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As if the imploding American empire doesn’t have enough explosives along its foundations as is, there has been a marked bipartisan increase in hostility towards the world’s ascendant second pole over the last four years:

The setup for a spectacular American collapse is nearly complete. If China makes a move on Taiwan, a move on US treasuries, or both, the rot at the center of the American system will be exposed for the world to see.

For all the cultural imperialism abroad and cultural erasure at home the American empire has perpetrated, I’m still overtaken by sadness. This was the greatest country on earth. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrims’ pride, from every mountain side, let freedom ring. It isn’t any longer. It never will be again.

 
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  1. It will, but probably not within our lifetimes.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Catdog

    https://i.imgur.com/jR3THAG.jpg

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Showmethereal

  2. AE — you are a brilliant guy, but I’d like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can’t produce anything anymore, I don’t think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That’s how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi’s), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon’s gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin’ incredible.

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home — while it may seem a little degenerate — has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air… when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can’t stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn’t crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Troll: Supply and Demand
    • Replies: @Malenfant
    @DanHessinMD


    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

     

    Here you expose considerable ignorance. China's consumer markets -- particularly 1688, JD, and TaoBao -- are vastly superior. They are less centralized, with much more variety, cheaper prices, and more customer base diversity. (A huge fraction of 1688's clientele are in industry, looking for chemicals or industrial equipment.) Buying goods from those Chinese markets is just as easy as it is on Amazon, and shipping is just as fast, if not faster. Customer service is immediately responsive, almost 24/7. Reviews are usually trustworthy, and can only be left by people who have genuinely purchased the products in question.

    What's more, and this is perhaps the most important point, those Chinese markets actually benefit local Chinese small businesses, whereas Amazon is rightly famous for fucking over American small businesses, especially if they're in the brick-and-mortar space.

    I regularly patronize both American and Chinese consumer markets, and China has the clear edge here, by a mile.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD, @Live from China

    , @Anonymous
    @DanHessinMD

    @ Twinkie


    AE is a low T trans-woman in denial, he has a habit of making hysterical blog posts with no basis in reality, just his strange emotional fluctuations.


    In reality the USA is doing just fine and China is hobbling along, still unable to provide enough protein to its citizens to survive. As a former member of PeakOil.com, I've seen hysterical anti-American doomers come and go for nearly 20 years. They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.

    Replies: @Jackbnimbl, @anonymous, @Eugene Norman, @anon, @Audacious Epigone

    , @Boomthorkell
    @DanHessinMD

    I would never knock China, as it's people, land, and society really do habe a lot going for them (and always have), but you're absolutely right about our food security, and ultimately the security of our population here.

    No matter how terrible things get, or nuts and internally oppressive society and the systems around us become, when they change and go away, we remain a fertile, resource rich continent-sized Island. When we hit rock-bottom, it will not be the rock-bottom of countries that can't feed themselves, and we will only be able to move up.

    Basically, when we shed the weight of our empire, we will be greater and happier than ever before, unlike the poor nations who, when they loss their empire, become meat for the vultures to pick over.

    As for Twinkie, you can't knock his poetry!

    I get melancholic too, and have said about the same thing. That melancholy is an important step and point of spiritual rest, I think. From there, one can move on to the boundless optimism of what to do next!

    What can be restored, renewed, reformed, and revolutionized!

    , @Joe Paluka
    @DanHessinMD

    When the Titanic hit the iceberg, the engines were running and full of steam, the hoppers still had lots of coal, the band was still playing, there was lots of food to eat and the ship was still on course and the designers said it was unsinkable. The view from the bridge was very rosy, what they couldn't see was that multiple compartments were breached and starting to fill with water. The ship sank in 2 hours. If you don't like the Titanic example, I 'll refer to how rosy everything looked in 1929, everyone thought prosperity would last forever, it didn't and didn't return until 1946. The US was in better shape in every way in 1929 than it is today. It was much better prepared to stick together as a nation because it wasn't being torn apart by a phony pandemic and enormous racial divisions like today.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    , @bro3886
    @DanHessinMD

    You think any of this will matter when AOC is President and Stacy Abrams is Secretary of State? When you have a third-world population you'll be a third-world country, full stop. That's the real cause of America's decline and none of the things you mention are relevant in comparison.

    , @Realist
    @DanHessinMD


    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.
     
    This is useless data, for so many reasons. For one US GDP data is rigged.

    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home.
     
    It is corrupt and controlled by the government

    A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.
     
    The Chinese can get anything we can...much cheaper.

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.
     
    China has plenty of space with four times the population and a higher average IQ. In the US only the elite have gigantic homes

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.
     
    Again the GDP number is made up. And only an idiot would think the US faired better than China.

    You sure do live in a goddamn dream world.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Liberty Mike

    , @Liberty Mike
    @DanHessinMD

    Upon basis do you asseverate that American food is higher quality than China's.

    Is your position predicated upon the hordes of horizontally challenged one finds at Food Lion, Krogers, or Walmart?

    Is your contention informed by the bounty of ADM?

    Is your take based on the ubiquity of HFC and MSG in our food products?

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @DanHessinMD

    GDP:

    Yes, it's interesting, but I wonder if it can last. My brother manages a shop that was considered necessary and avoided lockdowns. They were able to do business all year until just recently they ran out of product. Supply chains and storage finally petered out, and they cannot meet customer demand anymore. I imagine there must be others in similar situation. For example, recently, as computer nerds will tell you, we have started having problems with the consumer PC market. Prices are going up and some things are unavailable. How long can the current situation escalate before starting to effect the rest of the economy? I don't know.

    Food security:

    The US's cheap protein comes from agricultural practices that are environmentally degenerative and probably unsustainable in the medium-to-long-term (and also unethically abusive of animals, although that is sustainable). Moreover, the entire food system is shot through with problems, from excessive water requirements to subsidized production of empty calories. There negative externalities that are not taken into account in food prices. We also have only a fraction of China's population. If adopt immigration practices designed to make us economically and militarily competitive with China in the long run (a la Matt Yglesias 1,000,000,000 Americans), the food production will not look so good.

    People:

    There were some studies a few years ago that show Hispanic immigrant families don't build savings or go to university at comparable rates to the native population, even into the third generation. China also doesn't have to deal with an African population that is constantly at risk of undermining its urban centers for reasons both social/economic (Detroit) and political (NYC). I don't know how China will deal with its structural demographic problems, but the basic human capital they are dealing with is better quality than ours already and the trends are in the wrong direction for us (not to mention the political and social problems from diversity, such as DIE ideology).

    , @Supply and Demand
    @DanHessinMD

    This is pretty weak hasbara.

    The rest of the replies cover most points I would riposte with (particularly Malefan's) -- but as far as the business side, take a look at Amazon's global market share vis-a-vis Alibaba. 37% vs 69% within their home borders. The American oligarchs are giving their best go at snuffing out all their domestic competition (unlike China) and still getting 1-hit-KO'd by what was formerly Jack Ma's copycat. The student has eclipsed the master -- and not needed to surrender the national interest in doing so.

    Replies: @showmethereal

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @DanHessinMD

    At the risk of sounding like a jerk, I never made any predictions about GDP. I wouldn't because it's such an easy figure for the Fed to goose. Pump trillions into the system without paying for them and one consequence will be an increase in GDP. That money has to be spent somewhere. I still think consumer prices are going up in a big way.

  3. @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Here you expose considerable ignorance. China’s consumer markets — particularly 1688, JD, and TaoBao — are vastly superior. They are less centralized, with much more variety, cheaper prices, and more customer base diversity. (A huge fraction of 1688’s clientele are in industry, looking for chemicals or industrial equipment.) Buying goods from those Chinese markets is just as easy as it is on Amazon, and shipping is just as fast, if not faster. Customer service is immediately responsive, almost 24/7. Reviews are usually trustworthy, and can only be left by people who have genuinely purchased the products in question.

    What’s more, and this is perhaps the most important point, those Chinese markets actually benefit local Chinese small businesses, whereas Amazon is rightly famous for fucking over American small businesses, especially if they’re in the brick-and-mortar space.

    I regularly patronize both American and Chinese consumer markets, and China has the clear edge here, by a mile.

    • Agree: GomezAdddams
    • Thanks: showmethereal
    • Replies: @DanHessinMD
    @Malenfant

    Your comment got my attention.

    "Buying goods from those Chinese markets is just as easy as it is on Amazon, and shipping is just as fast, if not faster. Customer service is immediately responsive, almost 24/7. Reviews are usually trustworthy, and can only be left by people who have genuinely purchased the products in question."

    The Chinese system copied the American system, lock stock and barrel. OMG, you order everything through a website, and there are even online product reviews. And you have to have bought the product to leave a review! Genius! Why didn't we think of that?

    Your bragging about China got me to read up.

    I came across this:
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-shipping-china-both-fast-cheap-jons-slemmer-%E9%98%B3%E6%96%AF-?articleId=6694538695984472065

    And the key thing I noticed was this image:
    https://media-exp1.licdn.com/dms/image/C5612AQHMwrewBr_zUA/article-inline_image-shrink_1500_2232/0/1596102940623?e=1624492800&v=beta&t=whawfGuK9It7lpLk_uMzKc_0Pb21jdJ_L-cQlA1nmRg

    Look at the image on the left. What is that? It is Amazon's warehouse automation and robotics system, which is covered by probably hundreds of patents all over the world, ILLEGALLY STOLEN BY CHINA almost identically.

    For reference, here is the genuine article, invented in America before it was stolen by China.

    https://cms.qz.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/kivarobotamazon.jpeg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1600&h=900&crop=1

    The robots are exactly the same, the shelves are the same, even the markings are the same. 100% ILLEGAL intellectual property theft, not a speck of creativity unless you count yellow robots instead of orange as innovation. I thought I had made a new discovery of IP theft, but actually it is a known problem to Amazon. I actually contacted one of the inventors of this system and I asked about this thinking I was providing an important tip (true). Apparently Amazon knows but isn't engaging because this is China and China is that lawless.

    China set up 402 fulfillment centers like this, copying Amazon's fulfillment centers exactly.

    It's infuriating.

    Yes, tell me about how China has such vastly superior ecommerce. Yes, do tell me about my "considerable ignorance" about how our online order fulfillment is so inferior to China's.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @V. K. Ovelund, @Boomthorkell

    , @Live from China
    @Malenfant

    I live in China and the sites you mentioned are sewers. The quality of the products and services available to Americans are amazing in comparison. Moreover, the United States has a lower cost of living than China by a country mile.

  4. It never will be again.

    With all due respect, you are not a prophet. You don’t know what the future holds. So long as good men draw breath, there is always a chance of renewal.

    I know things look (and are) grim right now, but I suggest for everyone a bit less “doom masturbation” and more productive and fruitful thinking and actions.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @anon
    @Twinkie


    "With all due respect, you are not a prophet. You don’t know what the future holds. So long as good men draw breath, there is always a chance of renewal."
     
    Some guy, Rome 450 AD: Rome will never be the same. True.

    Some guy, Soviet Union 1990: The Soviet Union will never be same. True.

    Some guy, America 2020: America will never be the same. Also true.

    One need not be a prophet to see the obvious. America literally is not America anymore, not with these demographics. America was based on its founding people, their culture, and various compatible European groups. Other groups had essentially zero political representation and made only a minor contribution to the culture, with was overwhelmingly British and broadly European.

    Now, that's all but gone. You can see it in the culture, too. White Americans prided freedom, including unpopular speech. Even if the government didn't always hold up to that standard, there was essentially a broad consensus on the subject, for political speech at least. But now America is practically an authoritarian regime that jails people for their tweets and censors the regime's enemies from the internet (when they aren't doxxing and promoting violence against them). What changed? America changed. The coastal elites are drunk on non-White American demographic power. They can't lose elections now, so they can do whatever they want -- purge the military, pack the Supreme Court and overthrow the constitution. Polls show non-Whites care much less about free speech for ideas they find offensive, so there is no longer enough demographic push back to keep the regime from outlawing those ideas.

    I could draw similar parallels to the movie industry and how it no longer makes anything good; it can depend on easily-impressed Hispanics and immigrants who care much less about dialogue, story, originality, and character than they do CGI and explosions, so Hollywood doesn't need to make anything for Whites anymore. Or books. Or any number of things that once distinguished America as what we knew it as.

    There is no way the United States can return to what it once was. It won't and can't happen, so predicting the future in that respect is actually quite easy. Things will NOT return to what they once were baring a miracle of the highest order because there is no way to change the demographics and culture back. You don't get those things back when you lose them.

    The US is destined to slowly deteriorate and become a nightmare for its remaining White population. Whatever happens, this country won't be what it once was and could have been had the ruling class not embraced mass immigration, a kill shot that can't be reversed now. If it could be, you'd have seen realistic proposals for making it happen by now. There are none that I've read besides secession. Mostly, it's just wishful thinking and conspiracies like Qanon from this side of the aisle. Conservatives don't know what to do or how to do it, so they cling to unlikely nonsense like secret cabals coming to their rescue; or they "vote harder" or think things will magically get better because the elite is going over to the democrat party -- Huey Long to the rescue (as if the regime couldn't just brainwash the population with the media and whip up enough anti-White rage among non-Whites to override their feelings on populism to win any election ... worked for Amazon in busting that union in Alabama and defeating Trump in that election).

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Johann Ricke

    , @Anon
    @Twinkie

    Actually he's right.

    you can't have the USA without americans. and you can't have it with your people either. if you actually cared about America, you would leave right now.

  5. Anonymous[120] • Disclaimer says:
    @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    @ Twinkie

    AE is a low T trans-woman in denial, he has a habit of making hysterical blog posts with no basis in reality, just his strange emotional fluctuations.

    In reality the USA is doing just fine and China is hobbling along, still unable to provide enough protein to its citizens to survive. As a former member of PeakOil.com, I’ve seen hysterical anti-American doomers come and go for nearly 20 years. They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.

    • Replies: @Jackbnimbl
    @Anonymous

    It all comes down to demographics in the end. If China remains 90% Han, and we keep doing what we are doing. We lose. May take 20 years. May take longer.

    Replies: @anon

    , @anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Last year, non-whites crossed into the majority among the under 18. How to escape that?

    , @Eugene Norman
    @Anonymous


    They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.
     
    Well peak oil was always nonsense. But you might want to look at Chinese economic growth of you think they are “rotting” and the US is “improving”. They aren’t hampered by an ideological left trying to over throw Han Chinese supremacy either. Nor are the Han Chinese going to be a minority anytime soon.

    So good luck with that.

    Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain

    , @anon
    @Anonymous

    so tell us why it takes one medical emergency to lose everything including either that life concerned or severe morbidity .
    tell us why 40% have no savings and another 40% have less than 1000 dollars
    tell us why so many died in Covid
    tell us why every day a few mikitary vet commit suicide
    tell us why only jobs left for us are to work at McDonald or Amazon
    tell us why American share of PhD and master in computer science ,aerispace,microbi,ogy,medicine ,shrinking.
    tell us why I see Chinese name in each paper at Nature,Science,New England Journal of Med or Lancet or in PNAS
    tell us why your water in the remotest creek in IL or MI not fit for drniking
    tell us why every 2 nd American is not normal weight and every third is overweight
    tell us why we have so many obese kids
    tell us why you discount food and fuel cost while estimating inflation
    tell us everything - clothes,food,toilet paper,gas,water,electricity,phone bill.internet, and services for home maintainance or car cost way more than 1 year ago and gov claim there is no inflation
    tell us why students in undergraduate go hungry and eat 1 or 2 protein bar to stay alive
    tell us why yiur abundance of food giving rise to so many food related diseases - diabetes,autism,parkinsons disease, infertility ,

    Replies: @Showmethereal

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @Anonymous

    You believed in peak oil and I'm the hysterical one who posts with no basis in reality?

  6. @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    I would never knock China, as it’s people, land, and society really do habe a lot going for them (and always have), but you’re absolutely right about our food security, and ultimately the security of our population here.

    No matter how terrible things get, or nuts and internally oppressive society and the systems around us become, when they change and go away, we remain a fertile, resource rich continent-sized Island. When we hit rock-bottom, it will not be the rock-bottom of countries that can’t feed themselves, and we will only be able to move up.

    Basically, when we shed the weight of our empire, we will be greater and happier than ever before, unlike the poor nations who, when they loss their empire, become meat for the vultures to pick over.

    As for Twinkie, you can’t knock his poetry!

    I get melancholic too, and have said about the same thing. That melancholy is an important step and point of spiritual rest, I think. From there, one can move on to the boundless optimism of what to do next!

    What can be restored, renewed, reformed, and revolutionized!

  7. @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    When the Titanic hit the iceberg, the engines were running and full of steam, the hoppers still had lots of coal, the band was still playing, there was lots of food to eat and the ship was still on course and the designers said it was unsinkable. The view from the bridge was very rosy, what they couldn’t see was that multiple compartments were breached and starting to fill with water. The ship sank in 2 hours. If you don’t like the Titanic example, I ‘ll refer to how rosy everything looked in 1929, everyone thought prosperity would last forever, it didn’t and didn’t return until 1946. The US was in better shape in every way in 1929 than it is today. It was much better prepared to stick together as a nation because it wasn’t being torn apart by a phony pandemic and enormous racial divisions like today.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Joe Paluka


    If you don’t like the Titanic example, ...
     
    I don't. The Titanic was a steel-hulled vessel afloat in a vast ocean.

    The analogy just doesn't work. Even Guam cannot capsize. The North American continent certainly won't.


    ... I'll refer to how rosy everything looked in 1929, ...
     
    I do not wish to be overly disputatious, but as severe as U.S. troubles are today, they have little in common with 1929. PE ratios are high, but further parallels are hard to find. Your own analysis says as much.

    It is as though I had argued, “The New York Jets are doomed to a losing season this year, because look what happened to the republicans during the Spanish Civil War.”

    Does not follow.

    Replies: @iffen, @Joe Paluka

  8. anon[331] • Disclaimer says:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    Doesn’t matter. China is closing fast, and GDP will be the factor determining who runs the world, not per capita GDP.

    “we produce a superabundance of food … By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less”

    Who’s worse off, the nation that imports millions of peasant third worlders into their country to take over demographically so they can get cheap tomatoes at the grocery store, or the nation that grows things with domestic labor?

    Further, the stat you cited on Chinese labor really means nothing. It hasn’t impeded China’s ability to out-compete the United States in 5G and quantum computing; the Chinese will dominate countless other emerging technologies in the future. I’m sure that China will eventually industrialize to the point where they need much less labor to grow food anyway.

    “Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home.”

    China is leading the way in super computing and the emerging field of quantum computing. They are also leading in 5G, which is why the US desperately banned Huawei from operating in the United States and attempted (unsuccessfully) to bully the rest of the world into foregoing their technology. The US barely got their 5G chips, after banning the competition, into the latest smartphones. What happens when China races ahead with 6G and the US has no answer? How exactly are 198 million White Caucasians, a few Asians, and immigrants supposed to compete with a billion smart Han Chinese in any intellectual field? Whites are dying off at a rate of about 500k/1 million per year in the United States, and China already publishes more scientific papers in many fields than the US and is set to race far ahead in the coming decade.

    “A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles.”

    They’re not. China has an equivalent service that is just as good. They also have the world’s largest internet company, most advanced highspeed rail, most advanced telecommunications company, third largest smart phone manufacturer, a nascent competitor to Boeing, etc.

    Amazon is a leftist monopoly that censors their political opposition. I don’t see how anyone should be cheering for them. They’re also heavily subsidized by the publicly-funded US postal service anyway, so they’re certainly not a paragon of free market capitalism.

    “China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life.”

    How does that explain the Japanese or the Koreans? Both are rich, industrialized nations with fiercely competitive populations. South Korea issues more patents per capita than the United States does. More likely explanation: China competes hard because their mean IQ, along with other East Asian nations, is much higher than America’s pathetic 97 (and falling fast). And it’s worse than that for the United States. In the near future, all political power will be concentrated in the hands of a party whose mean IQ is maybe 95 and falling, the democrats. Compare that with the CCP, which is filled with engineers and assorted geniuses. I believe a writer for this website once calculated the CCP’s mean IQ at 140, at least for senior leadership rolls. Compare that with either major American party and laugh. Do AOC and Marco Rubio have 140 IQs?

    They choke on unbreathable air

    So did the US in the 1950s and 60s. Didn’t stop the US from taking over the world with 50% of global GDP.

    China has a massive shortage of women

    The US has a similar problem with rising numbers of singles, declining marriage rates, and crashing birthrates. The Chinese still have over 100 million more females than the entire US population. Who cares if the ratios are off when they can make up for it on volume? In the United States, we have a different, but also significant, problem: rising inequality in male/female quality of life, educational attainment, etc. We’re hardly in a position to gloat.

    “Chinese people wish they were us.”

    No, they don’t. The number of US graduates in many technical fields has actually declined as Chinese students have opted to return home after graduation rather than staying. The evidence is in, they don’t want to be us. China is freer and much less divided than the United States. Here, if you’re White male, you’re discriminated against, hounded out of your job, denied opportunities* and you have no future. There is high crime, 24/7 racism, terrorist groups like antifa roaming the streets, and constant fear. I certainly wish I hadn’t been born here. I’d kill to have been born Japanese. I have a feeling I’ll wish I had been born Chinese in a few decades, if I make it that far in this climate.

    *There are countless stories like this one coming from the US:

    Hollywood Doesn’t Want WHITE DUDES Anymore, Say Movie Execs.

    Several Hollywood executives, actors and writers spoke to the Daily Mail UK this week (anonymously) and said that Hollywood is in FULL ON PANIC MODE over “cancel culture” right now. The mandate from many studios is that middle-aged white dudes (called “menemies”) are now persona non grata, as studios are TERRIFIED of social media backlash for not being progressive enough. Between this and the pandemic, some white folks in Hollywood are even selling their houses and moving out of state because they know their careers are effectively OVER.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfVrcC39R84

    China doesn’t discriminate against their own people. No one in China will force you to hire non-Chinese and defer to them. China doesn’t have an entire month dedicated to celebrating foreign racial groups and castigating their own. Antifa doesn’t attack Chinese courthouses with permission of the state, that’s for sure. We have political prisoners in the US (jailed for making fun of Hilary Clinton on Facebook), a strict censorship regime (which the website has been victimized by), and a corrupt government and media that lie and attack their opponents nonstop. I could go on all day. Just what exactly makes you proud to be an American over being born Han Chinese? They have a future, at least. Can you say that about Whites in the United States?

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @anon

    It hasn’t impeded China’s ability to out-compete the United States in 5G and quantum computing

    One of those is an utter scam, as outlined in IEEE spectrum a few months back, and the other is a boondoggle. WiFi 6 is going to make 5G, the absurd notion that all data should move wirelessly in bulk,instead of over the shortest distance until it gets to wire, a big waste of money.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD

    , @Realist
    @anon

    Excellent, correct points all.

    , @showmethereal
    @anon

    That is mostly spot on.... But actually - minorities in China actually get better benefits than US "affirmative action". That is especially true of higher education (minorities can score much lower). As to promoting the culture publicly - the Chinese government openly and actively promotes Han Chinese to go and visit minority areas and spend money to help those groups escape poverty. There are also events on television dedicated to live performances of minority groups.

    But the rest of your comment is pretty much spot on.

    , @Live from China
    @anon

    GDP is a meaningless concept in socialist country. China technically has one but it is a meaningless number and the Chinese manipulate the underlying accounting identities to suit their purposes. Without the assumption of mutually beneficial voluntary exchange, consumption, investment, government spending, and net exports tell you little or nothing about the economic welfare or national power of a country.

  9. anon[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie

    It never will be again.
     
    With all due respect, you are not a prophet. You don’t know what the future holds. So long as good men draw breath, there is always a chance of renewal.

    I know things look (and are) grim right now, but I suggest for everyone a bit less “doom masturbation” and more productive and fruitful thinking and actions.

    Replies: @anon, @Anon

    “With all due respect, you are not a prophet. You don’t know what the future holds. So long as good men draw breath, there is always a chance of renewal.”

    Some guy, Rome 450 AD: Rome will never be the same. True.

    Some guy, Soviet Union 1990: The Soviet Union will never be same. True.

    Some guy, America 2020: America will never be the same. Also true.

    One need not be a prophet to see the obvious. America literally is not America anymore, not with these demographics. America was based on its founding people, their culture, and various compatible European groups. Other groups had essentially zero political representation and made only a minor contribution to the culture, with was overwhelmingly British and broadly European.

    Now, that’s all but gone. You can see it in the culture, too. White Americans prided freedom, including unpopular speech. Even if the government didn’t always hold up to that standard, there was essentially a broad consensus on the subject, for political speech at least. But now America is practically an authoritarian regime that jails people for their tweets and censors the regime’s enemies from the internet (when they aren’t doxxing and promoting violence against them). What changed? America changed. The coastal elites are drunk on non-White American demographic power. They can’t lose elections now, so they can do whatever they want — purge the military, pack the Supreme Court and overthrow the constitution. Polls show non-Whites care much less about free speech for ideas they find offensive, so there is no longer enough demographic push back to keep the regime from outlawing those ideas.

    I could draw similar parallels to the movie industry and how it no longer makes anything good; it can depend on easily-impressed Hispanics and immigrants who care much less about dialogue, story, originality, and character than they do CGI and explosions, so Hollywood doesn’t need to make anything for Whites anymore. Or books. Or any number of things that once distinguished America as what we knew it as.

    There is no way the United States can return to what it once was. It won’t and can’t happen, so predicting the future in that respect is actually quite easy. Things will NOT return to what they once were baring a miracle of the highest order because there is no way to change the demographics and culture back. You don’t get those things back when you lose them.

    The US is destined to slowly deteriorate and become a nightmare for its remaining White population. Whatever happens, this country won’t be what it once was and could have been had the ruling class not embraced mass immigration, a kill shot that can’t be reversed now. If it could be, you’d have seen realistic proposals for making it happen by now. There are none that I’ve read besides secession. Mostly, it’s just wishful thinking and conspiracies like Qanon from this side of the aisle. Conservatives don’t know what to do or how to do it, so they cling to unlikely nonsense like secret cabals coming to their rescue; or they “vote harder” or think things will magically get better because the elite is going over to the democrat party — Huey Long to the rescue (as if the regime couldn’t just brainwash the population with the media and whip up enough anti-White rage among non-Whites to override their feelings on populism to win any election … worked for Amazon in busting that union in Alabama and defeating Trump in that election).

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @anon

    The rest of your comment makes fine points. However:


    China already publishes more scientific papers in many fields than the US and is set to race far ahead in the coming decade.
     
    Scientific papers in both countries are largely useless. One must read them, and attend the conferences their authors attend, to see why. The authors are usually capable persons who would be useful in industry if employed by Intel, Fluor or Ford, but those authors are seldom of the rare caliber that makes a paper worth reading.

    So a count of papers just is not a very useful metric.

    One could safely incinerate 90 percent of the journals that publish the papers. Hardly anyone would notice the difference.

    , @Johann Ricke
    @anon


    Some guy, Rome 450 AD: Rome will never be the same. True.

    Some guy, Soviet Union 1990: The Soviet Union will never be same. True.

    Some guy, America 2020: America will never be the same. Also true.
     
    One of these is not like the other two. But you'd had to have spent hundreds of hours learning both about the history of those fallen regimes, and even more time on finding out about the Fortune 500 companies that keep Uncle Sam #1. More trouble than it's worth, unless you're really interested in world history or a stock market buff.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

  10. While the perception of China may be nominally negative across the political spectrum, there are considerable differences in threat ranking.

    tl;dr: For Democrats, “domestic extremists” > Russia > China, for Republicans, the other way around.

  11. For all the cultural imperialism abroad and cultural erasure at home the American empire has perpetrated, I’m still overtaken by sadness. This was the greatest country on earth. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrims’ pride, from every mountain side, let freedom ring. It isn’t any longer. It never will be again.

    No, it won’t.

    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.

    … there has been a marked bipartisan increase in hostility towards the world’s ascendant second pole over the last four years….

    Competition between great powers being what it is, the increase in hostility is a necessary, healthful development. The increase is overdue.

    If China makes a move on Taiwan, …

    … then the move will probably, finally expose the bankruptcy of U.S. foreign policy. We Americans have written Taiwan a check that, in the event, the Taiwanese will find themselves unable to cash.

    [MORE]

    I suspect that that humiliation will come out all right for us Americans, though. For us to reduce our international pretensions to match our actual strength is another overdue development.

    Dan Hess is fundamentally right: the U.S. position remains strong, even if (as you observe) the position is no longer sound. The petrodollar (as earlier discussed) still has a good mechanism via XDR to divert gently into the macroeconomic off-ramp, averting a crash, if only Americans would show the foresight to use the mechanism and take the ramp.

    Besides this factor and the factors Dan mentions, the U.S. occupies an enviably secure geographical position. Natural U.S. interests lie in places like Panama, not in the old Spanish, French and Dutch colonies that ring the South China Sea. In Panama, we have the leverage, not the Chinese.

    One only wishes that the U.S. would shut up, draw down American military and perhaps naval presence in the Old World, and pull back to Guam—lapsing into a passive, unresponsive, nonprovocative foreign policy for the next 30 years, letting circumstances force Russia to realign with Japan and India against China, and maybe Australia to realign with Britain and Canada against both. That the U.S. did not do so 25 years ago is regrettable, but it is far from too late, still.

    Far from too late for us, that is. The unfortunate Taiwanese, by contrast, are in the wok.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @V. K. Ovelund


    One only wishes that the U.S. would shut up, draw down American military and perhaps naval presence in the Old World, and pull back to Guam—lapsing into a passive, unresponsive, nonprovocative foreign policy for the next 30 years, letting circumstances force Russia to realign with Japan and India against China, and maybe Australia to realign with Britain and Canada against both. That the U.S. did not do so 25 years ago is regrettable, but it is far from too late, still.
     
    That's optimistic. I think the thing that captures where we are headed is Apres moi, le deluge. The elites know they cannot keep spending 1trillion on "defense" that builds no worthwhile support base for the economy, but it pays so well right now. Nancy Pelosi will escape life without having to face the consequences of her insider trading and hollowing out the economy. AOC will have to deal with it; the deluge will overwhelm her generation.
    , @Wency
    @V. K. Ovelund


    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.
     
    I'd be curious for you to expand on this one. I'm making a conscious choice to try to distance my children more from overt expressions and notions of patriotism than was the case in my childhood, to not get so attached to the idea of America and the notion of loyalty and allegiance to the regime in DC, to instead conceptualize identities in terms of family, community, and church. Of course, we live in a place that is still very animated by the idea of American pride, even as our state is one of those most despised by the imperial core.

    But the truth is somehow all that youthful patriotism slipped away from me effortlessly in the past 10 or 15 years, without me really trying to disassociate from it. The prospect of a conflict between USG and CCP doesn't animate me any more than the conflict between Habsburg and Romanov animated my very non-Austrian and non-Russian forebears caught in the middle.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    , @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    One only wishes that the U.S. would shut up, draw down American military and perhaps naval presence in the Old World, and pull back to Guam—lapsing into a passive, unresponsive, nonprovocative foreign policy for the next 30 years
     
    That would be great.

    Withdrawing all US bases in foreign countries would be a very positive thing.

    Withdrawing from NATO would be a very very very good thing.

    The US faces zero military threats.

    letting circumstances force Russia to realign with Japan and India against China, and maybe Australia to realign with Britain and Canada against both.
     
    Another very good move would be for the US to cancel its military alliances with countries like Australia. Australia also faces zero military threats. The US-Australia alliance actually threatens Australia's security.

    Also dump the Five Eyes alliance.

    Pat Buchanan makes some good points on this subject in his latest column.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  12. @anon
    @Twinkie


    "With all due respect, you are not a prophet. You don’t know what the future holds. So long as good men draw breath, there is always a chance of renewal."
     
    Some guy, Rome 450 AD: Rome will never be the same. True.

    Some guy, Soviet Union 1990: The Soviet Union will never be same. True.

    Some guy, America 2020: America will never be the same. Also true.

    One need not be a prophet to see the obvious. America literally is not America anymore, not with these demographics. America was based on its founding people, their culture, and various compatible European groups. Other groups had essentially zero political representation and made only a minor contribution to the culture, with was overwhelmingly British and broadly European.

    Now, that's all but gone. You can see it in the culture, too. White Americans prided freedom, including unpopular speech. Even if the government didn't always hold up to that standard, there was essentially a broad consensus on the subject, for political speech at least. But now America is practically an authoritarian regime that jails people for their tweets and censors the regime's enemies from the internet (when they aren't doxxing and promoting violence against them). What changed? America changed. The coastal elites are drunk on non-White American demographic power. They can't lose elections now, so they can do whatever they want -- purge the military, pack the Supreme Court and overthrow the constitution. Polls show non-Whites care much less about free speech for ideas they find offensive, so there is no longer enough demographic push back to keep the regime from outlawing those ideas.

    I could draw similar parallels to the movie industry and how it no longer makes anything good; it can depend on easily-impressed Hispanics and immigrants who care much less about dialogue, story, originality, and character than they do CGI and explosions, so Hollywood doesn't need to make anything for Whites anymore. Or books. Or any number of things that once distinguished America as what we knew it as.

    There is no way the United States can return to what it once was. It won't and can't happen, so predicting the future in that respect is actually quite easy. Things will NOT return to what they once were baring a miracle of the highest order because there is no way to change the demographics and culture back. You don't get those things back when you lose them.

    The US is destined to slowly deteriorate and become a nightmare for its remaining White population. Whatever happens, this country won't be what it once was and could have been had the ruling class not embraced mass immigration, a kill shot that can't be reversed now. If it could be, you'd have seen realistic proposals for making it happen by now. There are none that I've read besides secession. Mostly, it's just wishful thinking and conspiracies like Qanon from this side of the aisle. Conservatives don't know what to do or how to do it, so they cling to unlikely nonsense like secret cabals coming to their rescue; or they "vote harder" or think things will magically get better because the elite is going over to the democrat party -- Huey Long to the rescue (as if the regime couldn't just brainwash the population with the media and whip up enough anti-White rage among non-Whites to override their feelings on populism to win any election ... worked for Amazon in busting that union in Alabama and defeating Trump in that election).

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Johann Ricke

    The rest of your comment makes fine points. However:

    China already publishes more scientific papers in many fields than the US and is set to race far ahead in the coming decade.

    Scientific papers in both countries are largely useless. One must read them, and attend the conferences their authors attend, to see why. The authors are usually capable persons who would be useful in industry if employed by Intel, Fluor or Ford, but those authors are seldom of the rare caliber that makes a paper worth reading.

    So a count of papers just is not a very useful metric.

    One could safely incinerate 90 percent of the journals that publish the papers. Hardly anyone would notice the difference.

  13. @Joe Paluka
    @DanHessinMD

    When the Titanic hit the iceberg, the engines were running and full of steam, the hoppers still had lots of coal, the band was still playing, there was lots of food to eat and the ship was still on course and the designers said it was unsinkable. The view from the bridge was very rosy, what they couldn't see was that multiple compartments were breached and starting to fill with water. The ship sank in 2 hours. If you don't like the Titanic example, I 'll refer to how rosy everything looked in 1929, everyone thought prosperity would last forever, it didn't and didn't return until 1946. The US was in better shape in every way in 1929 than it is today. It was much better prepared to stick together as a nation because it wasn't being torn apart by a phony pandemic and enormous racial divisions like today.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    If you don’t like the Titanic example, …

    I don’t. The Titanic was a steel-hulled vessel afloat in a vast ocean.

    The analogy just doesn’t work. Even Guam cannot capsize. The North American continent certainly won’t.

    … I’ll refer to how rosy everything looked in 1929, …

    I do not wish to be overly disputatious, but as severe as U.S. troubles are today, they have little in common with 1929. PE ratios are high, but further parallels are hard to find. Your own analysis says as much.

    It is as though I had argued, “The New York Jets are doomed to a losing season this year, because look what happened to the republicans during the Spanish Civil War.”

    Does not follow.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Even Guam cannot capsize.

    You are obviously not qualified to be a Representative in the U. S. House.

    , @Joe Paluka
    @V. K. Ovelund

    You didn't get what I was driving at and I'm not going to explain it to you.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

  14. @Anonymous
    @DanHessinMD

    @ Twinkie


    AE is a low T trans-woman in denial, he has a habit of making hysterical blog posts with no basis in reality, just his strange emotional fluctuations.


    In reality the USA is doing just fine and China is hobbling along, still unable to provide enough protein to its citizens to survive. As a former member of PeakOil.com, I've seen hysterical anti-American doomers come and go for nearly 20 years. They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.

    Replies: @Jackbnimbl, @anonymous, @Eugene Norman, @anon, @Audacious Epigone

    It all comes down to demographics in the end. If China remains 90% Han, and we keep doing what we are doing. We lose. May take 20 years. May take longer.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jackbnimbl

    It all comes down to demographics in the end.

    https://asiatimes.com/2021/01/chinas-demographic-time-bomb-quickly-ticking-down/

  15. @Twinkie

    It never will be again.
     
    With all due respect, you are not a prophet. You don’t know what the future holds. So long as good men draw breath, there is always a chance of renewal.

    I know things look (and are) grim right now, but I suggest for everyone a bit less “doom masturbation” and more productive and fruitful thinking and actions.

    Replies: @anon, @Anon

    Actually he’s right.

    you can’t have the USA without americans. and you can’t have it with your people either. if you actually cared about America, you would leave right now.

  16. @anon

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.
     
    Doesn't matter. China is closing fast, and GDP will be the factor determining who runs the world, not per capita GDP.

    "we produce a superabundance of food ... By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less"
     
    Who's worse off, the nation that imports millions of peasant third worlders into their country to take over demographically so they can get cheap tomatoes at the grocery store, or the nation that grows things with domestic labor?

    Further, the stat you cited on Chinese labor really means nothing. It hasn't impeded China's ability to out-compete the United States in 5G and quantum computing; the Chinese will dominate countless other emerging technologies in the future. I'm sure that China will eventually industrialize to the point where they need much less labor to grow food anyway.

    "Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home."
     
    China is leading the way in super computing and the emerging field of quantum computing. They are also leading in 5G, which is why the US desperately banned Huawei from operating in the United States and attempted (unsuccessfully) to bully the rest of the world into foregoing their technology. The US barely got their 5G chips, after banning the competition, into the latest smartphones. What happens when China races ahead with 6G and the US has no answer? How exactly are 198 million White Caucasians, a few Asians, and immigrants supposed to compete with a billion smart Han Chinese in any intellectual field? Whites are dying off at a rate of about 500k/1 million per year in the United States, and China already publishes more scientific papers in many fields than the US and is set to race far ahead in the coming decade.

    "A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles."
     
    They're not. China has an equivalent service that is just as good. They also have the world's largest internet company, most advanced highspeed rail, most advanced telecommunications company, third largest smart phone manufacturer, a nascent competitor to Boeing, etc.

    Amazon is a leftist monopoly that censors their political opposition. I don't see how anyone should be cheering for them. They're also heavily subsidized by the publicly-funded US postal service anyway, so they're certainly not a paragon of free market capitalism.

    "China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life."
     
    How does that explain the Japanese or the Koreans? Both are rich, industrialized nations with fiercely competitive populations. South Korea issues more patents per capita than the United States does. More likely explanation: China competes hard because their mean IQ, along with other East Asian nations, is much higher than America's pathetic 97 (and falling fast). And it's worse than that for the United States. In the near future, all political power will be concentrated in the hands of a party whose mean IQ is maybe 95 and falling, the democrats. Compare that with the CCP, which is filled with engineers and assorted geniuses. I believe a writer for this website once calculated the CCP's mean IQ at 140, at least for senior leadership rolls. Compare that with either major American party and laugh. Do AOC and Marco Rubio have 140 IQs?

    They choke on unbreathable air
     
    So did the US in the 1950s and 60s. Didn't stop the US from taking over the world with 50% of global GDP.

    China has a massive shortage of women
     
    The US has a similar problem with rising numbers of singles, declining marriage rates, and crashing birthrates. The Chinese still have over 100 million more females than the entire US population. Who cares if the ratios are off when they can make up for it on volume? In the United States, we have a different, but also significant, problem: rising inequality in male/female quality of life, educational attainment, etc. We're hardly in a position to gloat.

    "Chinese people wish they were us."
     
    No, they don't. The number of US graduates in many technical fields has actually declined as Chinese students have opted to return home after graduation rather than staying. The evidence is in, they don't want to be us. China is freer and much less divided than the United States. Here, if you're White male, you're discriminated against, hounded out of your job, denied opportunities* and you have no future. There is high crime, 24/7 racism, terrorist groups like antifa roaming the streets, and constant fear. I certainly wish I hadn't been born here. I'd kill to have been born Japanese. I have a feeling I'll wish I had been born Chinese in a few decades, if I make it that far in this climate.

    *There are countless stories like this one coming from the US:

    Hollywood Doesn't Want WHITE DUDES Anymore, Say Movie Execs.

    Several Hollywood executives, actors and writers spoke to the Daily Mail UK this week (anonymously) and said that Hollywood is in FULL ON PANIC MODE over "cancel culture" right now. The mandate from many studios is that middle-aged white dudes (called "menemies") are now persona non grata, as studios are TERRIFIED of social media backlash for not being progressive enough. Between this and the pandemic, some white folks in Hollywood are even selling their houses and moving out of state because they know their careers are effectively OVER.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfVrcC39R84
     
    China doesn't discriminate against their own people. No one in China will force you to hire non-Chinese and defer to them. China doesn't have an entire month dedicated to celebrating foreign racial groups and castigating their own. Antifa doesn't attack Chinese courthouses with permission of the state, that's for sure. We have political prisoners in the US (jailed for making fun of Hilary Clinton on Facebook), a strict censorship regime (which the website has been victimized by), and a corrupt government and media that lie and attack their opponents nonstop. I could go on all day. Just what exactly makes you proud to be an American over being born Han Chinese? They have a future, at least. Can you say that about Whites in the United States?

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Realist, @showmethereal, @Live from China

    It hasn’t impeded China’s ability to out-compete the United States in 5G and quantum computing

    One of those is an utter scam, as outlined in IEEE spectrum a few months back, and the other is a boondoggle. WiFi 6 is going to make 5G, the absurd notion that all data should move wirelessly in bulk,instead of over the shortest distance until it gets to wire, a big waste of money.

    • Replies: @DanHessinMD
    @TomSchmidt

    Great comment.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  17. @V. K. Ovelund

    For all the cultural imperialism abroad and cultural erasure at home the American empire has perpetrated, I’m still overtaken by sadness. This was the greatest country on earth. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrims’ pride, from every mountain side, let freedom ring. It isn’t any longer. It never will be again.
     
    No, it won't.

    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.


    ... there has been a marked bipartisan increase in hostility towards the world’s ascendant second pole over the last four years....
     
    Competition between great powers being what it is, the increase in hostility is a necessary, healthful development. The increase is overdue.

    If China makes a move on Taiwan, ...
     
    ... then the move will probably, finally expose the bankruptcy of U.S. foreign policy. We Americans have written Taiwan a check that, in the event, the Taiwanese will find themselves unable to cash.

    I suspect that that humiliation will come out all right for us Americans, though. For us to reduce our international pretensions to match our actual strength is another overdue development.

    Dan Hess is fundamentally right: the U.S. position remains strong, even if (as you observe) the position is no longer sound. The petrodollar (as earlier discussed) still has a good mechanism via XDR to divert gently into the macroeconomic off-ramp, averting a crash, if only Americans would show the foresight to use the mechanism and take the ramp.

    Besides this factor and the factors Dan mentions, the U.S. occupies an enviably secure geographical position. Natural U.S. interests lie in places like Panama, not in the old Spanish, French and Dutch colonies that ring the South China Sea. In Panama, we have the leverage, not the Chinese.

    One only wishes that the U.S. would shut up, draw down American military and perhaps naval presence in the Old World, and pull back to Guam—lapsing into a passive, unresponsive, nonprovocative foreign policy for the next 30 years, letting circumstances force Russia to realign with Japan and India against China, and maybe Australia to realign with Britain and Canada against both. That the U.S. did not do so 25 years ago is regrettable, but it is far from too late, still.

    Far from too late for us, that is. The unfortunate Taiwanese, by contrast, are in the wok.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Wency, @dfordoom

    One only wishes that the U.S. would shut up, draw down American military and perhaps naval presence in the Old World, and pull back to Guam—lapsing into a passive, unresponsive, nonprovocative foreign policy for the next 30 years, letting circumstances force Russia to realign with Japan and India against China, and maybe Australia to realign with Britain and Canada against both. That the U.S. did not do so 25 years ago is regrettable, but it is far from too late, still.

    That’s optimistic. I think the thing that captures where we are headed is Apres moi, le deluge. The elites know they cannot keep spending 1trillion on “defense” that builds no worthwhile support base for the economy, but it pays so well right now. Nancy Pelosi will escape life without having to face the consequences of her insider trading and hollowing out the economy. AOC will have to deal with it; the deluge will overwhelm her generation.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
  18. Strange post. It is undeniable that sooner or later, the security confrontation with China is going to force American elites to wake up and think about something other than how to steal another .05 cents per transaction off consumers and how they can launder 10% of the heist to their son-in-law or vice-versa. They either start governing as if they care about national survival, or someone else replaces them. China is the great catalyst for change.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
  19. As if the imploding American empire

    Given that there is no empire, except as a figure of speech … The difference between an empire and an alliance is that when attacked from without, an alliance bands together to fight off the threat, whereas an empire’s components seize the opportunity to weaken the metropole so they can each go their own way.

    China’s rulers have, like their counterparts among other great civilizations, always wanted to rule “all under heaven”.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tianxia

    The current crop is no different. Whether the rest of the world end ups being ruled from Beijing depends on how early it bands together to ward off China’s armies. China’s population in relation to the rest of the world now is similar to that of the Qin kingdom relative to the rest of northeast Asia when the First Emperor set out to create* the continental scale empire we now know as China.

    Thanks to the illusion created by MAD theory of a nuclear Masada in reaction to conventional attack, we’ve persuaded ourselves that national leaders no longer seek personal glory through territorial acquisition, whether via bloodless surrenders under threat or armed conquest. China is within a decade or so of slicing through the MAD Gordian Knot. In the decades ahead, the question is whether the US will be able to field a conventional military powerful enough to keep them out of North America, never mind the rest of the world. It’s only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.

    * Like Alexander, he was trying to conquer anything his armies could reach, until the cost of new advances started to cut into the minimum force he needed to hold on to his recently-won gains.

    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
    @Johann Ricke

    You’re misinterpreting Tianxia. The Chinese emperor considered areas in which he had no influence as his vassals of they did a once-a-rule tribute expression. An example here would be the Sultanate of Malacca, the Japanese during the Heian period, and the Portuguese who in the 16th century kowtowed and got a colony in exchange because the Emperor needed silver to mint coins. They were moving quite a bit of it via Japan and India.

    Most of the time it was a totally perfunctory court ritual that opened the door for trade access.

    The difference with Jewish power vs. Chinese power is that the Emperor only required about 1000 (mostly domestic) eunuchs to run his court. The Jews will be unsatisfied unless every single white chemically castrates themselves, which is what America is fast running towards under ZOG.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    , @V. K. Ovelund
    @Johann Ricke


    It’s only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.
     
    Yes but it's not working. American attempts somehow to make it work have caused Russia, incredibly, to throw in with China.

    Since Russia is the crucial element of any alliance of the kind of which you speak, the Russian turn toward China is a problem.

    Sometimes pushing, pushing, pushing by Americans simply does not work. Sometimes, the smart thing to do is to stop pushing.

    No one trusts the United States any longer. We blew it, but the situation can still be retrieved if we respectfully allow foreigners some time and space to find other countries not to trust.

    I grasp the imperative: resist China now! What I am telling you is that it is not working. The world will not follow our lead. The resources of the Free World can no longer be marshaled by us. That is no longer possible. We Americans are the most hated people on earth.

    Replies: @unit472

    , @Boomthorkell
    @Johann Ricke

    Honestly, even if China went for "world domination" in the literal sense, rather than its traditional model, no navy on Earth could land and sustain an army large enough to invade Heartland America across the two oceans. I tend not to worry about game-changing superweapons or secret alien technologyin this calculation, assuming either others have them too or we refuse to use them for fear of their knowledge opening the new nuclear race. Basically, we'd blow their ships up with purely conventional weapons. We wouldn't even need a navy to do it. Just coastal missiles.

    This is why America should focus all of its efforts on making a peaceful, prosperous, powerful and united North America. Assuming we united (worst case, annexed) Canada and Mexico (and Central America), we could almost make an autarky. Do to the Americas what China is doing to Eurasia.

    Best case scenario, the world becomes richer and happier. Worst case scenario, our separate worlds are richer and happier and eyeing each other warily.

  20. @Johann Ricke

    As if the imploding American empire
     
    Given that there is no empire, except as a figure of speech ... The difference between an empire and an alliance is that when attacked from without, an alliance bands together to fight off the threat, whereas an empire's components seize the opportunity to weaken the metropole so they can each go their own way.

    China's rulers have, like their counterparts among other great civilizations, always wanted to rule "all under heaven".

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tianxia

    The current crop is no different. Whether the rest of the world end ups being ruled from Beijing depends on how early it bands together to ward off China's armies. China's population in relation to the rest of the world now is similar to that of the Qin kingdom relative to the rest of northeast Asia when the First Emperor set out to create* the continental scale empire we now know as China.

    Thanks to the illusion created by MAD theory of a nuclear Masada in reaction to conventional attack, we've persuaded ourselves that national leaders no longer seek personal glory through territorial acquisition, whether via bloodless surrenders under threat or armed conquest. China is within a decade or so of slicing through the MAD Gordian Knot. In the decades ahead, the question is whether the US will be able to field a conventional military powerful enough to keep them out of North America, never mind the rest of the world. It's only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.

    * Like Alexander, he was trying to conquer anything his armies could reach, until the cost of new advances started to cut into the minimum force he needed to hold on to his recently-won gains.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @V. K. Ovelund, @Boomthorkell

    You’re misinterpreting Tianxia. The Chinese emperor considered areas in which he had no influence as his vassals of they did a once-a-rule tribute expression. An example here would be the Sultanate of Malacca, the Japanese during the Heian period, and the Portuguese who in the 16th century kowtowed and got a colony in exchange because the Emperor needed silver to mint coins. They were moving quite a bit of it via Japan and India.

    Most of the time it was a totally perfunctory court ritual that opened the door for trade access.

    The difference with Jewish power vs. Chinese power is that the Emperor only required about 1000 (mostly domestic) eunuchs to run his court. The Jews will be unsatisfied unless every single white chemically castrates themselves, which is what America is fast running towards under ZOG.

    • Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Supply and Demand


    the Emperor only required about 1000 (mostly domestic) eunuchs to run his court. 

     

    BS.

    The Empire was ran by meritocratic scholar-officials selected based on exam performance on knowledge of Confucianism. The Emperor was often only ceremonial ruler and overwhelmed by the moral-uppitiness and rhetorical power of the meritocrats, and thus resorted to employing a class of ex-"men“ with unquestionable loyalty and questionable methods, the eunuchs*, to balance the power of meritocrats.

    Whether the Imperial Exams and Confucian education have a straitjacketing effect is a good point. Compare that with castration is I would say hyperbolic. Comparing the eunuchs to today's tranny politicians I would say is fair.


    *Not all of them were odious, Zheng He, who did not voluntarily become a eunuch, famously sailed to East Africa a century before the Portuguese.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

  21. @anon
    @Twinkie


    "With all due respect, you are not a prophet. You don’t know what the future holds. So long as good men draw breath, there is always a chance of renewal."
     
    Some guy, Rome 450 AD: Rome will never be the same. True.

    Some guy, Soviet Union 1990: The Soviet Union will never be same. True.

    Some guy, America 2020: America will never be the same. Also true.

    One need not be a prophet to see the obvious. America literally is not America anymore, not with these demographics. America was based on its founding people, their culture, and various compatible European groups. Other groups had essentially zero political representation and made only a minor contribution to the culture, with was overwhelmingly British and broadly European.

    Now, that's all but gone. You can see it in the culture, too. White Americans prided freedom, including unpopular speech. Even if the government didn't always hold up to that standard, there was essentially a broad consensus on the subject, for political speech at least. But now America is practically an authoritarian regime that jails people for their tweets and censors the regime's enemies from the internet (when they aren't doxxing and promoting violence against them). What changed? America changed. The coastal elites are drunk on non-White American demographic power. They can't lose elections now, so they can do whatever they want -- purge the military, pack the Supreme Court and overthrow the constitution. Polls show non-Whites care much less about free speech for ideas they find offensive, so there is no longer enough demographic push back to keep the regime from outlawing those ideas.

    I could draw similar parallels to the movie industry and how it no longer makes anything good; it can depend on easily-impressed Hispanics and immigrants who care much less about dialogue, story, originality, and character than they do CGI and explosions, so Hollywood doesn't need to make anything for Whites anymore. Or books. Or any number of things that once distinguished America as what we knew it as.

    There is no way the United States can return to what it once was. It won't and can't happen, so predicting the future in that respect is actually quite easy. Things will NOT return to what they once were baring a miracle of the highest order because there is no way to change the demographics and culture back. You don't get those things back when you lose them.

    The US is destined to slowly deteriorate and become a nightmare for its remaining White population. Whatever happens, this country won't be what it once was and could have been had the ruling class not embraced mass immigration, a kill shot that can't be reversed now. If it could be, you'd have seen realistic proposals for making it happen by now. There are none that I've read besides secession. Mostly, it's just wishful thinking and conspiracies like Qanon from this side of the aisle. Conservatives don't know what to do or how to do it, so they cling to unlikely nonsense like secret cabals coming to their rescue; or they "vote harder" or think things will magically get better because the elite is going over to the democrat party -- Huey Long to the rescue (as if the regime couldn't just brainwash the population with the media and whip up enough anti-White rage among non-Whites to override their feelings on populism to win any election ... worked for Amazon in busting that union in Alabama and defeating Trump in that election).

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Johann Ricke

    Some guy, Rome 450 AD: Rome will never be the same. True.

    Some guy, Soviet Union 1990: The Soviet Union will never be same. True.

    Some guy, America 2020: America will never be the same. Also true.

    One of these is not like the other two. But you’d had to have spent hundreds of hours learning both about the history of those fallen regimes, and even more time on finding out about the Fortune 500 companies that keep Uncle Sam #1. More trouble than it’s worth, unless you’re really interested in world history or a stock market buff.

    • Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Johann Ricke


    Some guy, Rome 450 AD: Rome will never be the same. True.

     

    There was no cataclysmic „Fall of Rome“ in Fifth Century like it’s common narrated (there was, however, a Fall of Constantinople). The Greek Eastern Roman Empire thrived for another millennia. And almost made a comeback to the West under Justinian. Its call „Byzantine“ with certain connotations but still very much Roman.

    https://imgur.com/iVseQlj

    Who’s to say that you guys can’t have your own Justinian?
  22. @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    You think any of this will matter when AOC is President and Stacy Abrams is Secretary of State? When you have a third-world population you’ll be a third-world country, full stop. That’s the real cause of America’s decline and none of the things you mention are relevant in comparison.

    • Agree: WorkingClass
  23. Although I am not a total doomer, I do think it is likely accurate that the US will never be the undisputed #1 power on the planet again. China’s gross GDP will make it a force to be reckoned with not matter what other problems it may have internally and obviously the sheer number of people it has with 120+ IQs means it has more potential intellectual capital than any country, period.

    All that said, the US does seem to have an inherent cultural and economic dynamism that allows us to punch above our already-considerable weight. Even as China continues to rise, that quality will continue to attract a lot of talent for the foreseeable future.

    Our current cultural revolution is going to cause a great deal of damage and will take decades to unwind. But China also went through a disastrous cultural revolution and emerged from it with a renewed focus that brought it to its current heights. The difficulty for many is that we are old enough that we are just going to have to live through the rough times without getting to enjoy the ride back up.

  24. The US maybe a shitshow at the present time but there are still flashes of brilliance. Yesterday was one when NASA launched that little helicopter on Mars. OK, the project manager was a gal named Mimi Aung and the chief engineer Bob Balaram ( Indian by heritage) but they both speak unaccented English and, judging from their news conference yesterday, both seem more American than Joe Biden or Nancy Pelosi.

    We shouldn’t underestimate the ability of governments like China’s to ruin a good thing either. If Deng Xiaoping brought China into the global economy and made it an industrial powerhouse a tyrant like Xi Jinping seems perfectly capable of regressing China back into a totalitarian nightmare. Look what he’s done to Hong Kong just to show that he’s the boss.

    While America behaves like an international bully on occasion it still leads the most impressive international alliance in world history. Compare the US position with that of China’s bottom feeding international partners. North Korea, Russia and Iran. These are allies of convenience not partners like Japan or the EU.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @unit472

    NASA spends more than any other space agency. For its outlay, I would consider it to put on a pretty poor show. Of course, there is SpaceX, but a lot of subsidy went into that. We are still talking economic factors which might just be lag indicators of decline. Plus, if SpaceX accomplishes anything, when you prove something is possible, it is easy to copy.

    Replies: @unit472

  25. anonymous[164] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @DanHessinMD

    @ Twinkie


    AE is a low T trans-woman in denial, he has a habit of making hysterical blog posts with no basis in reality, just his strange emotional fluctuations.


    In reality the USA is doing just fine and China is hobbling along, still unable to provide enough protein to its citizens to survive. As a former member of PeakOil.com, I've seen hysterical anti-American doomers come and go for nearly 20 years. They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.

    Replies: @Jackbnimbl, @anonymous, @Eugene Norman, @anon, @Audacious Epigone

    Last year, non-whites crossed into the majority among the under 18. How to escape that?

  26. I’m most concerned by the extremely brittle “hard” systems in the US after decades of internal mismanagement in the event of crisis, be it external attack or something else. The handling of the pandemic should give an idea of what we’re up against here. If the grid is attacked or food/water supplies to cities are interrupted, then we’re in big trouble.

    For all the image the US gets as a compulsive minimal government place, moreover, the sclerotic, over-arching bureaucratic system is a problem, too, especially given cultural fixation on bureaucratic approval among our elites and a young generation marinated in that.

  27. It isn’t any longer. It never will be again.

    Correct…the dirty deed is done.

    • Agree: WorkingClass
  28. I think the Chinese are too risk averse to invade Taiwan this year. Their military and cultural power grow with every year. It is just better to wait. I’d give it another ten years, at least.

    Meanwhile, Taiwan’s TFR is like 1.2. China’s might not be much better, but it should be obvious to people in Taiwan that their government isn’t everything it is cracked up to be. The older civil war generations will be dying off and younger ones being born enmeshed within China’s culture.

    One of the big problems of the West is that nuclear weapons discourage any kind of military conflict of a scale that could cause domestic regime change. If China invaded Taiwan, I expect the US would cower back. Might lead to a collapse in King Dollar, but I’m not sure the dollar will last long enough for that to happen.

  29. @unit472
    The US maybe a shitshow at the present time but there are still flashes of brilliance. Yesterday was one when NASA launched that little helicopter on Mars. OK, the project manager was a gal named Mimi Aung and the chief engineer Bob Balaram ( Indian by heritage) but they both speak unaccented English and, judging from their news conference yesterday, both seem more American than Joe Biden or Nancy Pelosi.

    We shouldn't underestimate the ability of governments like China's to ruin a good thing either. If Deng Xiaoping brought China into the global economy and made it an industrial powerhouse a tyrant like Xi Jinping seems perfectly capable of regressing China back into a totalitarian nightmare. Look what he's done to Hong Kong just to show that he's the boss.

    While America behaves like an international bully on occasion it still leads the most impressive international alliance in world history. Compare the US position with that of China's bottom feeding international partners. North Korea, Russia and Iran. These are allies of convenience not partners like Japan or the EU.

    Replies: @songbird

    NASA spends more than any other space agency. For its outlay, I would consider it to put on a pretty poor show. Of course, there is SpaceX, but a lot of subsidy went into that. We are still talking economic factors which might just be lag indicators of decline. Plus, if SpaceX accomplishes anything, when you prove something is possible, it is easy to copy.

    • Replies: @unit472
    @songbird

    Its hard to determine if NASA spends its money well since what it spends money on are things no other nation or company can even attempt. Consider NASA's space telescopes. What we know of the universe is largely due to NASA's optical, X-ray and infrared spaced based telescopes. No one else is even in the game and this October the James Webb Space telescope is scheduled to be launched. It will dwarf Hubble in size and capability and who knows what it will reveal. That little Mars helicopter program cost $80 million but considering the know how gained and the prestige flying on another planet gives to the US ii is certainly money better spent than what Biden, Pelosi or Schumer would spend the money on.

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @songbird

  30. @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    This is useless data, for so many reasons. For one US GDP data is rigged.

    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home.

    It is corrupt and controlled by the government

    A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    The Chinese can get anything we can…much cheaper.

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    China has plenty of space with four times the population and a higher average IQ. In the US only the elite have gigantic homes

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    Again the GDP number is made up. And only an idiot would think the US faired better than China.

    You sure do live in a goddamn dream world.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Realist

    It's stupid to compete on overall GDP with a country that has three times your population unless you have a massive development and human capital advantage. You can debate whether India is ever going to reach that point, but with China, that advantage was inevitably going to end by the 1990s when the economic reforms really got going, however much US elites helped them.

    (Similarly, racing to the bottom in terms of cheap labor is a battle the US is never going to win, not that this matters to our rentier economy enthusiastic ruling class. If I were in charge of a developing African country, I'd view things differently, but you got to play with the hand you've got.)

    Focusing on quality instead of quantity is the way to go. It should be noted, however, that this only works if that quality is applied well, which is a stretch considering endemic labor and talent misallocation in the American economy. There's also the question of protection against foreign espionage, even if you can get to the point where you can produce superior quality products: tellingly, the Chinese have zero tolerance toward anybody who acts similarly to how many in the US industrial sector acted in the 1990s and 2000s.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Liberty Mike
    @Realist

    The GDP figures are a joke.

  31. @anon

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.
     
    Doesn't matter. China is closing fast, and GDP will be the factor determining who runs the world, not per capita GDP.

    "we produce a superabundance of food ... By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less"
     
    Who's worse off, the nation that imports millions of peasant third worlders into their country to take over demographically so they can get cheap tomatoes at the grocery store, or the nation that grows things with domestic labor?

    Further, the stat you cited on Chinese labor really means nothing. It hasn't impeded China's ability to out-compete the United States in 5G and quantum computing; the Chinese will dominate countless other emerging technologies in the future. I'm sure that China will eventually industrialize to the point where they need much less labor to grow food anyway.

    "Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home."
     
    China is leading the way in super computing and the emerging field of quantum computing. They are also leading in 5G, which is why the US desperately banned Huawei from operating in the United States and attempted (unsuccessfully) to bully the rest of the world into foregoing their technology. The US barely got their 5G chips, after banning the competition, into the latest smartphones. What happens when China races ahead with 6G and the US has no answer? How exactly are 198 million White Caucasians, a few Asians, and immigrants supposed to compete with a billion smart Han Chinese in any intellectual field? Whites are dying off at a rate of about 500k/1 million per year in the United States, and China already publishes more scientific papers in many fields than the US and is set to race far ahead in the coming decade.

    "A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles."
     
    They're not. China has an equivalent service that is just as good. They also have the world's largest internet company, most advanced highspeed rail, most advanced telecommunications company, third largest smart phone manufacturer, a nascent competitor to Boeing, etc.

    Amazon is a leftist monopoly that censors their political opposition. I don't see how anyone should be cheering for them. They're also heavily subsidized by the publicly-funded US postal service anyway, so they're certainly not a paragon of free market capitalism.

    "China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life."
     
    How does that explain the Japanese or the Koreans? Both are rich, industrialized nations with fiercely competitive populations. South Korea issues more patents per capita than the United States does. More likely explanation: China competes hard because their mean IQ, along with other East Asian nations, is much higher than America's pathetic 97 (and falling fast). And it's worse than that for the United States. In the near future, all political power will be concentrated in the hands of a party whose mean IQ is maybe 95 and falling, the democrats. Compare that with the CCP, which is filled with engineers and assorted geniuses. I believe a writer for this website once calculated the CCP's mean IQ at 140, at least for senior leadership rolls. Compare that with either major American party and laugh. Do AOC and Marco Rubio have 140 IQs?

    They choke on unbreathable air
     
    So did the US in the 1950s and 60s. Didn't stop the US from taking over the world with 50% of global GDP.

    China has a massive shortage of women
     
    The US has a similar problem with rising numbers of singles, declining marriage rates, and crashing birthrates. The Chinese still have over 100 million more females than the entire US population. Who cares if the ratios are off when they can make up for it on volume? In the United States, we have a different, but also significant, problem: rising inequality in male/female quality of life, educational attainment, etc. We're hardly in a position to gloat.

    "Chinese people wish they were us."
     
    No, they don't. The number of US graduates in many technical fields has actually declined as Chinese students have opted to return home after graduation rather than staying. The evidence is in, they don't want to be us. China is freer and much less divided than the United States. Here, if you're White male, you're discriminated against, hounded out of your job, denied opportunities* and you have no future. There is high crime, 24/7 racism, terrorist groups like antifa roaming the streets, and constant fear. I certainly wish I hadn't been born here. I'd kill to have been born Japanese. I have a feeling I'll wish I had been born Chinese in a few decades, if I make it that far in this climate.

    *There are countless stories like this one coming from the US:

    Hollywood Doesn't Want WHITE DUDES Anymore, Say Movie Execs.

    Several Hollywood executives, actors and writers spoke to the Daily Mail UK this week (anonymously) and said that Hollywood is in FULL ON PANIC MODE over "cancel culture" right now. The mandate from many studios is that middle-aged white dudes (called "menemies") are now persona non grata, as studios are TERRIFIED of social media backlash for not being progressive enough. Between this and the pandemic, some white folks in Hollywood are even selling their houses and moving out of state because they know their careers are effectively OVER.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfVrcC39R84
     
    China doesn't discriminate against their own people. No one in China will force you to hire non-Chinese and defer to them. China doesn't have an entire month dedicated to celebrating foreign racial groups and castigating their own. Antifa doesn't attack Chinese courthouses with permission of the state, that's for sure. We have political prisoners in the US (jailed for making fun of Hilary Clinton on Facebook), a strict censorship regime (which the website has been victimized by), and a corrupt government and media that lie and attack their opponents nonstop. I could go on all day. Just what exactly makes you proud to be an American over being born Han Chinese? They have a future, at least. Can you say that about Whites in the United States?

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Realist, @showmethereal, @Live from China

    Excellent, correct points all.

  32. There is a lot of normalcy bias on display here today AE. Keep up the good work anyway.

  33. anon[403] • Disclaimer says:

    Just about one year ago today, due to a confluence of unusual circumstances, the price of West Texas Intermediate briefly dropped to -$35 / bbl. That’s negative $35 per barrel, one would have to pay the guys in Cushing, Oklahoma to take it off your hands. There was a spasm of panic here at AE’s over that. A brief moment of intense blackpilling.

    What’s the price of WTI today?

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @anon

    That was an indication of problems with the credit markets. My guess at the time was that the price would be above $100 US in a couple of years. I still think that's correct.

    Replies: @anon

  34. @Realist
    @DanHessinMD


    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.
     
    This is useless data, for so many reasons. For one US GDP data is rigged.

    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home.
     
    It is corrupt and controlled by the government

    A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.
     
    The Chinese can get anything we can...much cheaper.

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.
     
    China has plenty of space with four times the population and a higher average IQ. In the US only the elite have gigantic homes

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.
     
    Again the GDP number is made up. And only an idiot would think the US faired better than China.

    You sure do live in a goddamn dream world.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Liberty Mike

    It’s stupid to compete on overall GDP with a country that has three times your population unless you have a massive development and human capital advantage. You can debate whether India is ever going to reach that point, but with China, that advantage was inevitably going to end by the 1990s when the economic reforms really got going, however much US elites helped them.

    (Similarly, racing to the bottom in terms of cheap labor is a battle the US is never going to win, not that this matters to our rentier economy enthusiastic ruling class. If I were in charge of a developing African country, I’d view things differently, but you got to play with the hand you’ve got.)

    Focusing on quality instead of quantity is the way to go. It should be noted, however, that this only works if that quality is applied well, which is a stretch considering endemic labor and talent misallocation in the American economy. There’s also the question of protection against foreign espionage, even if you can get to the point where you can produce superior quality products: tellingly, the Chinese have zero tolerance toward anybody who acts similarly to how many in the US industrial sector acted in the 1990s and 2000s.

    • Thanks: Realist
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @nebulafox

    I should clarify: in the 1990s, that advantage was overwhelming, but it should have been obvious that it wouldn't last 40 years into the future, barring unforseeable events. What the US could still use to retain dominance would have taken policy and ideology antithetical to our post-Cold War ruling and intellectual classes.

    Simply put: don't pick terrain disadvantageous to you and advantageous to your enemy. That's what competing on overall GDP is with another developed nation, if it happens to be 3x more populous than you. You have to either have overwhelming superiority in terms of human capital and technical development, or you pick a different battle to fight.

  35. @nebulafox
    @Realist

    It's stupid to compete on overall GDP with a country that has three times your population unless you have a massive development and human capital advantage. You can debate whether India is ever going to reach that point, but with China, that advantage was inevitably going to end by the 1990s when the economic reforms really got going, however much US elites helped them.

    (Similarly, racing to the bottom in terms of cheap labor is a battle the US is never going to win, not that this matters to our rentier economy enthusiastic ruling class. If I were in charge of a developing African country, I'd view things differently, but you got to play with the hand you've got.)

    Focusing on quality instead of quantity is the way to go. It should be noted, however, that this only works if that quality is applied well, which is a stretch considering endemic labor and talent misallocation in the American economy. There's also the question of protection against foreign espionage, even if you can get to the point where you can produce superior quality products: tellingly, the Chinese have zero tolerance toward anybody who acts similarly to how many in the US industrial sector acted in the 1990s and 2000s.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    I should clarify: in the 1990s, that advantage was overwhelming, but it should have been obvious that it wouldn’t last 40 years into the future, barring unforseeable events. What the US could still use to retain dominance would have taken policy and ideology antithetical to our post-Cold War ruling and intellectual classes.

    Simply put: don’t pick terrain disadvantageous to you and advantageous to your enemy. That’s what competing on overall GDP is with another developed nation, if it happens to be 3x more populous than you. You have to either have overwhelming superiority in terms of human capital and technical development, or you pick a different battle to fight.

  36. I don’t see any chance for American renewal. The status of too many people is built on an anti-white narrative. That goes double or triple for the government whose major expansion has been built on the duel pillars of open borders and “civil rights.”

    I’m not sure there is a single PoC member of Congress who isn’t a low rent hustler, with an anti-white platform. If there is, you’d have to search pretty hard. Are they a member of racial caucus? If so, they are a low-rent hustler.

    A lot of demographic change is built into the cake, even without immigration. Look at any past predictive model, test it with the current situation, and you can probably say it will be worse.

    I don’t anticipate any inspiration or questioning to come from art. It has been a long time since Europeans have asserted their right to have a discrete culture. At a minimum, it takes the ability to self associate, and that is a right that is not recognized and I don’t see it being recognized in the future.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @songbird


    It has been a long time since Europeans have asserted their right to have a discrete culture. At a minimum, it takes the ability to self associate, and that is a right that is not recognized and I don’t see it being recognized in the future.
     
    Maybe. It is too soon to tell. Europeans have not yet even asked for the right to self associate.

    Replies: @songbird

  37. @songbird
    @unit472

    NASA spends more than any other space agency. For its outlay, I would consider it to put on a pretty poor show. Of course, there is SpaceX, but a lot of subsidy went into that. We are still talking economic factors which might just be lag indicators of decline. Plus, if SpaceX accomplishes anything, when you prove something is possible, it is easy to copy.

    Replies: @unit472

    Its hard to determine if NASA spends its money well since what it spends money on are things no other nation or company can even attempt. Consider NASA’s space telescopes. What we know of the universe is largely due to NASA’s optical, X-ray and infrared spaced based telescopes. No one else is even in the game and this October the James Webb Space telescope is scheduled to be launched. It will dwarf Hubble in size and capability and who knows what it will reveal. That little Mars helicopter program cost $80 million but considering the know how gained and the prestige flying on another planet gives to the US ii is certainly money better spent than what Biden, Pelosi or Schumer would spend the money on.

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    @unit472

    What does the average USian get from all the money spent on space telescopes and such? NASA has been a boondoggle for decades spending money on the national credit card for things that have no practical application.

    Being the leader in wasting money isn't a plus.

    Replies: @unit472

    , @songbird
    @unit472

    If you add it up, year by year, it seems that for many years they were wasting a lot money without addressing the primary factor of making space practical - the cost of kg to orbit. Though, they are semi-addressing that now.


    the know how gained and the prestige flying on another planet gives to the US ii is certainly money better spent than what Biden, Pelosi or Schumer would spend the money on.
     
    There's a lot of politics in NASA. Just a month ago, they were considering using some facility as a migrant-housing camp. And SLS was certainly loaded with political bloat.

    It's hard to get excited about. The prestige just encourages more immigration - people in third world countries talk about their dream of working for NASA. If we manage to go back to the moon - it will be about showboating diversity/promoting the ideology.
  38. @Johann Ricke

    As if the imploding American empire
     
    Given that there is no empire, except as a figure of speech ... The difference between an empire and an alliance is that when attacked from without, an alliance bands together to fight off the threat, whereas an empire's components seize the opportunity to weaken the metropole so they can each go their own way.

    China's rulers have, like their counterparts among other great civilizations, always wanted to rule "all under heaven".

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tianxia

    The current crop is no different. Whether the rest of the world end ups being ruled from Beijing depends on how early it bands together to ward off China's armies. China's population in relation to the rest of the world now is similar to that of the Qin kingdom relative to the rest of northeast Asia when the First Emperor set out to create* the continental scale empire we now know as China.

    Thanks to the illusion created by MAD theory of a nuclear Masada in reaction to conventional attack, we've persuaded ourselves that national leaders no longer seek personal glory through territorial acquisition, whether via bloodless surrenders under threat or armed conquest. China is within a decade or so of slicing through the MAD Gordian Knot. In the decades ahead, the question is whether the US will be able to field a conventional military powerful enough to keep them out of North America, never mind the rest of the world. It's only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.

    * Like Alexander, he was trying to conquer anything his armies could reach, until the cost of new advances started to cut into the minimum force he needed to hold on to his recently-won gains.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @V. K. Ovelund, @Boomthorkell

    It’s only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.

    Yes but it’s not working. American attempts somehow to make it work have caused Russia, incredibly, to throw in with China.

    Since Russia is the crucial element of any alliance of the kind of which you speak, the Russian turn toward China is a problem.

    Sometimes pushing, pushing, pushing by Americans simply does not work. Sometimes, the smart thing to do is to stop pushing.

    No one trusts the United States any longer. We blew it, but the situation can still be retrieved if we respectfully allow foreigners some time and space to find other countries not to trust.

    I grasp the imperative: resist China now! What I am telling you is that it is not working. The world will not follow our lead. The resources of the Free World can no longer be marshaled by us. That is no longer possible. We Americans are the most hated people on earth.

    • Replies: @unit472
    @V. K. Ovelund

    I'd rather have Japan and the UK as allies than Russia. They have bigger economies and and can build better warships and submarines than Russia. They also have some indigenous aerospace capability and what they lack here the US will furnish.

    Of some interest to me ( and probably the Kremlin too) is that China did not recognize Russia's annexation of Crimea likely to avoid antagonizing the EU with whom China has far more important economic ties than with Russia so Russia really can't count on Chinese support for any of their foreign adventure other than with, perhaps, Iran.

    Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain

  39. @songbird
    I don't see any chance for American renewal. The status of too many people is built on an anti-white narrative. That goes double or triple for the government whose major expansion has been built on the duel pillars of open borders and "civil rights."

    I'm not sure there is a single PoC member of Congress who isn't a low rent hustler, with an anti-white platform. If there is, you'd have to search pretty hard. Are they a member of racial caucus? If so, they are a low-rent hustler.

    A lot of demographic change is built into the cake, even without immigration. Look at any past predictive model, test it with the current situation, and you can probably say it will be worse.

    I don't anticipate any inspiration or questioning to come from art. It has been a long time since Europeans have asserted their right to have a discrete culture. At a minimum, it takes the ability to self associate, and that is a right that is not recognized and I don't see it being recognized in the future.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    It has been a long time since Europeans have asserted their right to have a discrete culture. At a minimum, it takes the ability to self associate, and that is a right that is not recognized and I don’t see it being recognized in the future.

    Maybe. It is too soon to tell. Europeans have not yet even asked for the right to self associate.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Europeans have not yet even asked for the right to self associate.
     
    I would say they have asked, but not demanded. It will not be given by asking.
  40. @Realist
    @DanHessinMD


    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.
     
    This is useless data, for so many reasons. For one US GDP data is rigged.

    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home.
     
    It is corrupt and controlled by the government

    A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.
     
    The Chinese can get anything we can...much cheaper.

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.
     
    China has plenty of space with four times the population and a higher average IQ. In the US only the elite have gigantic homes

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.
     
    Again the GDP number is made up. And only an idiot would think the US faired better than China.

    You sure do live in a goddamn dream world.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Liberty Mike

    The GDP figures are a joke.

    • Thanks: Realist
  41. @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    Upon basis do you asseverate that American food is higher quality than China’s.

    Is your position predicated upon the hordes of horizontally challenged one finds at Food Lion, Krogers, or Walmart?

    Is your contention informed by the bounty of ADM?

    Is your take based on the ubiquity of HFC and MSG in our food products?

  42. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Johann Ricke


    It’s only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.
     
    Yes but it's not working. American attempts somehow to make it work have caused Russia, incredibly, to throw in with China.

    Since Russia is the crucial element of any alliance of the kind of which you speak, the Russian turn toward China is a problem.

    Sometimes pushing, pushing, pushing by Americans simply does not work. Sometimes, the smart thing to do is to stop pushing.

    No one trusts the United States any longer. We blew it, but the situation can still be retrieved if we respectfully allow foreigners some time and space to find other countries not to trust.

    I grasp the imperative: resist China now! What I am telling you is that it is not working. The world will not follow our lead. The resources of the Free World can no longer be marshaled by us. That is no longer possible. We Americans are the most hated people on earth.

    Replies: @unit472

    I’d rather have Japan and the UK as allies than Russia. They have bigger economies and and can build better warships and submarines than Russia. They also have some indigenous aerospace capability and what they lack here the US will furnish.

    Of some interest to me ( and probably the Kremlin too) is that China did not recognize Russia’s annexation of Crimea likely to avoid antagonizing the EU with whom China has far more important economic ties than with Russia so Russia really can’t count on Chinese support for any of their foreign adventure other than with, perhaps, Iran.

    • Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain
    @unit472

    Liberating Crimea from the grasp of Ukronazi fascist butchers was NOT a 'foreign' adventure.

  43. I’d rather have Japan and the UK as allies than Russia.

    So would I.

    They have bigger economies and and can build better warships and submarines than Russia. They also have some indigenous aerospace capability and what they lack here the US will furnish.

    Makes sense.

    However, insofar as Japan is in no position to defend the United States, better would be if Russia had Japan as an ally. That would leave us out of it, over the horizon, free to consider whether to lend or withhold aid during a crisis.

    A Russo-Japanese alliance be more problematical for the Chinese than the current arrangement is. It would also be cheaper and safer for us. Win-win.

    • Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain
    @V. K. Ovelund

    The UK? An ally? Are you MAD?

  44. @unit472
    @songbird

    Its hard to determine if NASA spends its money well since what it spends money on are things no other nation or company can even attempt. Consider NASA's space telescopes. What we know of the universe is largely due to NASA's optical, X-ray and infrared spaced based telescopes. No one else is even in the game and this October the James Webb Space telescope is scheduled to be launched. It will dwarf Hubble in size and capability and who knows what it will reveal. That little Mars helicopter program cost $80 million but considering the know how gained and the prestige flying on another planet gives to the US ii is certainly money better spent than what Biden, Pelosi or Schumer would spend the money on.

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @songbird

    What does the average USian get from all the money spent on space telescopes and such? NASA has been a boondoggle for decades spending money on the national credit card for things that have no practical application.

    Being the leader in wasting money isn’t a plus.

    • Replies: @unit472
    @RoatanBill

    Hard to believe someone could compose something as illiterate as this in 2021 but I'll take a stab at refuting sheer stupidity. Don't know where you live but you might appreciate improved weather forecasts which were among the first NASA efforts to use space. Tracking storms saves lives. Watching your hometown football team play an opponent in real time thousands of miles away might seem frivolous but without communication satellites we couldn't do it. Airliners used to have to use stellar navigation to determine their position if they were out of radar and radio range, they could even have a midair collision but GPS satellites fixed that.

    At the moment we have but one orbiting 20 year old space station with half a dozen people on it trying to conduct what experiments they can that a world of 7 billion people need to know the answer to and you think it is a 'boondoogle'? I'd rather know what the rocks of Mars can tell us than what you think.

    Replies: @anon, @Joe Stalin, @RoatanBill

  45. @unit472
    @songbird

    Its hard to determine if NASA spends its money well since what it spends money on are things no other nation or company can even attempt. Consider NASA's space telescopes. What we know of the universe is largely due to NASA's optical, X-ray and infrared spaced based telescopes. No one else is even in the game and this October the James Webb Space telescope is scheduled to be launched. It will dwarf Hubble in size and capability and who knows what it will reveal. That little Mars helicopter program cost $80 million but considering the know how gained and the prestige flying on another planet gives to the US ii is certainly money better spent than what Biden, Pelosi or Schumer would spend the money on.

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @songbird

    If you add it up, year by year, it seems that for many years they were wasting a lot money without addressing the primary factor of making space practical – the cost of kg to orbit. Though, they are semi-addressing that now.

    the know how gained and the prestige flying on another planet gives to the US ii is certainly money better spent than what Biden, Pelosi or Schumer would spend the money on.

    There’s a lot of politics in NASA. Just a month ago, they were considering using some facility as a migrant-housing camp. And SLS was certainly loaded with political bloat.

    It’s hard to get excited about. The prestige just encourages more immigration – people in third world countries talk about their dream of working for NASA. If we manage to go back to the moon – it will be about showboating diversity/promoting the ideology.

  46. This is ridiculous… The US is the 3th most populous country in the world, no matter how bad you fall, the worst will be not being able to screw up Asia, Europe and Latin America still yours ro rule.

  47. The JEW/WASP Ruling Class of the American Empire has crawled into bed with the ruling class of the Chinese Communist Party. Bill Clinton and George W Bush sold out the sovereignty and national security interests of the United States in their treasonous plots with the Communist Chinese.

    The JEW/WASP Ruling Class is using trade and immigration policy as a weapon to weaken the United States of America. Bill Clinton and George W Bush are treasonous baby boomer scumbags who sold out the United States to the Communist Chinese.

  48. @V. K. Ovelund

    For all the cultural imperialism abroad and cultural erasure at home the American empire has perpetrated, I’m still overtaken by sadness. This was the greatest country on earth. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrims’ pride, from every mountain side, let freedom ring. It isn’t any longer. It never will be again.
     
    No, it won't.

    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.


    ... there has been a marked bipartisan increase in hostility towards the world’s ascendant second pole over the last four years....
     
    Competition between great powers being what it is, the increase in hostility is a necessary, healthful development. The increase is overdue.

    If China makes a move on Taiwan, ...
     
    ... then the move will probably, finally expose the bankruptcy of U.S. foreign policy. We Americans have written Taiwan a check that, in the event, the Taiwanese will find themselves unable to cash.

    I suspect that that humiliation will come out all right for us Americans, though. For us to reduce our international pretensions to match our actual strength is another overdue development.

    Dan Hess is fundamentally right: the U.S. position remains strong, even if (as you observe) the position is no longer sound. The petrodollar (as earlier discussed) still has a good mechanism via XDR to divert gently into the macroeconomic off-ramp, averting a crash, if only Americans would show the foresight to use the mechanism and take the ramp.

    Besides this factor and the factors Dan mentions, the U.S. occupies an enviably secure geographical position. Natural U.S. interests lie in places like Panama, not in the old Spanish, French and Dutch colonies that ring the South China Sea. In Panama, we have the leverage, not the Chinese.

    One only wishes that the U.S. would shut up, draw down American military and perhaps naval presence in the Old World, and pull back to Guam—lapsing into a passive, unresponsive, nonprovocative foreign policy for the next 30 years, letting circumstances force Russia to realign with Japan and India against China, and maybe Australia to realign with Britain and Canada against both. That the U.S. did not do so 25 years ago is regrettable, but it is far from too late, still.

    Far from too late for us, that is. The unfortunate Taiwanese, by contrast, are in the wok.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Wency, @dfordoom

    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.

    I’d be curious for you to expand on this one. I’m making a conscious choice to try to distance my children more from overt expressions and notions of patriotism than was the case in my childhood, to not get so attached to the idea of America and the notion of loyalty and allegiance to the regime in DC, to instead conceptualize identities in terms of family, community, and church. Of course, we live in a place that is still very animated by the idea of American pride, even as our state is one of those most despised by the imperial core.

    But the truth is somehow all that youthful patriotism slipped away from me effortlessly in the past 10 or 15 years, without me really trying to disassociate from it. The prospect of a conflict between USG and CCP doesn’t animate me any more than the conflict between Habsburg and Romanov animated my very non-Austrian and non-Russian forebears caught in the middle.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Wency



    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.
     
    I’d be curious for you to expand on this one.
     
    It's a feeling, a matter of the heart, hard to explain, but you have lived through it as have I. You will understand.

    Do you remember Corporal Pat Tillman, U.S. Army Ranger, who waived $3.6 million of this:

    https://pattillmanfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/PT_Stare.jpg

    For the privilege of this?

    https://pattillmanfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/PT_Bro_Rangers-1.jpg

    An American, the son of pioneers—blood, soil and bone—Tillman could not bear the shame that his country should be at war without him in the fight. In 2004, in the mountains of Afghanistan, he paid for that privilege with his life.

    I chanced to speak with a U.S. Army Ranger home on leave last year, the son of a friend, a member of Tillman's old regiment. The young Ranger, shorter than Tillman but heavily muscled enough to wrestle a bear, agreed with his father that the Rangers today are motivated by professionalism and comradeship. The young Ranger and his comrades have heard tell of the old patriotism, and they can hear it still in old sergeants' voices, but do not much feel it themselves. They train, they fight, they take just pride in a duty well done, but not for the spirit of their pioneer ancestors. Not any more.

    A patriot can love his country as he loves his son. Base betrayal by either country or son is bitter enough to poison the patriot's soul. Trust is shattered, and the patriotism along with it, for as Pat Buchanan tried to warn us ere it grew too late, “But what doth it profit a man if he gain the whole world and suffer the loss of his country?”

    The bitterness does not die. Our young sons sense the bitterness in us. Their patriotism thus never takes root.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  49. @V. K. Ovelund
    @songbird


    It has been a long time since Europeans have asserted their right to have a discrete culture. At a minimum, it takes the ability to self associate, and that is a right that is not recognized and I don’t see it being recognized in the future.
     
    Maybe. It is too soon to tell. Europeans have not yet even asked for the right to self associate.

    Replies: @songbird

    Europeans have not yet even asked for the right to self associate.

    I would say they have asked, but not demanded. It will not be given by asking.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
  50. @Wency
    @V. K. Ovelund


    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.
     
    I'd be curious for you to expand on this one. I'm making a conscious choice to try to distance my children more from overt expressions and notions of patriotism than was the case in my childhood, to not get so attached to the idea of America and the notion of loyalty and allegiance to the regime in DC, to instead conceptualize identities in terms of family, community, and church. Of course, we live in a place that is still very animated by the idea of American pride, even as our state is one of those most despised by the imperial core.

    But the truth is somehow all that youthful patriotism slipped away from me effortlessly in the past 10 or 15 years, without me really trying to disassociate from it. The prospect of a conflict between USG and CCP doesn't animate me any more than the conflict between Habsburg and Romanov animated my very non-Austrian and non-Russian forebears caught in the middle.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.

    I’d be curious for you to expand on this one.

    It’s a feeling, a matter of the heart, hard to explain, but you have lived through it as have I. You will understand.

    Do you remember Corporal Pat Tillman, U.S. Army Ranger, who waived $3.6 million of this:

    For the privilege of this?

    An American, the son of pioneers—blood, soil and bone—Tillman could not bear the shame that his country should be at war without him in the fight. In 2004, in the mountains of Afghanistan, he paid for that privilege with his life.

    I chanced to speak with a U.S. Army Ranger home on leave last year, the son of a friend, a member of Tillman’s old regiment. The young Ranger, shorter than Tillman but heavily muscled enough to wrestle a bear, agreed with his father that the Rangers today are motivated by professionalism and comradeship. The young Ranger and his comrades have heard tell of the old patriotism, and they can hear it still in old sergeants’ voices, but do not much feel it themselves. They train, they fight, they take just pride in a duty well done, but not for the spirit of their pioneer ancestors. Not any more.

    A patriot can love his country as he loves his son. Base betrayal by either country or son is bitter enough to poison the patriot’s soul. Trust is shattered, and the patriotism along with it, for as Pat Buchanan tried to warn us ere it grew too late, “But what doth it profit a man if he gain the whole world and suffer the loss of his country?”

    The bitterness does not die. Our young sons sense the bitterness in us. Their patriotism thus never takes root.

    • Thanks: Wency
    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund

    I appreciate your sentiment and am sympathetic to it, but I still inculcate patriotism in my children. You know I homeschool. I begin each day with the children with the Pledge of Allegiance.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Wency

  51. An excellent example showing that the jews can make a lot of the goyim believe anything they want in a very short amount of time. ZOG does not see China as an entity that will bend to its will, which is why it needs to have its thrall states like the USA and UK do everything possible to destroy China.

  52. @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    GDP:

    Yes, it’s interesting, but I wonder if it can last. My brother manages a shop that was considered necessary and avoided lockdowns. They were able to do business all year until just recently they ran out of product. Supply chains and storage finally petered out, and they cannot meet customer demand anymore. I imagine there must be others in similar situation. For example, recently, as computer nerds will tell you, we have started having problems with the consumer PC market. Prices are going up and some things are unavailable. How long can the current situation escalate before starting to effect the rest of the economy? I don’t know.

    Food security:

    The US’s cheap protein comes from agricultural practices that are environmentally degenerative and probably unsustainable in the medium-to-long-term (and also unethically abusive of animals, although that is sustainable). Moreover, the entire food system is shot through with problems, from excessive water requirements to subsidized production of empty calories. There negative externalities that are not taken into account in food prices. We also have only a fraction of China’s population. If adopt immigration practices designed to make us economically and militarily competitive with China in the long run (a la Matt Yglesias 1,000,000,000 Americans), the food production will not look so good.

    People:

    There were some studies a few years ago that show Hispanic immigrant families don’t build savings or go to university at comparable rates to the native population, even into the third generation. China also doesn’t have to deal with an African population that is constantly at risk of undermining its urban centers for reasons both social/economic (Detroit) and political (NYC). I don’t know how China will deal with its structural demographic problems, but the basic human capital they are dealing with is better quality than ours already and the trends are in the wrong direction for us (not to mention the political and social problems from diversity, such as DIE ideology).

  53. Chauvin guilty on all counts, poor sod. Let’s hope he wins the appeal.

    I’m going to hate the gloating of the Guardian and BBC about this.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Just made $1800 on a betting site over this.

    Love it when justice is also profitable.

  54. @Johann Ricke
    @anon


    Some guy, Rome 450 AD: Rome will never be the same. True.

    Some guy, Soviet Union 1990: The Soviet Union will never be same. True.

    Some guy, America 2020: America will never be the same. Also true.
     
    One of these is not like the other two. But you'd had to have spent hundreds of hours learning both about the history of those fallen regimes, and even more time on finding out about the Fortune 500 companies that keep Uncle Sam #1. More trouble than it's worth, unless you're really interested in world history or a stock market buff.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Some guy, Rome 450 AD: Rome will never be the same. True.

    There was no cataclysmic „Fall of Rome“ in Fifth Century like it’s common narrated (there was, however, a Fall of Constantinople). The Greek Eastern Roman Empire thrived for another millennia. And almost made a comeback to the West under Justinian. Its call „Byzantine“ with certain connotations but still very much Roman.

    View post on imgur.com

    Who’s to say that you guys can’t have your own Justinian?

  55. @YetAnotherAnon
    Chauvin guilty on all counts, poor sod. Let's hope he wins the appeal.

    I'm going to hate the gloating of the Guardian and BBC about this.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

    Just made $1800 on a betting site over this.

    Love it when justice is also profitable.

  56. @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    This is pretty weak hasbara.

    The rest of the replies cover most points I would riposte with (particularly Malefan’s) — but as far as the business side, take a look at Amazon’s global market share vis-a-vis Alibaba. 37% vs 69% within their home borders. The American oligarchs are giving their best go at snuffing out all their domestic competition (unlike China) and still getting 1-hit-KO’d by what was formerly Jack Ma’s copycat. The student has eclipsed the master — and not needed to surrender the national interest in doing so.

    • Replies: @showmethereal
    @Supply and Demand

    And JD.com has probably the most sophisticated infrastructure of any of them... Most people outside Asia have never even heard of them.

  57. This is just defeatism. If you are truly a great people then you will have the resilience.

    As you can see, the entirety of US history is shorter than that of the Han dynasty (and much shorter than any the 3 macrohistorical Imperial periods).

    After 3 centuries of disunion post-Han, China would assimilate the barbarian invaders and reach new pinnacle during Tang. And do this over again and again.

    During late Qing, there were those who thought that China had no chance, lest capitulate to fully adopting ways of the West like Japan.

    And yet again now, at the cusp of new pinnacle.

    Antiquity
    Xia 夏 dynasty (2070 – 1600 BC)
    Shang 商 dynasty (1600 – 1046 BC)
    Zhou 周 dynasty (1046 – 256 BC)
    Spring and Autumn 春秋 period (722 – 476 BC)
    Warring States 战国 period (476 – 221 BC)
    1st Reich
    Qin 秦 dynasty (221 – 206 BC)
    Han 汉 dynasty (206 BC – AD 220)
    Three Kingdoms 三国 (AD 220 – 280)
    Jin 晋 dynasty (AD 266 – 420)
    Northern and Southern dynasties 南北朝 (AD 420 – 589)
    2nd Reich
    Sui 隋 dynasty (AD 581 – 618)
    Tang 唐 dynasty (AD 618 – 907)
    Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms 五代十国 (AD 907 – 960)
    Song, Liao, Jin, and Western Xia dynasties 宋辽金夏 (AD 960 – 1279)
    3rd Reich
    Yuan 元 dynasty (AD 1271 – 1368)
    Ming 明 dynasty (AD 1368 – 1644)
    Qing 清 dynasty (AD 1644 – 1912)
    Modern
    Republic of China (AD 1912 – present)
    PRC Commies (AD 1949 – present)

    Whereas East Asia is an extremely dangerous neighborhood where even the Tibetans were once fierce warriors. US is located on an island with little threat of military invasion and no challengers to her power in all of Americas.

    Best case scenario, you can have a 中兴, mid-dynasty revival like so many times in Chinese history. Or even worse case, your version of a Romance of Three Kingdoms where Heros show what they are made of.

    • Agree: Boomthorkell
  58. @Jackbnimbl
    @Anonymous

    It all comes down to demographics in the end. If China remains 90% Han, and we keep doing what we are doing. We lose. May take 20 years. May take longer.

    Replies: @anon

  59. The USA was NEVER the greatest country on Earth save to Imperialists who thought that constant aggression against the rest of humanity makes you ‘great’.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Mulga Mumblebrain

    I mean, before the 1900s, it wasn't doing anything anyone else didn't do. It did have a lot of promise for a fairly genuine Republic.

    Again, though, I was never under the illusion America was to be a model for everyone. It was good for what it was. It was then taken along its worst possible path.

  60. @V. K. Ovelund

    I’d rather have Japan and the UK as allies than Russia.
     
    So would I.

    They have bigger economies and and can build better warships and submarines than Russia. They also have some indigenous aerospace capability and what they lack here the US will furnish.
     
    Makes sense.

    However, insofar as Japan is in no position to defend the United States, better would be if Russia had Japan as an ally. That would leave us out of it, over the horizon, free to consider whether to lend or withhold aid during a crisis.

    A Russo-Japanese alliance be more problematical for the Chinese than the current arrangement is. It would also be cheaper and safer for us. Win-win.

    Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain

    The UK? An ally? Are you MAD?

  61. @unit472
    @V. K. Ovelund

    I'd rather have Japan and the UK as allies than Russia. They have bigger economies and and can build better warships and submarines than Russia. They also have some indigenous aerospace capability and what they lack here the US will furnish.

    Of some interest to me ( and probably the Kremlin too) is that China did not recognize Russia's annexation of Crimea likely to avoid antagonizing the EU with whom China has far more important economic ties than with Russia so Russia really can't count on Chinese support for any of their foreign adventure other than with, perhaps, Iran.

    Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain

    Liberating Crimea from the grasp of Ukronazi fascist butchers was NOT a ‘foreign’ adventure.

  62. @RoatanBill
    @unit472

    What does the average USian get from all the money spent on space telescopes and such? NASA has been a boondoggle for decades spending money on the national credit card for things that have no practical application.

    Being the leader in wasting money isn't a plus.

    Replies: @unit472

    Hard to believe someone could compose something as illiterate as this in 2021 but I’ll take a stab at refuting sheer stupidity. Don’t know where you live but you might appreciate improved weather forecasts which were among the first NASA efforts to use space. Tracking storms saves lives. Watching your hometown football team play an opponent in real time thousands of miles away might seem frivolous but without communication satellites we couldn’t do it. Airliners used to have to use stellar navigation to determine their position if they were out of radar and radio range, they could even have a midair collision but GPS satellites fixed that.

    At the moment we have but one orbiting 20 year old space station with half a dozen people on it trying to conduct what experiments they can that a world of 7 billion people need to know the answer to and you think it is a ‘boondoogle’? I’d rather know what the rocks of Mars can tell us than what you think.

    • Replies: @anon
    @unit472

    Don’t know where you live

    He is on an island off of the coast of Central America.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Isla_Roatan

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

    , @Joe Stalin
    @unit472

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fq0GiYCOgQI

    I remember in the 1960s you could write to NOAA and receive free literature on how to construct reception equipment for Weather Satellites on the VHF band including circular polarized antennas and how to see the FAX transmissions. The US government made all this data from the WX sats free to all.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWWGDL5tC_I

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    , @RoatanBill
    @unit472

    I don't mind things that make sense, like satellites and even exploring the moon for possible resources that it may have. What I object to is telescopes that look out light years worth of distance and then have some cosmologist tell me he sees a neutron star, black hole, etc or missions to zoom past Pluto to take a few photos.

    Most of the things the cosmologists postulate are mathematical possibilities like 11 dimensions, dark matter, dark energy, etc. There's no actual evidence they exist and since they're so far away, actual empirical evidence is impossible to acquire to prove things one way or the other. The plasma physics community has completely different explanations for what the cosmologists theorize but the cosmologists get the money.

    Too much money is spent on unicorns when that money would be better spent on things with a more immediate payback, not some entity that is millions of years away given our rocket technology. All I'm saying is spend more wisely, especially since the country's broke.

    And you can take your stupidity remark and shove it up your ass.

    Replies: @Realist

  63. @unit472
    @RoatanBill

    Hard to believe someone could compose something as illiterate as this in 2021 but I'll take a stab at refuting sheer stupidity. Don't know where you live but you might appreciate improved weather forecasts which were among the first NASA efforts to use space. Tracking storms saves lives. Watching your hometown football team play an opponent in real time thousands of miles away might seem frivolous but without communication satellites we couldn't do it. Airliners used to have to use stellar navigation to determine their position if they were out of radar and radio range, they could even have a midair collision but GPS satellites fixed that.

    At the moment we have but one orbiting 20 year old space station with half a dozen people on it trying to conduct what experiments they can that a world of 7 billion people need to know the answer to and you think it is a 'boondoogle'? I'd rather know what the rocks of Mars can tell us than what you think.

    Replies: @anon, @Joe Stalin, @RoatanBill

    Don’t know where you live

    He is on an island off of the coast of Central America.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Isla_Roatan

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    @anon

    I’ve been there. It’s pretty nice. At least until the government of Honduras eventually screws it up.

    Replies: @RoatanBill

  64. @unit472
    @RoatanBill

    Hard to believe someone could compose something as illiterate as this in 2021 but I'll take a stab at refuting sheer stupidity. Don't know where you live but you might appreciate improved weather forecasts which were among the first NASA efforts to use space. Tracking storms saves lives. Watching your hometown football team play an opponent in real time thousands of miles away might seem frivolous but without communication satellites we couldn't do it. Airliners used to have to use stellar navigation to determine their position if they were out of radar and radio range, they could even have a midair collision but GPS satellites fixed that.

    At the moment we have but one orbiting 20 year old space station with half a dozen people on it trying to conduct what experiments they can that a world of 7 billion people need to know the answer to and you think it is a 'boondoogle'? I'd rather know what the rocks of Mars can tell us than what you think.

    Replies: @anon, @Joe Stalin, @RoatanBill

    I remember in the 1960s you could write to NOAA and receive free literature on how to construct reception equipment for Weather Satellites on the VHF band including circular polarized antennas and how to see the FAX transmissions. The US government made all this data from the WX sats free to all.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Joe Stalin

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQMNf4KeGh9ZmkJSOgktv6VerKxo_yNYtGPuw&usqp.jpg

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRZrP9LngfdbIJWXdt3Z13DYQ4R3oQ_bufdOA&usqp.jpg



    https://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Visualizing-US-Population-by-Race.jpg

    https://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Visualizing-US-Population-by-Race-in-Every-State.jpg

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

  65. @Supply and Demand
    @Johann Ricke

    You’re misinterpreting Tianxia. The Chinese emperor considered areas in which he had no influence as his vassals of they did a once-a-rule tribute expression. An example here would be the Sultanate of Malacca, the Japanese during the Heian period, and the Portuguese who in the 16th century kowtowed and got a colony in exchange because the Emperor needed silver to mint coins. They were moving quite a bit of it via Japan and India.

    Most of the time it was a totally perfunctory court ritual that opened the door for trade access.

    The difference with Jewish power vs. Chinese power is that the Emperor only required about 1000 (mostly domestic) eunuchs to run his court. The Jews will be unsatisfied unless every single white chemically castrates themselves, which is what America is fast running towards under ZOG.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    the Emperor only required about 1000 (mostly domestic) eunuchs to run his court. 

    BS.

    The Empire was ran by meritocratic scholar-officials selected based on exam performance on knowledge of Confucianism. The Emperor was often only ceremonial ruler and overwhelmed by the moral-uppitiness and rhetorical power of the meritocrats, and thus resorted to employing a class of ex-“men“ with unquestionable loyalty and questionable methods, the eunuchs*, to balance the power of meritocrats.

    Whether the Imperial Exams and Confucian education have a straitjacketing effect is a good point. Compare that with castration is I would say hyperbolic. Comparing the eunuchs to today’s tranny politicians I would say is fair.

    *Not all of them were odious, Zheng He, who did not voluntarily become a eunuch, famously sailed to East Africa a century before the Portuguese.

    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    I didn't say the Empire, I said the court. The court is a different beast than the day-to-day management of the state.

  66. @unit472
    @RoatanBill

    Hard to believe someone could compose something as illiterate as this in 2021 but I'll take a stab at refuting sheer stupidity. Don't know where you live but you might appreciate improved weather forecasts which were among the first NASA efforts to use space. Tracking storms saves lives. Watching your hometown football team play an opponent in real time thousands of miles away might seem frivolous but without communication satellites we couldn't do it. Airliners used to have to use stellar navigation to determine their position if they were out of radar and radio range, they could even have a midair collision but GPS satellites fixed that.

    At the moment we have but one orbiting 20 year old space station with half a dozen people on it trying to conduct what experiments they can that a world of 7 billion people need to know the answer to and you think it is a 'boondoogle'? I'd rather know what the rocks of Mars can tell us than what you think.

    Replies: @anon, @Joe Stalin, @RoatanBill

    I don’t mind things that make sense, like satellites and even exploring the moon for possible resources that it may have. What I object to is telescopes that look out light years worth of distance and then have some cosmologist tell me he sees a neutron star, black hole, etc or missions to zoom past Pluto to take a few photos.

    Most of the things the cosmologists postulate are mathematical possibilities like 11 dimensions, dark matter, dark energy, etc. There’s no actual evidence they exist and since they’re so far away, actual empirical evidence is impossible to acquire to prove things one way or the other. The plasma physics community has completely different explanations for what the cosmologists theorize but the cosmologists get the money.

    Too much money is spent on unicorns when that money would be better spent on things with a more immediate payback, not some entity that is millions of years away given our rocket technology. All I’m saying is spend more wisely, especially since the country’s broke.

    And you can take your stupidity remark and shove it up your ass.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @RoatanBill


    Most of the things the cosmologists postulate are mathematical possibilities like 11 dimensions, dark matter, dark energy, etc. There’s no actual evidence they exist and since they’re so far away, actual empirical evidence is impossible to acquire to prove things one way or the other.
     
    Totally agree and I would add string theory, although it is not in the total purview of cosmology.
  67. @V. K. Ovelund

    For all the cultural imperialism abroad and cultural erasure at home the American empire has perpetrated, I’m still overtaken by sadness. This was the greatest country on earth. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrims’ pride, from every mountain side, let freedom ring. It isn’t any longer. It never will be again.
     
    No, it won't.

    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.


    ... there has been a marked bipartisan increase in hostility towards the world’s ascendant second pole over the last four years....
     
    Competition between great powers being what it is, the increase in hostility is a necessary, healthful development. The increase is overdue.

    If China makes a move on Taiwan, ...
     
    ... then the move will probably, finally expose the bankruptcy of U.S. foreign policy. We Americans have written Taiwan a check that, in the event, the Taiwanese will find themselves unable to cash.

    I suspect that that humiliation will come out all right for us Americans, though. For us to reduce our international pretensions to match our actual strength is another overdue development.

    Dan Hess is fundamentally right: the U.S. position remains strong, even if (as you observe) the position is no longer sound. The petrodollar (as earlier discussed) still has a good mechanism via XDR to divert gently into the macroeconomic off-ramp, averting a crash, if only Americans would show the foresight to use the mechanism and take the ramp.

    Besides this factor and the factors Dan mentions, the U.S. occupies an enviably secure geographical position. Natural U.S. interests lie in places like Panama, not in the old Spanish, French and Dutch colonies that ring the South China Sea. In Panama, we have the leverage, not the Chinese.

    One only wishes that the U.S. would shut up, draw down American military and perhaps naval presence in the Old World, and pull back to Guam—lapsing into a passive, unresponsive, nonprovocative foreign policy for the next 30 years, letting circumstances force Russia to realign with Japan and India against China, and maybe Australia to realign with Britain and Canada against both. That the U.S. did not do so 25 years ago is regrettable, but it is far from too late, still.

    Far from too late for us, that is. The unfortunate Taiwanese, by contrast, are in the wok.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Wency, @dfordoom

    One only wishes that the U.S. would shut up, draw down American military and perhaps naval presence in the Old World, and pull back to Guam—lapsing into a passive, unresponsive, nonprovocative foreign policy for the next 30 years

    That would be great.

    Withdrawing all US bases in foreign countries would be a very positive thing.

    Withdrawing from NATO would be a very very very good thing.

    The US faces zero military threats.

    letting circumstances force Russia to realign with Japan and India against China, and maybe Australia to realign with Britain and Canada against both.

    Another very good move would be for the US to cancel its military alliances with countries like Australia. Australia also faces zero military threats. The US-Australia alliance actually threatens Australia’s security.

    Also dump the Five Eyes alliance.

    Pat Buchanan makes some good points on this subject in his latest column.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @dfordoom


    The US-Australia alliance actually threatens Australia’s security.
     

    The British Prime Minister Winston Churchill made it clear that, if forced to choose, he would use English troops and equipment to defend England itself, rather than helping to protect Australia against the Japanese in the Pacific. The Australian Prime Minister John Curtin then called on America for help. Many older Australians who retained the traditional loyalty to England were shocked by this new allegiance.

    America responded, and from early 1942, thousands of American troops began arriving in Australia, preparing to fight the Pacific war. By 1943, there were 250,000 Americans stationed in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. This was a time when very few Australians travelled overseas, and they got their ideas about Americans from the Hollywood movies which were extremely popular in Australia.

    http://ergo.slv.vic.gov.au/explore-history/australia-wwii/home-wii/americans-australia
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAPiIkULR7Y
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNHtMuLkBtE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVyAtN3NK60
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_N_lNF_15s

    Replies: @dfordoom

  68. China is within a decade or so of slicing through the MAD Gordian Knot. In the decades ahead, the question is whether the US will be able to field a conventional military powerful enough to keep them out of North America

    LOL. The idea that China wants to invade North America is paranoid nonsense.

    It’s only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.

    Silly Cold War nonsense.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @dfordoom

    The worst that China and Russia seem to due is to occasionally try to stoke this BLM nonsense with their propaganda outlets.

    Personally, I find it very distasteful, but I don't think it is RT that is making people riot. We've mostly done that to ourselves, or if not ourselves, our own governments have done it to us.

    It is hard to blame China and Russia for that, since it was an accepted Cold War practice, and they've probably been outpaced ideologically by the rapid transformation that the West has undergone. Frankly, I don't think it is in their long-term interest to try to stoke it anymore.

    Remarkably, Japan had a lot to due with stoking black nationalism, back when it was antagonistic to the US. I guess it was the original player in that regard, since followed by many. None of them very effective.

    , @V. K. Ovelund
    @dfordoom


    The idea that China wants to invade North America is paranoid nonsense.
     
    Considering that China has, down the millennia, never firmly conquered even Vietnam, you may have a point. Historically, China does not seem to have been a markedly expansionist power.

    However, we live in a science-fiction age in which a man can travel halfway across the globe between breakfast and bedtime, a rocket can a torch a city on a distant continent within an hour, and radio communications are all but instantaneous; so the extent to which historical precedents like the Sino-Vietnamese one still apply seems uncertain.

    (Due credit: the Sino-Vietnamese precedent was suggested by Richard B. Spencer who, whatever his other faults and indiscretions might be, remains an imaginative, interesting fellow.)

    Replies: @dfordoom, @bro3886

    , @bro3886
    @dfordoom

    Not the least bit far-fetched. With the leaders of America and particularly Canada gleefully supporting open borders it's not difficult to imagine a scenario where western Canada, in particular, becomes majority Chinese and opts out of the crumbling multiracial cesspool Canada will become. It's not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage. What's the Canadian government going to do about it? Would they even want to do anything about it? A territorial war on non-whites? Already Vancouver ("Hongcouver") is more than a quarter Chinese, and that's taken place in, what, just the last 30 years? The Chinese need land and the American, Canadian, and Australian ruling trash are happy to sell it out from under their own people.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @anon

  69. @Mulga Mumblebrain
    The USA was NEVER the greatest country on Earth save to Imperialists who thought that constant aggression against the rest of humanity makes you 'great'.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    I mean, before the 1900s, it wasn’t doing anything anyone else didn’t do. It did have a lot of promise for a fairly genuine Republic.

    Again, though, I was never under the illusion America was to be a model for everyone. It was good for what it was. It was then taken along its worst possible path.

  70. @Johann Ricke

    As if the imploding American empire
     
    Given that there is no empire, except as a figure of speech ... The difference between an empire and an alliance is that when attacked from without, an alliance bands together to fight off the threat, whereas an empire's components seize the opportunity to weaken the metropole so they can each go their own way.

    China's rulers have, like their counterparts among other great civilizations, always wanted to rule "all under heaven".

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tianxia

    The current crop is no different. Whether the rest of the world end ups being ruled from Beijing depends on how early it bands together to ward off China's armies. China's population in relation to the rest of the world now is similar to that of the Qin kingdom relative to the rest of northeast Asia when the First Emperor set out to create* the continental scale empire we now know as China.

    Thanks to the illusion created by MAD theory of a nuclear Masada in reaction to conventional attack, we've persuaded ourselves that national leaders no longer seek personal glory through territorial acquisition, whether via bloodless surrenders under threat or armed conquest. China is within a decade or so of slicing through the MAD Gordian Knot. In the decades ahead, the question is whether the US will be able to field a conventional military powerful enough to keep them out of North America, never mind the rest of the world. It's only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.

    * Like Alexander, he was trying to conquer anything his armies could reach, until the cost of new advances started to cut into the minimum force he needed to hold on to his recently-won gains.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @V. K. Ovelund, @Boomthorkell

    Honestly, even if China went for “world domination” in the literal sense, rather than its traditional model, no navy on Earth could land and sustain an army large enough to invade Heartland America across the two oceans. I tend not to worry about game-changing superweapons or secret alien technologyin this calculation, assuming either others have them too or we refuse to use them for fear of their knowledge opening the new nuclear race. Basically, we’d blow their ships up with purely conventional weapons. We wouldn’t even need a navy to do it. Just coastal missiles.

    This is why America should focus all of its efforts on making a peaceful, prosperous, powerful and united North America. Assuming we united (worst case, annexed) Canada and Mexico (and Central America), we could almost make an autarky. Do to the Americas what China is doing to Eurasia.

    Best case scenario, the world becomes richer and happier. Worst case scenario, our separate worlds are richer and happier and eyeing each other warily.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  71. @dfordoom

    China is within a decade or so of slicing through the MAD Gordian Knot. In the decades ahead, the question is whether the US will be able to field a conventional military powerful enough to keep them out of North America
     
    LOL. The idea that China wants to invade North America is paranoid nonsense.

    It’s only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.
     
    Silly Cold War nonsense.

    Replies: @songbird, @V. K. Ovelund, @bro3886

    The worst that China and Russia seem to due is to occasionally try to stoke this BLM nonsense with their propaganda outlets.

    Personally, I find it very distasteful, but I don’t think it is RT that is making people riot. We’ve mostly done that to ourselves, or if not ourselves, our own governments have done it to us.

    It is hard to blame China and Russia for that, since it was an accepted Cold War practice, and they’ve probably been outpaced ideologically by the rapid transformation that the West has undergone. Frankly, I don’t think it is in their long-term interest to try to stoke it anymore.

    Remarkably, Japan had a lot to due with stoking black nationalism, back when it was antagonistic to the US. I guess it was the original player in that regard, since followed by many. None of them very effective.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  72. @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    One only wishes that the U.S. would shut up, draw down American military and perhaps naval presence in the Old World, and pull back to Guam—lapsing into a passive, unresponsive, nonprovocative foreign policy for the next 30 years
     
    That would be great.

    Withdrawing all US bases in foreign countries would be a very positive thing.

    Withdrawing from NATO would be a very very very good thing.

    The US faces zero military threats.

    letting circumstances force Russia to realign with Japan and India against China, and maybe Australia to realign with Britain and Canada against both.
     
    Another very good move would be for the US to cancel its military alliances with countries like Australia. Australia also faces zero military threats. The US-Australia alliance actually threatens Australia's security.

    Also dump the Five Eyes alliance.

    Pat Buchanan makes some good points on this subject in his latest column.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    The US-Australia alliance actually threatens Australia’s security.

    The British Prime Minister Winston Churchill made it clear that, if forced to choose, he would use English troops and equipment to defend England itself, rather than helping to protect Australia against the Japanese in the Pacific. The Australian Prime Minister John Curtin then called on America for help. Many older Australians who retained the traditional loyalty to England were shocked by this new allegiance.

    America responded, and from early 1942, thousands of American troops began arriving in Australia, preparing to fight the Pacific war. By 1943, there were 250,000 Americans stationed in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. This was a time when very few Australians travelled overseas, and they got their ideas about Americans from the Hollywood movies which were extremely popular in Australia.

    http://ergo.slv.vic.gov.au/explore-history/australia-wwii/home-wii/americans-australia

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Joe Stalin

    You may not have heard the news but WW2 is over.

    The US-Australia alliance has been unnecessary and harmful to Australia since 1945. You seem to be one of those people who live in the past, totally unable to cope with the fact that the world changes. You're living in a bizarre paranoid Cold War fantasy world.

    The only danger to Australia is that the Americans will drag us into another of their futile unnecessary wars.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Showmethereal

  73. @anon

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.
     
    Doesn't matter. China is closing fast, and GDP will be the factor determining who runs the world, not per capita GDP.

    "we produce a superabundance of food ... By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less"
     
    Who's worse off, the nation that imports millions of peasant third worlders into their country to take over demographically so they can get cheap tomatoes at the grocery store, or the nation that grows things with domestic labor?

    Further, the stat you cited on Chinese labor really means nothing. It hasn't impeded China's ability to out-compete the United States in 5G and quantum computing; the Chinese will dominate countless other emerging technologies in the future. I'm sure that China will eventually industrialize to the point where they need much less labor to grow food anyway.

    "Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home."
     
    China is leading the way in super computing and the emerging field of quantum computing. They are also leading in 5G, which is why the US desperately banned Huawei from operating in the United States and attempted (unsuccessfully) to bully the rest of the world into foregoing their technology. The US barely got their 5G chips, after banning the competition, into the latest smartphones. What happens when China races ahead with 6G and the US has no answer? How exactly are 198 million White Caucasians, a few Asians, and immigrants supposed to compete with a billion smart Han Chinese in any intellectual field? Whites are dying off at a rate of about 500k/1 million per year in the United States, and China already publishes more scientific papers in many fields than the US and is set to race far ahead in the coming decade.

    "A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles."
     
    They're not. China has an equivalent service that is just as good. They also have the world's largest internet company, most advanced highspeed rail, most advanced telecommunications company, third largest smart phone manufacturer, a nascent competitor to Boeing, etc.

    Amazon is a leftist monopoly that censors their political opposition. I don't see how anyone should be cheering for them. They're also heavily subsidized by the publicly-funded US postal service anyway, so they're certainly not a paragon of free market capitalism.

    "China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life."
     
    How does that explain the Japanese or the Koreans? Both are rich, industrialized nations with fiercely competitive populations. South Korea issues more patents per capita than the United States does. More likely explanation: China competes hard because their mean IQ, along with other East Asian nations, is much higher than America's pathetic 97 (and falling fast). And it's worse than that for the United States. In the near future, all political power will be concentrated in the hands of a party whose mean IQ is maybe 95 and falling, the democrats. Compare that with the CCP, which is filled with engineers and assorted geniuses. I believe a writer for this website once calculated the CCP's mean IQ at 140, at least for senior leadership rolls. Compare that with either major American party and laugh. Do AOC and Marco Rubio have 140 IQs?

    They choke on unbreathable air
     
    So did the US in the 1950s and 60s. Didn't stop the US from taking over the world with 50% of global GDP.

    China has a massive shortage of women
     
    The US has a similar problem with rising numbers of singles, declining marriage rates, and crashing birthrates. The Chinese still have over 100 million more females than the entire US population. Who cares if the ratios are off when they can make up for it on volume? In the United States, we have a different, but also significant, problem: rising inequality in male/female quality of life, educational attainment, etc. We're hardly in a position to gloat.

    "Chinese people wish they were us."
     
    No, they don't. The number of US graduates in many technical fields has actually declined as Chinese students have opted to return home after graduation rather than staying. The evidence is in, they don't want to be us. China is freer and much less divided than the United States. Here, if you're White male, you're discriminated against, hounded out of your job, denied opportunities* and you have no future. There is high crime, 24/7 racism, terrorist groups like antifa roaming the streets, and constant fear. I certainly wish I hadn't been born here. I'd kill to have been born Japanese. I have a feeling I'll wish I had been born Chinese in a few decades, if I make it that far in this climate.

    *There are countless stories like this one coming from the US:

    Hollywood Doesn't Want WHITE DUDES Anymore, Say Movie Execs.

    Several Hollywood executives, actors and writers spoke to the Daily Mail UK this week (anonymously) and said that Hollywood is in FULL ON PANIC MODE over "cancel culture" right now. The mandate from many studios is that middle-aged white dudes (called "menemies") are now persona non grata, as studios are TERRIFIED of social media backlash for not being progressive enough. Between this and the pandemic, some white folks in Hollywood are even selling their houses and moving out of state because they know their careers are effectively OVER.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfVrcC39R84
     
    China doesn't discriminate against their own people. No one in China will force you to hire non-Chinese and defer to them. China doesn't have an entire month dedicated to celebrating foreign racial groups and castigating their own. Antifa doesn't attack Chinese courthouses with permission of the state, that's for sure. We have political prisoners in the US (jailed for making fun of Hilary Clinton on Facebook), a strict censorship regime (which the website has been victimized by), and a corrupt government and media that lie and attack their opponents nonstop. I could go on all day. Just what exactly makes you proud to be an American over being born Han Chinese? They have a future, at least. Can you say that about Whites in the United States?

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Realist, @showmethereal, @Live from China

    That is mostly spot on…. But actually – minorities in China actually get better benefits than US “affirmative action”. That is especially true of higher education (minorities can score much lower). As to promoting the culture publicly – the Chinese government openly and actively promotes Han Chinese to go and visit minority areas and spend money to help those groups escape poverty. There are also events on television dedicated to live performances of minority groups.

    But the rest of your comment is pretty much spot on.

  74. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Wency



    The very words of the hymn fail to resonate with our own children. One can see why.
     
    I’d be curious for you to expand on this one.
     
    It's a feeling, a matter of the heart, hard to explain, but you have lived through it as have I. You will understand.

    Do you remember Corporal Pat Tillman, U.S. Army Ranger, who waived $3.6 million of this:

    https://pattillmanfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/PT_Stare.jpg

    For the privilege of this?

    https://pattillmanfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/PT_Bro_Rangers-1.jpg

    An American, the son of pioneers—blood, soil and bone—Tillman could not bear the shame that his country should be at war without him in the fight. In 2004, in the mountains of Afghanistan, he paid for that privilege with his life.

    I chanced to speak with a U.S. Army Ranger home on leave last year, the son of a friend, a member of Tillman's old regiment. The young Ranger, shorter than Tillman but heavily muscled enough to wrestle a bear, agreed with his father that the Rangers today are motivated by professionalism and comradeship. The young Ranger and his comrades have heard tell of the old patriotism, and they can hear it still in old sergeants' voices, but do not much feel it themselves. They train, they fight, they take just pride in a duty well done, but not for the spirit of their pioneer ancestors. Not any more.

    A patriot can love his country as he loves his son. Base betrayal by either country or son is bitter enough to poison the patriot's soul. Trust is shattered, and the patriotism along with it, for as Pat Buchanan tried to warn us ere it grew too late, “But what doth it profit a man if he gain the whole world and suffer the loss of his country?”

    The bitterness does not die. Our young sons sense the bitterness in us. Their patriotism thus never takes root.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    I appreciate your sentiment and am sympathetic to it, but I still inculcate patriotism in my children. You know I homeschool. I begin each day with the children with the Pledge of Allegiance.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Twinkie


    I appreciate your sentiment and am sympathetic to it, but I still inculcate patriotism in my children. You know I homeschool. I begin each day with the children with the Pledge of Allegiance.
     
    The country is lucky to have you.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Wency
    @Twinkie

    That's interesting. When I attended Catholic school, they actually didn't make us say the Pledge of Allegiance, only the Lord's Prayer. We didn't say it in the secular private school I attended at one time either. I was only obliged to say it at public school, which I attended for two years in middle school in the 1990s. Except we didn't actually say it: our principal (presumably a closeted homosexual, with an extremely fruity voice) would say it during morning announcements and invite us to join in, and literally no student would speak it -- to do so would have been impossibly square.

    I'm wondering if this is what the decline of the old patriotism looked like, that V.K. was alluding to.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Twinkie, @Chrisnonymous

  75. @Supply and Demand
    @DanHessinMD

    This is pretty weak hasbara.

    The rest of the replies cover most points I would riposte with (particularly Malefan's) -- but as far as the business side, take a look at Amazon's global market share vis-a-vis Alibaba. 37% vs 69% within their home borders. The American oligarchs are giving their best go at snuffing out all their domestic competition (unlike China) and still getting 1-hit-KO'd by what was formerly Jack Ma's copycat. The student has eclipsed the master -- and not needed to surrender the national interest in doing so.

    Replies: @showmethereal

    And JD.com has probably the most sophisticated infrastructure of any of them… Most people outside Asia have never even heard of them.

  76. @Joe Stalin
    @unit472

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fq0GiYCOgQI

    I remember in the 1960s you could write to NOAA and receive free literature on how to construct reception equipment for Weather Satellites on the VHF band including circular polarized antennas and how to see the FAX transmissions. The US government made all this data from the WX sats free to all.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWWGDL5tC_I

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Blinky Bill

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSjq3b7p7UaUxoGqhEGT-Z6bxYDsl904yzmNA&usqp.jpg

    http://extremeservice.weebly.com/uploads/1/3/9/0/13907850/9200890.png

  77. @Blinky Bill
    @Joe Stalin

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQMNf4KeGh9ZmkJSOgktv6VerKxo_yNYtGPuw&usqp.jpg

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRZrP9LngfdbIJWXdt3Z13DYQ4R3oQ_bufdOA&usqp.jpg



    https://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Visualizing-US-Population-by-Race.jpg

    https://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Visualizing-US-Population-by-Race-in-Every-State.jpg

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

  78. @Catdog
    It will, but probably not within our lifetimes.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    • Thanks: Showmethereal
    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Blinky Bill

    If young Chinese are becoming more anti-western then that is a very very healthy thing for China.

    , @Showmethereal
    @Blinky Bill

    Also note that those surveys were conducted in the 3 most cosmopolitan places on the mainland. Had they chosen Chengdu and Xian and Dalian the views would probably tilt even more to nationalism... Even more still if they polled rural folk (some of whom still look up to Mao).

  79. @TomSchmidt
    @anon

    It hasn’t impeded China’s ability to out-compete the United States in 5G and quantum computing

    One of those is an utter scam, as outlined in IEEE spectrum a few months back, and the other is a boondoggle. WiFi 6 is going to make 5G, the absurd notion that all data should move wirelessly in bulk,instead of over the shortest distance until it gets to wire, a big waste of money.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD

    Great comment.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @DanHessinMD

    Invest accordingly.

  80. @anon
    @unit472

    Don’t know where you live

    He is on an island off of the coast of Central America.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Isla_Roatan

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

    I’ve been there. It’s pretty nice. At least until the government of Honduras eventually screws it up.

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Roatan is a gold mine for the Honduran gov't. The tourists bring in US cash that ends up as foreign exchange eventually. They have no reason to kill the goose that lays their golden egg.

    I've been here 16 years and the Honduran gov't is near invisible in my life and in my businesses. Things are more free here than anywhere in the US.

  81. @Joe Stalin
    @dfordoom


    The US-Australia alliance actually threatens Australia’s security.
     

    The British Prime Minister Winston Churchill made it clear that, if forced to choose, he would use English troops and equipment to defend England itself, rather than helping to protect Australia against the Japanese in the Pacific. The Australian Prime Minister John Curtin then called on America for help. Many older Australians who retained the traditional loyalty to England were shocked by this new allegiance.

    America responded, and from early 1942, thousands of American troops began arriving in Australia, preparing to fight the Pacific war. By 1943, there were 250,000 Americans stationed in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. This was a time when very few Australians travelled overseas, and they got their ideas about Americans from the Hollywood movies which were extremely popular in Australia.

    http://ergo.slv.vic.gov.au/explore-history/australia-wwii/home-wii/americans-australia
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAPiIkULR7Y
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNHtMuLkBtE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVyAtN3NK60
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_N_lNF_15s

    Replies: @dfordoom

    You may not have heard the news but WW2 is over.

    The US-Australia alliance has been unnecessary and harmful to Australia since 1945. You seem to be one of those people who live in the past, totally unable to cope with the fact that the world changes. You’re living in a bizarre paranoid Cold War fantasy world.

    The only danger to Australia is that the Americans will drag us into another of their futile unnecessary wars.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @dfordoom


    You’re living in a bizarre paranoid Cold War fantasy world.
     
    On the contrary, I don't really care what Australia does. New Zealand doesn't care what the USA thinks, so be it. Then us Yankees can talk about how you Aussies & New Zealanders have cucked to PRC.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9490407/New-Zealand-backs-Five-Eyes-alliance-wants-human-rights-raised-broader-group.html

    The only danger to Australia is that the Americans will drag us into another of their futile unnecessary wars.

     

    Keep on thinking that way. I will have a good laugh when PRC has you by the trading balls. I always have a good laugh reading the Australian commenters on the UK Daily Mail; your straight out hatred of the USA is palpable. So go ahead and get out of these Yankee alliances.

    I'm eagerly waiting.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    , @Showmethereal
    @dfordoom

    How is New Zealand able to craft a more independent foreign policy than Australia? I would think being that New Zealand is the smaller of the two - it would be reverse. Help me understand...

  82. @dfordoom

    China is within a decade or so of slicing through the MAD Gordian Knot. In the decades ahead, the question is whether the US will be able to field a conventional military powerful enough to keep them out of North America
     
    LOL. The idea that China wants to invade North America is paranoid nonsense.

    It’s only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.
     
    Silly Cold War nonsense.

    Replies: @songbird, @V. K. Ovelund, @bro3886

    The idea that China wants to invade North America is paranoid nonsense.

    Considering that China has, down the millennia, never firmly conquered even Vietnam, you may have a point. Historically, China does not seem to have been a markedly expansionist power.

    However, we live in a science-fiction age in which a man can travel halfway across the globe between breakfast and bedtime, a rocket can a torch a city on a distant continent within an hour, and radio communications are all but instantaneous; so the extent to which historical precedents like the Sino-Vietnamese one still apply seems uncertain.

    (Due credit: the Sino-Vietnamese precedent was suggested by Richard B. Spencer who, whatever his other faults and indiscretions might be, remains an imaginative, interesting fellow.)

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Considering that China has, down the millennia, never firmly conquered even Vietnam, you may have a point. Historically, China does not seem to have been a markedly expansionist power.
     
    China wants to be rich and powerful (doesn't everyone?) but they seem to have no interest in imperialism. They understand that imperialism entails the loss of national identity and national identity is everything to them. The idea of having more minorities to cope with does not appeal to them at all.

    And they're aware of the appalling problems that adding minorities has caused to western nations. They're not stupid enough to make that mistake.
    , @bro3886
    @V. K. Ovelund

    You are aware that the Great Wall was once on the Chinese frontier, and that China occupied Vietnam for a thousand years, and that part of today's China used to be part of Vietnam?

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

  83. @Blinky Bill
    @Catdog

    https://i.imgur.com/jR3THAG.jpg

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Showmethereal

    If young Chinese are becoming more anti-western then that is a very very healthy thing for China.

    • Agree: d dan
  84. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Joe Paluka


    If you don’t like the Titanic example, ...
     
    I don't. The Titanic was a steel-hulled vessel afloat in a vast ocean.

    The analogy just doesn't work. Even Guam cannot capsize. The North American continent certainly won't.


    ... I'll refer to how rosy everything looked in 1929, ...
     
    I do not wish to be overly disputatious, but as severe as U.S. troubles are today, they have little in common with 1929. PE ratios are high, but further parallels are hard to find. Your own analysis says as much.

    It is as though I had argued, “The New York Jets are doomed to a losing season this year, because look what happened to the republicans during the Spanish Civil War.”

    Does not follow.

    Replies: @iffen, @Joe Paluka

    Even Guam cannot capsize.

    You are obviously not qualified to be a Representative in the U. S. House.

  85. @V. K. Ovelund
    @dfordoom


    The idea that China wants to invade North America is paranoid nonsense.
     
    Considering that China has, down the millennia, never firmly conquered even Vietnam, you may have a point. Historically, China does not seem to have been a markedly expansionist power.

    However, we live in a science-fiction age in which a man can travel halfway across the globe between breakfast and bedtime, a rocket can a torch a city on a distant continent within an hour, and radio communications are all but instantaneous; so the extent to which historical precedents like the Sino-Vietnamese one still apply seems uncertain.

    (Due credit: the Sino-Vietnamese precedent was suggested by Richard B. Spencer who, whatever his other faults and indiscretions might be, remains an imaginative, interesting fellow.)

    Replies: @dfordoom, @bro3886

    Considering that China has, down the millennia, never firmly conquered even Vietnam, you may have a point. Historically, China does not seem to have been a markedly expansionist power.

    China wants to be rich and powerful (doesn’t everyone?) but they seem to have no interest in imperialism. They understand that imperialism entails the loss of national identity and national identity is everything to them. The idea of having more minorities to cope with does not appeal to them at all.

    And they’re aware of the appalling problems that adding minorities has caused to western nations. They’re not stupid enough to make that mistake.

  86. @Malenfant
    @DanHessinMD


    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

     

    Here you expose considerable ignorance. China's consumer markets -- particularly 1688, JD, and TaoBao -- are vastly superior. They are less centralized, with much more variety, cheaper prices, and more customer base diversity. (A huge fraction of 1688's clientele are in industry, looking for chemicals or industrial equipment.) Buying goods from those Chinese markets is just as easy as it is on Amazon, and shipping is just as fast, if not faster. Customer service is immediately responsive, almost 24/7. Reviews are usually trustworthy, and can only be left by people who have genuinely purchased the products in question.

    What's more, and this is perhaps the most important point, those Chinese markets actually benefit local Chinese small businesses, whereas Amazon is rightly famous for fucking over American small businesses, especially if they're in the brick-and-mortar space.

    I regularly patronize both American and Chinese consumer markets, and China has the clear edge here, by a mile.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD, @Live from China

    Your comment got my attention.

    “Buying goods from those Chinese markets is just as easy as it is on Amazon, and shipping is just as fast, if not faster. Customer service is immediately responsive, almost 24/7. Reviews are usually trustworthy, and can only be left by people who have genuinely purchased the products in question.”

    The Chinese system copied the American system, lock stock and barrel. OMG, you order everything through a website, and there are even online product reviews. And you have to have bought the product to leave a review! Genius! Why didn’t we think of that?

    Your bragging about China got me to read up.

    I came across this:
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-shipping-china-both-fast-cheap-jons-slemmer-%E9%98%B3%E6%96%AF-?articleId=6694538695984472065

    And the key thing I noticed was this image:
    https://media-exp1.licdn.com/dms/image/C5612AQHMwrewBr_zUA/article-inline_image-shrink_1500_2232/0/1596102940623?e=1624492800&v=beta&t=whawfGuK9It7lpLk_uMzKc_0Pb21jdJ_L-cQlA1nmRg

    Look at the image on the left. What is that? It is Amazon’s warehouse automation and robotics system, which is covered by probably hundreds of patents all over the world, ILLEGALLY STOLEN BY CHINA almost identically.

    For reference, here is the genuine article, invented in America before it was stolen by China.

    The robots are exactly the same, the shelves are the same, even the markings are the same. 100% ILLEGAL intellectual property theft, not a speck of creativity unless you count yellow robots instead of orange as innovation. I thought I had made a new discovery of IP theft, but actually it is a known problem to Amazon. I actually contacted one of the inventors of this system and I asked about this thinking I was providing an important tip (true). Apparently Amazon knows but isn’t engaging because this is China and China is that lawless.

    China set up 402 fulfillment centers like this, copying Amazon’s fulfillment centers exactly.

    It’s infuriating.

    Yes, tell me about how China has such vastly superior ecommerce. Yes, do tell me about my “considerable ignorance” about how our online order fulfillment is so inferior to China’s.

    • Troll: Showmethereal, d dan
    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
    @DanHessinMD

    the system is inferior, though, because Amazon has a massive middle-management and HR department run by blacks and jewish women that muck up what the white guys in the logistics network are trying to do.

    Alibaba just bribes the labor bureau and goes on its merry way.

    , @V. K. Ovelund
    @DanHessinMD


    China set up 402 fulfillment centers like this, copying Amazon’s fulfillment centers exactly.

    It’s infuriating.
     

    I've got to disagree with on this one, Dan. Intellectual property is a prudential artifice of domestic law. It is not an international principle

    The Chinese didn't steal the robots. They copied them. There is a difference.

    But did the Chinese not sign a treaty saying that they wouldn't copy? Answer: yes, they did, but since enforcing the treaty's terms would require domestic action within China against Chinese businesses by internal Chinese law enforcement, and since such enforcement flat-out harms Chinese interests, what fools were we to believe that the Chinese would ever honor such a treaty?

    It would be unpatriotic of a Chinaman who loves his country to honor the treaty. The patriotic Chinaman's patriotic duty is to copy our stuff. The patriotic American's duty is to stop him.

    Americans should respond by copying Chinese stuff and then boosting tariffs to block Chinese goods out. China won't really mind, much, because China no longer needs us, anyway, but it might save us the trouble, next time.

    Replies: @A123

    , @Boomthorkell
    @DanHessinMD

    While white men are undeniably more creative (statistically, I'm not inventing any robots) than most comparable groups, we can't in fairness knock China here. Even the Russians, very good inventors, during the USSR firmly believed in using copying where it was a convenient supplement, complement, or alternative to initial grinding reseatch and development, and (here's the big one)...so did we!

    America quote literally stole German inventions and literal tons of research papers during and after the war. Now, I'm not knocking that, of course, "to the victor go the spoils" and it's not like Germany wasn't robbing Europe of other things. We also completely copied A Soviet satellite on tour here to help us make a space breakthrough.

    That our government is so corrupt to allow its citizens companies to so thoroughly sell themselves out, and that the companies are so short sighted to boost their competition for short term gains is a personal and structural flaw.

    The Chinese though are creative where it counts, and smart enough to reproduce and develop what they copy, and eventually invent what they can't. They might not do it at an Indo-European level, but they really aren't far behind at all, and with continued efforts, I doubt they'll need to copy anything from us.

    Though, being white people, I'm sure one of us will come up with something newer and better, even weighed down by feminists, blacks, trannies and social justice movements.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

  87. @RoatanBill
    @unit472

    I don't mind things that make sense, like satellites and even exploring the moon for possible resources that it may have. What I object to is telescopes that look out light years worth of distance and then have some cosmologist tell me he sees a neutron star, black hole, etc or missions to zoom past Pluto to take a few photos.

    Most of the things the cosmologists postulate are mathematical possibilities like 11 dimensions, dark matter, dark energy, etc. There's no actual evidence they exist and since they're so far away, actual empirical evidence is impossible to acquire to prove things one way or the other. The plasma physics community has completely different explanations for what the cosmologists theorize but the cosmologists get the money.

    Too much money is spent on unicorns when that money would be better spent on things with a more immediate payback, not some entity that is millions of years away given our rocket technology. All I'm saying is spend more wisely, especially since the country's broke.

    And you can take your stupidity remark and shove it up your ass.

    Replies: @Realist

    Most of the things the cosmologists postulate are mathematical possibilities like 11 dimensions, dark matter, dark energy, etc. There’s no actual evidence they exist and since they’re so far away, actual empirical evidence is impossible to acquire to prove things one way or the other.

    Totally agree and I would add string theory, although it is not in the total purview of cosmology.

  88. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Supply and Demand


    the Emperor only required about 1000 (mostly domestic) eunuchs to run his court. 

     

    BS.

    The Empire was ran by meritocratic scholar-officials selected based on exam performance on knowledge of Confucianism. The Emperor was often only ceremonial ruler and overwhelmed by the moral-uppitiness and rhetorical power of the meritocrats, and thus resorted to employing a class of ex-"men“ with unquestionable loyalty and questionable methods, the eunuchs*, to balance the power of meritocrats.

    Whether the Imperial Exams and Confucian education have a straitjacketing effect is a good point. Compare that with castration is I would say hyperbolic. Comparing the eunuchs to today's tranny politicians I would say is fair.


    *Not all of them were odious, Zheng He, who did not voluntarily become a eunuch, famously sailed to East Africa a century before the Portuguese.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

    I didn’t say the Empire, I said the court. The court is a different beast than the day-to-day management of the state.

  89. @DanHessinMD
    @Malenfant

    Your comment got my attention.

    "Buying goods from those Chinese markets is just as easy as it is on Amazon, and shipping is just as fast, if not faster. Customer service is immediately responsive, almost 24/7. Reviews are usually trustworthy, and can only be left by people who have genuinely purchased the products in question."

    The Chinese system copied the American system, lock stock and barrel. OMG, you order everything through a website, and there are even online product reviews. And you have to have bought the product to leave a review! Genius! Why didn't we think of that?

    Your bragging about China got me to read up.

    I came across this:
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-shipping-china-both-fast-cheap-jons-slemmer-%E9%98%B3%E6%96%AF-?articleId=6694538695984472065

    And the key thing I noticed was this image:
    https://media-exp1.licdn.com/dms/image/C5612AQHMwrewBr_zUA/article-inline_image-shrink_1500_2232/0/1596102940623?e=1624492800&v=beta&t=whawfGuK9It7lpLk_uMzKc_0Pb21jdJ_L-cQlA1nmRg

    Look at the image on the left. What is that? It is Amazon's warehouse automation and robotics system, which is covered by probably hundreds of patents all over the world, ILLEGALLY STOLEN BY CHINA almost identically.

    For reference, here is the genuine article, invented in America before it was stolen by China.

    https://cms.qz.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/kivarobotamazon.jpeg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1600&h=900&crop=1

    The robots are exactly the same, the shelves are the same, even the markings are the same. 100% ILLEGAL intellectual property theft, not a speck of creativity unless you count yellow robots instead of orange as innovation. I thought I had made a new discovery of IP theft, but actually it is a known problem to Amazon. I actually contacted one of the inventors of this system and I asked about this thinking I was providing an important tip (true). Apparently Amazon knows but isn't engaging because this is China and China is that lawless.

    China set up 402 fulfillment centers like this, copying Amazon's fulfillment centers exactly.

    It's infuriating.

    Yes, tell me about how China has such vastly superior ecommerce. Yes, do tell me about my "considerable ignorance" about how our online order fulfillment is so inferior to China's.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @V. K. Ovelund, @Boomthorkell

    the system is inferior, though, because Amazon has a massive middle-management and HR department run by blacks and jewish women that muck up what the white guys in the logistics network are trying to do.

    Alibaba just bribes the labor bureau and goes on its merry way.

  90. @dfordoom
    @Joe Stalin

    You may not have heard the news but WW2 is over.

    The US-Australia alliance has been unnecessary and harmful to Australia since 1945. You seem to be one of those people who live in the past, totally unable to cope with the fact that the world changes. You're living in a bizarre paranoid Cold War fantasy world.

    The only danger to Australia is that the Americans will drag us into another of their futile unnecessary wars.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Showmethereal

    You’re living in a bizarre paranoid Cold War fantasy world.

    On the contrary, I don’t really care what Australia does. New Zealand doesn’t care what the USA thinks, so be it. Then us Yankees can talk about how you Aussies & New Zealanders have cucked to PRC.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9490407/New-Zealand-backs-Five-Eyes-alliance-wants-human-rights-raised-broader-group.html

    The only danger to Australia is that the Americans will drag us into another of their futile unnecessary wars.

    Keep on thinking that way. I will have a good laugh when PRC has you by the trading balls. I always have a good laugh reading the Australian commenters on the UK Daily Mail; your straight out hatred of the USA is palpable. So go ahead and get out of these Yankee alliances.

    I’m eagerly waiting.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Joe Stalin


    Keep on thinking that way. I will have a good laugh when PRC has you by the trading balls. I always have a good laugh reading the Australian commenters on the UK Daily Mail; your straight out hatred of the USA is palpable. So go ahead and get out of these Yankee alliances.

    I’m eagerly waiting.
     
    I'm not. Australians and Americans spring from the same root. Like any cousin, the Australian has his own interests, must solve his own problems, and will go his own way; but as an American, I want no part whatsoever of enmity against our old Australian friends.

    Australians today have valid reasons to be frustrated with the United States. When we have some time, we should lend an ear.

    Meanwhile, the Chinese presumably understand the Anglosphere to represent a single, collective obstacle to China's rise. The Chinese are not wrong, and indeed, treaty or no treaty, a hypothetical Chinese invasion of Australia would provoke an entirely different reaction from the United States than an invasion of Taiwan would. It would be treated by the United States as the mortal threat it is.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom

  91. @DanHessinMD
    @Malenfant

    Your comment got my attention.

    "Buying goods from those Chinese markets is just as easy as it is on Amazon, and shipping is just as fast, if not faster. Customer service is immediately responsive, almost 24/7. Reviews are usually trustworthy, and can only be left by people who have genuinely purchased the products in question."

    The Chinese system copied the American system, lock stock and barrel. OMG, you order everything through a website, and there are even online product reviews. And you have to have bought the product to leave a review! Genius! Why didn't we think of that?

    Your bragging about China got me to read up.

    I came across this:
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-shipping-china-both-fast-cheap-jons-slemmer-%E9%98%B3%E6%96%AF-?articleId=6694538695984472065

    And the key thing I noticed was this image:
    https://media-exp1.licdn.com/dms/image/C5612AQHMwrewBr_zUA/article-inline_image-shrink_1500_2232/0/1596102940623?e=1624492800&v=beta&t=whawfGuK9It7lpLk_uMzKc_0Pb21jdJ_L-cQlA1nmRg

    Look at the image on the left. What is that? It is Amazon's warehouse automation and robotics system, which is covered by probably hundreds of patents all over the world, ILLEGALLY STOLEN BY CHINA almost identically.

    For reference, here is the genuine article, invented in America before it was stolen by China.

    https://cms.qz.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/kivarobotamazon.jpeg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1600&h=900&crop=1

    The robots are exactly the same, the shelves are the same, even the markings are the same. 100% ILLEGAL intellectual property theft, not a speck of creativity unless you count yellow robots instead of orange as innovation. I thought I had made a new discovery of IP theft, but actually it is a known problem to Amazon. I actually contacted one of the inventors of this system and I asked about this thinking I was providing an important tip (true). Apparently Amazon knows but isn't engaging because this is China and China is that lawless.

    China set up 402 fulfillment centers like this, copying Amazon's fulfillment centers exactly.

    It's infuriating.

    Yes, tell me about how China has such vastly superior ecommerce. Yes, do tell me about my "considerable ignorance" about how our online order fulfillment is so inferior to China's.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @V. K. Ovelund, @Boomthorkell

    China set up 402 fulfillment centers like this, copying Amazon’s fulfillment centers exactly.

    It’s infuriating.

    I’ve got to disagree with on this one, Dan. Intellectual property is a prudential artifice of domestic law. It is not an international principle

    The Chinese didn’t steal the robots. They copied them. There is a difference.

    But did the Chinese not sign a treaty saying that they wouldn’t copy? Answer: yes, they did, but since enforcing the treaty’s terms would require domestic action within China against Chinese businesses by internal Chinese law enforcement, and since such enforcement flat-out harms Chinese interests, what fools were we to believe that the Chinese would ever honor such a treaty?

    It would be unpatriotic of a Chinaman who loves his country to honor the treaty. The patriotic Chinaman’s patriotic duty is to copy our stuff. The patriotic American’s duty is to stop him.

    Americans should respond by copying Chinese stuff and then boosting tariffs to block Chinese goods out. China won’t really mind, much, because China no longer needs us, anyway, but it might save us the trouble, next time.

    • Agree: Boomthorkell
    • Replies: @A123
    @V. K. Ovelund


    I’ve got to disagree with on this one, Dan. Intellectual property is a prudential artifice of domestic law. It is not an international principle
     
    Your understanding is flawed.

    IP theft is both immoral & an international crime. It "denies the fruits of their labor" to those who expended resources to develop the IP.

    Denying visas to all Chinese citizens would help. 100% of University "Confucius Institutes" should be shut down ASAP. China can only steal the IP it can access.

    Americans should respond by copying Chinese stuff
     
    Chinese firms have not created anything worth copying.

    boosting tariffs to block Chinese goods out.
     
    Going to "China Zero" is necessary for U.S. workers to prosper. However, it is not something that can be achieved over night:

    -- Complex supply chains must be disentangled.
    -- In some cases, such as Rare Earth element extraction, an entire industry has to be restarted.
    -- A minimum 10% tariff on all direct Chinese imports would be a good start. This requires content restrictions on items coming from other countries. Otherwise, China will end-run tariffs by exporting IP theft based components to be included in "non-Chinese" products.
    -- Paradoxically, laws intended to help U.S. workers are a key problem. Small U.S. firms are often reluctant to add staff when releasing them has a minimum expense (unemployment) and tail risk (wrongful discharge lawsuits).

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Blinky Bill, @Blinky Bill

  92. @Joe Stalin
    @dfordoom


    You’re living in a bizarre paranoid Cold War fantasy world.
     
    On the contrary, I don't really care what Australia does. New Zealand doesn't care what the USA thinks, so be it. Then us Yankees can talk about how you Aussies & New Zealanders have cucked to PRC.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9490407/New-Zealand-backs-Five-Eyes-alliance-wants-human-rights-raised-broader-group.html

    The only danger to Australia is that the Americans will drag us into another of their futile unnecessary wars.

     

    Keep on thinking that way. I will have a good laugh when PRC has you by the trading balls. I always have a good laugh reading the Australian commenters on the UK Daily Mail; your straight out hatred of the USA is palpable. So go ahead and get out of these Yankee alliances.

    I'm eagerly waiting.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    Keep on thinking that way. I will have a good laugh when PRC has you by the trading balls. I always have a good laugh reading the Australian commenters on the UK Daily Mail; your straight out hatred of the USA is palpable. So go ahead and get out of these Yankee alliances.

    I’m eagerly waiting.

    I’m not. Australians and Americans spring from the same root. Like any cousin, the Australian has his own interests, must solve his own problems, and will go his own way; but as an American, I want no part whatsoever of enmity against our old Australian friends.

    Australians today have valid reasons to be frustrated with the United States. When we have some time, we should lend an ear.

    Meanwhile, the Chinese presumably understand the Anglosphere to represent a single, collective obstacle to China’s rise. The Chinese are not wrong, and indeed, treaty or no treaty, a hypothetical Chinese invasion of Australia would provoke an entirely different reaction from the United States than an invasion of Taiwan would. It would be treated by the United States as the mortal threat it is.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Australians and Americans spring from the same root. Like any cousin, the Australian has his own interests, must solve his own problems, and will go his own way;
     
    If the US was prepared to allow Australia to pursue Australia's interests I'd be perfectly happy. But the US does not permit us to do that.

    Of course the sad pathetic thing is that a lot of Australians are too dumb to realise that we actually do have our own interests. The slavish devotion of many Australians to our American masters is nauseating.

    The US broke away from its British masters to go its own way. I'd like us to do what Americans did and become a free and independent nation.

    a hypothetical Chinese invasion of Australia would provoke an entirely different reaction from the United States than an invasion of Taiwan would.
     
    There is zero chance of a Chinese invasion of Australia. The Chinese (correctly) despise Australia as a grovelling American lapdog but they certainly aren't going to invade us. It would be pointless. And China (unlike the US) does not do pointless things.
    , @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Australia suffers from many of the same problems as the US. Too many Australians still have a paranoid Cold War mindset. They still think we need the US to defend us from the evil communist hordes of Russia and China. Older Australians are entirely locked-in to this mindset.

    And like most Americans most Australians believe everything the media tells them. The Australian media is rabidly pro-American.

    Australians are also copying the stupidities of American Wokeism. We have BLM rallies here, in spite of the fact that we simply do not have the racial and policing problems that Americans have. We have very few police shootings (and I'm not offering an opinion one way or the other on who is to blame for those problems in the US).

    We have Australian SJWs, slavishly copying American SJWs. Australians have the same addiction to virtue-signalling, and Australian lap up environmentalist nonsense just as readily as Americans.

    And Nanny Statism is arguably even worse in Australia.

    At times you really have to wonder if there's anything at all worth saving in the West. And you really do have to wonder if white Europeans are worth saving. There's no idea so stupid that you can't persuade white people to believe it.

  93. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Joe Stalin


    Keep on thinking that way. I will have a good laugh when PRC has you by the trading balls. I always have a good laugh reading the Australian commenters on the UK Daily Mail; your straight out hatred of the USA is palpable. So go ahead and get out of these Yankee alliances.

    I’m eagerly waiting.
     
    I'm not. Australians and Americans spring from the same root. Like any cousin, the Australian has his own interests, must solve his own problems, and will go his own way; but as an American, I want no part whatsoever of enmity against our old Australian friends.

    Australians today have valid reasons to be frustrated with the United States. When we have some time, we should lend an ear.

    Meanwhile, the Chinese presumably understand the Anglosphere to represent a single, collective obstacle to China's rise. The Chinese are not wrong, and indeed, treaty or no treaty, a hypothetical Chinese invasion of Australia would provoke an entirely different reaction from the United States than an invasion of Taiwan would. It would be treated by the United States as the mortal threat it is.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom

    Australians and Americans spring from the same root. Like any cousin, the Australian has his own interests, must solve his own problems, and will go his own way;

    If the US was prepared to allow Australia to pursue Australia’s interests I’d be perfectly happy. But the US does not permit us to do that.

    Of course the sad pathetic thing is that a lot of Australians are too dumb to realise that we actually do have our own interests. The slavish devotion of many Australians to our American masters is nauseating.

    The US broke away from its British masters to go its own way. I’d like us to do what Americans did and become a free and independent nation.

    a hypothetical Chinese invasion of Australia would provoke an entirely different reaction from the United States than an invasion of Taiwan would.

    There is zero chance of a Chinese invasion of Australia. The Chinese (correctly) despise Australia as a grovelling American lapdog but they certainly aren’t going to invade us. It would be pointless. And China (unlike the US) does not do pointless things.

  94. @Blinky Bill
    @Catdog

    https://i.imgur.com/jR3THAG.jpg

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Showmethereal

    Also note that those surveys were conducted in the 3 most cosmopolitan places on the mainland. Had they chosen Chengdu and Xian and Dalian the views would probably tilt even more to nationalism… Even more still if they polled rural folk (some of whom still look up to Mao).

  95. @dfordoom
    @Joe Stalin

    You may not have heard the news but WW2 is over.

    The US-Australia alliance has been unnecessary and harmful to Australia since 1945. You seem to be one of those people who live in the past, totally unable to cope with the fact that the world changes. You're living in a bizarre paranoid Cold War fantasy world.

    The only danger to Australia is that the Americans will drag us into another of their futile unnecessary wars.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Showmethereal

    How is New Zealand able to craft a more independent foreign policy than Australia? I would think being that New Zealand is the smaller of the two – it would be reverse. Help me understand…

  96. @V. K. Ovelund
    @DanHessinMD


    China set up 402 fulfillment centers like this, copying Amazon’s fulfillment centers exactly.

    It’s infuriating.
     

    I've got to disagree with on this one, Dan. Intellectual property is a prudential artifice of domestic law. It is not an international principle

    The Chinese didn't steal the robots. They copied them. There is a difference.

    But did the Chinese not sign a treaty saying that they wouldn't copy? Answer: yes, they did, but since enforcing the treaty's terms would require domestic action within China against Chinese businesses by internal Chinese law enforcement, and since such enforcement flat-out harms Chinese interests, what fools were we to believe that the Chinese would ever honor such a treaty?

    It would be unpatriotic of a Chinaman who loves his country to honor the treaty. The patriotic Chinaman's patriotic duty is to copy our stuff. The patriotic American's duty is to stop him.

    Americans should respond by copying Chinese stuff and then boosting tariffs to block Chinese goods out. China won't really mind, much, because China no longer needs us, anyway, but it might save us the trouble, next time.

    Replies: @A123

    I’ve got to disagree with on this one, Dan. Intellectual property is a prudential artifice of domestic law. It is not an international principle

    Your understanding is flawed.

    IP theft is both immoral & an international crime. It “denies the fruits of their labor” to those who expended resources to develop the IP.

    Denying visas to all Chinese citizens would help. 100% of University “Confucius Institutes” should be shut down ASAP. China can only steal the IP it can access.

    Americans should respond by copying Chinese stuff

    Chinese firms have not created anything worth copying.

    boosting tariffs to block Chinese goods out.

    Going to “China Zero” is necessary for U.S. workers to prosper. However, it is not something that can be achieved over night:

    — Complex supply chains must be disentangled.
    — In some cases, such as Rare Earth element extraction, an entire industry has to be restarted.
    — A minimum 10% tariff on all direct Chinese imports would be a good start. This requires content restrictions on items coming from other countries. Otherwise, China will end-run tariffs by exporting IP theft based components to be included in “non-Chinese” products.
    — Paradoxically, laws intended to help U.S. workers are a key problem. Small U.S. firms are often reluctant to add staff when releasing them has a minimum expense (unemployment) and tail risk (wrongful discharge lawsuits).

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @A123


    IP theft is ... immoral....
     
    But emulating a good idea isn't.

    Forty years ago, I watched closely how my high school's popular, suave student-body president approached girls. Thirty years ago, I stole his IP, and landed a hot wife. We all age, alas, but five children later, do I owe my old student-body prez a license fee?

    Anyway, complaining about the Chinese being immoral isn't going to get us anywhere. Fundamentally, I agree with you and Donald Trump: it's past time the U.S. stopped playing the fool.

    Replies: @A123

    , @Blinky Bill
    @A123

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/33/Jonathan_Pollard.png




    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Pollard

    , @Blinky Bill
    @A123

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/israel.png


    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @anonymous

  97. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Joe Stalin


    Keep on thinking that way. I will have a good laugh when PRC has you by the trading balls. I always have a good laugh reading the Australian commenters on the UK Daily Mail; your straight out hatred of the USA is palpable. So go ahead and get out of these Yankee alliances.

    I’m eagerly waiting.
     
    I'm not. Australians and Americans spring from the same root. Like any cousin, the Australian has his own interests, must solve his own problems, and will go his own way; but as an American, I want no part whatsoever of enmity against our old Australian friends.

    Australians today have valid reasons to be frustrated with the United States. When we have some time, we should lend an ear.

    Meanwhile, the Chinese presumably understand the Anglosphere to represent a single, collective obstacle to China's rise. The Chinese are not wrong, and indeed, treaty or no treaty, a hypothetical Chinese invasion of Australia would provoke an entirely different reaction from the United States than an invasion of Taiwan would. It would be treated by the United States as the mortal threat it is.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom

    Australia suffers from many of the same problems as the US. Too many Australians still have a paranoid Cold War mindset. They still think we need the US to defend us from the evil communist hordes of Russia and China. Older Australians are entirely locked-in to this mindset.

    And like most Americans most Australians believe everything the media tells them. The Australian media is rabidly pro-American.

    Australians are also copying the stupidities of American Wokeism. We have BLM rallies here, in spite of the fact that we simply do not have the racial and policing problems that Americans have. We have very few police shootings (and I’m not offering an opinion one way or the other on who is to blame for those problems in the US).

    We have Australian SJWs, slavishly copying American SJWs. Australians have the same addiction to virtue-signalling, and Australian lap up environmentalist nonsense just as readily as Americans.

    And Nanny Statism is arguably even worse in Australia.

    At times you really have to wonder if there’s anything at all worth saving in the West. And you really do have to wonder if white Europeans are worth saving. There’s no idea so stupid that you can’t persuade white people to believe it.

  98. @A123
    @V. K. Ovelund


    I’ve got to disagree with on this one, Dan. Intellectual property is a prudential artifice of domestic law. It is not an international principle
     
    Your understanding is flawed.

    IP theft is both immoral & an international crime. It "denies the fruits of their labor" to those who expended resources to develop the IP.

    Denying visas to all Chinese citizens would help. 100% of University "Confucius Institutes" should be shut down ASAP. China can only steal the IP it can access.

    Americans should respond by copying Chinese stuff
     
    Chinese firms have not created anything worth copying.

    boosting tariffs to block Chinese goods out.
     
    Going to "China Zero" is necessary for U.S. workers to prosper. However, it is not something that can be achieved over night:

    -- Complex supply chains must be disentangled.
    -- In some cases, such as Rare Earth element extraction, an entire industry has to be restarted.
    -- A minimum 10% tariff on all direct Chinese imports would be a good start. This requires content restrictions on items coming from other countries. Otherwise, China will end-run tariffs by exporting IP theft based components to be included in "non-Chinese" products.
    -- Paradoxically, laws intended to help U.S. workers are a key problem. Small U.S. firms are often reluctant to add staff when releasing them has a minimum expense (unemployment) and tail risk (wrongful discharge lawsuits).

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Blinky Bill, @Blinky Bill

    IP theft is … immoral….

    But emulating a good idea isn’t.

    Forty years ago, I watched closely how my high school’s popular, suave student-body president approached girls. Thirty years ago, I stole his IP, and landed a hot wife. We all age, alas, but five children later, do I owe my old student-body prez a license fee?

    Anyway, complaining about the Chinese being immoral isn’t going to get us anywhere. Fundamentally, I agree with you and Donald Trump: it’s past time the U.S. stopped playing the fool.

    • Replies: @A123
    @V. K. Ovelund



    IP theft is … immoral….
     
    But emulating a good idea isn’t.
     
    True. But, you are still missing the point.

    If Chinese firms were emulating a generic idea, they would have different robots, in differently shaped warehouses, running different software. Looking what exists, they have:
    • Physically identical robots
    • In identical dimension warehouses
    • With identical marked shelving
    • Behaving in an identical way
    One point of similarity could be emulation. Identicality on every point is a hallmark of IP theft.

    To review your High School example... Did you change your name and face to match his? No. Did you copy his lines 100% verbatim, with no original material of any kind? Doubtful. Trying to build analogies between personal situations and commercial ones is perilous. And, in this case, the comparison does not hold up well.

    complaining about the Chinese being immoral isn’t going to get us anywhere. ... it’s past time the U.S. stopped playing the fool.
     
    Building an "anti-fool" coalition requires different appeals & justification to different constituents. China's immoral behaviour is a compelling argument to traditional values, Protestant Christians. If those in your community are not disturbed by Chinese immorality, then a different message is needed for your constituency. However, it does not make sense to slam the door on potential coalition partners by declaring that China's immoral behaviour is moral.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Mulga Mumblebrain

  99. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @anon

    I’ve been there. It’s pretty nice. At least until the government of Honduras eventually screws it up.

    Replies: @RoatanBill

    Roatan is a gold mine for the Honduran gov’t. The tourists bring in US cash that ends up as foreign exchange eventually. They have no reason to kill the goose that lays their golden egg.

    I’ve been here 16 years and the Honduran gov’t is near invisible in my life and in my businesses. Things are more free here than anywhere in the US.

  100. @V. K. Ovelund
    @A123


    IP theft is ... immoral....
     
    But emulating a good idea isn't.

    Forty years ago, I watched closely how my high school's popular, suave student-body president approached girls. Thirty years ago, I stole his IP, and landed a hot wife. We all age, alas, but five children later, do I owe my old student-body prez a license fee?

    Anyway, complaining about the Chinese being immoral isn't going to get us anywhere. Fundamentally, I agree with you and Donald Trump: it's past time the U.S. stopped playing the fool.

    Replies: @A123

    IP theft is … immoral….

    But emulating a good idea isn’t.

    True. But, you are still missing the point.

    If Chinese firms were emulating a generic idea, they would have different robots, in differently shaped warehouses, running different software. Looking what exists, they have:
    • Physically identical robots
    • In identical dimension warehouses
    • With identical marked shelving
    • Behaving in an identical way
    One point of similarity could be emulation. Identicality on every point is a hallmark of IP theft.

    To review your High School example… Did you change your name and face to match his? No. Did you copy his lines 100% verbatim, with no original material of any kind? Doubtful. Trying to build analogies between personal situations and commercial ones is perilous. And, in this case, the comparison does not hold up well.

    complaining about the Chinese being immoral isn’t going to get us anywhere. … it’s past time the U.S. stopped playing the fool.

    Building an “anti-fool” coalition requires different appeals & justification to different constituents. China’s immoral behaviour is a compelling argument to traditional values, Protestant Christians. If those in your community are not disturbed by Chinese immorality, then a different message is needed for your constituency. However, it does not make sense to slam the door on potential coalition partners by declaring that China’s immoral behaviour is moral.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @A123

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a2/SH-3A_Sea_King_hovers_over_the_damaged_USS_Liberty_%28AGTR-5%29_on_8_June_1967_%28USN_1123118%29.jpg/856px-SH-3A_Sea_King_hovers_over_the_damaged_USS_Liberty_%28AGTR-5%29_on_8_June_1967_%28USN_1123118%29.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Liberty_incident

    Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain

    , @Mulga Mumblebrain
    @A123

    Dear me-that omega Sabbat Goy spewing race hatred at the Chinese. How Talmudic. There's nothing the Zionazis fear and hate so much as an emergent China, a great civilization that they will never control and suck dry, hence the ever deepening hatred and vitriol of the Gods Upon the Earth and their anal appendages.

  101. @A123
    @V. K. Ovelund


    I’ve got to disagree with on this one, Dan. Intellectual property is a prudential artifice of domestic law. It is not an international principle
     
    Your understanding is flawed.

    IP theft is both immoral & an international crime. It "denies the fruits of their labor" to those who expended resources to develop the IP.

    Denying visas to all Chinese citizens would help. 100% of University "Confucius Institutes" should be shut down ASAP. China can only steal the IP it can access.

    Americans should respond by copying Chinese stuff
     
    Chinese firms have not created anything worth copying.

    boosting tariffs to block Chinese goods out.
     
    Going to "China Zero" is necessary for U.S. workers to prosper. However, it is not something that can be achieved over night:

    -- Complex supply chains must be disentangled.
    -- In some cases, such as Rare Earth element extraction, an entire industry has to be restarted.
    -- A minimum 10% tariff on all direct Chinese imports would be a good start. This requires content restrictions on items coming from other countries. Otherwise, China will end-run tariffs by exporting IP theft based components to be included in "non-Chinese" products.
    -- Paradoxically, laws intended to help U.S. workers are a key problem. Small U.S. firms are often reluctant to add staff when releasing them has a minimum expense (unemployment) and tail risk (wrongful discharge lawsuits).

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Blinky Bill, @Blinky Bill

  102. @A123
    @V. K. Ovelund



    IP theft is … immoral….
     
    But emulating a good idea isn’t.
     
    True. But, you are still missing the point.

    If Chinese firms were emulating a generic idea, they would have different robots, in differently shaped warehouses, running different software. Looking what exists, they have:
    • Physically identical robots
    • In identical dimension warehouses
    • With identical marked shelving
    • Behaving in an identical way
    One point of similarity could be emulation. Identicality on every point is a hallmark of IP theft.

    To review your High School example... Did you change your name and face to match his? No. Did you copy his lines 100% verbatim, with no original material of any kind? Doubtful. Trying to build analogies between personal situations and commercial ones is perilous. And, in this case, the comparison does not hold up well.

    complaining about the Chinese being immoral isn’t going to get us anywhere. ... it’s past time the U.S. stopped playing the fool.
     
    Building an "anti-fool" coalition requires different appeals & justification to different constituents. China's immoral behaviour is a compelling argument to traditional values, Protestant Christians. If those in your community are not disturbed by Chinese immorality, then a different message is needed for your constituency. However, it does not make sense to slam the door on potential coalition partners by declaring that China's immoral behaviour is moral.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Mulga Mumblebrain

    • Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain
    @Blinky Bill

    You mean the 'USS Antisemite' don't you.

  103. Good grief. Blinky Biden the TROLL is trying to respond to me…. Even though he knows he is blocked.

    As a reminder, no one is interested in your homoerotic fantasies about being the middle of a flaming SJW man-wich, between your idol Joe and Barack Hussein.

    PEACE 😇

    • LOL: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @A123

    A123 thanks for reading my comments, even after “blocking me”. Just let me know which of my blocked comments you’ve read and which you haven’t.


    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRox0qIpu577i3C1JSvGPZk6vnV6i-3NyqWBg&usqp.jpg

  104. @A123
    Good grief. Blinky Biden the TROLL is trying to respond to me.... Even though he knows he is blocked.

    As a reminder, no one is interested in your homoerotic fantasies about being the middle of a flaming SJW man-wich, between your idol Joe and Barack Hussein.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    A123 thanks for reading my comments, even after “blocking me”. Just let me know which of my blocked comments you’ve read and which you haven’t.

    [MORE]

  105. Blinky Biden,

    All I see when you gay-post is a soothing grey line.

    We all know that you want to join the Biden-Obama bromance. Or, are you looking for a Bernie-Biden bromance? Either way, regardless of what you homo-post I am not going to see it.

    PEACE 😇

     

    • Troll: Mulga Mumblebrain
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @A123

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/all-the-jews-biden-has-tapped-for-top-roles-in-his-new-administration/


    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRJ6gKZi1Gm8yALaP8IXxnxz5PiYGCcLbxQGg&usqp.jpg

    , @nebulafox
    @A123

    Homo/bisexuality and effeminacy are not necessarily the same thing. Just ask Sulla.

    (To be fair, he lived thousands of years before humanity had the retarded idea of turning sexuality into an all-encompassing psychosocial identity. Of all the things you can be as a person, what you do in bed really speaks to a lack of anything else to identify with.)

  106. @A123
    Blinky Biden,

    All I see when you gay-post is a soothing grey line.

    We all know that you want to join the Biden-Obama bromance. Or, are you looking for a Bernie-Biden bromance? Either way, regardless of what you homo-post I am not going to see it.

    PEACE 😇

     
    https://pics.me.me/0-51-0-59-obama-first-gay-president-2003388.png

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @nebulafox

  107. @A123
    @V. K. Ovelund


    I’ve got to disagree with on this one, Dan. Intellectual property is a prudential artifice of domestic law. It is not an international principle
     
    Your understanding is flawed.

    IP theft is both immoral & an international crime. It "denies the fruits of their labor" to those who expended resources to develop the IP.

    Denying visas to all Chinese citizens would help. 100% of University "Confucius Institutes" should be shut down ASAP. China can only steal the IP it can access.

    Americans should respond by copying Chinese stuff
     
    Chinese firms have not created anything worth copying.

    boosting tariffs to block Chinese goods out.
     
    Going to "China Zero" is necessary for U.S. workers to prosper. However, it is not something that can be achieved over night:

    -- Complex supply chains must be disentangled.
    -- In some cases, such as Rare Earth element extraction, an entire industry has to be restarted.
    -- A minimum 10% tariff on all direct Chinese imports would be a good start. This requires content restrictions on items coming from other countries. Otherwise, China will end-run tariffs by exporting IP theft based components to be included in "non-Chinese" products.
    -- Paradoxically, laws intended to help U.S. workers are a key problem. Small U.S. firms are often reluctant to add staff when releasing them has a minimum expense (unemployment) and tail risk (wrongful discharge lawsuits).

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Blinky Bill, @Blinky Bill

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Blinky Bill

    25% of Americans over the age of 60 believe Israel is a threat to the US while a whopping 48% of Americans under 40 believe Israel is a threat. While it is still possible for the US to go war with Iran in this decade, it looks like the odds are slimmer in the 2030s.

  108. @DanHessinMD
    @TomSchmidt

    Great comment.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    Invest accordingly.

  109. @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund

    I appreciate your sentiment and am sympathetic to it, but I still inculcate patriotism in my children. You know I homeschool. I begin each day with the children with the Pledge of Allegiance.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Wency

    I appreciate your sentiment and am sympathetic to it, but I still inculcate patriotism in my children. You know I homeschool. I begin each day with the children with the Pledge of Allegiance.

    The country is lucky to have you.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Thank you for the kind words. I’m doing what was taught to me. And, God willing, my children will do the same with their own one day.

  110. @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund

    I appreciate your sentiment and am sympathetic to it, but I still inculcate patriotism in my children. You know I homeschool. I begin each day with the children with the Pledge of Allegiance.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Wency

    That’s interesting. When I attended Catholic school, they actually didn’t make us say the Pledge of Allegiance, only the Lord’s Prayer. We didn’t say it in the secular private school I attended at one time either. I was only obliged to say it at public school, which I attended for two years in middle school in the 1990s. Except we didn’t actually say it: our principal (presumably a closeted homosexual, with an extremely fruity voice) would say it during morning announcements and invite us to join in, and literally no student would speak it — to do so would have been impossibly square.

    I’m wondering if this is what the decline of the old patriotism looked like, that V.K. was alluding to.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Wency

    I did a brief stint in an evangelical Protestant school in rural Texas growing up. Whatever else you can say about them, they are not lacking in sincere, fervent, non-cynical patriotism.

    Now, the schools that had *Israeli* flags alongside the American ones... yeah, my feelings on that are another story.

    , @Twinkie
    @Wency


    When I attended Catholic school, they actually didn’t make us say the Pledge of Allegiance
     
    Catholic schools are a varied lot. Opus Dei-run schools, for example, are quite traditional. I think even most of the local parish Catholic schools in my diocese do the Pledge, but my diocese is often described as one of the most conservative in the country (the dead giveaway usually is whether there are any girl altar servers at Mass - although my bishop does not expressly bar it, most of the parishes in the diocese do not allow).
    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Wency

    That makes sense. Catholic schools really shouldn't do the pledge. It is borderline idolatrous.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Wency, @Twinkie

  111. • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Joe Stalin


    The World's Leading Sinologists
     
    https://ssl-static.libsyn.com/p/assets/b/e/8/3/be83661e2c6aa926/Podcast_65_Trailer_Thumbnail_1400x1400.jpg
  112. @Anonymous
    @DanHessinMD

    @ Twinkie


    AE is a low T trans-woman in denial, he has a habit of making hysterical blog posts with no basis in reality, just his strange emotional fluctuations.


    In reality the USA is doing just fine and China is hobbling along, still unable to provide enough protein to its citizens to survive. As a former member of PeakOil.com, I've seen hysterical anti-American doomers come and go for nearly 20 years. They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.

    Replies: @Jackbnimbl, @anonymous, @Eugene Norman, @anon, @Audacious Epigone

    They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.

    Well peak oil was always nonsense. But you might want to look at Chinese economic growth of you think they are “rotting” and the US is “improving”. They aren’t hampered by an ideological left trying to over throw Han Chinese supremacy either. Nor are the Han Chinese going to be a minority anytime soon.

    So good luck with that.

    • Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain
    @Eugene Norman

    Peak 'cheap' oil occurred in 2005. The fracking scam made a little difference, but it's nearly over, and substitution brought a bit more time, but the fall in output from now with be precipitous. Reliance on fossil fuels is a literal dead-end.

    Replies: @anon

  113. @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptFB0ooodMU

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    The World’s Leading Sinologists

    • LOL: d dan
  114. @A123
    Blinky Biden,

    All I see when you gay-post is a soothing grey line.

    We all know that you want to join the Biden-Obama bromance. Or, are you looking for a Bernie-Biden bromance? Either way, regardless of what you homo-post I am not going to see it.

    PEACE 😇

     
    https://pics.me.me/0-51-0-59-obama-first-gay-president-2003388.png

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @nebulafox

    Homo/bisexuality and effeminacy are not necessarily the same thing. Just ask Sulla.

    (To be fair, he lived thousands of years before humanity had the retarded idea of turning sexuality into an all-encompassing psychosocial identity. Of all the things you can be as a person, what you do in bed really speaks to a lack of anything else to identify with.)

  115. @Wency
    @Twinkie

    That's interesting. When I attended Catholic school, they actually didn't make us say the Pledge of Allegiance, only the Lord's Prayer. We didn't say it in the secular private school I attended at one time either. I was only obliged to say it at public school, which I attended for two years in middle school in the 1990s. Except we didn't actually say it: our principal (presumably a closeted homosexual, with an extremely fruity voice) would say it during morning announcements and invite us to join in, and literally no student would speak it -- to do so would have been impossibly square.

    I'm wondering if this is what the decline of the old patriotism looked like, that V.K. was alluding to.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Twinkie, @Chrisnonymous

    I did a brief stint in an evangelical Protestant school in rural Texas growing up. Whatever else you can say about them, they are not lacking in sincere, fervent, non-cynical patriotism.

    Now, the schools that had *Israeli* flags alongside the American ones… yeah, my feelings on that are another story.

  116. @Eugene Norman
    @Anonymous


    They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.
     
    Well peak oil was always nonsense. But you might want to look at Chinese economic growth of you think they are “rotting” and the US is “improving”. They aren’t hampered by an ideological left trying to over throw Han Chinese supremacy either. Nor are the Han Chinese going to be a minority anytime soon.

    So good luck with that.

    Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain

    Peak ‘cheap’ oil occurred in 2005. The fracking scam made a little difference, but it’s nearly over, and substitution brought a bit more time, but the fall in output from now with be precipitous. Reliance on fossil fuels is a literal dead-end.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Mulga Mumblebrain

    Peak ‘cheap’ oil occurred in 2005.

    Got evidence? Maybe you can point to the Oil Drum...

    the fall in output from now with be precipitous.

    Been reading that for close to 20 years. Hasn't happened yet. Why?

    Reliance on fossil fuels is a literal dead-end.

    What are you doing about this? Have you informed the Chinese government? They disagree.

  117. @Blinky Bill
    @A123

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a2/SH-3A_Sea_King_hovers_over_the_damaged_USS_Liberty_%28AGTR-5%29_on_8_June_1967_%28USN_1123118%29.jpg/856px-SH-3A_Sea_King_hovers_over_the_damaged_USS_Liberty_%28AGTR-5%29_on_8_June_1967_%28USN_1123118%29.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Liberty_incident

    Replies: @Mulga Mumblebrain

    You mean the ‘USS Antisemite’ don’t you.

  118. @A123
    @V. K. Ovelund



    IP theft is … immoral….
     
    But emulating a good idea isn’t.
     
    True. But, you are still missing the point.

    If Chinese firms were emulating a generic idea, they would have different robots, in differently shaped warehouses, running different software. Looking what exists, they have:
    • Physically identical robots
    • In identical dimension warehouses
    • With identical marked shelving
    • Behaving in an identical way
    One point of similarity could be emulation. Identicality on every point is a hallmark of IP theft.

    To review your High School example... Did you change your name and face to match his? No. Did you copy his lines 100% verbatim, with no original material of any kind? Doubtful. Trying to build analogies between personal situations and commercial ones is perilous. And, in this case, the comparison does not hold up well.

    complaining about the Chinese being immoral isn’t going to get us anywhere. ... it’s past time the U.S. stopped playing the fool.
     
    Building an "anti-fool" coalition requires different appeals & justification to different constituents. China's immoral behaviour is a compelling argument to traditional values, Protestant Christians. If those in your community are not disturbed by Chinese immorality, then a different message is needed for your constituency. However, it does not make sense to slam the door on potential coalition partners by declaring that China's immoral behaviour is moral.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Mulga Mumblebrain

    Dear me-that omega Sabbat Goy spewing race hatred at the Chinese. How Talmudic. There’s nothing the Zionazis fear and hate so much as an emergent China, a great civilization that they will never control and suck dry, hence the ever deepening hatred and vitriol of the Gods Upon the Earth and their anal appendages.

  119. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Twinkie


    I appreciate your sentiment and am sympathetic to it, but I still inculcate patriotism in my children. You know I homeschool. I begin each day with the children with the Pledge of Allegiance.
     
    The country is lucky to have you.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Thank you for the kind words. I’m doing what was taught to me. And, God willing, my children will do the same with their own one day.

  120. @Wency
    @Twinkie

    That's interesting. When I attended Catholic school, they actually didn't make us say the Pledge of Allegiance, only the Lord's Prayer. We didn't say it in the secular private school I attended at one time either. I was only obliged to say it at public school, which I attended for two years in middle school in the 1990s. Except we didn't actually say it: our principal (presumably a closeted homosexual, with an extremely fruity voice) would say it during morning announcements and invite us to join in, and literally no student would speak it -- to do so would have been impossibly square.

    I'm wondering if this is what the decline of the old patriotism looked like, that V.K. was alluding to.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Twinkie, @Chrisnonymous

    When I attended Catholic school, they actually didn’t make us say the Pledge of Allegiance

    Catholic schools are a varied lot. Opus Dei-run schools, for example, are quite traditional. I think even most of the local parish Catholic schools in my diocese do the Pledge, but my diocese is often described as one of the most conservative in the country (the dead giveaway usually is whether there are any girl altar servers at Mass – although my bishop does not expressly bar it, most of the parishes in the diocese do not allow).

  121. anon[212] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @DanHessinMD

    @ Twinkie


    AE is a low T trans-woman in denial, he has a habit of making hysterical blog posts with no basis in reality, just his strange emotional fluctuations.


    In reality the USA is doing just fine and China is hobbling along, still unable to provide enough protein to its citizens to survive. As a former member of PeakOil.com, I've seen hysterical anti-American doomers come and go for nearly 20 years. They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.

    Replies: @Jackbnimbl, @anonymous, @Eugene Norman, @anon, @Audacious Epigone

    so tell us why it takes one medical emergency to lose everything including either that life concerned or severe morbidity .
    tell us why 40% have no savings and another 40% have less than 1000 dollars
    tell us why so many died in Covid
    tell us why every day a few mikitary vet commit suicide
    tell us why only jobs left for us are to work at McDonald or Amazon
    tell us why American share of PhD and master in computer science ,aerispace,microbi,ogy,medicine ,shrinking.
    tell us why I see Chinese name in each paper at Nature,Science,New England Journal of Med or Lancet or in PNAS
    tell us why your water in the remotest creek in IL or MI not fit for drniking
    tell us why every 2 nd American is not normal weight and every third is overweight
    tell us why we have so many obese kids
    tell us why you discount food and fuel cost while estimating inflation
    tell us everything – clothes,food,toilet paper,gas,water,electricity,phone bill.internet, and services for home maintainance or car cost way more than 1 year ago and gov claim there is no inflation
    tell us why students in undergraduate go hungry and eat 1 or 2 protein bar to stay alive
    tell us why yiur abundance of food giving rise to so many food related diseases – diabetes,autism,parkinsons disease, infertility ,

    • Replies: @Showmethereal
    @anon

    According to the US Presidents and US Congress "its all China's fault". Just ask CNN and Fox and the rest of the "free media". I am waiting hear how they blame China for the sinfully inflated healthcare costs in the US.

  122. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Joe Paluka


    If you don’t like the Titanic example, ...
     
    I don't. The Titanic was a steel-hulled vessel afloat in a vast ocean.

    The analogy just doesn't work. Even Guam cannot capsize. The North American continent certainly won't.


    ... I'll refer to how rosy everything looked in 1929, ...
     
    I do not wish to be overly disputatious, but as severe as U.S. troubles are today, they have little in common with 1929. PE ratios are high, but further parallels are hard to find. Your own analysis says as much.

    It is as though I had argued, “The New York Jets are doomed to a losing season this year, because look what happened to the republicans during the Spanish Civil War.”

    Does not follow.

    Replies: @iffen, @Joe Paluka

    You didn’t get what I was driving at and I’m not going to explain it to you.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Joe Paluka


    You didn’t get what I was driving at ...
     
    Possible. It would not be the first time I didn't get something.

    ... and I’m not going to explain it to you.
     
    Ok. Thanks anyway.

    Maybe next time.

  123. @anon
    @Anonymous

    so tell us why it takes one medical emergency to lose everything including either that life concerned or severe morbidity .
    tell us why 40% have no savings and another 40% have less than 1000 dollars
    tell us why so many died in Covid
    tell us why every day a few mikitary vet commit suicide
    tell us why only jobs left for us are to work at McDonald or Amazon
    tell us why American share of PhD and master in computer science ,aerispace,microbi,ogy,medicine ,shrinking.
    tell us why I see Chinese name in each paper at Nature,Science,New England Journal of Med or Lancet or in PNAS
    tell us why your water in the remotest creek in IL or MI not fit for drniking
    tell us why every 2 nd American is not normal weight and every third is overweight
    tell us why we have so many obese kids
    tell us why you discount food and fuel cost while estimating inflation
    tell us everything - clothes,food,toilet paper,gas,water,electricity,phone bill.internet, and services for home maintainance or car cost way more than 1 year ago and gov claim there is no inflation
    tell us why students in undergraduate go hungry and eat 1 or 2 protein bar to stay alive
    tell us why yiur abundance of food giving rise to so many food related diseases - diabetes,autism,parkinsons disease, infertility ,

    Replies: @Showmethereal

    According to the US Presidents and US Congress “its all China’s fault”. Just ask CNN and Fox and the rest of the “free media”. I am waiting hear how they blame China for the sinfully inflated healthcare costs in the US.

  124. anonymous[770] • Disclaimer says:
    @Blinky Bill
    @A123

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/israel.png


    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @anonymous

    25% of Americans over the age of 60 believe Israel is a threat to the US while a whopping 48% of Americans under 40 believe Israel is a threat. While it is still possible for the US to go war with Iran in this decade, it looks like the odds are slimmer in the 2030s.

  125. @Wency
    @Twinkie

    That's interesting. When I attended Catholic school, they actually didn't make us say the Pledge of Allegiance, only the Lord's Prayer. We didn't say it in the secular private school I attended at one time either. I was only obliged to say it at public school, which I attended for two years in middle school in the 1990s. Except we didn't actually say it: our principal (presumably a closeted homosexual, with an extremely fruity voice) would say it during morning announcements and invite us to join in, and literally no student would speak it -- to do so would have been impossibly square.

    I'm wondering if this is what the decline of the old patriotism looked like, that V.K. was alluding to.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Twinkie, @Chrisnonymous

    That makes sense. Catholic schools really shouldn’t do the pledge. It is borderline idolatrous.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Chrisnonymous


    That makes sense. Catholic schools really shouldn’t do the pledge. It is borderline idolatrous.
     
    I think that you may have a point.

    A related point seems to arise, too. I do not know what it was like in the glory days of Fr. Coughlin, but during my lifetime, there always was something slightly forced in ecclesiastical Catholic displays of American patriotism. One appreciates the effort (I would not dissuade them!), yet Catholics are not Episcopalians, Davy Crockett is not Charles Martel, and the United States is not France. The image of George Washington in prayer at Valley Forge just is not a Catholic image (why, even Mormons relate to that image better than the Catholics do).

    I want to be careful how I say this, for not only have I no wish to insult the Catholics present, but in no way would such an insult be merited in any event.

    Individual Catholics such as Twinkie, Clarence Thomas, John F. Kennedy, Nicholas J. Fuentes and Pat Buchanan make superb patriots. Clearly, many do it for the mundane reasons any other American does it: the United States is their country; America is their home; their fathers are buried here; their kin have bled for the flag. Sometimes, though, I think that some Catholics are patriotic to be more American than the Americans—and if that works for them, then I am all for it. But that's the point, isn't it? American Catholics are not always in a position to take their own patriotism for granted, for specifically American patriotism was never implicit in their creed.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    , @Wency
    @Chrisnonymous

    Intellectually, I'm ambivalent about it. I think it absolutely can be idolatrous, though it can also be a sincere pledge to good citizenship, which is perfectly Scriptural, and I understand this is how Twinkie intends it.

    Aesthetically though, I'll admit that the Pledge has always really bothered me. Which is why, while I considered myself patriotic as a teen and not very religious, I still generally preferred to pray the Lord's Prayer over saying the Pledge. I figured if there was a God, He definitely deserved to hear the Lord's Prayer. But while I thought our republic was badass, I wasn't sure if any republic and its flag deserved to be honored with such a quasi-religious chant.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    It is borderline idolatrous.
     
    The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches Catholics to be patriotic.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @dfordoom

  126. @Mulga Mumblebrain
    @Eugene Norman

    Peak 'cheap' oil occurred in 2005. The fracking scam made a little difference, but it's nearly over, and substitution brought a bit more time, but the fall in output from now with be precipitous. Reliance on fossil fuels is a literal dead-end.

    Replies: @anon

    Peak ‘cheap’ oil occurred in 2005.

    Got evidence? Maybe you can point to the Oil Drum…

    the fall in output from now with be precipitous.

    Been reading that for close to 20 years. Hasn’t happened yet. Why?

    Reliance on fossil fuels is a literal dead-end.

    What are you doing about this? Have you informed the Chinese government? They disagree.

  127. @Chrisnonymous
    @Wency

    That makes sense. Catholic schools really shouldn't do the pledge. It is borderline idolatrous.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Wency, @Twinkie

    That makes sense. Catholic schools really shouldn’t do the pledge. It is borderline idolatrous.

    I think that you may have a point.

    A related point seems to arise, too. I do not know what it was like in the glory days of Fr. Coughlin, but during my lifetime, there always was something slightly forced in ecclesiastical Catholic displays of American patriotism. One appreciates the effort (I would not dissuade them!), yet Catholics are not Episcopalians, Davy Crockett is not Charles Martel, and the United States is not France. The image of George Washington in prayer at Valley Forge just is not a Catholic image (why, even Mormons relate to that image better than the Catholics do).

    I want to be careful how I say this, for not only have I no wish to insult the Catholics present, but in no way would such an insult be merited in any event.

    Individual Catholics such as Twinkie, Clarence Thomas, John F. Kennedy, Nicholas J. Fuentes and Pat Buchanan make superb patriots. Clearly, many do it for the mundane reasons any other American does it: the United States is their country; America is their home; their fathers are buried here; their kin have bled for the flag. Sometimes, though, I think that some Catholics are patriotic to be more American than the Americans—and if that works for them, then I am all for it. But that’s the point, isn’t it? American Catholics are not always in a position to take their own patriotism for granted, for specifically American patriotism was never implicit in their creed.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @V. K. Ovelund

    I wrote:


    The image of George Washington in prayer at Valley Forge just is not a Catholic image (why, even Mormons relate to that image better than the Catholics do).
     
    I failed to recognize a significant point: Catholicism is so rich in imagery of its own that it need not always rely on Protestant images such as Washington's image aforementioned. American Protestant imagery proceeds from a narrower base, whereby its two chief sources—namely, the Bible and pre-20th-century American history—fill a larger sector of the American Protestant's imagination. Pre-20th-centrury American history is the American Protestant's holy tradition, in a way. The American Protestant has no other.

    And to the extent to which pre-20th-century American history, especially the history of the frontier, is the American Protestant's own family history, the Protestant emphasis should not surprise.

    Replies: @Wency

  128. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Chrisnonymous


    That makes sense. Catholic schools really shouldn’t do the pledge. It is borderline idolatrous.
     
    I think that you may have a point.

    A related point seems to arise, too. I do not know what it was like in the glory days of Fr. Coughlin, but during my lifetime, there always was something slightly forced in ecclesiastical Catholic displays of American patriotism. One appreciates the effort (I would not dissuade them!), yet Catholics are not Episcopalians, Davy Crockett is not Charles Martel, and the United States is not France. The image of George Washington in prayer at Valley Forge just is not a Catholic image (why, even Mormons relate to that image better than the Catholics do).

    I want to be careful how I say this, for not only have I no wish to insult the Catholics present, but in no way would such an insult be merited in any event.

    Individual Catholics such as Twinkie, Clarence Thomas, John F. Kennedy, Nicholas J. Fuentes and Pat Buchanan make superb patriots. Clearly, many do it for the mundane reasons any other American does it: the United States is their country; America is their home; their fathers are buried here; their kin have bled for the flag. Sometimes, though, I think that some Catholics are patriotic to be more American than the Americans—and if that works for them, then I am all for it. But that's the point, isn't it? American Catholics are not always in a position to take their own patriotism for granted, for specifically American patriotism was never implicit in their creed.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    I wrote:

    The image of George Washington in prayer at Valley Forge just is not a Catholic image (why, even Mormons relate to that image better than the Catholics do).

    I failed to recognize a significant point: Catholicism is so rich in imagery of its own that it need not always rely on Protestant images such as Washington’s image aforementioned. American Protestant imagery proceeds from a narrower base, whereby its two chief sources—namely, the Bible and pre-20th-century American history—fill a larger sector of the American Protestant’s imagination. Pre-20th-centrury American history is the American Protestant’s holy tradition, in a way. The American Protestant has no other.

    And to the extent to which pre-20th-century American history, especially the history of the frontier, is the American Protestant’s own family history, the Protestant emphasis should not surprise.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Wency
    @V. K. Ovelund

    All interesting points, and I can agree with much of this. In practice, I think there's both a religious and an ethnic dimension that are frequently entangled. Old Stock Americans generally feel less of a historical connection to Europe and its history than do hyphenated-Americans. Protestants are much more likely to be Old Stock, yet I am Protestant but very much not Old Stock. There might be some value in drawing a distinction between Protestant sects that have appealed more to Old Stock Americans and those that were brought over from Continental Europe primarily in the 19th century. Though there's also an element that German-Americans are more deracinated than, say, Italian-Americans, primarily as a result of a conscious effort made by German-Americans amidst the world wars.

    Meanwhile, I have a friend in town who is a Cradle Catholic, active at the local parish, and yet he appears to be Old Stock, with a very English surname. He comes across as a regular Southern good ol' boy, you would guess that he was Baptist if you didn't know better. Somewhat maddeningly to me, he doesn't really understand why, historically, his family is Catholic. "No, we're not Irish or anything, we're from around here." I would suspect he doesn't feel so much connection to Europe and its history.

  129. @Chrisnonymous
    @Wency

    That makes sense. Catholic schools really shouldn't do the pledge. It is borderline idolatrous.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Wency, @Twinkie

    Intellectually, I’m ambivalent about it. I think it absolutely can be idolatrous, though it can also be a sincere pledge to good citizenship, which is perfectly Scriptural, and I understand this is how Twinkie intends it.

    Aesthetically though, I’ll admit that the Pledge has always really bothered me. Which is why, while I considered myself patriotic as a teen and not very religious, I still generally preferred to pray the Lord’s Prayer over saying the Pledge. I figured if there was a God, He definitely deserved to hear the Lord’s Prayer. But while I thought our republic was badass, I wasn’t sure if any republic and its flag deserved to be honored with such a quasi-religious chant.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Wency

    I agree. Plus, I think the idea of having a pledge for born and bred citizens is weird. It would make more sense if it were something that was only used in naturalization ceremonies. You could also start each school day by asking children to raise their right hand and say, "I swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help me God," but everyone would recognize that was a bit weird. At the beginning of court testimony, okay, but every day?

  130. @Chrisnonymous
    @Wency

    That makes sense. Catholic schools really shouldn't do the pledge. It is borderline idolatrous.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Wency, @Twinkie

    It is borderline idolatrous.

    The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches Catholics to be patriotic.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie


    V. Do you reject Satan?
    R. I do.
    V. And all his works?
    R. I do.
    V. And all his empty promises?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in God, the Father Almighty, creator of heaven and earth?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was born of the Virgin Mary was crucified, died, and was buried, rose from the dead, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Catholic church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting?
    R. I do.
    V. God, the all-powerful Father of our Lord Jesus Christ has given us a new birth by water and the Holy Spirit, and forgiven all our sins. May he also keep us faithful to our Lord Jesus Christ for ever and ever.
    R. Amen.
     
    This is a renewal of baptismal promises. It is a re-statement of allegiance to God and the Church. Do you do this with your kids every day? If not, why not? Do you value your country over the Church in action if not in theory?

    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Twinkie

    , @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches Catholics to be patriotic.
     
    There are different kinds of patriotism. What one person means by patriotism is not necessarily what another person means by it. A discussion on patriotism is a bit pointless unless you first agree on what you mean by the term.

    In democracies it gets complicated. You can be intensely patriotic and at the same time want to see the current government, or even the entire existing political system, overthrown.

    You don't have that problem if you're a monarchist. If you're a monarchist you're either loyal to the king (in which case you're a patriot) or you're disloyal to the king (in which case you're a traitor).

    Patriotism can be a simple affection for the land of one's birth, or for one's own ethnic or cultural group. In other words it can be a loyalty to one's homeland or to one's people.

    In democracies people sometimes think they're patriots when in fact their allegiance is to a particular political ideology rather than to the land or the people. A Frenchman can be patriotic because he loves France itself and the French people but there are Frenchmen who claim to be patriotic when in fact their loyalty is to republicanism.

    It gets very complicated when you're a transplant. I'm Australian but my family, ethnic and cultural roots lie in England, Scotland and Wales. I have an emotional attachment to the land of Australia but I also have an emotional attachment to my Anglo-Celtic cultural group.

    The Pledge of Allegiance seems a bit ideological to me, as if you're pledging allegiance to a particular form of government and a particular political ideology rather than to a land or a people.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @V. K. Ovelund

  131. @Wency
    @Chrisnonymous

    Intellectually, I'm ambivalent about it. I think it absolutely can be idolatrous, though it can also be a sincere pledge to good citizenship, which is perfectly Scriptural, and I understand this is how Twinkie intends it.

    Aesthetically though, I'll admit that the Pledge has always really bothered me. Which is why, while I considered myself patriotic as a teen and not very religious, I still generally preferred to pray the Lord's Prayer over saying the Pledge. I figured if there was a God, He definitely deserved to hear the Lord's Prayer. But while I thought our republic was badass, I wasn't sure if any republic and its flag deserved to be honored with such a quasi-religious chant.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    I agree. Plus, I think the idea of having a pledge for born and bred citizens is weird. It would make more sense if it were something that was only used in naturalization ceremonies. You could also start each school day by asking children to raise their right hand and say, “I swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help me God,” but everyone would recognize that was a bit weird. At the beginning of court testimony, okay, but every day?

    • Agree: Wency
  132. @V. K. Ovelund
    @V. K. Ovelund

    I wrote:


    The image of George Washington in prayer at Valley Forge just is not a Catholic image (why, even Mormons relate to that image better than the Catholics do).
     
    I failed to recognize a significant point: Catholicism is so rich in imagery of its own that it need not always rely on Protestant images such as Washington's image aforementioned. American Protestant imagery proceeds from a narrower base, whereby its two chief sources—namely, the Bible and pre-20th-century American history—fill a larger sector of the American Protestant's imagination. Pre-20th-centrury American history is the American Protestant's holy tradition, in a way. The American Protestant has no other.

    And to the extent to which pre-20th-century American history, especially the history of the frontier, is the American Protestant's own family history, the Protestant emphasis should not surprise.

    Replies: @Wency

    All interesting points, and I can agree with much of this. In practice, I think there’s both a religious and an ethnic dimension that are frequently entangled. Old Stock Americans generally feel less of a historical connection to Europe and its history than do hyphenated-Americans. Protestants are much more likely to be Old Stock, yet I am Protestant but very much not Old Stock. There might be some value in drawing a distinction between Protestant sects that have appealed more to Old Stock Americans and those that were brought over from Continental Europe primarily in the 19th century. Though there’s also an element that German-Americans are more deracinated than, say, Italian-Americans, primarily as a result of a conscious effort made by German-Americans amidst the world wars.

    Meanwhile, I have a friend in town who is a Cradle Catholic, active at the local parish, and yet he appears to be Old Stock, with a very English surname. He comes across as a regular Southern good ol’ boy, you would guess that he was Baptist if you didn’t know better. Somewhat maddeningly to me, he doesn’t really understand why, historically, his family is Catholic. “No, we’re not Irish or anything, we’re from around here.” I would suspect he doesn’t feel so much connection to Europe and its history.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
  133. @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    It is borderline idolatrous.
     
    The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches Catholics to be patriotic.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @dfordoom

    V. Do you reject Satan?
    R. I do.
    V. And all his works?
    R. I do.
    V. And all his empty promises?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in God, the Father Almighty, creator of heaven and earth?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was born of the Virgin Mary was crucified, died, and was buried, rose from the dead, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Catholic church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting?
    R. I do.
    V. God, the all-powerful Father of our Lord Jesus Christ has given us a new birth by water and the Holy Spirit, and forgiven all our sins. May he also keep us faithful to our Lord Jesus Christ for ever and ever.
    R. Amen.

    This is a renewal of baptismal promises. It is a re-statement of allegiance to God and the Church. Do you do this with your kids every day? If not, why not? Do you value your country over the Church in action if not in theory?

    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Chrisnonymous


    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.
     
    I don't know. To reëngineer Eisenhower/Kennedy-era Americanism is unnecessary. It was great, just the way it was.

    The daily pledge was part of that. I do not believe that the pledge needs to be questioned to that extent. Not everything needs to be reëxamined. The daily pledge was all right.

    Things have never been all right since.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous

    My children and I do daily Rosary and study “religion” (Seton’s study of the Catholic teachings) daily. We also attend daily Mass. Satisfied, mein Kommandant?


    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.
     
    Who said it did? Can you pinpoint anywhere I wrote that other parents should do as I do?

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  134. @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie


    V. Do you reject Satan?
    R. I do.
    V. And all his works?
    R. I do.
    V. And all his empty promises?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in God, the Father Almighty, creator of heaven and earth?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was born of the Virgin Mary was crucified, died, and was buried, rose from the dead, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Catholic church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting?
    R. I do.
    V. God, the all-powerful Father of our Lord Jesus Christ has given us a new birth by water and the Holy Spirit, and forgiven all our sins. May he also keep us faithful to our Lord Jesus Christ for ever and ever.
    R. Amen.
     
    This is a renewal of baptismal promises. It is a re-statement of allegiance to God and the Church. Do you do this with your kids every day? If not, why not? Do you value your country over the Church in action if not in theory?

    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Twinkie

    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.

    I don’t know. To reëngineer Eisenhower/Kennedy-era Americanism is unnecessary. It was great, just the way it was.

    The daily pledge was part of that. I do not believe that the pledge needs to be questioned to that extent. Not everything needs to be reëxamined. The daily pledge was all right.

    Things have never been all right since.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @V. K. Ovelund

    You are suggesting that Eisenhower-era America was the peak. This is like saying that Julius Caesar's consulship was the peak of Rome. No, it is simply the last point, after which Rome started to cease resembling itself. That is more the case with Eisenhower-era America.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @V. K. Ovelund

  135. Suum cuique.

    I’m uninterested what people want to do with their private lives as long as they get the job done: religious, sexual, personal habits, you name it. I mean just that: uninterested. Aka, neither celebration nor condemnation. Not even vague like/dislike. Just indifference. I. Do. Not. Care. In the purest sense of the words.

    I have a strange feeling that this attitude of genuine even-handed indifference would be considered vaguely disturbing in the corridors of our elite, more than any other belief.

  136. @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    It is borderline idolatrous.
     
    The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches Catholics to be patriotic.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @dfordoom

    The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches Catholics to be patriotic.

    There are different kinds of patriotism. What one person means by patriotism is not necessarily what another person means by it. A discussion on patriotism is a bit pointless unless you first agree on what you mean by the term.

    In democracies it gets complicated. You can be intensely patriotic and at the same time want to see the current government, or even the entire existing political system, overthrown.

    You don’t have that problem if you’re a monarchist. If you’re a monarchist you’re either loyal to the king (in which case you’re a patriot) or you’re disloyal to the king (in which case you’re a traitor).

    Patriotism can be a simple affection for the land of one’s birth, or for one’s own ethnic or cultural group. In other words it can be a loyalty to one’s homeland or to one’s people.

    In democracies people sometimes think they’re patriots when in fact their allegiance is to a particular political ideology rather than to the land or the people. A Frenchman can be patriotic because he loves France itself and the French people but there are Frenchmen who claim to be patriotic when in fact their loyalty is to republicanism.

    It gets very complicated when you’re a transplant. I’m Australian but my family, ethnic and cultural roots lie in England, Scotland and Wales. I have an emotional attachment to the land of Australia but I also have an emotional attachment to my Anglo-Celtic cultural group.

    The Pledge of Allegiance seems a bit ideological to me, as if you’re pledging allegiance to a particular form of government and a particular political ideology rather than to a land or a people.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom

    It's worse because the pledge...

    ...to the flag
    ...one nation indivisible...
    ...with liberty and justice for all...

    ...is an endorsement of whatever regime is in power. It says nothing of the Constitution or the bill of rights ( "flag"). It forces the swearer to put the regime ahead of personal sovereignty or logical consequences of social contract theory ( "indivisible"). It states that the regime does provide liberty and justice for all rather than saying the regime ought to provide the liberty and justice enjoined in the unmentioned founding documents.

    , @V. K. Ovelund
    @dfordoom

    America is terminally ill, so there seems little point in arguing with you; but if you had said the same 20 years ago, I would merely have observed that the United States has her own history, has her own institutions, and is not a monarchy.

    I said, “would have observed.” As it is, to argue with you would be pointless, for the thing argued over is going away of its own accord.

  137. @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie


    V. Do you reject Satan?
    R. I do.
    V. And all his works?
    R. I do.
    V. And all his empty promises?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in God, the Father Almighty, creator of heaven and earth?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was born of the Virgin Mary was crucified, died, and was buried, rose from the dead, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father?
    R. I do.
    V. Do you believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Catholic church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting?
    R. I do.
    V. God, the all-powerful Father of our Lord Jesus Christ has given us a new birth by water and the Holy Spirit, and forgiven all our sins. May he also keep us faithful to our Lord Jesus Christ for ever and ever.
    R. Amen.
     
    This is a renewal of baptismal promises. It is a re-statement of allegiance to God and the Church. Do you do this with your kids every day? If not, why not? Do you value your country over the Church in action if not in theory?

    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Twinkie

    My children and I do daily Rosary and study “religion” (Seton’s study of the Catholic teachings) daily. We also attend daily Mass. Satisfied, mein Kommandant?

    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.

    Who said it did? Can you pinpoint anywhere I wrote that other parents should do as I do?

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie

    I'm not sure if you got my point. You responded to my suggestion that a daily pledge of allegiance was bordering on idolatry by saying that the Church endorses patriotism. This is logically equating patriotism with a daily pledge of allegiance. Do you thus equate Christian faith with a Catholic pledge such as the renewal of baptism? No. Therefore, you endorse daily renewals of allegiance to the fatherland but not daily renewals of allegiance to God as proofs. This seems a bit idolatrous and what I mean.

    If your faith is born out in prayer and study, your patriotism should be born out in a similar manner, such as readings in history and geography, not oaths and pledges.

    This is all in addition to the fact that, as I pointed out to Wency, oaths and pledges should be for conversions or special occassions, and it's weird for natural-born citizens to daily say where their allegiance lies. The belief that this is normal or necessary comes out of paranoia it seems to me.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  138. @DanHessinMD
    @Malenfant

    Your comment got my attention.

    "Buying goods from those Chinese markets is just as easy as it is on Amazon, and shipping is just as fast, if not faster. Customer service is immediately responsive, almost 24/7. Reviews are usually trustworthy, and can only be left by people who have genuinely purchased the products in question."

    The Chinese system copied the American system, lock stock and barrel. OMG, you order everything through a website, and there are even online product reviews. And you have to have bought the product to leave a review! Genius! Why didn't we think of that?

    Your bragging about China got me to read up.

    I came across this:
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-shipping-china-both-fast-cheap-jons-slemmer-%E9%98%B3%E6%96%AF-?articleId=6694538695984472065

    And the key thing I noticed was this image:
    https://media-exp1.licdn.com/dms/image/C5612AQHMwrewBr_zUA/article-inline_image-shrink_1500_2232/0/1596102940623?e=1624492800&v=beta&t=whawfGuK9It7lpLk_uMzKc_0Pb21jdJ_L-cQlA1nmRg

    Look at the image on the left. What is that? It is Amazon's warehouse automation and robotics system, which is covered by probably hundreds of patents all over the world, ILLEGALLY STOLEN BY CHINA almost identically.

    For reference, here is the genuine article, invented in America before it was stolen by China.

    https://cms.qz.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/kivarobotamazon.jpeg?quality=75&strip=all&w=1600&h=900&crop=1

    The robots are exactly the same, the shelves are the same, even the markings are the same. 100% ILLEGAL intellectual property theft, not a speck of creativity unless you count yellow robots instead of orange as innovation. I thought I had made a new discovery of IP theft, but actually it is a known problem to Amazon. I actually contacted one of the inventors of this system and I asked about this thinking I was providing an important tip (true). Apparently Amazon knows but isn't engaging because this is China and China is that lawless.

    China set up 402 fulfillment centers like this, copying Amazon's fulfillment centers exactly.

    It's infuriating.

    Yes, tell me about how China has such vastly superior ecommerce. Yes, do tell me about my "considerable ignorance" about how our online order fulfillment is so inferior to China's.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand, @V. K. Ovelund, @Boomthorkell

    While white men are undeniably more creative (statistically, I’m not inventing any robots) than most comparable groups, we can’t in fairness knock China here. Even the Russians, very good inventors, during the USSR firmly believed in using copying where it was a convenient supplement, complement, or alternative to initial grinding reseatch and development, and (here’s the big one)…so did we!

    America quote literally stole German inventions and literal tons of research papers during and after the war. Now, I’m not knocking that, of course, “to the victor go the spoils” and it’s not like Germany wasn’t robbing Europe of other things. We also completely copied A Soviet satellite on tour here to help us make a space breakthrough.

    That our government is so corrupt to allow its citizens companies to so thoroughly sell themselves out, and that the companies are so short sighted to boost their competition for short term gains is a personal and structural flaw.

    The Chinese though are creative where it counts, and smart enough to reproduce and develop what they copy, and eventually invent what they can’t. They might not do it at an Indo-European level, but they really aren’t far behind at all, and with continued efforts, I doubt they’ll need to copy anything from us.

    Though, being white people, I’m sure one of us will come up with something newer and better, even weighed down by feminists, blacks, trannies and social justice movements.

    • Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Boomthorkell

    Kaiser’s Germany, America, and everyone else copied from England for the 1st Industrial Revolution (steam). Germans invested more than Britain on STEM research / education, and didn’t have pay to keep up an overseas empire that got into a nasty Boer War for no obvious reason. They also had a conglomerate type model, Konzern which allocated capital more efficiently. This let to them leading the 2nd (electric/chemical), and dominating hard science Nobels in 19/20th CE.

    This is the model China is looking to follow. But there is a creativity shortfall. Both Japan/SK’s per capita creativity output falls far short of West especially Germanic Europe.

    My theories are a few,
    1. More emphasis on work/life balance in West, having hobbies

    2. Creativity may not scale with population size, for example within Euros, German’s per capita innovation is somewhat smaller than Sweden/Switzerland. People need space to think. For this reason I’m not too concerned about East Asia’s demographics, C/J/K can shrink by a third of population and still be denser than Germany.

    3. Scientific revolution came in hand-in-hand with Western philosophy and humanities. While Eastern/Sinitic philosophy hasn’t kept up with all that, and is rightfully associated with fortune cookies and the section in Barnes and Nobles next to scented candles n shit. If the Sinosphere steps their game that will boost Japan/SK

    4. Last, on average, the skills to pick up women, that I think is strongly correlated with creativity, is lower.

  139. America will go down in history as an old maid laiden with sin, hubris, hatred, pride, and bloodlust. America is fallen, fallen from her pompous glory (Revelation 18:1). Come down and sit in darkness, America (Isaiah 47: 5). America needs to repent and return to the Lord. Chyna is rising to replace you and become #1 regardless of your noises. You will become her vassal state. The Lord of Heaven has granted her this status.

    https://the-masters-voice.com/2021/03/29/the-fairest-of-them-all-february-15-2021/

    PROPHECY
    “The Fairest Of Them All” – February 15, 2021
    Posted by CELESTIAL on MARCH 29, 2021

    “Mirror mirror on the wall, who is the fairest of them all?” – (The evil queen in ‘Snow White’)
    The following dreams occurred in one night, they are a revolving look at things that God said will come to this world in future. I’ve decided to leave them together as He showed me.
    First: I dreamt of the nations of the world. I saw they were gathered for a beauty pageant and each one had to display her glory and splendor before the others to compete. As they lined up to participate each one turned into a beautiful woman, every nation was talented in her own right but the nation nobody could beat or compete with was CHINA. She was DAZZLING. Her beauty filled the room and there was no need to have the competition anymore once they all turned into women. It was glaringly obvious who was the fairest of them all. God the judge crowned her the leader, the winner, the front-runner and she bowed her head and accepted her crown and scepter. That is the end of the dream.
    Prophecy: China will be the world leader in days to come. She will enter supremacy and there will be no holding back her glory. Thus says the Lord: The reward for hard work is ASCENDANCY, PROMINENCE AND GLORY. She will be the foremost nation among the nations and will take her place as a world leader who influences everybody else. All the style, culture and compelling political rhetoric will come from her, not America. She will be the leader in technology and nobody will be able to compete with her production rates, prices, market share, business savvy or anything else.
    Diplomats from China will be fêted (i.e. greatly celebrated and coveted as a friend or dinner guest) while America will be forgotten and irrelevant as we enter the end times. She will fade from prominence even as the glory and beauty of China fills the room. These are the words of the Lord.
    America your time is over; now you will be ignored, bested, outperformed and beaten by your enemies who have worked harder and burned the midnight oil more consistently than you. Prepare for your imminent defeat, prepare to go into the darkness. Prepare to be sidelined, overlooked, to lose international competitions and your once-sharp competitive edge. You will flounder and make great mistakes in the international arena. You will fail to read the writing on the wall. “Mene mene”.
    Mene – You have been weighed.
    Tekel- You have been found wanting.
    Upharsin- Your kingdom has been torn from your grasp and given to competitors who are hungrier and better than you. This is the word of the sovereign Lord who dictates the rise and fall of nations, and rules in the affairs of men. Amen.

  140. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Chrisnonymous


    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.
     
    I don't know. To reëngineer Eisenhower/Kennedy-era Americanism is unnecessary. It was great, just the way it was.

    The daily pledge was part of that. I do not believe that the pledge needs to be questioned to that extent. Not everything needs to be reëxamined. The daily pledge was all right.

    Things have never been all right since.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    You are suggesting that Eisenhower-era America was the peak. This is like saying that Julius Caesar’s consulship was the peak of Rome. No, it is simply the last point, after which Rome started to cease resembling itself. That is more the case with Eisenhower-era America.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Chrisnonymous


    You are suggesting that Eisenhower-era America was the peak.
     
    Correct. Eisenhower/Kennedy, to be precise.

    The suggestion is not very creative, admittedly. I deserve no credit for insight! A zillion Americans have noted the same before me, but that's because it was so obviously true.

    https://c7.alamy.com/comp/3/587a5f70cbf24993afa46ed8464bb584/cmrbhe.jpg

    The Eisenhower/Kennedy-era represented not only the peak of American civilization, never to be attained again, but also the peak of civilization on earth to date. It was astonishing, and all too brief.

    One does not pine for vanished days, or ought not, for you and I enjoy instead the historic honor to grapple the crisis that follows the decline; yet a decline it has indeed been. A decline from the peak.

    , @V. K. Ovelund
    @Chrisnonymous

    I neglected to note: the rest of your comment is well taken. I have nothing to add to it.

  141. @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous

    My children and I do daily Rosary and study “religion” (Seton’s study of the Catholic teachings) daily. We also attend daily Mass. Satisfied, mein Kommandant?


    Patriotism should not require a daily oath of allegiance.
     
    Who said it did? Can you pinpoint anywhere I wrote that other parents should do as I do?

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    I’m not sure if you got my point. You responded to my suggestion that a daily pledge of allegiance was bordering on idolatry by saying that the Church endorses patriotism. This is logically equating patriotism with a daily pledge of allegiance. Do you thus equate Christian faith with a Catholic pledge such as the renewal of baptism? No. Therefore, you endorse daily renewals of allegiance to the fatherland but not daily renewals of allegiance to God as proofs. This seems a bit idolatrous and what I mean.

    If your faith is born out in prayer and study, your patriotism should be born out in a similar manner, such as readings in history and geography, not oaths and pledges.

    This is all in addition to the fact that, as I pointed out to Wency, oaths and pledges should be for conversions or special occassions, and it’s weird for natural-born citizens to daily say where their allegiance lies. The belief that this is normal or necessary comes out of paranoia it seems to me.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    You responded to my suggestion that a daily pledge of allegiance was bordering on idolatry by saying that the Church endorses patriotism. This is logically equating patriotism with a daily pledge of allegiance.
     
    It doesn't "equate" anything. If you bothered to ask me for an explanation, rather than writing in so an incendiary manner ("bordering on idolatry"), you would realize that I don't consider The Pledge of Allegiance to be a necessary or a sufficient component of patriotism.

    What I think of it, rather, is as a ritual, a reminder that we ought to be grateful for the country and be loyal to it. You can do the Pledge of Allegiance a thousand times and be a traitor to the country through your deeds. Does that mean the said ritual is useless or counterproductive? Or idolatrous?


    Do you thus equate Christian faith with a Catholic pledge such as the renewal of baptism? No.
     
    First of all, God is not the same as a country. I can speak to God. I can't speak to the country (the country is more analogous to the Church, the whole body of believers). God is a unique being with unique properties (indeed He is beyond properties).

    Second, my children and I do the Rosary and other prayers, both as direct "conversations" with God and as sacred rituals and reminders of our faith. When we say "Benedic, Domine, nos..." three times a day, for example, we aren't simply asking for blessings or thanking God for the food in front our faces, but also for His grace and love and as affirmations of our desire to do what is pleasing to Him among many other reasons.

    It's silly to be quantitative about this, but we the say the Pledge once a day while prayers and religious study are throughout the day.


    If your faith is born out in prayer and study
     
    And actions. As St. James said:

    What shall it profit, my brethren, if a man say he hath faith, but hath not works? Shall faith be able to save him? [15] And if a brother or sister be naked, and want daily food:

    [16] And one of you say to them: Go in peace, be ye warmed and filled; yet give them not those things that are necessary for the body, what shall it profit? [17] So faith also, if it have not works, is dead in itself. [18] But some man will say: Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without works; and I will shew thee, by works, my faith. [19] Thou believest that there is one God. Thou dost well: the devils also believe and tremble. [20] But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?

    [21] Was not Abraham our father justified by works, offering up Isaac his son upon the altar? [22] Seest thou, that faith did co-operate with his works; and by works faith was made perfect? [23] And the scripture was fulfilled, saying: Abraham believed God, and it was reputed to him to justice, and he was called the friend of God. [24] Do you see that by works a man is justified; and not by faith only? [25] And in like manner also Rahab the harlot, was not she justified by works, receiving the messengers, and sending them out another way?

    [26] For even as the body without the spirit is dead; so also faith without works is dead.
     

    And regarding patriotism:

    your patriotism should be born out in a similar manner, such as readings in history and geography, not oaths and pledges.
     
    Reading history and geography does not a patriot make - especially among children whose reason is yet to fully-form (though it may help). Daily reminders, in my view, are much more efficacious. Then again, I'm someone who believes in a great value in ritual well-practiced, especially where the opportunity for actions is constrained (as is often the case with children).

    As for "oaths and pledges," if you wish to draw that kind of equivalence, there is Credo, said at the beginning of Mass.


    Therefore, you endorse daily renewals of allegiance to the fatherland but not daily renewals of allegiance to God as proofs.
     
    This is a pure straw man.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  142. @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches Catholics to be patriotic.
     
    There are different kinds of patriotism. What one person means by patriotism is not necessarily what another person means by it. A discussion on patriotism is a bit pointless unless you first agree on what you mean by the term.

    In democracies it gets complicated. You can be intensely patriotic and at the same time want to see the current government, or even the entire existing political system, overthrown.

    You don't have that problem if you're a monarchist. If you're a monarchist you're either loyal to the king (in which case you're a patriot) or you're disloyal to the king (in which case you're a traitor).

    Patriotism can be a simple affection for the land of one's birth, or for one's own ethnic or cultural group. In other words it can be a loyalty to one's homeland or to one's people.

    In democracies people sometimes think they're patriots when in fact their allegiance is to a particular political ideology rather than to the land or the people. A Frenchman can be patriotic because he loves France itself and the French people but there are Frenchmen who claim to be patriotic when in fact their loyalty is to republicanism.

    It gets very complicated when you're a transplant. I'm Australian but my family, ethnic and cultural roots lie in England, Scotland and Wales. I have an emotional attachment to the land of Australia but I also have an emotional attachment to my Anglo-Celtic cultural group.

    The Pledge of Allegiance seems a bit ideological to me, as if you're pledging allegiance to a particular form of government and a particular political ideology rather than to a land or a people.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @V. K. Ovelund

    It’s worse because the pledge…

    …to the flag
    …one nation indivisible…
    …with liberty and justice for all…

    …is an endorsement of whatever regime is in power. It says nothing of the Constitution or the bill of rights ( “flag”). It forces the swearer to put the regime ahead of personal sovereignty or logical consequences of social contract theory ( “indivisible”). It states that the regime does provide liberty and justice for all rather than saying the regime ought to provide the liberty and justice enjoined in the unmentioned founding documents.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  143. @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie

    I'm not sure if you got my point. You responded to my suggestion that a daily pledge of allegiance was bordering on idolatry by saying that the Church endorses patriotism. This is logically equating patriotism with a daily pledge of allegiance. Do you thus equate Christian faith with a Catholic pledge such as the renewal of baptism? No. Therefore, you endorse daily renewals of allegiance to the fatherland but not daily renewals of allegiance to God as proofs. This seems a bit idolatrous and what I mean.

    If your faith is born out in prayer and study, your patriotism should be born out in a similar manner, such as readings in history and geography, not oaths and pledges.

    This is all in addition to the fact that, as I pointed out to Wency, oaths and pledges should be for conversions or special occassions, and it's weird for natural-born citizens to daily say where their allegiance lies. The belief that this is normal or necessary comes out of paranoia it seems to me.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    You responded to my suggestion that a daily pledge of allegiance was bordering on idolatry by saying that the Church endorses patriotism. This is logically equating patriotism with a daily pledge of allegiance.

    It doesn’t “equate” anything. If you bothered to ask me for an explanation, rather than writing in so an incendiary manner (“bordering on idolatry”), you would realize that I don’t consider The Pledge of Allegiance to be a necessary or a sufficient component of patriotism.

    What I think of it, rather, is as a ritual, a reminder that we ought to be grateful for the country and be loyal to it. You can do the Pledge of Allegiance a thousand times and be a traitor to the country through your deeds. Does that mean the said ritual is useless or counterproductive? Or idolatrous?

    Do you thus equate Christian faith with a Catholic pledge such as the renewal of baptism? No.

    First of all, God is not the same as a country. I can speak to God. I can’t speak to the country (the country is more analogous to the Church, the whole body of believers). God is a unique being with unique properties (indeed He is beyond properties).

    Second, my children and I do the Rosary and other prayers, both as direct “conversations” with God and as sacred rituals and reminders of our faith. When we say “Benedic, Domine, nos…” three times a day, for example, we aren’t simply asking for blessings or thanking God for the food in front our faces, but also for His grace and love and as affirmations of our desire to do what is pleasing to Him among many other reasons.

    It’s silly to be quantitative about this, but we the say the Pledge once a day while prayers and religious study are throughout the day.

    If your faith is born out in prayer and study

    And actions. As St. James said:

    What shall it profit, my brethren, if a man say he hath faith, but hath not works? Shall faith be able to save him? [15] And if a brother or sister be naked, and want daily food:

    [16] And one of you say to them: Go in peace, be ye warmed and filled; yet give them not those things that are necessary for the body, what shall it profit? [17] So faith also, if it have not works, is dead in itself. [18] But some man will say: Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without works; and I will shew thee, by works, my faith. [19] Thou believest that there is one God. Thou dost well: the devils also believe and tremble. [20] But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?

    [21] Was not Abraham our father justified by works, offering up Isaac his son upon the altar? [22] Seest thou, that faith did co-operate with his works; and by works faith was made perfect? [23] And the scripture was fulfilled, saying: Abraham believed God, and it was reputed to him to justice, and he was called the friend of God. [24] Do you see that by works a man is justified; and not by faith only? [25] And in like manner also Rahab the harlot, was not she justified by works, receiving the messengers, and sending them out another way?

    [26] For even as the body without the spirit is dead; so also faith without works is dead.

    And regarding patriotism:

    your patriotism should be born out in a similar manner, such as readings in history and geography, not oaths and pledges.

    Reading history and geography does not a patriot make – especially among children whose reason is yet to fully-form (though it may help). Daily reminders, in my view, are much more efficacious. Then again, I’m someone who believes in a great value in ritual well-practiced, especially where the opportunity for actions is constrained (as is often the case with children).

    As for “oaths and pledges,” if you wish to draw that kind of equivalence, there is Credo, said at the beginning of Mass.

    Therefore, you endorse daily renewals of allegiance to the fatherland but not daily renewals of allegiance to God as proofs.

    This is a pure straw man.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie


    there is Credo, said at the beginning of Mass.
     
    That's true.

    Reading history and geography does not a patriot make
     
    And technically doing the Rosary does not a Catholic make. However, it would be hard to do daily prayers without falling into authentic Catholicism I would imagine, and similarly, I think it would be hard to become educated about the breadth and depth of the place one lives in without developing true affinity for it.

    I guess we have different ideas about what patriotism is. My ideas are closer to dfordoom's, I think. For me patriotism is about the land and the people, and the propagation of the political system is secondary. If the political system is a good one, it is a reasonable point of pride and celebration for the people, but patriots under totalitarianism might become rebels and revolutionaries. As I pointed out to dfordoom, the US's Pledge of Allegiance says nothing of our historical forms of governance, founding documents, etc. It is in fact mindlessly supportive of whatever the current regime is (as the current regime is, de facto, "the republic"), so saying it in the 1950s, in the 1980s, and in the 2020s are three different things.

    especially among children whose reason is yet to fully-form (though it may help). Daily reminders, in my view, are much more efficacious.
     
    I object to this in theory and from experience. In theory, I think learning about the country is more efficacious than rote repetition. But my idea of relgious education is like this too and is probably influenced by American protestants, who often educate their children by Bible memorization and study rather than credos and standardized prayers.

    My experience with the Pledge of Allegiance is that I said it daily for years like a robot and as soon as I thought about what I was saying started having doubts like those I expressed above. My feeling for the USA has nothing whatever to do with saying the Pledge for years. The single biggest factor in my love of the (soon to be former) USA was travel. As a boy, I attended a Boy Scout National Jamboree in Virigina and visited with my troop many sites around Washington, DC, such as George Washington's farm and also in Philadelphia. Also, as a boy, yearly cross-country trips with my family and camping at the Atlantic coast. I developed a true love for the variety of people who live in the USA and for the quite spectacular land the country was blessed with. Of course, these things are mixed up in my heart with the red white and blue and ideas about freedom, but that is why MAGA appeals. I want the people and place to be synonymous with the historical goodness. But if they cease to be, then I can discard feeling for the government and its symbols like the flag.

    tl;dr The pledge didn't make me a patriot.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  144. @Chrisnonymous
    @V. K. Ovelund

    You are suggesting that Eisenhower-era America was the peak. This is like saying that Julius Caesar's consulship was the peak of Rome. No, it is simply the last point, after which Rome started to cease resembling itself. That is more the case with Eisenhower-era America.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @V. K. Ovelund

    You are suggesting that Eisenhower-era America was the peak.

    Correct. Eisenhower/Kennedy, to be precise.

    The suggestion is not very creative, admittedly. I deserve no credit for insight! A zillion Americans have noted the same before me, but that’s because it was so obviously true.

    The Eisenhower/Kennedy-era represented not only the peak of American civilization, never to be attained again, but also the peak of civilization on earth to date. It was astonishing, and all too brief.

    One does not pine for vanished days, or ought not, for you and I enjoy instead the historic honor to grapple the crisis that follows the decline; yet a decline it has indeed been. A decline from the peak.

    • Thanks: Chrisnonymous
  145. @Chrisnonymous
    @V. K. Ovelund

    You are suggesting that Eisenhower-era America was the peak. This is like saying that Julius Caesar's consulship was the peak of Rome. No, it is simply the last point, after which Rome started to cease resembling itself. That is more the case with Eisenhower-era America.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @V. K. Ovelund

    I neglected to note: the rest of your comment is well taken. I have nothing to add to it.

  146. @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches Catholics to be patriotic.
     
    There are different kinds of patriotism. What one person means by patriotism is not necessarily what another person means by it. A discussion on patriotism is a bit pointless unless you first agree on what you mean by the term.

    In democracies it gets complicated. You can be intensely patriotic and at the same time want to see the current government, or even the entire existing political system, overthrown.

    You don't have that problem if you're a monarchist. If you're a monarchist you're either loyal to the king (in which case you're a patriot) or you're disloyal to the king (in which case you're a traitor).

    Patriotism can be a simple affection for the land of one's birth, or for one's own ethnic or cultural group. In other words it can be a loyalty to one's homeland or to one's people.

    In democracies people sometimes think they're patriots when in fact their allegiance is to a particular political ideology rather than to the land or the people. A Frenchman can be patriotic because he loves France itself and the French people but there are Frenchmen who claim to be patriotic when in fact their loyalty is to republicanism.

    It gets very complicated when you're a transplant. I'm Australian but my family, ethnic and cultural roots lie in England, Scotland and Wales. I have an emotional attachment to the land of Australia but I also have an emotional attachment to my Anglo-Celtic cultural group.

    The Pledge of Allegiance seems a bit ideological to me, as if you're pledging allegiance to a particular form of government and a particular political ideology rather than to a land or a people.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @V. K. Ovelund

    America is terminally ill, so there seems little point in arguing with you; but if you had said the same 20 years ago, I would merely have observed that the United States has her own history, has her own institutions, and is not a monarchy.

    I said, “would have observed.” As it is, to argue with you would be pointless, for the thing argued over is going away of its own accord.

  147. @Joe Paluka
    @V. K. Ovelund

    You didn't get what I was driving at and I'm not going to explain it to you.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    You didn’t get what I was driving at …

    Possible. It would not be the first time I didn’t get something.

    … and I’m not going to explain it to you.

    Ok. Thanks anyway.

    Maybe next time.

  148. @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    You responded to my suggestion that a daily pledge of allegiance was bordering on idolatry by saying that the Church endorses patriotism. This is logically equating patriotism with a daily pledge of allegiance.
     
    It doesn't "equate" anything. If you bothered to ask me for an explanation, rather than writing in so an incendiary manner ("bordering on idolatry"), you would realize that I don't consider The Pledge of Allegiance to be a necessary or a sufficient component of patriotism.

    What I think of it, rather, is as a ritual, a reminder that we ought to be grateful for the country and be loyal to it. You can do the Pledge of Allegiance a thousand times and be a traitor to the country through your deeds. Does that mean the said ritual is useless or counterproductive? Or idolatrous?


    Do you thus equate Christian faith with a Catholic pledge such as the renewal of baptism? No.
     
    First of all, God is not the same as a country. I can speak to God. I can't speak to the country (the country is more analogous to the Church, the whole body of believers). God is a unique being with unique properties (indeed He is beyond properties).

    Second, my children and I do the Rosary and other prayers, both as direct "conversations" with God and as sacred rituals and reminders of our faith. When we say "Benedic, Domine, nos..." three times a day, for example, we aren't simply asking for blessings or thanking God for the food in front our faces, but also for His grace and love and as affirmations of our desire to do what is pleasing to Him among many other reasons.

    It's silly to be quantitative about this, but we the say the Pledge once a day while prayers and religious study are throughout the day.


    If your faith is born out in prayer and study
     
    And actions. As St. James said:

    What shall it profit, my brethren, if a man say he hath faith, but hath not works? Shall faith be able to save him? [15] And if a brother or sister be naked, and want daily food:

    [16] And one of you say to them: Go in peace, be ye warmed and filled; yet give them not those things that are necessary for the body, what shall it profit? [17] So faith also, if it have not works, is dead in itself. [18] But some man will say: Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without works; and I will shew thee, by works, my faith. [19] Thou believest that there is one God. Thou dost well: the devils also believe and tremble. [20] But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?

    [21] Was not Abraham our father justified by works, offering up Isaac his son upon the altar? [22] Seest thou, that faith did co-operate with his works; and by works faith was made perfect? [23] And the scripture was fulfilled, saying: Abraham believed God, and it was reputed to him to justice, and he was called the friend of God. [24] Do you see that by works a man is justified; and not by faith only? [25] And in like manner also Rahab the harlot, was not she justified by works, receiving the messengers, and sending them out another way?

    [26] For even as the body without the spirit is dead; so also faith without works is dead.
     

    And regarding patriotism:

    your patriotism should be born out in a similar manner, such as readings in history and geography, not oaths and pledges.
     
    Reading history and geography does not a patriot make - especially among children whose reason is yet to fully-form (though it may help). Daily reminders, in my view, are much more efficacious. Then again, I'm someone who believes in a great value in ritual well-practiced, especially where the opportunity for actions is constrained (as is often the case with children).

    As for "oaths and pledges," if you wish to draw that kind of equivalence, there is Credo, said at the beginning of Mass.


    Therefore, you endorse daily renewals of allegiance to the fatherland but not daily renewals of allegiance to God as proofs.
     
    This is a pure straw man.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    there is Credo, said at the beginning of Mass.

    That’s true.

    Reading history and geography does not a patriot make

    And technically doing the Rosary does not a Catholic make. However, it would be hard to do daily prayers without falling into authentic Catholicism I would imagine, and similarly, I think it would be hard to become educated about the breadth and depth of the place one lives in without developing true affinity for it.

    I guess we have different ideas about what patriotism is. My ideas are closer to dfordoom’s, I think. For me patriotism is about the land and the people, and the propagation of the political system is secondary. If the political system is a good one, it is a reasonable point of pride and celebration for the people, but patriots under totalitarianism might become rebels and revolutionaries. As I pointed out to dfordoom, the US’s Pledge of Allegiance says nothing of our historical forms of governance, founding documents, etc. It is in fact mindlessly supportive of whatever the current regime is (as the current regime is, de facto, “the republic”), so saying it in the 1950s, in the 1980s, and in the 2020s are three different things.

    especially among children whose reason is yet to fully-form (though it may help). Daily reminders, in my view, are much more efficacious.

    I object to this in theory and from experience. In theory, I think learning about the country is more efficacious than rote repetition. But my idea of relgious education is like this too and is probably influenced by American protestants, who often educate their children by Bible memorization and study rather than credos and standardized prayers.

    My experience with the Pledge of Allegiance is that I said it daily for years like a robot and as soon as I thought about what I was saying started having doubts like those I expressed above. My feeling for the USA has nothing whatever to do with saying the Pledge for years. The single biggest factor in my love of the (soon to be former) USA was travel. As a boy, I attended a Boy Scout National Jamboree in Virigina and visited with my troop many sites around Washington, DC, such as George Washington’s farm and also in Philadelphia. Also, as a boy, yearly cross-country trips with my family and camping at the Atlantic coast. I developed a true love for the variety of people who live in the USA and for the quite spectacular land the country was blessed with. Of course, these things are mixed up in my heart with the red white and blue and ideas about freedom, but that is why MAGA appeals. I want the people and place to be synonymous with the historical goodness. But if they cease to be, then I can discard feeling for the government and its symbols like the flag.

    tl;dr The pledge didn’t make me a patriot.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    then I can discard feeling for the government and its symbols like the flag.
     
    Symbols mean different things to different people. For me, the flag doesn’t represent the government so much as the country, perhaps even what it once was. And what it once was exists in my heart and, hopefully, in the hearts of my children into the future. That is what the Pledge is for us.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Chrisnonymous

  149. @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie


    there is Credo, said at the beginning of Mass.
     
    That's true.

    Reading history and geography does not a patriot make
     
    And technically doing the Rosary does not a Catholic make. However, it would be hard to do daily prayers without falling into authentic Catholicism I would imagine, and similarly, I think it would be hard to become educated about the breadth and depth of the place one lives in without developing true affinity for it.

    I guess we have different ideas about what patriotism is. My ideas are closer to dfordoom's, I think. For me patriotism is about the land and the people, and the propagation of the political system is secondary. If the political system is a good one, it is a reasonable point of pride and celebration for the people, but patriots under totalitarianism might become rebels and revolutionaries. As I pointed out to dfordoom, the US's Pledge of Allegiance says nothing of our historical forms of governance, founding documents, etc. It is in fact mindlessly supportive of whatever the current regime is (as the current regime is, de facto, "the republic"), so saying it in the 1950s, in the 1980s, and in the 2020s are three different things.

    especially among children whose reason is yet to fully-form (though it may help). Daily reminders, in my view, are much more efficacious.
     
    I object to this in theory and from experience. In theory, I think learning about the country is more efficacious than rote repetition. But my idea of relgious education is like this too and is probably influenced by American protestants, who often educate their children by Bible memorization and study rather than credos and standardized prayers.

    My experience with the Pledge of Allegiance is that I said it daily for years like a robot and as soon as I thought about what I was saying started having doubts like those I expressed above. My feeling for the USA has nothing whatever to do with saying the Pledge for years. The single biggest factor in my love of the (soon to be former) USA was travel. As a boy, I attended a Boy Scout National Jamboree in Virigina and visited with my troop many sites around Washington, DC, such as George Washington's farm and also in Philadelphia. Also, as a boy, yearly cross-country trips with my family and camping at the Atlantic coast. I developed a true love for the variety of people who live in the USA and for the quite spectacular land the country was blessed with. Of course, these things are mixed up in my heart with the red white and blue and ideas about freedom, but that is why MAGA appeals. I want the people and place to be synonymous with the historical goodness. But if they cease to be, then I can discard feeling for the government and its symbols like the flag.

    tl;dr The pledge didn't make me a patriot.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    then I can discard feeling for the government and its symbols like the flag.

    Symbols mean different things to different people. For me, the flag doesn’t represent the government so much as the country, perhaps even what it once was. And what it once was exists in my heart and, hopefully, in the hearts of my children into the future. That is what the Pledge is for us.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie

    I think most people agree with you about the sentimentality of the flag. If I were given the powers of imperium right now like a Sulla or Caesar, I would change a lot about the government, but I would keep the flag because it binds us to great people and moments in our history. However, right now, what it means to show the flag is in flux. This is a real issue for me as I wear American flag-decorated clothing in my current place of residence, Japan. Increasingly, this is perceived as an indictment of traditional aspects of culture. For example, there was a court case recently in which two Japanese nationals who met and got married while living in New York State sued the government to overturn a law forbidding them from registering their marriage in Japan using two different surnames. Their argument was basically Americans are free because they aren't constrained by any social traditions, and we shouldn't be either (this wasn't their legal argument, but the implicit political one behind their suit). You can imagine the way this looks in the Japanese press, and Japanese people automatically assume I must agree with US laws (and look down on Japanese backwardness) because I display the flag. This is what it means to fly the flag now--you become a representative to the world not of liberty but of social dissolution, or as we would say in modern US parlance, wokism. Now, for me personally, the flag still means other things, but at some point I may feel it is embarrassing or counterproductive to display it.

    We can live in a bubble of sentimentality, but we shouldn't. The fact is that, whatever you want the Pledge to mean, it is in fact a Pledge to "the republic", unqualified by any dates and without any asterix and, so, to the current regime. When schoolchildren stand up in public school and say it, none of them is thinking like VK Ovelund that he is referring to Eisenhower-Kennedy America or the republic referred to had a Department of the Navy but not a standing army, etc.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie

    By the way, why don't you write your own USA allegiance oath for you and your children to recite? It could fix the problems I explained with the current "official" version.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Twinkie

  150. @Boomthorkell
    @DanHessinMD

    While white men are undeniably more creative (statistically, I'm not inventing any robots) than most comparable groups, we can't in fairness knock China here. Even the Russians, very good inventors, during the USSR firmly believed in using copying where it was a convenient supplement, complement, or alternative to initial grinding reseatch and development, and (here's the big one)...so did we!

    America quote literally stole German inventions and literal tons of research papers during and after the war. Now, I'm not knocking that, of course, "to the victor go the spoils" and it's not like Germany wasn't robbing Europe of other things. We also completely copied A Soviet satellite on tour here to help us make a space breakthrough.

    That our government is so corrupt to allow its citizens companies to so thoroughly sell themselves out, and that the companies are so short sighted to boost their competition for short term gains is a personal and structural flaw.

    The Chinese though are creative where it counts, and smart enough to reproduce and develop what they copy, and eventually invent what they can't. They might not do it at an Indo-European level, but they really aren't far behind at all, and with continued efforts, I doubt they'll need to copy anything from us.

    Though, being white people, I'm sure one of us will come up with something newer and better, even weighed down by feminists, blacks, trannies and social justice movements.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Kaiser’s Germany, America, and everyone else copied from England for the 1st Industrial Revolution (steam). Germans invested more than Britain on STEM research / education, and didn’t have pay to keep up an overseas empire that got into a nasty Boer War for no obvious reason. They also had a conglomerate type model, Konzern which allocated capital more efficiently. This let to them leading the 2nd (electric/chemical), and dominating hard science Nobels in 19/20th CE.

    This is the model China is looking to follow. But there is a creativity shortfall. Both Japan/SK’s per capita creativity output falls far short of West especially Germanic Europe.

    My theories are a few,
    1. More emphasis on work/life balance in West, having hobbies

    2. Creativity may not scale with population size, for example within Euros, German’s per capita innovation is somewhat smaller than Sweden/Switzerland. People need space to think. For this reason I’m not too concerned about East Asia’s demographics, C/J/K can shrink by a third of population and still be denser than Germany.

    3. Scientific revolution came in hand-in-hand with Western philosophy and humanities. While Eastern/Sinitic philosophy hasn’t kept up with all that, and is rightfully associated with fortune cookies and the section in Barnes and Nobles next to scented candles n shit. If the Sinosphere steps their game that will boost Japan/SK

    4. Last, on average, the skills to pick up women, that I think is strongly correlated with creativity, is lower.

    • Agree: Boomthorkell
  151. @DanHessinMD
    AE -- you are a brilliant guy, but I'd like to think of myself as a friend of yours and I urge to cheer up. If you ingest too many black pills, you will get sick! It is legit not as bad as you think, at least not right now.

    There is some reason for genuine optimism:

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.

    (2) If you think we are worthless losers who can't produce anything anymore, I don't think that is quite right. It is kind of hard to compete with China on manufactured goods when their wages are a tiny fraction of ours.

    But:

    The most important thing to produce is food. And we produce a superabundance of food for not only ourselves but for the world with just 2% of the population. That's how productive we are in the most important aspect. And our food is cheap (especially at Costco or Lidl or Aldi's), varied, and high quality. By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less variety.

    The second most important thing to produce is energy including electricity. Again, we have a superabundance of cheap energy, homegrown.

    (3)
    Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home. You can buy anything instantly at nearly the best global price and have it delivered for free in most cases the next day. Anything you want to know, any medical knowledge, any knowledge on how to fix anything, there at your fingertips.

    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets -- think Amazon -- are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

    Watch this: these are the robots that run Amazon's gigantic warehouses. Totally automated. Friggin' incredible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhimvktaXh8

    We have an abundance of space, an abundance of gigantic homes.

    When COVID hit, you and I both expected like a 50% decline in GDP from the lockdowns. Instead, GDP declined almost not at all in the end.

    We were both wrong, and had extreme bias on the pessimistic side. Who would have thought our economy could navigate a year of lockdown so well? Time to recalibrate.

    And work from home -- while it may seem a little degenerate -- has worked okay so far. And that is a massive improvement in quality of life, honestly.

    China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life. Low incomes, tiny living spaces, unbreathable air... when they hosted the Olympics, they shuttered their factories for weeks to make their air temporarily breathable for the benefit of foreigners:

    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/niallmccarthy/files/2015/01/20150123_China_US_Pollution_Fo.jpg

    They choke on unbreathable air, and we get all the things plus clean air like we never had. What a deal. And they can't stop this arrangement because they need the money.

    Our money isn't crashing. Why? There are 100 crappier countries that are dollarized.

    China has a massive shortage of women and the girlfriend of a large proportion of Chinese men is this AI bot:

    https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1006531/the-ai-girlfriend-seducing-chinas-lonely-men

    Cheer up, we are kicking a great deal of ass still. Chinese people wish they were us.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Anonymous, @Boomthorkell, @Joe Paluka, @bro3886, @Realist, @Liberty Mike, @Chrisnonymous, @Supply and Demand, @Audacious Epigone

    At the risk of sounding like a jerk, I never made any predictions about GDP. I wouldn’t because it’s such an easy figure for the Fed to goose. Pump trillions into the system without paying for them and one consequence will be an increase in GDP. That money has to be spent somewhere. I still think consumer prices are going up in a big way.

  152. @Malenfant
    @DanHessinMD


    (4) A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles. Anything you can think of with 30 seconds of effort for top quality and the best price.

     

    Here you expose considerable ignorance. China's consumer markets -- particularly 1688, JD, and TaoBao -- are vastly superior. They are less centralized, with much more variety, cheaper prices, and more customer base diversity. (A huge fraction of 1688's clientele are in industry, looking for chemicals or industrial equipment.) Buying goods from those Chinese markets is just as easy as it is on Amazon, and shipping is just as fast, if not faster. Customer service is immediately responsive, almost 24/7. Reviews are usually trustworthy, and can only be left by people who have genuinely purchased the products in question.

    What's more, and this is perhaps the most important point, those Chinese markets actually benefit local Chinese small businesses, whereas Amazon is rightly famous for fucking over American small businesses, especially if they're in the brick-and-mortar space.

    I regularly patronize both American and Chinese consumer markets, and China has the clear edge here, by a mile.

    Replies: @DanHessinMD, @Live from China

    I live in China and the sites you mentioned are sewers. The quality of the products and services available to Americans are amazing in comparison. Moreover, the United States has a lower cost of living than China by a country mile.

  153. @anon

    (1) GDP per capita is $65,000 in the US and $10,000 in China.
     
    Doesn't matter. China is closing fast, and GDP will be the factor determining who runs the world, not per capita GDP.

    "we produce a superabundance of food ... By contrast China has 35% of its labor force in agriculture and still produces far less food per capita and they get way less"
     
    Who's worse off, the nation that imports millions of peasant third worlders into their country to take over demographically so they can get cheap tomatoes at the grocery store, or the nation that grows things with domestic labor?

    Further, the stat you cited on Chinese labor really means nothing. It hasn't impeded China's ability to out-compete the United States in 5G and quantum computing; the Chinese will dominate countless other emerging technologies in the future. I'm sure that China will eventually industrialize to the point where they need much less labor to grow food anyway.

    "Another major part of the economy is data and everyone here has a data massive pipeline into multiple supercomputers in their home."
     
    China is leading the way in super computing and the emerging field of quantum computing. They are also leading in 5G, which is why the US desperately banned Huawei from operating in the United States and attempted (unsuccessfully) to bully the rest of the world into foregoing their technology. The US barely got their 5G chips, after banning the competition, into the latest smartphones. What happens when China races ahead with 6G and the US has no answer? How exactly are 198 million White Caucasians, a few Asians, and immigrants supposed to compete with a billion smart Han Chinese in any intellectual field? Whites are dying off at a rate of about 500k/1 million per year in the United States, and China already publishes more scientific papers in many fields than the US and is set to race far ahead in the coming decade.

    "A central part of an economy is markets. Our markets — think Amazon — are the best in the world by a million miles."
     
    They're not. China has an equivalent service that is just as good. They also have the world's largest internet company, most advanced highspeed rail, most advanced telecommunications company, third largest smart phone manufacturer, a nascent competitor to Boeing, etc.

    Amazon is a leftist monopoly that censors their political opposition. I don't see how anyone should be cheering for them. They're also heavily subsidized by the publicly-funded US postal service anyway, so they're certainly not a paragon of free market capitalism.

    "China competes hard because Chinese people have a shitty life."
     
    How does that explain the Japanese or the Koreans? Both are rich, industrialized nations with fiercely competitive populations. South Korea issues more patents per capita than the United States does. More likely explanation: China competes hard because their mean IQ, along with other East Asian nations, is much higher than America's pathetic 97 (and falling fast). And it's worse than that for the United States. In the near future, all political power will be concentrated in the hands of a party whose mean IQ is maybe 95 and falling, the democrats. Compare that with the CCP, which is filled with engineers and assorted geniuses. I believe a writer for this website once calculated the CCP's mean IQ at 140, at least for senior leadership rolls. Compare that with either major American party and laugh. Do AOC and Marco Rubio have 140 IQs?

    They choke on unbreathable air
     
    So did the US in the 1950s and 60s. Didn't stop the US from taking over the world with 50% of global GDP.

    China has a massive shortage of women
     
    The US has a similar problem with rising numbers of singles, declining marriage rates, and crashing birthrates. The Chinese still have over 100 million more females than the entire US population. Who cares if the ratios are off when they can make up for it on volume? In the United States, we have a different, but also significant, problem: rising inequality in male/female quality of life, educational attainment, etc. We're hardly in a position to gloat.

    "Chinese people wish they were us."
     
    No, they don't. The number of US graduates in many technical fields has actually declined as Chinese students have opted to return home after graduation rather than staying. The evidence is in, they don't want to be us. China is freer and much less divided than the United States. Here, if you're White male, you're discriminated against, hounded out of your job, denied opportunities* and you have no future. There is high crime, 24/7 racism, terrorist groups like antifa roaming the streets, and constant fear. I certainly wish I hadn't been born here. I'd kill to have been born Japanese. I have a feeling I'll wish I had been born Chinese in a few decades, if I make it that far in this climate.

    *There are countless stories like this one coming from the US:

    Hollywood Doesn't Want WHITE DUDES Anymore, Say Movie Execs.

    Several Hollywood executives, actors and writers spoke to the Daily Mail UK this week (anonymously) and said that Hollywood is in FULL ON PANIC MODE over "cancel culture" right now. The mandate from many studios is that middle-aged white dudes (called "menemies") are now persona non grata, as studios are TERRIFIED of social media backlash for not being progressive enough. Between this and the pandemic, some white folks in Hollywood are even selling their houses and moving out of state because they know their careers are effectively OVER.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfVrcC39R84
     
    China doesn't discriminate against their own people. No one in China will force you to hire non-Chinese and defer to them. China doesn't have an entire month dedicated to celebrating foreign racial groups and castigating their own. Antifa doesn't attack Chinese courthouses with permission of the state, that's for sure. We have political prisoners in the US (jailed for making fun of Hilary Clinton on Facebook), a strict censorship regime (which the website has been victimized by), and a corrupt government and media that lie and attack their opponents nonstop. I could go on all day. Just what exactly makes you proud to be an American over being born Han Chinese? They have a future, at least. Can you say that about Whites in the United States?

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @Realist, @showmethereal, @Live from China

    GDP is a meaningless concept in socialist country. China technically has one but it is a meaningless number and the Chinese manipulate the underlying accounting identities to suit their purposes. Without the assumption of mutually beneficial voluntary exchange, consumption, investment, government spending, and net exports tell you little or nothing about the economic welfare or national power of a country.

  154. @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    then I can discard feeling for the government and its symbols like the flag.
     
    Symbols mean different things to different people. For me, the flag doesn’t represent the government so much as the country, perhaps even what it once was. And what it once was exists in my heart and, hopefully, in the hearts of my children into the future. That is what the Pledge is for us.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Chrisnonymous

    I think most people agree with you about the sentimentality of the flag. If I were given the powers of imperium right now like a Sulla or Caesar, I would change a lot about the government, but I would keep the flag because it binds us to great people and moments in our history. However, right now, what it means to show the flag is in flux. This is a real issue for me as I wear American flag-decorated clothing in my current place of residence, Japan. Increasingly, this is perceived as an indictment of traditional aspects of culture. For example, there was a court case recently in which two Japanese nationals who met and got married while living in New York State sued the government to overturn a law forbidding them from registering their marriage in Japan using two different surnames. Their argument was basically Americans are free because they aren’t constrained by any social traditions, and we shouldn’t be either (this wasn’t their legal argument, but the implicit political one behind their suit). You can imagine the way this looks in the Japanese press, and Japanese people automatically assume I must agree with US laws (and look down on Japanese backwardness) because I display the flag. This is what it means to fly the flag now–you become a representative to the world not of liberty but of social dissolution, or as we would say in modern US parlance, wokism. Now, for me personally, the flag still means other things, but at some point I may feel it is embarrassing or counterproductive to display it.

    We can live in a bubble of sentimentality, but we shouldn’t. The fact is that, whatever you want the Pledge to mean, it is in fact a Pledge to “the republic”, unqualified by any dates and without any asterix and, so, to the current regime. When schoolchildren stand up in public school and say it, none of them is thinking like VK Ovelund that he is referring to Eisenhower-Kennedy America or the republic referred to had a Department of the Navy but not a standing army, etc.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Chrisnonymous


    We can live in a bubble of sentimentality, but we shouldn’t. The fact is that, whatever you want the Pledge to mean, it is in fact a Pledge to “the republic”, unqualified by any dates and without any asterix and, so, to the current regime. When schoolchildren stand up in public school and say it, none of them is thinking like VK Ovelund that he is referring to Eisenhower-Kennedy America or the republic referred to had a Department of the Navy but not a standing army, etc.
     
    Probably right.

    I can speak for no one but myself, but when I recited the Pledge during elementary school, I don't remember thinking anything at all. The Pledge was rote.

    This is not to criticize the Pledge. It's merely an observation.
  155. @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    then I can discard feeling for the government and its symbols like the flag.
     
    Symbols mean different things to different people. For me, the flag doesn’t represent the government so much as the country, perhaps even what it once was. And what it once was exists in my heart and, hopefully, in the hearts of my children into the future. That is what the Pledge is for us.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Chrisnonymous

    By the way, why don’t you write your own USA allegiance oath for you and your children to recite? It could fix the problems I explained with the current “official” version.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Chrisnonymous


    By the way, why don’t you write your own USA allegiance oath for you and your children to recite?
     
    Because then it would not be the national Pledge, which by its very nature is a united undertaking of fellow citizens, acting together as a body for the honor of the homeland they share.

    Creative writing serves other purposes.

    Besides that, Christians will generally take oaths only as propounded by state and institutional authority. On advice of Matthew's gospel, Christians avoid inventing their own.

    , @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    By the way, why don’t you write your own USA allegiance oath for you and your children to recite?
     
    What, so that the Japanese can look down upon us and say that we have no traditions? Oh, the horror, the horror!

    In any case, that would be silly. Should I make my own crucifix-substitute too, because there are would-be Christians who distort its meanings?

    You can imagine the way this looks in the Japanese press, and Japanese people automatically assume
     
    Forgive me for the seeming rudeness, but I could not care less how things look to the Japanese or the rest of the world. The intelligent among them know that what they see on TV doesn't quite capture the reality. That America is no more real America than that portrayed in Hollywood movies. I don't think the Japanese get bent out of shape either, just because some Americans might assume Japan is how it is portrayed in films such as "Black Rain" or "Mr. Baseball."

    We can live in a bubble of sentimentality, but we shouldn’t.
     
    It's not sentimentality if I live it and I teach my children to live it. If we have to be in the catacombs for a while, so be it. But, God-willing, if not my children, then my children's children will emerge from them and rebuild the American civilization. So long as one of them breathes and carries the flame within their hearts, my America will stay alive and endure.

    Have children and inculcate them well - that's how you fight the present and change the future.
  156. @Anonymous
    @DanHessinMD

    @ Twinkie


    AE is a low T trans-woman in denial, he has a habit of making hysterical blog posts with no basis in reality, just his strange emotional fluctuations.


    In reality the USA is doing just fine and China is hobbling along, still unable to provide enough protein to its citizens to survive. As a former member of PeakOil.com, I've seen hysterical anti-American doomers come and go for nearly 20 years. They are always wrong, America always continues prevailing and the rest of the world truly rots, while we improve. Yet these strange people, with their tendencies to root for underdogs and resent the strong, always keep re-spawning.

    Replies: @Jackbnimbl, @anonymous, @Eugene Norman, @anon, @Audacious Epigone

    You believed in peak oil and I’m the hysterical one who posts with no basis in reality?

  157. @anon
    Just about one year ago today, due to a confluence of unusual circumstances, the price of West Texas Intermediate briefly dropped to -$35 / bbl. That's negative $35 per barrel, one would have to pay the guys in Cushing, Oklahoma to take it off your hands. There was a spasm of panic here at AE's over that. A brief moment of intense blackpilling.

    What's the price of WTI today?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    That was an indication of problems with the credit markets. My guess at the time was that the price would be above $100 US in a couple of years. I still think that’s correct.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Audacious Epigone

    That was an indication of problems with the credit markets.

    No. It was a brief issue of supply / demand. Storage at Cushing, Oklahoma is not infinite.
    It was not the beginning of some tribulation or other drama, either.

    My guess at the time was that the price would be above $100 US in a couple of years. I still think that’s correct.

    Could be, but irrelevant to that brief moment of panic.

    Sidebar: when I stream bubblevision I keep hearing little bits implying that a price inflation rate of 2% would be just fine...not necessarily the Fed saying that directly, just off-hand remarks by talking heads. They could be talking their book, of course.

  158. @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie

    I think most people agree with you about the sentimentality of the flag. If I were given the powers of imperium right now like a Sulla or Caesar, I would change a lot about the government, but I would keep the flag because it binds us to great people and moments in our history. However, right now, what it means to show the flag is in flux. This is a real issue for me as I wear American flag-decorated clothing in my current place of residence, Japan. Increasingly, this is perceived as an indictment of traditional aspects of culture. For example, there was a court case recently in which two Japanese nationals who met and got married while living in New York State sued the government to overturn a law forbidding them from registering their marriage in Japan using two different surnames. Their argument was basically Americans are free because they aren't constrained by any social traditions, and we shouldn't be either (this wasn't their legal argument, but the implicit political one behind their suit). You can imagine the way this looks in the Japanese press, and Japanese people automatically assume I must agree with US laws (and look down on Japanese backwardness) because I display the flag. This is what it means to fly the flag now--you become a representative to the world not of liberty but of social dissolution, or as we would say in modern US parlance, wokism. Now, for me personally, the flag still means other things, but at some point I may feel it is embarrassing or counterproductive to display it.

    We can live in a bubble of sentimentality, but we shouldn't. The fact is that, whatever you want the Pledge to mean, it is in fact a Pledge to "the republic", unqualified by any dates and without any asterix and, so, to the current regime. When schoolchildren stand up in public school and say it, none of them is thinking like VK Ovelund that he is referring to Eisenhower-Kennedy America or the republic referred to had a Department of the Navy but not a standing army, etc.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    We can live in a bubble of sentimentality, but we shouldn’t. The fact is that, whatever you want the Pledge to mean, it is in fact a Pledge to “the republic”, unqualified by any dates and without any asterix and, so, to the current regime. When schoolchildren stand up in public school and say it, none of them is thinking like VK Ovelund that he is referring to Eisenhower-Kennedy America or the republic referred to had a Department of the Navy but not a standing army, etc.

    Probably right.

    I can speak for no one but myself, but when I recited the Pledge during elementary school, I don’t remember thinking anything at all. The Pledge was rote.

    This is not to criticize the Pledge. It’s merely an observation.

  159. @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie

    By the way, why don't you write your own USA allegiance oath for you and your children to recite? It could fix the problems I explained with the current "official" version.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Twinkie

    By the way, why don’t you write your own USA allegiance oath for you and your children to recite?

    Because then it would not be the national Pledge, which by its very nature is a united undertaking of fellow citizens, acting together as a body for the honor of the homeland they share.

    Creative writing serves other purposes.

    Besides that, Christians will generally take oaths only as propounded by state and institutional authority. On advice of Matthew’s gospel, Christians avoid inventing their own.

    • Thanks: Chrisnonymous
  160. anon[389] • Disclaimer says:
    @Audacious Epigone
    @anon

    That was an indication of problems with the credit markets. My guess at the time was that the price would be above $100 US in a couple of years. I still think that's correct.

    Replies: @anon

    That was an indication of problems with the credit markets.

    No. It was a brief issue of supply / demand. Storage at Cushing, Oklahoma is not infinite.
    It was not the beginning of some tribulation or other drama, either.

    My guess at the time was that the price would be above $100 US in a couple of years. I still think that’s correct.

    Could be, but irrelevant to that brief moment of panic.

    Sidebar: when I stream bubblevision I keep hearing little bits implying that a price inflation rate of 2% would be just fine…not necessarily the Fed saying that directly, just off-hand remarks by talking heads. They could be talking their book, of course.

  161. @V. K. Ovelund
    @dfordoom


    The idea that China wants to invade North America is paranoid nonsense.
     
    Considering that China has, down the millennia, never firmly conquered even Vietnam, you may have a point. Historically, China does not seem to have been a markedly expansionist power.

    However, we live in a science-fiction age in which a man can travel halfway across the globe between breakfast and bedtime, a rocket can a torch a city on a distant continent within an hour, and radio communications are all but instantaneous; so the extent to which historical precedents like the Sino-Vietnamese one still apply seems uncertain.

    (Due credit: the Sino-Vietnamese precedent was suggested by Richard B. Spencer who, whatever his other faults and indiscretions might be, remains an imaginative, interesting fellow.)

    Replies: @dfordoom, @bro3886

    You are aware that the Great Wall was once on the Chinese frontier, and that China occupied Vietnam for a thousand years, and that part of today’s China used to be part of Vietnam?

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @bro3886


    It’s not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage. What’s the Canadian government going to do about it?
     
    Send in the army, I suppose, with U.S. NATO reïnforcements if necessary.

    Insofar as the red Chinese have been unable to reoccupy even Taiwan, I agree with @dfordoom: farfetched.


    You are aware that the Great Wall was once on the Chinese frontier, and that China occupied Vietnam for a thousand years, and that part of today’s China used to be part of Vietnam?
     
    I wasn't, but am now, thanks to you.
  162. @dfordoom

    China is within a decade or so of slicing through the MAD Gordian Knot. In the decades ahead, the question is whether the US will be able to field a conventional military powerful enough to keep them out of North America
     
    LOL. The idea that China wants to invade North America is paranoid nonsense.

    It’s only prudent to marshal an alliance to harness the resources of the Free World while a Free World outside of China still exists.
     
    Silly Cold War nonsense.

    Replies: @songbird, @V. K. Ovelund, @bro3886

    Not the least bit far-fetched. With the leaders of America and particularly Canada gleefully supporting open borders it’s not difficult to imagine a scenario where western Canada, in particular, becomes majority Chinese and opts out of the crumbling multiracial cesspool Canada will become. It’s not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage. What’s the Canadian government going to do about it? Would they even want to do anything about it? A territorial war on non-whites? Already Vancouver (“Hongcouver”) is more than a quarter Chinese, and that’s taken place in, what, just the last 30 years? The Chinese need land and the American, Canadian, and Australian ruling trash are happy to sell it out from under their own people.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @bro3886


    It’s not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage.
     
    Like I said, silly Cold War nonsense.
    , @anon
    @bro3886

    It’s not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage.

    Suggest you read Sun Tzu a couple of times and get back to us.

  163. @bro3886
    @dfordoom

    Not the least bit far-fetched. With the leaders of America and particularly Canada gleefully supporting open borders it's not difficult to imagine a scenario where western Canada, in particular, becomes majority Chinese and opts out of the crumbling multiracial cesspool Canada will become. It's not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage. What's the Canadian government going to do about it? Would they even want to do anything about it? A territorial war on non-whites? Already Vancouver ("Hongcouver") is more than a quarter Chinese, and that's taken place in, what, just the last 30 years? The Chinese need land and the American, Canadian, and Australian ruling trash are happy to sell it out from under their own people.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @anon

    It’s not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage.

    Like I said, silly Cold War nonsense.

  164. @bro3886
    @V. K. Ovelund

    You are aware that the Great Wall was once on the Chinese frontier, and that China occupied Vietnam for a thousand years, and that part of today's China used to be part of Vietnam?

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    It’s not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage. What’s the Canadian government going to do about it?

    Send in the army, I suppose, with U.S. NATO reïnforcements if necessary.

    Insofar as the red Chinese have been unable to reoccupy even Taiwan, I agree with : farfetched.

    You are aware that the Great Wall was once on the Chinese frontier, and that China occupied Vietnam for a thousand years, and that part of today’s China used to be part of Vietnam?

    I wasn’t, but am now, thanks to you.

  165. @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie

    By the way, why don't you write your own USA allegiance oath for you and your children to recite? It could fix the problems I explained with the current "official" version.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Twinkie

    By the way, why don’t you write your own USA allegiance oath for you and your children to recite?

    What, so that the Japanese can look down upon us and say that we have no traditions? Oh, the horror, the horror!

    In any case, that would be silly. Should I make my own crucifix-substitute too, because there are would-be Christians who distort its meanings?

    You can imagine the way this looks in the Japanese press, and Japanese people automatically assume

    Forgive me for the seeming rudeness, but I could not care less how things look to the Japanese or the rest of the world. The intelligent among them know that what they see on TV doesn’t quite capture the reality. That America is no more real America than that portrayed in Hollywood movies. I don’t think the Japanese get bent out of shape either, just because some Americans might assume Japan is how it is portrayed in films such as “Black Rain” or “Mr. Baseball.”

    We can live in a bubble of sentimentality, but we shouldn’t.

    It’s not sentimentality if I live it and I teach my children to live it. If we have to be in the catacombs for a while, so be it. But, God-willing, if not my children, then my children’s children will emerge from them and rebuild the American civilization. So long as one of them breathes and carries the flame within their hearts, my America will stay alive and endure.

    Have children and inculcate them well – that’s how you fight the present and change the future.

  166. @bro3886
    @dfordoom

    Not the least bit far-fetched. With the leaders of America and particularly Canada gleefully supporting open borders it's not difficult to imagine a scenario where western Canada, in particular, becomes majority Chinese and opts out of the crumbling multiracial cesspool Canada will become. It's not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage. What's the Canadian government going to do about it? Would they even want to do anything about it? A territorial war on non-whites? Already Vancouver ("Hongcouver") is more than a quarter Chinese, and that's taken place in, what, just the last 30 years? The Chinese need land and the American, Canadian, and Australian ruling trash are happy to sell it out from under their own people.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @anon

    It’s not difficult to imagine the process being abetted by the arrival on jetliners shortly thereafter of half a million or so young, Chinese male tourists with guns in their luggage.

    Suggest you read Sun Tzu a couple of times and get back to us.

  167. anon[102] • Disclaimer says:

    Now, now, come, come, AE — I’m about as heritage American as it gets, and it’s pretty awful, but you have to look for the silver linings in any given situation. The people that made this a remarkable country are still here, and they can be reconvened later in an even more dynamic form. Just focus on decentralization and privatization. Things will change! Good luck.

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