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Does your faith in the integrity of the electoral process need shoring up? Spend more time in academia:

Four other responses–“a moderate amount” (28%), “only a little” (15%), “none at all” (11%), and “not sure” (11%)–were offered, so maybe it’s not as bad as it looks at first blush.

On the other hand, if Americans lose trust in the most fundamental aspect of democracy, serious questions about the legitimacy of the social order arise. The colonists successfully seceded from the British empire and the South unsuccessfully attempted to secede from the North on a perceived lack of representation in the bodies governing them. It’s a recipe for revolution.

Parenthetically, it’s curious how under the yoke of a putative dictator, Democrats are more sanguine about electoral integrity than Republicans are. In actual authoritarian regimes, the authoritarian doesn’t worry about being voted out of power.

Nearly half the country, and an overwhelming majority of Republicans, suspect voting by mail will “increase voter fraud”:

The reason we presage a breaking dollar is the same reason we presage the coming political dissolution of the US–deceleration has become almost unfathomable. QEternity and perpetually negative real rates of interest with regards to the former, continual escalation in the Culture War with respect to the latter. There are no brakes on either of them and there never will be.

There is a lot of ruin in a nation and her currency. But not an infinite amount. The gods of the copybook headings are on their way home.

 
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  1. continual escalation in the Culture War with respect to the latter. There are no brakes on either of them and there never will be.

    If the billionaires and the mega-corporations decide that the Cultural Revolution is a threat to their interests it will be stopped dead in its tracks. The Cultural Revolutionaries will find that their money tap has been turned off. All those professional political activists will have to get jobs waiting tables. Without those political activists to provide leadership the Cultural Revolution will disappear like the morning mist.

    Like most (possibly all) revolutions the Cultural Revolution is a top-down revolution. And it requires money. Lots and lots of money.

    And it requires media support. If the elites decide they want it stopped the media will turn on a dime and start denouncing the Cultural Revolutionaries as terrorists and dangerous extremists.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @dfordoom

    >If the billionaires and the mega-corporations decide that the Cultural Revolution is a threat to their interests it will be stopped dead in its tracks.

    Could not agree more. The upper-middle class that is the major ideological force in the Democratic Party essentially trades a pressure filed credential gathering young adulthood-and much steeper consequences for any slip-up on that path-in exchange for a shadow of oligarch life.

    >Like most (possibly all) revolutions the Cultural Revolution is a top-down revolution. And it requires money. Lots and lots of money.

    Does the actual Cultural Revolution count? The worst atrocities-seriously sick stuff, including cannibalism-in that period in China took place in Guangxi. That's down south near the Vietnamese border, far away from Beijing and Shanghai, which is part of why it isn't remembered much by outsiders. The evidence suggests that it was more motivated by local Communist party bosses and the mob than any premeditated plan by the central government.

    Interestingly, the PRC doesn't try to deny the legacy of the Cultural Revolution at all, mainly because nobody sane in China wants that to ever happen again. It's deeply illuminating that in 1989, both sides accused each other of aping the tactics of that period, protesters and government alike.

    Replies: @ic1000

  2. My interpretation is that highly educated democrats of color are pretty sure this thing’s legit in the bag while less educated melanin-challenged republicans are pretty sure it’s illegitimately going to be stolen via mail fraud. And my savings may as well be virtual peanuts considering I can’t even eat it for sustinence. Sweet

  3. The first chart in particular also proves that there are indeed some notions that are so profoundly stupid that it requires a PhD to believe in them. Piled High and Deep enough and they’ll insist it smells like a bouquet of roses. The product of a fine higher edumacation. Anyone up for a nice half-million loan for that first-rate degree in whiteness studies?? Rates have never been lower!!

    • Replies: @Realist
    @Exalted Cyclops


    Piled High and Deep enough and they’ll insist it smells like a bouquet of roses. The product of a fine higher edumacation.
     
    With exemption of STEM studies...or at least it use to be that way.
  4. In this case, the old definitions of academic degrees hold true:

    B.S. = Bull Shit

    M.S. = More Shit

    Ph.D. = Piled higher and Deeper

    • LOL: Rosie
    • Replies: @Rosie
    @Buzz Mohawk

    https://youtu.be/oBIxGjSHzF8

  5. America has more lax voting standards than countries like India or South Africa. Of course this is on purpose because fraudulent elections are a feature not bug of the US system, the people that say voter fraud can’t happen with sending in it via mail (which is a ridiculous idea) say so because they don’t sincerely care about fraud, they just want their party to win at all costs.

  6. I don’t know how anyone could think this is a ‘free and fair’ election. The Democratic primary was openly rigged by Obama, making a mockery of the process. The only Americans I respect are those who take no part in this charade.

  7. @dfordoom

    continual escalation in the Culture War with respect to the latter. There are no brakes on either of them and there never will be.
     
    If the billionaires and the mega-corporations decide that the Cultural Revolution is a threat to their interests it will be stopped dead in its tracks. The Cultural Revolutionaries will find that their money tap has been turned off. All those professional political activists will have to get jobs waiting tables. Without those political activists to provide leadership the Cultural Revolution will disappear like the morning mist.

    Like most (possibly all) revolutions the Cultural Revolution is a top-down revolution. And it requires money. Lots and lots of money.

    And it requires media support. If the elites decide they want it stopped the media will turn on a dime and start denouncing the Cultural Revolutionaries as terrorists and dangerous extremists.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    >If the billionaires and the mega-corporations decide that the Cultural Revolution is a threat to their interests it will be stopped dead in its tracks.

    Could not agree more. The upper-middle class that is the major ideological force in the Democratic Party essentially trades a pressure filed credential gathering young adulthood-and much steeper consequences for any slip-up on that path-in exchange for a shadow of oligarch life.

    >Like most (possibly all) revolutions the Cultural Revolution is a top-down revolution. And it requires money. Lots and lots of money.

    Does the actual Cultural Revolution count? The worst atrocities-seriously sick stuff, including cannibalism-in that period in China took place in Guangxi. That’s down south near the Vietnamese border, far away from Beijing and Shanghai, which is part of why it isn’t remembered much by outsiders. The evidence suggests that it was more motivated by local Communist party bosses and the mob than any premeditated plan by the central government.

    Interestingly, the PRC doesn’t try to deny the legacy of the Cultural Revolution at all, mainly because nobody sane in China wants that to ever happen again. It’s deeply illuminating that in 1989, both sides accused each other of aping the tactics of that period, protesters and government alike.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    @nebulafox

    China scholar Tanner Greer just posted an erudite essay on the distinctly different drivers. of the Cultural Revolution (Mao’s attack on the institutions of that society) and the Great Awokening (attacks sponsored by this society’s institutions).

    Replies: @nebulafox

  8. OTOH, what are the number of soft-sciency people vs. hard-sciency people in that PhD bar?

    Still, when doing your PhD you better concentrate on the task and double-think hard. Not pretending that outside your focus bubble all manner of bullshit is coming down and it’s maybe time to take a deeper look for your own safety will tend to drive you to dangerous levels of distraction.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @El Dato


    OTOH, what are the number of soft-sciency people vs. hard-sciency people in that PhD bar?
     
    Excellent question...same for college grad bar.
  9. If those polls reflect our reality, I find it slightly disturbing that those who are the most educated are the ones who most think this or any election can and will be held fairly. The ones that answered the upcoming election will be fair could’ve been asked if they think our society is fair, and if not, why would the election be? I think the best we can hope for is that they are held according to the law, which is something different.

    • Replies: @anon
    @adreadline

    If those polls reflect our reality, I find it slightly disturbing that those who are the most educated are the ones who most think this or any election can and will be held fairly.

    Category error. Many people with advanced degrees are not educated at all. They are merely trained.

    Rather like this:

    https://media.giphy.com/media/13cf8QRSe1Fx60/giphy.gif

    , @A123
    @adreadline


    I find it slightly disturbing that those who are the most educated are the ones who most think this or any election can and will be held fairly.
     
    My guess is... they are giving the answer that supports their position.

    They understand that elections are rigged. And, they also believe they are rigged in favor of their preferred SJW Globalist DNC. Thus, they give the answer supporting their "Elite PhD Privilege".

    Is lying to a pollster a sin?

    PEACE 😇
  10. Amazing how the folks with the longer history of stealing elections have the most faith that the system will result in fair elections.

    • Agree: Realist
  11. @nebulafox
    @dfordoom

    >If the billionaires and the mega-corporations decide that the Cultural Revolution is a threat to their interests it will be stopped dead in its tracks.

    Could not agree more. The upper-middle class that is the major ideological force in the Democratic Party essentially trades a pressure filed credential gathering young adulthood-and much steeper consequences for any slip-up on that path-in exchange for a shadow of oligarch life.

    >Like most (possibly all) revolutions the Cultural Revolution is a top-down revolution. And it requires money. Lots and lots of money.

    Does the actual Cultural Revolution count? The worst atrocities-seriously sick stuff, including cannibalism-in that period in China took place in Guangxi. That's down south near the Vietnamese border, far away from Beijing and Shanghai, which is part of why it isn't remembered much by outsiders. The evidence suggests that it was more motivated by local Communist party bosses and the mob than any premeditated plan by the central government.

    Interestingly, the PRC doesn't try to deny the legacy of the Cultural Revolution at all, mainly because nobody sane in China wants that to ever happen again. It's deeply illuminating that in 1989, both sides accused each other of aping the tactics of that period, protesters and government alike.

    Replies: @ic1000

    China scholar Tanner Greer just posted an erudite essay on the distinctly different drivers. of the Cultural Revolution (Mao’s attack on the institutions of that society) and the Great Awokening (attacks sponsored by this society’s institutions).

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @ic1000

    Wow! That's a fascinating blog: thanks for sharing it with me!

  12. Does your faith in the integrity of the electoral process need shoring up?

    There is nothing that will shore up my faith in the electoral process. The problems of the US will not be solved through voting.

  13. @El Dato
    OTOH, what are the number of soft-sciency people vs. hard-sciency people in that PhD bar?

    Still, when doing your PhD you better concentrate on the task and double-think hard. Not pretending that outside your focus bubble all manner of bullshit is coming down and it's maybe time to take a deeper look for your own safety will tend to drive you to dangerous levels of distraction.

    Replies: @Realist

    OTOH, what are the number of soft-sciency people vs. hard-sciency people in that PhD bar?

    Excellent question…same for college grad bar.

  14. @Exalted Cyclops
    The first chart in particular also proves that there are indeed some notions that are so profoundly stupid that it requires a PhD to believe in them. Piled High and Deep enough and they'll insist it smells like a bouquet of roses. The product of a fine higher edumacation. Anyone up for a nice half-million loan for that first-rate degree in whiteness studies?? Rates have never been lower!!

    Replies: @Realist

    Piled High and Deep enough and they’ll insist it smells like a bouquet of roses. The product of a fine higher edumacation.

    With exemption of STEM studies…or at least it use to be that way.

  15. Sailer recently had a post on the decline of COVID-19 mortality where he doesn’t mention seasonality. AE, in the spring you promised a full post on COVID and humidity which I look forward to in your good time. I know you are busy but a treatment that cuts the case fatality rate by an order of magnitude sits before us.

    That was the finding of a group of 51 scientists in this new paper:

    https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.07.11.20147157v2.full.pdf

    “Severity of COVID-19 in Europe decreased significantly between March and May and the seasonality of COVID-19 is the most likely explanation. Mucosal barrier and mucociliary clearance can significantly decrease viral load and disease progression, and their inactivation by low relative humidity of indoor air might significantly contribute to severity of the disease. ”

    Innate respiratory immunity is impaired in conditions of low humidity, as has been shown extensively in this large review of the literature by a group led by renowned virologist Professor Akiko Iwasaki of Yale University. In fact, this may be the most comprehensive review of respiratory infection seasonality published anywhere:

    https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev-virology-012420-022445

    Here’s what I wrote over at Sailer:

    I believe the purpose of this post is to drive me insane. Me personally.

    “If this really was a peak for deaths, it looks like the Case Fatality Rate has dropped about, say, 75% since April, due to some uncertain combination of more testing and better treatment. ”

    Literally no mention of the large herd of elephants milling about the room. Is the seasonality obvious only to me?

    Just look at these numbers (see table below) fresh from this morning from worldometers.info :

    In Florida deaths/confirmed case is 0.015 but in New York it is 0.073. Is Florida medicine and age profile so much better than New York’s? Florida is a very old state and medicine is not regarded as more advanced in Florida than in New York. Both had to deal with COVID early and Florida’s age profile is particularly skewed old. In fact Florida is typically the retirement destination for aging New Yorkers.

    In Mississippi deaths/confirmed case is 0.028 but in Massachusetts it is 0.072. Is Mississippi medicine and age profile so much better than Massachusetts’s? Mississippi is very poor and 40% black, and known to lag socioeconomically. Massachusetts is very wealthy and just 7% black, and known for its advanced medicine and socioeconomic success. If anything, you would expect a much higher CFR in Mississippi than in Massachusetts. But Massachusetts has cold winters, which translates into dry indoor air in the colder months.

    In Georgia and Alabama, deaths/confirmed case are 0.019 and 0.017 respectively. In Michigan and Connecticut they are 0.069 and 0.088 respectively. Is Georgia so much younger and medically superior to Michigan? Is impoverished and 30% black Alabama so much younger and more medically advanced than wealthy Connecticut which is just 10% black? Of course not. You would expect Alabama to have a much higher CFR than Connecticut, but instead it is more than 5 times lower. This is an incredibly dramatic difference that is inexplicable until you realize that humidity (including indoor humidity) is such a dominant factor for COVID-19 survival.

    People buy humidifiers for respiratory health. They have been doing this for generations. This isn’t snake oil. We see mortality drop by 75% in the summer and humidity is the only available variable because everyone is inside most of the time and the temperature indoors is 72 degrees year round.

    This is a sophisticated practical joke on me by the operators of the simulation right? It cannot be that the most blindingly obvious remedy to this once in a century pandemic, indoor humidification in winter, is obvious only to me, can it?

    Maybe the dramatic decline in COVID mortality across the northern hemisphere is just God’s special grace, with no natural cause.

    • Agree: gabriel alberton
    • Thanks: John Achterhof
    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @DanHessinMD

    I ran the numbers and there was no correlation at the state or national levels, at least as of a couple of months ago. We featured your pointing to this paper a couple of weeks ago as well.

  16. The various percentages probably have a lot to do with motivated reasoning. The Dems and Postgrads think they are going to win, so they think it is fair. If they thought Trump were going to win they would be screaming about fraud.

    Did that even need saying?

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @another fred

    Everyone knew McCain was dead in the water, I don't remember anything about it then. Instead, at least some Republicans accepted that the Iraq War was a disaster and it should not be repeated if they wanted to win future elections.

    The underlying issue is that the subscribers to magazines had to have things like a bit of money and a regular address. But anyone can get on the idiot screen and blare out their "thoughts." As the audience got dumber, opinion makers adjusted their ideas to appeal to the new average.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @John Achterhof
    @another fred

    My thought exactly. They think that Biden will win, that the outcome ought to be accepted, and generally that anything that makes the process of voting easier & less of a time commitment is a good thing in increasing participation - and benefits Democrats. Motivated reasoning on both sides.

  17. The CHARLES PEWITT write-in campaign for president of the USA will not let Bernie from Brooklyn Sanders out-bash the billionaires!

    Not gonna happen Bernie!

    The CHARLES PEWITT write-in campaign for president is now calling for a 97.1775% Wealth Tax on all billionaires and all university endowments and all corporations and all hedge funds and the like…you get the picture.

    What would William the Conqueror do?

    Willy would tax the billionaires so hard their pips would start squeaking!

    The William the Conqueror Wealth Tax will help pay for the Pewitt Conjured Loot Portion(PCLP).

    The Pewitt Conjured Loot Portion(PCLP) will pay each American who has all blood ancestry born in colonial America or the USA before 1924 a cool ten thousand dollars a month. The US Treasury and the Federal Reserve Bank shall work together to conjure up the cash out of thin air, just like the ruling class is doing now.

  18. @another fred
    The various percentages probably have a lot to do with motivated reasoning. The Dems and Postgrads think they are going to win, so they think it is fair. If they thought Trump were going to win they would be screaming about fraud.

    Did that even need saying?

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @John Achterhof

    Everyone knew McCain was dead in the water, I don’t remember anything about it then. Instead, at least some Republicans accepted that the Iraq War was a disaster and it should not be repeated if they wanted to win future elections.

    The underlying issue is that the subscribers to magazines had to have things like a bit of money and a regular address. But anyone can get on the idiot screen and blare out their “thoughts.” As the audience got dumber, opinion makers adjusted their ideas to appeal to the new average.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Alexander Turok

    I wasn't old enough to vote in 2008, but I don't think who the GOP nominated mattered: there was no way America was going to elect him. That summer and the summer after, I couldn't get a job: no one in my particularly hard impacted part of the country seemed to be able to. It was an incredibly petty problem to have and I made the best of a bad situation by doing odd yard work for neighbors, but it wasn't the same kind of cash and independence that could have made a positive impact on my personality. On a more serious level, lot of parents were losing theirs-I was incredibly fortunate compared to some of my peers. All this on the heels of debacles ranging from Baghdad to New Orleans. So, the deep undercurrent of anti-Republican sentiment at the time in the Rust Belt is hard to underrate. The deeply weird pseudo-deification of Obama in the MSM was hardly necessary for the Democrats to win in 2008.

    The interesting thing is that Clinton messed up 2008 just like she would eventually mess up 2016 to a challenger that was arguably starting off from a far weaker point than Trump did. She just isn't a good politician, never has been. I'm astounded at how many Democrats refuse to accept that, even four years later.

    > Instead, at least some Republicans accepted that the Iraq War was a disaster and it should not be repeated if they wanted to win future elections.

    I didn't see that. IMO, the absolute refusal of the Republican Party's cognoscenti to acknowledge just how much of a trainwreck Dubya's Presidency was nominated Trump as much anything.

    I still remember watching the South Carolina debate on TV when ME policy came up. The moment when the stage started to praise Bush and the donor packed audience booed Trump for pointing out the obvious about Iraq-that was the moment I knew Trump was going to win the nomination. South Carolina is home to Parris Island: it's about as pro-military and conservative and hawkish as you are going to find. Yet even there, people knew that Iraq was a disaster, and Trump duly stormed to victory: it really underpinned just how disconnected from reality the GOPe had become.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Alexander Turok

    "accepted that the Iraq war was a disaster..."

    A disaster? Nonsense. Not to its instigators, it wasn't; for them, it was a smashing success.

    The Jews got everything they wanted, and more.

  19. On the other hand, if Americans lose trust in the most fundamental aspect of democracy, serious questions about the legitimacy of the social order arise. The colonists successfully seceded from the British empire and the South unsuccessfully attempted to secede from the North on a perceived lack of representation in the bodies governing them. It’s a recipe for revolution.

    The elections in New Hampshire are decently run by mostly ethical and honest people starting with the Secretary of State, but I have no faith that other states and cities and regions and sections of the USA are on the up-and-up in regards to elections.

    I like to say the colonists seceded from the British Empire because the American colonists did not want to unseat George the Third or the monarchy — they wanted a test of strength and a test of will to prove to the English they meant business. The colonists knew they would have to contend with the European empires and the British Empire after they successfully separated from crown and parliament and the British navy.

    The Southern states wanted to secede from the Northern states and they didn’t care who ruled New York or Boston and they were following the lead of the Northerners who plotted to secede from the Union over the War of 1812 and other matters — Hartford Convention.

    The Hartford Convention was a bunch of Northern money-grubbing treasonites who wanted to get big fat cash from the federal government for trade-related grievances and they were looking to split the union. Sort of like the current crop of money-grubbing hogs who screamed for the Federal Reserve Bank to buy corporate bonds and mortgage-backed securities and the like over the last ten years or so.

    Maritime Bourgeoisie or Maritime History of Massachusetts kind of stuff. Samuel Eliot Morison.

    The reason we presage a breaking dollar is the same reason we presage the coming political dissolution of the US–deceleration has become almost unfathomable. QEternity and perpetually negative real rates of interest with regards to the former, continual escalation in the Culture War with respect to the latter. There are no brakes on either of them and there never will be.

    The dollar is a dodo and some guy who follows currencies and commodities and ruling classes has moved to inland New England instead of coastal New England and that says he thinks population centers will be problematic when the dollar speeds up its downward death spiral.

    Monetary extremism inevitably leads to currency collapse and implosion, and the ruling class of the American Empire is standing on the monetary extremism gas pedal something fierce.

    I wrote this on March 16 2020 about this central banker shysterism monetary extremism crud:

    The asset bubbles in stocks and bonds and real estate — commercial and residential — must be allowed to undergo PRICE DISCOVERY unhindered by the anti-capitalist machinations of the globalized central banker shysters.

    This is the third frigging asset bubble, starting in the 1990s, that the plutocrat- and privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank has inflated using monetary extremism — low or zero or negative interest rates, asset purchases, quantitative easing, dollar swaps, direct central bank purchases of sovereign and corporate debt, balance sheet ballooning, bailouts…etc. — and enough is enough, DAMMIT!

    A lot of sonsofabitches are saying they want this thing that is so-called “capitalism” and I say give it to ’em with both barrels. Stop the monetary extremism from the Fed and you greedy stupid boneheads will get your damn “capitalism.”

    There is no “capitalism,” you damn dirty ape fools, there is only globalized central banker shysterism. You can’t have any damn thing called “capitalism” when you have a debt-based fiat currency system. The greedy and immoral and evil ones will always use the electronics of an electronic debt-based fiat currency system to their advantage and they don’t give a frigging damn about what is in the best interests of the nation as a whole.

    The hostile and evil and immoral JEW/WASP ruling class of the American Empire is actively engaged in attacking and destroying the USA using globalization and fiancialization and mass legal immigration and mass illegal immigration and globalized trade deal scams and monetary policy and foreign policy and tax policy as a political weapon to kill the historic American nation and to attack and destroy the European Christian ancestral core of the USA.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/taleb-on-why-panic-is-good/#comment-3774628

    There is a lot of ruin in a nation and her currency. But not an infinite amount. The gods of the copybook headings are on their way home.

    IMPLODE THIS MONETARY EXTREMIST MONSTROSITY NOW!

    Break on through to the other side of this monetary extremist crap like a baby boomer speed freak on meth and conjure up the trillions of dollars now! Jim Morrison in Hartford Baby! Break on through to levels of monetary madness never before seen in the history of central banking, DAMMIT! Okay, the internet says the admiral’s son Jim Morrison got arrested in New Haven, but New England states ain’t that big like out West, so Hartford is close to new Haven — less than 40 miles.

    Most experts that I have talked to agree that the Pewitt Conjured Loot Portion(PCLP) is the only way forward for the USA.

    The Pewitt Conjured Loot Portion(PCLP) will pay each American who has all blood ancestry born in colonial America or the USA before 1924 a cool ten thousand dollars a month. The US Treasury and the Federal Reserve Bank shall work together to conjure up the cash out of thin air, just like the ruling class is doing now.

  20. anon[834] • Disclaimer says:
    @adreadline
    If those polls reflect our reality, I find it slightly disturbing that those who are the most educated are the ones who most think this or any election can and will be held fairly. The ones that answered the upcoming election will be fair could've been asked if they think our society is fair, and if not, why would the election be? I think the best we can hope for is that they are held according to the law, which is something different.

    Replies: @anon, @A123

    If those polls reflect our reality, I find it slightly disturbing that those who are the most educated are the ones who most think this or any election can and will be held fairly.

    Category error. Many people with advanced degrees are not educated at all. They are merely trained.

    Rather like this:

  21. @adreadline
    If those polls reflect our reality, I find it slightly disturbing that those who are the most educated are the ones who most think this or any election can and will be held fairly. The ones that answered the upcoming election will be fair could've been asked if they think our society is fair, and if not, why would the election be? I think the best we can hope for is that they are held according to the law, which is something different.

    Replies: @anon, @A123

    I find it slightly disturbing that those who are the most educated are the ones who most think this or any election can and will be held fairly.

    My guess is… they are giving the answer that supports their position.

    They understand that elections are rigged. And, they also believe they are rigged in favor of their preferred SJW Globalist DNC. Thus, they give the answer supporting their “Elite PhD Privilege”.

    Is lying to a pollster a sin?

    PEACE 😇

  22. the South unsuccessfully attempted to secede from the North on a perceived lack of representation in the bodies governing them.

    This is not accurate. Slave states had been “in control” of the Union since the beginning. They lost (were losing control), and giddy up let’s have a war.

    • Disagree: Cloudbuster
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @iffen

    This simply isn't true. There was no particular pattern of north-south Presidential voting before the fateful 1860, election maybe 1856 to a degree, though Buchanon's win was bolstered by victories in Illinois, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, all non-slave states.

    The Northern states' overall representation far outmatched the southern states. It's significant that even if all the electoral votes for Breckenridge, Bell and Douglas had gone to one candidate, Lincoln still would have won.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_presidential_election_results_by_state

    The South was also constitutionally hamstrung by the 3/5 Compromise.

    And, economically, the cotton boom in the South was a pretty short-term phenomenon countered by the much larger and longer-lasting industrial boom in the North. The very reason that the North won the war is that it simply had the money, population and industrial capacity to outdo the South in every way.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @iffen

  23. “if Americans lose trust in the most fundamental aspect of democracy, …”

    That already happened, way back in 2000, when we discovered that voters can’t even figure out how to punch clean holes in hollerith cards.

    The most fundamental aspect of democracy is having an electorate that is moral, rational, and well educated and informed. We don’t have that anymore. We have immoral, irrational, poorly educated greedy mobs and power-thirsty factions.

  24. @Buzz Mohawk
    In this case, the old definitions of academic degrees hold true:

    B.S. = Bull Shit

    M.S. = More Shit

    Ph.D. = Piled higher and Deeper

    Replies: @Rosie

  25. @ic1000
    @nebulafox

    China scholar Tanner Greer just posted an erudite essay on the distinctly different drivers. of the Cultural Revolution (Mao’s attack on the institutions of that society) and the Great Awokening (attacks sponsored by this society’s institutions).

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Wow! That’s a fascinating blog: thanks for sharing it with me!

  26. @Alexander Turok
    @another fred

    Everyone knew McCain was dead in the water, I don't remember anything about it then. Instead, at least some Republicans accepted that the Iraq War was a disaster and it should not be repeated if they wanted to win future elections.

    The underlying issue is that the subscribers to magazines had to have things like a bit of money and a regular address. But anyone can get on the idiot screen and blare out their "thoughts." As the audience got dumber, opinion makers adjusted their ideas to appeal to the new average.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I wasn’t old enough to vote in 2008, but I don’t think who the GOP nominated mattered: there was no way America was going to elect him. That summer and the summer after, I couldn’t get a job: no one in my particularly hard impacted part of the country seemed to be able to. It was an incredibly petty problem to have and I made the best of a bad situation by doing odd yard work for neighbors, but it wasn’t the same kind of cash and independence that could have made a positive impact on my personality. On a more serious level, lot of parents were losing theirs-I was incredibly fortunate compared to some of my peers. All this on the heels of debacles ranging from Baghdad to New Orleans. So, the deep undercurrent of anti-Republican sentiment at the time in the Rust Belt is hard to underrate. The deeply weird pseudo-deification of Obama in the MSM was hardly necessary for the Democrats to win in 2008.

    The interesting thing is that Clinton messed up 2008 just like she would eventually mess up 2016 to a challenger that was arguably starting off from a far weaker point than Trump did. She just isn’t a good politician, never has been. I’m astounded at how many Democrats refuse to accept that, even four years later.

    > Instead, at least some Republicans accepted that the Iraq War was a disaster and it should not be repeated if they wanted to win future elections.

    I didn’t see that. IMO, the absolute refusal of the Republican Party’s cognoscenti to acknowledge just how much of a trainwreck Dubya’s Presidency was nominated Trump as much anything.

    I still remember watching the South Carolina debate on TV when ME policy came up. The moment when the stage started to praise Bush and the donor packed audience booed Trump for pointing out the obvious about Iraq-that was the moment I knew Trump was going to win the nomination. South Carolina is home to Parris Island: it’s about as pro-military and conservative and hawkish as you are going to find. Yet even there, people knew that Iraq was a disaster, and Trump duly stormed to victory: it really underpinned just how disconnected from reality the GOPe had become.

    • Agree: Alexander Turok
  27. @iffen
    the South unsuccessfully attempted to secede from the North on a perceived lack of representation in the bodies governing them.

    This is not accurate. Slave states had been "in control" of the Union since the beginning. They lost (were losing control), and giddy up let's have a war.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

    This simply isn’t true. There was no particular pattern of north-south Presidential voting before the fateful 1860, election maybe 1856 to a degree, though Buchanon’s win was bolstered by victories in Illinois, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, all non-slave states.

    The Northern states’ overall representation far outmatched the southern states. It’s significant that even if all the electoral votes for Breckenridge, Bell and Douglas had gone to one candidate, Lincoln still would have won.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_presidential_election_results_by_state

    The South was also constitutionally hamstrung by the 3/5 Compromise.

    And, economically, the cotton boom in the South was a pretty short-term phenomenon countered by the much larger and longer-lasting industrial boom in the North. The very reason that the North won the war is that it simply had the money, population and industrial capacity to outdo the South in every way.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Cloudbuster

    It's important to stress that when the Constitution was being hammered out, the majority of people there thought slavery was going to go the same way as indentured servitude within a few decades. The 1808 law against further slave importation was designed with this in mind. Nobody could have predicted the Haitian Revolution, for example: it's hard to overstate how much that scared the crap out of slaveholders.

    Virginia was actually on board for an earlier date, but Georgia and South Carolina objected, hence 1808.

    >The very reason that the North won the war is that it simply had the money, population and industrial capacity to outdo the South in every way.

    Bingo. In the South, the guys who might have otherwise been building railroads or starting up factories still went into agriculture, because that was still the route to upward mobility. An archaic, deliberately retarded economic system reliant on slave labor couldn't compete with modernity, and the war proved that in the most clear terms possible. You don't need to rely off America as an example of the failings of agrarian oligarchal economies, just look at Russia and serfdom, or the Ostflucht in Germany.

    There were Southerners who utterly detested the plantation aristocracy that was the driving force behind the Confederacy while still having deeply racist views about blacks, BTW. Andrew Johnson was one of them.

    Replies: @Sher Singh

    , @iffen
    @Cloudbuster

    You are ignorant of history.

    Replies: @Talha

  28. @Cloudbuster
    @iffen

    This simply isn't true. There was no particular pattern of north-south Presidential voting before the fateful 1860, election maybe 1856 to a degree, though Buchanon's win was bolstered by victories in Illinois, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, all non-slave states.

    The Northern states' overall representation far outmatched the southern states. It's significant that even if all the electoral votes for Breckenridge, Bell and Douglas had gone to one candidate, Lincoln still would have won.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_presidential_election_results_by_state

    The South was also constitutionally hamstrung by the 3/5 Compromise.

    And, economically, the cotton boom in the South was a pretty short-term phenomenon countered by the much larger and longer-lasting industrial boom in the North. The very reason that the North won the war is that it simply had the money, population and industrial capacity to outdo the South in every way.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @iffen

    It’s important to stress that when the Constitution was being hammered out, the majority of people there thought slavery was going to go the same way as indentured servitude within a few decades. The 1808 law against further slave importation was designed with this in mind. Nobody could have predicted the Haitian Revolution, for example: it’s hard to overstate how much that scared the crap out of slaveholders.

    Virginia was actually on board for an earlier date, but Georgia and South Carolina objected, hence 1808.

    >The very reason that the North won the war is that it simply had the money, population and industrial capacity to outdo the South in every way.

    Bingo. In the South, the guys who might have otherwise been building railroads or starting up factories still went into agriculture, because that was still the route to upward mobility. An archaic, deliberately retarded economic system reliant on slave labor couldn’t compete with modernity, and the war proved that in the most clear terms possible. You don’t need to rely off America as an example of the failings of agrarian oligarchal economies, just look at Russia and serfdom, or the Ostflucht in Germany.

    There were Southerners who utterly detested the plantation aristocracy that was the driving force behind the Confederacy while still having deeply racist views about blacks, BTW. Andrew Johnson was one of them.

    • Replies: @Sher Singh
    @nebulafox

    Corvinus already debunked this. The west industrialized off cotton.

  29. @Alexander Turok
    @another fred

    Everyone knew McCain was dead in the water, I don't remember anything about it then. Instead, at least some Republicans accepted that the Iraq War was a disaster and it should not be repeated if they wanted to win future elections.

    The underlying issue is that the subscribers to magazines had to have things like a bit of money and a regular address. But anyone can get on the idiot screen and blare out their "thoughts." As the audience got dumber, opinion makers adjusted their ideas to appeal to the new average.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “accepted that the Iraq war was a disaster…”

    A disaster? Nonsense. Not to its instigators, it wasn’t; for them, it was a smashing success.

    The Jews got everything they wanted, and more.

  30. @another fred
    The various percentages probably have a lot to do with motivated reasoning. The Dems and Postgrads think they are going to win, so they think it is fair. If they thought Trump were going to win they would be screaming about fraud.

    Did that even need saying?

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @John Achterhof

    My thought exactly. They think that Biden will win, that the outcome ought to be accepted, and generally that anything that makes the process of voting easier & less of a time commitment is a good thing in increasing participation – and benefits Democrats. Motivated reasoning on both sides.

  31. “Nearly half the country, and an overwhelming majority of Republicans, suspect voting by mail will “increase voter fraud”.”

    Hate facts, here, get your hate facts.

    https://www.sacbee.com/opinion/article243473206.html

  32. “Does your faith in the integrity of the electoral process need shoring up? Spend more time in academia”

    There are not many independent thinkers in academia any longer. Most have been forced out or retired. The academic is a serial group thinker. Like the politicians, they live in a bubble.

    They have a job no matter how mediocre they are, and they still get paid no matter how little they produce. They do not have to produce for the market. They do not have to compete with other workers or other firms. Their salary is safe.

    Much like Karl Marx who sat home all day writing and drinking wine while his expenses were paid by his family’s business, the politician /academic are same, their expense are paid by the hard work of others. They do not produce anything scarce or useful for the public. They live off the production of the producers.

  33. @Cloudbuster
    @iffen

    This simply isn't true. There was no particular pattern of north-south Presidential voting before the fateful 1860, election maybe 1856 to a degree, though Buchanon's win was bolstered by victories in Illinois, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, all non-slave states.

    The Northern states' overall representation far outmatched the southern states. It's significant that even if all the electoral votes for Breckenridge, Bell and Douglas had gone to one candidate, Lincoln still would have won.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_presidential_election_results_by_state

    The South was also constitutionally hamstrung by the 3/5 Compromise.

    And, economically, the cotton boom in the South was a pretty short-term phenomenon countered by the much larger and longer-lasting industrial boom in the North. The very reason that the North won the war is that it simply had the money, population and industrial capacity to outdo the South in every way.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @iffen

    You are ignorant of history.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @iffen

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVxJ016xb4Q

    Peace.

    Replies: @iffen

  34. @iffen
    @Cloudbuster

    You are ignorant of history.

    Replies: @Talha

    Peace.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Talha

    I know. People's belief about history has a commonality with religion; one can actually believe whatever pops into the mind. There really are people who think that the War wasn't fought over the issue of slavery.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  35. The Democrats expect mail in ballots to be their key to victory.

    This may be the most fraudulent and possibly last election.

    Voting doesn’t change things at all.

    People are growing TIRED and IMPATIENT of this Failed System.

    Its good that it is now morally and fiscally bankrupt.

    Do not expect any more “peaceful” transfers of power.

    The levers of power are now UP FOR GRABS.

  36. From the chart:

    Men: 36%
    Women: 33%

    Yet…..

    Democrats: 48%
    Republicans: 30%

    Such discordance, especially considering the fact that substantially more women are Democrat then men. Is this data correct?

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @anon

    There aren't crosstabs for the YouGov poll so it's speculation, but you're correct about it not following the usual partisan trend. Perhaps conservative women are especially distrusting of the process.

  37. @Talha
    @iffen

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVxJ016xb4Q

    Peace.

    Replies: @iffen

    I know. People’s belief about history has a commonality with religion; one can actually believe whatever pops into the mind. There really are people who think that the War wasn’t fought over the issue of slavery.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @iffen


    People’s belief about history has a commonality with religion; one can actually believe whatever pops into the mind. There really are people who think that the War wasn’t fought over the issue of slavery.
     
    There are lots of those people right here at UR.

    The idea that beliefs should be tested against actual evidence is now considered hopelessly outdated. And there don't seem to be many people left who can distinguish between evidence that is actually convincing and evidence that is clearly nonsense.

    The amount of craziness at UR seems to be growing day by day. The crazies are feeding off each other.

    I guess it's probably the same in mental hospitals. You put enough crazy people together and their craziness blossoms into ever more exotic blooms of lunacy.

    Replies: @iffen

  38. @iffen
    @Talha

    I know. People's belief about history has a commonality with religion; one can actually believe whatever pops into the mind. There really are people who think that the War wasn't fought over the issue of slavery.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    People’s belief about history has a commonality with religion; one can actually believe whatever pops into the mind. There really are people who think that the War wasn’t fought over the issue of slavery.

    There are lots of those people right here at UR.

    The idea that beliefs should be tested against actual evidence is now considered hopelessly outdated. And there don’t seem to be many people left who can distinguish between evidence that is actually convincing and evidence that is clearly nonsense.

    The amount of craziness at UR seems to be growing day by day. The crazies are feeding off each other.

    I guess it’s probably the same in mental hospitals. You put enough crazy people together and their craziness blossoms into ever more exotic blooms of lunacy.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @dfordoom

    And there don’t seem to be many people left who can distinguish between evidence that is actually convincing and evidence that is clearly nonsense.

    Distinguishing between fact and opinion does seem to be a milestone. Now, about that global warming ...

  39. @dfordoom
    @iffen


    People’s belief about history has a commonality with religion; one can actually believe whatever pops into the mind. There really are people who think that the War wasn’t fought over the issue of slavery.
     
    There are lots of those people right here at UR.

    The idea that beliefs should be tested against actual evidence is now considered hopelessly outdated. And there don't seem to be many people left who can distinguish between evidence that is actually convincing and evidence that is clearly nonsense.

    The amount of craziness at UR seems to be growing day by day. The crazies are feeding off each other.

    I guess it's probably the same in mental hospitals. You put enough crazy people together and their craziness blossoms into ever more exotic blooms of lunacy.

    Replies: @iffen

    And there don’t seem to be many people left who can distinguish between evidence that is actually convincing and evidence that is clearly nonsense.

    Distinguishing between fact and opinion does seem to be a milestone. Now, about that global warming …

  40. Distinguishing between fact and opinion does seem to be a milestone. Now, about that global warming …

    Yes, that’s a good example of getting confused between facts (climate does change) and opinion (if climate changes it must be our fault).

    HBD is another good example – a mixture of facts, unsupported hypotheses and mere opinion.

    In both cases people start out with a politically motivated belief and then cherry-pick evidence to support that belief.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @dfordoom

    There are short cycles and long cycles of cold and warm. AFAIK we don't know where we are in these cycles. Our industrial activities are adding to the warm. Are we adding to a warm cycle or are we blunting a cold cycle? Who knows? When the permafrost melts it might get your attention.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  41. @dfordoom

    Distinguishing between fact and opinion does seem to be a milestone. Now, about that global warming …
     
    Yes, that's a good example of getting confused between facts (climate does change) and opinion (if climate changes it must be our fault).

    HBD is another good example - a mixture of facts, unsupported hypotheses and mere opinion.

    In both cases people start out with a politically motivated belief and then cherry-pick evidence to support that belief.

    Replies: @iffen

    There are short cycles and long cycles of cold and warm. AFAIK we don’t know where we are in these cycles. Our industrial activities are adding to the warm. Are we adding to a warm cycle or are we blunting a cold cycle? Who knows? When the permafrost melts it might get your attention.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @iffen


    There are short cycles and long cycles of cold and warm. AFAIK we don’t know where we are in these cycles. Our industrial activities are adding to the warm. Are we adding to a warm cycle or are we blunting a cold cycle? Who knows?
     
    If we're blunting a cold cycle that's a good thing. In fact essential for our survival. In that case we would need to burn as many fossil fuels as possible. We would need to increase those carbon emissions! We would need to ban green energy.

    And that scenario is just as likely as that we're adding to a warm cycle.

    Even more likely is that the effect of our activities is insignificant. If the climate is going to change it will change regardless of what we do.

    Either way, getting hysterical about global warming is bonkers. We know so little about how climate works that the sane option is to do nothing. If we try to do something we may make things worse. Or, most likely, we will cut our own economic throats for nothing.

    People might as well get hysterical about the possibility of an asteroid strike.

    Climate change hysteria is one of the periodic outbursts of mass hysteria that are part and parcel of life. It's like the great Satanic Ritual Abuse hysteria of a few decades ago. In fact it's very similar since it's yet another moral panic. People are simply prone to mass hysteria and moral panics. People always have been, but 24/7 cable news and social media means we get more frequent and more severe outbursts of mass hysteria.

    Replies: @iffen

  42. @iffen
    @dfordoom

    There are short cycles and long cycles of cold and warm. AFAIK we don't know where we are in these cycles. Our industrial activities are adding to the warm. Are we adding to a warm cycle or are we blunting a cold cycle? Who knows? When the permafrost melts it might get your attention.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    There are short cycles and long cycles of cold and warm. AFAIK we don’t know where we are in these cycles. Our industrial activities are adding to the warm. Are we adding to a warm cycle or are we blunting a cold cycle? Who knows?

    If we’re blunting a cold cycle that’s a good thing. In fact essential for our survival. In that case we would need to burn as many fossil fuels as possible. We would need to increase those carbon emissions! We would need to ban green energy.

    And that scenario is just as likely as that we’re adding to a warm cycle.

    Even more likely is that the effect of our activities is insignificant. If the climate is going to change it will change regardless of what we do.

    Either way, getting hysterical about global warming is bonkers. We know so little about how climate works that the sane option is to do nothing. If we try to do something we may make things worse. Or, most likely, we will cut our own economic throats for nothing.

    People might as well get hysterical about the possibility of an asteroid strike.

    Climate change hysteria is one of the periodic outbursts of mass hysteria that are part and parcel of life. It’s like the great Satanic Ritual Abuse hysteria of a few decades ago. In fact it’s very similar since it’s yet another moral panic. People are simply prone to mass hysteria and moral panics. People always have been, but 24/7 cable news and social media means we get more frequent and more severe outbursts of mass hysteria.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @dfordoom

    You are telling me stuff that I already know.

    I am trying to get you to acknowledge factual information. There is global warming. Human activities are adding to this warming,

  43. @dfordoom
    @iffen


    There are short cycles and long cycles of cold and warm. AFAIK we don’t know where we are in these cycles. Our industrial activities are adding to the warm. Are we adding to a warm cycle or are we blunting a cold cycle? Who knows?
     
    If we're blunting a cold cycle that's a good thing. In fact essential for our survival. In that case we would need to burn as many fossil fuels as possible. We would need to increase those carbon emissions! We would need to ban green energy.

    And that scenario is just as likely as that we're adding to a warm cycle.

    Even more likely is that the effect of our activities is insignificant. If the climate is going to change it will change regardless of what we do.

    Either way, getting hysterical about global warming is bonkers. We know so little about how climate works that the sane option is to do nothing. If we try to do something we may make things worse. Or, most likely, we will cut our own economic throats for nothing.

    People might as well get hysterical about the possibility of an asteroid strike.

    Climate change hysteria is one of the periodic outbursts of mass hysteria that are part and parcel of life. It's like the great Satanic Ritual Abuse hysteria of a few decades ago. In fact it's very similar since it's yet another moral panic. People are simply prone to mass hysteria and moral panics. People always have been, but 24/7 cable news and social media means we get more frequent and more severe outbursts of mass hysteria.

    Replies: @iffen

    You are telling me stuff that I already know.

    I am trying to get you to acknowledge factual information. There is global warming. Human activities are adding to this warming,

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  44. @DanHessinMD
    Sailer recently had a post on the decline of COVID-19 mortality where he doesn't mention seasonality. AE, in the spring you promised a full post on COVID and humidity which I look forward to in your good time. I know you are busy but a treatment that cuts the case fatality rate by an order of magnitude sits before us.

    That was the finding of a group of 51 scientists in this new paper:

    https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.07.11.20147157v2.full.pdf

    "Severity of COVID-19 in Europe decreased significantly between March and May and the seasonality of COVID-19 is the most likely explanation. Mucosal barrier and mucociliary clearance can significantly decrease viral load and disease progression, and their inactivation by low relative humidity of indoor air might significantly contribute to severity of the disease. "

    Innate respiratory immunity is impaired in conditions of low humidity, as has been shown extensively in this large review of the literature by a group led by renowned virologist Professor Akiko Iwasaki of Yale University. In fact, this may be the most comprehensive review of respiratory infection seasonality published anywhere:

    https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev-virology-012420-022445

    Here's what I wrote over at Sailer:
    ---

    I believe the purpose of this post is to drive me insane. Me personally.

    “If this really was a peak for deaths, it looks like the Case Fatality Rate has dropped about, say, 75% since April, due to some uncertain combination of more testing and better treatment. ”

    Literally no mention of the large herd of elephants milling about the room. Is the seasonality obvious only to me?

    Just look at these numbers (see table below) fresh from this morning from worldometers.info :

    In Florida deaths/confirmed case is 0.015 but in New York it is 0.073. Is Florida medicine and age profile so much better than New York’s? Florida is a very old state and medicine is not regarded as more advanced in Florida than in New York. Both had to deal with COVID early and Florida’s age profile is particularly skewed old. In fact Florida is typically the retirement destination for aging New Yorkers.

    In Mississippi deaths/confirmed case is 0.028 but in Massachusetts it is 0.072. Is Mississippi medicine and age profile so much better than Massachusetts’s? Mississippi is very poor and 40% black, and known to lag socioeconomically. Massachusetts is very wealthy and just 7% black, and known for its advanced medicine and socioeconomic success. If anything, you would expect a much higher CFR in Mississippi than in Massachusetts. But Massachusetts has cold winters, which translates into dry indoor air in the colder months.

    In Georgia and Alabama, deaths/confirmed case are 0.019 and 0.017 respectively. In Michigan and Connecticut they are 0.069 and 0.088 respectively. Is Georgia so much younger and medically superior to Michigan? Is impoverished and 30% black Alabama so much younger and more medically advanced than wealthy Connecticut which is just 10% black? Of course not. You would expect Alabama to have a much higher CFR than Connecticut, but instead it is more than 5 times lower. This is an incredibly dramatic difference that is inexplicable until you realize that humidity (including indoor humidity) is such a dominant factor for COVID-19 survival.

    People buy humidifiers for respiratory health. They have been doing this for generations. This isn’t snake oil. We see mortality drop by 75% in the summer and humidity is the only available variable because everyone is inside most of the time and the temperature indoors is 72 degrees year round.

    This is a sophisticated practical joke on me by the operators of the simulation right? It cannot be that the most blindingly obvious remedy to this once in a century pandemic, indoor humidification in winter, is obvious only to me, can it?

    Maybe the dramatic decline in COVID mortality across the northern hemisphere is just God’s special grace, with no natural cause.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    I ran the numbers and there was no correlation at the state or national levels, at least as of a couple of months ago. We featured your pointing to this paper a couple of weeks ago as well.

  45. @nebulafox
    @Cloudbuster

    It's important to stress that when the Constitution was being hammered out, the majority of people there thought slavery was going to go the same way as indentured servitude within a few decades. The 1808 law against further slave importation was designed with this in mind. Nobody could have predicted the Haitian Revolution, for example: it's hard to overstate how much that scared the crap out of slaveholders.

    Virginia was actually on board for an earlier date, but Georgia and South Carolina objected, hence 1808.

    >The very reason that the North won the war is that it simply had the money, population and industrial capacity to outdo the South in every way.

    Bingo. In the South, the guys who might have otherwise been building railroads or starting up factories still went into agriculture, because that was still the route to upward mobility. An archaic, deliberately retarded economic system reliant on slave labor couldn't compete with modernity, and the war proved that in the most clear terms possible. You don't need to rely off America as an example of the failings of agrarian oligarchal economies, just look at Russia and serfdom, or the Ostflucht in Germany.

    There were Southerners who utterly detested the plantation aristocracy that was the driving force behind the Confederacy while still having deeply racist views about blacks, BTW. Andrew Johnson was one of them.

    Replies: @Sher Singh

    Corvinus already debunked this. The west industrialized off cotton.

  46. @anon
    From the chart:

    Men: 36%
    Women: 33%

    Yet.....

    Democrats: 48%
    Republicans: 30%


    Such discordance, especially considering the fact that substantially more women are Democrat then men. Is this data correct?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    There aren’t crosstabs for the YouGov poll so it’s speculation, but you’re correct about it not following the usual partisan trend. Perhaps conservative women are especially distrusting of the process.

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