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How America Went from Mom-and-Pop Capitalism to Techno-Feudalism
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The crisis of 2020 has created the greatest wealth gap in history. The middle class, capitalism and democracy are all under threat. What went wrong and what can be done?

In a matter of decades, the United States has gone from a largely benign form of capitalism to a neo-feudal form that has created an ever-widening gap in wealth and power. In his 2013 bestseller Capital in the 21st Century, French economist Thomas Piketty declared that “the level of inequality in the US is probably higher than in any other society at any time in the past anywhere in the world.” In a 2014 podcast about the book, Bill Moyers commented:

Here’s one of its extraordinary insights: We are now really all headed into a future dominated by inherited wealth, as capital is concentrated in fewer and fewer hands, giving the very rich ever greater power over politics, government and society. Patrimonial capitalism is the name for it, and it has potentially terrifying consequences for democracy.

Paul Krugman maintained in the same podcast that the United States is becoming an oligarchy, a society of inherited wealth, “the very system our founders revolted against.” While things have only gotten worse since then thanks to the economic crisis of 2020, it’s worth retracing the history that brought us to this volatile moment.

Not the Vision of Our Founders

The sort of capitalism on which the United States was originally built has been called mom-and-pop capitalism. Families owned their own farms and small shops and competed with each other on a more or less level playing field. It was a form of capitalism that broke free of the feudalistic model and reflected the groundbreaking values set forth in the Declaration of Independence and Bill of Rights: that all men are created equal and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, including the rights to free speech, a free press, to worship and assemble; and the right not to be deprived of life, liberty or property without due process.

It was good in theory, but there were glaring, inhumane exceptions to this idealized template, including the confiscation of the lands of indigenous populations and the slavery that then prevailed. The slaves were emancipated by the US Civil War; but while they were freed in their persons, they were not economically free. They remained entrapped in economic serfdom. Although Black and Indigenous communities have been disproportionately oppressed, poor people were all trapped in “indentured servitude” of sorts — the obligation to serve in order to pay off debts, e.g. the debts of Irish workers to pay for passage to the United States, and the debts of “sharecroppers” (two-thirds of whom were white), who had to borrow from landlords at interest for land and equipment. Today’s U.S. prison system has also been called a form of slavery, in which free or cheap labor is extracted from poor people of color.

To the creditors, economic captivity actually had certain advantages over “chattel” slavery (ownership of humans as a property right). According to an infamous document called the Hazard Circular, circulated by British banking interests among their American banking counterparts during the American Civil War:

Slavery is likely to be abolished by the war power and chattel slavery destroyed. This, I and my European friends are glad of, for slavery is but the owning of labor and carries with it the care of the laborers, while the European plan, led by England, is that capital shall control labor by controlling wages.

Slaves had to be housed, fed and cared for. “Free” men housed and fed themselves. Free men could be kept enslaved by debt by paying them wages that were insufficient to meet their costs of living.

From ‘Industrial Capitalism’ to ‘Finance Capitalism’

The economy crashed in the Great Depression, when Franklin D. Roosevelt’s government revived it and rebuilt the country through a public financial institution called the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. After World War II, the US middle class thrived. Small businesses competed on a relatively level playing field similar to the mom-and-pop capitalism of the early pioneers. MMeanwhile, larger corporations engaged in “industrial capitalism,” in which the goal was to produce real goods and services.

But the middle class, considered the backbone of the economy, has been progressively eroded since the 1970s. The one-two punch of the Great Recession and what the IMF has called the “Great Lockdown” has again reduced much of the population to indentured servitude; while industrial capitalism has largely been displaced by “finance capitalism,” in which money makes money for those who have it, “in their sleep.” As economist Michael Hudson explains, unearned income, not productivity, is the goal. Corporations take out cheap 1% loans, not to invest in machinery and production, but to buy their own stock earning 8% or 9%; or to buy out smaller corporations, eliminating competition and creating monopolies. Former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis explains that “capital” has been decoupled from productivity: businesses can make money without making profits on their products. As Kevin Cahill described the plight of people today in a book titled Who Owns the World?:

These latter day pharaohs, the planet owners, the richest 5% – allow the rest of us to pay day after day for the right to live on their planet. And as we make them richer, they buy yet more of the planet for themselves, and use their wealth and power to fight amongst themselves over what each possesses – though of course it’s actually us who have to fight and die in their wars.

The 2020 Knockout Punch

The final blow to the middle class came in 2020. Nick Hudson, co-founder of a data analytics firm called PANDA (Pandemics, Data and Analysis), argued in an interview following his keynote address at a March 2021 investment conference:

Lockdowns are the most regressive strategy that has ever been invented. The wealthy have become much wealthier. Trillions of dollars of wealth have been transferred to wealthy people. … Not a single country did a cost/benefit analysis before imposing these measures.

Policymakers followed the recommendations of the World Health Organization, based on predictive modeling by the Imperial College London that subsequently proved to be wildly inaccurate. Later studies have now been done, at least some of which have concluded that lockdowns have no significant effects on case numbers and that the costs of lockdowns substantially outweigh the benefits, in terms not just of economic costs but of lives.

On the economic front, global lockdowns eliminated competition from small and medium-sized businesses, allowing monopolies and oligopolies to grow. “The biggest loser from all this is the middle class,” wrote Logan Kane on Seeking Alpha. By May 2020, about one in four Americans had filed for unemployment, with over 40 million Americans filing jobless claims; and 200,000 more businesses closed in 2020 than the historical annual average. Meanwhile, US billionaires collectively increased their total net worth by $1.1 trillion during the last 10 months of 2020; and 46 people joined the billionaire class.

The number of “centi-billionaires”– individuals with a net worth of $100 billion or more – also grew. In the US they included:

  • Jeff Bezos, soon-to-be former CEO of Amazon, whose net worth increased from $113 billion in March 2020 to $182 billion in March 2021, up by $70 billion for the year;
  • Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, whose net worth increased from $25 billion in March 2020 to $164 billion in March 2021, up by $139 billion for the year; and
  • Bill Gates, formerly CEO of Microsoft and currently considered the “global vaccine czar,” whose net worth increased to $124 billion in March 2021, up by $26 billion for the year.

Two others are almost centi-billionaires:

  • The net worth of Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, grew from $55 billion in March 2020 to $95 billion in March 2021, up by $40 billion for the year; and
  • The net worth of Warren Buffett of Berkshire Hathaway grew from $68 billion in March 2020 to $95 billion in March 2021, up by $27.6 billion for the year.

These five individuals collectively added $300 billion to their net worth just in 2020. For perspective, that’s enough to create 300,000 millionaires, or to give $100,000 to 3 million people.

Philanthrocapitalism

The need to shield the multibillionaire class from taxes and to change their predatory corporate image has given rise to another form of capitalism, called philanthrocapitalism. Wealth is transferred to foundations or limited liability corporations that are designated as having charitable purposes but remain under the ownership and control of the donors, who can invest the funds in ways that serve their corporate interests. As noted in The Reporter Magazine of the Rochester Institute of Technology:

Essentially, what we are witnessing is the transfer of responsibility for public goods and services from democratic institutions to the wealthy, to be administered by an executive class. In the CEO society, the exercise of social responsibilities is no longer debated in terms of whether corporations should or shouldn’t be responsible for more than their own business interests. Instead, it is about how philanthropy can be used to reinforce a politico-economic system that enables such a small number of people to accumulate obscene amounts of wealth.

With $100 billion, nearly anything can be bought – not just land and resources but media and journalists, political influence and legislation, regulators, university research departments and laboratories. Jeff Bezos now owns The Washington Post. Bill Gates is not only the largest funder of the World Health Organization and the Imperial College London but the largest owner of agricultural land in the US. And Elon Musk’s aerospace manufacturer SpaceX has effectively privatized the sky. Astronomers and stargazers complain that the thousands of satellites it has already launched, with many more in the works, are blocking their ability to see the stars. Astronomy professor Samantha Lawler writes in a piece for The Conversation:

SpaceX has already received approval for 12,000 Starlink satellites and is seeking approval for 30,000 more. Other companies are not far behind […] The point of the Starlink mega-constellation is to provide global internet access. It is often stated by Starlink supporters that this will provide internet access to places on the globe not currently served by other communication technologies. But currently available information shows the cost of access will be too high in nearly every location that needs internet access. Thus, Starlink will likely only provide an alternate for residents of wealthy countries who already have other ways of accessing the internet […] With tens of thousands of new satellites approved for launch, and no laws about orbit crowding, right-of-way or space cleanup, the stage is set for the disastrous possibility of Kessler Syndrome, a runaway cascade of debris that could destroy most satellites in orbit and prevent launches for decades…. Large corporations like SpaceX and Amazon will only respond to legislation — which is slow, especially for international legislation — and consumer pressure […] Our species has been stargazing for thousands of years, do we really want to lose access now for the profit of a few large corporations?

Public advocacy groups, such as the Cellular Phone Task Force, have also objected due to health concerns over increased electromagnetic radiation. But the people have little say over public policy these days. So concluded a study summarized in a January 2021 article in Foreign Affairs. Princeton professor and study co-author Martin Gilens wrote:

[O]rdinary citizens have virtually no influence over what their government does in the United States. … Government policy-making over the last few decades reflects the preferences … of economic elites and of organized interests.

Varoufakis calls our current economic scheme “postcapitalism” and “techno-feudalism.” As in the medieval feudal model, assets are owned by the few. He notes that the stock market and the businesses in it are essentially owned by three companies – the giant exchange-traded funds BlackRock, Vanguard, and State Street. Under the highly controversial “Great Reset” envisioned by the World Economic Forum, “you will own nothing and be happy.” By implication, everything will be owned by the techno-feudal lords.

Getting Back on Track

The capitalist model has clearly gone off the rails. How to get it back on track? One obvious option is to tax the uber-rich. As Chuck Collins, author of The Wealth Hoarders: How Billionaires Pay Millions to Hide Trillions (2021), writes in a March 2021 article:

A wealth tax would reverse more than a half-​century of tax cuts for the wealthiest households. Billionaires have seen their taxes decline roughly 79 percent as a percentage of their wealth since 1980. The “effective rate” on the billionaire class—the actual percentage paid—was 23 percent in 2018, lower than for most middle-​income taxpayers.

He notes that Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-​Mass.) and co-authors recently introduced legislation to levy a 2 percent annual tax on wealth starting at $50 million, rising to 3 percent on fortunes of more than $1 billion:

The tax, which would apply to fewer than 100,000 U.S. residents, would raise an estimated $3 trillion over the next decade. It would be paid entirely by multi-​millionaires and billionaires who have reaped the lion’s share of wealth gains over the last four decades, including during the pandemic.

Varoufakis contends, however, that taxing wealth won’t be enough. The corporate model itself needs an overhaul. To create a “humanist” capitalism, he says, democracy needs to be brought to the marketplace.

Politically, one adult gets one vote. But in corporate elections, votes are weighted according to financial investment: the largest investors hold the largest number of voting shares. Varoufakis argues that the proper principle for reconfiguring the ownership of corporations for a market-based society would be one employee, one share (not tradeable), one vote. On that basis, he says, we can imagine as an alternative to our post-capitalist model a market-based democratic society without capitalism.

Another proposed solution is a land value tax, restoring at least a portion of the land to the “commons.” As Michael Hudson has observed:

There is one Achilles heel in the globalists’ strategy, an option that remains open to governments. This option is a tax on the rental income – the “unearned income” – of land, natural resources and monopoly takings.

Reforming the banking system is another critical tool. Banks operated as a public utility could allocate credit for productive purposes serving the public interest. Other possibilities include enforcement of anti-monopoly legislation and patent law reform.Perhaps, however, the flaw is in the competitive capitalist model itself. The winners will inevitably capture and exploit the losers, creating an ever-growing gap in wealth and power. Studies of natural systems have shown that cooperative models are more efficient than competitive schemes. That does not mean the sort of “cooperation” coerced through iron-fisted totalitarian control at the top. We need a set of rules that actually levels the playing field, rewards productivity, and maximizes benefit to society as a whole, while preserving the individual rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

This article was first posted on ScheerPost. Ellen Brown is an attorney, chair of the Public Banking Institute, and author of thirteen books including Web of Debt, The Public Bank Solution, and Banking on the People: Democratizing Money in the Digital Age. She also co-hosts a radio program on PRN.FM called “It’s Our Money.” Her 300+ blog articles are posted at EllenBrown.com.

(Republished from Web of Debt by permission of author or representative)
 
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  1. unwoke says:

    “Studies of natural systems have shown that cooperative models are more efficient than competitive schemes. That does not mean the sort of “cooperation” coerced through iron-fisted totalitarian control at the top …that actually levels the playing field, rewards productivity, and maximizes benefit to society as a whole, while preserving the individual rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.”

    That all sounds so quaint. Like something from way back in 2013. But class & individual rights are out of fashion today. Race is the determining factor now. And the way that you “level the playing field” is by leveling ‘Whiteness’. And the laws must be re-written to maximize benefit to favored identity groups through an iron-fisted totalitarian control at the top of government & industry; not to benefit society as a whole, which would include “deplorable & irredeemable” whites, or to preserve individual rights, which would preserve “white privilege”(sic) guaranteed by the U,S. Constitution, which guarantees “white supremacy”(sic). Nature is smarter than human society; don’t expect to find any guidance there. That wouldn’t be very ‘progressive'(sic).

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy, Corrupt
    • Replies: @Leo Den
    , @GomezAdddams
  2. This woman is telling most readers what they know already.
    The proper term is not post capitalist or techno-feudalist but corporatist, where oligopolies control large swathes of the economy. Those who control these corporations have overwhelming political influence as a result. The obvious solution is to confiscate the oligarchs’ assets, break up the oligopolies and impose effective competition laws. Needless to say, this will not be easy.

    On a more critical note, she makes no mention of Jews and the strong Jewish connections of American financial institutions. No surprise there, either!

  3. Perhaps, however, the flaw is in the competitive capitalist model itself. The winners will inevitably capture and exploit the losers, creating an ever-growing gap in wealth and power. Studies of natural systems have shown that cooperative models are more efficient than competitive schemes. That does not mean the sort of “cooperation” coerced through iron-fisted totalitarian control at the top. We need a set of rules that actually levels the playing field, rewards productivity, and maximizes benefit to society as a whole, while preserving the individual rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

    Please. We’re at the point where so many are emptying out the cities and and fleeing the institutions controlled by the globalist COVID-state, like the end of the Roman Empire, and you are still planning for reform?

    Let everything crash and fall apart, while some gets out and save themselves. After everything is over and we’re in a new Dark Age, we can at least start rebuilding for a new Middle Ages.

  4. onebornfree says: • Website

    “Getting Back on Track.The capitalist model has clearly gone off the rails. How to get it back on track? ”

    Well, since the size/power of government is so obviously not the main problem 🙄, I would humbly suggest :

    mo’ gubmint, mo’ gubmint, mo’ gubmint! 😂 . Works every time, right? 🤣

    “There has been no greater threat to life, liberty, and property throughout the ages than government. Even the most violent and brutal private individuals have been able to inflict only a mere fraction of the harm and destruction that have been caused by the use of power by political authorities.” Richard Ebeling

    “Government is a disease masquerading as its own cure” Robert LeFevere

    “Government doesn’t work” Harry Browne https://wiki.mises.org/wiki/Why_Government_Doesn%27t_Work

    Regards, onebornfree

  5. El Dato says:

    These five individuals collectively added $300 billion to their net worth just in 2020. For perspective, that’s enough to create 300,000 millionaires, or to give $100,000 to 3 million people.

    I don’t think so.

    This is IMAGINARY wealth, a meaningless number obtained by multiplying the shares they hold by what a single share goes for right now.

    It’s like looking at the charge of a capacitor, seeing it is at 2000 V and concluding there is enormous energy in there. But probably there are only a couple of Joule in the capacitor. One little spark and it’s all over.

    They can’t realize that “pseudo wealth” or transform it into cash to be handed out because the value of the single share goes down the more are offered on the market.

    It’s the same reason Elon Musk’s wealth fluctuates by billions in a single day depending on the mood of the “market”.

    At least Elon and Bezos have delivered goods (actual novel approach at rocketry and a fat chunk of what is called “cloud infrastructure” — the book store is dwarfed by AWS) whereas facebook is just there because of brand name recognition and user data mining.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    , @HallParvey
  6. El Dato says:

    He notes that the stock market and the businesses in it are essentially owned by three companies – the giant exchange-traded funds BlackRock, Vanguard, and State Street.

    No. The stock market is a computer system, a brand, and a building.

    They own nothing of the companies traded there. The shareholders do.

  7. El Dato says:

    Public advocacy groups, such as the Cellular Phone Task Force, have also objected due to health concerns over increased electromagnetic radiation.

    No. Elon should be filled with castor oil for this Starlink bullshit and whoever is in govnmt who approves it should be thrown down a well, but for reasons of clear skies not “electromagnetic radiation” (i.e. radio waves).

    If you support sunlight, you can support radio waves. As 40 years of scrutinizing statistics show. You are bathing in them in any case. Just don’t go near radar.

    People “getting sick of Wifi” etc are as much freaks of nature as are transsexuals.

    • Agree: Bert
    • Replies: @Joe Paluka
  8. @El Dato

    This is IMAGINARY wealth, a meaningless number obtained by multiplying the shares they hold by what a single share goes for right now.

    Got it in one, Sr Dato. Very few shares in Amazon of Facebook Inc etc are actually traded. The values at which they are traded have very little connection to the actual economic value of the companies. If you multiply the number of Facebook Inc’s shares by the value of the small number traded, then Facebook Inc has the same value as Boeing ! Oh, and Mark Zuckerberg is worth $97bn.

    The economic value of Facebook comes from the money it gets from advertisers. On that basis, it might have an economic value of single digit $bns. Essentially, its an grotesquely overvalued advertising tool. Other Tech stocks are just as grotesquely overvalued. Twitter’s total assets are classed as over $13bn. This from a company that has never made a profit.

  9. The author agrees it’s the time to look forward – this means alternatives are needed. But what, institutional reform? What I am saying is that, at least in a middle American context, it is better for the new outcasts to embrace agorism, local production and agrarianism, all of them building independence from formal institutions control by globalist interests they are no longer part of. You don’t need to wait to find many flocking over there after becoming anti-vaxx.

    • Replies: @gotmituns
  10. @El Dato

    The stock market is a computer system, a brand, and a building.

    Co-founded by Emma Lazarus’s grandfather.

  11. TG says:

    It’s about demographics. Supply and demand.

    In the 19th century America had a low fertility rate and abundant resources. Labor was king: wages were high, the owner-operator dominated.

    America the industrial powerhouse was not created by slaves or by immigrants. It was created by free Americans.

    Starting in 1888 the rich opened the floodgates to massive immigration from then third-world europe, and the working class was crushed even as the rich prospered.

    After the collapse of 1929, immigration was basically halted, and the already low US fertility rate fell even further. Once the depression ended, with a modest population and labor being the limiting factor, wages soared and America became the pre-eminent industrial power of history.

    Starting in the late 1960’s, the rich decided to end this, and increasingly opened the border to the overpopulated third world. Wages stagnated and fell; profits rose. Of course inequality rose. It’s the supply and demand, stupid.

    There is nothing mysterious about this. If we really want to do something about this, shut off the flow of cheap foreign labor. But that would cost the rich profits and power, so I guess that would be racist.

  12. @Yellowface Anon

    Let everything crash and fall apart, while some gets out and save themselves. After everything is over and we’re in a new Dark Age, we can at least start rebuilding for a new Middle Ages.

    This is a difficult situation. On one hand, Many people deserve what is coming, and a collapse is probably the fastest path toward a chance to rebuild. On the other hand, I don’t think any of us can understand how painful this will be. Wishing for a collapse is wishing for billions of people to die horrific deaths of starvation. There is no easy answer, that is for sure. Thanks for your comment!

  13. The elephant in the room is currency debasement. When the banks can create money out of thin air, the economy becomes financialized, and the wealth becomes increasingly concentrated. Nominally, wages where 7 times higher in 2016 than in 1956. But expenses? over 20 times. In some cases like health care and education, over 50 times. REAL wages are a third of what they were. While it is not the only problem, currency debasement which is in layman’s term’s massive (electronic) money printing is the main tool of the banksters. Then again, what should we expect from the (((money changers))).

    “There is no subtler, no surer means of overturning the existing basis of society than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose.”

    https://www.reference.com/history/much-did-things-cost-1956-1c8c29771bb78135#:~:text=The%20average%20cost%20of%20a,pound%20was%20about%2085%20cents.

    • Replies: @TKK
    , @R2b
  14. @TG

    In the 19th century America had a low fertility rate

    In 1800 the average U.S. woman had 7.04 children. There is no country on the planet with a fertility rate this high today. Even in deepest darkest Africa…

    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:US_Census_Population_Graph_from_1790.svg

    As you can see from the link I supplied, the population of the US has grown every single decade since the country was founded. Population growth is actually positively correlated with economic prosperity, and the causality goes both ways. The average American was far more prosperous in 1950 then in 1850, with a far greater life expectancy, FAR lower child mortality, etc. Despite the population being over 6 times higher.

    Your post is based on wishful thinking, and contradicts reality, as I kindly demonstrated above.

    • LOL: 3g4me
  15. Questions…

    1. This same technological change occurred in Europe & Australia so why does the USA have more economic inequality than Europe or Australia or New Zealand.

    2. Why is the USA more corrupt than other developed countries such as Europe or New Zealand or Australia.

    3. What difference would it make to Europe or NZ or Australia if the USA ceased to be a Superpower or becomes a backwater?

    4. Why aren’t Australia or Norway or New Zealand mired in awful gini-coefficient poverty than the USA? Strong unions? Higher wages?

    5. If the USA collapses…so what? Won’t Japan & Europe & Australia & NZ continue? Or Canada? What the heck difference will it really make?

    6. If 18th century immigration was so bad, then why are Italians & Irish & Germans & Slavs today more educated & successful?

    7. How are other developed countries such as NZ, Canada, Australia or Western Europe able to avoid this?

    8. Why do Americans always point that finger at “socialism” & desire more right-wing policy when the more Leftist countries of Europe, NZ, Australia or Canada have less poverty?

  16. The economy crashed in the Great Depression, when Franklin D. Roosevelt’s government revived it and rebuilt the country through a public financial institution called the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. After World War II, the US middle class thrived. Small businesses competed on a relatively level playing field similar to the mom-and-pop capitalism of the early pioneers. MMeanwhile, larger corporations engaged in “industrial capitalism,” in which the goal was to produce real goods and services.

    There you have your answer already.
    Kike loving amerimutt golems tried to cripple the world to eliminate competition. Karmic justice threw a haymaker toward the satanic, kosher, commie loving (((nation))).

    1945 reward. This is exactly what they stormed Normandy and sent countless supplies on Lend Lease for. Enjoy. Hell is forever!

    • Replies: @Mefobills
  17. “It was good in theory, but there were glaring, inhumane exceptions to this idealized template, including the confiscation of the lands of indigenous populations and the slavery that then prevailed. The slaves were emancipated by the US Civil War; but while they were freed in their persons, they were not economically free. They remained entrapped in economic serfdom. Although Black and Indigenous communities have been disproportionately oppressed…”

    I started reading the article which was good, but then the author put in this left-wing stupidity, which seems to be obligatory these days. At that point I stopped and went on to something else.

  18. @El Dato

    “People “getting sick of Wifi” etc are as much freaks of nature as are transsexuals.”

    It won’t be long before we see headlines like: Wifi turned my son into a girl!

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  19. rgl says:

    “How America Went from Mom-and-Pop Capitalism to Techno-Feudalism”

    Dare I say ‘Because Americans Allowed It To’?

  20. BorisMay says:

    This is all pussy footing around the edges of the problem without dealing with the real issues.

    Capitalism, in what ever shape or form it is presented, is in essence the absolute exploitation of the weak, poor and vulnerable by the oppressive, exploitative and privileged classes of society: eg the rich, the educated and those self adulating chosen by God types so commonly found in false spiritual belief ridden societies.

    The only answer is to force everyone to only allow pay to those who do a proper day’s work. Other matters that must be outlawed are share trading, currency speculation and usury. Private banking must be prohibited and only enough currency issued to facilitate trade by governments together with the adoption of the Bancor system to facilitate international trade.

    The best way to do this is outlaw private ownership of land and to make all non productive land common land.

    Without private ownership of land, but allowing private ownership of property to the end of a person’s life, when it reverts to public ownership, this would negate the rich people’s ability to monopolise assets.

    Alternatively end all fiat currencies and return to a physical gold standard and tax anyone with assets in excess of one million dollars at a rate of 90% on income and 95% on investment capital.

    The very best option is to outlaw all ownership and end the concept of money.

    But all of these things would need an armed revolution and the have nots would be like the Palestinians and the haves like Zionists.

    As this is about where we are now…armed insurrection is the only option you bunch of soulless softies.

    So it looks like the Roman Empire on steroids is about to enslave everyone.

    I noticed how the real wealth mongers were conveniently excluded from this analysis: JP Morgan, Rothschilds, Rockerfellers, Warburgs and all the other untouchable super rich.

    People like Bezos, Musk and that idiot at Facebook are all expendable useful idiots for the super rich.

  21. The claim that Franklin D. Roosevelt’s government saved the country from the Great Recession is debatable. To say the least.

    • Agree: 3g4me
    • Replies: @stevennonemaker88
  22. neutral says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    The general answer to all those questions is racial. If you look at other countries with significant black, brown and white demographics then you will find a massive inequality gap. With time Europe will become less white and all the usual stuff that happens in places like South Africa, South America, USA will also happen there.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  23. @Verymuchalive

    Jews have destroyed American industrial engineering and replaced it with financial engineering and techno-monopolies.

    • Agree: ThreeCranes
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  24. Capitalism itself is state-sponsored usury. America was not a capitalist country in the late 1700s – it was a free enterprise country. There is a difference. Capitalism destroys free enterprise.

    • Agree: Thim
  25. Bert says:
    @onebornfree

    Harry Browne, though obviously correct in his assessment of government, is trumped by Rudolph Rummel, the academic who documented democide, i.e., mass murder of citizens by their own government.

    In his last book, Rummel increased his estimate to over 272 million innocent, non-combatant civilians who were murdered by their own governments during the 20th century.[5] However, Rummel noted that his 272 million death estimate was his lower, more prudent figure, stating that it “could be over 400,000,000.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolph_Rummel

    • Replies: @onebornfree
  26. Yes, Ellen Brown, we have already noticed the problem. We are the complacent frogs that failed to jump out of the pot when the water started heating up. It’s now the sad everyday experience of the former middle class.

    Your recommended solutions are wonderful. They would certainly work in a nice democratic system that was not owned and operated by those with money, big money. But your suggestions are other-worldly. We, the new feudal serfs, haven’t got that magic ingredient. And without any representation, we just can’t get there from here.

    What’s your Plan B?

  27. aspnaz says:
    @onebornfree

    Once corporations found out that they could make more profit by sponsoring laws than by making better stuff, the effort to make better stuff went out the window. Just look at the scam vaccine corporates.

    This is a weakness of humanity: there are too many scumbags who want to die with 100 million in the bank. Why? For the children they ignored all these years … it’s sad and pathetic.

    Government is full of the lazy and inept, they couldn’t even compete with Boeing management, they are that bad. A war would sort this out, but that Jew Einstein put an end to winnable wars against worthy opponents.

    • Agree: HdC
  28. aspnaz says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    You seem to think that Ardern and Morrison and the rest of the Aussie Kiwi swamp are not corrupt: sorry, I have difficulty writing that. What makes you think that?

    It seems to me that they are worse than the USA – at least as bad – but they have no real power: 4m, 26m against the 300m top GDP per person people on the planet.

    Australia and NZ are not as profitable as the USA. They do not avoid corruption, it just happens differently. For example, feminism in Australia is a disgrace, it is nowhere near as bad in the USA (except in pockets).

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  29. gotmituns says:
    @Yellowface Anon

    After everything is over and we’re in a new Dark Age, we can at least start rebuilding for a new Middle Ages.
    —————————————————————————————————–
    Oh goody, we can have another Reformation/30 years war while we’re at it.

  30. gotmituns says:
    @Yellowface Anon

    I’m not anti-vaxx. I couldn’t care less about the Covid hoax or the vaccine hoax. Just leave me out of the whole thing.

  31. anarchyst says:

    Labor is never given value, but is a commodity-a “necessary evil” according to the Wall Street types and is to be minimized and marginalized at all costs.
    Adolph Hitler’s Germany monetized labor and gave it value. THAT is the reason that the jews went after Germany. Post WW1 Germany was successful in its economy due to throwing off the shackles (and shekels) of the internationalist banksters.
    Henry Ford CREATED a market which had not existed when he paid his employees $5.00 per day when the average wage of the day was around $1.25 per day. His premise was not entirely altruistic as assembly line work was monotonous; a way had to be found to retain employees as well.
    Of course, the wall street types and the banksters howled that Ford’s wage rates would destroy capitalism (as they knew it-those at the top reap all of the benefits while the proles are forced to live on a bare subsistence wage, due to the machinations of those at the top).
    Guess what??
    The OPPOSITE happened. Henry Ford knew one of the basic tenets of a truly free, capitalistic society, that a well-paid work force would be able to participate and contribute to a strong economy, unlike what is taught in business schools today-that wages must be kept to a bare minimum and that the stockholder is king.
    Our “free trade” politicians have assisted the greedy wall street types and banksters in depressing wages on the promise of cheap foreign labor and products.
    A good example of this is the negative criticism that Costco receives for paying its employees well above market wages. These same wall street types praise Wal-Mart for paying its employees barely subsistence wages while assisting them in filling out their public assistance (welfare) forms.
    Any sane person KNOWS that in order for capitalism to work, employees need to make an adequate wage. Unfortunately, this premise does not exist in today’s business climate.
    Henry Ford openly criticized those of the “tribe” for manipulating wall street and banksters to their own advantage, and was roundly (and unjustly) criticized for pointing out the TRUTH.
    Catholic priest, Father Coughlin did the same thing and was punished by the Catholic church, despite his popularity and exposing the TRUTH of the American economy and the outsider internationalists that ran it . . . and STILL run it.
    Our race to the bottom will not be without consequences. A great realignment is necessary (and is coming) . . .

    • Agree: Mefobills, Jazman, TKK, HeebHunter
    • Replies: @stevennonemaker88
    , @Jazman
  32. Anon[200] • Disclaimer says:

    The most likely solution is the proscriptions. We just have to make sure it is us doing it to them rather than them doing it to us.

  33. Eureka! says:

    Interesting read. I’d simply point out that nobody will privatize space. Nobody has really sent a car into space nor driven a golf cart on the moon. Satellites hang from balloons.

  34. @Verymuchalive

    She certainly did leave out Milton Friedman in this article.

  35. Mefobills says:

    Mom and Pop capitalism actually does require somebody at home in the brain center of your civilization.

    Or in more colloquial terms, the train has to run down the tracks with its headlights on.

    Unz readers might be tired of me shilling for fascism, where there is a functioning brain center. Here is another case, Canada, which had a sovereign money system for a time. It was not codified enough in law (the brain center wasn’t made whole), but still serves as an example of how to create local economy (mom and pop capitalism).

    Please don’t ask me for references, this is my own research – I am the reference.

    [MORE]

    ____________________________

    In Canada from 1938 to 1973 there was little to no price inflation. Canada had a sovereign-like money system, where the Crown bank spent debt free into productivity channels.
    A graph of Canada’s debt position is at link below. Take note of the years in question:

    Private bank emissions of credit were limited to four year loans only @ 6%. Canada’s state bank was incorporated in 1935, and became a Crown bank in 1938. What is a crown bank?

    Bank of Canada (BOC) was a crown bank, meaning its stock shares were wholly held in a Trust by Minister of Finance (MOF). In other words, BOC was originally an incorporated private bank, but its shares then became wholly owned by the trust, with MOF as trustee. BOC morphed from being a private bank to a State Bank when the bank shares became owned by the public. BOC then worked for its public and not private shareholders.

    It is true that this is a weak arrangement that can be easily usurped, and that is exactly what happened in 1974, when the Bank of International Settlements came along and demanded Canada return to a private credit money system.

    Prior to 74, MOF would tell BOC Governor to create money debt free. This debt free would be spent by injection into the commons on productivity modes. Commons are those things that everybody uses to improve productivity for whole, like roads, rail, ports, and telecommunications.

    These are things Canada did from 38 to 74: Canada’s small population of 11M built out third largest Navy in WW2 as well, by using debt free of money. In 38 Canada had only 11M people, and by 1974 they had 22M. Building out continental scale railroads, highways, waterways, and all of the other things this population did is astonishing.

    Private Banks are ordered to remove their banknotes from circulation in 1945, and only use tangible bills issued by bank of Canada.

    1) Almost Free Education, especially for returning WW2 Veterans. Improving labor in this way improves productivity. Colleges and Schools had their buildings built with debt free, thus lowering access costs for the general population.
    2) Business loans.
    3) Land Grants. (Land Grants are a way of keeping land from being grabbed by monopoly forces. This was easy in Canada given the amount of land they have.)
    4) St Lawrence Seaway was dredged and improved by adding locks. (Note that Canada spends into their commons, as all governments should.) St. Lawrence Seaway is something like Panama Canal and a significant engineering feat. It allowed an inland seaway to go from Montreal to Lake Ontario, thus improving the shipment of goods and services. Ocean going vessels could then travel from the Atlantic to Great Lakes.
    5) Welland Canal is another waterway link between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. It is eight locks and lifts ships 326 feet over Niagara Escarpment.
    6) Trans-Canada Highway was built, about 4,000 miles.
    7) Universal Health Care. Since economy was efficient, health care could be afforded. Only after 1974 did Canada’s Health Care System go bad.
    8) Pensions and Direct Injections

    • This is a sort of Social Credit Theory. These direct injects are debt free money being collected in taxes, and then re-spent (injected) back down into the base of the population, usually at the family level. This creates a pumping action, and the money goes on to create consumption and wealth. It also overcomes losses from waste in industry, so labor can buy their output. (Wages never equal the actual value of production as waste and overhead is captured in prices.) Canada probably did not understand that injections are proper economics -and needed, as shown by Social Credit Gap theory.

    • Family Allowances: This is another direct injection, usually for kids up to age 16, about $5 in the 1960’s per month.

    9) Private Banks are Restricted to four year loans only.

    o This is private creation of bank credit. A four year loan at 6% interest means that the interest does not go exponential. Note: In 1974 BIS coerced and removed these restrictions, so Banker could make usurious profits. His profits are parasitical after 74, and also change the composition of Canada’s money supply, making it more bank credit and less debt free. In this case, think of the debt free money as originating not at private banks, but instead at the State Bank. This is analogous to Lincoln’s emission of Greenbacks (from Treasury) during America’s civil war.

    • Canada provided housing mortgages by using TRUSTS. Trusts are a collection of people’s savings, similar to savings and loans in the U.S. at that time. Savings and loans would loan out existing money, not creating new credit. Canadian Trusts would issue a GIC, or what Americans call a CD. This CD would be for five years or so, and only have a percent or two of interest. Remember, they were loaning out existing money, not creating new credit. The interest channel would be back to the savers, and non- usurious. (Usury is a power relation, where the weak are silently robbed by predatory schemes. Usury can be taken with sophisticated monetary schemes. But, here mortgage housing loan interest payment would go to saving elderly, who would then buy the product of the young.)

    o When BOC no longer had restrictions on their private banks, e.g. four year loans at 6%, this allowed Canadian private banks to directly compete with the Trusts (similar to savings and loans).

    Again, trusts would take existing money, what formerly was debt free, which then became people’s savings, and loan it out. When the trust loaned it out, they would add a percentage of interest, effectively a FEE. This is how money supplies should work, where the money is stored wealth and not credit.

    ___________

    By 1974, Canada had local economy, where neighbors would borrow from each other, or the trusts, to then build out local business. This would be mom and pop, and the total economic picture was one of decentralization (nor corporatism), but yet it took somebody at the top of the civilizational hierarchy to set the rules.

    Once a nation parts with the control of its credit, it matters not who makes the laws.

    William Lyon Mackenzie King

  36. @Irish Savant

    Thanks. As you and the more astute thinkers probably realize, CORRELATION and CAUSALITY are not the same thing. Proving correlation is often a simple task. But proving causality? the real world is extremely complex. With so many factors and contingencies, showing causality is difficult to impossible.

    Making a successful supercar like the Bugatti Chiron 300+ requires many thousands of moving parts, without which it won’t function correctly, or at all. It is built on thousands of years of technological development as well. Human societies and life in general follow a similar pattern.

  37. @El Dato

    … facebook is just there because of brand name recognition and user data mining.

    For those who are old enough to remember Snuffy Smith, facebook is the modern version of Loweezy’s Gossip Fence. “She sez,,,then she sez,,,and you know,,,then she sez,,,”.

    “Trading, trading, trading, keep them dogees movin along.” With every trade, a new and more exciting level of Stock Market reportage. Buy Now, Tomorrow might be too late. (Besides, your broker needs your money).

    Ironic, that the one thing you can’t buy at the Stock Market, is a cow. But, what the heck, there’s plenty of cow poop available.

  38. @anarchyst

    Any sane person KNOWS that in order for capitalism to work, employees need to make an adequate wage.

    Depends what you mean by “work”. For us, or for them…lol

    Generally speaking, I agree with you. Capitalism has become a religion of sorts to many. A market economy certainly can function well, and raise the standard of living across the board. But it is also open to exploitation, and when inequalities become too extreme, it becomes unsustainable and self destructive.

    Sadly, virtually any man made system is open to corruption and exploitation. The people running the system are often more important than the system itself. Incidentally, the question of Capitalism vs Socialism is like the question of Monarchy vs Democracy: The bigger question is, who is the king, and who are the voters?

    • Replies: @Mefobills
    , @anarchyst
  39. hillaire says:

    Who would of thought that all those tax dollars pilfered from the plebs weren’t ever intended to enhance the life of the herd, but instead were being ‘invested’ in the creation of a panopticon hitherto undreamed of ..

    I mean, what is this dimwit waffling on about..? america has always been an oligarchy and the west has always been techno-feudalism, one could argue all civilizations are techno-feudalism… there are those that control the tek and those they use the tek to control..

    wacky-pediaphile states:

    Capitalism is an economic system based on the private ownership of the means of production and their operation for profit. Central characteristics of capitalism include capital accumulation, competitive markets, a price system, private property and the recognition of property rights, voluntary exchange and wage labour..

    did you get that….. ‘ownership of the means of production’ and of course that ‘ownership’ goes to the oligarchs (now kritokrats off course) because they have the ‘moolah’ baby… oh yes… in fact they print the stuff ..

    and what little is left of the nation and it’s wealth which used to of course include that quaint old fashioned concept ‘its people’… will be sucked dry by perfidious pilferers ( your governments and their masters)and scolded to death by femenist loons, race-baitors and goat faced mendicants, residual euro imbeciles running around agreeing with everything they pull out of their collective arses…

    ‘mom and pops’ were an aberration somewhat like ‘england’ being a nation of shopkeepers (all pakistani now I may add )… useful up to a point but now unnecessary because of course the oligarchs have decided to remove the serfs from the economic equation..

    and the ‘modern serf’ being only notable for the simple fact that he is the most imbecilic in history..

    will have nothing and be happy…

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  40. @neutral

    While I fear what will happen to Australia if China can manage to wean itself off our iron ore our situation and its causes are completely different from those of America where the corrupt ruling classes have impoverished the formerly prosperous middle and upper working class who had inadequate union clout or voting power to prevent the loss of manufacturing employment and the waste of trillions on war and threatening war.

  41. @aspnaz

    I wonder if you even know how elections and campaigning are financed in Australia. Do you know about its largely effective limits on election expenditure? And is not a 90 per cent turn out to vote and the preferential (aka in UK as Alternative Vote) system very important in making Australia’s democracy something relatively close to….. well, democracy?

  42. Mefobills says:
    @BorisMay

    Alternatively end all fiat currencies and return to a physical gold standard and tax anyone with assets in excess of one million dollars at a rate of 90% on income and 95% on investment capital.

    So it looks like the Roman Empire on steroids is about to enslave everyone.

    If you hold contradictory ideas in your noggin, you are in cognitive dissonance.

    The Roman Empire “on steroids” happened after the second Punic war, when they moved to precious metals… gold coins. Prior to that, it was pure fiat money, Bronze Disks – Nomisa, which were the paper of that day, and the stamped value was what mattered, as it was enforced by law.

    All money is fiat, including gold coins. Once a coin receives its legal stamp, it is fiat. Clipped gold coins circulated at par, did they not?

    • Replies: @stevennonemaker88
  43. onebornfree says: • Website
    @BorisMay

    “The only answer is to force everyone to only allow pay to those who do a proper day’s work. Other matters that must be outlawed are share trading, currency speculation and usury. Private banking must be prohibited and only enough currency issued to facilitate trade by governments together with the adoption of the Bancor system to facilitate international trade.”

    In other words: ‘Mo gubmint, mo’ gubmint, ‘mo gubmint! 🤣 🤣 🤮

    “Government is a disease masquerading as its own cure” Robert LeFevere

    “The kind of man who wants the government to adopt and enforce his ideas is always the kind of man whose ideas are idiotic” H.L.Mencken

    “Government doesn’t work” Harry Browne
    https://wiki.mises.org/wiki/Why_Government_Doesn%27t_Work

    “Regards” onebornfree

  44. onebornfree says: • Website
    @Bert

    “Harry Browne, though obviously correct in his assessment of government, is trumped by Rudolph Rummel, the academic who documented democide, i.e., mass murder of citizens by their own government.”

    So, then to prevent even more “democide”, “logically speaking” we obviously need even more government, right? 😎

    “Government is a disease masquerading as its own cure” Robert LeFevere

    “Everything government touches turns to crap” Ringo Starr

    “The kind of man who wants the government to adopt and enforce his ideas is always the kind of man whose ideas are idiotic” H.L.Mencken

    “Government doesn’t work” Harry Browne
    https://wiki.mises.org/wiki/Why_Government_Doesn%27t_Work

    Regards, onebornfree

    • Replies: @anon
  45. Mefobills says:
    @stevennonemaker88

    The people running the system are often more important than the system itself. Incidentally, the question of Capitalism vs Socialism is like the question of Monarchy vs Democracy: The bigger question is, who is the king, and who are the voters?

    Ah… and you have hit upon the most important question. The question nobody asks – but is hiding in plain sight.

    How do you filter and select for your ruling hierarchy.

    There is always a need for a third party to intercede between two way relations of man. This of course must be the case, as people have disagreements. These disagreements exist, despite the bleetings of lolbertarians such as one-born-free dumb.

    Uncle Adolph had the answers for how you filter. He had Hitler Schools, where the best and brightest went for education. These were natural leaders, people (boys not girls) who had empathy, and were taught the verities of life.

    It actually takes some sort of praetorian guard, where you hand select and train elect people to be guardians of the general welfare. These people must be outside of the economy, not making sordid gain as capital holders, but instead paid well from the general fund for the general welfare.

    Any civilization that does not have a guard, will fail regardless of its system.

    • Thanks: HeebHunter
    • Replies: @stevennonemaker88
  46. “Our species has been stargazing for thousands of years, do we really want to lose access now for the profit of a few large corporations?”

    Profits! All so that Bezos, Musk and Gates can give each other larger doses of anemas… when you’re so rich, the ordinary laxatives just won’t do.

  47. A touchy-feely nothing-new soft-Left blather, Ellen, which contains no history of any value, yet many are now familiar with such history.

    1) WHO were/are the people involved in this gigantic confidence trick ?
    WHO have been their beneficiaries — eg payoffs, pensions, fat salaries, protection from indiscreet letters to former lovers (like “conservative president” Wilson) etc.
    Contrary to your conclusion, some would argue that an “iron fist” might indeed be necessary against the parasites. Do you imagine inviting them to afternoon tea and asking nicely for their cooperation in ceasing to kill off humanity ?

    2) Would outlawing Usury make a difference ?

    3) Why is (for example) National-Socialism or Fascism so demonised ?
    (Why even are Mom-and-Pop demonised, come to that ?)

    Weak semi-apologetic paper.

  48. anarchyst says:
    @stevennonemaker88

    You are correct. “Cartelization” of business has a corrosive effect on the whole system. All one has to do is observe the business closures during our fake “plandemic”. Small businesses, churches and restaurants were forced to close while “big box” stores, strip clubs, gay bars, and other unnecessary entertainment venues were allowed to operate unrestricted.
    It was surprising to see the lack of “pushback” against these clearly unconstitutional closures and mandates. Let’s hope the “next round” has a different result.

    • Replies: @stevennonemaker88
  49. @BorisMay

    Capitalism, in what ever shape or form it is presented, is in essence the absolute exploitation of the weak, poor and vulnerable by the oppressive, exploitative and privileged classes of society.

    I used to believe that until I went into academia and saw how adjuncts were (and still are) treated. Academia is completely under leftist control these days, yet within it people are exploited. Explain that. The movers and shakers in academia are leftists, and they hate capitalism and want a redistribution of wealth, yet somehow exploitation exists. They refuse to acknowledge or even talk about the exploitation that takes place right under their noses. In fact, they have helped steer the “national conversation” to a discussion about race rather than exploitation. How convenient.

  50. HT says:

    The super wealthy today like the tech plutocrats became wealthy through government welfare spending. When people don’t have to use their own money for all the basic necessities of life, they have more to spend on things like smart phones, cable TV services, and general consumerism which drives Amazon. The welfare state destroyed America in numerous ways but the one that gets overlooked is how it created a plutocracy whereby wealth is transferred to these diamond merchants as the government debt goes out of control.

  51. Jazman says:
    @anarchyst

    Excellent comment so much truth

  52. Mefobills says:
    @HeebHunter

    Kike loving amerimutt golems tried to cripple the world to eliminate competition.

    FDR resurrected some of the American System of Economy. However, the Fascist countries had evolved to a more advanced understanding of the American System.

    The failure in the American System was this notion of 50:50 split between State Credit and Private Credit (the rich were taking sordid gain by owning part of the money power). The other failure of America (I’m American) was this idea that the government has to borrow its own credit (Article 1 Section 8).

    You can see this 50:50 idea from the very beginning of America, when Hamilton allowed the first bank to be partially stock owned by both Treasury and Privateers. To Hamilton’s credit, he put in a sinking fund so that the first bank would be reverted to Treasury, but of course this didn’t work, and Treasury went down to 20% ownership as revealed when bank was disbanded.

    Bet you can’t guess (((who))) the other 80% were?

    So, even if FDR was a POS, some of what he did worked, and we shouldn’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. The Canadian system I posted earlier was better (BOC was 100% stock owned by MOF), or the Fascist economies (100% stock owned or State Banks), were better and they quickly got out of the great depression.

    Below is a link I posted on Reconstruction Finance and how it worked. Reinhardt and Schacht (Hitler’s economists) were better than the Jews surrounding FDR, but they used somewhat similar policies.

    https://www.unz.com/ishamir/biden-freezes-texas/#comment-4483169

    • Thanks: HeebHunter
  53. TKK says:
    @stevennonemaker88

    It takes a U.S. minimum wage worker 9 hours of labor after taxes to buy a single sheet of plywood.

    Makes my crazy uncle who hoards and has 5 acres of scrap and a Quonset Hut full of lumber and random building supplies seems like a clever guy. Is that why the County will not stop harassing him? He has no vermin. It’s not rotting trash. Did orders come from somewhere? to not allow the peasants to have to many options for shelter construction?

    Throw in an emergency drill kit for fresh water, ammo and some peanut butter with canned food- I’d say that’s the best savings account for these times.

    • Agree: stevennonemaker88
    • Replies: @HbutnotG
  54. anon[356] • Disclaimer says:

    I think a more effective way to reduce inequality would be for the Fed to stop the QE and allow long term interest rates to rise. The Fed has been holding interest rates low through expansion of monetary supply for nearly two decades to allow the government to finance all the wars and wasteful spending. Long term interest rates are supposed to be determined by “the market”, yet the Fed has directly intervened in “the market” by printing money to buy up these bonds. 40% of US treasuries are now owned by the US government, either directly by the Fed or the Social Security Fund. Thirty year bond rate has gone from a high of 15% in 1980 to now at 2.33%. Since 2000 it has only gone in one direction which is ever lower:
    https://www.macrotrends.net/2521/30-year-treasury-bond-rate-yield-chart

    Low interest rates exacerbate inequality by allowing those with access to the Fed and large bank credits (Finance industry, large corporations, high net worth individuals) to borrow on the cheap and invest in real assets like securities and real estate, further increasing their wealth. Meanwhile main street loses out as the money they put in the bank earns next to no interest, esp. the 50% of Americans who are not invested in the stock market, and as inflation takes hold.

    The government also becomes poorer over time as it’s liabilities grow with the bond issues, and the inflation that their endless QEs create will wash over the 99% far more than the 1%. They do this to try to wash away their debt to foreign bond holders but it also inflates asset prices and further enrich the rich. Wealth is relative, but when the rich bid up the prices of everything incl. housing, wealth is no longer relative but absolute. Inflation hurts the poor and middle class far more than the rich as wages don’t often keep up.

    To restore equality, it’s time for the Fed to end the relentless QEs. And also, bust up all the monopolies, not just in big tech but in big pharma, telecom, finance, farming, consumer goods, everything. The Fed is supposed to be independent from the government, it has been anything but.

  55. @hillaire

    True, all too true. There is nothing in this article that was not already covered in Ferdinand Lundberg’s The Rich and the SuperRich, published in the late 1960’s–a book still well worth reading but a bit outdated by the fact that the SuperRich he skewers were the protestant gentiles who owned then-corporate America while today, the appropriate target would be Jewish bankers, hedge fund operators and media moguls.

    The important thing to realize is that the family foundation is still the vehicle by which and through which the very rich in America perpetuate their power. Laughably, these are labeled as “philanthropic” by the compliant press yet they are anything but. They exist only to shield the great fortunes from inheritance taxes and to allow family members to skate through life, free from the burden of working for a living as they use the foundation’s resources to pay their way–all tax deductible–around the world in luxury, on board their private jets, dining at the world’s finest restaurants and staying in the most elite hotels while flitting about overseeing their various “charity” enterprises.

    To enjoy this tax-free lifestyle, the foundation must annually spend 5% of its assets on “good works”, yet expects to make 8% on its investments. So much for giving it all to the poor.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @hillaire
  56. @Jeff Stryker

    I cannot resist this opportunity for mental exercise that Mr. Stryker has provided us.

    1. This same technological change occurred in Europe & Australia so why does the USA have more economic inequality than Europe or Australia or New Zealand.

    As a general rule, looking for mono-causality is a fools errand. There are numerous factors and contingencies involved in real world situations. That being said, Some of the relevant factors are: racial differences, the size and strength of the financial sector and reserve currency status, the level of cultural integrity (Norway for example, is much more ethnically , culturally, and linguistically unified than the USA). Government policy is certainly a big part of it as well. In the USA the regulations are designed to handicap small businesses, not target monopolies as they were originally intended. etc. I think Europe is following the same declining trajectory, but not as far along in some ways, while further along in others. I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg. A book could be written on this topic and still not flesh it out completely.

    2. Why is the USA more corrupt than other developed countries such as Europe or New Zealand or Australia.

    Corruption is a complex issue. In the third world like where I live, you hand the police man the equivalent of $50 and go on your way. In the USA the corruption is simply larger scale, and more disguised. Instead of you bribing the street cop, the Lobbyists bribe the congress. Australia and New Zealand have had harsher lockdowns and more government restrictions than the USA in many cases, which is a form of corruption.

    3. What difference would it make to Europe or NZ or Australia if the USA ceased to be a Superpower or becomes a backwater?

    You are an expat, so I’m sure you understand how interconnected our world is. The ptb are global; if there is a massive collapse in the USA or real chaos (as opposed to contrived, staged events); it will affect the ENTIRE PLANET.

    I’ll answer the rest of your post later

  57. The WEF, UN Agenda 2030, the covid-19 scam and psyop ie it has never been isolated, are all communist fronts to install a communist satanist one world government.

  58. It has been reported that Paul Krugman is a member of ????? a committee
    See https://theconversation.com/pikettys-focus-on-inequality-may-also-set-a-blueprint-for-the-study-of-economics-27421 from 2014

    He is on board with Lynn and Evelyn de Rothschilds Inclusive Capitalism scam…. Just another Illuminati Ploy to deceive the masses.

    The economic and political focus is increasingly on the inequality of income and wealth as they both rise in Europe and the US. At a conference on Inclusive Capitalism held near the end of May at London’s Guildhall, Christine Lagarde, the head of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), claimed that rising inequality posed a threat to growth and financial stability and that governments need to narrow the gaps through imposing more progressive taxes. NOTE Who ends up getting taxed…. The middle class to provide a Universal Basic Income to everyone…. But note there is no real accounting any where in the world… the central banks controlled by the Rothschild networks and other banks controlled by them, can inject ( look at how much money for world control has been injected to pay for the creation of COVID and the plandemic and these gene altering dangerous shots, WORLDWIDE, a WORLDWIDE AGENDA, that they inject money into the world economy just to eventually cause a Zombie apocalypse [ due to giving people HIV, cardiovascular disease, Dementia, autoimmune diseases, spontaneous abortions and infertility, but remember some communities could just be getting placebos] what ever amount of digital dollars to achieve world control goals) The entire assets and economic activity of the US in no way can support the amount of “digital dollars” that are generated, it is all a scam. So taxes on the middle class or even the lower upper class… you could take 80% of all this income and still not afford to pay for these programs…. It is all a scam for control.

    Piketty’s book has been broadly supported by economists in the centre of the political spectrum. Paul Krugman (the Nobel Prize-winning US economist based at Princeton University and the op-ed columnist for the New York Times) has praised it profusely — perversely

  59. Capitalism is a sham. The enlightenment and it’s child liberalism provided convenient cover for the rise of the misanthropic and narcissistic bourgeois class but the fact of the matter is that it was not a transition to economic utopia, it was a coup against medieval feudalism to create economic feudalism. We dont need new capitalism, we need guillotines.

  60. PJ London says:

    It seems that nobody has ever played Monopoly, the game invented to teach children how capitalism works.
    There are two basic rules 1) The bank can never ‘go broke’ the banker may write money on any available paper.
    2) the game continues until a winner has all the property and money.
    Marx in his Das Kapital said exactly the same, the end result of capitalism is that one person(Corporation) controls all the assets.
    I don’t understand why this is not common knowledge. It is the rules of the game.
    Don’t complain that you are losing when you did not bother to learn the rules.
    Unfortunately there is no other game available unless you are willing to live in China, Africa or Muslim societies where the objectives and rules are very different.

    • Agree: Thim
  61. @Mefobills

    All money is fiat, including gold coins. Once a coin receives its legal stamp, it is fiat. Clipped gold coins circulated at par, did they not?

    I think you are perhaps painting an incomplete, dare I say distorted, picture as far as the concept of the gold standard.

    You are correct; precious metals are not a magic bullet, and they don’t solve all of our problems. There was massive inflation after the Spanish subjugated and colonized mexico & south america. “I learnt a proverb here”, said a French traveler in 1603: “Everything is dear in Spain except silver”. Similarly, paper claims on gold exceeded actual reserves at least as early as the middle ages.

    At the same time, I do think that generally speaking, there are significant benefits to a precious metal standard. It DOES put something of a limit on madhouse currency debasement. Especially in a situation of international trade. Trial and error is the often the best, (if at times harsh) teacher. During the time when the middle class really came into being, there was a gold standard internationally. Sure it isn’t perfect; but it is a useful tool, and a major restraint on currency debasement.

    • Replies: @Mefobills
  62. @anarchyst

    Agree completely. The utter perversion and evil of the elites defies vocabulary. I think things are going to get alot worse before they get better.

  63. @BorisMay

    So you want to end the family unit and the very concept of heritage. Leaving most of humanity aimless and nihilistic.

    Where could THAT go wrong?

  64. To lighten the air, here is another piece from Anglin:

    https://dailystormer.su/the-economy-has-already-collapsed-but-the-government-is-able-to-prevent-the-biggest-effects/

    When will the (((Beast))) decide to flip the table? It is extremely unlikely that China or Russia will ever make a first move, considering that they even went along with the Corona Hoax just to cripple the (((west))).

    The scale of the implosion will be so unimaginable and put Zimbawe to shame.

  65. @Jeff Stryker

    Why is the USA more corrupt than other developed countries such as Europe or New Zealand or Australia.

    There was this common burglar who made it big in Australia never having to stop being a corrupt criminal:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Bond

  66. Mefobills says:
    @stevennonemaker88

    At the same time, I do think that generally speaking, there are significant benefits to a precious metal standard. It DOES put something of a limit on madhouse currency debasement.

    Especially in a situation of international trade

    .

    I’m not hostile to a gold trading standard. It works well. Goods and services moving external to a national economy, are marked by gold flow.

    If a nation is in trade deficit, then they lose gold in proportion. This then signals for an exchange rate adjustment to the national currency.

    Money’s true nature is law. Internal to a national countries borders, money settles debts by virtue of law.

    If, internal to an economy, the money is debased, that is an internal problem where some bad actors are taking sordid gain.

    What you are proposing with regards to mad-house debasement, by using “gold” is making gold your god.

    Gold, or any metal, cannot flex to the S shape of a natural economy, especially as the economy ebbs and flows with the agricultural season.

    The better way is to have one headwaters for national money creation, then have the that headwater monitored by citizens with guns. If the bureaucrats within the monetary authority get froggy and do something extra legal, then they can be executed.

    Every single case in monetary history, where there are good results, are a function of the national economy coming under legal control.

    Money = Law = Force.

    There is only a couple of cases in history where an internal gold standard worked, and even then it took a lot of effort. One was the Hanseatic league (Germany before it became a country), and the other was Ancient Venice before it became corrupted.

    The Venetians made anybody who had gold on hand to put it into the state bank, and from that point on the “internal” public had to use what was the equivalent of checks, which were based on gold stores.

    Any gold lost to international trade imbalance was soon recovered, as Venice was an exporting powerhouse.

    In modern history, internal gold standards have had private bank credit riding on top, so any small changes in external trade, acted like a lever, which would crater the credit economy, and lead to war.

    • Replies: @stevennonemaker88
  67. To diagnose the most significant problem, look first to the greatest affront to equity.

    Assume that you were to win $1 billion in cash in a mega-lottery.

    The next day, when you deposit the cash at a private bank, it is no longer your cash. The bank has both the legal title and the use title by possession. All you have is an unsecured deposit credit that did not cost the bank anything to produce.

    With respect to the cash, it is the same result in law as if the private bank had won the lottery.

    Copied below is a relatively brief summary and link to a more comprehensive explanation.

    The essential point is that if you do not change this foundational-reality – then nothing else matters.

    http://werex.org/a-general-theory-of-financial-relativity/

    ____

    [MORE]

    6. The Deposit function (excerpt from “My Top 7 reasons why All of this is unreal – Reason #2”)

    Assume, for the sake of exposition and argument, that some force, divine or otherwise, makes me the winner of $1 billion in cash in a super-multi-state powerball-type lottery. That $1 billion would bestow upon me some quantifiable and very substantial socioeconomic power.

    By whatever means, fate will have selected me for such power, and about 100 million people would have each paid an average of at least $10 in cash buying tickets to make it happen.

    Also further assume, just to keep track of it, that the typical / average lottery-ticket-buyer earns $14 per hour, and nets $10 after nominal taxes, such that the $1 billion jackpot represents the product of an aggregate 100 million hours of taxable / tax-paid labour already performed (plus whatever percentage the government keeps from total ticket sales[6]).

    But the cash would be mine regardless and I would own it in fact (possession) and in law.

    Yet the next day, if and when I deposit the cash in a private bank, the cash henceforth belongs in fact and in law to the bank, and I (henceforth) have an unsecured liability of the bank (an unsecured deposit credit) that I own and which I can trade with or assign to others (by cheque / check), but which did not cost the bank anything of substance to produce.

    Now the private bank also has $1 billion of new socioeconomic power by my decision to so favour it – a systemic gift of the equity and financial product of 100 million hours of labour already performed.

    Now apply the same process to the (say) $5 trillion-plus of earnings from new broadly-defined labour services annually in the U.S. economy.

    Assume that you work for a year to earn a cash payment of $100,000 in exchange for your labour and other skills and talents that others find useful in that amount. You too will have earned a certain amount of socioeconomic power.

    But the instant you deposit the money into a bank account, it is no longer your legal or actual money, and you have unwittingly made the private bank an equal partner in the product of your year’s labour. Same with cheques / checks (and anything that is deposited) – the bank literally and legally owns your paycheque the instant you deposit it.

    The same goes for all the illegal-vice-and-drug-money globally. Even if the drug dealers, etc., could obtain every last coin and banknote currency on Earth (in normal circulation)[7], there is still only about the USD-equivalent of $1 trillion, or about a one-year supply for the world’s broadly-defined vice-and-substance-abuse industries. So if it has been going on for 40-plus-years-in-fact, then you know with certainty that virtually every last dollar of such vice-and-drug-money is being laundered-in-fact (converted to deposit balances / credits) through private banks. It can’t go anywhere else. They are partners-in-theory, and they are partners-in-fact.

    Then if and when you participate in the financial markets, you find that your local bank, as with virtually all banks individually and in the aggregate, is not just a scorekeeper, but an active participant on the economic and financial playing field. So even if you beat it, you give your gain back to it when you deposit it. When your opponent scores a point, it scores a point. When you score a point, your point is forfeit to your opponent, but you get a different kind of point as a consolation, so it is kind of alright.

    And since at least my great-great-great-grandfather’s time, our global army of financial and economic analysts, with more troops worldwide than Napoleon and Wellington combined at Waterloo, cannot figure out that unearned and unjust conveyance of rights of property in money itself, via deposits and the custom and practice of private bankers, is a multi-hundred-trillion-dollar annual business of itself, and a defining reality of our entire system. It has just never occurred to anyone that it might be important?

    Just as the words “application fee” or “loan fee” or “commitment fee” excite a different area of your brain, than do the words “Cross-leveraged-double-counting-fee” or “True-principal-amount and real-interest-rate obfuscation and concealment fee” or “Accounting-fraud concealment fee”, so too does the word “deposit” evoke a very different reality than the more conceptually accurate “gratuitous-wealth-transfer”. As in: “Hi Bob, I just got my paycheque, and I am on my way to gratuitously assign the legal right of property in my earnings to the bank. I’ll meet you later for pizza.”

    Since the founding of the privately-owned Bank of England, for that matter; for 323 years our international army of bloodhound economists have failed to grasp the significance of this one all-encompassing and game-defining rule.

    Now let’s see, why would an economist concern themselves with something as arcane as rights of property in money itself, in a global system that processes $98 of financial / money transactions for every $2 of actual GDP [as at 2016]? They witness $3 quadrillion of financial transactions annually to support global GDP of $60 trillion (2%) and, with a few notable exceptions, these economic analysts can’t think of a single reason why rights of property in the $3 quadrillion might have some effect on human socioeconomic relationships?[8]

    Assuming that there are about 7,000 substantive private deposit-taking institutions globally, then there would be one such special-player per million human players (labour units). Assume also that each special player is substantially and beneficially owned and / or controlled by one vested-oligarch-family-unit, with the most senior (and largest by far) units having been in place for over 300 years.

    In this game, all seven billion human players perform labour each day for wages and 90% of them, by amounts, deposit those wages into deposit (gratuitous-wealth-transfer) accounts at one of the 7,000 special-players / family-units, at which point the wages become the legal and actual property of the special-players / families. The special players call their special advantage a level playing field and which is their inherent right by the longstanding custom and practice of private bankers.

    And for 323 years our inter-generational global army of economists cannot figure out “What’s wrong with this game?”

    Computer! End program!

    _____________

    The deposit function is one of several essential feedback devices or components in the larger / aggregate socioeconomic or socio-financial feedback loop that effectively channels half of all new wealth, as it is produced / created, to the owners of the nominal banking system. And that is before interest-called-interest.

  68. Agent76 says:

    May 16, 2021 Resetting the Business of Data and AI Part 2 | DAVOS AGENDA 2021 by the World Economic Forum

    The future of artificial intelligence (AI) will be shaped by the ways in which data is collected, stored, governed, accessed and used. From a risk-based approach to data governance to ethically designed AI tools, what novel approaches are needed to harness the full value of data and accelerate the benefits of AI for society?


  69. @TG

    A clap-trap reply to a fatuous article. The US emerged as an indsutrial powerhouse after Lowell ripped off the British technology for textile mills. The mills were absolutely run on the fruits of slavery, specifically the slave cotton of the South. Wages were absolutely atrocious in the US in the nineteenth century, and US industry was far more dangerous than in Europe, particularly mining, in which the death rate in accidents in the US far exceeded rates in Western Europe.
    As to the article itself, it’s painful Amway-level garbage. The notion that the US was a mom-and-pop capitalist society given the role and power of Standard Oil, Dupont, US banks, General Motors, etc., ad infinitum, is so far removed from reality as to be some form of post–post-modern comedy bit.

  70. @Mefobills

    Interesting insight, thankyou.

    Uncle Adolph had the answers for how you filter. He had Hitler Schools, where the best and brightest went for education. These were natural leaders, people (boys not girls) who had empathy, and were taught the verities of life.

    This was quite similar to the German General Staff which had roots going back to Prussia. They had a system which selected, educated, and promoted officers, and stressed flexibility and innovation. This is one of the reasons that the Germans caused higher casualties then they lost and generally were man for man far superior to the allies in both world wars.

    On a similar note, people often thought that hereditary kinship where the firstborn son was the next king was an institution made for the benefit of the king. While this may have been a factor, an often more important reason was that determining succession in this manner avoided the dynastic struggles which tore apart most countries in Europe for so long. In theory, the first born who was set to become king would take on training for his duties from childhood.

    I appreciate your insight and I agree with you on alot. I am of the opinion that Fascism was very efficient and effective for the Germans, but copying their template into another race or culture might have drastically different results. Who knows what would have happened if there was no ww2 and Hitler had stayed in power. Maybe I am a bit cynical, but I can see them having simply fast tracked to the material overabundance and ensuing decadence of today. It’s impossible to know.

    • Replies: @Mefobills
    , @Mefobills
  71. Corrupt says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    “Why do Americans always point that finger at “socialism” & desire more right-wing policy when the more Leftist countries of Europe, NZ, Australia or Canada have less poverty?”

    Because a good portion of poverty in the U.S. is caused by a broken (African American) culture that the other countries you cite don’t have to deal with. The USA would cut crime and poverty in half if all the blacks were to magically disappear.

    • Agree: TKK
    • Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain
  72. People been e-mask-ulated.

  73. First, thanks for an essay on economic issues rather than racial ones.

    But, second, there is no point in raising taxes on the rich:

    1. It’s like belling the cat in that those who will be raising the taxes are already fairly rich, and they will ensure lots of loopholes for their fellow rich citizens.

    2. When taxes are raised on the rich, taxes on the poor often get raised as well.

    3. Raising taxes on the rich gives the illusion that the money collected will be redistributed to the poor, but in practice that is not necessarily the case. Once the government gets its hands on the money, it can go anywhere, including right back to rich people. I saw this happen in academia. There are lots of government grants for academics, but they mostly go to people from rich backgrounds who went to elite schools, while those of us from poorer backgrounds who went to non-elite schools got nothing.

    4. The concept of raising taxes on the rich fools poor people into thinking that this is an important thing, when it isn’t. For example, our elites wanted to get people angry at Donald Trump for not paying his fair share of taxes, but Donald Trump was a friend of the poor who created lots of jobs for them. Meanwhile, our elites excuse rich institutions for the rich, like Harvard, which don’t pay any taxes. What has Harvard done for the poor? Nothing worth writing about.

    5. Even assuming you can get lots of money from the rich and assuming it mostly goes to the poor, what will you do about those poor people who squander their money on illegal drugs or who gamble it all away at a casino? What will you do when they come back begging for more?

    6. And even assuming you can redistribute wealth to the poor, it will never be enough to get them up to the level of the middle class.

    There are plenty of other reasons for not raising taxes on the rich. To help the poor, it’s better to create lots of good jobs for them.

  74. HbutnotG says:

    The headline says it all.

    But looking at the comments, one notices very few get it, and many just overthink things, a trait I’ve noticed of “college”-educated people, born with just enough synapses to pass junior HS in my day.

    I’ve watched this whole thing happen (the headline, I mean). It first became evident to me when my dad, a tool & die maker (c. 1970, UAW, Big 3, making $25/hr) began referring to his shop as “The Clubhouse.” He’d come home on Friday with a stack of magazines and papers with the crossword puzzles all solved (obviously hours to accomplish) gloating about how bingo was boring (his shop had a bingo game going most days) but he had better things to do. The part I found amusing was his description of the start of the day: “I put a piece of scrap in the machine, slow feed, just throwing sparks….grab the newspaper and head off to the shithouse…make sure you get a booth…and, sometimes some slob would actually take a shit and smell up the place…”

    What was this all about? He told me then how tooling was being shipped to Germany and Japan. So they had nothing to do. Funny thing is that he usually still worked 6 days – sometimes 7! We’re talking time and a half here.

    But that was 1970. 20 years later I watched about 90% of the numerous shops (yes, 90%) on Groesbeck Hwy close up (there were dozens, everything from pencil sharpener parts, to plastic floats, to precision grinding). It was a new type of ghost town! Interestingly, one that remained open was the manufacturer who always had gov’t contracts when I worked there in the early 1970’s. It was the go to place if you got laid off from the GM plant. Interestingly, in the 90’s i recall noticing factories in Ontario, Canada (where my cottage was) had full parking lots even on Saturday nights. Brand new pre-fab steel plants popped up all over the place.

    So what’s the point? Just what do you think the average Joe in that part of the US (and most other parts, too) in the “Mom & Pop Capitalist days” did …with their HS education, ( if that)? Well let me tell you, in those days, non-factory work was called “Pencil pushing.” Pencil pushers were the ones that rented flats and took 10 – 15 years longer to cough up a down payment for a house they “owned.” The factory workers already had an FHA mortgage by 1952. The few biz degrees around largely were pencil tip lickers, taking the bus and took until 1960 to acquire an “A-One” used car. The factory workers already owned 2 cars. Think about that.

    By 1980 the “Rust Belt” was in full rust mode. College loan money became just like the money conveyor belt we see today…and tuition increased by 10X then 50X, then 100X in direct proportion to the amount of federal loan money available. In concert, women now insisted on leaving the kitchen and laundry (the workforce nearly doubled over night, and so did real estate [and commissions]) and tons of moulah available to allow marginally qualified young people to go to college, the course catalogue featured “underwater basket weaving” courses, and interestingly, at the same time, began loading up their now empty engineering schools with foreigners, mostly from Asia, while ‘muricans went into business – what amounts to little more than a jazzed up version of 5th grade math – replete with a new vocabulary, constructed just for a stinkin’ pie chart. Well that part was learnable to most anybody. The computerization part became the province of the smarter ones with some logic ability – even though they managed to add “lesser” level jobs in that field – call them “techs.”. The irony is that computerization (which was originally developed to eliminate too many pencil pushers) did just the opposite!

    The outcome? Universities have more money in their “fund” than ever and so, participate in politics; college grads are in hock up to their necks, and now, we have 67 clerks (formerly known as “pencil pushers”) between the raw materials and the bask cart out the door where 60 years ago, when the computer was a sci fi dream word, about 7 were quite enough. The salaries of all those useless clerks gets added to the price, of course. That’s really why something invented and marketed 80 years ago now costs 5X as much as it originally did and you have to buy ten lifetimes worth, or none at all. And, btw, robotics were already 95% developed 40 years ago – but notice, China still needs living bodies, lots of them, to get the stuff put together.

  75. Mefobills says:

    A clap-trap reply to a fatuous article. The US emerged as an indsutrial powerhouse after Lowell ripped off the British technology for textile mills. The mills were absolutely run on the fruits of slavery, specifically the slave cotton of the South.

    You are full of clap trap.

    The U.S. emerged as an industrial powerhouse because it used industrial capitalism.

    Finance Capital, by contrast, wants to lower the wage price, to then take unearned income.

    The “Yankee Method” was water wheels, powering machinery, and using high value labor assembling work-pieces, which was the forerunner to Henry Ford. The first work-pieces to be assembled using standardized parts was for gun manufacturing in said Yankee Workshops.

    There were many discussions in those early days about how the Americas was not to have “Coolie Labor” or wage slaves.

    The slave cotton of the south was because the south back slid backwards into Oligarchy and was rejoining the British Colonial System – and this was the real reason for the Civil War.

    https://peofdev.wordpress.com/2016/05/23/americas-protectionist-takeoff/

    (Hudson) tells the story of the neglected American School of Political Economy (ASPE), whose ideas and policies shaped the US economy, and its industrial sector in particular, for many years. Their economics ran against the ideas of the English classical political economists Ricardo and Malthus and was more like statecraft than pure economic theory.

    The industrializing north, using American Credit, did not want negro labor, nor did it need it. Simultaneously, England was shipping white debt slaves to the Americas, who had to work in the factories to pay off debt instruments sourced in England.

    The south was buying negroes from Jewish merchants, to then use as tractors, to then grow cotton.

    Cotton was on-sold to England, and in return (to balance trade) the South bought English goods rather than northern industrial products.

    • Replies: @Alden
  76. @Mefobills

    The golden age of the gold standard (no pun intended haha) ended when all the major powers went OFF the gold standard in order to fight the first world war to its bitter end. IF they had remained on the gold standard, they would have gone bankrupt and fighting would have ended in 1914-1915.

    Some might call this a weakness of the Gold standard, but I see it as doing exactly what it does best; keeping some level of accountability on debt and expenses. Now, in the real world the powers that be simply did what they are wont to do, and changed the rules (went off the gold standard) when push came to shove.

    There is only a couple of cases in history where an internal gold standard worked, and even then it took a lot of effort. One was the Hanseatic league (Germany before it became a country), and the other was Ancient Venice before it became corrupted.

    I think you could add the American system which was originally silver, then bimetallic, then gold to the list as well. It wasn’t perfect, but it was in place during some of the greatest economic growth EVER in world history.

    I think we are mostly on the same page. What argument there is, if it can even be called that, is that I think history shows the Gold standard to have been quite useful in restraining runaway debasement. The physical quality of the metals themselves prevent massive “printing” in the manner of paper or digital currencies. I certainly don’t think a precious metal system is total fix, or a perfect panacea. Like a trusty wrench, it has it’s place when wielded correctly, and is just one important tool in the toolbox…

    • Replies: @Mefobills
  77. Alden says:

    Bezos just bought MGM movies TV channels and much more.

    This article is Econ 101 at its most ignorant. ,There is Mom and Pop capitalism small and medium businesses. But America was built on cannibal capitalism and rapacious industry. And the importation of the starving masses of Britain Germany and later Scandinavia and E Europe. .

    I wish Econ 101 would distinguish between middle class entrepreneurs and employees. When a person at the bottom of the affirmative action caste scale has to beg for jobs in this affirmative action jobs, it’s not middle class. Even if the beggar has a MS in engineering.

    Only 3 reasons there was an employee middle class for less than 100 years in America.

    1 1924 25 immigration restriction
    2 Actual enforcement of those immigration restrictions
    3 A very strong militant labor union movement.

    The unions didn’t just benefit its own members. For instance a unionized factory. The office clerks and managers benefitted too from high wages and benefits wrested from the owners and upper management by the unionized workers.

    But the private sector unions are gone. Econ 101 still claims an MBA or STEM MS is necessary for a good wage. But ignores the fact that black unionized bus drivers make 100K plus a year because they belong to unions. Same with all the unionized government jobs.

    I really wonder if the economy is in such bad shape. For instance evictions. There’s an extended family owned medium sized residential real estate company I know of that has more than 3,000 properties. Not one tenant is behind on the rent.

    It’s a small sample. But it totally contradicts the hysterical articles in the lying media that hundreds of thousands of tenants haven’t paid rent since March 2020 and will be evicted by eeevvvilll landlords when eviction moratorium is lifted. There were articles the third week of March that people laid off Match 21 wouldn’t be able to pay the first of April rent. Like they wouldn’t get their last paycheck. And unemployment insurance didn’t exist.

    Some tenants did get laid off but their unemployment was sufficient, more than sufficient with the extra $600 a week. And unemployment was extended to August this year. One building I know of is near several hospitals and has hospital employees as tenants. The hospital employees all had their hours cut, some only working 3 days a week. Not just medics but clerks maintaince food service.

    As hospital workers worked only 3 or 4 days a week the media was shrieking , hospitals full of dying patients!!! Patients Lying on gurneys in the halls for lack of beds.!!!! Overworked nurses and Drs collapsing after 18 hour days.!!

    Lies all lies as usual

  78. Mefobills says:
    @stevennonemaker88

    Maybe I am a bit cynical, but I can see them having simply fast tracked to the material overabundance and ensuing decadence of today. It’s impossible to know.

    Maybe its impossible. But, history ran many money experiments. These experiments are not taught in school, which is why the average person walking around has no frame of reference. They imagine things rather than understand.

    With national socialism, women were sent home – to engage in the home life. Children were not used as labor. The work weak was shortened to 40 hours.

    The material over-abundance went to feed and house more mouths with less labor.

    In the upper middle ages under England’s Talley Stick System, a family of four could survive fairly well with one wage earner working about 4-6 months a year. The rest of the time, they volunteered their labor, or took long vacations.

    The decadence of today has many authors, with over-abundance being one variable. Many have under-abundance, as the economy polarizes into haves and have- nots.

    • Thanks: stevennonemaker88
  79. frontier says:
    @onebornfree

    While I don’t disagree about the problems of big gov, they should never be separated from the problems of big corp. Thus, you’ve made a grave error, because here and now, big gov and big corp work as a team against the rest of us, they want each other to be big, that makes us smaller, powerless and insignificant.

    Ms Brown covers mostly big corp, and does it reasonably well, but she too makes a mistake by mislabeling this phenomenon with fancy names. The merging of big corp & gov isn’t new, it isn’t philanthro- or techno- or post- capitalism, it can work fine without philanthropy or high-tech and it was used way before the post-era by people like Mussolini, who defined “the merging of the state and corporate power” as Fascism… Why invent new names?

  80. Alden says:
    @Mefobills

    Agree but you forgot to mention that the free Whites who wove the cotton had less food and worse living conditions and worked longer and harder than the slaves who planted and picked the cotton. Picking and harvesting is hard work. But only 2 to 3 months a year for cotton. Contrast that to standing in a dangerous factory 14, 16 hours a day 6 days a week. And if in England living on tea, rice pudding, potatoes turnips cabbage bread and jam.

    • Replies: @Mefobills
  81. Mefobills says:
    @stevennonemaker88

    Point taken about succession and dynastic struggles.

    Here is an interesting case study in Mexico. They have figured out a way to resist the agents of Mammon.

  82. onebornfree says: • Website

    “While I don’t disagree about the problems of big gov, they should never be separated from the problems of big corp. Thus, you’ve made a grave error, because here and now, big gov and big corp work as a team against the rest of us, they want each other to be big, that makes us smaller, powerless and insignificant.”

    So, even bigger government is required [to “fix” all of the “problems”you see], right? 😎

    “Everything government touches turns to crap” Ringo Starr

    “Government is a disease masquerading as its own cure” Robert LeFevere

    Regards [?] , onebornfree

  83. R2b says:
    @stevennonemaker88

    We should have a right to a stable value.
    And a fair salary.
    Many here are maybe rentiers, or inheritors, judging by time spent, or 8200?
    Anyway, when the time comes, the only thing you can do is run and buy a gun.
    Or some land.
    Nothing much else to buy, is there?
    Value subsist over, some time, then it disappears, or at least diminishes.
    How to mend this?
    May I suggest hang the bankers?
    Or anyone up with more creative thoughts?

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @stevennonemaker88
  84. @Irish Savant

    They weren’t the only ones. They certainly played a very large part. But, as Paul Craig Roberts has often written, the involvement of the Deep State in all of this should not be minimised.

  85. @Mefobills

    Appreciate the part about the Tally stick system. I’ve never head of it. I’m educating myself now. Thank you!

  86. Alden says:
    @ThreeCranes

    Don’t get me started on non profits. We have several copies of Ferdinand Lindbergh’s book. Another book “ Who owns the land”. Author disapproves of people who own hundreds and thousands of acres.

    Non profits just parasite off what government already does. Streets and sewers environmentalists get in in the action. Food EBT cards more women sitting in store front offices outreaching to inform people they may be eligible for EBT than women in the welfare offices that actually grant the cards.

    School lunch and breakfast is a good example. It’s a big business. Michelle Obama wasn’t the first to enter into liberal health food school lunches. Started in black Oakland Ca. White women got a grant to force liberal health food school lunches on black run black lunch provider Oakland schools. So they advised and consulted and did studies on kids preferences for brown rice vs barley.

    In many counties there are more NGO do gooders trying to rehabilitate the criminals than there are criminals.

    Can’t find a job? Unemployable for whatever reason? Create a cause, save the ragweed . Borrow $1,000 or less to set up a non profit corporation, hire a commission grant writer and you’re set for life.

    When brother was in college there was a chart of every business then owned by Rockefeller Industries; separate from Standard Chevron Exxon oil and gas. Yellow Cab Greyhound nation wide supermarket chains coal and iron mines railroads appliance brands . Can’t remember the names It was about 50 of the then biggest companies and brands in America.

  87. Ace says:

    ** Today’s U.S. prison system has also been called a form of slavery, in which free or cheap labor is extracted from poor people of color. **

    Oh, brother. GMAB.

  88. Alden says:
    @R2b

    Land is easily confiscated. Probably the most easily found and confiscated form of property.
    American French Russian and Chinese revolutions. You should read what happened to American property owners who were neutral during the revolution. Property confiscated and out in the road without even a mule and cart
    Between mortgage and property taxes, no one really owns real property. Even if the property is owned free and clear. Local government can just raise property taxes to the level the owner can’t pay them. That’s the most benign form of government confiscation of land.

    Another is government confiscation by the Detroit Compton Bronx method. Just allow black crime to rise to the level the owner has to sell and not make enough of a profit to ever buy another piece of real estate.

    Land is actually very risky especially in America. Local government either raises property taxes to confiscatory levels or surrounds your home business and other property with black criminals.

    Even small scale hobby farming is basically a gamble. Droughts changing markets fuel prices the endless machinery and equipment problems floods government and environmental regulations, class action law suits. EPA inspectors insisting that 2 inches of water in a field after the snow thaws makes it a wetlands and you can’t use it for crops or pasturage. But must continue to pay property taxes on it.
    Highest and best usage property taxes. When expensive condos are built around your shabby little warehouse property tax goes up.

    Lots of luck

  89. Skeptikal says:
    @El Dato

    “stock market and the businesses in it are essentially owned by three companies –– the giant exchange-traded funds BlackRock, Vanguard, and State Street.”

    I think what is meant here is that these three companies own or control the shares that are publicly traded on the stock market(s). I guess perhaps US stock markets are meant. I believe that all of these companies operate hundreds of different funds and also own or control shares directly, or their fund managers trade/own the shares in these funds.

    It should be possible to do a fairly straightforward calculation of the total value of the NY Stock Market and the values of shares held or controlled by the funds of these three entities.

    Per Wiki:
    “The Vanguard Group, Inc. is an American registered investment advisor based in Malvern, Pennsylvania with about $6.2 trillion in global assets under management, as of January 31, 2020.[5] It is the largest provider of mutual funds and the second-largest provider of exchange-traded funds (ETFs) in the world after BlackRock’s iShares.[6] In addition to mutual funds and ETFs, . . . Several mutual funds managed by Vanguard are ranked at the top of the list of US mutual funds by assets under management.[7] Along with BlackRock and State Street, Vanguard is considered one of the Big Three index funds that dominate corporate America.[8]:2[9]:721

  90. @Joe Paluka

    It won’t be long before we see headlines like: Wifi turned my son into a girl!

    If not by the microwave radiation itself, then by the garbage propaganda they convey.

  91. I’m pretty sure the translation of “You will own nothing, and you will be happy” from Orwellian-speak to everyday English is “We will own you, and you are disposable when you no longer please us.”

  92. @Mefobills

    Good for these people but it is far from effective. As I see, it is still a small group of vanguards doing all the security and fighting. Until ALL abled body men are willing to hold the guns, it is bound to fail quickly. I guess these people just cannot evolve beyond the masters-slaves system. But they are definitely better than the modern (((western))) goyim though, especially these (((q anon))) kike loving boomers, who are the most well-armed group of citizens, yet the most cucked.

    Thank you for a piece of good news in these troubled times.

  93. Alden says:
    @TG

    Starving desperate immigrants drove down 19 the century wages starting January 1 1800, long before 1888. As early as 1807 a New England shoemakers Union was formed. As well
    As higher wages they wanted immigration restrictions. Laws were quickly passed that out lawed unions or criminal syndicates.

    By 1840 the well paid comfortably housed single women Lowell mill workers were replaced by European immigrant men paid the same wages to support wives and children. Same wage as the single women paid to a man to support several people.

    1820s Know Nothing Party. It’s only cause was limiting immigration.

    Westward expansion American born people moving west because they weren’t wanted in industry. Similar to Redmond Wa and Silicon Valley Ca discriminatory against American hiring practices today.

    1848 revolutions and potato crop failure in Europe caused a flood of Germans. The big 1848 potato famine didn’t affect just the native real Irish. It affected all of Europe’s working classes. Especially in German countries where the poor were almost as potato dependent as the native Irish.

    As well as starving the native Irish, the British upper classes were literally clearing Scotland of people with inherited ownership rights to make way for sheep. And the English working classes were even more malnourished than the Scots and famine Irish As proven by steadily shrinking during the 18 and 18th century.

    Consensus of historians is that about 66 percent of colonial American Whites arrived as indentured convicts and indentured servants who “ freely” entered into 7-10 years of slavery in America to escape starvation and vagabond homelessness in Britain.

  94. HbutnotG says:
    @TKK

    Your uncle should have gotten an Ed degree, had a student deferment, and taught elementary school gym in Chicago. Easy schmeasy and cheap college and, heck, Chicago was an OK place in his day. Today (now a resident of white semirural SE Wisconsin) he’d be getting a $100,000 a year pension (guaranteed for life) and have his summer home on the market for 1.2 mil – just like my neighbor who I described above.

    Quonset hut with those hoarded “goodies” and a weedy vegetable garden that he’s now too feeble to manage. lol Maybe his dad who lived through the depression, but why him?

  95. @R2b

    May I suggest hang the bankers?

    This is probably about the only thing almost every Unz reader can agree on.

    otherwise, your post seemed like a bit of bizarre and convoluted poetry. Was that the point?

  96. Anyone else notice the seeming connection between the appearance of the Soviet Union and then all kinds of social programs for the masses in the West and then those programs being systemtically dismantled
    as soon as the ” threat” of the Soviet Union disappeared or is it just me?

  97. The Hazard Circular? As Ledeen said of Machiavelli-‘ You can almost hear the Jewish music’.

  98. @Plume de gurre

    Absolutely! Every ‘concession’ granted working people in the West over decades of struggle has been withdrawn since the Thatcher/Reagan reaction set in. After the infamous Powell Memorandum in 71 and Nixon’s ending of dollar/gold convertability. Once the USSR went, the process accelerated, and now the social and economic inequality is unprecedented, and the ruling elites are actively planning the extirpation of the ‘useless classes’ as the Israeli ‘intellectual’ Yuval Noah Hariri calls the goyim. And excess Jews, too, I suppose-Israel is the second most unequal society in the OECD after all.
    Now all the serfs have left is to vote out of divisive hatreds fomented by the indoctrination system, pointless greed, and pig stupidity and ignorance-the great triumph of ‘Demo-crazy’. As their lives crumble away, and the Bosses blame China, or Putin, or Hamas, or ‘the Left’, when no Left exists anywhere in the ‘Free World’. Suicide cults like anthropogenic climate destabilisation denial proliferate, stoked by Rightwing ideologues, as the global ecosystems disintegrate, and drug addiction grows, suicide burgeons, and crudely exploitative mass culture poisons minds, preparatory to early onset dementia.

  99. @Corrupt

    If you think Austfailia is ‘Leftist’ you have been misinformed. The current Federal regime is the most hard Right ever, rapidly turning full fascist with an influx of ex-military thugs and religious zealots as Members of Parliament, and the ‘Opposition’ Labor Party is a zombie corpse having moved ever further Right for forty years. In foreign affairs we are leading the racist, Sinophobic, attacks on China as chief lap-dog of the USA, despite any war against China being a definitive extinction event for the country. But race and civilizational hatred is such a virulent impulse on the Right that we charge on like rabid lemmings.

  100. @Plume de gurre

    The history of the modern welfare state goes back to the programs (Staatssozialismus) enacted by Bismarck in the late 19th century, more than 3 decades before the Russian Revolution. The number and size of social programs are at an all time high, even as the economic independence and actual purchasing power of the dollar declines.

    The social programs came about before the USSR, and many of them have actually expanded since its demise.

  101. @unwoke

    “The economy of despair” BUT in other news —woman in Vancouver – New York claims she was impregnated by —-not John Hagee—not William Jefferson Clinton–not Ron Jeremy or Jeffery Epstein or Donald Trump BUT –the Dalai Lama. A fortune is now secure for another generation.

  102. ” Former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis explains that “capital” has been decoupled from productivity: businesses can make money without making profits on their products. ”

    Maybe you are saying the same thing. But I would state specifically that stock prices are not only decoupled from productivity, but also from products themselves.

    And using the market to determine overall economic health is a drastic error.

  103. bayviking says:

    This phony economics appears to have started under Thatcher (TINA) There Is No Alternative a staunch follower of the Austrian School under author Hayek. But the Chicago School under Milton Friedman won the Nobel prize for his work, while completely destroying the lives of Chileans. Alan Greenspan was the most powerful advocate of Libertarian free market bullshit, a system of enriching the rich ever further though endless cycles of boom and bust.

    Academic economics does not stand up to any scientific standards, unless you look outside the mainstream to Hudson and Keens. I do not mean to suggest they are the only good economists, only that they have been publishing better thinking for a very long time and for doing that are locked out of Washington DC and the Federal Reserve, which are owned by the ruling class.

    In fact attacks on the new deal and all its implications began under Carter. With respect to economics, academia, the Democrat and Republican Parties all drink the same Kool-Aide. They are deeply invested in the class warfare identified by Karl Marx. That is why working people have been losing since the seventies.

    • Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain
  104. In today’s Woke World under current anti white illegitimate Biden Regime, all you need is one employee calling you a racist Nazi white Supremacists on social media and there goes your business.
    What follows next is a bunch of BLM/Antifa thugs threatening to Burm Loot Murder in the name of racial justice.
    Civil War 2.0 can’t come any sooner. There’s no way forward to a compromise or mutual accommodation between the children of the Dark and the children of the Light. This is a war between Good and Evil, where government is the primary driving force of evil.
    Never take a knee for any BLM/POC/Wigger/Zionist POS.

  105. https://group30.org/members DownLoad this

    Paul Krugman is a member of the Group of 30. Which he jokingly refers to as the Bavarian Illuminati…..

    https://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/06/what-i-said/ If you can get past the paywall.

  106. BlackFlag says:
    @Mefobills

    Mefobills, which countries today would you say implement a system which is closest to Fascism? I’m guessing China and Israel.

    • Replies: @Mefobills
  107. Meena says:

    1 “In the first quarter of 2021, Tesla reported $518 million in sales of regulatory credits, which Elon Musk’s company generally receives from government programs to support renewable energy. It has sold these to other automakers, notably FCA (now Stellantis) when they needed credits to offset their own carbon footprint.”

    2 “In the fourth quarter of 2020, Tesla’s $270 million in net income was enabled by its sale of $401 million in regulatory credits to other automakers.

    Tesla historically has racked up around $1.6 billion in regulatory energy credits, primarily zero emission vehicle credits, which helped the company report more than four consecutive quarters of profitability, qualifying the automaker for addition to the S&P 500 index.”–https://www.cnbc.com/2021/05/17/michael-burry-of-the-big-short-reveals-a-530-million-bet-against-tesla.html

    This is pure corruption . It doesn’t help green or clean energy or zero emission by subsidizing ( Government subsidizing Musk and Elos Musk )then selling the “indulgence” to other other common its and making money ( by Elon Musk ) on those business philosophy or practices or mechanism by selling tax payers incentives or subsidies. Essentially Elon took the money from Gov and sold certain papers ( that these companies are becoming greener ) to other companies and made a killing .

    Elon Musk made the money on the back of the tax payers .Tax payers could have forced government to not subsidize buy invest in zero emission car or other industries .

    His car sales business couldn’t have taken him anywhere where he is in terms of wealth .

    Now his wealth and government connections or intervention by lobbyists would possibly see deregulation of NASA and other projects including those run by universities .

    Deregulation means Elon Musk will run the NASA paid by the same tax payers .

    • Replies: @Malla
  108. Mefobills says:
    @BlackFlag

    Mussolini defined what Fascism is:

    http://www.worldfuturefund.org/wffmaster/Reading/Germany/mussolini.htm

    Fascism is therefore opposed to all individualistic abstractions based on eighteenth century materialism; and it is opposed to all Jacobinistic utopias and innovations

    So, right off the bat, you can tell Israel is not fascist. Israel is an outpost of “Jacobin” Globo-Homo, which is finance capitalism. Fascism is the antithesis of finance capital, as it uses industrial capitalism and state capital.

    People keep conflating corporatism with fascism, when they are two different things. When corporations are over the government, that is Corporatism. Government over corporations is fascism; although fascism includes much more as described at link above.

    Here it is, where Mussolini describes fascist hierarchy, where State power is supreme, and over corporations (and the Oligarchs behind corporations).

    We are, in other words, a state which controls all forces acting in nature. We control political forces, we control moral forces we control economic forces, therefore we are a full-blown Corporative state

    The U.S. is a full blown corporatocracy, which includes Oligarchs string pulling from behind the scenes. In 1926 Mussolini nationalized the banks. Do you think that would happen in Israel, or the U.S.?

    China is fascist, which I have stated many times in my comment history. Of course, many Chinese get all butt-hurt when I make the comparison, but too bad. China definitely meets many aspects of the definition Mussolini laid down.

    Fascism has no negative connotations in my brain, unlike most people who are trained from birth to knee jerk.

    • Thanks: BlackFlag
    • Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain
  109. Mefobills says:
    @Alden

    Agree but you forgot to mention that the free Whites who wove the cotton had less food and worse living conditions and worked longer and harder than the slaves who planted and picked the cotton. Picking and harvesting is hard work. But only 2 to 3 months a year for cotton.

    Yep. That is why it is outrageous to listen to today’s negroes who have been wound up with all kinds of nonsense.

    Ask yourself the question. Why is it that the negro population increased at the same rate or faster than whites in the Americas, even with white people immigrating from Europe? Reproduction is the definition of success.

    Obviously Chattel slavery was not that rough, and many negroes had good lives as part of the white family, where kinship relations were extended. Jews spread narratives at odds with real history, to then gaslight populations.

    England was sending debt slaves to the U.S. This is especially the case after the Bank of England came into being in 1694, the worlds first debt spreading bank.

    http://jrbooksonline.com/PDF_Books/theywereslaves.pdf

    In the course of an 1855 journey up the Alabama River on the steamboat Fashion, Frederic Law Olmsted, the landscape architect who designed New York’s Central Park, observed bales of cotton being thrown from a considerable height into a cargo ship’s hold. The men tossing the bales somewhat recklessly into the hold were negroes, the men in the hold were Irish. Olmsted inquired about this to a mate on the ship. ‘Oh, said the mate, ‘the niggers are worth too much to be risked here; if the Paddies are knocked overboard or get their backs broke, nobody loses anything.” (Frederic Law Olmsted, A Journey to the Seaboard Slave States, pp. 100-101; G.E.M. de Ste. Croix, Slavery and Other Forms of Unfree Labor, p. 27).

    • Replies: @ProudBLM
    , @ThreeCranes
  110. Mefobills says:
    @stevennonemaker88

    The golden age of the gold standard (no pun intended haha) ended when all the major powers went OFF the gold standard in order to fight the first world war to its bitter end.

    The “internal” Gold standard didn’t stop the private debt hypothecations the led to the great depression.

    In the interwar years, the FED artificially held interest rates low in the U.S., so that France and England could recover their gold.

    The post Bretton Woods TRADING GOLD STANDARD was a golden age, with general prosperity.

    This balanced trade regime lasted until America abused its “reserve status” by exporting inflation as it turned to war in IndoChina. Officially, the trading gold standard was over in 1971 when Nixon closed the gold window.

    Hudson explains the mechanism in his book, Super Imperialism.

    In 1971, the world transitioned to floating exchange rate regime, with dollar as reserve. In 1973, with the secret Kissinger/Saudi agreement, the world transitioned to the TBill/Petrodollar/Reserve system.

    We are still immersed in that system, with many nations trying to exit.

    • Thanks: stevennonemaker88
  111. anon[214] • Disclaimer says:

    In my day, high school nerds would be competing
    to bring down these pieces of space junk.

    Sorry, Elon.

  112. anon[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @onebornfree

    “The kind of man who wants the government to adopt and enforce his ideas is always the kind of man whose ideas are idiotic” H.L.Mencken

    So does this mean the government can never adopt and enforce an idea that is not idiotic, since all ideas came from somebody?

    I think the only kind of government that works is one that rules over a small group of like minded individuals. Which is why I’m in favor of maximum decentralization. Return all power to the states. Scrap all national laws and institutions from congress to the fed, the DOJ, the cabinet, POTUS, SCOTUS. America should be run like 50 independent nations. Let each state determine their own economic and political systems. If some states wish to build a wall all around them and accept no new immigrants they are free to do so. If some states want open borders they are free to do so. If some states wish to be totally socialist or Marxist they are free to do so. Let’s have some choices, and let’s see who has the best system in a hundred years.

    • Replies: @onebornfree
  113. ProudBLM says:
    @Mefobills

    The Irish were hated because they were Catholics Not because they were “white”, and the Negro Slaves were Slaves because they were Black, “Irish Slaves” is mostly a myth at least they got paid after their 7 yr bondage was over, Negros couldn’t own land/property America is the only place where a black driver can be stopped at anytime and questioned about the “ownership” of his property.

  114. hillaire says:
    @ThreeCranes

    Irregardless of how these miscreants spend their time, and whether they or their system are in anyway worthwhile (which even by their own metrics they are not).. one should never lose sight of the stated ‘aims’ of these ‘foundations’ (of power and wealth) and the methods of ‘inheritance’ and inbreeding employed to perpetuate them….

    They want you powerless, muted and preferably DEAD….that is their ‘stated aim’ all dressed up in dinner suits and silk dresses, no arguments…

    Which is why the imbecilic prole carpet baggers, cultists and slavish followers of the cancers of libertarianism, neo-liberalism and other such monstrous ideologies….

    Should be imprisoned immediately, strapped in an ‘iron-maiden’ and force fed pureed cockroach egg sacs through a giant cake icer whilst being forced to watch fugly red haired tattooed jewish/aboriginal australian porno.. a-la-mode-de clock-work orange.. electric shocks being liberally administered.

    thus allowing the ‘sane’ amongst us to avoid such an appalling fate…

  115. Mefobills says:
    @ProudBLM

    Being a debt slave was conditional, and sometimes it was for life.

    I can see you are butt hurt about claims that whitey had it rough and that blacks are not unique victims.

    Your comments should convince unz readers about how easy it is for Jews to wind up negroes and turn them into agents using victim narrative.

  116. onebornfree says: • Website
    @anon

    “So does this mean the government can never adopt and enforce an idea that is not idiotic, since all ideas came from somebody?”

    In a word , yes ! 😎

    Anyone who believes in government solutions to _any_ problem in this world is, in Menckens view, an idiot. [To give them the benefit of the doubt, I would personally add that they might just instead be extremely naive and childish – an all too common trait these days. 😒]

    Some reminders for all of the “government can fix it” fantasists [ who apparently comprise 99% of the worlds population-and definitely 99% of the contributors and commenters at this site]:

    “Because they are all ultimately funded via both direct and indirect theft [taxes], and counterfeiting [central bank monopolies], all governments are essentially, at their very cores, 100% corrupt criminal scams which cannot be “reformed”or “improved”,simply because of their innate criminal nature.” onebornfree

    “Government is a disease masquerading as its own cure” Robert LeFevere

    “Government doesn’t work” Harry Browne
    https://wiki.mises.org/wiki/Why_Government_Doesn%27t_Work

    Regards, onebornfree

  117. @onebornfree

    While government tyranny is often a problem, a certain level of government is absolutely necessary. Anarchy has NEVER worked on any significant scale in human history. Organization becomes more important as numbers increase. This is basic common sense and can be observed first hand by anyone.

    Too much water will kill you. Not enough water will kill you. The right amount of water is healthy, and necessary for life. The same general concept applies with government, and most other things. “Everything in balance” could be called the key to success.

  118. bayviking says:
    @onebornfree

    What onebornfree fails to recognize is that laws and planning are a necessary part of a civilized society. While California is a good example of regulatory schizophrenia, in the good ol’ USA the economy is being run by the banking industry, who do not have your best interests in mind. It is pure delusion to suppose that the Federal Reserve is a public institution representing the best interests of the American people, which is supposed to be the responsibility of Government. Our constitution directs our government to promote the general welfare, almost the last thing politicians in DC will ever bring up, because they are almost all beholding to the big banks, who are running our economy in concert with the Federal Reserve, which they own. The Federal Reserve is charged with controlling two opposing phenomena, unemployment and inflation. But their record is clear, inflation is all they have ever harped about or acted against. It is vitally important for bankers to keep the rate of inflation below the rate of interest they collect from everybody for shuffling paper. What does that say about inflation today? Libertarian Greenspan. as Fed Chair, the most powerful person in the country, crushed the working class, while being completely derelict in regulating his banking stockholders. There is some evidence that Powell, the current Fed Chair, recognizes this problem.

    • Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain
  119. @Mefobills

    Thank you for making the point about blacks having bred faster than whites from 1860 to the present day. I went through every census, compiled the numbers of both population increase and immigration for whites and blacks, worked backwards until I found an exponential rate of increase that fit and the result is unequivocal. Blacks have indeed thrived in America.

    There is and has been no genocide of black bodies. They have, just as you have indicated, multiplied to such an extent that their rate of growth outpaces that of both native white’s breeding with, in addition, the arrival of white immigrants from Europe!

    I challenge anyone to dispute this.

    (For simplicity’s sake, I assumed that so-called “native” whites bred at the same rate as white immigrants from Europe. In other words, I applied the same exponential growth factor to all whites, independently of whether they had just arrived or had been here for centuries.)

    • Thanks: Mefobills
    • Replies: @Mefobills
  120. Mefobills says:
    @ThreeCranes

    Thanks for doing the analysis and work ThreeCranes. I’m saving your link and will reuse it with your permission.

    Blacks are easy to wind up and gaslight, as is evident from the BLM response.

    Inconvenient facts like population numbers are hard to refute.

  121. @bayviking

    Libertarianism is simply private tyranny, and the rule of the misanthropes and xenophobes, those who hate others. A pernicious Evil.

  122. @Mefobills

    Fascist is a Western term, and applying it to China is Orientalist. The nearest Chinese concept was probably Legalism. Mind you, the fasces, with its rods bound together as a symbol of communal unity and common purpose, is not far from the Mandate of Heaven ie popular support. And the Chinese Government has that in trumps with >80% of Chinese satisfied or highly satisfied with the Government’s efforts.

    • Thanks: Mefobills
    • Troll: GeneralRipper
  123. @bayviking

    Friedman’s most telling observation was that ‘Capitalism is good for the Jews’, and financial capitalism, the apotheosis of blood-sucking, is better still.

  124. @onebornfree

    The corporate form of ownership is a creation of govt. “Limited liability” is not a natural constraint, but something imposed by the state.

    • Replies: @onebornfree
  125. @Commentator Mike

    Blacks lived under serious constraints, whether they were slave or ‘”free.”

  126. onebornfree says: • Website
    @Marcaurelius

    “The corporate form of ownership is a creation of govt. “Limited liability” is not a natural constraint, but something imposed by the state.”

    Exactly, but try explaining that to any boiler-plate “the Fed is a private inc.” lint head, or yer average “Facebook, Google, Twitter are all private incs” type dimwit.

    They [the Fed,Facebook, Google, Twitter and many others] are all merely just poorly veiled extensions of the state itself.

    Regards, onebornfree

  127. I have no comment to add under this particular article, but Ellen Brown is one of my favorite authors at The Unz Review. One need not agree with her to find her articles interesting and informative. (Her article on BlackRock was a classic.)

    Brown’s hyperlinks alone are worth reading an article of Brown’s.

    One hopes that Brown’s infrequent series of articles continues. I enjoy reading the articles, every time.

  128. Anon[966] • Disclaimer says:

    Oracle Boasted That Its Software Was Used Against U.S. Protesters. Then It Took the Tech to China.
    https://theintercept.com/2021/05/25/oracle-social-media-surveillance-protests-endeca/

  129. Anon[115] • Disclaimer says:

    TikTok reaches deal with Oracle, rejects Microsoft as White House deadline looms
    https://news.yahoo.com/tiktok-reaches-deal-oracle-001005063.html

    Israel’s Netanyahu boasts of destroying US 1st Amendment & free speech
    https://israelpalestinenews.org/israels-netanyahu-boasts-of-destroying-us-1st-amendment-free-speech/

    Facebook reassurances on ‘Zionist’ hate speech policy met with skepticism
    https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/israel-palestine-facebook-zionist-hate-speech-skepticism

    Netanyahu wanted a social media blackout during IDF operation
    https://www.jpost.com/israel-news/netanyahu-wanted-a-social-media-blackout-during-idf-operation-report-669630

  130. Malla says:
    @Meena

    Yo Meena check this out
    https://www.asianage.com/india/all-india/300920/mathura-court-dismisses-krishna-janmabhoomi-petition.html
    Looks like the Hinduvadis are claiming another mosque to be the birth place of another Hindu Good. They seem to have a long term plan to scrub Islam out of India.

  131. @El Dato

    No. The stock market is a computer system, a brand, and a building.

    Owned by Jeffrey Sprecher and his backers.

    They own nothing of the companies traded there. The shareholders do.

    Strictly speaking, the Sulzbergers don’t “own” the NYT, either — but they sure control it.

    The same thing goes for Larry Fink’s cabal, Vanguard, and State Street when it comes to the companies whose stock is traded on the NYSE. Not quite to the same degree, but to a very significant extent. BlackRock alone owns a very significant percentage of the stock of pretty much any company listed on the NYSE.

  132. jadan says:

    The Constitution’s original intent was to elevate property owners and control the mob of ordinary people. The original vision of the founders was what we call today “white supremacy”. The Republic “if you can keep it” was designed as an oligarchy. It declared the independence of the class ofwhite minority wealth from the entitled aristocrats and the king and allowed them political control of their lives through elections. If you were a white, male, property owner in 1789, the Constitution was your declaration of political freedom. At that time, an oligarchic republic was an improvement over the absolute rule of kings and the retinue of aristocratic wealth.

    What we have today is the fruition of that original vision of an oligarchic republic. It is not and never was a democratic political structure. What democracy we have is the result of amendments to the Constitution through popular movements. In the beginning the rich minority had political control and today it is the same. In spite of all the popular agitation for democracy, the fundamentals have not changed.

    A revolution is needed. The old Constitutional vision has been incrementally altered and the coup de gras is now needed: the elimination of the Electoral College & the federalization of elections with blockchain voting. One person, one vote would demonopolize the 5% overnight. Guaranteed. The insistence that the 2020 election was legitimate is designed to prevent any fundamental change to the election process which would be revolutionary.

    • Replies: @anarchyst
  133. While I’ve never been a wild fan of the Electoral College per se, there are reasons to be wary of current Democratic arguments for its abolition. I’ve heard some plausible stories about some vote-fixing having occurred in California. Now I personally don’t doubt that Clinton won California in 2016 and Biden in 2020. But the issue of how big that margin of victory was is important here.

    I think off the top of my head that Clinton was supposed to have won CA by about 4 million votes in 2016. At the same time, nationwide, she was said to have won the popular vote by 2.9 million. Suppose hypothetically that it was revealed that in 2016 1.5 million CA votes were falsely switched from Trump to Clinton. That would still leave her with a solid margin of stateside victory in CA of 1 million votes. But it would place Trump over the top with a margin of 100g votes nationwide.

    Granting that real vote-fixing in CA during 2016 and 2020 probably didn’t reach anywhere near this far, the issue is still important. A lot of the arguments made by Democrats in favor of abolishing the electoral college have rested claims that Trump lost the popular vote. Yet the alleged Democratic margin of victory in the popular vote very much depends upon several key states which have long been Democrat and where Trump appears to have lost in the vote overwhelmingly. If even just a little bit of the votes in each of these key Democratic states were shown to be fraudulent then it could easily tip the count of the nationwide popular vote.

    So far nobody has really assembled any coherent research on this because the electoral college appears to make it unnecessary. If the popular votes from CA are only going to influence the casting of electoral votes from CA, then no one outside of CA will really care if Clinton actually won in CA by 4 million or maybe just by 1 million with an extra 3 million votes resulting from vote-fraud. This is unimportant as long as the CA vote only influences CA. But if one is going to switch to a nationwide system of counting the popular vote without going through the Electoral College then there will have to be much higher scrutiny of the practices in individual states. Until that becomes the norm it is better to stick with the Electoral College.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  134. anarchyst says:
    @jadan

    Disagree…
    The founders were not only prescient in their adoption of the electoral college for president, they KNEW that absent an “equalizer”, the major population centers would determine the outcome of elections.
    Without the electoral college system, candidates would have to campaign in only 4 or 5 states and could safely ignore the rest of the country.
    The electoral college system forces candidates to campaign in all 50 states to achieve a majority of electors.
    The founders were hell of a lot smarter than those who want to dismantle the electoral college system.
    In fact, the STATES should adopt the electoral college system county by county for gubernatorial elections in order to promote true representation of all the counties in a state.

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