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The War on Thanksgiving
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Has plenty of self-appointed chiefs but vanishingly few Indians:

And yes, the item’s sample size really is 1492. Sense of humor, subversion (but we repeat ourselves), or coincidence inside YouGov? Whatever the reason, I’m grateful!

 
• Category: Culture/Society • Tags: Polling 
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  1. Given that Columbus, in 1492, did not land in what today comprises the United States, and the Pilgrims arrived much later in 1620, this coincidence is a very big one.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    @Thomm

    Correction : Is NOT a very big one.

    Replies: @Twodees Partain

  2. @Thomm
    Given that Columbus, in 1492, did not land in what today comprises the United States, and the Pilgrims arrived much later in 1620, this coincidence is a very big one.

    Replies: @Thomm

    Correction : Is NOT a very big one.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    @Thomm

    Oh. When you correct it, then it ain't funny.

  3. Hispanics more likely to celebrate than whites? Just more evidence to support my position in favor of accession of all territories north (west?) of the Panama Canal by the United States.

  4. Did you look at Native Americans? They might have a different perspective…

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    @SFG

    They were probably left off the graph because the little band at the bottom representing zero wouldn't allow a color to be assigned. Besides, Red was already assigned to republicans.

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @SFG

    They're mixed in with Asians in the "Others" category, so it looks like you're directionally correct.

  5. @SFG
    Did you look at Native Americans? They might have a different perspective...

    Replies: @Twodees Partain, @Audacious Epigone

    They were probably left off the graph because the little band at the bottom representing zero wouldn’t allow a color to be assigned. Besides, Red was already assigned to republicans.

  6. @Thomm
    @Thomm

    Correction : Is NOT a very big one.

    Replies: @Twodees Partain

    Oh. When you correct it, then it ain’t funny.

    • Agree: songbird
  7. I wonder how much some of these differences might reflect 1.) different family structure (lack of father), or 2.) relative new comers, who haven’t had a chance to integrate.

    Thanksgiving is probably the ultimate civic nationalist day, in the sense of families actually celebrating it in the home. Of course, when it comes to virtue-signaling, no contest, it has to be the Fourth of July.

  8. The temperate zone harvest season tradition of going to eat yourself sick with your near family is pretty easily separable from the idea that you’re celebrating Indian-Colonist amity, which was just paleo-multiculturist hypocritical baloney anyway.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    @ludonomous

    I suspect that the official tale is fiction. Anyway, it's a bogus holiday, first declared by Abraham Lincoln. It's part of that pilgrim/puritan myth of being the original Americans. Jamestown preceded Plymouth, and the puritans left England because they were such insufferable assholes that nobody could stand them.

    Their descendants have been a pox on the rest of the country ever since, promoting socialism and other collectivist nonsense.

  9. Now that I’ve outlived most of my family I finally enjoy Thanksgiving.

    • LOL: Herbert West
  10. I was in the supermarket on Thanksgiving and it was full of Hispanics, Jamaicans, Africans, trying to figure out what cornstarch is and how best to use Velveeta. They were obviously foreigners trying to fit in with American customs by trying to gin up a little traditional American Thanksgiving dinner.

    Good for them.

    (No Indians or Chinese, I noticed. Guess who is more into assimilation?)

    On the other hand–there is no War on Thanksgiving. No War on Christmas. No War on Meat. This is all just talking-point-memo rile-up-the-booboisie boilerplate nonsense. Don’t you people ever learn?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @obwandiyag


    (No Indians or Chinese, I noticed. Guess who prepared earlier?)
     
    FTFY

    Replies: @obwandiyag

  11. @obwandiyag
    I was in the supermarket on Thanksgiving and it was full of Hispanics, Jamaicans, Africans, trying to figure out what cornstarch is and how best to use Velveeta. They were obviously foreigners trying to fit in with American customs by trying to gin up a little traditional American Thanksgiving dinner.

    Good for them.

    (No Indians or Chinese, I noticed. Guess who is more into assimilation?)

    On the other hand--there is no War on Thanksgiving. No War on Christmas. No War on Meat. This is all just talking-point-memo rile-up-the-booboisie boilerplate nonsense. Don't you people ever learn?

    Replies: @Anon

    (No Indians or Chinese, I noticed. Guess who prepared earlier?)

    FTFY

    • LOL: 216
    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Anon

    Liar.

    Replies: @Anon

  12. @Anon
    @obwandiyag


    (No Indians or Chinese, I noticed. Guess who prepared earlier?)
     
    FTFY

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    Liar.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @obwandiyag

    How so?

  13. @obwandiyag
    @Anon

    Liar.

    Replies: @Anon

    How so?

  14. As an Australian, all I know about Thanksgiving is that Americans eat some turkey, get drunk, and scream at their relatives for having the Wrong Opinions.

  15. It’s hardly a war to point out that the present version of the Thanksgiving Day legend dates to a much, much later period than 1621 and is ungrounded in actual historical events. The so-called Pilgrims (they never called themselves this; they were “Separatists”) had been expelled from England in the first place because of their bigoted intolerance toward all other belief systems. When Ronnie Rayguns blabbered about Puritan Winthrop’s fairy tale “shining city on a hill” he bought the fantasy version too. In reality, in March 1661, the Council for Foreign Plantations in London received a petition from “divers persons who had been sufferers in New-England on behalf of themselves and thousands there” in which it was stated, “[t]hrough the tyranny and oppression of those in power there, multitudes of the King’s subjects have been most unjustly and grievously oppressed, contrary to their own laws and the laws of England, imprisoned, fined, fettered, whipt, and further punished by cutting off their ears, branding the face, their estates seized and themselves banished [from] the country.” Summoned to England in 1662, Puritan representatives made such an unfavorable impression on the Council that King Charles appointed two commissioners for New England, whom he invested with royal authority to end the rampant abuses by the Puritan theocratic government there.

    If people find comfort and even identity in this myth, fine; but do not pass it off on the rest of us as fact.

    • Replies: @J1234
    @Observator


    The so-called Pilgrims (they never called themselves this; they were “Separatists”) had been expelled from England in the first place because of their bigoted intolerance toward all other belief systems.
     
    Right...because 17th century England was all about religious tolerance. What 17th century England was all about was religious turmoil, and the intolerance vectored out from a variety of sources towards a variety of targets, including the Puritans/Separatists/Pilgrims themselves. If you find "legend" so unacceptable in holidays you ought to step back from it yourself. But yeah, the Puritans were crappy in ways.
    , @Twodees Partain
    @Observator

    Yes, you beat me to it. You said it much better than I could, as well.

  16. @Observator
    It's hardly a war to point out that the present version of the Thanksgiving Day legend dates to a much, much later period than 1621 and is ungrounded in actual historical events. The so-called Pilgrims (they never called themselves this; they were "Separatists") had been expelled from England in the first place because of their bigoted intolerance toward all other belief systems. When Ronnie Rayguns blabbered about Puritan Winthrop's fairy tale "shining city on a hill" he bought the fantasy version too. In reality, in March 1661, the Council for Foreign Plantations in London received a petition from “divers persons who had been sufferers in New-England on behalf of themselves and thousands there” in which it was stated, “[t]hrough the tyranny and oppression of those in power there, multitudes of the King’s subjects have been most unjustly and grievously oppressed, contrary to their own laws and the laws of England, imprisoned, fined, fettered, whipt, and further punished by cutting off their ears, branding the face, their estates seized and themselves banished [from] the country.” Summoned to England in 1662, Puritan representatives made such an unfavorable impression on the Council that King Charles appointed two commissioners for New England, whom he invested with royal authority to end the rampant abuses by the Puritan theocratic government there.

    If people find comfort and even identity in this myth, fine; but do not pass it off on the rest of us as fact.

    Replies: @J1234, @Twodees Partain

    The so-called Pilgrims (they never called themselves this; they were “Separatists”) had been expelled from England in the first place because of their bigoted intolerance toward all other belief systems.

    Right…because 17th century England was all about religious tolerance. What 17th century England was all about was religious turmoil, and the intolerance vectored out from a variety of sources towards a variety of targets, including the Puritans/Separatists/Pilgrims themselves. If you find “legend” so unacceptable in holidays you ought to step back from it yourself. But yeah, the Puritans were crappy in ways.

  17. @ludonomous
    The temperate zone harvest season tradition of going to eat yourself sick with your near family is pretty easily separable from the idea that you're celebrating Indian-Colonist amity, which was just paleo-multiculturist hypocritical baloney anyway.

    Replies: @Twodees Partain

    I suspect that the official tale is fiction. Anyway, it’s a bogus holiday, first declared by Abraham Lincoln. It’s part of that pilgrim/puritan myth of being the original Americans. Jamestown preceded Plymouth, and the puritans left England because they were such insufferable assholes that nobody could stand them.

    Their descendants have been a pox on the rest of the country ever since, promoting socialism and other collectivist nonsense.

  18. @Observator
    It's hardly a war to point out that the present version of the Thanksgiving Day legend dates to a much, much later period than 1621 and is ungrounded in actual historical events. The so-called Pilgrims (they never called themselves this; they were "Separatists") had been expelled from England in the first place because of their bigoted intolerance toward all other belief systems. When Ronnie Rayguns blabbered about Puritan Winthrop's fairy tale "shining city on a hill" he bought the fantasy version too. In reality, in March 1661, the Council for Foreign Plantations in London received a petition from “divers persons who had been sufferers in New-England on behalf of themselves and thousands there” in which it was stated, “[t]hrough the tyranny and oppression of those in power there, multitudes of the King’s subjects have been most unjustly and grievously oppressed, contrary to their own laws and the laws of England, imprisoned, fined, fettered, whipt, and further punished by cutting off their ears, branding the face, their estates seized and themselves banished [from] the country.” Summoned to England in 1662, Puritan representatives made such an unfavorable impression on the Council that King Charles appointed two commissioners for New England, whom he invested with royal authority to end the rampant abuses by the Puritan theocratic government there.

    If people find comfort and even identity in this myth, fine; but do not pass it off on the rest of us as fact.

    Replies: @J1234, @Twodees Partain

    Yes, you beat me to it. You said it much better than I could, as well.

  19. @SFG
    Did you look at Native Americans? They might have a different perspective...

    Replies: @Twodees Partain, @Audacious Epigone

    They’re mixed in with Asians in the “Others” category, so it looks like you’re directionally correct.

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