The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersAudacious Epigone Blog
The War on Covid
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety are a majority:

Working-class white men are a problem. They’re always a problem. Nobody else except Republicans–a redundancy, since we already mentioned white men–has an issue getting with the program. The troglodytes hate The Science. They need remedial education.

In camps, if necessary. After all, there is a lot of disinformation out there. It’s hard for the average person separate fact from fiction. Perhaps we could get a coronavirus advisory system to color code daily changes in threat levels from the invisible enemy.

 
Hide 76 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Working-class white men are a problem. They’re always a problem.

    Ah yes…but perhaps Covid can conveniently help with this problem, no?

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Talha


    "expert in ethics".
     
    It's always an "expert in ethics", isn't it?

    Whenever I hear the word "ethicist", or worse, "bioethicist", I reach for my Luger.
    , @Dan
    @Talha

    Except that whites don't live the longest. Hispanics live longer and so do Asians. In fact the gap of Hispanics over whites is larger than the gap of Whites over blacks:

    African Americans: 75.54 years
    White Americans: 79.12 years
    Hispanic Americans: 82.89 years
    Asian Americans: 86.67 years

    https://www.thebalance.com/the-racial-life-expectancy-gap-in-the-u-s-4588898#:~:text=African%20Americans%3A%2075.54%20years,Asian%20Americans%3A%2086.67%20years

    Our execrable overlords can't be bothered to check the most basic facts.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

    , @nebulafox
    @Talha

    It speaks volumes that these people would cheerfully let elderly non-white people die as collateral in this process.

    Replies: @Talha

  2. Thank you so much, A.E., for your common sense and perspective regarding this PanicFest. We’re all in those light-blue and red bars together.

    BTW, do you have a number for total Americans who took the poll, to match your headline?

    I think it would be cool to have this same graphic, which I’ve seen multiple times at airports, with the word “terrorism” struck out but visible and “virus” there. I don’t want to burden the readers with a long video just for one scene*, but it reminds me of Les Nessman of WKRP (in Cincinnati) pulling out his ready-for-broadcast Communist invasion emergency report and substituting “tornadoes” for “Communists”.

    What color do we have to get down to before we can take our stupid face diapers off for a spell? Just asking for a friend.

    Merry Christmas, Audacious Epigone and commenters!

    .

    * I’ve tried to put starts and ends in the youtube links, which works on my site, but no joy as embedded here. Anyone here got this working?

    • Replies: @Apollo 20
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s weird. While I’m a skeptic on many things including this virus, I’m not sure I would feel personally confident in a medical doctor who pooh-poohed C-19 or minimized the need to protect oneself from it.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Since moving over to UR, which uses Wordpress, I've not been able to get it to work. The start is fine, but the end doesn't take.

    Re: the number who took the poll and answered this question, it's 1,025 (that's the N = in the graph).

  3. @Achmed E. Newman
    Thank you so much, A.E., for your common sense and perspective regarding this PanicFest. We're all in those light-blue and red bars together.

    BTW, do you have a number for total Americans who took the poll, to match your headline?

    I think it would be cool to have this same graphic, which I've seen multiple times at airports, with the word "terrorism" struck out but visible and "virus" there. I don't want to burden the readers with a long video just for one scene*, but it reminds me of Les Nessman of WKRP (in Cincinnati) pulling out his ready-for-broadcast Communist invasion emergency report and substituting "tornadoes" for "Communists".

    What color do we have to get down to before we can take our stupid face diapers off for a spell? Just asking for a friend.

    Merry Christmas, Audacious Epigone and commenters!



    .


    * I've tried to put starts and ends in the youtube links, which works on my site, but no joy as embedded here. Anyone here got this working?

    Replies: @Apollo 20, @Audacious Epigone

    It’s weird. While I’m a skeptic on many things including this virus, I’m not sure I would feel personally confident in a medical doctor who pooh-poohed C-19 or minimized the need to protect oneself from it.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Apollo 20

    Sure, Apollo 20. A doctor friend told me the disease itself is no laughing matter, but then we all know who is more susceptible. His I.D. (Infectious Disease) doctor friend put it like this "Do you know anyone who's never had the common cold? That's how this will be after a while." No doctor ever told me to wear a face diaper though. When we ate at the fancy restaurant (my bill alone was 60 bucks!) nobody was masked-up or in the least concerned.

  4. Perhaps we could get a coronavirus advisory system to color code daily changes in threat levels from the invisible enemy.

    Assume this is tongue in cheek . . . otherwise you are a bit behind the times:

    • Agree: res
    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @res
    @for-the-record

    Indeed.

    For California red was not serious enough so they had to go to purple (11?). And there is no green.
    https://edsource.org/2020/quick-guide-what-californias-color-coded-county-tracking-system-means-for-schools/639357

    https://mk0edsource0y23p672y.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/colorCodeCategorywhole.png

    If you search for "covid color coding by state" you will see many more.

  5. The age groups are interesting. Younger people want more restrictions even if they are much less likely to die of Covid. I guess a lot of this is connected to younger age groups more likely to be Democrats.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Jay Fink

    I think it is because younger people grew up in schools with metal detectors and lockdown drills. They cannot remember a time when they could board an airplane without TSA harassment. They are a generation who have not been allowed to play outside without adult supervision or ride a bicycle without a helmet. They have been conditioned to love authoritarianism and obey.

    Replies: @216, @SaneClownPosse

  6. Perhaps we could get a coronavirus advisory system to color code daily changes in threat levels from the invisible enemy.

    They already did is in Canada. And I thin in some European countries.

    But remember, the real problem is defining “mother” as a woman, and “father” as a man:

  7. @Talha

    Working-class white men are a problem. They’re always a problem.
     
    Ah yes...but perhaps Covid can conveniently help with this problem, no?
    https://twitter.com/AlecMacGillis/status/1340038519830552576

    Peace.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Dan, @nebulafox

    “expert in ethics”.

    It’s always an “expert in ethics”, isn’t it?

    Whenever I hear the word “ethicist”, or worse, “bioethicist”, I reach for my Luger.

  8. The odd thing is EVERYONE of us can make the covid restrictions as tight as we want. No visitors, no shopping, no outside dining, mask wearimg are all up to your own discretion. Don’t need Anthony Fauci or any other government bureaucrat to mandate those things. Its up to you.

    What isn’t up to me is what medicine I can get. I asked my doctor for HCQ and he wouldn’t give it to me. He will refill my xanax Rx though no questions asked. Asked for tamiflu a couple of years ago ‘just in case’ and he said sure. Ask for HCQ and I may as well said could you give me a Rx for some cocaine too! What is it about HCQ that gives doctors so much concern?

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman, res
    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @unit472

    He could give you an Rx for cocaine. You should ask. It is a prescription drug.
    https://www.rxlist.com/cocaine-drug.htm

  9. Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety are a majority:

    Surprise, surprise.

  10. I agreed with a comment at iSteve that pretty succinctly reveals the causes behind Steve’s airball response to this whole fiasco. The interesting thing is, this commenter has only 100 or so comments (a rather brief posting history) yet he very quickly identified the factors operating within Steve’s unusual psychology that give the lie to to the whole HBD universe—something many soi-disant “high IQ” denizens here have been unable to do for years.

    Go ahead and read the comment. Read it and weep. The handle is “Matt Buckalew” and, despite the poor punctuation, I think he nailed it.

    The libertarian right conducted itself with a lot more dignity and level headedness during the pandemic than has the boomer paleo right. Thankfully the pitiful reaction of the boomer paleos has sped up the development of a youth oriented alt right that isn’t obsessed with equity in their house, memories of the space race, and superannuated complacency. Boomer HBDers were especially prone to idiocy because they are so high on their own supppy of soi disant scientific rigor and status anxiety that the cathedral might as well have them on a string.

    Beginning to seem more and more like the boomer right is just people who resent blacks for keeping them off the varsity basketball team but otherwise share most of the cathedrals POV.

    • Troll: SIMP simp
    • Replies: @Wyatt
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Boomers are cancer. Black man commits a murder. More at 11.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Yeah, too bad the graphs and my own lyin' eyes say otherwise, I.D. As Mr. Fink wrote above, some of these young people, who have more chance of dying from their obesity, political correctness, coformity, and stupidty than the Kung Flu, who are wearing the face diapers even when walking by themselves outside in the bright sunshine and not selling me medicine at the Pets Mart and giving me shit at the health food store. #Retarded and spinless!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Mark G.

    , @Dumbo
    @Intelligent Dasein


    The libertarian right conducted itself with a lot more dignity and level headedness during the pandemic than has the boomer paleo right.
     
    While I'm not the biggest fan of libertarianism (it could work, maybe, in a world with only high-IQ white people, and even then...), Ron Paul and other libertarians were right on Covid, while the response by almost the rest of the whole political spectrum has been mostly disappointing.

    The thing people don't get about the Covid farce, is that it's not a "virus" that is the problem. It's the stupid response with "lockdowns" and "masks" and the whole paraphernalia of authoritarian measures. Imagine if nothing had been done at all, and people were simply free to take their own precautions as they always have with flu/cold/any other disease etc.

    Would things have been much worse? I really don't think so.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    , @dfordoom
    @Intelligent Dasein



    Thankfully the pitiful reaction of the boomer paleos has sped up the development of a youth oriented alt right that isn’t obsessed with equity in their house, memories of the space race, and superannuated complacency.
     

     
    Does this youth oriented alt right actually exist? I mean does it exist in meaningful numbers in the real world, outside of the fantasy world of a few UR commenters?
    , @Daniel Williams
    @Intelligent Dasein

    What is the nature of your bizarre and pathetic obsession with Steve Sailer?

    Why do you repeatedly come here to complain about what he—a grown man presumably unrelated to you—says at his blog?

    And the only reason you liked that comment so much is because that guy also writes like a H. P, Lovecraft.

  11. @Talha

    Working-class white men are a problem. They’re always a problem.
     
    Ah yes...but perhaps Covid can conveniently help with this problem, no?
    https://twitter.com/AlecMacGillis/status/1340038519830552576

    Peace.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Dan, @nebulafox

    Except that whites don’t live the longest. Hispanics live longer and so do Asians. In fact the gap of Hispanics over whites is larger than the gap of Whites over blacks:

    African Americans: 75.54 years
    White Americans: 79.12 years
    Hispanic Americans: 82.89 years
    Asian Americans: 86.67 years

    https://www.thebalance.com/the-racial-life-expectancy-gap-in-the-u-s-4588898#:~:text=African%20Americans%3A%2075.54%20years,Asian%20Americans%3A%2086.67%20years

    Our execrable overlords can’t be bothered to check the most basic facts.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @Dan

    The Hispanic longevity paradox was destroyed this year by COVID. Google it. Three whole years shaved off hispanic life expectancy in a matter of months. That's worse than deaths of despair did to whites over decades.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD

  12. @Intelligent Dasein
    I agreed with a comment at iSteve that pretty succinctly reveals the causes behind Steve's airball response to this whole fiasco. The interesting thing is, this commenter has only 100 or so comments (a rather brief posting history) yet he very quickly identified the factors operating within Steve's unusual psychology that give the lie to to the whole HBD universe---something many soi-disant "high IQ" denizens here have been unable to do for years.

    Go ahead and read the comment. Read it and weep. The handle is "Matt Buckalew" and, despite the poor punctuation, I think he nailed it.


    The libertarian right conducted itself with a lot more dignity and level headedness during the pandemic than has the boomer paleo right. Thankfully the pitiful reaction of the boomer paleos has sped up the development of a youth oriented alt right that isn’t obsessed with equity in their house, memories of the space race, and superannuated complacency. Boomer HBDers were especially prone to idiocy because they are so high on their own supppy of soi disant scientific rigor and status anxiety that the cathedral might as well have them on a string.

    Beginning to seem more and more like the boomer right is just people who resent blacks for keeping them off the varsity basketball team but otherwise share most of the cathedrals POV.
     

    Replies: @Wyatt, @Achmed E. Newman, @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @Daniel Williams

    Boomers are cancer. Black man commits a murder. More at 11.

  13. @Apollo 20
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s weird. While I’m a skeptic on many things including this virus, I’m not sure I would feel personally confident in a medical doctor who pooh-poohed C-19 or minimized the need to protect oneself from it.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Sure, Apollo 20. A doctor friend told me the disease itself is no laughing matter, but then we all know who is more susceptible. His I.D. (Infectious Disease) doctor friend put it like this “Do you know anyone who’s never had the common cold? That’s how this will be after a while.” No doctor ever told me to wear a face diaper though. When we ate at the fancy restaurant (my bill alone was 60 bucks!) nobody was masked-up or in the least concerned.

  14. White men without a degree are the n*****s of white men.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Supply and Demand

    "White people exiled in China will be the n*****s of the Orient."

    - John Lennon, oops, Xi Jinping

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @Supply and Demand

  15. @Intelligent Dasein
    I agreed with a comment at iSteve that pretty succinctly reveals the causes behind Steve's airball response to this whole fiasco. The interesting thing is, this commenter has only 100 or so comments (a rather brief posting history) yet he very quickly identified the factors operating within Steve's unusual psychology that give the lie to to the whole HBD universe---something many soi-disant "high IQ" denizens here have been unable to do for years.

    Go ahead and read the comment. Read it and weep. The handle is "Matt Buckalew" and, despite the poor punctuation, I think he nailed it.


    The libertarian right conducted itself with a lot more dignity and level headedness during the pandemic than has the boomer paleo right. Thankfully the pitiful reaction of the boomer paleos has sped up the development of a youth oriented alt right that isn’t obsessed with equity in their house, memories of the space race, and superannuated complacency. Boomer HBDers were especially prone to idiocy because they are so high on their own supppy of soi disant scientific rigor and status anxiety that the cathedral might as well have them on a string.

    Beginning to seem more and more like the boomer right is just people who resent blacks for keeping them off the varsity basketball team but otherwise share most of the cathedrals POV.
     

    Replies: @Wyatt, @Achmed E. Newman, @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @Daniel Williams

    Yeah, too bad the graphs and my own lyin’ eyes say otherwise, I.D. As Mr. Fink wrote above, some of these young people, who have more chance of dying from their obesity, political correctness, coformity, and stupidty than the Kung Flu, who are wearing the face diapers even when walking by themselves outside in the bright sunshine and not selling me medicine at the Pets Mart and giving me shit at the health food store. #Retarded and spinless!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    There was supposed to be a verb in there in that 2nd sentence eventually, I swear!

    , @Intelligent Dasein
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Yeah, too bad the graphs and my own lyin’ eyes say otherwise, I.D.
     
    Well, I don't really know what the younger demographic thinks in real life since I don't have much contact with any of them, but when the lockdowns first went into effect they were widely scoffed at and ignored by college kids and spring breakers, which is a phenomenon both you and I comment upon at the time, if I recall correctly.

    So, in other words, take the poll with a grain of salt.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Mark G.
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Achmed, I tend to agree with you that young people support more restrictions. They are more liberal than the older generation and have grown up in a more regimented society and are more used to it. But I.D. has a good point in his response to you that this poll might need to be taken with a grain of salt. This is even more true about the black response. I live in a large city around lots of blacks and they observe the current restrictions less than white suburbanites and yet in this poll they say they want more restrictions.

    Another problem with this poll is that it doesn't define what is meant by more restrictions. When young people respond saying they want more restrictions they might be thinking the government shuts down the business they work at and then pays them to stay at home to do nothing. When you see what the Democrats in Congress are proposing, this appears to be the case.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  16. @Supply and Demand
    White men without a degree are the n*****s of white men.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    “White people exiled in China will be the n*****s of the Orient.”

    John Lennon, oops, Xi Jinping

    • Replies: @Adam Smith, @Supply and Demand
    @Achmed E. Newman

    there are already actual n*****s of the orient, though. In Guangzhou.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  17. California has a color code system, but as you might well expect from governor gruesome, there is no green. The best it gets is yellow, and even worse than red is purple.

    This is in line with the theory that even after 100% of the population is vaccinated business will have to remain closed, we will have to continue to wear masks and “take precautions” because, according to ABC News, we don’t know how long vaccine immunity lasts and we don’t know if it actually prevents the spread of the disease.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Bill H


    This is in line with the theory that even after 100% of the population is vaccinated business will have to remain closed, we will have to continue to wear masks and “take precautions”
     
    That's not the worst. The worst is that this Covid fiasco created a precedent and now Big Gov and Big Tech can lock people down for "another virus", or for "climate change" or any other excuse that strikes their fancy. If anything, this Covid farce was a big pavlovian experiment to find out how much people will obey. And the answer, sadly, is that most (white?) people are conformist or lack critical thinking and will do as authority figures say, as long as the reasons are presented in a nice or "scientific" way.
  18. Once again we see: Democrats are Fucking Idiots.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  19. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Yeah, too bad the graphs and my own lyin' eyes say otherwise, I.D. As Mr. Fink wrote above, some of these young people, who have more chance of dying from their obesity, political correctness, coformity, and stupidty than the Kung Flu, who are wearing the face diapers even when walking by themselves outside in the bright sunshine and not selling me medicine at the Pets Mart and giving me shit at the health food store. #Retarded and spinless!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Mark G.

    There was supposed to be a verb in there in that 2nd sentence eventually, I swear!

    • LOL: Adam Smith
  20. @for-the-record
    Perhaps we could get a coronavirus advisory system to color code daily changes in threat levels from the invisible enemy.

    Assume this is tongue in cheek . . . otherwise you are a bit behind the times:

    https://image.assets.pressassociation.io/v2/image/production/90316eb9c11fba66bbf66c47ca672569Y29udGVudHNlYXJjaCwxNTkyNjQ2Mzkw/2.54214056.jpg?w=640

    https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/polopoly_fs/1.5096309!/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_960/image.jpg

    https://www.nbc4i.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/08/thumbnail_image008.jpg

    Ontario: https://media.blogto.com/uploads/2020/11/03/1604433533-20201103-ontario-covid-framework-levels_1.jpg?w=1400&cmd=resize&height=2500&quality=70

    usw.

    Replies: @res

    Indeed.

    For California red was not serious enough so they had to go to purple (11?). And there is no green.
    https://edsource.org/2020/quick-guide-what-californias-color-coded-county-tracking-system-means-for-schools/639357

    If you search for “covid color coding by state” you will see many more.

  21. @Jay Fink
    The age groups are interesting. Younger people want more restrictions even if they are much less likely to die of Covid. I guess a lot of this is connected to younger age groups more likely to be Democrats.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    I think it is because younger people grew up in schools with metal detectors and lockdown drills. They cannot remember a time when they could board an airplane without TSA harassment. They are a generation who have not been allowed to play outside without adult supervision or ride a bicycle without a helmet. They have been conditioned to love authoritarianism and obey.

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous, Jay Fink
    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @216
    @Adam Smith

    It might be something to adapt to, rather than fight.

    If authoritarianism is our future, then it benefits us to become a technocratic movement.

    , @SaneClownPosse
    @Adam Smith

    The "% of positive cases" metric, does that have a fudge factor for false results and a factor for the number of cycles repeated?

  22. A major problem has been that the powers that be have massively distorted reality on the dangers of COVID and have literally censored anything that went against the panic narrative.

    Early in the pandemic, sincere scientists and doctors made videos advocating against lockdown and saw their content banned. It was only the BLM street activitism that broke the stranglehold of lockdown thinking, because suddenly gathering in large groups was fine.

    Nobody dares publicly take the view that COVID is not so bad. Big tech actually invented a new ban category in 2020, “false” medical information as per the judgment of the blue-haired women’s studies majors at Twitter, Google and Facebook’s “Trust and Safety” teams whose medical competency is nil. Much of this new power was used against those who wanted to resist the panic.

    Ironically, it has long been a ban-worthy offence apply medically true gender descriptions to people. The overseers of truth, in other words, are social justice warriors who never respected truth to begin with.

    As for the opener of this blog-post then:
    “Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety are a majority” —

    The problem is that the public has been completely failed by those who would guide public thinking. Florida has been open normally for most of the year while New York has been on lockdown for most of the year. Masks are not required in Florida and schools are open. The opposite is true in New York. Florida has a larger and older population than New York. Yet Florida has had 1/2 a many COVID deaths as New York.

    How many people even know this? If you follow mainstream media you would think that Florida has had far worse outcomes that New York but instead Florida’s outcomes have been far better, while having virtually no restrictions. Can the public be blamed for giving up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety when they aren’t even allowed to know the truth?

    The most obvious remedy for respiratory infections, humidifying living spaces in winter, has gotten virtually no traction. A curious person could learn about the respiratory system and figure out within days that moist air is of paramount importance. No matter how low your opinion of our thought leaders, it should be lower still.

    Our intellectual overlords are profoundly intellectually incompetent. Their minds do not specialize in truth but in enforcing conformity. Masks were utter ignored for the first many weeks of the pandemic until suddenly in an instant they became the state religion. It is comical to watch a video of Fauci mocking masks in mid-March and then worshiping them now, but he is nothing more than a reflection of prevailing groupthink. What are ordinary people to do? A figure like Dr. Fauci is supposed to be reliable and conscientious people used to simply be able to follow the experts.

    The experts are telling us to skip the holidays. But they don’t tell us about the most basic things like humidity and they sure don’t expend much effort getting us a vaccine quickly.

    Two weeks will stop the spread, masks will stop this, shuttering schools will stop the spread, in every instance the left used massive power including censorship to enforce a narrative and in every instance they were wrong.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @DanHessinMD
    @DanHessinMD

    The latest proof of the profound intellectual inferiority of our overlords is the inability to get the vaccine to oldsters first. That should be the easiest call imaginable.

    The inability to do the obvious with such an easy call should cast doubt upon our ability to deal (or even recognize) real societal challenges:

    - debt
    - fertility collapse of the right half of the bell curve, worldwide
    - social justice overreach, with present soaring crime among the first results

    Those are the things that can break the back of society, not some virus that has killed just 1 in 1000 Americans. It is only a big deal for oldies, but we cannot even get them a humidifier and a vaccine. What hope is there on real problems?

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @Daniel Williams

    , @Adam Smith
    @DanHessinMD


    "No matter how low your opinion of our thought leaders, it should be lower still."
     
    I seriously doubt that my opinion of these creatures could be any lower.

    , @Kratoklastes
    @DanHessinMD


    Our intellectual overlords are profoundly intellectually incompetent.
     
    You're assuming that their objectives are the objectives you think they ought to have - i.e., efficient implementation of socially-optimal policies.

    That's an increasingly untenable assumption, even for people who form their expectations by allowing life to happen to them and trying to work out why.

    For those who like evidence-based assessments, it hasn't been a tenable assumption since the first government emerged in about 6000BCE.

    Our overlords are, have always been, and will always be, motivated by power and personal wealth. The individual exceptions (e.g., that shouty Austrian guy with the funny moustache[1]) fail to understand that their weltanschauung is 180° out of step with the hundreds of thousands of people who form the political class.




    [1] It might alarm folks to read that I conclude that Nasty Old Adolf was genuinely motivated by what he thought of as the best interests of his people: there is no alternative conclusion to any objective evaluation of his career. He ought to have annihilated the cornered Allies at Dunkerque rather than making a futile gesture of goodwill: Prussian martial correctness was wasted on Churchill, who was a mischling piece of shit.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  23. @DanHessinMD
    A major problem has been that the powers that be have massively distorted reality on the dangers of COVID and have literally censored anything that went against the panic narrative.

    Early in the pandemic, sincere scientists and doctors made videos advocating against lockdown and saw their content banned. It was only the BLM street activitism that broke the stranglehold of lockdown thinking, because suddenly gathering in large groups was fine.

    Nobody dares publicly take the view that COVID is not so bad. Big tech actually invented a new ban category in 2020, "false" medical information as per the judgment of the blue-haired women's studies majors at Twitter, Google and Facebook's "Trust and Safety" teams whose medical competency is nil. Much of this new power was used against those who wanted to resist the panic.

    Ironically, it has long been a ban-worthy offence apply medically true gender descriptions to people. The overseers of truth, in other words, are social justice warriors who never respected truth to begin with.

    As for the opener of this blog-post then:
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety are a majority" --

    The problem is that the public has been completely failed by those who would guide public thinking. Florida has been open normally for most of the year while New York has been on lockdown for most of the year. Masks are not required in Florida and schools are open. The opposite is true in New York. Florida has a larger and older population than New York. Yet Florida has had 1/2 a many COVID deaths as New York.

    How many people even know this? If you follow mainstream media you would think that Florida has had far worse outcomes that New York but instead Florida's outcomes have been far better, while having virtually no restrictions. Can the public be blamed for giving up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety when they aren't even allowed to know the truth?

    The most obvious remedy for respiratory infections, humidifying living spaces in winter, has gotten virtually no traction. A curious person could learn about the respiratory system and figure out within days that moist air is of paramount importance. No matter how low your opinion of our thought leaders, it should be lower still.

    Our intellectual overlords are profoundly intellectually incompetent. Their minds do not specialize in truth but in enforcing conformity. Masks were utter ignored for the first many weeks of the pandemic until suddenly in an instant they became the state religion. It is comical to watch a video of Fauci mocking masks in mid-March and then worshiping them now, but he is nothing more than a reflection of prevailing groupthink. What are ordinary people to do? A figure like Dr. Fauci is supposed to be reliable and conscientious people used to simply be able to follow the experts.

    The experts are telling us to skip the holidays. But they don't tell us about the most basic things like humidity and they sure don't expend much effort getting us a vaccine quickly.

    Two weeks will stop the spread, masks will stop this, shuttering schools will stop the spread, in every instance the left used massive power including censorship to enforce a narrative and in every instance they were wrong.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD, @Adam Smith, @Kratoklastes

    The latest proof of the profound intellectual inferiority of our overlords is the inability to get the vaccine to oldsters first. That should be the easiest call imaginable.

    The inability to do the obvious with such an easy call should cast doubt upon our ability to deal (or even recognize) real societal challenges:

    – debt
    – fertility collapse of the right half of the bell curve, worldwide
    – social justice overreach, with present soaring crime among the first results

    Those are the things that can break the back of society, not some virus that has killed just 1 in 1000 Americans. It is only a big deal for oldies, but we cannot even get them a humidifier and a vaccine. What hope is there on real problems?

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @DanHessinMD


    – fertility collapse of the right half of the bell curve, worldwide
     
    Fertility is naturally dysgenic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwZ0ZUy7P3E

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Wielgus

    , @Daniel Williams
    @DanHessinMD


    What hope is there on real problems?
     
    What hope was there ever of the ruling class solving real problems?

    Problems are solved when small numbers of serious people overthrow the existing order that has been perpetuating those problems.

    Why would our rulers change a society that is so clearly working to their benefit? To make your life better?
  24. The support for restrictions increasing as you get to younger groups who are less likely to die from this is not really surprising.

    Older people over their lives have seen one problem after another trumpeted by politicians and the media as a crisis that requires a major response. Often, if there is no major response, it is later found out that the dire predictions of “The sky is falling!” crowd never come to pass. If there is a major response, the long term costs of the response often end up exceeding the short term benefits. So this is just a case of getting wiser as you get older.

    Younger people just have seen less of life. They are also exposed to a less accurate version of history in schools now than previous generations so are unable to learn the lessons that history has to offer.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Mark G.


    Older people over their lives have seen one problem after another trumpeted by politicians and the media as a crisis that requires a major response. Often, if there is no major response, it is later found out that the dire predictions of “The sky is falling!” crowd never come to pass. If there is a major response, the long term costs of the response often end up exceeding the short term benefits. So this is just a case of getting wiser as you get older.
     
    Yes, I agree.

    Also young people tend to be emotional and idealistic. They see bad stuff happening and they not only think it can be stopped, they think it must be stopped. Right now.

    It's always been that way. It has nothing to do with any particular generation. Every generation of young people has been prone to idealism and emotionalism.

    The only real difference between the Boomers and Millennials/Zoomers is that the Boomers when young thought that more freedom would fix everything. Millennials/Zoomers think that more authoritarianism will fix everything. But in both cases there's the same naïve belief that all the problems of the world can be easily fixed.
  25. @DanHessinMD
    A major problem has been that the powers that be have massively distorted reality on the dangers of COVID and have literally censored anything that went against the panic narrative.

    Early in the pandemic, sincere scientists and doctors made videos advocating against lockdown and saw their content banned. It was only the BLM street activitism that broke the stranglehold of lockdown thinking, because suddenly gathering in large groups was fine.

    Nobody dares publicly take the view that COVID is not so bad. Big tech actually invented a new ban category in 2020, "false" medical information as per the judgment of the blue-haired women's studies majors at Twitter, Google and Facebook's "Trust and Safety" teams whose medical competency is nil. Much of this new power was used against those who wanted to resist the panic.

    Ironically, it has long been a ban-worthy offence apply medically true gender descriptions to people. The overseers of truth, in other words, are social justice warriors who never respected truth to begin with.

    As for the opener of this blog-post then:
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety are a majority" --

    The problem is that the public has been completely failed by those who would guide public thinking. Florida has been open normally for most of the year while New York has been on lockdown for most of the year. Masks are not required in Florida and schools are open. The opposite is true in New York. Florida has a larger and older population than New York. Yet Florida has had 1/2 a many COVID deaths as New York.

    How many people even know this? If you follow mainstream media you would think that Florida has had far worse outcomes that New York but instead Florida's outcomes have been far better, while having virtually no restrictions. Can the public be blamed for giving up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety when they aren't even allowed to know the truth?

    The most obvious remedy for respiratory infections, humidifying living spaces in winter, has gotten virtually no traction. A curious person could learn about the respiratory system and figure out within days that moist air is of paramount importance. No matter how low your opinion of our thought leaders, it should be lower still.

    Our intellectual overlords are profoundly intellectually incompetent. Their minds do not specialize in truth but in enforcing conformity. Masks were utter ignored for the first many weeks of the pandemic until suddenly in an instant they became the state religion. It is comical to watch a video of Fauci mocking masks in mid-March and then worshiping them now, but he is nothing more than a reflection of prevailing groupthink. What are ordinary people to do? A figure like Dr. Fauci is supposed to be reliable and conscientious people used to simply be able to follow the experts.

    The experts are telling us to skip the holidays. But they don't tell us about the most basic things like humidity and they sure don't expend much effort getting us a vaccine quickly.

    Two weeks will stop the spread, masks will stop this, shuttering schools will stop the spread, in every instance the left used massive power including censorship to enforce a narrative and in every instance they were wrong.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD, @Adam Smith, @Kratoklastes

    “No matter how low your opinion of our thought leaders, it should be lower still.”

    I seriously doubt that my opinion of these creatures could be any lower.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
  26. @DanHessinMD
    @DanHessinMD

    The latest proof of the profound intellectual inferiority of our overlords is the inability to get the vaccine to oldsters first. That should be the easiest call imaginable.

    The inability to do the obvious with such an easy call should cast doubt upon our ability to deal (or even recognize) real societal challenges:

    - debt
    - fertility collapse of the right half of the bell curve, worldwide
    - social justice overreach, with present soaring crime among the first results

    Those are the things that can break the back of society, not some virus that has killed just 1 in 1000 Americans. It is only a big deal for oldies, but we cannot even get them a humidifier and a vaccine. What hope is there on real problems?

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @Daniel Williams

    – fertility collapse of the right half of the bell curve, worldwide

    Fertility is naturally dysgenic.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @Adam Smith

    No, that's wrong. It's only dysgenic in a society where prosperity has removed normal evolutionary pressures.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    , @Wielgus
    @Adam Smith

    Clevon seems to have more fun.

  27. @Adam Smith
    @DanHessinMD


    – fertility collapse of the right half of the bell curve, worldwide
     
    Fertility is naturally dysgenic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwZ0ZUy7P3E

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Wielgus

    No, that’s wrong. It’s only dysgenic in a society where prosperity has removed normal evolutionary pressures.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Cloudbuster

    Perhaps.

    Behavioral sink?

  28. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Supply and Demand

    "White people exiled in China will be the n*****s of the Orient."

    - John Lennon, oops, Xi Jinping

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @Supply and Demand

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  29. @DanHessinMD
    A major problem has been that the powers that be have massively distorted reality on the dangers of COVID and have literally censored anything that went against the panic narrative.

    Early in the pandemic, sincere scientists and doctors made videos advocating against lockdown and saw their content banned. It was only the BLM street activitism that broke the stranglehold of lockdown thinking, because suddenly gathering in large groups was fine.

    Nobody dares publicly take the view that COVID is not so bad. Big tech actually invented a new ban category in 2020, "false" medical information as per the judgment of the blue-haired women's studies majors at Twitter, Google and Facebook's "Trust and Safety" teams whose medical competency is nil. Much of this new power was used against those who wanted to resist the panic.

    Ironically, it has long been a ban-worthy offence apply medically true gender descriptions to people. The overseers of truth, in other words, are social justice warriors who never respected truth to begin with.

    As for the opener of this blog-post then:
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety are a majority" --

    The problem is that the public has been completely failed by those who would guide public thinking. Florida has been open normally for most of the year while New York has been on lockdown for most of the year. Masks are not required in Florida and schools are open. The opposite is true in New York. Florida has a larger and older population than New York. Yet Florida has had 1/2 a many COVID deaths as New York.

    How many people even know this? If you follow mainstream media you would think that Florida has had far worse outcomes that New York but instead Florida's outcomes have been far better, while having virtually no restrictions. Can the public be blamed for giving up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety when they aren't even allowed to know the truth?

    The most obvious remedy for respiratory infections, humidifying living spaces in winter, has gotten virtually no traction. A curious person could learn about the respiratory system and figure out within days that moist air is of paramount importance. No matter how low your opinion of our thought leaders, it should be lower still.

    Our intellectual overlords are profoundly intellectually incompetent. Their minds do not specialize in truth but in enforcing conformity. Masks were utter ignored for the first many weeks of the pandemic until suddenly in an instant they became the state religion. It is comical to watch a video of Fauci mocking masks in mid-March and then worshiping them now, but he is nothing more than a reflection of prevailing groupthink. What are ordinary people to do? A figure like Dr. Fauci is supposed to be reliable and conscientious people used to simply be able to follow the experts.

    The experts are telling us to skip the holidays. But they don't tell us about the most basic things like humidity and they sure don't expend much effort getting us a vaccine quickly.

    Two weeks will stop the spread, masks will stop this, shuttering schools will stop the spread, in every instance the left used massive power including censorship to enforce a narrative and in every instance they were wrong.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD, @Adam Smith, @Kratoklastes

    Our intellectual overlords are profoundly intellectually incompetent.

    You’re assuming that their objectives are the objectives you think they ought to have – i.e., efficient implementation of socially-optimal policies.

    That’s an increasingly untenable assumption, even for people who form their expectations by allowing life to happen to them and trying to work out why.

    For those who like evidence-based assessments, it hasn’t been a tenable assumption since the first government emerged in about 6000BCE.

    Our overlords are, have always been, and will always be, motivated by power and personal wealth. The individual exceptions (e.g., that shouty Austrian guy with the funny moustache[1]) fail to understand that their weltanschauung is 180° out of step with the hundreds of thousands of people who form the political class.

    [1] It might alarm folks to read that I conclude that Nasty Old Adolf was genuinely motivated by what he thought of as the best interests of his people: there is no alternative conclusion to any objective evaluation of his career. He ought to have annihilated the cornered Allies at Dunkerque rather than making a futile gesture of goodwill: Prussian martial correctness was wasted on Churchill, who was a mischling piece of shit.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Kratoklastes

    Though I agree with the gist of your reply comment (the beginning), I don't know what's so much better about evil being caused by stupidity rather than old-fashioned greed (for money and/or power). Your Hitler's, your Mao's, your Lenin's, Stalin's and Pol Pots - I don't see what difference it makes whether they were all in it for what the perceived as the good of their own people, though I agree they were. Good intentions + Absolute Power + Stupidity still = EVIL.

    BTW, could you please, please, lose that BCE bit, Krato? If BC/AD was good enough for a couple of thousand years, what's the problem with it now, political correctness?

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Kratoklastes

  30. @Kratoklastes
    @DanHessinMD


    Our intellectual overlords are profoundly intellectually incompetent.
     
    You're assuming that their objectives are the objectives you think they ought to have - i.e., efficient implementation of socially-optimal policies.

    That's an increasingly untenable assumption, even for people who form their expectations by allowing life to happen to them and trying to work out why.

    For those who like evidence-based assessments, it hasn't been a tenable assumption since the first government emerged in about 6000BCE.

    Our overlords are, have always been, and will always be, motivated by power and personal wealth. The individual exceptions (e.g., that shouty Austrian guy with the funny moustache[1]) fail to understand that their weltanschauung is 180° out of step with the hundreds of thousands of people who form the political class.




    [1] It might alarm folks to read that I conclude that Nasty Old Adolf was genuinely motivated by what he thought of as the best interests of his people: there is no alternative conclusion to any objective evaluation of his career. He ought to have annihilated the cornered Allies at Dunkerque rather than making a futile gesture of goodwill: Prussian martial correctness was wasted on Churchill, who was a mischling piece of shit.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Though I agree with the gist of your reply comment (the beginning), I don’t know what’s so much better about evil being caused by stupidity rather than old-fashioned greed (for money and/or power). Your Hitler’s, your Mao’s, your Lenin’s, Stalin’s and Pol Pots – I don’t see what difference it makes whether they were all in it for what the perceived as the good of their own people, though I agree they were. Good intentions + Absolute Power + Stupidity still = EVIL.

    BTW, could you please, please, lose that BCE bit, Krato? If BC/AD was good enough for a couple of thousand years, what’s the problem with it now, political correctness?

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Achmed E. Newman


    BTW, could you please, please, lose that BCE bit
     
    I only use BCE/CE because it is more accurate than BC/AD.

    BC/AD is horribly inaccurate for two main reasons:
     • the zero date was chosen arbitrarily (and is inaccurate); and
     • the 'C' and 'D' bits are both fictional.

    'Current Era' doesn't roll off the tongue, but since 'era' defines a period of time from a given starting point, there is no nonsense involved. (I would prefer if there was a Year 0 CE, but that was ruled out because the retards who invented BC/AD fucked up, and the BCE/CE guys wanted to retain historical dates as far as possible).

    It's all much of a muchness, considering that everyone just got a few days off to inaccurately celebrate the birth of a fictional Jewish grifter and bullshit artist.

    Hopefully we ditch all the Magic ManGodMan bullshit sometime in the next half-century, and just start celebrating solstices again.

    Bah humbug. HAIL KEK.


    (I know what the psychocharlatans will be thinking... "Typical - displays the oppositional defiance that is to be expected from an INTJ born in late Γαμηλιών [Gamelion], with high Orneriness : prescribe him a dream-catcher and 4 Seroquil, STAT")

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @TomSchmidt, @nebulafox

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I don’t see what difference it makes whether they were all in it for what the perceived as the good of their own people, though I agree they were. Good intentions + Absolute Power + Stupidity still = EVIL.
     
    I agree 95%: the missing 5% is because 'evil' isn't a useful idea because it's a vaguely supernatural concept.

    True Believers are far more likely to cross the line to atrocity; zealots are much scarier than sociopathic megalomaniacs. Both are costly, but only the former will personally torture you and set you on fire in the public square.

    So sociopathic megalomaniacs need a cadre of zealots in order to get anything done.

    FWIW I don't think Hitler was a zealot or a sociopath. He was nominally a vegetarian anti-smoking teetotal equal-rights environmentalist atheist... but departed from all of those things at times, so never got to SJW/soyboy levels of nonsense. He wasn't terribly fond of Red Sea Pedestrians... again, with a very large number of exceptions.

    His one genuine zealotry was adamantine hatred of hunting for sport: he couldn't shut his yap about that, even in diplomatic settings.

    (I would still travel back n time and strangle him in his crib if I had the chance, because he was a key figure in Our Enemy, The State.)

  31. @Bill H
    California has a color code system, but as you might well expect from governor gruesome, there is no green. The best it gets is yellow, and even worse than red is purple.

    This is in line with the theory that even after 100% of the population is vaccinated business will have to remain closed, we will have to continue to wear masks and "take precautions" because, according to ABC News, we don't know how long vaccine immunity lasts and we don't know if it actually prevents the spread of the disease.

    Replies: @Dumbo

    This is in line with the theory that even after 100% of the population is vaccinated business will have to remain closed, we will have to continue to wear masks and “take precautions”

    That’s not the worst. The worst is that this Covid fiasco created a precedent and now Big Gov and Big Tech can lock people down for “another virus”, or for “climate change” or any other excuse that strikes their fancy. If anything, this Covid farce was a big pavlovian experiment to find out how much people will obey. And the answer, sadly, is that most (white?) people are conformist or lack critical thinking and will do as authority figures say, as long as the reasons are presented in a nice or “scientific” way.

  32. @Cloudbuster
    @Adam Smith

    No, that's wrong. It's only dysgenic in a society where prosperity has removed normal evolutionary pressures.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    Perhaps.

    Behavioral sink?

    • Agree: Cloudbuster
  33. @Intelligent Dasein
    I agreed with a comment at iSteve that pretty succinctly reveals the causes behind Steve's airball response to this whole fiasco. The interesting thing is, this commenter has only 100 or so comments (a rather brief posting history) yet he very quickly identified the factors operating within Steve's unusual psychology that give the lie to to the whole HBD universe---something many soi-disant "high IQ" denizens here have been unable to do for years.

    Go ahead and read the comment. Read it and weep. The handle is "Matt Buckalew" and, despite the poor punctuation, I think he nailed it.


    The libertarian right conducted itself with a lot more dignity and level headedness during the pandemic than has the boomer paleo right. Thankfully the pitiful reaction of the boomer paleos has sped up the development of a youth oriented alt right that isn’t obsessed with equity in their house, memories of the space race, and superannuated complacency. Boomer HBDers were especially prone to idiocy because they are so high on their own supppy of soi disant scientific rigor and status anxiety that the cathedral might as well have them on a string.

    Beginning to seem more and more like the boomer right is just people who resent blacks for keeping them off the varsity basketball team but otherwise share most of the cathedrals POV.
     

    Replies: @Wyatt, @Achmed E. Newman, @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @Daniel Williams

    The libertarian right conducted itself with a lot more dignity and level headedness during the pandemic than has the boomer paleo right.

    While I’m not the biggest fan of libertarianism (it could work, maybe, in a world with only high-IQ white people, and even then…), Ron Paul and other libertarians were right on Covid, while the response by almost the rest of the whole political spectrum has been mostly disappointing.

    The thing people don’t get about the Covid farce, is that it’s not a “virus” that is the problem. It’s the stupid response with “lockdowns” and “masks” and the whole paraphernalia of authoritarian measures. Imagine if nothing had been done at all, and people were simply free to take their own precautions as they always have with flu/cold/any other disease etc.

    Would things have been much worse? I really don’t think so.

    • Agree: Cloudbuster, Mark G.
    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Dumbo

    They did that in South Dakota, Sweden, and after a few months, Florida. The results are in. They didn't do any worse.

  34. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Yeah, too bad the graphs and my own lyin' eyes say otherwise, I.D. As Mr. Fink wrote above, some of these young people, who have more chance of dying from their obesity, political correctness, coformity, and stupidty than the Kung Flu, who are wearing the face diapers even when walking by themselves outside in the bright sunshine and not selling me medicine at the Pets Mart and giving me shit at the health food store. #Retarded and spinless!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Mark G.

    Yeah, too bad the graphs and my own lyin’ eyes say otherwise, I.D.

    Well, I don’t really know what the younger demographic thinks in real life since I don’t have much contact with any of them, but when the lockdowns first went into effect they were widely scoffed at and ignored by college kids and spring breakers, which is a phenomenon both you and I comment upon at the time, if I recall correctly.

    So, in other words, take the poll with a grain of salt.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I do take a lot of polls with grains of salt, I.D. In fact I reported recently on getting polled by Gallup. It was a waste of time for me, at least, and I can't see that Gallup got but one piece of good data out of me. That wasn't my doing, but the doing of whoever made and arranged so many stupid wasteful questions.

    However, I have been out and about regularly throughout this PanicFest, and at least lately, the young people. even college-aged kids (we've had over 1,000 cases of the Kung Flu at the nearby U. - # of hospitalization = 0), seem hysterical about this Kung Flu, maybe more than the older people I know. That was not the case back in May.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  35. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Yeah, too bad the graphs and my own lyin’ eyes say otherwise, I.D.
     
    Well, I don't really know what the younger demographic thinks in real life since I don't have much contact with any of them, but when the lockdowns first went into effect they were widely scoffed at and ignored by college kids and spring breakers, which is a phenomenon both you and I comment upon at the time, if I recall correctly.

    So, in other words, take the poll with a grain of salt.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I do take a lot of polls with grains of salt, I.D. In fact I reported recently on getting polled by Gallup. It was a waste of time for me, at least, and I can’t see that Gallup got but one piece of good data out of me. That wasn’t my doing, but the doing of whoever made and arranged so many stupid wasteful questions.

    However, I have been out and about regularly throughout this PanicFest, and at least lately, the young people. even college-aged kids (we’ve had over 1,000 cases of the Kung Flu at the nearby U. – # of hospitalization = 0), seem hysterical about this Kung Flu, maybe more than the older people I know. That was not the case back in May.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Achmed E. Newman


    However, I have been out and about regularly throughout this PanicFest, and at least lately, the young people. even college-aged kids (we’ve had over 1,000 cases of the Kung Flu at the nearby U. – # of hospitalization = 0), seem hysterical about this Kung Flu, maybe more than the older people I know. That was not the case back in May.
     
    I agree. It's not really surprising. For young people every minor crisis is the worst thing that ever happened, ever. It's the end of the world. Literally!

    When you get older and you're told that some new crisis means the end of the world your response tends to be - What, again??!!
  36. @Talha

    Working-class white men are a problem. They’re always a problem.
     
    Ah yes...but perhaps Covid can conveniently help with this problem, no?
    https://twitter.com/AlecMacGillis/status/1340038519830552576

    Peace.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Dan, @nebulafox

    It speaks volumes that these people would cheerfully let elderly non-white people die as collateral in this process.

    • Agree: Talha
    • Replies: @Talha
    @nebulafox

    You know what they say; gotta break a few eggs to make that diversity omelette.

    Peace.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Kratoklastes

    Though I agree with the gist of your reply comment (the beginning), I don't know what's so much better about evil being caused by stupidity rather than old-fashioned greed (for money and/or power). Your Hitler's, your Mao's, your Lenin's, Stalin's and Pol Pots - I don't see what difference it makes whether they were all in it for what the perceived as the good of their own people, though I agree they were. Good intentions + Absolute Power + Stupidity still = EVIL.

    BTW, could you please, please, lose that BCE bit, Krato? If BC/AD was good enough for a couple of thousand years, what's the problem with it now, political correctness?

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Kratoklastes

    BTW, could you please, please, lose that BCE bit

    I only use BCE/CE because it is more accurate than BC/AD.

    BC/AD is horribly inaccurate for two main reasons:
     • the zero date was chosen arbitrarily (and is inaccurate); and
     • the ‘C’ and ‘D’ bits are both fictional.

    ‘Current Era’ doesn’t roll off the tongue, but since ‘era’ defines a period of time from a given starting point, there is no nonsense involved. (I would prefer if there was a Year 0 CE, but that was ruled out because the retards who invented BC/AD fucked up, and the BCE/CE guys wanted to retain historical dates as far as possible).

    It’s all much of a muchness, considering that everyone just got a few days off to inaccurately celebrate the birth of a fictional Jewish grifter and bullshit artist.

    Hopefully we ditch all the Magic ManGodMan bullshit sometime in the next half-century, and just start celebrating solstices again.

    Bah humbug. HAIL KEK.

    (I know what the psychocharlatans will be thinking… “Typical – displays the oppositional defiance that is to be expected from an INTJ born in late Γαμηλιών [Gamelion], with high Orneriness : prescribe him a dream-catcher and 4 Seroquil, STAT”)

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @Kratoklastes

    BC/AD is horribly inaccurate for two main reasons:
     • the zero date was chosen arbitrarily (and is inaccurate); and
     • the ‘C’ and ‘D’ bits are both fictional.


    CE/BCE use exactly the same zero date, so they're not an improvement from that standpoint. It's nothing but atheist virtue signaling.

    As for fictional, well, you places your bets and you takes your chances.

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Kratoklastes


    I would prefer if there was a Year 0 CE, but that was ruled out because the retards who invented BC/AD fucked up
     
    Thought you were smarter than this.

    https://www.livescience.com/45510-anno-domini.html

    "Dionysius devised his system to replace the Diocletian system, named after the 51st emperor of Rome, who ruled from A.D. 284 to A.D. 305. The first year in Dionysius' Easter table, “Anno Domini 532,” followed the year “Anno Diocletiani 247.” Dionysius made the change specifically to do away with the memory of this emperor who had been a ruthless persecutor of Christians."
    ...
    "Dionysius attempted to set A.D. 1 as the year of Jesus Christ’s birth, but was off in his estimation by a few years, which is why the best modern estimates place Christ’s birth at 4 B.C.

    According to Charles Seife in his book "Zero: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea": “To Bede, also ignorant of the number zero, the year that came before 1 A.D. [sic] was 1 B.C. There was no year zero. After all, to Bede, zero didn’t exist.”

    However, zero did exist; our modern conception of zero was first published in A.D. 628 by the Indian scholar Brahmagupta. The idea would not spread to medieval Christian Europe, however, until the 11th to 13th centuries."

    can we call you a retard if you do not include a technology not yet known in a post you originate in AD2020, when we look back in 10 years?

    Enjoy the solstice and the return of the sun to the Northern Hemisphere.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @nebulafox
    @Kratoklastes

    >It’s all much of a muchness, considering that everyone just got a few days off to inaccurately celebrate the birth of a fictional Jewish grifter and bullshit artist.

    So Tacitus, who we rely upon for the portrayal of emperors to this day, was covering for a cult dominated by the dregs of society at the time, or the kind of devout Jew that would have been an early Christian would have adopted pagan myths? I don't buy that. Jesus (and Muhammad, for that matter) were not Moses or Achilles. They came from a time period where information was not passed by propagating oral legends over the course of centuries. The evidence doesn't point to mythical origins.

    (I think the answer as to who Jesus "really" was is an utterly mundane one. He was a typical 1st Century Palestinian Jewish apocalyptic: i.e, someone who probably genuinely believed the end times were nigh and did stuff that could have easily led to an agonizing end at the hands of the Roman authorities. This answer would present big problems to today's "mainstream" portrayal of Jesus Christ the Proto-Hippie invoked for whatever political blather is on the tube: for believers and disbelievers alike. So despite fulfilling Occam's razor, it doesn't get much airtime. But then, you could also say that for Jesus the Justifier of Victorian Imperialism. Who the man really was in his time shouldn't be confused with his posthumous portrayals-and thus, importance-in the course of history.)

    Replies: @iffen

  38. The Oookie Mouth Epigone.

  39. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Yeah, too bad the graphs and my own lyin' eyes say otherwise, I.D. As Mr. Fink wrote above, some of these young people, who have more chance of dying from their obesity, political correctness, coformity, and stupidty than the Kung Flu, who are wearing the face diapers even when walking by themselves outside in the bright sunshine and not selling me medicine at the Pets Mart and giving me shit at the health food store. #Retarded and spinless!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Mark G.

    Achmed, I tend to agree with you that young people support more restrictions. They are more liberal than the older generation and have grown up in a more regimented society and are more used to it. But I.D. has a good point in his response to you that this poll might need to be taken with a grain of salt. This is even more true about the black response. I live in a large city around lots of blacks and they observe the current restrictions less than white suburbanites and yet in this poll they say they want more restrictions.

    Another problem with this poll is that it doesn’t define what is meant by more restrictions. When young people respond saying they want more restrictions they might be thinking the government shuts down the business they work at and then pays them to stay at home to do nothing. When you see what the Democrats in Congress are proposing, this appears to be the case.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Mark G.


    But I.D. has a good point in his response to you that this poll might need to be taken with a grain of salt.
     
    What I.D.'s response amounts to is saying that he doesn't like this bit of evidence so he's going to ignore it.

    Which is what most people on the right seem to do these days.
  40. @Dan
    @Talha

    Except that whites don't live the longest. Hispanics live longer and so do Asians. In fact the gap of Hispanics over whites is larger than the gap of Whites over blacks:

    African Americans: 75.54 years
    White Americans: 79.12 years
    Hispanic Americans: 82.89 years
    Asian Americans: 86.67 years

    https://www.thebalance.com/the-racial-life-expectancy-gap-in-the-u-s-4588898#:~:text=African%20Americans%3A%2075.54%20years,Asian%20Americans%3A%2086.67%20years

    Our execrable overlords can't be bothered to check the most basic facts.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

    The Hispanic longevity paradox was destroyed this year by COVID. Google it. Three whole years shaved off hispanic life expectancy in a matter of months. That’s worse than deaths of despair did to whites over decades.

    • Replies: @DanHessinMD
    @JohnPlywood

    JohnPlywood wrote:
    "The Hispanic longevity paradox was destroyed this year by COVID. Google it. Three whole years shaved off hispanic life expectancy in a matter of months. That’s worse than deaths of despair did to whites over decades."

    Incorrect. That is a statistical misunderstanding. That would mean that all Hispanics lost an average of 3 years from COVID.

    https://ourworldindata.org/life-expectancy-how-is-it-calculated-and-how-should-it-be-interpreted

    "An alternative approach consists in estimating the average length of life for a hypothetical cohort assumed to be exposed, from birth through death, to the mortality rates observed at one particular period – commonly a year. This approach leads to what is known as ‘period life expectancy‘ and it is the much more commonly used life expectancy metric. It is the definition used by most international organizations, including the UN and the World Bank, when reporting ‘life expectancy’ figures. Period life expectancy estimates do not take into account how mortality rates are changing over time and instead only reflects the mortality pattern at one point in time. "

    What is going on is that if every year were the COVID mortality year for all 80 years of a Hispanic person's life then they would lose three years of life. That is of course impossible because COVID would burn itself out in perhaps 2 years naturally.

    This actually shows how mild COVID actually is. You could have a similar new global 'pandemic' every single year for the rest of your life and still be expected to live to the ripe old age of 77 instead of 80.

    This is the year of a pandemic and the pandemic is not even the first or second leading cause of death. Only one person in 1000 died of COVID. In the past, this would not even register. In the past you would have been more likely to die of disease in a non-pandemic year! That is, a few generations ago, every single year was worse than COVID, disease-wise. We used to always lose more than 1/1000 to disease. Perhaps we would lose 1/100 to disease in the average year a few generations ago. That would mean the average year of our great great grandparents was 10x worse than our COVID year.

    Nobody understands this.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

  41. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Kratoklastes

    Though I agree with the gist of your reply comment (the beginning), I don't know what's so much better about evil being caused by stupidity rather than old-fashioned greed (for money and/or power). Your Hitler's, your Mao's, your Lenin's, Stalin's and Pol Pots - I don't see what difference it makes whether they were all in it for what the perceived as the good of their own people, though I agree they were. Good intentions + Absolute Power + Stupidity still = EVIL.

    BTW, could you please, please, lose that BCE bit, Krato? If BC/AD was good enough for a couple of thousand years, what's the problem with it now, political correctness?

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Kratoklastes

    I don’t see what difference it makes whether they were all in it for what the perceived as the good of their own people, though I agree they were. Good intentions + Absolute Power + Stupidity still = EVIL.

    I agree 95%: the missing 5% is because ‘evil’ isn’t a useful idea because it’s a vaguely supernatural concept.

    True Believers are far more likely to cross the line to atrocity; zealots are much scarier than sociopathic megalomaniacs. Both are costly, but only the former will personally torture you and set you on fire in the public square.

    So sociopathic megalomaniacs need a cadre of zealots in order to get anything done.

    FWIW I don’t think Hitler was a zealot or a sociopath. He was nominally a vegetarian anti-smoking teetotal equal-rights environmentalist atheist… but departed from all of those things at times, so never got to SJW/soyboy levels of nonsense. He wasn’t terribly fond of Red Sea Pedestrians… again, with a very large number of exceptions.

    His one genuine zealotry was adamantine hatred of hunting for sport: he couldn’t shut his yap about that, even in diplomatic settings.

    (I would still travel back n time and strangle him in his crib if I had the chance, because he was a key figure in Our Enemy, The State.)

  42. @nebulafox
    @Talha

    It speaks volumes that these people would cheerfully let elderly non-white people die as collateral in this process.

    Replies: @Talha

    You know what they say; gotta break a few eggs to make that diversity omelette.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Talha

    We never actually get the omelet, do we? All I ever see is the broken eggshells, and dreams.

    Replies: @Talha

  43. @Kratoklastes
    @Achmed E. Newman


    BTW, could you please, please, lose that BCE bit
     
    I only use BCE/CE because it is more accurate than BC/AD.

    BC/AD is horribly inaccurate for two main reasons:
     • the zero date was chosen arbitrarily (and is inaccurate); and
     • the 'C' and 'D' bits are both fictional.

    'Current Era' doesn't roll off the tongue, but since 'era' defines a period of time from a given starting point, there is no nonsense involved. (I would prefer if there was a Year 0 CE, but that was ruled out because the retards who invented BC/AD fucked up, and the BCE/CE guys wanted to retain historical dates as far as possible).

    It's all much of a muchness, considering that everyone just got a few days off to inaccurately celebrate the birth of a fictional Jewish grifter and bullshit artist.

    Hopefully we ditch all the Magic ManGodMan bullshit sometime in the next half-century, and just start celebrating solstices again.

    Bah humbug. HAIL KEK.


    (I know what the psychocharlatans will be thinking... "Typical - displays the oppositional defiance that is to be expected from an INTJ born in late Γαμηλιών [Gamelion], with high Orneriness : prescribe him a dream-catcher and 4 Seroquil, STAT")

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @TomSchmidt, @nebulafox

    BC/AD is horribly inaccurate for two main reasons:
     • the zero date was chosen arbitrarily (and is inaccurate); and
     • the ‘C’ and ‘D’ bits are both fictional.

    CE/BCE use exactly the same zero date, so they’re not an improvement from that standpoint. It’s nothing but atheist virtue signaling.

    As for fictional, well, you places your bets and you takes your chances.

    • Agree: Rich
  44. In the real world freedom is not all that important to people. Freedom is a luxury good. It’s a slogan.

    I’m not saying freedom is a bad thing. I’m merely saying that for most people there are lots of other things that are much more important.

    Freedom is also to a large extent a meaningless slogan. Most people would tell you that they’re in favour of freedom but if you asked them to explain their ideas on what would constitute a free society you wouldn’t get consistent, coherent or sensible answers.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom

    There are luxury goods and luxury goods. People need to eat and heat their homes in winter, but suggesting that freedom is like owning diamonds is not correct. I work with eastern Europeans, and they will accept diminished QOL before loss of freedom. The fact that many people haven't thought this through in the west is a testament to the extent of the freedoms people have traditionally enjoyed, not to their meaninglessness. If you talked to most Americans in a small discussion group, I think most would quickly converge on a similar set, even if they started out with different definitions/opinions. Perhaps gun control is the one big exception. You should read Scott's book Against the Grain. Before the modern era, many chose freedom over safety.

    Replies: @unit472

  45. @Intelligent Dasein
    I agreed with a comment at iSteve that pretty succinctly reveals the causes behind Steve's airball response to this whole fiasco. The interesting thing is, this commenter has only 100 or so comments (a rather brief posting history) yet he very quickly identified the factors operating within Steve's unusual psychology that give the lie to to the whole HBD universe---something many soi-disant "high IQ" denizens here have been unable to do for years.

    Go ahead and read the comment. Read it and weep. The handle is "Matt Buckalew" and, despite the poor punctuation, I think he nailed it.


    The libertarian right conducted itself with a lot more dignity and level headedness during the pandemic than has the boomer paleo right. Thankfully the pitiful reaction of the boomer paleos has sped up the development of a youth oriented alt right that isn’t obsessed with equity in their house, memories of the space race, and superannuated complacency. Boomer HBDers were especially prone to idiocy because they are so high on their own supppy of soi disant scientific rigor and status anxiety that the cathedral might as well have them on a string.

    Beginning to seem more and more like the boomer right is just people who resent blacks for keeping them off the varsity basketball team but otherwise share most of the cathedrals POV.
     

    Replies: @Wyatt, @Achmed E. Newman, @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @Daniel Williams

    Thankfully the pitiful reaction of the boomer paleos has sped up the development of a youth oriented alt right that isn’t obsessed with equity in their house, memories of the space race, and superannuated complacency.

    Does this youth oriented alt right actually exist? I mean does it exist in meaningful numbers in the real world, outside of the fantasy world of a few UR commenters?

  46. @Adam Smith
    @Jay Fink

    I think it is because younger people grew up in schools with metal detectors and lockdown drills. They cannot remember a time when they could board an airplane without TSA harassment. They are a generation who have not been allowed to play outside without adult supervision or ride a bicycle without a helmet. They have been conditioned to love authoritarianism and obey.

    Replies: @216, @SaneClownPosse

    It might be something to adapt to, rather than fight.

    If authoritarianism is our future, then it benefits us to become a technocratic movement.

  47. @Intelligent Dasein
    I agreed with a comment at iSteve that pretty succinctly reveals the causes behind Steve's airball response to this whole fiasco. The interesting thing is, this commenter has only 100 or so comments (a rather brief posting history) yet he very quickly identified the factors operating within Steve's unusual psychology that give the lie to to the whole HBD universe---something many soi-disant "high IQ" denizens here have been unable to do for years.

    Go ahead and read the comment. Read it and weep. The handle is "Matt Buckalew" and, despite the poor punctuation, I think he nailed it.


    The libertarian right conducted itself with a lot more dignity and level headedness during the pandemic than has the boomer paleo right. Thankfully the pitiful reaction of the boomer paleos has sped up the development of a youth oriented alt right that isn’t obsessed with equity in their house, memories of the space race, and superannuated complacency. Boomer HBDers were especially prone to idiocy because they are so high on their own supppy of soi disant scientific rigor and status anxiety that the cathedral might as well have them on a string.

    Beginning to seem more and more like the boomer right is just people who resent blacks for keeping them off the varsity basketball team but otherwise share most of the cathedrals POV.
     

    Replies: @Wyatt, @Achmed E. Newman, @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @Daniel Williams

    What is the nature of your bizarre and pathetic obsession with Steve Sailer?

    Why do you repeatedly come here to complain about what he—a grown man presumably unrelated to you—says at his blog?

    And the only reason you liked that comment so much is because that guy also writes like a H. P, Lovecraft.

  48. @Mark G.
    The support for restrictions increasing as you get to younger groups who are less likely to die from this is not really surprising.

    Older people over their lives have seen one problem after another trumpeted by politicians and the media as a crisis that requires a major response. Often, if there is no major response, it is later found out that the dire predictions of "The sky is falling!" crowd never come to pass. If there is a major response, the long term costs of the response often end up exceeding the short term benefits. So this is just a case of getting wiser as you get older.

    Younger people just have seen less of life. They are also exposed to a less accurate version of history in schools now than previous generations so are unable to learn the lessons that history has to offer.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Older people over their lives have seen one problem after another trumpeted by politicians and the media as a crisis that requires a major response. Often, if there is no major response, it is later found out that the dire predictions of “The sky is falling!” crowd never come to pass. If there is a major response, the long term costs of the response often end up exceeding the short term benefits. So this is just a case of getting wiser as you get older.

    Yes, I agree.

    Also young people tend to be emotional and idealistic. They see bad stuff happening and they not only think it can be stopped, they think it must be stopped. Right now.

    It’s always been that way. It has nothing to do with any particular generation. Every generation of young people has been prone to idealism and emotionalism.

    The only real difference between the Boomers and Millennials/Zoomers is that the Boomers when young thought that more freedom would fix everything. Millennials/Zoomers think that more authoritarianism will fix everything. But in both cases there’s the same naïve belief that all the problems of the world can be easily fixed.

    • Agree: Daniel Williams
  49. @DanHessinMD
    @DanHessinMD

    The latest proof of the profound intellectual inferiority of our overlords is the inability to get the vaccine to oldsters first. That should be the easiest call imaginable.

    The inability to do the obvious with such an easy call should cast doubt upon our ability to deal (or even recognize) real societal challenges:

    - debt
    - fertility collapse of the right half of the bell curve, worldwide
    - social justice overreach, with present soaring crime among the first results

    Those are the things that can break the back of society, not some virus that has killed just 1 in 1000 Americans. It is only a big deal for oldies, but we cannot even get them a humidifier and a vaccine. What hope is there on real problems?

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @Daniel Williams

    What hope is there on real problems?

    What hope was there ever of the ruling class solving real problems?

    Problems are solved when small numbers of serious people overthrow the existing order that has been perpetuating those problems.

    Why would our rulers change a society that is so clearly working to their benefit? To make your life better?

  50. @dfordoom
    In the real world freedom is not all that important to people. Freedom is a luxury good. It's a slogan.

    I'm not saying freedom is a bad thing. I'm merely saying that for most people there are lots of other things that are much more important.

    Freedom is also to a large extent a meaningless slogan. Most people would tell you that they're in favour of freedom but if you asked them to explain their ideas on what would constitute a free society you wouldn't get consistent, coherent or sensible answers.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    There are luxury goods and luxury goods. People need to eat and heat their homes in winter, but suggesting that freedom is like owning diamonds is not correct. I work with eastern Europeans, and they will accept diminished QOL before loss of freedom. The fact that many people haven’t thought this through in the west is a testament to the extent of the freedoms people have traditionally enjoyed, not to their meaninglessness. If you talked to most Americans in a small discussion group, I think most would quickly converge on a similar set, even if they started out with different definitions/opinions. Perhaps gun control is the one big exception. You should read Scott’s book Against the Grain. Before the modern era, many chose freedom over safety.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @unit472
    @Chrisnonymous

    I don't think so. There was never any shortage of serfs to take the side of their Lord. They would jeer at and fight his enemies because the devil you know etc.Think it was robber baron J. Gould who said he didn't worry about a proletatian upheaval because he could hire his own proletarians to shoot those who would rise up.

    From time to time the ruling class makes such a bollox of things they lose control. Rome had a number of really atrocious Emperors but the Empire soldiered on until there was a foreign enemy they could not subdue. The US was blessed because it had a powerful ally in France and the British king could not bring all his might to bear against Washington's army. I note the US did not return the favor when the French king got in trouble.

  51. @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom

    There are luxury goods and luxury goods. People need to eat and heat their homes in winter, but suggesting that freedom is like owning diamonds is not correct. I work with eastern Europeans, and they will accept diminished QOL before loss of freedom. The fact that many people haven't thought this through in the west is a testament to the extent of the freedoms people have traditionally enjoyed, not to their meaninglessness. If you talked to most Americans in a small discussion group, I think most would quickly converge on a similar set, even if they started out with different definitions/opinions. Perhaps gun control is the one big exception. You should read Scott's book Against the Grain. Before the modern era, many chose freedom over safety.

    Replies: @unit472

    I don’t think so. There was never any shortage of serfs to take the side of their Lord. They would jeer at and fight his enemies because the devil you know etc.Think it was robber baron J. Gould who said he didn’t worry about a proletatian upheaval because he could hire his own proletarians to shoot those who would rise up.

    From time to time the ruling class makes such a bollox of things they lose control. Rome had a number of really atrocious Emperors but the Empire soldiered on until there was a foreign enemy they could not subdue. The US was blessed because it had a powerful ally in France and the British king could not bring all his might to bear against Washington’s army. I note the US did not return the favor when the French king got in trouble.

  52. Interesting tweet from a govt insider, 2/17/20

    I really hadn’t considered that specific scenario.

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
    @Bragadocious

    I always trust reports from third party, anonymous "govt insiders".

    Everybody working for the CIA, NSA, etc., is a "govt insider".

    The first disinformation was that Covid is not flu, and that Covid is extremely contagious.

    Then it was reported deaths from other than Covid, such as motorcycle accidents, etc. were falsely labeled as death due to Covid.

    Now the disinformation is that they mislabled Covid cases as flu cases to suppress Covid numbers.

    Confusion fuels Panic and Fear. They want people to be confused, easier to herd.

    Check the CDC site for symptoms of Covid, then check the CDC site for symptoms of seasonal flu, they have the same symptoms.

    The Covid surges match Flu seasonal surges in prior years.

  53. @unit472
    The odd thing is EVERYONE of us can make the covid restrictions as tight as we want. No visitors, no shopping, no outside dining, mask wearimg are all up to your own discretion. Don't need Anthony Fauci or any other government bureaucrat to mandate those things. Its up to you.

    What isn't up to me is what medicine I can get. I asked my doctor for HCQ and he wouldn't give it to me. He will refill my xanax Rx though no questions asked. Asked for tamiflu a couple of years ago 'just in case' and he said sure. Ask for HCQ and I may as well said could you give me a Rx for some cocaine too! What is it about HCQ that gives doctors so much concern?

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    He could give you an Rx for cocaine. You should ask. It is a prescription drug.
    https://www.rxlist.com/cocaine-drug.htm

  54. @Talha
    @nebulafox

    You know what they say; gotta break a few eggs to make that diversity omelette.

    Peace.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    We never actually get the omelet, do we? All I ever see is the broken eggshells, and dreams.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @TomSchmidt

    That just means they haven’t cracked enough eggs yet, Tom. Have faith in the process.

    Peace.

  55. @Kratoklastes
    @Achmed E. Newman


    BTW, could you please, please, lose that BCE bit
     
    I only use BCE/CE because it is more accurate than BC/AD.

    BC/AD is horribly inaccurate for two main reasons:
     • the zero date was chosen arbitrarily (and is inaccurate); and
     • the 'C' and 'D' bits are both fictional.

    'Current Era' doesn't roll off the tongue, but since 'era' defines a period of time from a given starting point, there is no nonsense involved. (I would prefer if there was a Year 0 CE, but that was ruled out because the retards who invented BC/AD fucked up, and the BCE/CE guys wanted to retain historical dates as far as possible).

    It's all much of a muchness, considering that everyone just got a few days off to inaccurately celebrate the birth of a fictional Jewish grifter and bullshit artist.

    Hopefully we ditch all the Magic ManGodMan bullshit sometime in the next half-century, and just start celebrating solstices again.

    Bah humbug. HAIL KEK.


    (I know what the psychocharlatans will be thinking... "Typical - displays the oppositional defiance that is to be expected from an INTJ born in late Γαμηλιών [Gamelion], with high Orneriness : prescribe him a dream-catcher and 4 Seroquil, STAT")

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @TomSchmidt, @nebulafox

    I would prefer if there was a Year 0 CE, but that was ruled out because the retards who invented BC/AD fucked up

    Thought you were smarter than this.

    https://www.livescience.com/45510-anno-domini.html

    “Dionysius devised his system to replace the Diocletian system, named after the 51st emperor of Rome, who ruled from A.D. 284 to A.D. 305. The first year in Dionysius’ Easter table, “Anno Domini 532,” followed the year “Anno Diocletiani 247.” Dionysius made the change specifically to do away with the memory of this emperor who had been a ruthless persecutor of Christians.”

    “Dionysius attempted to set A.D. 1 as the year of Jesus Christ’s birth, but was off in his estimation by a few years, which is why the best modern estimates place Christ’s birth at 4 B.C.

    According to Charles Seife in his book “Zero: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea”: “To Bede, also ignorant of the number zero, the year that came before 1 A.D. [sic] was 1 B.C. There was no year zero. After all, to Bede, zero didn’t exist.”

    However, zero did exist; our modern conception of zero was first published in A.D. 628 by the Indian scholar Brahmagupta. The idea would not spread to medieval Christian Europe, however, until the 11th to 13th centuries.

    can we call you a retard if you do not include a technology not yet known in a post you originate in AD2020, when we look back in 10 years?

    Enjoy the solstice and the return of the sun to the Northern Hemisphere.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @TomSchmidt

    It's interesting to note how little changed in the Roman state ideology or administration with Christianity's rise as an imperially favored religion in the 4th Century. The big changes were done by Diocletian (and to a limited extent, his predecessors), as you noted. Julian the Apostate wasn't just interested in reversing Constantine, he also wanted to reverse Diocletian, which I think was about as realistic as the Flavians restoring the Republic.

    In the east, where the empire did not collapse in the 5th Century, the big shift came when the Arabs seized 2/3rds of the empire's land and 3/4ths of its wealth.

  56. @TomSchmidt
    @Talha

    We never actually get the omelet, do we? All I ever see is the broken eggshells, and dreams.

    Replies: @Talha

    That just means they haven’t cracked enough eggs yet, Tom. Have faith in the process.

    Peace.

  57. When I pressed a link to this page, I got “Howdy, Audacious Epigone!”, like I was the WordPress admin? I would leave this comment at the Bugs page, but the last time I checked Ron Unz was ignoring my posts.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Nodwink

    It's an issue with latent caching. I appreciate the heads up but as long as you're not able to do anything beyond the dashboard, all is well.

  58. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I do take a lot of polls with grains of salt, I.D. In fact I reported recently on getting polled by Gallup. It was a waste of time for me, at least, and I can't see that Gallup got but one piece of good data out of me. That wasn't my doing, but the doing of whoever made and arranged so many stupid wasteful questions.

    However, I have been out and about regularly throughout this PanicFest, and at least lately, the young people. even college-aged kids (we've had over 1,000 cases of the Kung Flu at the nearby U. - # of hospitalization = 0), seem hysterical about this Kung Flu, maybe more than the older people I know. That was not the case back in May.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    However, I have been out and about regularly throughout this PanicFest, and at least lately, the young people. even college-aged kids (we’ve had over 1,000 cases of the Kung Flu at the nearby U. – # of hospitalization = 0), seem hysterical about this Kung Flu, maybe more than the older people I know. That was not the case back in May.

    I agree. It’s not really surprising. For young people every minor crisis is the worst thing that ever happened, ever. It’s the end of the world. Literally!

    When you get older and you’re told that some new crisis means the end of the world your response tends to be – What, again??!!

    • Agree: SaneClownPosse
  59. @Mark G.
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Achmed, I tend to agree with you that young people support more restrictions. They are more liberal than the older generation and have grown up in a more regimented society and are more used to it. But I.D. has a good point in his response to you that this poll might need to be taken with a grain of salt. This is even more true about the black response. I live in a large city around lots of blacks and they observe the current restrictions less than white suburbanites and yet in this poll they say they want more restrictions.

    Another problem with this poll is that it doesn't define what is meant by more restrictions. When young people respond saying they want more restrictions they might be thinking the government shuts down the business they work at and then pays them to stay at home to do nothing. When you see what the Democrats in Congress are proposing, this appears to be the case.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    But I.D. has a good point in his response to you that this poll might need to be taken with a grain of salt.

    What I.D.’s response amounts to is saying that he doesn’t like this bit of evidence so he’s going to ignore it.

    Which is what most people on the right seem to do these days.

  60. Everything within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state.

    Can’t be allowing any vaccines to go just any old people who want them.

    https://nypost.com/2020/12/26/brooklyn-clinics-face-criminal-probe-over-covid-19-vaccines/amp/

  61. @Adam Smith
    @Jay Fink

    I think it is because younger people grew up in schools with metal detectors and lockdown drills. They cannot remember a time when they could board an airplane without TSA harassment. They are a generation who have not been allowed to play outside without adult supervision or ride a bicycle without a helmet. They have been conditioned to love authoritarianism and obey.

    Replies: @216, @SaneClownPosse

    The “% of positive cases” metric, does that have a fudge factor for false results and a factor for the number of cycles repeated?

  62. @Bragadocious
    Interesting tweet from a govt insider, 2/17/20

    https://twitter.com/Johnheretohelp/status/1229561849282203650

    I really hadn't considered that specific scenario.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    I always trust reports from third party, anonymous “govt insiders”.

    Everybody working for the CIA, NSA, etc., is a “govt insider”.

    The first disinformation was that Covid is not flu, and that Covid is extremely contagious.

    Then it was reported deaths from other than Covid, such as motorcycle accidents, etc. were falsely labeled as death due to Covid.

    Now the disinformation is that they mislabled Covid cases as flu cases to suppress Covid numbers.

    Confusion fuels Panic and Fear. They want people to be confused, easier to herd.

    Check the CDC site for symptoms of Covid, then check the CDC site for symptoms of seasonal flu, they have the same symptoms.

    The Covid surges match Flu seasonal surges in prior years.

  63. @TomSchmidt
    @Kratoklastes


    I would prefer if there was a Year 0 CE, but that was ruled out because the retards who invented BC/AD fucked up
     
    Thought you were smarter than this.

    https://www.livescience.com/45510-anno-domini.html

    "Dionysius devised his system to replace the Diocletian system, named after the 51st emperor of Rome, who ruled from A.D. 284 to A.D. 305. The first year in Dionysius' Easter table, “Anno Domini 532,” followed the year “Anno Diocletiani 247.” Dionysius made the change specifically to do away with the memory of this emperor who had been a ruthless persecutor of Christians."
    ...
    "Dionysius attempted to set A.D. 1 as the year of Jesus Christ’s birth, but was off in his estimation by a few years, which is why the best modern estimates place Christ’s birth at 4 B.C.

    According to Charles Seife in his book "Zero: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea": “To Bede, also ignorant of the number zero, the year that came before 1 A.D. [sic] was 1 B.C. There was no year zero. After all, to Bede, zero didn’t exist.”

    However, zero did exist; our modern conception of zero was first published in A.D. 628 by the Indian scholar Brahmagupta. The idea would not spread to medieval Christian Europe, however, until the 11th to 13th centuries."

    can we call you a retard if you do not include a technology not yet known in a post you originate in AD2020, when we look back in 10 years?

    Enjoy the solstice and the return of the sun to the Northern Hemisphere.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    It’s interesting to note how little changed in the Roman state ideology or administration with Christianity’s rise as an imperially favored religion in the 4th Century. The big changes were done by Diocletian (and to a limited extent, his predecessors), as you noted. Julian the Apostate wasn’t just interested in reversing Constantine, he also wanted to reverse Diocletian, which I think was about as realistic as the Flavians restoring the Republic.

    In the east, where the empire did not collapse in the 5th Century, the big shift came when the Arabs seized 2/3rds of the empire’s land and 3/4ths of its wealth.

  64. @Kratoklastes
    @Achmed E. Newman


    BTW, could you please, please, lose that BCE bit
     
    I only use BCE/CE because it is more accurate than BC/AD.

    BC/AD is horribly inaccurate for two main reasons:
     • the zero date was chosen arbitrarily (and is inaccurate); and
     • the 'C' and 'D' bits are both fictional.

    'Current Era' doesn't roll off the tongue, but since 'era' defines a period of time from a given starting point, there is no nonsense involved. (I would prefer if there was a Year 0 CE, but that was ruled out because the retards who invented BC/AD fucked up, and the BCE/CE guys wanted to retain historical dates as far as possible).

    It's all much of a muchness, considering that everyone just got a few days off to inaccurately celebrate the birth of a fictional Jewish grifter and bullshit artist.

    Hopefully we ditch all the Magic ManGodMan bullshit sometime in the next half-century, and just start celebrating solstices again.

    Bah humbug. HAIL KEK.


    (I know what the psychocharlatans will be thinking... "Typical - displays the oppositional defiance that is to be expected from an INTJ born in late Γαμηλιών [Gamelion], with high Orneriness : prescribe him a dream-catcher and 4 Seroquil, STAT")

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @TomSchmidt, @nebulafox

    >It’s all much of a muchness, considering that everyone just got a few days off to inaccurately celebrate the birth of a fictional Jewish grifter and bullshit artist.

    So Tacitus, who we rely upon for the portrayal of emperors to this day, was covering for a cult dominated by the dregs of society at the time, or the kind of devout Jew that would have been an early Christian would have adopted pagan myths? I don’t buy that. Jesus (and Muhammad, for that matter) were not Moses or Achilles. They came from a time period where information was not passed by propagating oral legends over the course of centuries. The evidence doesn’t point to mythical origins.

    (I think the answer as to who Jesus “really” was is an utterly mundane one. He was a typical 1st Century Palestinian Jewish apocalyptic: i.e, someone who probably genuinely believed the end times were nigh and did stuff that could have easily led to an agonizing end at the hands of the Roman authorities. This answer would present big problems to today’s “mainstream” portrayal of Jesus Christ the Proto-Hippie invoked for whatever political blather is on the tube: for believers and disbelievers alike. So despite fulfilling Occam’s razor, it doesn’t get much airtime. But then, you could also say that for Jesus the Justifier of Victorian Imperialism. Who the man really was in his time shouldn’t be confused with his posthumous portrayals-and thus, importance-in the course of history.)

    • Replies: @iffen
    @nebulafox

    So, what people believe happened is more important than what really happened? Where does that leave people who "know" what happened?

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  65. @Adam Smith
    @DanHessinMD


    – fertility collapse of the right half of the bell curve, worldwide
     
    Fertility is naturally dysgenic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwZ0ZUy7P3E

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Wielgus

    Clevon seems to have more fun.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  66. @nebulafox
    @Kratoklastes

    >It’s all much of a muchness, considering that everyone just got a few days off to inaccurately celebrate the birth of a fictional Jewish grifter and bullshit artist.

    So Tacitus, who we rely upon for the portrayal of emperors to this day, was covering for a cult dominated by the dregs of society at the time, or the kind of devout Jew that would have been an early Christian would have adopted pagan myths? I don't buy that. Jesus (and Muhammad, for that matter) were not Moses or Achilles. They came from a time period where information was not passed by propagating oral legends over the course of centuries. The evidence doesn't point to mythical origins.

    (I think the answer as to who Jesus "really" was is an utterly mundane one. He was a typical 1st Century Palestinian Jewish apocalyptic: i.e, someone who probably genuinely believed the end times were nigh and did stuff that could have easily led to an agonizing end at the hands of the Roman authorities. This answer would present big problems to today's "mainstream" portrayal of Jesus Christ the Proto-Hippie invoked for whatever political blather is on the tube: for believers and disbelievers alike. So despite fulfilling Occam's razor, it doesn't get much airtime. But then, you could also say that for Jesus the Justifier of Victorian Imperialism. Who the man really was in his time shouldn't be confused with his posthumous portrayals-and thus, importance-in the course of history.)

    Replies: @iffen

    So, what people believe happened is more important than what really happened? Where does that leave people who “know” what happened?

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @iffen


    So, what people believe happened is more important than what really happened?
     
    Unfortunately, yes, this often seems to be the case.

    Where does that leave people who “know” what happened?
     
    If what they "know" deviates too far from the official narrative they are likely to be called names.

  67. @JohnPlywood
    @Dan

    The Hispanic longevity paradox was destroyed this year by COVID. Google it. Three whole years shaved off hispanic life expectancy in a matter of months. That's worse than deaths of despair did to whites over decades.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD

    JohnPlywood wrote:
    “The Hispanic longevity paradox was destroyed this year by COVID. Google it. Three whole years shaved off hispanic life expectancy in a matter of months. That’s worse than deaths of despair did to whites over decades.”

    Incorrect. That is a statistical misunderstanding. That would mean that all Hispanics lost an average of 3 years from COVID.

    https://ourworldindata.org/life-expectancy-how-is-it-calculated-and-how-should-it-be-interpreted

    “An alternative approach consists in estimating the average length of life for a hypothetical cohort assumed to be exposed, from birth through death, to the mortality rates observed at one particular period – commonly a year. This approach leads to what is known as ‘period life expectancy‘ and it is the much more commonly used life expectancy metric. It is the definition used by most international organizations, including the UN and the World Bank, when reporting ‘life expectancy’ figures. Period life expectancy estimates do not take into account how mortality rates are changing over time and instead only reflects the mortality pattern at one point in time. ”

    What is going on is that if every year were the COVID mortality year for all 80 years of a Hispanic person’s life then they would lose three years of life. That is of course impossible because COVID would burn itself out in perhaps 2 years naturally.

    This actually shows how mild COVID actually is. You could have a similar new global ‘pandemic’ every single year for the rest of your life and still be expected to live to the ripe old age of 77 instead of 80.

    This is the year of a pandemic and the pandemic is not even the first or second leading cause of death. Only one person in 1000 died of COVID. In the past, this would not even register. In the past you would have been more likely to die of disease in a non-pandemic year! That is, a few generations ago, every single year was worse than COVID, disease-wise. We used to always lose more than 1/1000 to disease. Perhaps we would lose 1/100 to disease in the average year a few generations ago. That would mean the average year of our great great grandparents was 10x worse than our COVID year.

    Nobody understands this.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @DanHessinMD

    *Sigh* ...

    It sure is exhausting, having to interact with people like you.


    Read and weep:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7499775/


    Our findings indicate that as a result of the pandemic, the time-tested Latino paradox has rapidly diminished due to higher COVID-19 mortality among older Latino adults compared to non-Latino Whites. Future research should continue to monitor the impact of COVID-19 to assess the disparate impact of the pandemic on older Black, Latino and non-Latino White adults as additional data become available.
     
    https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.07.12.20148387v3

    The Black and Latino populations are estimated to experience declines in life expectancy at birth of 2.10 and 3.05 years, respectively, both of which are several times the 0.68-year reduction for whites.
     
    This is why people want to censor and politically disenfranchise you.
  68. @iffen
    @nebulafox

    So, what people believe happened is more important than what really happened? Where does that leave people who "know" what happened?

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    So, what people believe happened is more important than what really happened?

    Unfortunately, yes, this often seems to be the case.

    Where does that leave people who “know” what happened?

    If what they “know” deviates too far from the official narrative they are likely to be called names.

  69. @DanHessinMD
    @JohnPlywood

    JohnPlywood wrote:
    "The Hispanic longevity paradox was destroyed this year by COVID. Google it. Three whole years shaved off hispanic life expectancy in a matter of months. That’s worse than deaths of despair did to whites over decades."

    Incorrect. That is a statistical misunderstanding. That would mean that all Hispanics lost an average of 3 years from COVID.

    https://ourworldindata.org/life-expectancy-how-is-it-calculated-and-how-should-it-be-interpreted

    "An alternative approach consists in estimating the average length of life for a hypothetical cohort assumed to be exposed, from birth through death, to the mortality rates observed at one particular period – commonly a year. This approach leads to what is known as ‘period life expectancy‘ and it is the much more commonly used life expectancy metric. It is the definition used by most international organizations, including the UN and the World Bank, when reporting ‘life expectancy’ figures. Period life expectancy estimates do not take into account how mortality rates are changing over time and instead only reflects the mortality pattern at one point in time. "

    What is going on is that if every year were the COVID mortality year for all 80 years of a Hispanic person's life then they would lose three years of life. That is of course impossible because COVID would burn itself out in perhaps 2 years naturally.

    This actually shows how mild COVID actually is. You could have a similar new global 'pandemic' every single year for the rest of your life and still be expected to live to the ripe old age of 77 instead of 80.

    This is the year of a pandemic and the pandemic is not even the first or second leading cause of death. Only one person in 1000 died of COVID. In the past, this would not even register. In the past you would have been more likely to die of disease in a non-pandemic year! That is, a few generations ago, every single year was worse than COVID, disease-wise. We used to always lose more than 1/1000 to disease. Perhaps we would lose 1/100 to disease in the average year a few generations ago. That would mean the average year of our great great grandparents was 10x worse than our COVID year.

    Nobody understands this.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

    *Sigh*

    It sure is exhausting, having to interact with people like you.

    Read and weep:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7499775/

    Our findings indicate that as a result of the pandemic, the time-tested Latino paradox has rapidly diminished due to higher COVID-19 mortality among older Latino adults compared to non-Latino Whites. Future research should continue to monitor the impact of COVID-19 to assess the disparate impact of the pandemic on older Black, Latino and non-Latino White adults as additional data become available.

    https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.07.12.20148387v3

    The Black and Latino populations are estimated to experience declines in life expectancy at birth of 2.10 and 3.05 years, respectively, both of which are several times the 0.68-year reduction for whites.

    This is why people want to censor and politically disenfranchise you.

  70. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Supply and Demand

    "White people exiled in China will be the n*****s of the Orient."

    - John Lennon, oops, Xi Jinping

    Replies: @Adam Smith, @Supply and Demand

    there are already actual n*****s of the orient, though. In Guangzhou.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Supply and Demand

    There were 20,000 or so, in a city of 40,000,000, a vertitable drop. That'd make the city still yellower (at 99.98%) than any city in the US is white, I mean anywhere, Idaho, Vermont, you name it. I think I see what you're up to, S&D, haha...

    BTW, I thought lots of them had been kicked back home some years ago. There was a big brew-haha 10 years ago as the Chinese cops rounded up people on expired visas. (Hey, now there's an idea! Quick, someone call Washington!)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  71. @Supply and Demand
    @Achmed E. Newman

    there are already actual n*****s of the orient, though. In Guangzhou.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    There were 20,000 or so, in a city of 40,000,000, a vertitable drop. That’d make the city still yellower (at 99.98%) than any city in the US is white, I mean anywhere, Idaho, Vermont, you name it. I think I see what you’re up to, S&D, haha…

    BTW, I thought lots of them had been kicked back home some years ago. There was a big brew-haha 10 years ago as the Chinese cops rounded up people on expired visas. (Hey, now there’s an idea! Quick, someone call Washington!)

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Dang, that 1 in 2,000 would be 99.95%. I did it in my head wrong. I'm glad you're not a math teacher. ;-}

  72. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Supply and Demand

    There were 20,000 or so, in a city of 40,000,000, a vertitable drop. That'd make the city still yellower (at 99.98%) than any city in the US is white, I mean anywhere, Idaho, Vermont, you name it. I think I see what you're up to, S&D, haha...

    BTW, I thought lots of them had been kicked back home some years ago. There was a big brew-haha 10 years ago as the Chinese cops rounded up people on expired visas. (Hey, now there's an idea! Quick, someone call Washington!)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Dang, that 1 in 2,000 would be 99.95%. I did it in my head wrong. I’m glad you’re not a math teacher. ;-}

  73. @Achmed E. Newman
    Thank you so much, A.E., for your common sense and perspective regarding this PanicFest. We're all in those light-blue and red bars together.

    BTW, do you have a number for total Americans who took the poll, to match your headline?

    I think it would be cool to have this same graphic, which I've seen multiple times at airports, with the word "terrorism" struck out but visible and "virus" there. I don't want to burden the readers with a long video just for one scene*, but it reminds me of Les Nessman of WKRP (in Cincinnati) pulling out his ready-for-broadcast Communist invasion emergency report and substituting "tornadoes" for "Communists".

    What color do we have to get down to before we can take our stupid face diapers off for a spell? Just asking for a friend.

    Merry Christmas, Audacious Epigone and commenters!



    .


    * I've tried to put starts and ends in the youtube links, which works on my site, but no joy as embedded here. Anyone here got this working?

    Replies: @Apollo 20, @Audacious Epigone

    Since moving over to UR, which uses WordPress, I’ve not been able to get it to work. The start is fine, but the end doesn’t take.

    Re: the number who took the poll and answered this question, it’s 1,025 (that’s the N = in the graph).

  74. @Dumbo
    @Intelligent Dasein


    The libertarian right conducted itself with a lot more dignity and level headedness during the pandemic than has the boomer paleo right.
     
    While I'm not the biggest fan of libertarianism (it could work, maybe, in a world with only high-IQ white people, and even then...), Ron Paul and other libertarians were right on Covid, while the response by almost the rest of the whole political spectrum has been mostly disappointing.

    The thing people don't get about the Covid farce, is that it's not a "virus" that is the problem. It's the stupid response with "lockdowns" and "masks" and the whole paraphernalia of authoritarian measures. Imagine if nothing had been done at all, and people were simply free to take their own precautions as they always have with flu/cold/any other disease etc.

    Would things have been much worse? I really don't think so.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    They did that in South Dakota, Sweden, and after a few months, Florida. The results are in. They didn’t do any worse.

  75. @Nodwink
    When I pressed a link to this page, I got "Howdy, Audacious Epigone!", like I was the Wordpress admin? I would leave this comment at the Bugs page, but the last time I checked Ron Unz was ignoring my posts.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    It’s an issue with latent caching. I appreciate the heads up but as long as you’re not able to do anything beyond the dashboard, all is well.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Audacious Epigone Comments via RSS