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The Democrats are increasingly the party of the rich and poor, Republicans of the middle and those at risk of sliding out of it:

Like other demographic trends–racial, educational, religious, marital–this bodes well for Democrat electoral prospects in the future. The ranks of the top are growing a little, the ranks of the bottom are growing a lot. The middle is hollowing out.

 
• Category: Culture/Society, Economics • Tags: Class, Election 2020, Polling 
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  1. Michael S says:

    Unfortunately for their long-term prospects, when the top gets small enough and the middle disappears completely, the bottom tends to kill the top.

    It’s already happening. Where are the riots and looting and cop-killings taking place? Not in the suburbs of flyover country. The top would undoubtedly like to direct the bottom to the middle, as they always do, but if the middle has flown the coop, or there is no middle at all, then…

    Eventually you run out of kulaks.

  2. I wonder what the figures are for the “downwardly mobile” millennials and early zoomers who are entering this boomer-parasite economy. I would suspect roughly 65/35 democrat, given the blind polls by the international students at my university, most of whom are from middle-class backgrounds with nurse/teacher/state employee late boomer/early genX parents.

    My uneducated, anecdotal guess would be Mils being significantly more democrat leaning and zoomers probably slightly tending towards Trump. The political difference between my 23-26 year old students (shitlibs to a man/woman) and 18 year olds (radical rights/lefts of all sorts) is rather significant.

    I also forgot about how the Grand Old Party is apparently champion of the middle class. Apparently there’s only 3% difference in agreement on this subject, so I suspect many others just don’t know! Destroyer of the Gold Standard (Nixon), Buster of the Unions (Reagan) importer of the Guatemalan Farmhand (Bush Sr.), sender of the goyim’s son to die for Tel Aviv in Afghanistan & Iraq (Bush Jr.). True middle class folk heroes.

    • Replies: @Rahan
    , @Anonymous
  3. Dr. Doom says:

    Without the Middle there is no America. Its the backbone.

    The Great Middle Class built America, and America will not exist without it.

    I expect Civil War II to clean up a lot of the poor, and expel them.

    Most of the new poor are not really CORE Americans, after all.

    • Replies: @neutral
    , @The Alarmist
  4. Jtgw says:

    How are these classes defined?

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Audacious Epigone
  5. @Michael S

    It’s already happening. Where are the riots and looting and cop-killings taking place? Not in the suburbs of flyover country. The top would undoubtedly like to direct the bottom to the middle, as they always do, but if the middle has flown the coop, or there is no middle at all, then…

    Unfortunately, many if not most of the riots have been directed at the middle class. Middle class people do, in fact, live in cities, and they disproportionately own small shops and business which they are now no longer allowed to defend. The riots have not been directed at the rich, at all really. If they were, the rioters would be smashing the glass skyscrapers of central business districts and leaving the grocers and pharmacists alone. What we see is precisely the opposite.

    The “urban” nature of the riots, while real, has been played up as a means to seduce rural people into a false sense of security; “oh, its happening to those other people, not my problem.” In reality, they can happen anywhere; Kenosha is hardly Manhattan, while Lancaster only averted disaster because their police force there is still willing to take tough proactive measures. It could easily have gone the other way.

    Moreover, as I’ve pointed out before, rural Americans and their urban working-class compatriots have a lot in common, probably more in common with each other than either does with suburbia. Writing off South Philly Italians as “the rich,” who deserve what they’re getting, just because they happen to live in a city is unfair to say the least.

    When these thugs start looting 200 West Street and leave Joe’s greengrocer alone, maybe I’ll start to take comfort. But I’m not holding my breath.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
  6. nebulafox says:
    @Michael S

    You end up with Brazil, where the local upper-middle class lead lives that would be stunning to their American counterparts-if you don’t mind the permanent need to pay attention to security, of course.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  7. It would be interesting if someone did a survey of wealthy republican donors in the country. Of those that have adult children – how many of them are democrats? I’d guess it would be around 40%.

  8. Twinkie says:

    The ranks of the top are growing a little, the ranks of the bottom are growing a lot. The middle is hollowing out.

    I agree with the entire post, but I think “little” here is a bit unfair. Over the past 20-30 years, the ranks of the lower upper class and the upper middle class have grown substantially if not as greatly as the ranks of the poor.

    The hollowing of the middle class is dead on, but the segment of the middle class that has declined significantly is the lower middle class – those with no college degrees who otherwise had decent incomes working in jobs that required something between skilled and menial labor.

    One thing that would really help would be reformulating our secondary education system to produce more skilled/technical/trades workers (combined with corporate apprenticeship programs) instead of gearing everyone for college – in other words, follow the German three-tier system – but that appears well-neigh impossible in our highly politicized and racialized education system.

    • Agree: iffen, dfordoom, AP
    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    , @Franz
  9. @Twinkie

    Yeah, the German system works for a homogenous population in a relatively socialized system. I think we need something like it here but don’t see how it can work in the context of multiculturism.

  10. Rahan says:
    @Supply and Demand

    The political difference between my 23-26 year old students (shitlibs to a man/woman)

    • Agree: Cloudbuster
    • Disagree: Supply and Demand
    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
  11. neutral says:
    @Dr. Doom

    Most of the new poor are not really CORE Americans

    Most of the rich are not really Americans.

    • Replies: @Realist
    , @Corvinus
  12. Franz says:
    @Twinkie

    One thing that would really help would be reformulating our secondary education system to produce more skilled/technical/trades workers

    No value here unless some combination of re-industrialization kicks in.

    Keep in mind most “education” before the 1970s was called “work.” You got hired somewhere and worked a crappy job till you proved yourself capable of a better job. You got an apprenticeship at a foundry and worked you way up the craft cycle. The more you could do the more you could earn.

    In Cleveland, Ohio, one of the last plant superintendent of a major industrial complex that shut down in the 1980s started out as a furnace bricklayer for Carnegie Steel. He just kept working as he learned till he knew enough to do that.

    Education without opportunity is the problem. Only basic industry creates it overnight. Some sort of Marshall Plan for the middle class should be a national priority.

    Paradoxically this will also create a serious demand for your suggestion, exactly as you stated it.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    , @Alden
  13. Well yeah, that’s pretty much Marxism. The top and bottom vs. the middle. Classically, it was a subset of the top, isolated intelligensia that didn’t fit it.

  14. Realist says:
    @Michael S

    Where are the riots and looting and cop-killings taking place? Not in the suburbs of flyover country.

    You need to check out Wauwatosa and Kenosha.

  15. Realist says:
    @neutral

    Most of the rich are not really Americans.

    Exactly…to kill the snake…chop off it head.

  16. Twinkie says:
    @Franz

    No value here unless some combination of re-industrialization kicks in.

    On the contrary, many technical/trades jobs (that do not require college degrees, but do require technical training/certification, go unfilled in the United States.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
  17. @Elmer's Washable School Glue

    …Lancaster only averted disaster because their police force there is still willing to take tough proactive measures. It could easily have gone the other way.

    Except it couldn’t easily have gone the other way in Lancaster, because the middle and working class are still in control of their own government in Lancaster, as witnessed by police willingness to act on their behalf.

    This is obviously untrue in major cities and was untrue in Kenosha, which only qualifies as flyover country if you don’t live in flyover country. Situated on the lake shore halfway between Chicago and Milwaukee, it is just a corridor of Leftist Urbanistan, much like all of New Jersey is just small towns in a corridor between New York and Philly.

  18. Arclight says:

    I don’t see this chart as all doom actually. The left has successfully radicalized the politics of the minority lower class and upper class whites LARPing as revolutionaries, and their willingness to make demands and unabashedly claim they are the only just option is what is moving them forward.

    If the right has the nerve to radicalize the middle and working class against their cultural (lower) and economic (upper) overlords, they would dominate national elections. The question is whether the will exists to name these two groups as the enemy of the aspirations of the middle and working classes and say that their concerns should come behind those of the middle.

  19. @Twinkie

    On the contrary, many technical/trades jobs (that do not require college degrees, but do require technical training/certification, go unfilled in the United States.

    I wonder. If unfilled, then why are those wages not rising?

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  20. A123 says:

    this bodes well for Democrat electoral prospects in the future. The ranks of the top are growing a little, the ranks of the bottom are growing a lot. The middle is hollowing out.

    Actually, this bodes will for the Populist GOP.

    Trump’s 2nd Term will see the U.S. clear the WUHAN-19 pandemic. The associated recovery will help the bottom poor obtain decent paying blue-collar jobs and become Middle Class.

    The Upper Middle class will return to parity or become favorable to the GOP as new H-1B rules kick in. (1)

    [President Trump’s] administration is:

    — Reining in what it calls “shadow employers”, what others term Indian outsourcing companies, the main middlemen in the H-1B business;

    — Cutting down the time period for initial visas for these employers from the current three years to one year, to give the government greater opportunities to monitor compliance; and

    — Changing how the prevailing wage for H-1B workers is calculated, which will force these H-1B employers, on average, to increase the wages paid to these workers.

    It is also going to “bolster its enforcement authority” and will “upskill” the definition of “specialty occupation” used in the program

    Harris-Biden will kill these reforms, so preventing DNC fraud-by-mail is crucial to keep these gains.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://cis.org/North/Government-Announces-Stricter-H1B-Provisions-Outsourcing-Firms

  21. Donald Warren was the guy who coined the term Middle American Radicals(MARs)and then Sam Francis picked that up and wrote more about it.

    John Judis — The Return of the Middle American Radical — from October 2 2015 — portion of article:

    In 1976, Don­ald War­ren—a so­ci­olo­gist from Oak­land Uni­versity in Michigan who would die two dec­ades later without ever at­tain­ing the rank of full pro­fess­or—pub­lished a book called The Rad­ic­al Cen­ter: Middle Amer­ic­ans and the Polit­ics of Ali­en­a­tion. Few people have read or heard of it—I learned of it about 30 years ago from the late, very ec­cent­ric pa­leo­con­ser­vat­ive Samuel Fran­cis—but it is, in my opin­ion, one of the three or four books that best ex­plain Amer­ic­an polit­ics over the past half-cen­tury.

    While con­duct­ing ex­tens­ive sur­veys of white voters in 1971 and again in 1975, War­ren iden­ti­fied a group who de­fied the usu­al par­tis­an and ideo­lo­gic­al di­vi­sions. These voters were not col­lege edu­cated; their in­come fell some­where in the middle or lower-middle range; and they primar­ily held skilled and semi-skilled blue-col­lar jobs or sales and cler­ic­al white-col­lar jobs. At the time, they made up about a quarter of the elect­or­ate. What dis­tin­guished them was their ideo­logy: It was neither con­ven­tion­ally lib­er­al nor con­ven­tion­ally con­ser­vat­ive, but in­stead re­volved around an in­tense con­vic­tion that the middle class was un­der siege from above and be­low.

    War­ren called these voters Middle Amer­ic­an Rad­ic­als, or MARS. “MARS are dis­tinct in the depth of their feel­ing that the middle class has been ser­i­ously neg­lected,” War­ren wrote. They saw “gov­ern­ment as fa­vor­ing both the rich and the poor sim­ul­tan­eously.” Like many on the left, MARS were deeply sus­pi­cious of big busi­ness: Com­pared with the oth­er groups he sur­veyed—lower-in­come whites, middle-in­come whites who went to col­lege, and what War­ren called “af­flu­ents”—MARS were the most likely to be­lieve that cor­por­a­tions had “too much power,” “don’t pay at­ten­tion,” and were “too big.” MARS also backed many lib­er­al pro­grams: By a large per­cent­age, they favored gov­ern­ment guar­an­tee­ing jobs to every­one; and they sup­por­ted price con­trols, Medi­care, some kind of na­tion­al health in­sur­ance, fed­er­al aid to edu­ca­tion, and So­cial Se­cur­ity.

    On the oth­er hand, they held very con­ser­vat­ive po­s­i­tions on poverty and race. They were the least likely to agree that whites had any re­spons­ib­il­ity “to make up for wrongs done to blacks in the past,” they were the most crit­ic­al of wel­fare agen­cies, they re­jec­ted ra­cial bus­ing, and they wanted to grant po­lice a “heav­ier hand” to “con­trol crime.” They were also the group most dis­trust­ful of the na­tion­al gov­ern­ment. And in a stand that wasn’t really lib­er­al or con­ser­vat­ive (and that ap­peared, at least on the sur­face, to be in ten­sion with their dis­like of the na­tion­al gov­ern­ment), MARS were more likely than any oth­er group to fa­vor strong lead­er­ship in Wash­ing­ton—to ad­voc­ate for a situ­ation “when one per­son is in charge.”

    If these voters are be­gin­ning to sound fa­mil­i­ar, they should: War­ren’s MARS of the 1970s are the Don­ald Trump sup­port­ers of today. Since at least the late 1960s, these voters have peri­od­ic­ally co­alesced to be­come a force in pres­id­en­tial polit­ics, just as they did this past sum­mer. In 1968 and 1972, they were at the heart of George Wal­lace’s pres­id­en­tial cam­paigns; in 1992 and 1996, many of them backed H. Ross Perot or Pat Buchanan. Over the years, some of their is­sues have changed—il­leg­al im­mig­ra­tion has re­placed ex­pli­citly ra­cist ap­peals—and many of these voters now have ju­ni­or-col­lege de­grees and are as likely to hold white-col­lar as blue-col­lar jobs. But the ba­sic MARS world­view that War­ren out­lined has re­mained sur­pris­ingly in­tact from the 1970s through the present.

    https://carnegieendowment.org/2015/10/02/return-of-middle-american-radical-pub-61534

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
  22. indocon says:
    @Michael S

    The endpoint you describe will not happen here, best example of future of America is today’s India, coincidently with a lot of descendants of upper class Indians in positions of power here in US today.

  23. Middle or CORE or Middle American Radical or White Core American or European Christian ancestral core or British Protestant settler nation-state or White Christian America or anything else as long as it talks about demography and race and ancestry and the historic American nation.

    BACK TO BLOOD

    Don’t forget the Great Lakes states German American Middle American Radical White Core Americans that won the election for Trump in 2016.

    I wrote this in October of 2018:

    It’s all well and good to send the East Anglian Puritans to Hell. We all know the East Anglian Puritans were the ones who started the War Of Northern Aggression.

    We all know that East Anglian Puritan New England Ivy League baby boomer scumbag George W Bush was putting on a fake Southern accent and acting like he was Mr. Texas. Baby boomer scumbag globalizer Hillary Clinton went further than George W Bush by putting on a fake Southern Black accent to ingratiate herself to Black voters.

    BUT,

    The German American vote in the Great Lakes states is the big prize being fought over by the WASP/JEW Puritan ruling class and the White Core American Patriots.

    Sam Francis’s Middle American Radicals is less descriptive than White Core American Patriots(WCAP), and WCAP is even less descriptive than European Christian Ancestral Core.

    Haddon Hall guy from Long Island likes to use Good Whites vs Bad Whites. John always minds his Manners. I think that sounds too much like the “bad guys” rhetoric of some of the brainwashed globalizer asshole officers in the US military.

    Trump’s campaign was deliberately going after the German American vote like gangbusters.

    I ain’t going into the Aristotelian categorization of Krauts, but the Trump guys were focusing like hell on the Krauts who could be won over to Trump’s winning political message.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/onrushing-hispanic-electoral-tsunami-postponed-for-another-two-years/#comment-2566965

    Tweets from 2014 and 2015:

  24. @Rahan

    I teach in China. The universities here make no accommodations for baizuo gender fantasies, and neither do I. They learn eventually, or leave the study abroad program.

    • Thanks: Rahan
    • Replies: @Rahan
  25. Twinkie says:
    @V. K. Ovelund

    If unfilled, then why are those wages not rising?

    They have in many parts of the country. Automotive mechanics in my metro area often make over $100,o00 a year. There are also high wages for HVAC technicians, plumbers, and pest control techs (which require certification and understanding of certain chemicals and environmental standards).

    Some such jobs are filled by immigrants (Asians and Hispanics), but whites still “dominate” them.

    • Thanks: V. K. Ovelund
  26. @Cloudbuster

    You’re not necessarily wrong, but you also kinda missed the point. The point is that writing off looting and rioting as only affecting “the rich” is sour grapes at its finest. Few of the small business these people are torching belong to the “rich.” Even some of the chain stores belong to franchisees. Overall, the super-wealthy have probably been least affected, out of any class, by the riots.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  27. Jay Fink says:
    @Cloudbuster

    I am very familiar with Wisconsin and you are right that Kenosha doesn’t have a rural vibe at all. It is technically part of the Chicago metro.

    People in big cities have a misconception of what is rural. I live in a city of 100K, around the size of Kenosha but more isolated. When my friends from my former big city visit me they all expect a rural setting and are surprised it’s a city and has a city vibe. I’m not sure how small it has to be to feel rural but 100k is not it.

  28. Keep in mind most “education” before the 1970s was called “work.” You got hired somewhere and worked a crappy job till you proved yourself capable of a better job. You got an apprenticeship at a foundry and worked you way up the craft cycle. The more you could do the more you could earn.

    That was under-girded by a finite, limited national labor pool.

    The employment market I can personally recall as an American teen / 20-something was one in which almost every employer I applied to hired me ‘on the spot’ (with no experience at all in most cases), and told me something to effect of “dont worry about the background check”. They did not want you going to another interview the next day if you looked useful to their labor needs.

    Today’s entry-level applicants have never encountered that. They encountered a fungible labor markets flooded by globalism, in which alien contingents are actually favored in the current structure, and act as a barrier to wage increases let alone standard-of-living wages, by design.

    I took a temp job in a factory during the early Covid days since it was close to home, and I had initially been offered a desirable position in Industrial maintenance, which I simply enjoy, since you get to work hands-on with mechanical industrial machinery and trouble-shoot on your own initiative. In the end, they retracted that offer and replaced it with an operator position, which I took to try it out.

    What I found on the factory floor was a company that employed 95% Mexican nationals, who were largely obtained through a captive Mexican-american, Spanish language only, labor agency, who brought these workers from Mexico directly to the Midwest for the express purpose of filling slots at this company (at least a thousand jobs, likely more than that.)

    These are not Mexican-Americans in the super-majority of cases, they are Mexican nationals who speak only Spanish, recruited in Mexico, provided arranged transport to the premises of the labor agency in the central US. I had one very sweet woman who was intent on settling me down with her daughter tell me that she and her child had crossed over the US border 7 months earlier, and had no idea where the labor agency was taking them. She was one of the few who spoke any English due to her home origin, close to El Paso.

    Very few of these Mexican origin workers EVER get hired by that “US” company. The company (according to a woman in the front office who was in a position to know) uses the US based labor agency to act as a labor holding company, so that when Enforcement action is eventually taken, the fungible labor agency will be the target, while another renamed company can simply take its place and carry on this scheme in the aftermath.

    The way it was explained to me was, the labor agency alone is required to verify and maintain records of legal right to work documents, while the company that ”contracts” the labor is only required to have record of a claimed S.S. #, or other resident alien status, which means the potential punishment to the employing company is virtually zero.

    I found that almost none of the staff could speak anything approaching passable English, including almost all supervisors, and it was expressed to me immediately upon hire that they (HR) hoped I could figure out what was wrong with their packaging line, since they had been unable to get it running correctly. It took about 30 minutes to see first hand that none of the staff had any training to manage the console, they had memorized basic run sequences to start the process and could not read, let alone interpret, what was going on or what entire panels were intended to adjust for.

    I stood by on my first day while product LITERALLY, not figuratively, flew off of the equipment, was torn to pieces, was thrown into reject bins and salvage bins when the entire line jammed regularly, and this was at a cost of in some cases 10’s of thousands of dollars at a given run. Most of the staff was totally indifferent, and the Mexican supervisors only approached the line when it shut down due to a totally avoidable jam. When I identified a sensor issue on my second work day, and brought this to a supervisor, he needed a translator from HR to comprehend what I was telling him, and was dis-interested in coming to the distant location to see what was wrong.

    Moral of the story – cheap labor is cheap for a reason, anyone who would make a hamburger for 8 bucks an hour is probably not someone hygienic enough that you would want them handling your food, and a systemic misdirection of resources, is not the same thing as a lack of resources.

    What needed to take place in the US labor market is essentially a reversal of the socially-engineered transition from industrial to services. You can only resolve what was by design deconstructed by re-constructing it to operate correctly again-

    i.e. – The domestic career manufactures sector needs to cannibalize the domestic labor supply of the services sector (fast food, chain retail) which is overheated due to global labor supply -this not only raises the wages of the the mean worker / job applicant, but it acts to discourage the temptation to develop this type of global labor conduit that has now brought down the curtain on the Republican party prospects. There is plenty of labor with a market-adjusted cannibalization of domestic labor from dead-end / low-pay service into burgeoning career-based / high pay manufactures, but it will entail a right-sizing.

    The McDonalds on every corner is a late-market phenomena. The very sizable town I grew up in had only 2 McDonalds, and one was basically a Museum. The oversupply of global labor allows an artificial over-expansion of services employers, which normally would be limited by the High School age applicants work availability, and is overcome once 25% of the Guatemalan workforce is inside the USA.

    In the end, those of us who have a personal recollection of American Industry were too few to make a difference, and those powerful enough to ride to the rescue had a vested interest not to do so.

    • Agree: iffen
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  29. ariel says:

    the gop has a small advantage among white zoomers but gen z overall is 2-1 for the democrats

  30. Alden says:
    @Franz

    Wonderful wonderful

    “ Education without opportunity is the problem” High schools and most community colleges don’t even have classes in keyboarding or typing and Microsoft Office. Yet there’s a gazillion ads for assistants
    with advanced Microsoft office skills.

    The only apprenticeship programs are in the construction unions and unionized supermarkets. But Republicans. and conservatives believe unions are minions of Satan. Plus the courts believe testing is a KKK White supremacist racist plot against critters of color.

    Construction work requires native ability in spatial relations, mechanical ability and most high school
    algebra 2 and trig as evidenced by a good grade in a written test in those skills I bet there’s not a judge or journalist in the country who can do A2 + B2= C2 in their heads all day

    • Replies: @anon
  31. Rosie says:
    @nebulafox

    You end up with Brazil, where the local upper-middle class lead lives that would be stunning to their American counterparts-if you don’t mind the permanent need to pay attention to security, of course.

    I find this very bizarre. What is the point of living in a gilded cage? The best in things in life are free: clean parks, safe roads, clean subways, public libraries, etc. Beyond that, what do you really need so badly that you’ll sell out your country to get it? I just can’t wrap my mind around it.

  32. anon[403] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    ” High schools and most community colleges don’t even have classes in keyboarding or typing and Microsoft Office.

    Ridiculous. A simply absurd claim with no factual basis at all.

  33. anon[403] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jtgw

    How are these classes defined?

    Maybe like this?

    class MiddleClass {
    public:
    float MidIncome;
    string MidString;
    _Bool MidLoyal = 1;
    };

    class GlobalistClass {
    public:
    float GlobalistIncome;
    string GlobalistString;
    _Bool GlobalistlLoyal = 0;
    };

    • LOL: Jtgw
  34. @Rosie

    It’s not life in a gilded cage. Outside of Rio, Sao Paulo and maybe a couple other cities, most of Brazil is pretty safe.

    • Replies: @AP
  35. Anonymous[153] • Disclaimer says:
    @John the Painter

    Seen similar at my my company.

    Some branches are all run and staffed by “people of colour”, mostly Pakistanis, Indians, and blacks. Other more rural ones are run by whites still.

    The white ones work, the managers push their workers to improve, the processes are improving, etc.

    The “people or colour” ones… kind of work… as in, they do the bare minimum, spurred on by the white senior leadership. They are stagnant. “It gets done when it gets done”.

    These are professional people of colour not a bunch of guatemalan illegals. They are also under pressur from the white leaders. However, the disparities are already showing. It will only get worse, and worse. China, and even Europe for a while, will likely destroy us in industry in the next 20 or 30 years just based on demographics

  36. AP says:
    @Cloudbuster

    It’s not life in a gilded cage. Outside of Rio, Sao Paulo and maybe a couple other cities, most of Brazil is pretty safe.

    As of 2012, homicide rates in even the safest, European-inhabited southeast, were very high by European-inhabited standards; and Sao Paolo was pretty safe by Brazilian standards:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Brazilian_states_by_murder_rate

    The safest Brazilian province, Santa Catarina, had a homicide rate of 10.8/100,000.

    That is higher than every US state other than Louisiana:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_homicide_rate

    And more than double that of the USA as a whole (4.96). It is higher than any European-inhabited country (Russia’s is highest, at 8.91):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate

    Santa Caterina is only safe by the unsafe standards of Latin America and Africa. Though Argentina (5.36) and Chile (4.40) are a lot safer than Santa Caterina.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
  37. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Rosie

    I find this very bizarre. What is the point of living in a gilded cage? The best in things in life are free: clean parks, safe roads, clean subways, public libraries, etc.

    Depends on your personality and your personal tastes. I could happily live without public libraries and clean subways (you could not persuade me to use public transportation even at gunpoint). If I had a nice secure walled garden I’d happily give up clean parks.

    You’e probably a lot safer in that gilded cage than you are taking the subway.

    As the song goes,

    The best things in life are free
    But you can keep ’em for the birds and bees

  38. Rahan says:
    @Supply and Demand

    The universities here make no accommodations for baizuo gender fantasies, and neither do I. They learn eventually, or leave the study abroad program.

    I know a guy, social science classical liberal, who has recently come to believe that one way to kill two rabbits with one stone:
    1) Diffuse the warmongering propaganda of the elites, and
    2) Puncture the bubble of the conditioned youth
    Would be for China and Russia to invest heavily into sponsored semesters for Western students and high schoolers on a mass basis. Say cycle 100-200K US youths a year through China and Russia that way.
    By his theories, this would on one hand, produce a layer of voters who have actual lived experience, good bad and ugly, of big bad China and big bad Russia, and thus not easily swayed by political phantasms about these countries, and on the other hand, show them what life is like outside the globohomo bubble. Thus possibly creating gradually a demographic chunk of young citizens who are less easily brainwashed about various things due to basic direct lived reality.

    Does that sound theoretically possible from your point of you, based on your professional experience?

  39. @Dr. Doom

    I had a conversation yesterday with a European who asked, “Won’t the Republicans do something in the event the election is stolen from Trump?”

    I replied, “The US is a country with 350 million guns and 330 million people, but the vast majority of those guns are owned by people who lean right and are more likely to vote Republican. The real tell that the Republicans will do nothing is the news you currently see from America. If these people were inclined to do anything, you wouldn’t see any of this news … instead, they buy more guns and ammunition, and then sit at home cleaning their guns waiting for the battle to come to them as individuals or small neighbourhood watches.”

    That is hardly a winning strategy, but I get it, since organised militias with any leanings to the right of centre-left are vilified and outlawed and prosecuted, while those leaning left are allowed to roam, pillage, and plunder with impunity.

    • Replies: @Getaclue
  40. @AP

    That is higher than every US state other than Louisiana:

    That’s just it. You are not taking your life in your hands every time you venture into Louisiana. Stay out of the wrong parts of New Orleans and Baton Rouge after dark and you are going to be just fine.

    I am not saying Brazil is great. I have spent a lot of time there and it is not something I want to replicate in the US, but like many countries, crime isn’t evenly distributed. It involves certain people in certain places doing certain things.

    Like New York, Sao Paulo is both a city and a state. I haven’t been there since the 2000s, but parts of the city are absolutely friggin terrifying. Other parts look like a pleasant, prosperous Southern European city.

    Brasilia, to take another example, has a pretty boring, quiet downtown area with lots of open space though the Federal District itself has a high murder rate.

    My point is that in a state like Brazil, the elite live very nice lives that don’t feel at all “caged” as Rosie says. It’s pretty horrible for millions and millions of people not lucky enough to be in the elite, though.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    , @AP
  41. Jtgw says:
    @Audacious Epigone

    Ok. How do you define them?

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
  42. Anonymous[278] • Disclaimer says:
    @Supply and Demand

    Yep

    Perfectly said .

    You might also add Reagan wasted the 1980s fighting our kinsmen the Russians in Afghanistan arming mountain Muslim Jihadists that morphed in to the Taliban .

    If you want to toss your lunch try watching that Rambo III movie where Amurikun patriot aye Johnny Rambo goes off to Afghanistan to fight with the Afghan Taliban against those evil White racist Russians.

    And then there is senile President Reagan telling Russian leader Gorbachev “ Mr Gorbachev tear down that wall”.

    Even then I was screaming at the TV

    “ no you old fool, build the wall”

  43. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Cloudbuster

    My point is that in a state like Brazil, the elite live very nice lives that don’t feel at all “caged” as Rosie says. It’s pretty horrible for millions and millions of people not lucky enough to be in the elite, though.

    It’s always very easy for rich people to protect themselves from hazards that everyone else has to put up with. In practically every society in history the elites have successfully sheltered themselves from all the bad stuff.

    And the elites seem to be pretty happy in their gilded cages.

    • Agree: iffen
  44. Dr. Doom says:

    When Trump wins, the “revolution” will begin.

    History calls it: Civil War II.

    War will come anyway. It must. The system must fall down.

    The system is bankrupt. The Federal Reserve is propping up a Failed State.

    The Marxists will start the War. Burning down the White House, maybe?

    A reichstagg moment and then WAR WILL COME.

    Its not 1917. Weimar 2.0 is Burning Down this November.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  45. Here is a key paragraph from John Judis’s 2015 article The Return of the Middle American Radical.

    John Judis writing about a voter cohort that Donald Warren identified and described:

    While con­duct­ing ex­tens­ive sur­veys of white voters in 1971 and again in 1975, War­ren iden­ti­fied a group who de­fied the usu­al par­tis­an and ideo­lo­gic­al di­vi­sions. These voters were not col­lege edu­cated; their in­come fell some­where in the middle or lower-middle range; and they primar­ily held skilled and semi-skilled blue-col­lar jobs or sales and cler­ic­al white-col­lar jobs. At the time, they made up about a quarter of the elect­or­ate. What dis­tin­guished them was their ideo­logy: It was neither con­ven­tion­ally lib­er­al nor con­ven­tion­ally con­ser­vat­ive, but in­stead re­volved around an in­tense con­vic­tion that the middle class was un­der siege from above and be­low.

    What dis­tin­guished them was their ideo­logy: It was neither con­ven­tion­ally lib­er­al nor con­ven­tion­ally con­ser­vat­ive, but in­stead re­volved around an in­tense con­vic­tion that the middle class was un­der siege from above and be­low.

    https://carnegieendowment.org/2015/10/02/return-of-middle-american-radical-pub-61534

  46. Greedy and treasonous nation-wrecking Plutocrats and Upper Middle Class Globalizers are using the Bloated Underclass Boneheads to attack and destroy the wonderful and pleasant and patriotic Middle American Radicals of White Core America.

    It’s sad to contemplate the viciousness of the Plutocrats and the Upper Middle Class Globalizers as they go about using the Bloated Underclass Boneheads as demographic weapons to obliterate and pauperize the sweet and patriotic men and women of the Middle American Patriots and White Core America.

    Trump and the rancid Republican Party will be utterly destroyed by the voters on election day November 3 and that will provide political space for the decent and honorable men and women of the new political party called WHITE CORE AMERICA.

    Tweets from 2014 and 2015:

  47. Anon[295] • Disclaimer says:

    The Managerial Revolution described by James Burnham and Sam Francis explains why the votes fall this way. The middle and working classes are the bourgeois remnants who are conservative holdovers of the pre-1930s order. The underclass are the recipients of the complex public and private welfare systems managed by the technocratic elite.

    If anyone thinks I missed something please chime in.

  48. Jtgw says:

    Why don’t we use the term “upper class” for “rich”, “lower middle class” for “working class” and “lower class” for “poor”?

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
  49. @Rosie

    Beyond that, what do you really need so badly that you’ll sell out your country to get it?

    The capacity to not think of it as your country.

  50. @Jtgw

    Something like this:

    Rich: $500k+/year, net worth in the multi-millions
    UMC: $150k-$500k/year, net worth over $1 milion
    Middle class: $60k-$150k/year, net worth in positive territory
    Working class: $30k-$60k/year, paycheck-to-paychech
    Poor: <$30k, debtor

    Class is more than income and wealth of course. There is a certain subjectivity to it for sure.

    • Thanks: Jtgw
    • Replies: @iffen
    , @Jtgw
  51. @Jtgw

    This data is taken from a recent YouGov survey. These are the five categories the survey used. “Rich” and “poor” class descriptors are a bit… declasse!

  52. iffen says:
    @Audacious Epigone

    Class is more than income and wealth of course. There is a certain subjectivity to it for sure.

    Do tell us more!

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
  53. Corvinus says:
    @Dr. Doom

    “War will come anyway. It must. The system must fall down.”

    More tuff talk from an Internet Armchair Warrior. I am sure you’re quite sad that your buddies in Michigan failed in their task. So, what’s your Plan B?

  54. Corvinus says:
    @neutral

    “Most of the rich are not really Americans.”

    Thanks for employing the No True Scotsman fallacy. But, since I am a good sport, I will ask you “What do you believe constitutes a ‘real American’?” In other words, what are the metrics YOU employ here?

    I mean, I imagine you are eager to share in your definition, right?

  55. @iffen

    Assuming you’re not trolling me, the master plumber who makes a quarter million dollars a year vs the PhD lecturer at State U who makes $60k a year; the latter probably thinks of himself as higher class than the former.

    • Agree: Twinkie
    • Replies: @iffen
  56. iffen says:
    @Audacious Epigone

    Assuming you’re not trolling me

    Moi!

    I wondered if you were going for the born nobility angle or perhaps the “behavioral” approach.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
  57. AP says:
    @Cloudbuster

    That is higher than every US state other than Louisiana:

    That’s just it. You are not taking your life in your hands every time you venture into Louisiana. Stay out of the wrong parts of New Orleans and Baton Rouge after dark and you are going to be just fine.

    Sure. I suspect people aren’t cowering in fear all over the place even in South Africa, either.

    Keep in mind that Santa Catarina and Sao Paolo states are the safest, outlier states of Brazil. After those two, the next lowest state’s homicide rate jumps up to 15.8 (Minas Gerais). And then 18.9 after that, for the federal district. The European-populated Southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul is safe by Brazilian standards. Its homicide rate is 21.9. No US state comes close. Only certain US cities do. So Minas Gerais state (third safest in Brazil) has a homicide rate only slightly lower than in Oakland California (16.24) or Washington DC (16.72). The city of Philadelphia is safer in terms of homicide rate (20.06) than the southern, European-inhabited Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul (21.9).

    Keep in mind though, that African-inhabited parts of Brazil have homicide rates in the 50s and 60s. So these places I mentioned which are quite dangerous by American or European standards are perceived as safe by Brazilians.

    My point is that in a state like Brazil, the elite live very nice lives that don’t feel at all “caged” as Rosie says.

    That’s true. It’s pretty sure it’s even true of elite areas of South Africa or Nigeria.

  58. @iffen

    Those are relevant factors, too.

  59. Dr. Doom says:

    Oh, Corvy, those anarchists are not US. They are Leftists.

    I am no “armchair warrior”. I use the net to drop Truth Bombs.

    These hidden memes explode across platforms and guide the new narrative.

    The Hidden Hand using the web to get the Right Mindset.

    It really is a Battle for Minds and Souls.

  60. Getaclue says:
    @Michael S

    You think they haven’t already figured that out? Why do you think they are so desperate to “vaccinate” you? Gates has stated several times — the “vaccine” is for “depopulation” — I cannot understand why people are in such denial as to this and as to what the Davos creeps have planned for us — they could not make it more obvious.

    Here’s some of Gates’ “vaccine” work — your next!: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2908963/Judges-demand-answers-children-die-controversial-cancer-vaccine-trial-India.html

  61. Getaclue says:
    @The Alarmist

    Totally agree — the “2nd Am” “Civil War” thing is total bs — these types are going to do NOTHING, they are not “Kyle” — but as you say they keep buying guns — it’s pathological — I know people who just keep buying them — all you need is one hand gun, a rifle and maybe a shotgun — and to be very knowledgeable as to using them and cleaning them. These people buying guns and talking of “Civil War” almost all have jobs and people with jobs have homes and wives etc. i.e. they have stuff to lose — they are not going to risk that — so this constant bs as to the coming “Civil War” is laughable. They will submit to authority as they always do– look at all of them wearing useless masks and tell me about the coming “Civil War” LOL….

  62. Jtgw says:
    @Audacious Epigone

    I’m thinking each class must also be associated with some typical mentality. Eg my working class archetype believes in value of hard work and earning ones way but doesn’t really have a flexible entrepreneurial mindset. He was trained to do a job and is good at it and darn well deserves fair pay for the work he puts in and shouldn’t be expected to change profession just because the market changes (at least not if he can blame outsourcing or cheap migrant labor). Also doesn’t think about future too much; it’s his employers responsibility to provide him a pension as a reward for a lifetime of service, or at least it’s the governments responsibility.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone

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