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Eurasia has most of the world’s wealth, resources, and population — yet there is very low economic connectivity. A Sino-Russian partnership can collectively create a gravitational pull that allows them to capture the geoeconomic levers of power by creating an alternative to the Western-centric model. This entails developing new global value chains that captures the high-value activities in strategic industries and energy markets, developing new transportation corridors through Eurasia and the Arctic, and constructing new financial instruments such as development banks, trade/reserve currencies, technical standards, and trade regimes. Russia’s comparative advantage derives from its geographical expanse by developing an East-West corridor connecting Northeast Asia with Europe, and a North-South Corridor that links India, Iran and Russia. Moscow sees itself as a stabilising factor in Eurasia by bringing together the entire continent with economic connectivity to ensure that it becomes multipolar and no one state or region can dominate. The EU stands to lose much from Russia’s Greater Eurasia ambitions. Russia’s original Greater Europe project, which they EU rejected, would have endowed the EU with a powerful ally to collectively project influence deep into the Eurasian continent. In contrast, Russia’s new Greater Eurasia initiative will marginalise the EU’s role across Eurasia as socio-economic and political decisions will be made by BRICS, the Eurasian Economic Union, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation, and the Belt and Road Initiative. The EU is faced with a dilemma as it has strong economic incentives to cooperate with the development taking place in Greater Eurasia, yet this would contribute to the shift away from the Western-centric geoeconomic infrastructure. Glenn Diesen. The Global Resurgence of Economic Nationalism.

Halford Mackinder[1]The Geographical Pivot of History, Royal Geographical Society, 1904, Mackinder extended the scope of geopolitical analysis to the entire globe. said we don’t think of Asia and Europe as a single continent because sailors couldn’t voyage around it. Today the Northeast Passage, The Polar Silk Road, along Russia’s northern coast, links the Pacific and Atlantic coasts while a network of pipelines and air, rail, road and fiber routes are knitting Mackinder’s World Island into ‘Eurasia,’ despite Kissinger’s warning, “Domination by a single power of either of Eurasia’s two principal spheres–Europe or Asia–remains a good definition of strategic danger for America. For such a grouping would have the capacity to outstrip America economically and, in the end, militarily.”

Together, Russia and China have outstripped America economically and militarily within Eurasia and are in the process of drawing the European Union into a vast, increasingly prosperous alliance as America pursues an increasingly dystopian future. Their leaders ares so dominant, their vision is so seductive, their alliance so strong, their weapons so advanced and their pockets so deep that their centripetal force is almost irresistible. Russia’s leadership–Putin, Lavrov, Nabiullina, Siluanov and Shoygu–is the best in the country’s history and, as President Trump observed, “China’s leaders are much smarter than our leaders. It’s like taking the New England Patriots and Tom Brady and having them play your high school football team.” President Xi has visited Moscow more than any other capital city and has met Vladimir Putin thirty times, calling him, “My best, most intimate friend.”

* * *

Colonial nations lost their political and economic freedom because imperial centers of capital needed to control resources crucial for their survival, wealth, and power[2]Economic Democracy: The Political Struggle of the 21st Century. By J. W. Smith. This is the real meaning of the terms ‘national security’ and ‘national interest.’ Powerful nations’ ‘national security’ is the control of an economic empire of subject states and the strategies through which this is carried out are their ‘national security secrets.’ They practice the antithesis of what they preach: their trumpeting of peace, freedom, justice, rights, democracy, and majority rule disguises those strategies for controlling other people and their resources be kept secret. The most pernicious is that multi-party democracy and a free press and must precede successful development.

In reality, such a combination ends all hope of development. No nation has ever developed under multiparty democracy nor, as Lee Kwan Yew[3]A Third World Perspective on the Press. RH Lee Kwan Yew, Prime Minister of Singapore. C-SPAN, APRIL 14, 1988 observed, with a free press,

The Philippines press enjoys all the freedoms of the US system but fails the people: a wildly partisan press helped Philippines politicians flood the marketplace of ideas with junk and confuse and befuddle the people so that they could not see what their vital interests were in a developing country. And, because vital issues like economic growth and equitable distribution were seldom discussed, they were never tackled and the democratic system malfunctioned. Look at Taiwan and South Korea: their free press runs rampant and corruption runs riot. The critic itself is corrupt yet the theory is, if you have a free press, corruption disappears. Now I’m telling you, that’s not true. Freedom of the press, freedom of news critics, must be subordinated to the overriding needs of the integrity of Singapore and to the primacy of purpose of an elected government.

Russia and China offer an alternative to the imperialist model: security without coercion, aid without conditions and, instead of WTO agreements that prevent sustainable development, trade and development pacts to promote it. In addition to being permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, their executives head five of the UN’s fifteen agencies and China provides a permanent UN infantry battalion, the only country to do so.

The blocs in play are the European Union; The Eurasian Economic Union; The Shanghai Cooperative Organization; The Association of Southeast Asian Nations; The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership; The Belt and Road Initiative. After the 2019 Conference on Interaction and Confidence-Building Measures in Asia (CICA) in Dushanbe, Tajikistan President Putin, before a beaming President Xi, stressed that all of them should be integrated.

The European Union, occupying Eurasia’s Western peninsula, is tired of the status quo. President Macron said recently, “We are undoubtedly experiencing the end of Western hegemony over the world…Things change, and they have been deeply shaken by the mistakes of Westerners in certain crises, by the choices that have been made by Americans for several years..And then there is the emergence of new powers whose impact we have probably underestimated for a long time. China is at the forefront, but also the Russian strategy, which has, it must be said, been pursued more successfully in recent years…They think about our planet with a true logic, a true philosophy, an imagination that we’ve lost a little bit.” Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England added, “The world’s reliance on the US dollar won’t hold and needs to be replaced by a new international monetary and financial system… It is worth considering how an SHC [synthetic hegemonic currency] in the IMF could support better global outcomes.” Germany is completing Nord Stream II and installing Huawei systems despite US threats, and Poland, Greece, Italy, Austria, Luxembourg, Switzerland have joined the Belt and Road Initiative. One more downturn in the US economy (where manufacturing is already in recession) and the rest of the EU will follow. Turkey’s[4]President Erdogan said he bought Russian S-400s so he could withdraw from NATO and join the SCO President Erdogan, on NATO’s Eastern flank, said he bought Russia’s S-400 so his country could safely withdraw from NATO and he is already a dialog partner in the world’s largest security association, the SCO.

The Eurasian Economic Union (Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Russia, and Tajikistan, with Moldova in consideration) is devoted to free movement of goods, services, capital and labor and coordinated, coherent and common policies in all key economic sectors. In the past two years Russia’s EAEU trade has increased dramatically: with Armenia (30%), Belarus (10%) Kazakhstan (21%), and Kyrgyzstan (17%). China is negotiating product tariffs on its existing FTA agreement and, in the past two years its EAEU trade has risen rapidly, too: Armenia (29%), Belarus (35%), Kazakhstan (48%) and Kyrgyzstan (31%). Minsk and Moscow are seeking to unify their customs and energy policies by 2021 and the union’s state tax code is expected to be adopted by the Spring of 2021, and a single tax code, civil code, and list of foreign trade rules, in addition to unified oil, gas and electricity market regulators by 2022. In soft power terms, Russian remains the lingua franca in Mongolia, Central Asia and the Caucasus.

The Shanghai Cooperative Organization, SCO. (Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, India, China, and Pakistan; with Afghanistan, Iran, Mongolia and Belarus as observers and Armenia, Azerbaijan, Cambodia, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Turkey as dialog partners). The SCO is the world’s largest security organization and counts four nuclear powers among its members. Its objectives are to (i) strengthen relations among member states; (ii) promote cooperation in political affairs, economics and trade, scientific-technical, cultural, and educational spheres and in energy, transportation, tourism, and environmental protection; (iv) safeguard regional peace, security, and stability; and (v) create a democratic, equitable international political and economic order. SCO members have completed an intergovernmental agreement facilitating international road transport and are finalizing one on rail transport. The Bishkek Declaration, adopted by SCO members, emphasizes the security guarantees of the Central Asian Nuclear-Weapons-Free Zone Treaty, the ‘unacceptability of attempts to ensure one country’s security at the expense of other countries’ security,’ and condemns ‘the unilateral and unlimited buildup of missile defense systems by certain countries or groups of states.’ Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, speaking to Presidents Putin, Xi, Modi and Imran Khan, blasted the US as ‘a serious risk to stability in the region and the world” and offered preferential treatment for all fellow SCO nations, companies, and entrepreneurs to invest in Iran’s market. Xi responded that Beijing will keep developing ties with Tehran ‘no matter how the situation changes.’ After eighteen succesful years, the SCO is raising its game.

ASEAN. Established in 1967, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations–Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam–agreed to accelerate their region’s economic growth, social progress and cultural development through joint endeavors in the spirit of equality and partnership in order to strengthen the foundation for a prosperous and peaceful community and to promote regional peace and stability through abiding respect for justice and the rule of law in the relationship among countries in the region and adherence to the principles of the United Nations Charter. Russia and China are strategic ASEAN partners but, though ASEAN had a much longer dialog partnerships with the Western countries like America and the EU, none of them proposed a free trade agreement for ASEAN. China did so in 1988 and then concluded the ASEAN-China FTA in record time with the result that total trade between ASEAN and China, $8 billion in 1991, grew to $600 billion in 2018 with a goal of $1 trillion by 2024.

The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership[5]According to PwC, RCEP member states GDP, PPP, will be $250 trillion by 2050, with the combined GDPs of China and India making up more than 75% of that. RCEP’s share of the global economy could account for half of the $0.5 quadrillion global GDP by 2050., (Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, China, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand, with India undecided). The world’s largest trade bloc, the RCEP accounts for forty percent of the world’s economy. It is biased in favor of developing nations and excludes investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms (ISDS)[6]ISDS clauses allow foreign investors to sue national governments for any measures that harm their profits. NGOs, trade unions, charities and faith groups say they are a threat to human rights, health and the environment. that advantage private corporations over states.

The Belt and Road Initiative. Scheduled to launch on June 1, 2021, the BRI integrates four billion people in one-hundred thirty countries across Eurasia, Africa, Latin America and the South Pacific. BRI focuses on policy coordination, infrastructure connectivity, unimpeded trade, financial integration and people-to-people ties. It is building power plants in Pakistan, train lines in Hungary and ports from Africa to Greece, replacing Western institutions, refashioning the global economic order, forging new ties, creating new markets, deepening economic connections and strengthening diplomatic bonds. Iran is a key BRI node and Tehran sees it as the way to full integration into the Eurasian economic ecosystem. Cargo transiting from all over India via the International North-South Transport Corridor, INSTC, to Iran’s port of Bandar Abbas reduces shipping costs to Europe by forty percent and will soon merge with BRI’s global transport network.

The BRI’s Eurasian Land Bridge exemplifies its cooperative model. Added value production, like assembling component parts from different origins, can be conducted tax free in its border Free Trade Zones, where wages are one-fifth of China’s. This allows for the addition of lower cost labor to be factored into the production cost rather than being exposed to one salary band in one country. Goods entering these FTZs attract no customs duty or VAT because they are considered to be outside customs borders, and companies operating within them are exempt from all taxes. The nodes: Huoergousi Export Processing Zone (China-Kazakhstan Border); Khorgos Eastern Gate Special Economic Zone (Kazakhstan); Aktau Special Economic Zone (Kazakhstan); Alat Free Trade Zone (Azerbaijan); Poti Free Industrial Zone (Georgia); Hualing-Kutaisi Free Industrial Zone (Georgia). Turkey’s East Anatolia Free Trade Zone is the most interesting, since Turkey’s Custom Union with the EU admits goods of Turkish origin free of tax. Over 6,300 trains made the journey last year, one every ninety minutes. Trans-Eurasia transit time has fallen from three weeks to two, and will reach ten days next year.

Ultimately, Russia aims to connect China’s northern provinces with Eurasia via the Trans-Siberian and the Chinese Eastern Railway. Chita in China and Khabarovsk in Russia are already totally interconnected. Across the spectrum, Moscow aims at maximizing return on the crown jewels of her Far East: agriculture, water resources, minerals, lumber, oil and gas. Construction of LNG plants in Yamal vastly benefits China, Japan and South Korea. The same applies to gateway Vladivostok, Eurasia’s entry point for both South Korea and Japan, as well as Russia’s entry point to Northeast Asia. Kazakhstan shows how Greater Eurasia and BRI are complementary: Astana is a member of both the BRI and the EAEU.

TOOLS OF THE TRADE

The Polar Silk Road sea route, the long-sought Northeast Passage, five-thousand miles shorter than the Suez route, runs mostly in Russia’s coastal waters. In 2010 the first cargo ship sailed the entire route without icebreaker assistance and, in 2017, the Christophe de Margerie became the first ever ice-breaking LNG carrier to transport LNG from the Yamal peninsula through the Bering Strait and south to Japan and China. Russia’s Sovcomflot and Novatek signed an agreement with China’s Cosco Shipping and the Silk Road Fund to establish a Maritime Arctic Transport joint venture to manage an ice-breaking tanker fleet in the transportation of LNG for current and planned Novatek projects including Yamal LNG, Arctic LNG Two and others.

Pipelineistan. The IEA calculates that oil will remain the world’s dominant source of energy in 2040, accounting for one-fourth of global energy consumption. Russia accounts for fifteen percent of the world’s energy reserves and the Persian Gulf region for 65%. Russian and Chinese-built pipelines are distributing this energy wealth across the continent resurrecting the South Stream gas pipeline to supply Europe as an extension of TurkStream. Though the US has furiously opposed Nord Stream 2, it will begin delivering gas to Germany within six months. Russian gas will also start flowing to Turkey via TurkStream this year and Russia and Bulgaria have begun work on the Balkan Stream Pipeline to carry gas to southern EU.

The Global Electric Interconnect. Beijing launched GEIDCO in 2016, an ultra-high voltage grid to continually transmit clean energy around the globe, following the sun. GEIDCO has seven regional offices, forty global offices, six-hundred regional and national members and has invested $1.6 trillion in eighty generation and transmission projects across Eurasia, Latin America, Africa, Europe and North America.

The Digital Silk Road. The DSR is strengthening internet infrastructure, deepening space cooperation, developing common technology standards, and improving the efficiency of policing systems among Belt and Road countries. It gathers space-based remote sensing data for multiple projects along the BRI and China is promoting BeiDou-2, its global satellite navigation system as an alternative to America’s GPS. Pakistan, Laos, Brunei, and Thailand have already adopted BeiDou. Construction has begun on the Pakistan East Africa Cable Express, connecting Pakistan to Kenya and Djibouti. In 2012, under one percent of Myanmar’s population had broadband access but the country expects to launch 5G broadband service by 2025, leapfrogging the USA.

The Russo-Chinese Electronic Funds Silk Road will replace the US-dominated SWIFT network.

The Silk Road International Bank, along with the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, guarantees a trillion dollars annually in long-term, low interest loans for regional infrastructure, poverty reduction, growth and climate change mitigation and allows Eurasia’s four billion savers to mobilize local savings that previously had few safe or creative outlets. Nothing could be more sensible for the new Pipelineistan deal than to have it settled in yuan. Beijing would pay Gazprom in that currency (convertible into rubles); Gazprom would accumulate the yuan and Russia would then buy myriad made-in-China goods and services in yuan convertible into rubles. The merger of Russia’s Mir payment system and China’s Union Pay appears inevitable because their bilateral trade is growing by an astonishing half a billion dollars a month and Beijing’s fully convertible digital yuan may debut as soon as this year, adding to the fun.

Invulnerability to attack. In the past eighteen months, Russia and China have demonstrated their ability to defend themselves against any attack and, in turn, to destroy every city in the United States inside forty-five minutes. Russia is now helping China build her own Missile Attack Early warning System (SPRN).

Hegemony and Humanitarian Leadership. According to Chinese political scientist Xunzi[7]Hegemonic Stability Theory: An Empirical Assessment. Michael C. Webb and Stephen D. Krasner. Review of International Studies. Vol. 15, No. 2, Special Issue on the Balance of Power (Apr., 1989), pp. 183-198. Cambridge University Press, there are three types of leadership: humane authority, hegemony and tyranny. Humane authority begins by creating a desirable model at home that inspires people abroad. He proposed that, though hegemons know how to win wars, “The ruler who makes his own state act correctly will attain international primacy. The domestic determines the international and, since humane authority based on morality rather than power, is superior to hegemony it is more important to win over people than territory. States wishing to exercise humane authority must be the first to respect the norms they advocate and leaders of high ethical reputation and great administrative ability will attract other states. To be compassionate in great matters and overlook the small makes one fit to become lord of the covenants. Loving friends, being friendly with the great, rewarding your allies and punishing those who oppose you, the lord of the covenants has a definite duty and his moral standing should match it. Presiding over the meetings of other states grants international recognition of humane authority.” Two centuries later, Confucius summarized Xunzi thus, “Moral superiors and inferiors relate to each other like wind and grass: grass must bend when the wind blows over it”.

Godfree Roberts has been studying China since 1967 and is preparing a book, How China Works, for publication this year. His collected ravings can be found on the Unz Review, here.

Notes

[1] The Geographical Pivot of History, Royal Geographical Society, 1904, Mackinder extended the scope of geopolitical analysis to the entire globe.

[2] Economic Democracy: The Political Struggle of the 21st Century. By J. W. Smith

[3] A Third World Perspective on the Press. RH Lee Kwan Yew, Prime Minister of Singapore. C-SPAN, APRIL 14, 1988

[4] President Erdogan said he bought Russian S-400s so he could withdraw from NATO and join the SCO

[5] According to PwC, RCEP member states GDP, PPP, will be $250 trillion by 2050, with the combined GDPs of China and India making up more than 75% of that. RCEP’s share of the global economy could account for half of the $0.5 quadrillion global GDP by 2050.

[6] ISDS clauses allow foreign investors to sue national governments for any measures that harm their profits. NGOs, trade unions, charities and faith groups say they are a threat to human rights, health and the environment.

[7] Hegemonic Stability Theory: An Empirical Assessment. Michael C. Webb and Stephen D. Krasner. Review of International Studies. Vol. 15, No. 2, Special Issue on the Balance of Power (Apr., 1989), pp. 183-198. Cambridge University Press

[8] Ancient Chinese Thought, Modern Chinese Power. By Yan Xuetong

 
• Category: Economics, Foreign Policy • Tags: China, Eurasia, New Silk Road, Russia 
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  1. onebornfree says: • Website

    Yet more anti-free market, pro-big government, statist, authoritarian, “government can/should manage all trade”, socialist/communist/fascist, horseshit propaganda [ with colorful pics,mind you 🙂 ]from yet another foaming-at-the-mouth statist halfwit in complete denial of the fact that:

    “Because they are all ultimately funded via both direct and indirect theft [taxes], and counterfeiting [via central bank monopolies], all governments are essentially, at their very cores, 100% corrupt criminal scams which cannot be “reformed”,”improved”, nor “limited” in scope, simply because of their innate criminal nature.”

    Just “par for the course” for Unz.com.

    And so it goes….

    No regards, onebornfree

  2. Anonymous[316] • Disclaimer says:

    America and countries like UK, France, etc, are finished. Populated by low IQ, increasingly aggressive and very racially aware non-whites who are on the verge of becoming the majority and mostly weak, directionless whites still deeply attached to the idea of living in multicultural, multiracial harmony and totally in denial about the fact that vision is collapsing around them.

    Even most Trump and Brexit supporters are not racially aware and are supportive of the mutliracial agenda, and they’re as right wing as it gets in those societies.

  3. WC says:

    No nation ever developed under multiparty democracy and a free press?

    Utter horseshit. The English-speaking nations all did so without ever experiencing a dictatorship. Ditto for Scandinavia, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and (mostly) France.

    Russia is a tin-pot mafia state with the GDP of Spain. Putin is a deft PR stuntman, but he won’t be around forever.

    Yes, China has 1.4 billion people with an average IQ of 105, so it’s no surprise they’ve come a long way since throwing off the trappings of Maoism. It’s still a sinister, dystopian police state operating in a radically different cultural and historical milieu. They have very little to teach us – save that cultural homogeneity is a huge advantage, and importing low-IQ diversity is fvcking insane.

  4. @WC

    The English-speaking nations all did so [developed] without ever experiencing a dictatorship. Ditto for Scandinavia, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and (mostly) France.

    Dictatorship is not the only alternative to our current, factional pseudo-democracy.

    • Replies: @Sandmann
  5. Erebus says:

    No nation has ever developed under multiparty democracy…

    Huh? Where the hell did you spring this one out of? Without making a pretty good case that “multi-party democracy” is a facade for what amounts to centralized rule, it’s prima facie false.

    • Agree: Hail
  6. Awesome, isn’t it. The largest landmass united and the US and UK shunted to the periphery, where they can shout about ruling the waves. The only fly in the ointment is the third leg of the USUKisrael (and it does) conspiracy: “israel”. And that will drop off soon. 再见 (zài jiàn)

    • Agree: Iris
  7. @Erebus

    In our own time, we know that India, the world’s biggest multi-party democracy, has not developed (unless Indians are voting for two million of their children to starve to death each year and hate toilets and highways).

    Britain’s takeoff, 1800-1830, occurred when 3% of citizens could vote.

    America’s takeoff, 1843-1860, occurred a century before universal suffrage, under the same oligarchy and fake democracy that runs America today.

    In Germany the rate of economic growth 1880-1914 was 33 percent per decade, when the kaiser controlled ministerial appointments, foreign policy and the armed forces.

    In Japan from 1874-1929 the rate was 43 percent, long before Japanese voted.

    The Soviet Union rate was 54 percent over the period 1928-58, long before Putin brought stable Democracy to Russia.

    China’s decadal rate over the years 1952-72 was 64 percent, but its democracy was not multi-party.

    Though virtually all of Africa’s 54 countries are democracies, none has developed. Ditto Latam’s, which are regressing under democracy.
    __________________________________________________

    *Rostow’s three requirements for take-off:

    1. The rate of productive investment should rise from approximately 5% to over 10% of national income or net national product

    2. The development of one or more substantial manufacturing sectors, with a high rate of growth;

    3. The existence or quick emergence of a political, social and institutional framework which exploits the impulses to expansion in the modern sector and the potential external economy effects of the take-off.[2]

    __________________________________________________
    See: Democracy does not cause growth. by Julia Ruiz Pozuelo, Amy Slipowitz, Guillermo Vuletin 30 September 2016. Brookings.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  8. Rahan says:

    Eurasia, ASEAN, Europe, the Anglosphere, and possibly 2-3 similar blocks centered on Brazil, India, and Africa, all being in non-violent competition with each other is good.

    Pluralism is good.

    Without competition, even the best “good guys” go mad with power in a decade.

    Eurasia will not outperform the Anglosphere to the extent of “taking over”, and Europe can’t outperform either, and ASEAN is potentially strong enough to be a collective equivalent of India…

    Not bad, actually.

    With the Anglosphere’s and the EU’s level of functioning stunted dramatically of late, and everyone else only being able to reach the same level as a ceiling, but not capable of innovating beyond this ceiling, we could be settling into a reasonably comfortable Neo-Middle Ages.

    Until some of the surviving centers for real science kick off the Singularity, then all bets are off. but until then–a long Pax Multipolaria could be a thing, if Zionists or Anglos don’t start something they can’t finish…

    • Agree: Godfree Roberts
  9. Realist says:
    @WC

    They have very little to teach us – save that cultural homogeneity is a huge advantage, and importing low-IQ diversity is fvcking insane.

    One of the most important things to know…the main reason this country is on the shit slide to hell.

  10. nymom says:

    The only problem with this whole “Eurasia” idea is that Russia (and other European countries) have a very low population compared to the vast numbers in Asia. So I am not sure exactly how it would work out especially if most of the Asia partners decided to up and move to Europe…

    People wise (as opposed to government to government) Europeans and Asians do appear to get alone well for the most part. Noting there are exceptions to every rule…

    Only time will tell how this will play out…

  11. Erebus says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    Your blanket statement regarding development can’t be derived from a snapshot of political development at (in this case) the onset of the industrial revolution.

    America, for instance, has developed quite a bit in the 100 yrs since women got the vote, and it had been a multi-party democracy with ~universal (white) manhood suffrage since 6-7 decades before that. All European countries followed, mutatis mutandis, a similar trajectory.

    Regardless, Democracy ≠ Universal Suffrage, or Political Parties for that matter.

    The interesting thing here is China’s divergence from most other countries. Historically, in most developed countries economic development hit some tipping point and rapid political development followed. Then, economic development accelerated. China is well beyond any historical economic tipping point, but the demand for political change that typically followed in the West is entirely missing. Should that demand materialize, it’ll be interesting to watch what the CCP morphs into.

    Watching the West’s multi-party democracy self-immolate, and the sort of governance that will likely rise from those ashes, otoh, will quite probably mitigate those demands.

  12. Biff says:
    @WC

    The English-speaking nations all did so without ever experiencing a dictatorship.

    If Washington isn’t a dictatorship then I’m King Tut…

  13. Anon[357] • Disclaimer says:

    Eurasia has one big, fundamental problem. It’s lousy at generating wealth (with almost the sole exception of Japan). Even China, which has tried hard to get its momentum going, mostly sends its cash into the pockets of a small elite, which doesn’t trust its government not to steal it. Russia is plagued by a nasty class of monied oligarchs and a general lack of respect for law.

    A country’s culture is simply the expression of the mass behavior of an awful lot of genetic matter, and until the composition of that genetic matter changes significantly, what you see is what you get. Eurasian countries right now are showing all the potential that’s in them to have.

  14. GMC says:

    Both Silk thoroughfares and the Belt/Road systems is great plan and has a future. It will serve the purpose of opening and bringing together Eurasia and East Asia in a positive way. Compared to the ” Example”, that the US and Europe has offered/showed the World, in the past 70 years, one would have to be brain dead, to keep backing the Western NWO. Unfortunately, the USA was built up nicely, then had everything stolen, then built up again – and got burglarized again. Just like Turkey stole all the manufacturing tools and machinery from Syria, the “US Gov.” allowed America’s industry and manufacturing to move first to Mexico and then offshore to China and Asia. Add the Social programs that got looted for Trillions { then given an IOU } and the Private Federal Reserve printing without one check or balance and its pretty simple to say that – anyone criticizing what the Russians and Chinese are doing – is living in a fishbowl. Washington, London, Brussels, and Tel Aviv need to be Foreclosed on . Between the denial and accepting the propaganda BS, its highly likely that the NWO citizens will go down with their ship. Thanks Unz Rev.

  15. RHC says:

    “We’ve always been at war with Eastasia.”

    If they nuke DC, NYC, City of London, and the Levantine HQ I will send them a fruit basket.

  16. Anon[254] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Populated by low IQ… whites & non-whites

    FTFY

    • Agree: Realist
  17. @Erebus

    Yes, perhaps we need to pay closer attention to those tipping points.

    I suspect that they occur when the system bumps into internal, Gödelian contradictions, and no-one has the power to address and resolve them–even though everyone is aware of them.

    China’s process of addressing the ‘leading contradiction’ every five years seems like a smart way to acknowledge that this will happen and build in a mechanism for anticipating and resolving such problems.

    We desperately need it right now.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
  18. Miro23 says:

    The Shanghai Cooperative Organization, SCO. (Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, India, China, and Pakistan; with Afghanistan, Iran, Mongolia and Belarus as observers and Armenia, Azerbaijan, Cambodia, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Turkey as dialog partners). The SCO is the world’s largest security organization and counts four nuclear powers among its members. Its objectives are to (i) strengthen relations among member states; (ii) promote cooperation in political affairs, economics and trade, scientific-technical, cultural, and educational spheres and in energy, transportation, tourism, and environmental protection; (iv) safeguard regional peace, security, and stability; and (v) create a democratic, equitable international political and economic order.

    A good article. The Shanghai Cooperative Organization is interesting, in that it brings together nuclear rivals India and Pakistan and provides a positive framework for interaction with orphans like Iran and Afghanistan.

    The BRI’s (Belt and Road Initiative) Eurasian Land Bridge exemplifies its cooperative model. Added value production, like assembling component parts from different origins, can be conducted tax free in its border Free Trade Zones, where wages are one-fifth of China’s. This allows for the addition of lower cost labor to be factored into the production cost rather than being exposed to one salary band in one country. Goods entering these FTZs attract no customs duty or VAT because they are considered to be outside customs borders, and companies operating within them are exempt from all taxes.

    Signing up for this guarantees de-industrialization and globalization. The difference is that Western global corporate hegemony is substituted by Chinese global corporate hegemony.

    Invulnerability to attack. In the past eighteen months, Russia and China have demonstrated their ability to defend themselves against any attack and, in turn, to destroy every city in the United States inside forty-five minutes. Russia is now helping China build her own Missile Attack Early warning System (SPRN).

    If this is true, 45 minutes to TEOWAKI (The End Of the World As We Know It) isn’t long.

  19. @WC

    Yes, China has 1.4 billion people with an average IQ of 105, so it’s no surprise they’ve come a long way since throwing off the trappings of Maoism. It’s still a sinister, dystopian police state operating in a radically different cultural and historical milieu. They have very little to teach us – save that cultural homogeneity is a huge advantage, and importing low-IQ diversity is fvcking insane.

    White-Cope is a helluva drug.

    More like USA, UK, Canada, France, etc are the sinister, dystopian police states. The New World Order’s wet dream paradise.

    ~ Google was conceived, nurtured, and incubated, and its creation materially buttressed by the deep state. ~

    (https://medium.com/insurge-intelligence/how-the-cia-made-google-e836451a959e)

    ~ The NSA and Five-Eyes monitor every move you make online, North America and Europe, a la the revelations of Udo Ulfkotte.

    ~ 90% of worldwide pedophilia material/content is produced, hosted, and distributed in NA and Europe according to the IWF and Interpol. ~

    (https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/3245003/how-europe-is-now-the-worlds-child-abuse-capital-with-more-than-half-of-all-vile-images-and-videos-filmed-in-europe-and-hosted-on-european-websites/)

    (http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9608/26/german.pedophile/)

    (https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/anneke-lucass-harrowing-tale-of-sex-trafficking-am/)

    ~ Your addiction to pharmaceuticals are killing you while those companies are raking in billions from your corpses. ~

    The NWO’s wet dream indeed.

    • Agree: Godfree Roberts
    • Replies: @BraveNewWorldPlease
    , @Anon
  20. Charon says:
    @Anonymous

    Whites in the European West have been brainwashed by decades of mass media propaganda, aided and abetted by the various Institutions, including Educational, Corporate, and even Ecclesiastical.

    A tireless minority, keen on Domination, has wreaked this demolition, and ultimately Europe and North America will be afterthoughts; vassal states.

    The unique part (historically speaking) is that so many of these European-descended people will have welcomed their own demise.

    Never underestimate the power of propaganda.

  21. Eurasian integration seems to be applying a philosophy & following a trajectory that doesn’t seem to have been much used in the “West” (indeed, the World) for most of its history.
    The West (inc’ Mesopotamia etc) has tended to the exploitative, hegemonic approach. Invade, or over-power a country, put in place a system that essentially exploits a country for the benefit of the hegemonic Power. Yes, this technique has almost infinite variations, where “exploitation” is of a “greater or lesser” extent.
    The US (& UK, Europe) have been particularly adept here. Indeed, from the mid 70’s – 90’s the US & the “West” (esp the UK) have basically “doubled down” on the exploitative approach — that’s what neoliberalism & neo-conservativeism are.
    Lacking friends & allies & devoid of the capacity for change or new thinking (the US has vassals of various degrees of respect) the US is simply gone. (Israel is the exception here, where the tail seems wag the dog) It has no answers to the current world. Except to double-down & double-down again. Short of a miracle it has little hope – just a question of timing & response.
    Europe also seems hopeless. Still completely in thrall to the US, Europe may have missed the greatest opportunity of its recent history by rejecting a part in the earlier phases of Eurasian integration. Still, there is probably time if they could get the gumption up to stand up to the US.
    And, yes, people have a right to question the sincerity & sense of Russia, China here etc.
    However, given the economic, political & climatic instabilities of the contemporary World these issues may be entirely academic…. (A “Polar silk road” ?? That’s not exactly a symptom or sign of a bright future for the World).

  22. Charon says:
    @Anonymous

    Even most Trump and Brexit supporters are not racially aware and are supportive of the mutliracial agenda, and they’re as right wing as it gets in those societies.

    Which may tip you off to the fact that what you call “right wing” will in no wise be the savior of the white race.

    Quite the contrary, the “right wing” has marched in rough lockstep with the left when it comes to sealing the fate of the white race. It’s over now, done.

    • Replies: @Realist
  23. @Godfree Roberts

    The problem with centralized (non-democratic) government is that it tends to get some utterly unworkable idea it its collective bureaucracy and then waste all its capital on trying to make “political reality” into “physical reality”. Suvorov’s _The Chief Culprit_ is a very good description of one such case. Lenin and Stalin both were not really developing the USSR. They were building a one use industrial base intended to invade and conquer Western Europe. After that event turned into a fiasco [1] subsequent Russian leaders were never able to turn their wartime economy into something else [2] (which you would expect from Von Mises’ criticism of pricing in centrally planned economies) and eventually fell. The USSR’s fall was quite an achievement, in that before 1990 it was considered impossible for an industrial State to simply quit functioning and dissolve itself.

    So: you can call the English government with extremely limited franchise “non-democratic”, but the fact is that it’s government was not able to get some wild idea and go loco back then. In a way, the British government after Cromwell was more limited by its constituencies than was the British government that imported foreign voters to remain in power. And that proved critical — the British government after Cromwell had to answer to constituencies that insisted on productive investment of capital. The British made many mistakes back then, but avoided most of the big ones.

    Counterinsurgency

    1] Fiasco: from the Italian “cheap wine bottle”. Like buying a bottle of wine and seeing it hit a rock and smash while it’s still full.
    https://www.thefreedictionary.com/fiasco

    2] Francis Spufford
    _Red Plenty_

  24. Bankotsu says:

    Godfree Roberts, if you are going to publish a book on China, I think you should include a short bio on yourself and how a westerner like yourself could have such views on China that are completely in the minority within western society.

    Chinese like me are not used to westerners having such views on China.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  25. @onebornfree

    onebornfree objected:

    Yet more anti-free market, pro-big government, statist, authoritarian, “government can/should manage all trade”, socialist/communist/fascist, horseshit propaganda

    Hmmm…..

    Over the last seventy years, the Western nations have become enormously more socialistic, bureaucratic, and government-encumbered.

    Russia and China have become enormously less so.

    It seems to me that the direction matters.

    onebornfree concluded:

    “Because they are all ultimately funded via both direct and indirect theft [taxes], and counterfeiting [via central bank monopolies], all governments are essentially, at their very cores, 100% corrupt criminal scams which cannot be “reformed”,”improved”, nor “limited” in scope, simply because of their innate criminal nature.”

    Indeed. But, alas, the anarcho-capitalist utopia does not seem on the horizon in any country. In the interim, which ruling elite do you think is more competent — Beijing or the Washington-New York axis?

  26. Sandmann says:
    @Godfree Roberts

    Some people view the Republic 1649-1660 as a Dictatorship when the New Model Army held the power under Oliver Cromwell. Others view The Sedition Acts and Combination Acts under Pitt the Younger as limiting options free speech and the jailing of John Wilkes – who firstly wanted Voters not the House of Commons to choose Representatives; and had the novel idea of publishing details of Parliamentary Proceedings in the Press……….as evidence of a somewhat unfree country.

    After 1737 Plays had to be licensed in theatres.

    The use of very aggressive Libel Laws reversing burden of proof and DA Notices might be said to inhibit what might be called “a free press” but then again keeping ownership in the hands of Big Money has long been a means of rendering “a free press” compliant ?

    So “WC” I do not share your absolutist viewpoint.

  27. unit472 says:

    The concept of Eurasia is a geo-political fantasy. Maritime trade is essential because rail links are inadequate. The US tied its east and west coasts together by rail by 1870 but the sparsely settled area between Chicago and the Pacific Coast was hard to develop because there were no rivers or large bodies of water to move people and goods upon and rail is comparatively less efficient than water in the movement of people and goods. Thus the need for the Panama Canal! Even today, almost all rail traffic to the west must pass through Chicago because there was no other sizable destination to go to for almost two thousand miles until you reached the Pacific Coast. It took the war against Japan to put enough population and industry into the West to develop a denser rail and road grid that allowed cities like Phoenix and Las Vegas to grow in the desert Southwest.

    The distances between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans via the Eurasian land mass are just too vast. Russia, despite being a single political entity, has not really been able to develop its vast interior spaces because it doesn’t have enough population in its Far East or a interim hub like Chicago to justify denser road and rail grids. Trying to cobble together a more southerly rail or road network is unlikely for the same reasons plus the political fragmentation and borders one must cross to do it.

    China came across the ‘Belt and Road’ concept out of geopolitical necessity not because it offered any economic efficiencies over seaborne trade. Their problem was the US and its allies dominate the and open oceans China was/is decades away from being able to build a blue water navy capable of challenging that naval hegemony. Alternative trade routes hugging the Eurasian land mass seemed an alternative way for China to keep its trade routes safe.

  28. onebornfree says: • Website

    PhysicistDave says: “Over the last seventy years, the Western nations have become enormously more socialistic, bureaucratic, and government-encumbered. Russia and China have become enormously less so…..”

    I’m not sure about your claim vis a vis Russia, as I haven’t looked too closely [although I suspect you are wrong], but it is definitely no longer true of China. China under Xi has once again reverted to totalitarianism.

    The Deng Xiaoping era (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deng_Xiaoping ] of [slightly]more open markets and de-regulation of both businesses and individuals is over, as should be more than obvious to anyone keeping up with the news.

    China is now coasting economically on general standard of living gains made during its recent, all too brief, freer, Deng Xiaoping past. As it continues [under Xi] down the road to hell [ more centralization] for its economy and its citizens, any/all gains made during the brief Xiaoping period will be eroded, possibly very quickly [ie total economic collapse].

    Of course the same course [and end result] is inevitable in the US too, albeit it at a slightly slower rate than China, unless it too reverses course – and even if it does, it might already be too late .

    Regards, onebornfree

    • Agree: Half-Jap
  29. @Bankotsu

    how a westerner like yourself could have such views on China that are completely in the minority within western society.

    You have to remember that in the West minority views are expected and quite often considered good per se [1]. Foreign countries [2] really are foreign.

    See Kevin MacDonald, _Individualism and the Western Liberal Tradition_ [3], for a further treatment of the subject. If you have Amazon Prime, the book is a free download.

    Counterinsurgency

    1] https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1601785
    As a refinement, the WEIRD characteristics generally become stronger as one goes from Eastern to Western Europe, and the emphasis on “fairness” ( as opposed to “individuality”
    ) is stronger as one goes towards the NE. See MacDonald [3].

    2] “Foreign” in the sense of “not your own”.

    3] Kevin MacDonald,
    _Individualism and the Western Liberal Tradition: Evolutionary Origins, History, and Prospects for the Future_
    Publisher: Independently published (September 13, 2019)
    Language: English
    ISBN-10: 1089691483
    ISBN-13: 978-1089691488

  30. @Godfree Roberts

    You maybe right about the number of people dying of starvation in India since 1947, the year of its founding, but what you are not telling us is how many Chinese have died of starvation since 1949, the year the communists took over. My guess is, it is in the millions. And if it wasn’t for the white man opening trade opportunities for China in the last two decades, many more million Chinese would have starved to death. Italy with its multi party democracy has developed just fine, so it isn’t that system but something else. I would hazard that when it comes to opening its door to the goodies, the yellow-man ranks above the brown and the black man in the eyes of the white developed societies. Of course, in due time, China, for all its supposed progress will end up paying a very high price to the western piper.

    • Replies: @Godfree Roberts
    , @Lin
  31. @PhysicistDave

    In the interim, which ruling elite do you think is more competent — Beijing or the Washington-New York axis?

    Competent Washington-New York axis. Now, _that’s_ funny.

    The British managed their takeoff after Cromwell partially because of position, but also because they were ruled democratically by a stable agricultural aristocracy with extensive trading interests, and had a large number of “Dissidents”, very competent semi-Puritans left over from the Cromwell regime and barred from seeking public employment (see Dickens, Scrooge, “A Christmas Carole”, AD 1842), and because Cromwell had laid down a basically sound British colonial strategy. Britain invested its capital productively, and by c.a. AD 1905 had won enough to wipe out the coalition that produced the productivity. And so it goes.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @Ilyana_Rozumova
  32. Here’s the truth: the Anglosphere is in drastic, perhaps terminal, decline. In terms of human capital alone, the United States of America is screwed, as whites move from majority to plurality. As the USA gets more brown, it will become more irrational, and I can’t blame countries for opting out of it.

    Ask a Chinaman, “what happens when you become a majority Mexican state?” And he will reply with, “Mexico!” Ask this to a white American, and he will respond with great anger and call you a racist.

    Canada is not doing so well either, the amount of depression, debt slavery, societal dysfunction, and alienation is massive. We are being flooded with low IQ immigrants, roads are failing, the debt is soaring, the environment being destroyed to build housing. Indians are coming in, taking huge debts, and destroying the middle class. No white Canadian dares speak up.

    As a proud Anglo it is with great shame and sadness that I see our lands being destroyed and our people becoming lunatics. At our best, we are the best. In our current state, we deserve to be beaten and I wish the rest of the world luck in developing alternatives that allow for the respect and dignity of all, while preserving local cultures.

    • Replies: @bikeanarkist
    , @Brown Boiii
  33. Che Guava says:

    God-free,

    Having spent 5 years growing up and being educated in Singapore (with many visits to Malaysia), your account of ASEAN is incorrect (as you so often are).

    Your sentence re. that is incorrect, ASEAN was originally formed as a cold-war entity. It was conceived as a replcement for SEATO, one of several U.S.A. confections. at the time.

    Vietnam and Cambodia were very late members.

    AFAIK, Laos is not (the system is stil like Belarus), mantaining many Communist institutions.

    Looking at those, they seem quite great!

  34. voicum says:
    @onebornfree

    Nobody stops you to go and shoot some skunks in your back yard , skin them and go and exchange the skins for goods whit your friends.There you go ‘free market’ for you.

  35. Agent76 says:

    May 2015 US “Grand Strategy” for war against China laid out

    The advanced stage of discussions in US foreign policy circles over the pursuit of an ever-more aggressive policy toward China has been revealed by the recent release of a chilling report under the auspices of the influential Council on Foreign Relations. Entitled “Revising US Grand Strategy Toward China,” the report is nothing less than an agenda for war.

    https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/05/02/chin-m02.html

    Nov 1, 2019 US-China Trade Deal Hits a Snag | China News Headlines

    The US China Trade Deal is off, at least for now. Halloween in Hong Kong is full of tricks and very little treats. The US challenges China in the UN.

  36. Yee says:

    Miro23,

    “Signing up for this guarantees de-industrialization and globalization. ”

    There’s no turning back of globalization now…

    Most countries in the world are not big enough to run a full industrial system. As a matter of fact, the only country currently has a full system is China.

    The only way left for other developing countries is to become part of the global supply chain. Therefore, you don’t need obstacles on trade, it’d only add to the cost of production. Protectionism is pointless for small countries because they can’t make everything themselves and they can’t afford to give up international market either.

  37. Yee says:

    I think the future might end up Europe, East Asia, America become relatively independent of each other.

    With Africans and Arabs going to Europe, central Americans going to US, both region would have low pay labor to level with East Asia.

    • Replies: @Anon
  38. @Counterinsurgency

    Mentioning Cromwell?
    Charles first was not a dictator. All he did was appeasing the nobility.
    Cromwell took power and he become a dictator. He taxed hell out of nobility.
    While under Charles England built one warship a a year, Cromwell built from six to seven warships a year. That did guarantee that England did rule the waves. It guaranteed England move toward preeminence of England in the word, rule of England over India Australia and many other countries.
    But it all have passed now.
    I am only pointing out that only dictator can make something from the country.
    ……………………………………
    Concerning the article; it is truly monumental work.
    Eurasia is on the way to become the center of the world. And maybe rightfully so.
    First the economic unity.
    Than political unity.
    Than finally a collective defense unity.

    Dreams of US Zio-Globalists rulling the world will only remains dreams until the end of times.
    ……………………………………
    But concerning what is happening; now is that China is looking for large market for their overstock products, because China is worrying that US market is not enough, and is worrying also that US dollar in not on very solid footing.

  39. The problem with using Rostow’s purely technical definition is that it fixates on more shit through the goose. It’s a good example of US economics: make an abstract mathematical model that assumes away institutional exploitation or resource allocation, and optimize one greedy objective, in this case growth.

    By contrast, the civilized world including Eurasia has defined development as fulfillment of human rights (the US was the only country in the world to reject this.) The idea is to divert resources from blowing shit up and locking people up and spying on them to economic and other rights. This article would benefit from including the grandaddy of all international development organizations, ECOSOC, a charter body of the UN.

    Instead of making more rats race faster, you could put states to work using the core human rights instruments as work rules. Venezuela does that – that’s why the US calls it socialist and tries to knock it over. Libya did that – that’s why George H.W. Bush tried to fight a war with it, and Hillary traveled thousands of miles to celebrate when Qaddafy got buttfucked by a bayonet.

    Here is the civilized world’s definition of development.

    https://www.un.org/en/events/righttodevelopment/

    https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/ProfessionalInterest/rtd.pdf

    • Agree: Erebus
    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  40. @LoutishAngloQuebecker

    the Anglosphere is in drastic, perhaps terminal, decline.

    The countries are but English language use is far beyond that within the Anglocountries.

    Canada is not doing so well either

    Not forgetting the low IQ political puppets that propagate throughout the Coloured Team Political Parties (Red, Blue, Green, Orange).

    And, to top it off, the government of Canada has become a ZOG, as the limits to free speech and Political Correctness threaten the remaining anchors of alternative and contrarian thought.

    To top it off: CBC News Division is actually owned by CBS.

  41. Richard B says:
    @PhysicistDave

    which ruling elite do you think is more competent — Beijing or the Washington-New York axis?

    It’s an interesting quesiton exactly because it has more than one answer.

    Before offering an answer, it’d be more accurate to add Tel Aviv to the hostile elite in the West (London and Brussels too, while we’re at it). More on them later.

    From that perspective we could say that Bejing is less incompetent.

    But that incompetence will grow fast exactly because China itself is growing fast – way too fast.

    In other words, the speed of change is greater than its ability to manage it.

    They’re in the position of a scientist whose theory produces more data than they can respond to, and another kind of data that it can’t respond to at all because it’s beyond the range of the theory.

    In short, they’re in way over their heads. The result will an increase in incompetent decision-making (and corruption, already a problem) and a corresponding need to conceal this in the usual way – propaganda and censorship.

    If enough people in positions of power in China experience this, and if the word gets out, the result will be a devastating social incoherence. And now we’re back to the evil axis of NYC, DC, Tel Aviv.

    For them (and us) the future has already happened.

    That would explain why, now that the hostile elite who control the West have essentially sucked all of the blood out of it, it’s currently engaged in a Fire Sale, where everything must go, and a sale, moreover, with only one buyer – China.

    • Agree: Counterinsurgency
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  42. ricpic says:

    The Belt and Road Initiative is mercantilism, plain and simple. China’s not fooling anyone but Mr. Roberts.

  43. @Counterinsurgency

    Most of what “Suvorov” ever wrote is a bunch of lies, starting with his name (his real last name is Rezun). If he claims something, that something is most likely untrue.

  44. @LoutishAngloQuebecker

    Accepting defeat gracefully is a virtue, and I think your complex around Indians is due to your previous history.

    The narrative you’ve propogated around Indian society leaves them no room but to be on the offensive.

    Indian society according to the BBC is hopelessly mired in caste & misogyny. Any non self-hating Indian would then desire nothing less than the destruction and enslavement of the white race.

    Yet, you still find many sympathetic to the perils of the west which speaks to the inherent compassion of Sanatan Dharma.

  45. @unit472

    The idea that two countries might have a lot in common because they were on the same continent used to be called “they myth of continents” in geopolitics. The question was, back in the 1800s, whether sea power or land power would be decisive in what was seen then as the probable uniting of the Earth under improved transportation and communications.

    McKinder saw the conflict as between Asia and the Americas (Germany and the UK / Americas). “Myth of continents” pointed out that sea travel is so much cheaper and faster than land travel that an island continent like North America (or a flat island, like the UK in earlier times) could deliver goods and military force to a coastal strip on each continent much more cheaply than, say, China could ever deliver goods to Moscow. McKinder, however, saw Asia as eventually wining the competition simply because it could control more resources (Africa, say) with overland routes that the sea power couldn’t touch, then building a Navy to defeat the Americas. You see faint echoes of this in _1984_. Obviously developments in firepower and other weapons technologies has made McKinder’s analysis questionable.

    In any case, the idea that continents aren’t all that important is a fairly well tested one, and seems to be true — at least for the time being.

    Counterinsurgency

  46. @4. 2X bigger fake tits for Louise Linton

    Here is the civilized world’s definition of development.

    https://www.un.org/en/events/righttodevelopment/

    https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/ProfessionalInterest/rtd.pdf

    Get into a fight with the national government anywhere in the world because the local politico thinks you should have bribed him with more respect and money. You will find that this same government is completely in compliance with the principles of development, and you aren’t.

    It is a very old game.

    Counterinsurgency

  47. @Counterinsurgency

    “So: you can call the English government with extremely limited franchise “non-democratic”, but the fact is that it’s government was not able to get some wild idea and go loco back then.”

    The High Speed 2 rail project has quadrupled in estimated budget and now exceeds £100bn. Economic benefit is hypothetical and uncertain, and nowhere near break-even. For that cost, hundreds of miles of areas of outstanding natural beauty will be concreted over and thousands of dwellings knocked down. If this is not “going loco over a wild idea”, then I don’t know what is.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  48. Half-Jap says:
    @onebornfree

    Chill man, it’s just his utopian belief and preference, and we all know what happened to every attempt at utopia…

    I agree that every government is essentially an officially sanctioned mafia, whether sanctioned by ‘God’ as in the recent past, or by ‘the will of the people’ as the myopic believe. But there has never been any purely voluntary society either, not even in tribal, subsistence ‘communist’ communities. There is always a party with greater power than another, such as when one’s need is greater than the other’s need for the exchange.

  49. Bob in DC says: • Website

    Karl Haushofer was a colleague of Halford Mackinder, and the mentor of Rudolf Hess. It was likely he who influenced the extreme, and ultimately fatal, aspects of Adolf Hitler’s Lebensraum policy. His wife was Jewish.

  50. Lisbon says:
    @Anonymous

    I agree. America and the UK are finished.

    – They decided to invest all the cash in the NATO.

    – America and the UK want to conquer the world through AGRESSION. They have always done so. They are HATED worldwide. They are LOST.

    – America and the UK operate through INTIMIDATION and EXTORTION on the five continents with their weapons. They are LOST

    – The SCO members act like WINNERS. They will WIN:

    The Bishkek Declaration, adopted by SCO members, emphasizes the security guarantees of the Central Asian Nuclear-Weapons-Free Zone Treaty, the ‘unacceptability of attempts to ensure one country’s security at the expense of other countries’ security,’ and condemns ‘the unilateral and unlimited buildup of missile defense systems by certain countries or groups of states.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  51. denk says:
    @WC

    It’s still a sinister, dystopian police state operating in a radically different cultural and historical milieu. They have very little to teach us

    Agreed.
    When it comes to B.S, YOu guys are the pro.
    The CCP should send its minister of propaganda to a one year internship at the Guardaian, or any of the premier
    five liars media.

    http://www.unz.com/freed/a-recruiting-poster/#comment-3529334

  52. Lisbon says:

    “Russia and China have outstripped America economically and militarily within Eurasia and are in the process of drawing the European Union into a vast, increasingly prosperous alliance”

    Europe must respect the Lisbon Treaty while making sure that NATO will NOT try to use the last clause of this treaty (please see below) to HIGHJACK the EU and militarily intimidate the China-Russia-Iran alliance.

    {NATO recently added 12 new military bases in Europe}:

    The Treaty of Lisbon
    {excerpt, emphasis added}

    “On the common security and defence policy (CSDP) (5.1.2), the Lisbon Treaty introduces a mutual defence clause which provides that all Member States are obliged to provide help to a Member State under attack. A solidarity clause provides that the Union and each of its Member States have to provide assistance by all possible means to a Member State affected by a human or natural catastrophe or by a terrorist attack. A ‘permanent structured cooperation’ is open to all Member States which commit themselves to taking part in European military equipment programmes and to providing combat units that are available for immediate action. To establish such cooperation, it is necessary to obtain a qualified majority in Council after consultation with the VP/HR.”

    http://www.europarl.europa.eu/factsheets/en/sheet/5/the-treaty-of-lisbon

  53. denk says:
    @WC

    The English-speaking nations

    The Five Eyes is the name of an international crime cartel. Previously known as the British Empire it specialized in piracy (Elizabethan Era), drug running (Opium Wars), kidnapping for ransom, armed robbery (aka Gunboat Diplomacy), extortion, and mass murder, mostly in India, China, and Africa. After WW II the family business was taken over by the US branch who changed the name to “Free World Inc.” and expanded to include Latin America, Korea, and Japan.
    [wsws]

  54. @onebornfree

    onebornfree,

    Don’t you libertarians realize that you have lost? Ron Paul (whom I love for his anti-war views) was your high water mark. It’s been all down hill since then.

  55. @Erebus

    I had been growing more and more skeptical of democracy, specifically the fake US one (which is the only one I know), with every passing year, but finally became convinced that it is a destructive ideology after reading “The End of Democracy” by Christophe Buffin de Chosal.

    And our republic took a major, and fatal, hit when women were given the vote.

  56. Vidi says:
    @unit472

    The concept of Eurasia is a geo-political fantasy. Maritime trade is essential because rail links are inadequate. The US tied its east and west coasts together by rail by 1870 but the sparsely settled area between Chicago and the Pacific Coast was hard to develop because there were no rivers or large bodies of water to move people and goods upon and rail is comparatively less efficient than water in the movement of people and goods.

    Rail is usually less efficient than shipping; I doubt anyone contests that. However, there’s a more important question: will rail be efficient enough to give Eurasian countries viable alternatives to American hegemony? I think so.

    • Replies: @Ilyana_Rozumova
  57. I’m sure all you bastards are just tickled pink the thugs ousted Morales. You’re on the thug side. Always the thug side.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  58. @Richard B

    Richard B wrote to me:

    From that perspective we could say that Bejing is less incompetent.

    But that incompetence will grow fast exactly because China itself is growing fast – way too fast.

    In other words, the speed of change is greater than its ability to manage it.

    Yeah, that is certainly a possibility.

    I’m not a big fan of any government, and certainly not the ChiComs. And even if the rulers of China were of superhuman levels of benevolence and integrity, they would face some daunting challenges.

    What I do object to is those who paint China (or Russia) all in black and the USA all in white. It is nowadays in fact all different shades of gray (I cheerfully concede that China under Mao and Russia under Stalin were indeed deepest black).

    If, as our friend above suggested, the USA is such a beacon of free speech, why are most of the media (even most right-leaning media) afraid to mention the name of the alleged whistle-blower, Eric Ciaramella?

    Mollie Hemingway finally got so exasperated today that she did mention it on Fox, on the Howie Kurtz show: poor Howie looked as if he had severe indigestion!

    We live now under “soft totalitarianism” in the USA, nothing like the Stalinist or Maoist terrors, of course, but comparable to life in Russia or China today.

    Americans today remind me of the title of Milton Mayer’s classic about Germans under Nazism: They Thought They Were Free.

  59. @Vidi

    I do have to contest that. Shipping is more efficient for large volumes, particularly bulk materials.
    Concerning processed goods the volume has to be large (ship has to be more or less full) to be more efficient. Smaller volumes, particularly perishable goods. more efficient is train transport.

    • Replies: @Showmethereal
  60. anon[113] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    CIARAMELLA
    …CHALUPA
    …….OHR

    It’ll happen.

  61. Miro23 says:
    @PhysicistDave

    We live now under “soft totalitarianism” in the USA, nothing like the Stalinist or Maoist terrors, of course, but comparable to life in Russia or China today.

    There is some similarity. All three have elites that don’t accept any real threat to their power. And each of them controls their respective MSM. On this reading, Russia has a Russian KGB elite, China has a Chinese Communist elite and the US has a Jewish radical elite (with Gentile collaborators).

  62. Anonymous[398] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s amazed me that no one in the comments seems care any little about what Xunzi said regarding to the Hegemony VS Humanitarian Leadership.
    But again, why should I be surprised since people in the comments seems naturally resent the government(any kind of government). How could such people believe in anything Xunzi said about Humanitarian Leadership since under their logic there is nothing good a government/leader can do? Xunzi and his humanitarian leadership would be simply taken as some kind of Utopia nonsense propaganda that could never be realized and thus become meaningless and worthless for any discussions.

    ‘They have very little to teach us – save that cultural homogeneity is a huge advantage, …’
    How do they reach such cultural homogeneity with such huge size?——–Why don’t you ever think of this question?
    Again, is it impossible to imagine that one day all human being on Earth will eventually reach some kind of cultural homogeneity? It’s already happening with the bright side industrialization, modernization, globalization, and the dark side colonialism, imperialism. Yin and Yang works everywhere.
    If you try to build the common trust on common benefit and interest, gradually you will get the common values and finally, aha, the cultural homogeneity.
    Even if you fail to make it, as long as you keep trying, you get the direction for the common people.
    Believe in what you keep saying, you will be there.
    Believe in white and non-white, you be there racist and colonialism, invade and invite.
    Believe in my nation first, you be there nationalism protectionism and conflicts with others.
    Believe in multicultural, you be there more fractions of cultures.
    Believe in democracy, you be there parties do whatever to get vote.
    Believe in freedom, you be there privileged people do whatever they want to do.
    Believe in China bad and ChiCom bad, you be there a really bad enemy you created.

    How about we believe in common good for common people, we be there common values built and common future shared?

    People once believed in religions devoutly (btw, it’s also ridiculous nonsense in some others eyes), why not give a try on morality? You guys just have no trust in goodness of humanity, don’t you? Just can’t give up being the privileged ones and become the common guy, right? Well, rehab measures needed for addictions.

    Instead of pointing fingers or simply go back to some old ways, people can always try to come up with some solutions.

    It’s totally right that China solution is in short of theory, and in unknown risks.
    At least, it’s some solution.
    This world would award the scholar who come up with whole theory about China story.

    • Agree: Godfree Roberts
    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  63. Richard B says:
    @PhysicistDave

    If, as our friend above suggested, the USA is such a beacon of free speech….

    Do people really think that today?

    If Americans believed in freedom of speech there’d be no such thing as Political Correctness.

    I lived and worked in Latin America for 20 years and enjoyed more free speech there than I ever did in the USA.

    What I do object to is those who paint China (or Russia) all in black and the USA all in white.

    Agreed.

    In fact, constantly and mindlessly applying this kind of over-simplified, Either/Or thinking to a complex world has deluded many Americans into believing they still have freedom of speech when they lost it a long time ago.

    It also explains why

    We live now under “soft totalitarianism” in the USA

  64. @Plato's Dream

    The High Speed 2 rail project has quadrupled in estimated budget and now exceeds £100bn. Economic benefit is hypothetical and uncertain, and nowhere near break-even. For that cost, hundreds of miles of areas of outstanding natural beauty will be concreted over and thousands of dwellings knocked down. If this is not “going loco over a wild idea”, then I don’t know what is.

    Heh. I fully agree. My actual text was: “it’s government was not able to get some wild idea and go loco back then.”, and I used past tense for a very strong reason.
    We’re faced with the usual problem of co-evolution. The prey develops a counter to existing parasites / predators / grazers, and then, wow, new set of parasites / predators / grazers develops with new strategies.

    As the US and EU are now demonstrating, contemporary “democracies” are not run by the demos, or in fact by anybody outside of government. They are run by the political establishment, to include the bureaucracy. The political establishment, by the same token, is run by ideas that appeal to (pardon the description) over educated mediocrities who have spent their entire working lives in “political reality”. These ideas can be and have been just about anything that won’t stop the flow of paperwork. [1]

    So, yes, contemporary “democracies” can indeed get some wild idea and go loco, sorry if I misled.

    Counterinsurgency

    1] Supposedly when Metternich was finally driven from his post, his assistant on the way out pointed to a room full of clerks and said something like “We will be all right, but what will these people do?”. Metternich said something like “The clerks? The clerks go on forever.”

  65. @Lisbon

    The SCO members act like WINNERS. They will WIN:

    What does “SCO” mean? Please add footnotes that explain acronyms, or at least put the words associated with the acronyms in parentheses after the acronyms, as in NGO (Non-Governmental Organization).

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @anon_231
  66. Realist says:
    @Charon

    Quite the contrary, the “right wing” has marched in rough lockstep with the left when it comes to sealing the fate of the white race. It’s over now, done.

    The Deep State doesn’t care about the unimportant internecine squabbles of the ‘two parties’ as long as their important issues are maintained. As a matter of fact it strengthens the false perception that there is a choice when voting.

    • Agree: Showmethereal
  67. @Counterinsurgency

    “The problem with centralized (non-democratic) government is that it tends to get some utterly unworkable idea it its collective bureaucracy and then waste all its capital on trying to make “political reality” into “physical reality”.”

    The problem is the China is neither centralized nor non-democratic.

    It is more economically decentralized than federal Switzerland:

    And more democratic that the USA (a low bar, admittedly): https://www.unz.com/article/selling-democracy-to-china/.

    • Replies: @John Arthur
  68. @Really No Shit

    I wrote about famine deaths here on the Unz Review: http://www.unz.com/article/mao-reconsidered-part-two-whose-famine/

    I conclude that, though no-one died of starvation, the US cereal embargo was responsible for excess deaths of people aged over 60.

  69. @Erebus

    From what I read of Chinese history, when China reaches certain richness levels, it’s govt official corruption goes off the roof, not unlike the current US govt. This usually causes peasant revolts after a century or two.

    What we all need to watch for is if China legalizes the corruption like the USA, ie lobbying money, millions in “donations” or “retirement 200 mil book deals” or “cushy wallstreet jobs” n superpacs.

    When these happens, that will be the start of the Chinese end cycle for the Chinese CCP led govt. Just like the USA right now.

    • Replies: @Showmethereal
  70. @PhysicistDave

    You read like a smarter, well adjusted version of derb.

  71. @WC

    Which ones did? Europe and the US industrialized without giving everyone the vote. South Korea – Japan – Taiwan… Nope – were u der military dictatorship. Democracy is only feasible in a rich society. At that point it is more about banter and stemming the stagnation that occurs when societies get lazy.
    Free “mainstream” press is a fallacy at any rate. Either overtly or covertly press is censored or biased to fit a narrative.

  72. @Astuteobservor II

    Correct. That is the real reason Xi is seen as a threat to those who want China to fail. He is having corrupt officials jailed for life or executed. He has especially targeted graft in the military… A corrupt and militarily weak China is no threat. Since he is changing both of those he is the western media’s boogeyman. He doesnt have the persona of Putin though

    • Agree: Godfree Roberts
  73. @Ilyana_Rozumova

    Yes generallly the nodes are such than – cheaper and non perishable goods go by ship. Expensive goods that require speed go by plame. Trains split the difference between the two in speed – cost – and capacity.
    I say generally because not all fit the mold — some exceptions exist like cars…. But even now luxury cars from Germany are increasingly being shipped by rail to China rather than ship. Customers pay a premium for the vehicle and so getting their special order faster makes a big difference.

  74. @obwandiyag

    That story is still developing. Thugs overplayed their hand by engaging in widespread looting. Thus, if repeat elections are really held, the support for thugs is likely to wane. So, the State Department would likely do its level best to either prevent new elections or falsify their results. But the people of Bolivia might ruin State Department plans, like the people of Venezuela, Mexico, and Argentina did. Stay tuned.

  75. On the ‘belt’ part of BRI –

    Land transport doesn’t compete with seas Godfree. Never have. Never will.

    China will do very well in this century. May even overtake America. Other Asian countries may also do well. But trust me, barring some technological leap, this overland freight transport to Europe thing is a non-starter. It will remain a niche service.

    • Replies: @Vidi
  76. @Anonymous

    How about we believe in common good for common people, we be there common values built and common future shared?

    Tried that, back in the 1950s. 101st Airborne to integrate a high school, among other things. By 2008 the populations that had been “accepted” were not accepting the people who had accepted them. The policy had been rejected by the populations who were supposedly its beneficiaries.

    If China wants to do the same thing, it’s perfectly free to try; nobody on Earth can stop it.

    Counterinsurgency

  77. Erebus says:

    Land transport doesn’t compete with seas Godfree. Never have. Never will.

    It’s not supposed to.

    The land corridors aren’t simply transport. They’re intended to be value added corridors where local inputs such as labour, components, etc are added as the products move across the continent. It’s more about economic integration, and less about transport.

    Orders of magnitude more ambitious and sophisticated than the simplistic picture that the West’s coverage of BRI paints of freight trains full of Chinese appliances trundling to Europe.

  78. @Erebus

    The land corridors aren’t simply transport. They’re intended to be value added corridors where local inputs such as labour, components, etc are added as the products move across the continent. It’s more about economic integration, and less about transport.

    If the PRC can get the populations along the Silk Road to add value to manufactured goods, they’ll be the first in history to do that.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @Erebus
  79. @anon_231

    Got it. Thanks! Important addition to what I know.

    Counterinsurgency

  80. Erebus says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    … they’ll be the first in history to do that.

    Yeah, but it won’t be their first first.

    • Agree: d dan
  81. denk says:
    @WC

    The Chinese have nuthin to teach us…

    The Chinese do not deign to teach anybody any damned thing, they just mind their own biz , trying to survive in a very hostile world.

    Its the self appointed ‘world cop’ , who think its his biz to pontificate on ‘human rights;, lecture on ‘rule of law’

    Inspite of the following….

    BLood for oil,
    Economic hitman,
    R2p[lunder],
    False flags,
    Perpetual wars on false pretext,
    State terrorism….
    Biowarfare,,,,.

    Hence,
    The questions to ask should be…..

    Does the world’s no 1 rogue state has anything to teach the world ??

    Why are the criminals in Washington still holding court on the world stage, as ‘arbiter’ of ‘human rights’ and ‘rule of law ‘??

    Why aint BUsh, Clinton, OBama, Trump, Cheney, Rumsfeld, Wolferwicz,…..in the dock answering for their supreme international crimes., as defined in the Nuremberg trial.

  82. Vidi says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    The problem with centralized (non-democratic) government is that it tends to get some utterly unworkable idea it its collective bureaucracy and then waste all its capital on trying to make “political reality” into “physical reality”.

    Then the U.S. is non-democratic by your definition; the invasion of Iraq proves it. That disaster had all the features that you hate: it was a horrible idea that nevertheless was rammed through the U.S. and proceeded to kill uncounted numbers of Iraqis.

    So take your pick: a non-democratic U.S. that routinely kills people by the millions round the globe, or a non-democratic China that does not do that.

    • Agree: Showmethereal
  83. Vidi says:
    @Hanoodtroll

    But trust me, barring some technological leap, this overland freight transport to Europe thing is a non-starter. It will remain a niche service.

    Even a “niche service” is better than nothing. An American blockade is meaningless if key goods and resources can still be transported around Eurasia. By permitting such transport in emergencies, the BRI will be extremely important in uniting the Heartland.

  84. dfordoom says: • Website
    @unit472

    Maritime trade is essential because rail links are inadequate.

    Maritime trade is great but in order to protect it you need a very large very powerful navy. And very large very powerful navies are very expensive. Very few countries have ever been able to afford them. The Spanish in the 16th century were fabulously rich but had major problems protecting their maritime trade. The British managed it for a while but by 1914 they could no longer afford it. In the First World War Britain’s navy would have been hopelessly overstretched without their Japanese allies. Britain’s inability to afford a powerful navy was the reason they ended up as an American vassal state after WW2.

    The Japanese lost WW2 because their powerful navy was not powerful enough to protect their maritime trade routes.

    Today the only country that can afford to protect its maritime trade is the United States. All other countries dependent on maritime trade have become American vassal states.

    Maritime trade is cheap but relying on it is a seriously bad idea.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  85. @dfordoom

    Maritime trade is cheap but relying on it is a seriously bad idea.

    You can make that case, but note what has happened to N. Korea. Cutting a country off from world trade hasn’t seemed to work well either.

    All other countries dependent on maritime trade have become American vassal states.

    Not quite. China is dependent on maritime trade for its raw materials, and is not an American vassal state. Ability to blockade doesn’t mean absolute dominance, it just means ability to influence. Sometimes not even that — e.g. Iran.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  86. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Counterinsurgency

    Maritime trade is cheap but relying on it is a seriously bad idea.

    You can make that case, but note what has happened to N. Korea. Cutting a country off from world trade hasn’t seemed to work well either.

    Yeah, if you’re unlucky enough to be unable to avoid dependence on maritime trade then you’re screwed. But my point is that if you have the option of not having to depend on maritime trade then unless you’re a superpower the wise move is to avoid that dependence. That seems to be the thinking of China and Russia and I think it’s sound thinking. It might have economic costs but those costs are probably worth paying.

    Not quite. China is dependent on maritime trade for its raw materials, and is not an American vassal state.

    But if it comes to the crunch the Chinese do not have the capability, at this stage, to keep their sea lanes open.

    And the US certainly intends to try to make both Russia and China into American vassal states. Whether they can succeed is another matter, but it looks increasingly like they are prepared to risk war in order to do so.The United States has never been prepared to accept the existence of any serious rival, economic political or military.

  87. @WhiteCoper

    To encourage readers to read more of the article linked-to by your first link (medium.com) above, here’s a tiny slice from it:

    “… We now know that just two months before O’Neill’s address at Harvard in 2001, under the TIA program, President Bush had secretly authorized the NSA’s domestic surveillance of Americans without court-approved warrants, in what appears to have been an illegal modification of the ThinThread data-mining project — as later exposed by NSA whistleblowers William Binney and Thomas Drake.

    “The surveillance-startup nexus
    “From here on, Highlands Forum partner SAIC played a key role in the NSA roll out from inception. Shortly after 9/11, Brian Sharkey, chief technology officer of SAIC’s ELS3 Sector (focusing on IT systems for emergency responders), teamed up with John Poindexter to propose the TIA surveillance program. …”

    The article documents in enormous detail what we already kind of knew.

    I haven’t read it all, but I hope it also proposes some reason for hope for the future.

  88. Godfree, I was always skeptical of the concept of Eurasia. Mainly because I never felt like there was any great economical benefit for the cost of placing infrasturcture through the underdeveloped Central Asian countries.
    My guess is that China is fine where it is, and the level of connectivity between Europe and it are more or less adaquate for the Chinese needs.
    I feel like SouthEast Asia is a better place for China to interconnect with, as they are countries that are growing fast and are not moving away from competition and trade the way that the corrupt and stagnant EU is doing.
    For instance Vietnam has a similiar IQ to China, and is currently underdeveloped, with still a growing population. To me it seems that Vietnam offers more opportunity than Spain or Portugal over the long run, but I cant be too sure about this.
    Anyways those were just my thoughts, Europe, unless major reform occurs, will keep on stagnating and playing a lesser role in the world going forward.

  89. @Godfree Roberts

    Yes countries that are decentralized tend to be more successful than centralized countries. China’s more state intensive economy is coupled with Switzerland decentralization for very good positive effect.
    For instance, the Chinese didn’t know how to spur growth in the beginning, so they made some special economic zones and followed the more successful ones, like Shenzhen, and copied that results nationwide. If you were to ask the United States to take the lessons of Successful Texas and California and copy them in Alabama and the Midwest, you would have dramatically less problems today. Alas, we are a very stupid nation.

  90. @Godfree Roberts

    Here’s a contradiction for you. Growth is not good. It is bad. If you get one on your colon, you’re dead. I can’t believe how many relatively sane people are still plugged into that ancient unlimited growth crap. Here’s another contradiction. Growth is not growth. It is despoliation. Look it up.

    • Replies: @Erebus
  91. Erebus says:
    @obwandiyag

    Here’s a contradiction for you….

    The notion of “Progress” is relatively new.

    As an organizing principle, it arose at the onset of the West’s industrial revolution and has brought us to a point where we can see that there is indeed a limit to unlimited growth. The limit was dramatically brought forward by Progress’ corollary – a step function increase in population. Had we held at the ~2B population of 1900, we’d be nowhere near the limits we now see looming dead ahead.

    Not much longer into the 21st century, “Progress” will come to mean the inverse of “growth”.

    • Replies: @Ilyana_Rozumova
  92. @Erebus

    There are so many types of progress that you would not be able to count them.
    Generalization in this case is totally absurd.

  93. Anon[201] • Disclaimer says:
    @Yee

    “Yee says:

    With Africans and Arabs going to Europe, central Americans going to US, both region would have low pay labor to level with East Asia”

    It’s mostly people from east Europe that come to work in Britain.

  94. Lin says:
    @Really No Shit

    You maybe right about the number of people dying of starvation in India since 1947, the year of its founding, but what you are not telling us is how many Chinese have died of starvation since 1949, the year the communists took over

    Sure many Chinese starved during the 3 bad years 1958-1961 but the numbers were highly exaggerated.
    …..
    Some facts to ponder: 50-60% of india land are cultivable. Chinese figure at most 15% though land area 3 times as big; still india has more farm land and has more water and overall warmer. Yet indian grain production in 2015 was about 200 kg/capita and the Chinese figure in 1978,one year after the cultural revolution, was 300 kg/capita. The indian agricultural scene is more a reflection of the hindu social structure than anything else.
    Chinese grain production in 2018 was about 470 kg/capita, supplemented by about 70kg/capita of imports(mostly fodders like soy).Corn has displaced rice as the biggest crop in china because of meat consumption and fodders demand. Chinese meat consumption in 2018 was about 60 kg/capita.

    And if it wasn’t for the white man opening trade opportunities for China in the last two decades, many more million Chinese would have starved to death

    That’s just nonsense repeated many times

    • Replies: @Really No Shit
  95. Anon[971] • Disclaimer says:
    @WhiteCoper

    “White-Cope is a helluva drug”

    “More like USA, UK, Canada, France, etc are ~ 90% of worldwide pedophilia material/content is produced, hosted, and distributed in NA and Europe according to the IWF and Interpol. ~”

    A lot of countries wouldn’t even have laws against rape or paedophilia if it weren’t for the influence of some of those countries, in some parts of Africa a woman is thought to be raped every 26 seconds and about 41℅ of those those rape victims are children.

    (https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/3245003/how-europe-is-now-the-worlds-child-abuse-capital-with-more-than-half-of-all-vile-images-and-videos-filmed-in-europe-and-hosted-on-european-websites/)

    “~ Your addiction to pharmaceuticals are killing you while those companies are raking in billions from your corpses. ~”

    I think this is someone’s ‘cope’, a big reason for the population boom in the third world in that last 60 years or so is due to improvements in medicine.

    And why do you use ‘you’ as if you assume that what you’re saying applies to the the person you’re talking to?

  96. @Lin

    You maybe an expert on Hindu culture and thus its effects on farming methods and resultant yields of grain, however, I am not, and therefore, I wouldn’t attribute the low crop productions to something so idiotic as cultural norms but more likely on some other yet unknown things.

  97. Lin says:

    You maybe an expert on Hindu culture and thus its effects on farming methods and resultant yields of grain

    Relax. I’m a relatively well read person with a wide range of interest but I’m not an ‘expert on hindu culture’ nor on farming.
    It’s actually quite simple:
    USA has very manpower efficient agricultural production and also advanced bio-tech, as a result US farm products are price competitive. A tractor+combine harvester can do the jobs of 100 indian farm workers.
    ….
    Because of the population and (often under-reported)unemployment problem, it’ll be a social disaster even if the india agriculture can become as mechanized as the US’s. With such meagre income, what could the poor Indians buy? So even the poor indian (non-land owner)farm hands can’t afford much food, hence low demand for food as well. The whole thing runs into a vicious circle. Also throw in the caste system there and you can get a good picture what’s happening there.
    25 million Indians applied for 90000 railway jobs:
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-india-unemployment-railways/more-than-25-million-people-apply-for-indian-railway-vacancies-idUSKBN1H524C
    …….
    Chinese demographic pressure has levelled off. A significant portion of Chinese registered as ‘rural inhabitants’ have actually migrated to cities findings jobs like construction, factory… workers. The actual % of Chinese family with agriculture as main source of income is about 17% I think.
    17% is still high(though china has no problem manufacturing large number of tractors and combines; china has the biggest auto-making industry in the world) and that’s one of the indicators china is still a developing country

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