democratic nation states.

    Those are the priorities of the university and they are enforced top down, not by Commies, but by agents of the nascent global plutocracy intent on establishing a global system of oligarchs and wage slaves. Commies have a role only as useful idiots.

    That explains the revulsion against Donald Trump. The son-of-a-bitch shows every sign of being pro-American.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  186. ” Establishing a global system of oligarchs and wage slaves”

    This is a precise definition of Communism, whether you know it or not, the “Oligarchs” being the Cadre’, and holding in place of ” Capital” the rubber stamps with power over life and death, and the “wage slaves” being the masses.

    Look the point you are missing is : What is the main goal of all of these “Self-hating euro freaks”, and American SJW nut-cases, leftist professors, criminals like HC, GS, the whole NWO ilk?

    This all started back in the thirties with the movement of the Frankfurt school to the US, and just what was then, is now , the main goal of these various lunatics and tryants : The main goal is and was the installation of :

    WORLD COMMUNISM

    And these despots assume that they will be the honchos thereof, the academics automatically assume that they will be the administrators of edumacation.

    I respect your opinion but I do not agree with you, as you unwittingly trying to euphemize or obliterate the role of world communism in all of this conglomeration of efforts by these subversive dirtbags, in tune with the tabu of seeking out and exposing communists.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” society member since 1973, and pro jazz artist

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  187. @Daniel Chieh

    What’s your problem with “classical liberalism”? I take ghat to be the liberalism of J.S. Mill???

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  188. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Authenticjazzman

    I agree that some of the leading exponents of the New World Order were Trotskyites or some other variety of Communist. And I also agree that the New World Order, if it emerges as now intended, will be highly authoritarian.

    But it will likely be very different in many particulars from either the Russian or Chinese communist model.

    The objective, certainly, is to brainwash the public into acceptance of the global system, not to terrorize them into submission. Hence the prominence of political correctness in academia.

    Moreover, central planning and state ownership of the means of production, distribution and exchange will not be attempted.

    The oligarchs will come to own virtually all of the world’s assets and will operate them efficiently, although they will naturally seek to achieve global monopolies, justified as the means to achieve economies of scale.

    For the people, it will likely turn out to be worse than it did for the Russians or the Chinese under the Marxists.

    Most of them will simply not be needed. They won’t be gassed or machine gunned. Rather, they will be fed with the crumbs from the oligarchs tables while they die prematurely from a combination of bad diet, drugs and demoralization, their fertility undermined by the distractions of every kind of virtual reality porn and propaganda.

    Within little more than a generation, the European peoples will have ceased to exist as coherent groups with a culture and religious tradition of their own, or even as large minorities in their former homelands.

    As for the seething masses of Africa and Asia, maybe a deadly pandemic will be used to open up space for oligarchs to locate their hunting estates.

    • Replies: @Authenticjazzman
  189. @Wizard of Oz

    Mostly that it never really remains at “classical liberalism.” Always swims left – quite logically, as the competing parties both seek to expand franchise and entice voters. The concept itself is quite appealing, though. I do love Voltaire.

  190. Paul D says:

    Recall that it was during the 20s that Social science abandoned bio determinism, so the subsequent social developments are the result in part of the implication of empiricist psych. “Society” became wicked (bad schools) and the source of devience and no longer the body (bad students). As the battle during earlier centuries was against the wicked body now the social body. This compelling moral vision was what caused campus radicalism, and not careerism or cowardice. Change the moral vision or priority, as trump is doing, then our institutions will change accordingly. (See the book Human Sin or Social Sin.)

  191. @CanSpeccy

    Okay I don’t have the energy or patience to continue this contest with you, so I will sum it up in as simplistic as terms as possible :

    If you were to ask each and every one of the culprits involved in the NWO scenario as to which governmental system they consider to be superior and the best for all of mankind, all of them WITHOUT exception would state that they consider marxism to be the best, to be the most optimal system of government, and they simply do not give a damn about the sordid past history of communism, as each new generation of communists see the Russians, Chinese, Cubans, etc as having been the ” wrong” ones who really did not understand marxism, and themselves as the right ones and they will get it “right” this time.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” society member of foryty-plus years and pro jazz artist.

  192. Anonymous [AKA "Anselmus"] says:
    @Anon

    The difference between the left and the right is that leftists are on the wrong side of history: 20 years of daycare only to emerge STEM-illiterate, and unable to comprehend that opinions are downstream of people.

  193. Miro23 says:
    @joef

    So I agree with you, we are forced into the position to either fight back or perish; or we can wait underground until this leftist mess falls apart from lack of ability to sustain itself (in the longterm), and then rebuild from there. The problem is clear, and even if we lose the culture war battle, we will win the war (progressive ideas will eventually collapse because it can only work with very large unsustainable economic inputs).

    Don’t forget that Progressives have a strong Totalitarian streak. They would love to deploy the Patriot Act, Homeland Security and the NSA against “Deplorables” and have already shown that they have no regard for the Constitution.

    They’re also well funded and have a lock in the MSM so you need to include a coup d’état in the list of possibilities.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    , @joef
  194. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Miro23

    They’re also well funded and have a lock in the MSM so you need to include a coup d’état in the list of possibilities.

    If Progressives ever feel they’re facing a real threat then an attempted coup d’état is almost a certainty. Remember that they have no belief whatsoever in democracy – if democracy produces results that they don’t like then democracy will have to go.

  195. joef says:
    @Miro23

    Yes, that is all true. And so far we been on the long retreat in this attack from the new left progressivism. A lot of damage has been done already, and we will probably see some more in the future. I do not believe that progs would actually want a civil war situation because of one major factor: guns. Most leftist do not believe in them nor do they know how to competently operate one.

    There are efforts to cultivate afro americans as their leftist warriors, but that has had mixed results because most afro americans are into what ever provides the most immediate gratification, not long term political goals.
    Its not like they can sway/convince the military, and urban ghetto city cops to join them, who mostly despise the leftist agenda (although there are many modern suburban, state, and federal law enforcement officers, {i e the non ‘urban ghetto’ police} who are true believers, treating traffic tickets to working people as if they were violent felonies).

    But what it really comes down to is this: even if we lost every battle against these leftist fanatics, it is still not sustainable in the long term, and it will have to eventually collapse from the exhaustion of economic inputs. Thus, we will eventually out endure them by having more staying power than the “I want it now” leftist.

    Then maybe we can do something good and rebuilt (maybe we can put some leftist on trial for war crimes such as irresponsibly causing white hatred among the afro american populace). The leftist progressive system cannot last, while traditional systems proved their permanence throughout the centuries. Time is on our side, the bad side is the great damage caused until then.

    • Replies: @Miro23
    , @dfordoom
  196. Miro23 says:
    @joef

    But what it really comes down to is this: even if we lost every battle against these leftist fanatics, it is still not sustainable in the long term, and it will have to eventually collapse from the exhaustion of economic inputs. Thus, we will eventually out endure them by having more staying power than the “I want it now” leftist.

    For what it’s worth, I draw parallels with post WW1 Weimar Germany. That government was run by Progressives who ridiculed traditional German values and ran a famously corrupt and decadent society. They also had a society that was financialized with unpayable government debts.

    In 1922/23 it resolved with a fast and unexpected hyperinflation that wiped out the middle class, with the interesting aspect that the Plutocracy somehow knew that the hyperinflation was coming. They took out large scale loans (that were paid back in worthless money) to buy real estate, corporations and hard currency).

    The British historian Arthur Bryant in his book “Unfinished Victory” (1940) shows that it was a vast transfer of wealth in which something like a third of real property in Germany came into the hands of a small financial elite, and talking about the losers, he said, “But to those who lost their all, this transfer seemed a monstrous injustice. After prolonged sufferings they had now been deprived of their last possessions”.

    If the US plays out the same way, then the traditional conservative middle class would be left destitute and the Plutocracy would get their hands on a large part of the US assets that they don’t already own.

    It probably won’t go like this, but the game has similar players and traditional America wouldn’t have any staying power if it was put on the street – but it would certainly become radicalized.

    • Replies: @res
  197. res says:
    @Miro23

    “Unfinished Victory” looks difficult/expensive to find in print, but an ebook is available at: https://archive.org/details/ArthurBryantUnfinishedVictory1940V1

    Does anyone have an ebook source for another book on Weimar Germany: “Germany Puts the Clock Back”? The Hathi Trust has a copy of the 1933 first edition at https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b3269356;view=1up;seq=15
    but I am unable to download.

    Amazon has some interesting reviews of Unfinished Victory. One of which compares the two books.

    • Replies: @Miro23
  198. Miro23 says:
    @res

    There’s a print copy of “Germany Puts The Clock Back” on Abebooks for $27.09 (1938 paperback). https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&an=&tn=germany+puts+the+clock+back&kn=&isbn=

    I have it in print along with “Unfinished Victory” and they’re interesting because they were both written prior to post WW2 propaganda.

    For example, “Germany Puts The Clock Back” gives good descriptions of corrupt Weimar capitalism that could have been written today:

    P128. This German system was a stiff framework of trusts and monopolies which substituted technical ability for economic utility and perpetuated privilege without equivalent risk. In the last analysis it relied for power upon its control of the State, for this enabled it not only to maintain its monopolies, but in times of crisis to stretch a hungry hand into the pockets of the taxpayers.

    P129. “They preached a system free from State interference and built it up on State assistance” (M.J.Bonn, Vossische Zeitung, May 22, 1932)

    P.129. What he wanted was a system in which private risk had been socialized while private benefits were maintained.

    Mowrer also describes Weimar sleaze:

    P.197. No one who lived through the period 1919 to 1926 is likely to forget the sexual promiscuity that prevailed. If anything the women were the more aggressive. Morality virginity, monogamy, even good taste were treated as prejudice. “Let’s go to bed together and see if we like each other” – half as a joke, half seriously intended – was heard in all sort of society. …… At private parties mattresses were strewn about for convenience…

    P.192. Somehow the unhampered exhibit and sale of these works (hard core porn) was a symbol of German democracy and the “freest Republic in the world”.

    And Mowrer also identified the appeal of the rising National Socialists, quoting a radio broadcast by Gregor Strasser (June 14, 1932):

    “By socialism we understand governmental measures for the protection of the individual or the group against any kind of exploitation. The taking over of the railways by the State, of the street cars, power plants and gas works by the municipalities; the emancipation of the peasants by Baron von Stein; and the incorporation of the guild system into the State; the Prussian officer’s system of selection by achievement; the incorruptibility of the German official; the old walls, the town hall, the cathedral of the free imperial city – these are all expressions of German socialism as we conceive and demand it.”

    An unusual blend of socialism with Prussian Imperialism and absolutely opposed to Marxism.

  199. dfordoom says: • Website
    @joef

    I do not believe that progs would actually want a civil war situation because of one major factor: guns.

    Guns are irrelevant. What matters is who controls the military.

    Its not like they can sway/convince the military, and urban ghetto city cops to join them

    They’re the big unanswered questions. Which way would the military and the police jump? My guess is they’ll make that decision based on their own interests – they’ll support the side that is most likely to go on paying them.

  200. SR says:
    @DaveE

    Comment’s climactic ending grabs familiar punchline: Blame it on the Jews.

    Bonus: the conspiracy began “what, about 2700 years” ago, so Marx was 2500+ years late to his own game.

  201. SR says:
    @ThreeCranes

    The information provided in this reply, notwithstanding its own merits, is a strangely overwrought objection to the term “triggering,” coming as it does with the suggestion that the meaning of the term is limited to the usages cited (trigger point therapy, Reich, etc.)

    In common parlance, “triggering” anxiety, fear, anger, hostility, etc. seems pretty familiar, and is clearly the usage relevant in the case of SJW snowflakes, etc.

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