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Americans perceive Canada to be our greatest ally, at least among the fourteen countries inquired about in a recent YouGov survey. If Australia had been included, maybe the Aussies would’ve been number one:

Great Britain is right behind. It’s almost as though after all these years we are still not yet deaf to the voice of consanguinity.

Our two greatest foes of the second world war are today perceived to as friends. What a happy turn of affairs.

While our relationship with Israel comes in for a lot of criticism, our government’s cozy relationship with the Saudis is the greatest affront to our democratic process.

Speaking of, it’s hard to shake the sense that we perceive those countries whose leaders most readily bend to the empire’s will in a most positive light while the recalcitrant leaders who refuse to do Washington’s bidding are the ones we’ve been conditioned to hate most. Coincidence, I’m sure. It’s not like the regime would want it that way or anything.

 
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  1. North Korea…greatest foe?! Seriously? Other than causing stupidity on a relatively small peninsula in a corner of the world, what real threat do they present?

    Maybe I need to watch more network news so I can be properly indoctrinated on the subject.

    Peace.

    • Thanks: Jim Christian
    • LOL: paranoid goy, zimriel
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Talha


    Maybe I need to watch more network news so I can be properly indoctrinated on the subject.
     
    Well, yeah! This yougov survey points to your need of clarification of who they want, errr, who our enemies are. Russia's position in this graph is laughable and foolish, the whole thing is. They think we're idiots. Well, they'd be right.

    Seeing through the game ain't the same as winning it..

    Replies: @A123

    , @Bao Jiankang
    @Talha

    It's friendliness not power. North Korea is a chihuahua compared to china but the average american can find something nice to say about china, not so much for north korea.

    Replies: @Talha, @A123

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @Talha

    Right up there with the Taliban in the existential threat they represent!

    Replies: @Talha

    , @Colin Wright
    @Talha

    'North Korea…greatest foe?! Seriously? Other than causing stupidity on a relatively small peninsula in a corner of the world, what real threat do they present?'

    China certainly needs to be regarded with thought and respect, but the only group that poses a real and necessary threat to us is ourselves; I suppose North Korea wins (or loses) in the sense that it's the most openly hostile.

    Perhaps needless to say, in my opinion the one nation whose disappearance would most definitely and immediately benefit us would be Israel. If that vanished tomorrow, we would be better off economically, militarily, diplomatically, morally...

    But there again. We have have met the enemy and he is us. All we have to do is yank that little beast off our teat. Then Israel arguably either withers away or doesn't -- but inarguably ceases to be our special little ball 'n chain.

    Replies: @Talha

  2. Any neutral-minded Martian observer would immediately conclude, with neither emotion nor rancor nor prejudice, that our greatest foe is, of course… “Our Greatest Ally.”

    I mean, c’mon already.

    ISRAELI AMBASSADOR: Israel is America’s only friend in the Mideast.
    AMERICAN AMBASSADOR: Prior to Israel, America had no enemies in the Mideast.

    Math. Do.

    • Agree: mark green
    • Replies: @anonymous
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    Prior to Israel, America had no enemies in the Mideast
     
    Pop quiz - against whom did the United States fight its first foreign war? (Hint: it was during the Presidency of Thomas Jefferson, and resulted in the famous line in the Marine fight song about 'the shores of Tripoli.')

    Ok, I'll just come out and educate you. The United States went to war against the Bey of Algeria and his Ottoman protectors because they were kidnapping and enslaving American sailors, justified in their own words by their interpretation of Islam, 145 years before Israel existed.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AnonStarter

  3. If Australia had been included, maybe the Aussies would’ve been number one:

    I vote for OZ, and I miss my late, Australian brother-in-law. You wanna talk about allies? He got shot down over the Pacific Ocean fighting Japan. (He said he worried more about the sharks than the Japs.) More importantly, he taught me some very dirty jokes…

    Note about age and dates: He was almost as old as our father, and he liked young women like my sister. What man doesn’t?

    Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be. They have a healthy willingness to insult the “pommy bastards” who spawned us both. At least that was my brother-in-law. I once saw him come home — beaten, angry and with a black eye — from a bar near the naval base in Seal Beach, California, where he had gotten into a fight with some British sailers half his age.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • LOL: Happy Tapir
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    >Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be.

    One interesting anecdote I have of Bon Scott was that shortly before he died, he was thinking of quitting the band after Back In Black was released, making him richer than he could have ever imagined. Would have gone down to Texas to clean up and detox from the booze with one of his local friends, settled down, married, and started a family. He really liked Hill Country Texas because it reminded him a lot of backwoods Australia-same kind of culture, BBQs, weather, outdoors, attitude.

    That was back in 1979, 1980ish. Even Texas is changing nowadays with all the Californians moving in. You'd think they'd learn not to try and advocate for the same policies that caused them to flee. Guess not.

    Wore a Confederate buckle during some live shows. Quite a character. Between him and Bonham and Moon... as someone who has seen alcohol abuse up close and personal, man, people forget that it is a *drug* that can screw you up as bad as anything.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Peter Akuleyev, @Charles

    , @Rosie
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be.
     
    My impression is that the Aussies are less fanatical and more pragmatic, presumably due to the convict rather than pilgrim founding population, more of a worker's paradise than a City on a Hill. Of course, that's all over now.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @Odin
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Does Steve know about the "British sailers"?

  4. @Buzz Mohawk

    If Australia had been included, maybe the Aussies would’ve been number one:
     
    I vote for OZ, and I miss my late, Australian brother-in-law. You wanna talk about allies? He got shot down over the Pacific Ocean fighting Japan. (He said he worried more about the sharks than the Japs.) More importantly, he taught me some very dirty jokes...

    Note about age and dates: He was almost as old as our father, and he liked young women like my sister. What man doesn't?

    Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be. They have a healthy willingness to insult the "pommy bastards" who spawned us both. At least that was my brother-in-law. I once saw him come home -- beaten, angry and with a black eye -- from a bar near the naval base in Seal Beach, California, where he had gotten into a fight with some British sailers half his age.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Rosie, @Odin

    >Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be.

    One interesting anecdote I have of Bon Scott was that shortly before he died, he was thinking of quitting the band after Back In Black was released, making him richer than he could have ever imagined. Would have gone down to Texas to clean up and detox from the booze with one of his local friends, settled down, married, and started a family. He really liked Hill Country Texas because it reminded him a lot of backwoods Australia-same kind of culture, BBQs, weather, outdoors, attitude.

    That was back in 1979, 1980ish. Even Texas is changing nowadays with all the Californians moving in. You’d think they’d learn not to try and advocate for the same policies that caused them to flee. Guess not.

    Wore a Confederate buckle during some live shows. Quite a character. Between him and Bonham and Moon… as someone who has seen alcohol abuse up close and personal, man, people forget that it is a *drug* that can screw you up as bad as anything.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @nebulafox

    I agree about the alcohol thing. I had two drunk parents who beat the shit out of each other and occasionally me, but I can't help but honor them and occasionally recount positive stories about them here. (My father was very successful, and I still live with the benefits.) Humans are double-edged swords; each of us is, and none of us should forget it.

    I like the music of AC/DC!

    My wife is an Eastern European immigrant who grew up watching the television show Dallas. I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all. (But we Coloradans used to make fun of Texans. I've gotten over that, though.)

    I hope this isn't too OT. I love AE's blog, and I'm happy to add comment numbers if they're worth anything.

    Keep the graphs, charts and surveys coming, AE!

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Verity

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @nebulafox

    Wasn’t Bon Scott more Scottish than Australian? Or maybe a perfect mix of both. He certainly could rock the bagpipes.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Charles
    @nebulafox

    Back In Black was the album made after Scott died.

  5. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    >Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be.

    One interesting anecdote I have of Bon Scott was that shortly before he died, he was thinking of quitting the band after Back In Black was released, making him richer than he could have ever imagined. Would have gone down to Texas to clean up and detox from the booze with one of his local friends, settled down, married, and started a family. He really liked Hill Country Texas because it reminded him a lot of backwoods Australia-same kind of culture, BBQs, weather, outdoors, attitude.

    That was back in 1979, 1980ish. Even Texas is changing nowadays with all the Californians moving in. You'd think they'd learn not to try and advocate for the same policies that caused them to flee. Guess not.

    Wore a Confederate buckle during some live shows. Quite a character. Between him and Bonham and Moon... as someone who has seen alcohol abuse up close and personal, man, people forget that it is a *drug* that can screw you up as bad as anything.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Peter Akuleyev, @Charles

    I agree about the alcohol thing. I had two drunk parents who beat the shit out of each other and occasionally me, but I can’t help but honor them and occasionally recount positive stories about them here. (My father was very successful, and I still live with the benefits.) Humans are double-edged swords; each of us is, and none of us should forget it.

    I like the music of AC/DC!

    My wife is an Eastern European immigrant who grew up watching the television show Dallas. I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all. (But we Coloradans used to make fun of Texans. I’ve gotten over that, though.)

    I hope this isn’t too OT. I love AE’s blog, and I’m happy to add comment numbers if they’re worth anything.

    Keep the graphs, charts and surveys coming, AE!

    • Thanks: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm so sorry you went through that. I had an extremely close brush with alcoholism myself in the not so distant past-the stuff does not bring out my best. I still have to fight the binge drinking urges.

    Learning about that and understanding I might have a genetic predisposition to an addictive personality actually is helping me quit that and my other demons, and drive that to more constructive stuff, because I better understand why I'm the way I am. My father recently died before his time, and he was extremely successful, maybe in part because he utilized his intense personality rather than going against it. I'm trying something similar.

    I want more than anything else to not let his sacrifices go to waste, and to do what I know inside I'm truly capable of. This will probably be my last post here. Hope life goes well for you, Buzz.

    > I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all.

    I miss Texas myself sometimes, TBH. It took a while because of the negative events that I associated with the place, but now that I'm getting over the past.... especially the brisket. It's always very fun to show Singaporeans pictures of what beef meals are like in rural Texas, the size of it.

    It's very similar to Colorado, what has been happening to Texas: a lot of out of state migrants. My father mentioned that when he was in Colorado well before I was born, you couldn't see any of the smog that you see over Denver these days. All clear mountains.

    >I like the music of AC/DC!

    Nice. Kind of always wondered if I was born in the wrong generation when I look at my music choices, it's basically all old school hard rock and metal. I've also developed a taste for classical lately: my grandparents were really into that, especially my Central European born grandmother who was a strongly conservative (Brahms > Wagner) partisan. Interestingly, my Dad was the complete opposite there.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Charlotte, @Not Only Wrathful, @Mr. Rational, @Bardon Kaldian

    , @Verity
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Make fun of Texans! Hell, most of you are Texans.

  6. it’s hard to shake the sense that we perceive those countries whose leaders most readily bend to the empire’s will in a most positive light while the recalcitrant leaders who refuse to do Washington’s bidding are the ones we’ve been conditioned to hate most.

    And that is surprising why? Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. Russians are desperate to get that feeling back.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Nowhere near as much as 20 years ago: even hawkishly inclined conservative voters are much more skeptical of interventionism as a first choice after the Bush/Obama years. The mental gap between Beltway and lay thinking is on best display with foreign policy. Both Obama and Trump clearly just didn't have their hearts into regime change as a default policy, and were elected not least because of that... not that this translated into policy in office, of course.

    As far as China goes, they've traditionally lacked the messianism that has a deep historical streak in both American and Russian thinking, so I don't think they aspire to global empire in that sense. But Xi's thinking on "hostile forces" outside his country could lead to actions that wouldn't make much of a difference to outside observers, and Chinese entrenchment into the economic and political centers of the West helps make it a reality.

    , @Jim Christian
    @Peter Akuleyev


    Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe.
     
    Washington insiders, Empire insiders with a piece of the financial action inside the Beltway may con themselves into feeling that way, but outside the Beltway Bubble, thoughtful people know the truth of it. Out here in the hinterlands, we see the broken Vets mistreated by the V.A., dumped back home without even the courtesy a civilian would receive on a Workman's Comp claim. Even that process is embroidered with money, pensions, benefits for civilians who never served a day. The entire apparatus that says no to Veteran's for compensation for the damage their service did to them costs 20 times what it would cost to simply pay the Vets off. Lot of SEIU votes at the VA. Hell of a budget at VA. and most of it stays at VA. The Vets mostly go hang. 22 a month. Or maybe a day, the numbers shift.

    That's The Empire in a nutshell. Outside Beltway Bandit Way, there's no interest to them of the proles. They simply aren't aware, nor would they care. And they're 'proud'. Shame on them. Grifters, all of em.

    Replies: @Carlton Meyer

    , @dfordoom
    @Peter Akuleyev


    And that is surprising why? Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. Russians are desperate to get that feeling back.
     
    But with Americans there's an extra and very dangerous ingredient - the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states. And as far as Americans are concerned there are only two types of foreign states - subservient vassals and wicked enemies that must be destroyed.

    For Americans the empire is a moral crusade.

    Replies: @Rosie, @iffen

    , @animalogic
    @Peter Akuleyev

    "Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. "
    The Chinese don't have an "empire". They never have (unless you include the Mongols -- & the Chinese would not). So, I suspect that different types of nationalistic feeling separate the US & China.

    Replies: @iffen

  7. @Buzz Mohawk
    @nebulafox

    I agree about the alcohol thing. I had two drunk parents who beat the shit out of each other and occasionally me, but I can't help but honor them and occasionally recount positive stories about them here. (My father was very successful, and I still live with the benefits.) Humans are double-edged swords; each of us is, and none of us should forget it.

    I like the music of AC/DC!

    My wife is an Eastern European immigrant who grew up watching the television show Dallas. I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all. (But we Coloradans used to make fun of Texans. I've gotten over that, though.)

    I hope this isn't too OT. I love AE's blog, and I'm happy to add comment numbers if they're worth anything.

    Keep the graphs, charts and surveys coming, AE!

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Verity

    I’m so sorry you went through that. I had an extremely close brush with alcoholism myself in the not so distant past-the stuff does not bring out my best. I still have to fight the binge drinking urges.

    Learning about that and understanding I might have a genetic predisposition to an addictive personality actually is helping me quit that and my other demons, and drive that to more constructive stuff, because I better understand why I’m the way I am. My father recently died before his time, and he was extremely successful, maybe in part because he utilized his intense personality rather than going against it. I’m trying something similar.

    I want more than anything else to not let his sacrifices go to waste, and to do what I know inside I’m truly capable of. This will probably be my last post here. Hope life goes well for you, Buzz.

    > I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all.

    I miss Texas myself sometimes, TBH. It took a while because of the negative events that I associated with the place, but now that I’m getting over the past…. especially the brisket. It’s always very fun to show Singaporeans pictures of what beef meals are like in rural Texas, the size of it.

    It’s very similar to Colorado, what has been happening to Texas: a lot of out of state migrants. My father mentioned that when he was in Colorado well before I was born, you couldn’t see any of the smog that you see over Denver these days. All clear mountains.

    >I like the music of AC/DC!

    Nice. Kind of always wondered if I was born in the wrong generation when I look at my music choices, it’s basically all old school hard rock and metal. I’ve also developed a taste for classical lately: my grandparents were really into that, especially my Central European born grandmother who was a strongly conservative (Brahms > Wagner) partisan. Interestingly, my Dad was the complete opposite there.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @nebulafox


    This will probably be my last post here.
     
    Please don't stop posting on UR. I hope you just mean this thread.
    , @Charlotte
    @nebulafox

    Sorry to see you go. I always read your posts with interest.

    , @Not Only Wrathful
    @nebulafox


    maybe in part because he utilized his intense personality rather than going against it. I’m trying something similar.
     
    Follow your truth, though often cringeingly given, is solid advice.

    Good luck 🤞
    , @Mr. Rational
    @nebulafox

    Gonna miss you.

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @nebulafox

    Last post here OK

    Last post at Unz- not OK

    Last post because: family, health, more interesting things to do, something extremely individual (boredom, ..), workload, ambitions ... none of anyone's business here.

  8. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    >Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be.

    One interesting anecdote I have of Bon Scott was that shortly before he died, he was thinking of quitting the band after Back In Black was released, making him richer than he could have ever imagined. Would have gone down to Texas to clean up and detox from the booze with one of his local friends, settled down, married, and started a family. He really liked Hill Country Texas because it reminded him a lot of backwoods Australia-same kind of culture, BBQs, weather, outdoors, attitude.

    That was back in 1979, 1980ish. Even Texas is changing nowadays with all the Californians moving in. You'd think they'd learn not to try and advocate for the same policies that caused them to flee. Guess not.

    Wore a Confederate buckle during some live shows. Quite a character. Between him and Bonham and Moon... as someone who has seen alcohol abuse up close and personal, man, people forget that it is a *drug* that can screw you up as bad as anything.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Peter Akuleyev, @Charles

    Wasn’t Bon Scott more Scottish than Australian? Or maybe a perfect mix of both. He certainly could rock the bagpipes.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Peter Akuleyev

    >Wasn’t Bon Scott more Scottish than Australian? Or maybe a perfect mix of both. He certainly could rock the bagpipes.

    The Young brothers and Scott were Scots who emigrated to Australia as kids as part of a mass postwar immigration scheme the Aussies had: the Ten Pound Poms. Given the economic situation in Scotland after WWII, a lot of people took them up on the offer. They kept a lot of attitudes from Scotland with them, though, including the work ethic and a tendency to see the gig as a job.

    >Please don’t stop posting on UR. I hope you just mean this thread.

    I'm afraid so. I've tried to leave in the past, but this time, I've really got to do it. I want to leave my past behind for good and actually form my own views, not just parrot what sounds plausible. It's been fun.

    Replies: @SFG, @Talha

  9. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm so sorry you went through that. I had an extremely close brush with alcoholism myself in the not so distant past-the stuff does not bring out my best. I still have to fight the binge drinking urges.

    Learning about that and understanding I might have a genetic predisposition to an addictive personality actually is helping me quit that and my other demons, and drive that to more constructive stuff, because I better understand why I'm the way I am. My father recently died before his time, and he was extremely successful, maybe in part because he utilized his intense personality rather than going against it. I'm trying something similar.

    I want more than anything else to not let his sacrifices go to waste, and to do what I know inside I'm truly capable of. This will probably be my last post here. Hope life goes well for you, Buzz.

    > I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all.

    I miss Texas myself sometimes, TBH. It took a while because of the negative events that I associated with the place, but now that I'm getting over the past.... especially the brisket. It's always very fun to show Singaporeans pictures of what beef meals are like in rural Texas, the size of it.

    It's very similar to Colorado, what has been happening to Texas: a lot of out of state migrants. My father mentioned that when he was in Colorado well before I was born, you couldn't see any of the smog that you see over Denver these days. All clear mountains.

    >I like the music of AC/DC!

    Nice. Kind of always wondered if I was born in the wrong generation when I look at my music choices, it's basically all old school hard rock and metal. I've also developed a taste for classical lately: my grandparents were really into that, especially my Central European born grandmother who was a strongly conservative (Brahms > Wagner) partisan. Interestingly, my Dad was the complete opposite there.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Charlotte, @Not Only Wrathful, @Mr. Rational, @Bardon Kaldian

    This will probably be my last post here.

    Please don’t stop posting on UR. I hope you just mean this thread.

  10. @Peter Akuleyev
    it’s hard to shake the sense that we perceive those countries whose leaders most readily bend to the empire’s will in a most positive light while the recalcitrant leaders who refuse to do Washington’s bidding are the ones we’ve been conditioned to hate most.

    And that is surprising why? Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. Russians are desperate to get that feeling back.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Jim Christian, @dfordoom, @animalogic

    Nowhere near as much as 20 years ago: even hawkishly inclined conservative voters are much more skeptical of interventionism as a first choice after the Bush/Obama years. The mental gap between Beltway and lay thinking is on best display with foreign policy. Both Obama and Trump clearly just didn’t have their hearts into regime change as a default policy, and were elected not least because of that… not that this translated into policy in office, of course.

    As far as China goes, they’ve traditionally lacked the messianism that has a deep historical streak in both American and Russian thinking, so I don’t think they aspire to global empire in that sense. But Xi’s thinking on “hostile forces” outside his country could lead to actions that wouldn’t make much of a difference to outside observers, and Chinese entrenchment into the economic and political centers of the West helps make it a reality.

  11. @Peter Akuleyev
    @nebulafox

    Wasn’t Bon Scott more Scottish than Australian? Or maybe a perfect mix of both. He certainly could rock the bagpipes.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    >Wasn’t Bon Scott more Scottish than Australian? Or maybe a perfect mix of both. He certainly could rock the bagpipes.

    The Young brothers and Scott were Scots who emigrated to Australia as kids as part of a mass postwar immigration scheme the Aussies had: the Ten Pound Poms. Given the economic situation in Scotland after WWII, a lot of people took them up on the offer. They kept a lot of attitudes from Scotland with them, though, including the work ethic and a tendency to see the gig as a job.

    >Please don’t stop posting on UR. I hope you just mean this thread.

    I’m afraid so. I’ve tried to leave in the past, but this time, I’ve really got to do it. I want to leave my past behind for good and actually form my own views, not just parrot what sounds plausible. It’s been fun.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @nebulafox

    If you think Internet posting is a huge time suck and you'd rather spend your hours working out, trying to get a better job, writing the Great American Novel, or finding a girlfriend please quit, but as with Buzz, I've enjoyed your posts.

    I don't see why spending time on a particular site means you have to parrot what everyone says--I read a few different sites from different views. Unz is useful as a corrective to the mainstream media (as I believe its proprietor intended), but some of the stuff on here is really cuckoo.

    Best of luck to you either way.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Talha
    @nebulafox

    Your insights will be missed. May God grant you success in this world and the next.

    Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s, anybody who says otherwise is probably gay and may even eat cat litter on a regular basis and their opinions on all subjects should be discarded.

    Peace.

    Replies: @Talha, @SunBakedSuburb

  12. @nebulafox
    @Peter Akuleyev

    >Wasn’t Bon Scott more Scottish than Australian? Or maybe a perfect mix of both. He certainly could rock the bagpipes.

    The Young brothers and Scott were Scots who emigrated to Australia as kids as part of a mass postwar immigration scheme the Aussies had: the Ten Pound Poms. Given the economic situation in Scotland after WWII, a lot of people took them up on the offer. They kept a lot of attitudes from Scotland with them, though, including the work ethic and a tendency to see the gig as a job.

    >Please don’t stop posting on UR. I hope you just mean this thread.

    I'm afraid so. I've tried to leave in the past, but this time, I've really got to do it. I want to leave my past behind for good and actually form my own views, not just parrot what sounds plausible. It's been fun.

    Replies: @SFG, @Talha

    If you think Internet posting is a huge time suck and you’d rather spend your hours working out, trying to get a better job, writing the Great American Novel, or finding a girlfriend please quit, but as with Buzz, I’ve enjoyed your posts.

    I don’t see why spending time on a particular site means you have to parrot what everyone says–I read a few different sites from different views. Unz is useful as a corrective to the mainstream media (as I believe its proprietor intended), but some of the stuff on here is really cuckoo.

    Best of luck to you either way.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @SFG

    Thanks, you always were a pleasure to read, too. Let me get this out of the way as I blow the last rocket juice...

    I'm probably the last guy you should take advice from on this, but if are still interested in having a family, go for it and keep an open mind on who you might be happy with while doing so. Men have the advantage of having more time to work with: yes, it gets far more difficult to get a fertile woman as you get older and it isn't optimal to be be chasing around your 10 year old in your 50s, but you do have that option in the first place, unlike women. You know your own situation best, so I'm probably sounding real preachy at this point, but you strike me as someone who would genuinely, truly make a good father. If you don't want to do it, another story, but don't sell yourself short.

    >I don’t see why spending time on a particular site means you have to parrot what everyone says

    It shouldn't, and for most people, it doesn't. For better or for worse, I'm not most people. Most of my life, that's been "for worse". Maybe that could have been different if I was a bit luckier as a kid or a younger man (I'm still well below 30... another reason I should be listening, not talking), true, but that's mostly my own damn fault. So for better is the aim going forward.

    Replies: @anon

  13. @Talha
    North Korea...greatest foe?! Seriously? Other than causing stupidity on a relatively small peninsula in a corner of the world, what real threat do they present?

    Maybe I need to watch more network news so I can be properly indoctrinated on the subject.

    Peace.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Bao Jiankang, @Audacious Epigone, @Colin Wright

    Maybe I need to watch more network news so I can be properly indoctrinated on the subject.

    Well, yeah! This yougov survey points to your need of clarification of who they want, errr, who our enemies are. Russia’s position in this graph is laughable and foolish, the whole thing is. They think we’re idiots. Well, they’d be right.

    Seeing through the game ain’t the same as winning it..

    • Replies: @A123
    @Jim Christian


    Russia’s position in this graph is laughable and foolish, the whole thing is. They think we’re idiots. Well, they’d be right.
     
    48% of Democrats think RUSSIA = ENEMY.

    We have a foolish, idiot party in this country and it is the DNC.

    PEACE 😇
  14. North Korea pales in comparison to the existential threat the Grand Duchy of Fenwick posed to the US in 1959. Maybe they should send a boat to LA and humiliate us into a large NDA settlement.

    BTW, ask nearly every Congress Critter aside from the Squad, and Israel are our besties.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @The Alarmist


    BTW, ask nearly every Congress Critter aside from the Squad, and Israel are our besties.
     
    I am surely far from the only one who, upon seeing the title for this post, was all-but-certain it had to be an allusion to the Zionist state. I wouldn't be surprised if that was intentional on the part of AE. Great click-bait at any rate. :)

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone, @iffen

  15. @Peter Akuleyev
    it’s hard to shake the sense that we perceive those countries whose leaders most readily bend to the empire’s will in a most positive light while the recalcitrant leaders who refuse to do Washington’s bidding are the ones we’ve been conditioned to hate most.

    And that is surprising why? Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. Russians are desperate to get that feeling back.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Jim Christian, @dfordoom, @animalogic

    Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe.

    Washington insiders, Empire insiders with a piece of the financial action inside the Beltway may con themselves into feeling that way, but outside the Beltway Bubble, thoughtful people know the truth of it. Out here in the hinterlands, we see the broken Vets mistreated by the V.A., dumped back home without even the courtesy a civilian would receive on a Workman’s Comp claim. Even that process is embroidered with money, pensions, benefits for civilians who never served a day. The entire apparatus that says no to Veteran’s for compensation for the damage their service did to them costs 20 times what it would cost to simply pay the Vets off. Lot of SEIU votes at the VA. Hell of a budget at VA. and most of it stays at VA. The Vets mostly go hang. 22 a month. Or maybe a day, the numbers shift.

    That’s The Empire in a nutshell. Outside Beltway Bandit Way, there’s no interest to them of the proles. They simply aren’t aware, nor would they care. And they’re ‘proud’. Shame on them. Grifters, all of em.

    • Replies: @Carlton Meyer
    @Jim Christian

    I agree, the American Empire has no allies, only vassal states. President Bush made that clear with his "you're with us or against us" decree.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

  16. @nebulafox
    @Peter Akuleyev

    >Wasn’t Bon Scott more Scottish than Australian? Or maybe a perfect mix of both. He certainly could rock the bagpipes.

    The Young brothers and Scott were Scots who emigrated to Australia as kids as part of a mass postwar immigration scheme the Aussies had: the Ten Pound Poms. Given the economic situation in Scotland after WWII, a lot of people took them up on the offer. They kept a lot of attitudes from Scotland with them, though, including the work ethic and a tendency to see the gig as a job.

    >Please don’t stop posting on UR. I hope you just mean this thread.

    I'm afraid so. I've tried to leave in the past, but this time, I've really got to do it. I want to leave my past behind for good and actually form my own views, not just parrot what sounds plausible. It's been fun.

    Replies: @SFG, @Talha

    Your insights will be missed. May God grant you success in this world and the next.

    Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s, anybody who says otherwise is probably gay and may even eat cat litter on a regular basis and their opinions on all subjects should be discarded.

    Peace.

    • LOL: Adam Smith, dfordoom
    • Replies: @Talha
    @Talha


    Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s
     
    Speaking of...saw a DeLorean straight up driving through my neighborhood today!!! I don’t think I’ve ever seen one on the road before.

    Immediately triggered Huey Lewis tunes in my head.

    Peace.

    Replies: @botazefa

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Talha

    "Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s"

    No, Talha. No. Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't you say you're foreign born? If so, you get a pass for this musical blaspheme. This wretched band was born in my neck of the woods. And I was dragged to a couple of their local shows before they became big-time. Admittedly, Huey's got a fine set of pipes; but he used his gift to deliver warmed over doo-whop for Generation X. Ugh!

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

  17. @SFG
    @nebulafox

    If you think Internet posting is a huge time suck and you'd rather spend your hours working out, trying to get a better job, writing the Great American Novel, or finding a girlfriend please quit, but as with Buzz, I've enjoyed your posts.

    I don't see why spending time on a particular site means you have to parrot what everyone says--I read a few different sites from different views. Unz is useful as a corrective to the mainstream media (as I believe its proprietor intended), but some of the stuff on here is really cuckoo.

    Best of luck to you either way.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Thanks, you always were a pleasure to read, too. Let me get this out of the way as I blow the last rocket juice…

    I’m probably the last guy you should take advice from on this, but if are still interested in having a family, go for it and keep an open mind on who you might be happy with while doing so. Men have the advantage of having more time to work with: yes, it gets far more difficult to get a fertile woman as you get older and it isn’t optimal to be be chasing around your 10 year old in your 50s, but you do have that option in the first place, unlike women. You know your own situation best, so I’m probably sounding real preachy at this point, but you strike me as someone who would genuinely, truly make a good father. If you don’t want to do it, another story, but don’t sell yourself short.

    >I don’t see why spending time on a particular site means you have to parrot what everyone says

    It shouldn’t, and for most people, it doesn’t. For better or for worse, I’m not most people. Most of my life, that’s been “for worse”. Maybe that could have been different if I was a bit luckier as a kid or a younger man (I’m still well below 30… another reason I should be listening, not talking), true, but that’s mostly my own damn fault. So for better is the aim going forward.

    • Replies: @anon
    @nebulafox

    nebulafox if you have not read this book, you should. Not just for yourself but for those around you. Neuroplasticity is a real thing, and it matters. Take care.

    https://www.amazon.com/Biology-Desire-Why-Addiction-Disease/dp/1610397126

  18. The data merely proves the importance of media control.

    How many Americans are aware that Israel’s Lobby is at the forefront of efforts to undermine the First Amendment via anti-BDS legislation? How many know that 30 states have now passed such laws? Or that Florida now prosecutes criticism of Israel as “hate speech”?

    Plenty of media coverage about those 28 pages missing from the 9/11 report and Saudi brutality against Yemen. Would that we’d see as much about the 82-page DEA report on Israeli activity in the run-up to the attacks or the routine murder, property destruction, vandalism, and theft that’s been abetted by our tax dollars for well over half a century.

    The greatest affront to our democratic process? It certainly isn’t a polity that doesn’t pretend to be democratic.

  19. Bruh…

    Saying North Korea is America’s greatest foe is like me, a grown ass 20 year old man, completely seriously, not joking, saying that the neighbor’s 5 year old kid that doesn’t like me is my greatest rival.

    Idiocy!

  20. I’m rather surprised at how favorably Mexico is perceived. Maybe Mexican immigrants and their descendants bump the favorable rating up, but Mexico and Central America are huge problems for the United States. And an ally is generally someone one turns to help defeat an enemy. Mexico is in no position to offer any such aid.

    I’m also distressed at the very unfavorable attitude towards Russia. Russia poses no threat whatsoever to the United States and the hostility is the result of a media and “intelligence oommunity” disinformation campaign.

    The truth of the matter is, as John Derbyshire observed years ago, the United States could have the foreign policy of a large Switzerland; it needs no allies and it’s enemies are largely of its own making. Is Switzerland seeking allies? Who is the enemy of Switzerland (I mean, except the fiscal authorities of many nations)?

    • Agree: Miro23
    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Diversity Heretic

    The unnecessary antagonism of Russia is especially stupid given the obviously rising tensions between the US and China. Perhaps we can blame the outcome of the next US election on Hindu Nationalists.

    , @prime noticer
    @Diversity Heretic

    "I’m rather surprised at how favorably Mexico is perceived."

    i also wondered if having 30 million Mexicans is what bumps Mexico approval, a country right on the border of which most Mexican Paper-Americans will forever identify with.

    eventually when there are 50 million Mexicans in the US, it might have higher favorability than Ireland.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Diversity Heretic


    The truth of the matter is, as John Derbyshire observed years ago, the United States could have the foreign policy of a large Switzerland; it needs no allies and it’s enemies are largely of its own making.
     
    AGREE. Totally, absolutely, 100%.

    "Our detached and distant situation invites and enables us to pursue a different course. If we remain one people, under an efficient government, the period is not far off, when we may defy material injury from external annoyance; when we may take such an attitude as will cause the neutrality, we may at any time resolve upon, to be scrupulously respected; when belligerent nations, under the impossibility of making acquisitions upon us, will not lightly hazard the giving us provocation; when we may choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel."

    -- from President George Washington's Farewell Address

    Read the whole thing and ask yourself if any of our elected leaders today could ever produce anything as eloquent.
    , @Miro23
    @Diversity Heretic

    A very fine idea. A country without allies or enemies.

  21. @Jim Christian
    @Talha


    Maybe I need to watch more network news so I can be properly indoctrinated on the subject.
     
    Well, yeah! This yougov survey points to your need of clarification of who they want, errr, who our enemies are. Russia's position in this graph is laughable and foolish, the whole thing is. They think we're idiots. Well, they'd be right.

    Seeing through the game ain't the same as winning it..

    Replies: @A123

    Russia’s position in this graph is laughable and foolish, the whole thing is. They think we’re idiots. Well, they’d be right.

    48% of Democrats think RUSSIA = ENEMY.

    We have a foolish, idiot party in this country and it is the DNC.

    PEACE 😇

  22. Why is Iran’s (or Saudi Arabia’s) bar brown while Israel’s white? I don’t often mistake what I picture as the average Israeli for an ethnic German.

    Not good to see commenter nebulafox go. He posted well-written, fairly interesting additions.

    • Agree: Talha
    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @adreadline

    Israeli women don't look any less white than southern Europeans. You may not think Meds deserve a white bar, but I'm more of a lumper than a splitter.

  23. @Talha
    North Korea...greatest foe?! Seriously? Other than causing stupidity on a relatively small peninsula in a corner of the world, what real threat do they present?

    Maybe I need to watch more network news so I can be properly indoctrinated on the subject.

    Peace.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Bao Jiankang, @Audacious Epigone, @Colin Wright

    It’s friendliness not power. North Korea is a chihuahua compared to china but the average american can find something nice to say about china, not so much for north korea.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @Bao Jiankang

    That’s a good point.

    Peace.

    , @A123
    @Bao Jiankang


    It’s friendliness not power. North Korea is a chihuahua compared to china but the average american can find something nice to say about china, not so much for north korea.
     
    Yes. This is a reasonable explanation. Each nation was asked via a separate poll question, so there was no explicit ranking of nations against each other.

    NK has both nukes and a pudgy unsympathetic leader. It is not surprising that NK has the max negative, even though they are not the biggest threat.

    PEACE 😇
  24. Speaking of, it’s hard to shake the sense that we perceive those countries whose leaders most readily bend to the empire’s will in a most positive light while the recalcitrant leaders who refuse to do Washington’s bidding are the ones we’ve been conditioned to hate most.

    There are many layers to the perception. For example, generally speaking, most citizens of the US and Canada get along very well. Cross border travel and immigration/emigration, until recently, has always been easy, and in the big scheme of things, neither country is really “foreign”. If you shift into political mode, there are significant differences. That applies to the public perception of its government by each population, and views of foreign policy of their own government as well as that of the other.
    The poll asks whether the country is perceived to be friend or foe. Unless prompted, most people do not separate the specifics of government policies from their perception of the citizenry.

  25. @Talha
    North Korea...greatest foe?! Seriously? Other than causing stupidity on a relatively small peninsula in a corner of the world, what real threat do they present?

    Maybe I need to watch more network news so I can be properly indoctrinated on the subject.

    Peace.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Bao Jiankang, @Audacious Epigone, @Colin Wright

    Right up there with the Taliban in the existential threat they represent!

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Talha
    @Audacious Epigone

    Don’t let that landlocked country fool you. Eventually the Taliban will build a formidable modern navy and invade Florida and it’s because of traitors like you that we will be unprepared!!!

    Peace.

    Replies: @songbird, @dfordoom

  26. @Audacious Epigone
    @Talha

    Right up there with the Taliban in the existential threat they represent!

    Replies: @Talha

    Don’t let that landlocked country fool you. Eventually the Taliban will build a formidable modern navy and invade Florida and it’s because of traitors like you that we will be unprepared!!!

    Peace.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Talha

    What was that book where the author said that the Taliban booked window seats on passenger planes flying over the Indian Ocean in order to do reconnaissance on the deployment of the 7th Fleet? Three Cups of Tea was it? Anyway, I never trusted the author. Though I think he was trying to boost them rather than detract from them.

    , @dfordoom
    @Talha


    Don’t let that landlocked country fool you. Eventually the Taliban will build a formidable modern navy and invade Florida and it’s because of traitors like you that we will be unprepared!!!
     
    When you said that "landlocked country" I thought you were referring to Switzerland, since Switzerland was mentioned in an earlier comment.

    The Swiss are definitely an existential threat. We need to fight the Swiss over there, otherwise we'll end up having to fight them over here. The US has blindly ignored the Swiss threat for too long.

    Replies: @Talha, @Mr. Rational

  27. @Diversity Heretic
    I'm rather surprised at how favorably Mexico is perceived. Maybe Mexican immigrants and their descendants bump the favorable rating up, but Mexico and Central America are huge problems for the United States. And an ally is generally someone one turns to help defeat an enemy. Mexico is in no position to offer any such aid.

    I'm also distressed at the very unfavorable attitude towards Russia. Russia poses no threat whatsoever to the United States and the hostility is the result of a media and "intelligence oommunity" disinformation campaign.

    The truth of the matter is, as John Derbyshire observed years ago, the United States could have the foreign policy of a large Switzerland; it needs no allies and it's enemies are largely of its own making. Is Switzerland seeking allies? Who is the enemy of Switzerland (I mean, except the fiscal authorities of many nations)?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone, @prime noticer, @Buzz Mohawk, @Miro23

    The unnecessary antagonism of Russia is especially stupid given the obviously rising tensions between the US and China. Perhaps we can blame the outcome of the next US election on Hindu Nationalists.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
  28. @Bao Jiankang
    @Talha

    It's friendliness not power. North Korea is a chihuahua compared to china but the average american can find something nice to say about china, not so much for north korea.

    Replies: @Talha, @A123

    That’s a good point.

    Peace.

  29. @adreadline
    Why is Iran's (or Saudi Arabia's) bar brown while Israel's white? I don't often mistake what I picture as the average Israeli for an ethnic German.

    Not good to see commenter nebulafox go. He posted well-written, fairly interesting additions.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    Israeli women don’t look any less white than southern Europeans. You may not think Meds deserve a white bar, but I’m more of a lumper than a splitter.

  30. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm so sorry you went through that. I had an extremely close brush with alcoholism myself in the not so distant past-the stuff does not bring out my best. I still have to fight the binge drinking urges.

    Learning about that and understanding I might have a genetic predisposition to an addictive personality actually is helping me quit that and my other demons, and drive that to more constructive stuff, because I better understand why I'm the way I am. My father recently died before his time, and he was extremely successful, maybe in part because he utilized his intense personality rather than going against it. I'm trying something similar.

    I want more than anything else to not let his sacrifices go to waste, and to do what I know inside I'm truly capable of. This will probably be my last post here. Hope life goes well for you, Buzz.

    > I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all.

    I miss Texas myself sometimes, TBH. It took a while because of the negative events that I associated with the place, but now that I'm getting over the past.... especially the brisket. It's always very fun to show Singaporeans pictures of what beef meals are like in rural Texas, the size of it.

    It's very similar to Colorado, what has been happening to Texas: a lot of out of state migrants. My father mentioned that when he was in Colorado well before I was born, you couldn't see any of the smog that you see over Denver these days. All clear mountains.

    >I like the music of AC/DC!

    Nice. Kind of always wondered if I was born in the wrong generation when I look at my music choices, it's basically all old school hard rock and metal. I've also developed a taste for classical lately: my grandparents were really into that, especially my Central European born grandmother who was a strongly conservative (Brahms > Wagner) partisan. Interestingly, my Dad was the complete opposite there.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Charlotte, @Not Only Wrathful, @Mr. Rational, @Bardon Kaldian

    Sorry to see you go. I always read your posts with interest.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
  31. AC/DC was mostly Scottish. all the main guys were Scots. heck, the one guy’s name was literally Scott.

    but how much of Back In Black was even written before Bon Scott died? seems like most of the major songs were written after he was gone. i’m not an expert on AC/DC but i reckon that was probably forever a disputed issue.

    Back In Black is on the Billboard 200 chart right now – it’s still selling thousands of units per week right now, today. only Metallica and Pink Floyd have longer charting albums, with Guns N Roses and Nirvana coming in somewhere behind them.

  32. @Diversity Heretic
    I'm rather surprised at how favorably Mexico is perceived. Maybe Mexican immigrants and their descendants bump the favorable rating up, but Mexico and Central America are huge problems for the United States. And an ally is generally someone one turns to help defeat an enemy. Mexico is in no position to offer any such aid.

    I'm also distressed at the very unfavorable attitude towards Russia. Russia poses no threat whatsoever to the United States and the hostility is the result of a media and "intelligence oommunity" disinformation campaign.

    The truth of the matter is, as John Derbyshire observed years ago, the United States could have the foreign policy of a large Switzerland; it needs no allies and it's enemies are largely of its own making. Is Switzerland seeking allies? Who is the enemy of Switzerland (I mean, except the fiscal authorities of many nations)?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone, @prime noticer, @Buzz Mohawk, @Miro23

    “I’m rather surprised at how favorably Mexico is perceived.”

    i also wondered if having 30 million Mexicans is what bumps Mexico approval, a country right on the border of which most Mexican Paper-Americans will forever identify with.

    eventually when there are 50 million Mexicans in the US, it might have higher favorability than Ireland.

  33. I thought it’d be the UK, but forgot about Canada. Could one ask for a better neighbouring state than Canada?

  34. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm so sorry you went through that. I had an extremely close brush with alcoholism myself in the not so distant past-the stuff does not bring out my best. I still have to fight the binge drinking urges.

    Learning about that and understanding I might have a genetic predisposition to an addictive personality actually is helping me quit that and my other demons, and drive that to more constructive stuff, because I better understand why I'm the way I am. My father recently died before his time, and he was extremely successful, maybe in part because he utilized his intense personality rather than going against it. I'm trying something similar.

    I want more than anything else to not let his sacrifices go to waste, and to do what I know inside I'm truly capable of. This will probably be my last post here. Hope life goes well for you, Buzz.

    > I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all.

    I miss Texas myself sometimes, TBH. It took a while because of the negative events that I associated with the place, but now that I'm getting over the past.... especially the brisket. It's always very fun to show Singaporeans pictures of what beef meals are like in rural Texas, the size of it.

    It's very similar to Colorado, what has been happening to Texas: a lot of out of state migrants. My father mentioned that when he was in Colorado well before I was born, you couldn't see any of the smog that you see over Denver these days. All clear mountains.

    >I like the music of AC/DC!

    Nice. Kind of always wondered if I was born in the wrong generation when I look at my music choices, it's basically all old school hard rock and metal. I've also developed a taste for classical lately: my grandparents were really into that, especially my Central European born grandmother who was a strongly conservative (Brahms > Wagner) partisan. Interestingly, my Dad was the complete opposite there.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Charlotte, @Not Only Wrathful, @Mr. Rational, @Bardon Kaldian

    maybe in part because he utilized his intense personality rather than going against it. I’m trying something similar.

    Follow your truth, though often cringeingly given, is solid advice.

    Good luck 🤞

  35. The famous N. Korean traffic ladies. Kim has traffic ladies with a retirement age of 26, personal cheerleaders, and deliverable nuclear weapons. Now if that’s not a worrying combination, I don’t know what would be. If future historians ever comb through the rubble of the United States, they will write: We should have known, because of the traffic ladies.

  36. @Bao Jiankang
    @Talha

    It's friendliness not power. North Korea is a chihuahua compared to china but the average american can find something nice to say about china, not so much for north korea.

    Replies: @Talha, @A123

    It’s friendliness not power. North Korea is a chihuahua compared to china but the average american can find something nice to say about china, not so much for north korea.

    Yes. This is a reasonable explanation. Each nation was asked via a separate poll question, so there was no explicit ranking of nations against each other.

    NK has both nukes and a pudgy unsympathetic leader. It is not surprising that NK has the max negative, even though they are not the biggest threat.

    PEACE 😇

  37. @Talha
    @Audacious Epigone

    Don’t let that landlocked country fool you. Eventually the Taliban will build a formidable modern navy and invade Florida and it’s because of traitors like you that we will be unprepared!!!

    Peace.

    Replies: @songbird, @dfordoom

    What was that book where the author said that the Taliban booked window seats on passenger planes flying over the Indian Ocean in order to do reconnaissance on the deployment of the 7th Fleet? Three Cups of Tea was it? Anyway, I never trusted the author. Though I think he was trying to boost them rather than detract from them.

  38. @nebulafox
    @SFG

    Thanks, you always were a pleasure to read, too. Let me get this out of the way as I blow the last rocket juice...

    I'm probably the last guy you should take advice from on this, but if are still interested in having a family, go for it and keep an open mind on who you might be happy with while doing so. Men have the advantage of having more time to work with: yes, it gets far more difficult to get a fertile woman as you get older and it isn't optimal to be be chasing around your 10 year old in your 50s, but you do have that option in the first place, unlike women. You know your own situation best, so I'm probably sounding real preachy at this point, but you strike me as someone who would genuinely, truly make a good father. If you don't want to do it, another story, but don't sell yourself short.

    >I don’t see why spending time on a particular site means you have to parrot what everyone says

    It shouldn't, and for most people, it doesn't. For better or for worse, I'm not most people. Most of my life, that's been "for worse". Maybe that could have been different if I was a bit luckier as a kid or a younger man (I'm still well below 30... another reason I should be listening, not talking), true, but that's mostly my own damn fault. So for better is the aim going forward.

    Replies: @anon

    nebulafox if you have not read this book, you should. Not just for yourself but for those around you. Neuroplasticity is a real thing, and it matters. Take care.

  39. @Diversity Heretic
    I'm rather surprised at how favorably Mexico is perceived. Maybe Mexican immigrants and their descendants bump the favorable rating up, but Mexico and Central America are huge problems for the United States. And an ally is generally someone one turns to help defeat an enemy. Mexico is in no position to offer any such aid.

    I'm also distressed at the very unfavorable attitude towards Russia. Russia poses no threat whatsoever to the United States and the hostility is the result of a media and "intelligence oommunity" disinformation campaign.

    The truth of the matter is, as John Derbyshire observed years ago, the United States could have the foreign policy of a large Switzerland; it needs no allies and it's enemies are largely of its own making. Is Switzerland seeking allies? Who is the enemy of Switzerland (I mean, except the fiscal authorities of many nations)?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone, @prime noticer, @Buzz Mohawk, @Miro23

    The truth of the matter is, as John Derbyshire observed years ago, the United States could have the foreign policy of a large Switzerland; it needs no allies and it’s enemies are largely of its own making.

    AGREE. Totally, absolutely, 100%.

    “Our detached and distant situation invites and enables us to pursue a different course. If we remain one people, under an efficient government, the period is not far off, when we may defy material injury from external annoyance; when we may take such an attitude as will cause the neutrality, we may at any time resolve upon, to be scrupulously respected; when belligerent nations, under the impossibility of making acquisitions upon us, will not lightly hazard the giving us provocation; when we may choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel.”

    — from President George Washington’s Farewell Address

    Read the whole thing and ask yourself if any of our elected leaders today could ever produce anything as eloquent.

  40. Canada is more like a huge Puerto Rico. PR went from Spanish Empire to US empire. Canada went from British Empire to US empire. It is now just an extension of the US.

  41. I’m surprised at France in third. Wasn’t until recently that they were being called “surrender monkeys” by American politicians and someone wanted to change “french fries” to “freedom fries”? (I wonder how they would change “french kiss”).

    In the end, Americans love/hate mostly whom they are told by their government and media to love/hate. (Except in the case of the Anglo countries, where a somewhat similar culture makes it easier and more natural to identify with, without being told to).

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Dumbo

    That's died off, I think, and the conservative media cooled off on that. It's still a major tourist destination, artsy girls who aren't woke like it, and, honestly, the culture's different from us and the UK, but it's not *that* different. They financed our revolution, we influenced theirs, and we've never really been at war.

    As for Israel, you might try looking at the effects by age. I'd bet favorability drops quite a bit in younger cohorts, both due to POC not feeling much sympathy and younger conservative whites being influenced by the alt-right. That said Russia and China are geopolitical competitors, so I doubt we'd get too friendly with them--improving relations with them is more in the service of decreasing tensions than any real attempt at alliances. Iran, well, if we ditched Israel we might make friends with them, though I don't know what the point would be. The optimal course from a realist point of view would simply be to be neutral.

    Replies: @Dissident

  42. @Buzz Mohawk

    If Australia had been included, maybe the Aussies would’ve been number one:
     
    I vote for OZ, and I miss my late, Australian brother-in-law. You wanna talk about allies? He got shot down over the Pacific Ocean fighting Japan. (He said he worried more about the sharks than the Japs.) More importantly, he taught me some very dirty jokes...

    Note about age and dates: He was almost as old as our father, and he liked young women like my sister. What man doesn't?

    Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be. They have a healthy willingness to insult the "pommy bastards" who spawned us both. At least that was my brother-in-law. I once saw him come home -- beaten, angry and with a black eye -- from a bar near the naval base in Seal Beach, California, where he had gotten into a fight with some British sailers half his age.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Rosie, @Odin

    Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be.

    My impression is that the Aussies are less fanatical and more pragmatic, presumably due to the convict rather than pilgrim founding population, more of a worker’s paradise than a City on a Hill. Of course, that’s all over now.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Rosie


    My impression is that the Aussies are less fanatical and more pragmatic, presumably due to the convict rather than pilgrim founding population
     
    Actually there weren't that many convicts. Mostly it was free settlers.

    Australia was incredibly lucky in not getting any significant influx of religious nutjobs. As a result we just don't tend to see everything in moral terms.

    Australia is one of the most secular nations on Earth.

    It's still a pretty good place.

    Replies: @sb

  43. @Dumbo
    I'm surprised at France in third. Wasn't until recently that they were being called "surrender monkeys" by American politicians and someone wanted to change "french fries" to "freedom fries"? (I wonder how they would change "french kiss").

    In the end, Americans love/hate mostly whom they are told by their government and media to love/hate. (Except in the case of the Anglo countries, where a somewhat similar culture makes it easier and more natural to identify with, without being told to).

    Replies: @SFG

    That’s died off, I think, and the conservative media cooled off on that. It’s still a major tourist destination, artsy girls who aren’t woke like it, and, honestly, the culture’s different from us and the UK, but it’s not *that* different. They financed our revolution, we influenced theirs, and we’ve never really been at war.

    As for Israel, you might try looking at the effects by age. I’d bet favorability drops quite a bit in younger cohorts, both due to POC not feeling much sympathy and younger conservative whites being influenced by the alt-right. That said Russia and China are geopolitical competitors, so I doubt we’d get too friendly with them–improving relations with them is more in the service of decreasing tensions than any real attempt at alliances. Iran, well, if we ditched Israel we might make friends with them, though I don’t know what the point would be. The optimal course from a realist point of view would simply be to be neutral.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @SFG


    As for Israel, you might try looking at the effects by age. I’d bet favorability drops quite a bit in younger cohorts, both due to POC not feeling much sympathy and younger conservative whites being influenced by the alt-right.
     
    What percentage of Americans, of any age, are influenced by voices that could reasonably be described as "alt-right"?

    Just how popular is 4chan's /pol, for example, among the roughly 13-30 demographic? (Could also be useful to narrow to any number of subsets therein, such as 13-25; 13-18; 15-25, 11-15, etc.) 8chan? [1]


    Iran, well, if we ditched Israel we might make friends with them, though I don’t know what the point would be. The optimal course from a realist point of view would simply be to be neutral.
     
    Sounds about right to me.

    [1] From the limited time I have spent perusing 8chan's /pol, it appeared to be an all-out, expressly Nazi forum. (I use that term advisedly; I am not one to do so indiscriminately.) While such types appeared to be well-represented at 4chan's /pol, it, in contrast, appeared neither limited-to nor expressly founded upon such a viewpoint. It should probably be noted here that it can be difficult to distinguish between those who sincerely and seriously hold such views (i.e., admiring Hitler and the Nazis; simultaneously maintaining that the Holocaust is a hoax but would have been justified; blaming all ills of the world on Jews as the magic key, etc.) and those who merely express such views in order to be edgy and transgressive. I also suspect that many, perhaps even most of at least the 4chan demographic could be characterized as some combination of those two (i.e., sincere vs. trolling).

    Replies: @HappyBlueBreakfasts

  44. The sentiment is not returned.

    Canadians With Positive Views Of:

    UK: 73%
    Japan: 70%
    France: 69%
    Italy: 69%
    Germany: 67%
    S. Korea: 61%
    Mexico: 54%
    India: 37%
    Venezuela: 33%
    US: 32%
    Russia: 26%
    China: 21%
    Saudi Arabia: 20%
    Iran: 16%
    N. Korea: 13%

    Research Co. / July 8 / n=1000 / Online

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @songbird
    @Irishman

    Venezuela above the U.S.?

    I knew Canada was being super-invaded, but I didn't quite realize that things were at that level.

  45. @Peter Akuleyev
    it’s hard to shake the sense that we perceive those countries whose leaders most readily bend to the empire’s will in a most positive light while the recalcitrant leaders who refuse to do Washington’s bidding are the ones we’ve been conditioned to hate most.

    And that is surprising why? Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. Russians are desperate to get that feeling back.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Jim Christian, @dfordoom, @animalogic

    And that is surprising why? Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. Russians are desperate to get that feeling back.

    But with Americans there’s an extra and very dangerous ingredient – the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states. And as far as Americans are concerned there are only two types of foreign states – subservient vassals and wicked enemies that must be destroyed.

    For Americans the empire is a moral crusade.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @dfordoom


    And as far as Americans are concerned there are only two types of foreign states – subservient vassals and wicked enemies that must be destroyed.

    For Americans the empire is a moral crusade.
     
    The rank and file doesn't see it that way. Most Americans aren't even aware of any empire, and of course, the vast majority of us don't benefit from it.

    What Americans did believe until very recently that we were tremendously wealthy and powerful, and, like Uncle Ben said, with great power comes great responsibility. Especially after the end of the Cold War, Americans were very easily persuaded that we had a duty to police the world. ("Never Again!" thinking also played into this.) Nowadays, that sense of unprecedented wealth and power is gone.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @iffen
    @dfordoom

    – the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states.

    We can't help ourselves; it's called humanitarianism. We are forced to help (force) different peoples to better themselves whether they want to or not.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @botazefa

  46. @Buzz Mohawk
    @nebulafox

    I agree about the alcohol thing. I had two drunk parents who beat the shit out of each other and occasionally me, but I can't help but honor them and occasionally recount positive stories about them here. (My father was very successful, and I still live with the benefits.) Humans are double-edged swords; each of us is, and none of us should forget it.

    I like the music of AC/DC!

    My wife is an Eastern European immigrant who grew up watching the television show Dallas. I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all. (But we Coloradans used to make fun of Texans. I've gotten over that, though.)

    I hope this isn't too OT. I love AE's blog, and I'm happy to add comment numbers if they're worth anything.

    Keep the graphs, charts and surveys coming, AE!

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Verity

    Make fun of Texans! Hell, most of you are Texans.

  47. @Talha
    @Audacious Epigone

    Don’t let that landlocked country fool you. Eventually the Taliban will build a formidable modern navy and invade Florida and it’s because of traitors like you that we will be unprepared!!!

    Peace.

    Replies: @songbird, @dfordoom

    Don’t let that landlocked country fool you. Eventually the Taliban will build a formidable modern navy and invade Florida and it’s because of traitors like you that we will be unprepared!!!

    When you said that “landlocked country” I thought you were referring to Switzerland, since Switzerland was mentioned in an earlier comment.

    The Swiss are definitely an existential threat. We need to fight the Swiss over there, otherwise we’ll end up having to fight them over here. The US has blindly ignored the Swiss threat for too long.

    • LOL: Talha
    • Replies: @Talha
    @dfordoom

    Chocolate munching, yodeling watch makers!!! They’ve had it coming for a while!!!

    Peace.

    , @Mr. Rational
    @dfordoom

    It's the Swiss!

    https://youtu.be/aKBagN9p3Yo?t=262

  48. @Rosie
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be.
     
    My impression is that the Aussies are less fanatical and more pragmatic, presumably due to the convict rather than pilgrim founding population, more of a worker's paradise than a City on a Hill. Of course, that's all over now.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    My impression is that the Aussies are less fanatical and more pragmatic, presumably due to the convict rather than pilgrim founding population

    Actually there weren’t that many convicts. Mostly it was free settlers.

    Australia was incredibly lucky in not getting any significant influx of religious nutjobs. As a result we just don’t tend to see everything in moral terms.

    Australia is one of the most secular nations on Earth.

    It’s still a pretty good place.

    • Replies: @sb
    @dfordoom

    Australia has been fortunate in being able to keep an eye on the US experience and not outright rejecting the notion that blood and soil have a lot to do with having a national consciousness .

    ( Remember that until the 1960s Australia still thought of itself as a British nation and even now Anglo-Celts probably constitute a majority )

    Of course the times are much a changing

  49. @dfordoom
    @Peter Akuleyev


    And that is surprising why? Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. Russians are desperate to get that feeling back.
     
    But with Americans there's an extra and very dangerous ingredient - the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states. And as far as Americans are concerned there are only two types of foreign states - subservient vassals and wicked enemies that must be destroyed.

    For Americans the empire is a moral crusade.

    Replies: @Rosie, @iffen

    And as far as Americans are concerned there are only two types of foreign states – subservient vassals and wicked enemies that must be destroyed.

    For Americans the empire is a moral crusade.

    The rank and file doesn’t see it that way. Most Americans aren’t even aware of any empire, and of course, the vast majority of us don’t benefit from it.

    What Americans did believe until very recently that we were tremendously wealthy and powerful, and, like Uncle Ben said, with great power comes great responsibility. Especially after the end of the Cold War, Americans were very easily persuaded that we had a duty to police the world. (“Never Again!” thinking also played into this.) Nowadays, that sense of unprecedented wealth and power is gone.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Rosie


    The rank and file doesn’t see it that way. Most Americans aren’t even aware of any empire, and of course, the vast majority of us don’t benefit from it.
     
    The British Empire is an interesting comparison. Most Britons did not benefit in material terms from it, and in fact most Britons were leading lives of misery and squalor. But they benefited psychologically. They have have been poor, dumb and miserable but at least the Empire made them feel superior to the darkies. They got a vicarious sense of power and superiority.

    Don't underestimate the emotional appeal of imperialism to the poor and downtrodden. The poorer and more downtrodden and more ignorant people are the more they enjoy that emotional/psychological buzz of feeling that they are part of a mighty empire.

    Lots of Britons got very excited whenever the Royal Navy sent a gunboat to sort out some bunch of dirty (and inferior) foreigners. I imagine that a lot of Americans feel the same way every time the US bombs a bunch of dirty foreigners.

    Replies: @Rosie

  50. @dfordoom
    @Talha


    Don’t let that landlocked country fool you. Eventually the Taliban will build a formidable modern navy and invade Florida and it’s because of traitors like you that we will be unprepared!!!
     
    When you said that "landlocked country" I thought you were referring to Switzerland, since Switzerland was mentioned in an earlier comment.

    The Swiss are definitely an existential threat. We need to fight the Swiss over there, otherwise we'll end up having to fight them over here. The US has blindly ignored the Swiss threat for too long.

    Replies: @Talha, @Mr. Rational

    Chocolate munching, yodeling watch makers!!! They’ve had it coming for a while!!!

    Peace.

  51. @Rosie
    @dfordoom


    And as far as Americans are concerned there are only two types of foreign states – subservient vassals and wicked enemies that must be destroyed.

    For Americans the empire is a moral crusade.
     
    The rank and file doesn't see it that way. Most Americans aren't even aware of any empire, and of course, the vast majority of us don't benefit from it.

    What Americans did believe until very recently that we were tremendously wealthy and powerful, and, like Uncle Ben said, with great power comes great responsibility. Especially after the end of the Cold War, Americans were very easily persuaded that we had a duty to police the world. ("Never Again!" thinking also played into this.) Nowadays, that sense of unprecedented wealth and power is gone.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    The rank and file doesn’t see it that way. Most Americans aren’t even aware of any empire, and of course, the vast majority of us don’t benefit from it.

    The British Empire is an interesting comparison. Most Britons did not benefit in material terms from it, and in fact most Britons were leading lives of misery and squalor. But they benefited psychologically. They have have been poor, dumb and miserable but at least the Empire made them feel superior to the darkies. They got a vicarious sense of power and superiority.

    Don’t underestimate the emotional appeal of imperialism to the poor and downtrodden. The poorer and more downtrodden and more ignorant people are the more they enjoy that emotional/psychological buzz of feeling that they are part of a mighty empire.

    Lots of Britons got very excited whenever the Royal Navy sent a gunboat to sort out some bunch of dirty (and inferior) foreigners. I imagine that a lot of Americans feel the same way every time the US bombs a bunch of dirty foreigners.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @dfordoom


    I imagine that a lot of Americans feel the same way every time the US bombs a bunch of dirty foreigners.
     
    This is a rather uncharitable speculation on your part. I'm sure it's true for some, but certainly not most. As much as our elites hate us, even they recognize that they have to fabricate a justification (weapons of mass destruction!) for their military adventurism in order to quell dissent.
  52. @Jim Christian
    @Peter Akuleyev


    Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe.
     
    Washington insiders, Empire insiders with a piece of the financial action inside the Beltway may con themselves into feeling that way, but outside the Beltway Bubble, thoughtful people know the truth of it. Out here in the hinterlands, we see the broken Vets mistreated by the V.A., dumped back home without even the courtesy a civilian would receive on a Workman's Comp claim. Even that process is embroidered with money, pensions, benefits for civilians who never served a day. The entire apparatus that says no to Veteran's for compensation for the damage their service did to them costs 20 times what it would cost to simply pay the Vets off. Lot of SEIU votes at the VA. Hell of a budget at VA. and most of it stays at VA. The Vets mostly go hang. 22 a month. Or maybe a day, the numbers shift.

    That's The Empire in a nutshell. Outside Beltway Bandit Way, there's no interest to them of the proles. They simply aren't aware, nor would they care. And they're 'proud'. Shame on them. Grifters, all of em.

    Replies: @Carlton Meyer

    I agree, the American Empire has no allies, only vassal states. President Bush made that clear with his “you’re with us or against us” decree.

    • Agree: RVBlake
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @Carlton Meyer

    During the era of feudalism, vassal was actually a quite honorable status, conferred in a quasi-religious ceremony, where the lord and vassal held hands, the vassal promised service and the lord promised protection. Most men were the vassals of some lord, and lords were often vassals of a greater lord.

    The better description of American "allies" is bottom bitch, although some Germans are starting to show some spine.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  53. Hey, Carlton! How the Hell are ya? Always happy to see new content at G2!

    You read Taxi and Pepe’s pieces on the Beirut Blowup yet? Completely plausible on every front. All the usual players and even the ‘dumping’ of the fertilizer there was a shady story. And you say? You’ve spent time there, haven’t you? Any idea they had a bomb in town?

  54. @Talha
    @nebulafox

    Your insights will be missed. May God grant you success in this world and the next.

    Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s, anybody who says otherwise is probably gay and may even eat cat litter on a regular basis and their opinions on all subjects should be discarded.

    Peace.

    Replies: @Talha, @SunBakedSuburb

    Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s

    Speaking of…saw a DeLorean straight up driving through my neighborhood today!!! I don’t think I’ve ever seen one on the road before.

    Immediately triggered Huey Lewis tunes in my head.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @botazefa
    @Talha

    What about Hall and Oates!!! Didn't they have more hits than Huey Lewis? Plus, they were socially responsible by giving the world 'Maneater.'

    Good times, those 80's

    Replies: @Talha

  55. @The Alarmist
    North Korea pales in comparison to the existential threat the Grand Duchy of Fenwick posed to the US in 1959. Maybe they should send a boat to LA and humiliate us into a large NDA settlement.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/6a/37/f7/6a37f7dce7ff59236dfdd092452583df.jpg


    BTW, ask nearly every Congress Critter aside from the Squad, and Israel are our besties.

    Replies: @Dissident

    BTW, ask nearly every Congress Critter aside from the Squad, and Israel are our besties.

    I am surely far from the only one who, upon seeing the title for this post, was all-but-certain it had to be an allusion to the Zionist state. I wouldn’t be surprised if that was intentional on the part of AE. Great click-bait at any rate. 🙂

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Dissident

    Why I'd never! "Eh?" is an affectionate, charming aspect of Canadian English, that's all.

    , @iffen
    @Dissident

    Oh, you Jews.

    Paranoia is your destiny.

  56. @Carlton Meyer
    @Jim Christian

    I agree, the American Empire has no allies, only vassal states. President Bush made that clear with his "you're with us or against us" decree.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

    During the era of feudalism, vassal was actually a quite honorable status, conferred in a quasi-religious ceremony, where the lord and vassal held hands, the vassal promised service and the lord promised protection. Most men were the vassals of some lord, and lords were often vassals of a greater lord.

    The better description of American “allies” is bottom bitch, although some Germans are starting to show some spine.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Diversity Heretic


    The better description of American “allies” is bottom bitch
     
    Yep.

    Replies: @Dissident

  57. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    >Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be.

    One interesting anecdote I have of Bon Scott was that shortly before he died, he was thinking of quitting the band after Back In Black was released, making him richer than he could have ever imagined. Would have gone down to Texas to clean up and detox from the booze with one of his local friends, settled down, married, and started a family. He really liked Hill Country Texas because it reminded him a lot of backwoods Australia-same kind of culture, BBQs, weather, outdoors, attitude.

    That was back in 1979, 1980ish. Even Texas is changing nowadays with all the Californians moving in. You'd think they'd learn not to try and advocate for the same policies that caused them to flee. Guess not.

    Wore a Confederate buckle during some live shows. Quite a character. Between him and Bonham and Moon... as someone who has seen alcohol abuse up close and personal, man, people forget that it is a *drug* that can screw you up as bad as anything.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Peter Akuleyev, @Charles

    Back In Black was the album made after Scott died.

  58. @Peter Akuleyev
    it’s hard to shake the sense that we perceive those countries whose leaders most readily bend to the empire’s will in a most positive light while the recalcitrant leaders who refuse to do Washington’s bidding are the ones we’ve been conditioned to hate most.

    And that is surprising why? Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. Russians are desperate to get that feeling back.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Jim Christian, @dfordoom, @animalogic

    “Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. ”
    The Chinese don’t have an “empire”. They never have (unless you include the Mongols — & the Chinese would not). So, I suspect that different types of nationalistic feeling separate the US & China.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @animalogic

    The Chinese don’t have an “empire”.

    Well, that's a big sigh of relief from Tibetans and Uyghurs and countless other ethnic groups.

  59. @dfordoom
    @Peter Akuleyev


    And that is surprising why? Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. Russians are desperate to get that feeling back.
     
    But with Americans there's an extra and very dangerous ingredient - the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states. And as far as Americans are concerned there are only two types of foreign states - subservient vassals and wicked enemies that must be destroyed.

    For Americans the empire is a moral crusade.

    Replies: @Rosie, @iffen

    – the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states.

    We can’t help ourselves; it’s called humanitarianism. We are forced to help (force) different peoples to better themselves whether they want to or not.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @iffen



    – the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states.
     
    We can’t help ourselves; it’s called humanitarianism. We are forced to help (force) different peoples to better themselves whether they want to or not.
     
    The scary thing is that there are Americans who actually believe that.

    Replies: @iffen

    , @botazefa
    @iffen


    We are forced to help (force) different peoples to better themselves whether they want to or not.
     
    I blame Sally Struthers for all the humanitarianism'ism. She made 70's latchkey kids feel guilty about African starvation by littering herself all over the cheap ad afternoon reruns of The Jeffersons.
  60. @animalogic
    @Peter Akuleyev

    "Most Americans identify very strongly with the Empire and are proud they belong to a country that controls most of the globe. Chinese feel the same way about China. "
    The Chinese don't have an "empire". They never have (unless you include the Mongols -- & the Chinese would not). So, I suspect that different types of nationalistic feeling separate the US & China.

    Replies: @iffen

    The Chinese don’t have an “empire”.

    Well, that’s a big sigh of relief from Tibetans and Uyghurs and countless other ethnic groups.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  61. @Diversity Heretic
    @Carlton Meyer

    During the era of feudalism, vassal was actually a quite honorable status, conferred in a quasi-religious ceremony, where the lord and vassal held hands, the vassal promised service and the lord promised protection. Most men were the vassals of some lord, and lords were often vassals of a greater lord.

    The better description of American "allies" is bottom bitch, although some Germans are starting to show some spine.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    The better description of American “allies” is bottom bitch

    Yep.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @dfordoom



    The better description of American “allies” is bottom bitch

     

    Yep.
     
    Now, now, we wouldn't want to enforce hateful homophobic stereotypes, would we? We all know that Gay male culture and sexual behavior is the quintessence of egalitarianism, dignity, inclusion, tolerance and love in its truest, most refined form.[1], [2, [3], [4]

    Returning to the topic at-hand, when it comes to the special relationship that the US enjoys with one particular "greatest ally", some would say the indelicate metaphor invoked by Diversity Heretic is inverted; that it is the U.S. that is beholden and subservient to the Zionist state and its lobby. But others, such as Noam Chomsky, have argued that (the state that calls itself) Israel serves the interests of the US-- at least the Empire, if not the Republic-- at least as much as vice-versa. Is that there not at least some truth in such arguments? (Of course, this being Unz Review, one would hardly expect to find much interest in a topic of this variety...)

    Replies: @iffen

  62. @Buzz Mohawk

    If Australia had been included, maybe the Aussies would’ve been number one:
     
    I vote for OZ, and I miss my late, Australian brother-in-law. You wanna talk about allies? He got shot down over the Pacific Ocean fighting Japan. (He said he worried more about the sharks than the Japs.) More importantly, he taught me some very dirty jokes...

    Note about age and dates: He was almost as old as our father, and he liked young women like my sister. What man doesn't?

    Anyway, because of him I always think of Australians as distilled versions of what Americans used to be. They have a healthy willingness to insult the "pommy bastards" who spawned us both. At least that was my brother-in-law. I once saw him come home -- beaten, angry and with a black eye -- from a bar near the naval base in Seal Beach, California, where he had gotten into a fight with some British sailers half his age.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Rosie, @Odin

    Does Steve know about the “British sailers”?

  63. Anyone with a nuclear triad probably doesn’t need military allies, unless you’re in the MIC, and want to make a few extra bucks. Maybe, there’s a need for some other type of allies, or some new diplomacy, but I doubt any of these governments could create it.

    Uncle Sam doesn’t exactly seem to have my best interests at heart. If my own government doesn’t have my interests at heart, that doesn’t exactly inspire confidence in foreign ones. Every major state in the West (and a lot of minor ones) seems to be engaged in some sort of campaign against its own people.

    What about S. Korea and Japan? Well, I don’t want to invade Vietnam again, and I don’t see any purpose in keeping troops over there. It costs us and creates resentments. They should just get nuclear weapons. Anyway, they have deep problems of their own (declining fertility) and I doubt they be willing to rock the boat much since they are both so reliant on exports.

  64. @iffen
    @dfordoom

    – the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states.

    We can't help ourselves; it's called humanitarianism. We are forced to help (force) different peoples to better themselves whether they want to or not.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @botazefa

    – the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states.

    We can’t help ourselves; it’s called humanitarianism. We are forced to help (force) different peoples to better themselves whether they want to or not.

    The scary thing is that there are Americans who actually believe that.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @dfordoom

    The scary thing is that there are Americans who actually believe that.

    They are in the saddle and they are going to ride.

  65. @Irishman
    The sentiment is not returned.

    Canadians With Positive Views Of:

    UK: 73%
    Japan: 70%
    France: 69%
    Italy: 69%
    Germany: 67%
    S. Korea: 61%
    Mexico: 54%
    India: 37%
    Venezuela: 33%
    US: 32%
    Russia: 26%
    China: 21%
    Saudi Arabia: 20%
    Iran: 16%
    N. Korea: 13%

    Research Co. / July 8 / n=1000 / Online

    https://twitter.com/CanadianPolling/status/1289668596948299782

    Replies: @songbird

    Venezuela above the U.S.?

    I knew Canada was being super-invaded, but I didn’t quite realize that things were at that level.

  66. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm so sorry you went through that. I had an extremely close brush with alcoholism myself in the not so distant past-the stuff does not bring out my best. I still have to fight the binge drinking urges.

    Learning about that and understanding I might have a genetic predisposition to an addictive personality actually is helping me quit that and my other demons, and drive that to more constructive stuff, because I better understand why I'm the way I am. My father recently died before his time, and he was extremely successful, maybe in part because he utilized his intense personality rather than going against it. I'm trying something similar.

    I want more than anything else to not let his sacrifices go to waste, and to do what I know inside I'm truly capable of. This will probably be my last post here. Hope life goes well for you, Buzz.

    > I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all.

    I miss Texas myself sometimes, TBH. It took a while because of the negative events that I associated with the place, but now that I'm getting over the past.... especially the brisket. It's always very fun to show Singaporeans pictures of what beef meals are like in rural Texas, the size of it.

    It's very similar to Colorado, what has been happening to Texas: a lot of out of state migrants. My father mentioned that when he was in Colorado well before I was born, you couldn't see any of the smog that you see over Denver these days. All clear mountains.

    >I like the music of AC/DC!

    Nice. Kind of always wondered if I was born in the wrong generation when I look at my music choices, it's basically all old school hard rock and metal. I've also developed a taste for classical lately: my grandparents were really into that, especially my Central European born grandmother who was a strongly conservative (Brahms > Wagner) partisan. Interestingly, my Dad was the complete opposite there.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Charlotte, @Not Only Wrathful, @Mr. Rational, @Bardon Kaldian

    Gonna miss you.

    • Agree: Talha
  67. @dfordoom
    @Talha


    Don’t let that landlocked country fool you. Eventually the Taliban will build a formidable modern navy and invade Florida and it’s because of traitors like you that we will be unprepared!!!
     
    When you said that "landlocked country" I thought you were referring to Switzerland, since Switzerland was mentioned in an earlier comment.

    The Swiss are definitely an existential threat. We need to fight the Swiss over there, otherwise we'll end up having to fight them over here. The US has blindly ignored the Swiss threat for too long.

    Replies: @Talha, @Mr. Rational

    It’s the Swiss!

    • Thanks: Talha
  68. @dfordoom
    @Rosie


    The rank and file doesn’t see it that way. Most Americans aren’t even aware of any empire, and of course, the vast majority of us don’t benefit from it.
     
    The British Empire is an interesting comparison. Most Britons did not benefit in material terms from it, and in fact most Britons were leading lives of misery and squalor. But they benefited psychologically. They have have been poor, dumb and miserable but at least the Empire made them feel superior to the darkies. They got a vicarious sense of power and superiority.

    Don't underestimate the emotional appeal of imperialism to the poor and downtrodden. The poorer and more downtrodden and more ignorant people are the more they enjoy that emotional/psychological buzz of feeling that they are part of a mighty empire.

    Lots of Britons got very excited whenever the Royal Navy sent a gunboat to sort out some bunch of dirty (and inferior) foreigners. I imagine that a lot of Americans feel the same way every time the US bombs a bunch of dirty foreigners.

    Replies: @Rosie

    I imagine that a lot of Americans feel the same way every time the US bombs a bunch of dirty foreigners.

    This is a rather uncharitable speculation on your part. I’m sure it’s true for some, but certainly not most. As much as our elites hate us, even they recognize that they have to fabricate a justification (weapons of mass destruction!) for their military adventurism in order to quell dissent.

  69. anonymous[105] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Any neutral-minded Martian observer would immediately conclude, with neither emotion nor rancor nor prejudice, that our greatest foe is, of course... "Our Greatest Ally."

    I mean, c'mon already.

    ISRAELI AMBASSADOR: Israel is America's only friend in the Mideast.
    AMERICAN AMBASSADOR: Prior to Israel, America had no enemies in the Mideast.

    Math. Do.

    Replies: @anonymous

    Prior to Israel, America had no enemies in the Mideast

    Pop quiz – against whom did the United States fight its first foreign war? (Hint: it was during the Presidency of Thomas Jefferson, and resulted in the famous line in the Marine fight song about ‘the shores of Tripoli.’)

    Ok, I’ll just come out and educate you. The United States went to war against the Bey of Algeria and his Ottoman protectors because they were kidnapping and enslaving American sailors, justified in their own words by their interpretation of Islam, 145 years before Israel existed.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @anonymous

    Oh, I see. You're going to educate me. With a pop quiz, no less. How cute.

    Hey Dad -- can you help me out? How many sides does a square have, I keep forgetting. Can you educate me, please?

    Also, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

    Also, when Shlomo points and says, Look! Squirrel! Where is the squirrel?

    Replies: @anonymous, @AnonStarter

    , @AnonStarter
    @anonymous

    Hint: it was during the Presidency of Thomas Jefferson, and resulted in the famous line in the Marine fight song about ‘the shores of Tripoli.’

    To be precise, the line from the Marine Corps Hymn commemorates the Battle of Derna on April 27, 1805, made possible after consul William Eaton convinced an exiled brother of Pasha Yusuf Karamanli to join forces with America in an attempted coup. A grand total of eight marines, a smattering of Europeans, and a largely Arab Muslim army -- totaling about 500 -- took Derna that day; however, they weren't able to reach Tripoli.

    More importantly, though, the Barbary Wars ended 205 years ago. They certainly provide no evidence that America and Muslim polities are irreconcilable enemies, and the fact that you have to reach so far back in history to find an example of American-Muslim conflict that predates our support of Israel betrays a rather pitiful desperation.

    Thanks for trying, anyways. You made me hit the books again.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @dfordoom

  70. @Talha
    @nebulafox

    Your insights will be missed. May God grant you success in this world and the next.

    Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s, anybody who says otherwise is probably gay and may even eat cat litter on a regular basis and their opinions on all subjects should be discarded.

    Peace.

    Replies: @Talha, @SunBakedSuburb

    “Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s”

    No, Talha. No. Correct me if I’m wrong but didn’t you say you’re foreign born? If so, you get a pass for this musical blaspheme. This wretched band was born in my neck of the woods. And I was dragged to a couple of their local shows before they became big-time. Admittedly, Huey’s got a fine set of pipes; but he used his gift to deliver warmed over doo-whop for Generation X. Ugh!

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @SunBakedSuburb


    Admittedly, Huey’s got a fine set of pipes; but he used his gift to deliver warmed over doo-whop for Generation X. Ugh!
     
    But that's part of Huey and co.'s appeal - they're literally a bar band that happened to make it big. Huey has stated this in at least one interview.

    The '80s were the last decade where this kind of career trajectory was possible for this kind of band.

    Similarly, the '80s were also the last decade where someone like Phil Collins could have had the level of solo success that he did.
  71. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Talha

    "Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s"

    No, Talha. No. Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't you say you're foreign born? If so, you get a pass for this musical blaspheme. This wretched band was born in my neck of the woods. And I was dragged to a couple of their local shows before they became big-time. Admittedly, Huey's got a fine set of pipes; but he used his gift to deliver warmed over doo-whop for Generation X. Ugh!

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    Admittedly, Huey’s got a fine set of pipes; but he used his gift to deliver warmed over doo-whop for Generation X. Ugh!

    But that’s part of Huey and co.’s appeal – they’re literally a bar band that happened to make it big. Huey has stated this in at least one interview.

    The ’80s were the last decade where this kind of career trajectory was possible for this kind of band.

    Similarly, the ’80s were also the last decade where someone like Phil Collins could have had the level of solo success that he did.

    • Agree: Talha
  72. @dfordoom
    @Diversity Heretic


    The better description of American “allies” is bottom bitch
     
    Yep.

    Replies: @Dissident

    The better description of American “allies” is bottom bitch

    Yep.

    Now, now, we wouldn’t want to enforce hateful homophobic stereotypes, would we? We all know that Gay male culture and sexual behavior is the quintessence of egalitarianism, dignity, inclusion, tolerance and love in its truest, most refined form.[1], [2, [3], [4]

    Returning to the topic at-hand, when it comes to the special relationship that the US enjoys with one particular “greatest ally”, some would say the indelicate metaphor invoked by Diversity Heretic is inverted; that it is the U.S. that is beholden and subservient to the Zionist state and its lobby. But others, such as Noam Chomsky, have argued that (the state that calls itself) Israel serves the interests of the US– at least the Empire, if not the Republicat least as much as vice-versa. Is that there not at least some truth in such arguments? (Of course, this being Unz Review, one would hardly expect to find much interest in a topic of this variety…)

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Dissident

    Now, now, we wouldn’t want to enforce hateful homophobic stereotypes, would we? We all know that Gay male culture and sexual behavior is the quintessence of egalitarianism, dignity, inclusion, tolerance and love in its truest, most refined form.

    LOL

  73. @Talha
    @Talha


    Huey Lewis and the News owned the 80s
     
    Speaking of...saw a DeLorean straight up driving through my neighborhood today!!! I don’t think I’ve ever seen one on the road before.

    Immediately triggered Huey Lewis tunes in my head.

    Peace.

    Replies: @botazefa

    What about Hall and Oates!!! Didn’t they have more hits than Huey Lewis? Plus, they were socially responsible by giving the world ‘Maneater.’

    Good times, those 80’s

    • Replies: @Talha
    @botazefa

    I was joking of course, but yeah...all of these guys like Hall and Oates, Genesis and even - dare I say it - Chicago are what made the 80s the 80s.

    I’m actually running through a bunch of old 80s movies with my teenage sons like Aliens, Predator, Indiana Jones, etc. Many of those films hold up surprisingly well...even with the obvious stop motion special effects.

    Peace.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  74. @iffen
    @dfordoom

    – the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states.

    We can't help ourselves; it's called humanitarianism. We are forced to help (force) different peoples to better themselves whether they want to or not.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @botazefa

    We are forced to help (force) different peoples to better themselves whether they want to or not.

    I blame Sally Struthers for all the humanitarianism’ism. She made 70’s latchkey kids feel guilty about African starvation by littering herself all over the cheap ad afternoon reruns of The Jeffersons.

  75. @dfordoom
    @iffen



    – the belief that Americans have a God-given duty to impose their values and their culture on their vassal states.
     
    We can’t help ourselves; it’s called humanitarianism. We are forced to help (force) different peoples to better themselves whether they want to or not.
     
    The scary thing is that there are Americans who actually believe that.

    Replies: @iffen

    The scary thing is that there are Americans who actually believe that.

    They are in the saddle and they are going to ride.

  76. Used to be pretty nice when you could stroll into and out of Canada with practically no ID. Blame some of our other “allies” for the change.

  77. @botazefa
    @Talha

    What about Hall and Oates!!! Didn't they have more hits than Huey Lewis? Plus, they were socially responsible by giving the world 'Maneater.'

    Good times, those 80's

    Replies: @Talha

    I was joking of course, but yeah…all of these guys like Hall and Oates, Genesis and even – dare I say it – Chicago are what made the 80s the 80s.

    I’m actually running through a bunch of old 80s movies with my teenage sons like Aliens, Predator, Indiana Jones, etc. Many of those films hold up surprisingly well…even with the obvious stop motion special effects.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Talha


    I’m actually running through a bunch of old 80s movies with my teenage sons like Aliens, Predator, Indiana Jones, etc. Many of those films hold up surprisingly well…even with the obvious stop motion special effects.
     
    John Carpenter made some awesome movies in the 80s. Pretty much all his 80s output is terrific. Big Trouble in Little China!

    Replies: @Talha, @A123

  78. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm so sorry you went through that. I had an extremely close brush with alcoholism myself in the not so distant past-the stuff does not bring out my best. I still have to fight the binge drinking urges.

    Learning about that and understanding I might have a genetic predisposition to an addictive personality actually is helping me quit that and my other demons, and drive that to more constructive stuff, because I better understand why I'm the way I am. My father recently died before his time, and he was extremely successful, maybe in part because he utilized his intense personality rather than going against it. I'm trying something similar.

    I want more than anything else to not let his sacrifices go to waste, and to do what I know inside I'm truly capable of. This will probably be my last post here. Hope life goes well for you, Buzz.

    > I tease her that we should move to Texas just because she would love it. Actually, I feel like I would enjoy that, being an old Westerner and all.

    I miss Texas myself sometimes, TBH. It took a while because of the negative events that I associated with the place, but now that I'm getting over the past.... especially the brisket. It's always very fun to show Singaporeans pictures of what beef meals are like in rural Texas, the size of it.

    It's very similar to Colorado, what has been happening to Texas: a lot of out of state migrants. My father mentioned that when he was in Colorado well before I was born, you couldn't see any of the smog that you see over Denver these days. All clear mountains.

    >I like the music of AC/DC!

    Nice. Kind of always wondered if I was born in the wrong generation when I look at my music choices, it's basically all old school hard rock and metal. I've also developed a taste for classical lately: my grandparents were really into that, especially my Central European born grandmother who was a strongly conservative (Brahms > Wagner) partisan. Interestingly, my Dad was the complete opposite there.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Charlotte, @Not Only Wrathful, @Mr. Rational, @Bardon Kaldian

    Last post here OK

    Last post at Unz- not OK

    Last post because: family, health, more interesting things to do, something extremely individual (boredom, ..), workload, ambitions … none of anyone’s business here.

  79. @SFG
    @Dumbo

    That's died off, I think, and the conservative media cooled off on that. It's still a major tourist destination, artsy girls who aren't woke like it, and, honestly, the culture's different from us and the UK, but it's not *that* different. They financed our revolution, we influenced theirs, and we've never really been at war.

    As for Israel, you might try looking at the effects by age. I'd bet favorability drops quite a bit in younger cohorts, both due to POC not feeling much sympathy and younger conservative whites being influenced by the alt-right. That said Russia and China are geopolitical competitors, so I doubt we'd get too friendly with them--improving relations with them is more in the service of decreasing tensions than any real attempt at alliances. Iran, well, if we ditched Israel we might make friends with them, though I don't know what the point would be. The optimal course from a realist point of view would simply be to be neutral.

    Replies: @Dissident

    As for Israel, you might try looking at the effects by age. I’d bet favorability drops quite a bit in younger cohorts, both due to POC not feeling much sympathy and younger conservative whites being influenced by the alt-right.

    What percentage of Americans, of any age, are influenced by voices that could reasonably be described as “alt-right”?

    Just how popular is 4chan‘s /pol, for example, among the roughly 13-30 demographic? (Could also be useful to narrow to any number of subsets therein, such as 13-25; 13-18; 15-25, 11-15, etc.) 8chan? [1]

    Iran, well, if we ditched Israel we might make friends with them, though I don’t know what the point would be. The optimal course from a realist point of view would simply be to be neutral.

    Sounds about right to me.

    [1]

    [MORE]
    From the limited time I have spent perusing 8chan‘s /pol, it appeared to be an all-out, expressly Nazi forum. (I use that term advisedly; I am not one to do so indiscriminately.) While such types appeared to be well-represented at 4chan‘s /pol, it, in contrast, appeared neither limited-to nor expressly founded upon such a viewpoint. It should probably be noted here that it can be difficult to distinguish between those who sincerely and seriously hold such views (i.e., admiring Hitler and the Nazis; simultaneously maintaining that the Holocaust is a hoax but would have been justified; blaming all ills of the world on Jews as the magic key, etc.) and those who merely express such views in order to be edgy and transgressive. I also suspect that many, perhaps even most of at least the 4chan demographic could be characterized as some combination of those two (i.e., sincere vs. trolling).

    • Replies: @HappyBlueBreakfasts
    @Dissident


    From the limited time I have spent perusing 8chan‘s /pol, it appeared to be an all-out, expressly Nazi forum. (I use that term advisedly; I am not one to do so indiscriminately.) While such types appeared to be well-represented at 4chan‘s /pol, it, in contrast, appeared neither limited-to nor expressly founded upon such a viewpoint.
     
    8/pol/ (and all of 8chan) died a year ago.
    Even before that date, there was no authentic "/pol/" demographic on neither 4chan nor 8chan anymore. Both boards were heavily flooded by "immigrants" from reddit. 4/pol/ succumbed easily to the reddit flood. 8/pol/ tried to resist, but it was in vain in the end.

    Replies: @Dissident

  80. There is a difference between “ally/enemy according to our current pea-brained foreign policy” and “would be ally/enemy if we had a rational foreign policy designed to advance our true interests”; the survey question does not make it clear which one is meant.

  81. @Dissident
    @The Alarmist


    BTW, ask nearly every Congress Critter aside from the Squad, and Israel are our besties.
     
    I am surely far from the only one who, upon seeing the title for this post, was all-but-certain it had to be an allusion to the Zionist state. I wouldn't be surprised if that was intentional on the part of AE. Great click-bait at any rate. :)

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone, @iffen

    Why I’d never! “Eh?” is an affectionate, charming aspect of Canadian English, that’s all.

  82. @Talha
    North Korea...greatest foe?! Seriously? Other than causing stupidity on a relatively small peninsula in a corner of the world, what real threat do they present?

    Maybe I need to watch more network news so I can be properly indoctrinated on the subject.

    Peace.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Bao Jiankang, @Audacious Epigone, @Colin Wright

    ‘North Korea…greatest foe?! Seriously? Other than causing stupidity on a relatively small peninsula in a corner of the world, what real threat do they present?’

    China certainly needs to be regarded with thought and respect, but the only group that poses a real and necessary threat to us is ourselves; I suppose North Korea wins (or loses) in the sense that it’s the most openly hostile.

    Perhaps needless to say, in my opinion the one nation whose disappearance would most definitely and immediately benefit us would be Israel. If that vanished tomorrow, we would be better off economically, militarily, diplomatically, morally…

    But there again. We have have met the enemy and he is us. All we have to do is yank that little beast off our teat. Then Israel arguably either withers away or doesn’t — but inarguably ceases to be our special little ball ‘n chain.

    • Agree: Talha
    • Replies: @Talha
    @Colin Wright

    Saudi is also up there as far as a negative ally relationship overall, but man...do they buy billions of dollars of equipment that they then also hire US contractors to maintain and keep running with the oil money they throw our way yearly.

    Also, the Israelis have cornered much of the market in cryptography and spyware. And this does definitely affect people:
    “WhatsApp voice calls used to inject Israeli spyware on phones...WhatsApp, which is used by 1.5bn people worldwide, discovered in early May that attackers were able to install surveillance software on to both iPhones and Android phones by ringing up targets using the app’s phone call function.

    The malicious code, developed by the secretive Israeli company NSO Group, could be transmitted even if users did not answer their phones, and the calls often disappeared from call logs, said the spyware dealer, who was recently briefed on the WhatsApp hack.”
    https://www.ft.com/content/4da1117e-756c-11e9-be7d-6d846537acab

    “The FBI is investigating the role of Israeli spyware vendor NSO Group Technologies in possible hacks on American residents and companies as well as suspected intelligence gathering on governments, according to four people familiar with the inquiry.”
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-cyber-nso-exclusive/exclusive-fbi-probes-use-of-israeli-firms-spyware-in-personal-and-government-hacks-sources-idUSKBN1ZT38B

    For all the bluster NK does, they simply do not affect the average citizen of the US.

    Peace.

  83. @Talha
    @botazefa

    I was joking of course, but yeah...all of these guys like Hall and Oates, Genesis and even - dare I say it - Chicago are what made the 80s the 80s.

    I’m actually running through a bunch of old 80s movies with my teenage sons like Aliens, Predator, Indiana Jones, etc. Many of those films hold up surprisingly well...even with the obvious stop motion special effects.

    Peace.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    I’m actually running through a bunch of old 80s movies with my teenage sons like Aliens, Predator, Indiana Jones, etc. Many of those films hold up surprisingly well…even with the obvious stop motion special effects.

    John Carpenter made some awesome movies in the 80s. Pretty much all his 80s output is terrific. Big Trouble in Little China!

    • Replies: @Talha
    @dfordoom

    Agree. And Big Trouble in Little China was one of the first ones on our list.

    Peace.

    , @A123
    @dfordoom


    John Carpenter made some awesome movies in the 80s.
     
    And, at least one of his films is still relevant today....

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    https://media.makeameme.org/created/escape-from-new-c90cacb3db.jpg

    Replies: @dfordoom

  84. @Diversity Heretic
    I'm rather surprised at how favorably Mexico is perceived. Maybe Mexican immigrants and their descendants bump the favorable rating up, but Mexico and Central America are huge problems for the United States. And an ally is generally someone one turns to help defeat an enemy. Mexico is in no position to offer any such aid.

    I'm also distressed at the very unfavorable attitude towards Russia. Russia poses no threat whatsoever to the United States and the hostility is the result of a media and "intelligence oommunity" disinformation campaign.

    The truth of the matter is, as John Derbyshire observed years ago, the United States could have the foreign policy of a large Switzerland; it needs no allies and it's enemies are largely of its own making. Is Switzerland seeking allies? Who is the enemy of Switzerland (I mean, except the fiscal authorities of many nations)?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone, @prime noticer, @Buzz Mohawk, @Miro23

    A very fine idea. A country without allies or enemies.

  85. @anonymous
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    Prior to Israel, America had no enemies in the Mideast
     
    Pop quiz - against whom did the United States fight its first foreign war? (Hint: it was during the Presidency of Thomas Jefferson, and resulted in the famous line in the Marine fight song about 'the shores of Tripoli.')

    Ok, I'll just come out and educate you. The United States went to war against the Bey of Algeria and his Ottoman protectors because they were kidnapping and enslaving American sailors, justified in their own words by their interpretation of Islam, 145 years before Israel existed.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AnonStarter

    Oh, I see. You’re going to educate me. With a pop quiz, no less. How cute.

    Hey Dad — can you help me out? How many sides does a square have, I keep forgetting. Can you educate me, please?

    Also, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

    Also, when Shlomo points and says, Look! Squirrel! Where is the squirrel?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Whatever. Since you clearly knew so little about American and world history that you could make such a patently false claim as 'America never had enemies in the Middle East until Israel came around,' maybe you should take a step back and evaluate whether you actually understand anything about that region of the world, or US foreign policy.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @AnonStarter
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Also, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

    As many cookies as Cookie Monster could muster if Cookie Monster could muster cooking cookies.

    Alternatively, I don't know, but they sure like chucking buds off the pepper plants in my garden.

  86. @dfordoom
    @Talha


    I’m actually running through a bunch of old 80s movies with my teenage sons like Aliens, Predator, Indiana Jones, etc. Many of those films hold up surprisingly well…even with the obvious stop motion special effects.
     
    John Carpenter made some awesome movies in the 80s. Pretty much all his 80s output is terrific. Big Trouble in Little China!

    Replies: @Talha, @A123

    Agree. And Big Trouble in Little China was one of the first ones on our list.

    Peace.

  87. @dfordoom
    @Rosie


    My impression is that the Aussies are less fanatical and more pragmatic, presumably due to the convict rather than pilgrim founding population
     
    Actually there weren't that many convicts. Mostly it was free settlers.

    Australia was incredibly lucky in not getting any significant influx of religious nutjobs. As a result we just don't tend to see everything in moral terms.

    Australia is one of the most secular nations on Earth.

    It's still a pretty good place.

    Replies: @sb

    Australia has been fortunate in being able to keep an eye on the US experience and not outright rejecting the notion that blood and soil have a lot to do with having a national consciousness .

    ( Remember that until the 1960s Australia still thought of itself as a British nation and even now Anglo-Celts probably constitute a majority )

    Of course the times are much a changing

  88. @Colin Wright
    @Talha

    'North Korea…greatest foe?! Seriously? Other than causing stupidity on a relatively small peninsula in a corner of the world, what real threat do they present?'

    China certainly needs to be regarded with thought and respect, but the only group that poses a real and necessary threat to us is ourselves; I suppose North Korea wins (or loses) in the sense that it's the most openly hostile.

    Perhaps needless to say, in my opinion the one nation whose disappearance would most definitely and immediately benefit us would be Israel. If that vanished tomorrow, we would be better off economically, militarily, diplomatically, morally...

    But there again. We have have met the enemy and he is us. All we have to do is yank that little beast off our teat. Then Israel arguably either withers away or doesn't -- but inarguably ceases to be our special little ball 'n chain.

    Replies: @Talha

    Saudi is also up there as far as a negative ally relationship overall, but man…do they buy billions of dollars of equipment that they then also hire US contractors to maintain and keep running with the oil money they throw our way yearly.

    Also, the Israelis have cornered much of the market in cryptography and spyware. And this does definitely affect people:
    “WhatsApp voice calls used to inject Israeli spyware on phones…WhatsApp, which is used by 1.5bn people worldwide, discovered in early May that attackers were able to install surveillance software on to both iPhones and Android phones by ringing up targets using the app’s phone call function.

    The malicious code, developed by the secretive Israeli company NSO Group, could be transmitted even if users did not answer their phones, and the calls often disappeared from call logs, said the spyware dealer, who was recently briefed on the WhatsApp hack.”
    https://www.ft.com/content/4da1117e-756c-11e9-be7d-6d846537acab

    “The FBI is investigating the role of Israeli spyware vendor NSO Group Technologies in possible hacks on American residents and companies as well as suspected intelligence gathering on governments, according to four people familiar with the inquiry.”
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-cyber-nso-exclusive/exclusive-fbi-probes-use-of-israeli-firms-spyware-in-personal-and-government-hacks-sources-idUSKBN1ZT38B

    For all the bluster NK does, they simply do not affect the average citizen of the US.

    Peace.

  89. @dfordoom
    @Talha


    I’m actually running through a bunch of old 80s movies with my teenage sons like Aliens, Predator, Indiana Jones, etc. Many of those films hold up surprisingly well…even with the obvious stop motion special effects.
     
    John Carpenter made some awesome movies in the 80s. Pretty much all his 80s output is terrific. Big Trouble in Little China!

    Replies: @Talha, @A123

    John Carpenter made some awesome movies in the 80s.

    And, at least one of his films is still relevant today….

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @A123



    John Carpenter made some awesome movies in the 80s.

     

    And, at least one of his films is still relevant today….
     
    Yep. And not just Escape from New York. The Thing seems pretty relevant as well!
  90. anonymous[105] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @anonymous

    Oh, I see. You're going to educate me. With a pop quiz, no less. How cute.

    Hey Dad -- can you help me out? How many sides does a square have, I keep forgetting. Can you educate me, please?

    Also, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

    Also, when Shlomo points and says, Look! Squirrel! Where is the squirrel?

    Replies: @anonymous, @AnonStarter

    Whatever. Since you clearly knew so little about American and world history that you could make such a patently false claim as ‘America never had enemies in the Middle East until Israel came around,’ maybe you should take a step back and evaluate whether you actually understand anything about that region of the world, or US foreign policy.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @anonymous

    Okay. So the guy who can't tell the difference between a witty zinger and a detailed position paper, and who thinks Algeria is in the "Middle East" is now going to educate me.

    Let's get a move on, Professor. I can't wait to get all educated an sheeit.

  91. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @anonymous

    Oh, I see. You're going to educate me. With a pop quiz, no less. How cute.

    Hey Dad -- can you help me out? How many sides does a square have, I keep forgetting. Can you educate me, please?

    Also, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

    Also, when Shlomo points and says, Look! Squirrel! Where is the squirrel?

    Replies: @anonymous, @AnonStarter

    Also, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

    As many cookies as Cookie Monster could muster if Cookie Monster could muster cooking cookies.

    Alternatively, I don’t know, but they sure like chucking buds off the pepper plants in my garden.

  92. I’m wondering why South Korea scores so much lower than France, especially given all the France-bashing that took place during the lead up to the Iraq War.

    Maybe some people can’t remember which Korea is the “bad” one.

    I was surprised that France scored higher than Israel, given that majorities in both parties in Congress vote to give huge amounts of cash and other assistance to Israel, and any critics of Israeli policy are denounced as anti-Semites and weak on terrorism. Millions of Americans equate the State of Israel with the Biblical Israel, and are fanatical about “muh Izreal”.

    Does France still get a lot of goodwill for their assistance during the Revolutionary War? I wouldn’t think so. I doubt France’s anti-terrorism operations in Africa are well known. What is giving them goodwill in the eyes of the USA public? French art, culture, food, film, and beautiful women?

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Not Raul

    Purely anecdotal, but in the course of a rather eventful life of rather broad human acquaintance, not once have I ever met one of these purported Christian Zionist pro-Israel fanatics. I've met Christian Americans who support Israel, but generally for sober moral, or pro-West/anti-Arab, or real-politik reasons, not imaginary magic ones. Most Americans I know who support Israel do so because that's the American line, and they have other things to think about, so they just assume it's the correct line and get on with their lives. I have a sneaking suspicion that the whole "millions of Christian Evangelical Zionists" routine is a plausible-deniability scheme cooked up by the usual suspects, so that Americans won't realize that the pro-Israel stance is maintained by arm-twisting, graft, extortion, threats, and treachery, and so that nobody will notice who the actual blood-soaked monsters are, or the shape of their noses.

    Never met anybody who confuses modern Israel with the Biblical edition.

    Met oodles of scheming, plotting Zionist Jews, though.

    But, maybe I just move in the wrong circles.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @Not Raul

    I suspect it's your last sentence. If I had to guess, I'd say France is the most romanticized country in Europe for young American women. Maybe for young American men, too, although that honor might go to Italy instead.

    Replies: @anon

  93. @Dissident
    @dfordoom



    The better description of American “allies” is bottom bitch

     

    Yep.
     
    Now, now, we wouldn't want to enforce hateful homophobic stereotypes, would we? We all know that Gay male culture and sexual behavior is the quintessence of egalitarianism, dignity, inclusion, tolerance and love in its truest, most refined form.[1], [2, [3], [4]

    Returning to the topic at-hand, when it comes to the special relationship that the US enjoys with one particular "greatest ally", some would say the indelicate metaphor invoked by Diversity Heretic is inverted; that it is the U.S. that is beholden and subservient to the Zionist state and its lobby. But others, such as Noam Chomsky, have argued that (the state that calls itself) Israel serves the interests of the US-- at least the Empire, if not the Republic-- at least as much as vice-versa. Is that there not at least some truth in such arguments? (Of course, this being Unz Review, one would hardly expect to find much interest in a topic of this variety...)

    Replies: @iffen

    Now, now, we wouldn’t want to enforce hateful homophobic stereotypes, would we? We all know that Gay male culture and sexual behavior is the quintessence of egalitarianism, dignity, inclusion, tolerance and love in its truest, most refined form.

    LOL

  94. @Dissident
    @The Alarmist


    BTW, ask nearly every Congress Critter aside from the Squad, and Israel are our besties.
     
    I am surely far from the only one who, upon seeing the title for this post, was all-but-certain it had to be an allusion to the Zionist state. I wouldn't be surprised if that was intentional on the part of AE. Great click-bait at any rate. :)

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone, @iffen

    Oh, you Jews.

    Paranoia is your destiny.

  95. @Not Raul
    I’m wondering why South Korea scores so much lower than France, especially given all the France-bashing that took place during the lead up to the Iraq War.

    Maybe some people can’t remember which Korea is the “bad” one.

    I was surprised that France scored higher than Israel, given that majorities in both parties in Congress vote to give huge amounts of cash and other assistance to Israel, and any critics of Israeli policy are denounced as anti-Semites and weak on terrorism. Millions of Americans equate the State of Israel with the Biblical Israel, and are fanatical about “muh Izreal”.

    Does France still get a lot of goodwill for their assistance during the Revolutionary War? I wouldn’t think so. I doubt France’s anti-terrorism operations in Africa are well known. What is giving them goodwill in the eyes of the USA public? French art, culture, food, film, and beautiful women?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Audacious Epigone

    Purely anecdotal, but in the course of a rather eventful life of rather broad human acquaintance, not once have I ever met one of these purported Christian Zionist pro-Israel fanatics. I’ve met Christian Americans who support Israel, but generally for sober moral, or pro-West/anti-Arab, or real-politik reasons, not imaginary magic ones. Most Americans I know who support Israel do so because that’s the American line, and they have other things to think about, so they just assume it’s the correct line and get on with their lives. I have a sneaking suspicion that the whole “millions of Christian Evangelical Zionists” routine is a plausible-deniability scheme cooked up by the usual suspects, so that Americans won’t realize that the pro-Israel stance is maintained by arm-twisting, graft, extortion, threats, and treachery, and so that nobody will notice who the actual blood-soaked monsters are, or the shape of their noses.

    Never met anybody who confuses modern Israel with the Biblical edition.

    Met oodles of scheming, plotting Zionist Jews, though.

    But, maybe I just move in the wrong circles.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    But, maybe I just move in the wrong circles.
     
    Or rather you move in the right circles.

    John Hagee ditto-heads tend to be down-market.
  96. @anonymous
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    Prior to Israel, America had no enemies in the Mideast
     
    Pop quiz - against whom did the United States fight its first foreign war? (Hint: it was during the Presidency of Thomas Jefferson, and resulted in the famous line in the Marine fight song about 'the shores of Tripoli.')

    Ok, I'll just come out and educate you. The United States went to war against the Bey of Algeria and his Ottoman protectors because they were kidnapping and enslaving American sailors, justified in their own words by their interpretation of Islam, 145 years before Israel existed.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @AnonStarter

    Hint: it was during the Presidency of Thomas Jefferson, and resulted in the famous line in the Marine fight song about ‘the shores of Tripoli.’

    To be precise, the line from the Marine Corps Hymn commemorates the Battle of Derna on April 27, 1805, made possible after consul William Eaton convinced an exiled brother of Pasha Yusuf Karamanli to join forces with America in an attempted coup. A grand total of eight marines, a smattering of Europeans, and a largely Arab Muslim army — totaling about 500 — took Derna that day; however, they weren’t able to reach Tripoli.

    More importantly, though, the Barbary Wars ended 205 years ago. They certainly provide no evidence that America and Muslim polities are irreconcilable enemies, and the fact that you have to reach so far back in history to find an example of American-Muslim conflict that predates our support of Israel betrays a rather pitiful desperation.

    Thanks for trying, anyways. You made me hit the books again.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @AnonStarter

    "no evidence that America and Muslim polities are irreconcilable enemies"

    Theoretically, and theologically, Islam considers the entire non-Islamic world to be its eternal, irreconcilable enemy. Which would include America. But Islam also allows for practical, realistic considerations, and many Muslim leaders over the centuries have been practical, realistic men.

    America (and Europe) would have had nothing to fear from Islam, and could pursue beneficent relationships, if they had only remembered the ancient wisdom, and rigidly forbidden all Islamic immigration of any kind. So long as Islam is kept at a safe distance, it can be treated with rationally and to mutual benefit. But now, stupidly, we've forgotten our entire history and are going to re-learn it the hard way. The West is nursing a viper in its bosom, and it's going to get bit.

    Replies: @AnonStarter

    , @dfordoom
    @AnonStarter


    More importantly, though, the Barbary Wars ended 205 years ago. They certainly provide no evidence that America and Muslim polities are irreconcilable enemies, and the fact that you have to reach so far back in history to find an example of American-Muslim conflict that predates our support of Israel betrays a rather pitiful desperation.
     
    Agreed.
  97. @anonymous
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Whatever. Since you clearly knew so little about American and world history that you could make such a patently false claim as 'America never had enemies in the Middle East until Israel came around,' maybe you should take a step back and evaluate whether you actually understand anything about that region of the world, or US foreign policy.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Okay. So the guy who can’t tell the difference between a witty zinger and a detailed position paper, and who thinks Algeria is in the “Middle East” is now going to educate me.

    Let’s get a move on, Professor. I can’t wait to get all educated an sheeit.

    • LOL: AnonStarter
  98. @Not Raul
    I’m wondering why South Korea scores so much lower than France, especially given all the France-bashing that took place during the lead up to the Iraq War.

    Maybe some people can’t remember which Korea is the “bad” one.

    I was surprised that France scored higher than Israel, given that majorities in both parties in Congress vote to give huge amounts of cash and other assistance to Israel, and any critics of Israeli policy are denounced as anti-Semites and weak on terrorism. Millions of Americans equate the State of Israel with the Biblical Israel, and are fanatical about “muh Izreal”.

    Does France still get a lot of goodwill for their assistance during the Revolutionary War? I wouldn’t think so. I doubt France’s anti-terrorism operations in Africa are well known. What is giving them goodwill in the eyes of the USA public? French art, culture, food, film, and beautiful women?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Audacious Epigone

    I suspect it’s your last sentence. If I had to guess, I’d say France is the most romanticized country in Europe for young American women. Maybe for young American men, too, although that honor might go to Italy instead.

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @anon
    @Audacious Epigone

    If I had to guess, I’d say France is the most romanticized country in Europe for young American women.

    Well, that's because in France they kiss on main street. Or at least they used to.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7De3WgHas7U

  99. @AnonStarter
    @anonymous

    Hint: it was during the Presidency of Thomas Jefferson, and resulted in the famous line in the Marine fight song about ‘the shores of Tripoli.’

    To be precise, the line from the Marine Corps Hymn commemorates the Battle of Derna on April 27, 1805, made possible after consul William Eaton convinced an exiled brother of Pasha Yusuf Karamanli to join forces with America in an attempted coup. A grand total of eight marines, a smattering of Europeans, and a largely Arab Muslim army -- totaling about 500 -- took Derna that day; however, they weren't able to reach Tripoli.

    More importantly, though, the Barbary Wars ended 205 years ago. They certainly provide no evidence that America and Muslim polities are irreconcilable enemies, and the fact that you have to reach so far back in history to find an example of American-Muslim conflict that predates our support of Israel betrays a rather pitiful desperation.

    Thanks for trying, anyways. You made me hit the books again.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @dfordoom

    “no evidence that America and Muslim polities are irreconcilable enemies”

    Theoretically, and theologically, Islam considers the entire non-Islamic world to be its eternal, irreconcilable enemy. Which would include America. But Islam also allows for practical, realistic considerations, and many Muslim leaders over the centuries have been practical, realistic men.

    America (and Europe) would have had nothing to fear from Islam, and could pursue beneficent relationships, if they had only remembered the ancient wisdom, and rigidly forbidden all Islamic immigration of any kind. So long as Islam is kept at a safe distance, it can be treated with rationally and to mutual benefit. But now, stupidly, we’ve forgotten our entire history and are going to re-learn it the hard way. The West is nursing a viper in its bosom, and it’s going to get bit.

    • Agree: Hugo Silva
    • Replies: @AnonStarter
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Theoretically, and theologically, Islam considers the entire non-Islamic world to be its eternal, irreconcilable enemy.

    Well, I'm not only a Muslim, I've been studying the religion for thirty years now, so I consider myself qualified to speak on this subject.

    No, we don't hold such a view, nor does Islam command it. In The Qur'an, God says of the faithful regarding their antagonists, "You are those who love them, though they love you not." [3: 119] Being a born-and-bred American as well, I'm very familiar with all of the arguments regarding warfare and friendship. Been there and done that too many times to count.

    But Islam also allows for practical, realistic considerations, and many Muslim leaders over the centuries have been practical, realistic men.

    God not only allows for it, He orders us to be so.

    That being the case, I won't entertain any further discussion of it unless you're interested.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  100. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @AnonStarter

    "no evidence that America and Muslim polities are irreconcilable enemies"

    Theoretically, and theologically, Islam considers the entire non-Islamic world to be its eternal, irreconcilable enemy. Which would include America. But Islam also allows for practical, realistic considerations, and many Muslim leaders over the centuries have been practical, realistic men.

    America (and Europe) would have had nothing to fear from Islam, and could pursue beneficent relationships, if they had only remembered the ancient wisdom, and rigidly forbidden all Islamic immigration of any kind. So long as Islam is kept at a safe distance, it can be treated with rationally and to mutual benefit. But now, stupidly, we've forgotten our entire history and are going to re-learn it the hard way. The West is nursing a viper in its bosom, and it's going to get bit.

    Replies: @AnonStarter

    Theoretically, and theologically, Islam considers the entire non-Islamic world to be its eternal, irreconcilable enemy.

    Well, I’m not only a Muslim, I’ve been studying the religion for thirty years now, so I consider myself qualified to speak on this subject.

    No, we don’t hold such a view, nor does Islam command it. In The Qur’an, God says of the faithful regarding their antagonists, “You are those who love them, though they love you not.” [3: 119] Being a born-and-bred American as well, I’m very familiar with all of the arguments regarding warfare and friendship. Been there and done that too many times to count.

    But Islam also allows for practical, realistic considerations, and many Muslim leaders over the centuries have been practical, realistic men.

    God not only allows for it, He orders us to be so.

    That being the case, I won’t entertain any further discussion of it unless you’re interested.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @AnonStarter

    Well, I defer to your expertise. I have my own opinions on the topic, a few of them scholarly, many historical, and nearly all of them simply from a different perspective, but it's probably a topic we shouldn't trouble ourselves to pursue here. Cheerio.

  101. @A123
    @dfordoom


    John Carpenter made some awesome movies in the 80s.
     
    And, at least one of his films is still relevant today....

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    https://media.makeameme.org/created/escape-from-new-c90cacb3db.jpg

    Replies: @dfordoom

    John Carpenter made some awesome movies in the 80s.

    And, at least one of his films is still relevant today….

    Yep. And not just Escape from New York. The Thing seems pretty relevant as well!

  102. @AnonStarter
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Theoretically, and theologically, Islam considers the entire non-Islamic world to be its eternal, irreconcilable enemy.

    Well, I'm not only a Muslim, I've been studying the religion for thirty years now, so I consider myself qualified to speak on this subject.

    No, we don't hold such a view, nor does Islam command it. In The Qur'an, God says of the faithful regarding their antagonists, "You are those who love them, though they love you not." [3: 119] Being a born-and-bred American as well, I'm very familiar with all of the arguments regarding warfare and friendship. Been there and done that too many times to count.

    But Islam also allows for practical, realistic considerations, and many Muslim leaders over the centuries have been practical, realistic men.

    God not only allows for it, He orders us to be so.

    That being the case, I won't entertain any further discussion of it unless you're interested.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Well, I defer to your expertise. I have my own opinions on the topic, a few of them scholarly, many historical, and nearly all of them simply from a different perspective, but it’s probably a topic we shouldn’t trouble ourselves to pursue here. Cheerio.

    • Thanks: AnonStarter
  103. @AnonStarter
    @anonymous

    Hint: it was during the Presidency of Thomas Jefferson, and resulted in the famous line in the Marine fight song about ‘the shores of Tripoli.’

    To be precise, the line from the Marine Corps Hymn commemorates the Battle of Derna on April 27, 1805, made possible after consul William Eaton convinced an exiled brother of Pasha Yusuf Karamanli to join forces with America in an attempted coup. A grand total of eight marines, a smattering of Europeans, and a largely Arab Muslim army -- totaling about 500 -- took Derna that day; however, they weren't able to reach Tripoli.

    More importantly, though, the Barbary Wars ended 205 years ago. They certainly provide no evidence that America and Muslim polities are irreconcilable enemies, and the fact that you have to reach so far back in history to find an example of American-Muslim conflict that predates our support of Israel betrays a rather pitiful desperation.

    Thanks for trying, anyways. You made me hit the books again.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @dfordoom

    More importantly, though, the Barbary Wars ended 205 years ago. They certainly provide no evidence that America and Muslim polities are irreconcilable enemies, and the fact that you have to reach so far back in history to find an example of American-Muslim conflict that predates our support of Israel betrays a rather pitiful desperation.

    Agreed.

    • Thanks: AnonStarter
  104. @Audacious Epigone
    @Not Raul

    I suspect it's your last sentence. If I had to guess, I'd say France is the most romanticized country in Europe for young American women. Maybe for young American men, too, although that honor might go to Italy instead.

    Replies: @anon

    If I had to guess, I’d say France is the most romanticized country in Europe for young American women.

    Well, that’s because in France they kiss on main street. Or at least they used to.

  105. The belief that Israel is our ally is a testament to the controlled corporate media.

  106. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Not Raul

    Purely anecdotal, but in the course of a rather eventful life of rather broad human acquaintance, not once have I ever met one of these purported Christian Zionist pro-Israel fanatics. I've met Christian Americans who support Israel, but generally for sober moral, or pro-West/anti-Arab, or real-politik reasons, not imaginary magic ones. Most Americans I know who support Israel do so because that's the American line, and they have other things to think about, so they just assume it's the correct line and get on with their lives. I have a sneaking suspicion that the whole "millions of Christian Evangelical Zionists" routine is a plausible-deniability scheme cooked up by the usual suspects, so that Americans won't realize that the pro-Israel stance is maintained by arm-twisting, graft, extortion, threats, and treachery, and so that nobody will notice who the actual blood-soaked monsters are, or the shape of their noses.

    Never met anybody who confuses modern Israel with the Biblical edition.

    Met oodles of scheming, plotting Zionist Jews, though.

    But, maybe I just move in the wrong circles.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    But, maybe I just move in the wrong circles.

    Or rather you move in the right circles.

    John Hagee ditto-heads tend to be down-market.

  107. @Dissident
    @SFG


    As for Israel, you might try looking at the effects by age. I’d bet favorability drops quite a bit in younger cohorts, both due to POC not feeling much sympathy and younger conservative whites being influenced by the alt-right.
     
    What percentage of Americans, of any age, are influenced by voices that could reasonably be described as "alt-right"?

    Just how popular is 4chan's /pol, for example, among the roughly 13-30 demographic? (Could also be useful to narrow to any number of subsets therein, such as 13-25; 13-18; 15-25, 11-15, etc.) 8chan? [1]


    Iran, well, if we ditched Israel we might make friends with them, though I don’t know what the point would be. The optimal course from a realist point of view would simply be to be neutral.
     
    Sounds about right to me.

    [1] From the limited time I have spent perusing 8chan's /pol, it appeared to be an all-out, expressly Nazi forum. (I use that term advisedly; I am not one to do so indiscriminately.) While such types appeared to be well-represented at 4chan's /pol, it, in contrast, appeared neither limited-to nor expressly founded upon such a viewpoint. It should probably be noted here that it can be difficult to distinguish between those who sincerely and seriously hold such views (i.e., admiring Hitler and the Nazis; simultaneously maintaining that the Holocaust is a hoax but would have been justified; blaming all ills of the world on Jews as the magic key, etc.) and those who merely express such views in order to be edgy and transgressive. I also suspect that many, perhaps even most of at least the 4chan demographic could be characterized as some combination of those two (i.e., sincere vs. trolling).

    Replies: @HappyBlueBreakfasts

    From the limited time I have spent perusing 8chan‘s /pol, it appeared to be an all-out, expressly Nazi forum. (I use that term advisedly; I am not one to do so indiscriminately.) While such types appeared to be well-represented at 4chan‘s /pol, it, in contrast, appeared neither limited-to nor expressly founded upon such a viewpoint.

    8/pol/ (and all of 8chan) died a year ago.
    Even before that date, there was no authentic “/pol/” demographic on neither 4chan nor 8chan anymore. Both boards were heavily flooded by “immigrants” from reddit. 4/pol/ succumbed easily to the reddit flood. 8/pol/ tried to resist, but it was in vain in the end.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @HappyBlueBreakfasts

    Thanks for your input.


    8/pol/ (and all of 8chan) died a year ago.
     
    At least as of no more than two or so months ago, some iteration of 8chan existed, at a different domain. No idea how true to the original it was or even if it is still up.
  108. @HappyBlueBreakfasts
    @Dissident


    From the limited time I have spent perusing 8chan‘s /pol, it appeared to be an all-out, expressly Nazi forum. (I use that term advisedly; I am not one to do so indiscriminately.) While such types appeared to be well-represented at 4chan‘s /pol, it, in contrast, appeared neither limited-to nor expressly founded upon such a viewpoint.
     
    8/pol/ (and all of 8chan) died a year ago.
    Even before that date, there was no authentic "/pol/" demographic on neither 4chan nor 8chan anymore. Both boards were heavily flooded by "immigrants" from reddit. 4/pol/ succumbed easily to the reddit flood. 8/pol/ tried to resist, but it was in vain in the end.

    Replies: @Dissident

    Thanks for your input.

    8/pol/ (and all of 8chan) died a year ago.

    At least as of no more than two or so months ago, some iteration of 8chan existed, at a different domain. No idea how true to the original it was or even if it is still up.

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