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Forget fraud, Indiana Jack points out the potential ramifications of many incorrectly completed mail-in ballots being disqualified. This presumably at a higher rate than in-person voting which enjoys a comparative lack of distractions, an automated ballot review, and poll workers to assist voters:

The effect of mail-in voting on the election results this year will be interesting. Trump and many Republicans have criticized mail-in voting, and the general consensus seems to be that an increasing number of mail-in ballots will help Biden. Personally, I am not so sure. Nationwide, over 550,000 ballots were disqualified in the primaries this year because they were filled out incorrectly, and there will doubtless be large numbers of ballots disqualified in the general election as well. Minority voters are more likely than average to have their ballots thrown out than White voters are, and Democrats are far more likely to vote by mail than Republicans this year.

It should not be forgotten that this has already affected elections in the past. In 2000, more voters in Florida intended to vote for Gore than for Bush, but so many Gore voters filled out their ballots incorrectly that they were thrown out, giving Bush the state of Florida and thus the Presidency.

One possible scenario is that most voters will vote for Biden this year, but that so many of them will have their ballots disqualified that Trump will win the election. This possibility seems to be worrying some Democrats.

Alrenous on a personal pet peeve, the NPC who licks boots and kisses rings, never entertaining–let alone generating–a thought that would be out of place on the airwaves of CNN or the pages of the NYT, always speaking power to truth who, despite this, imagines himself a plucky pugilist on the side of the angels sticking it to The Man:

If witch hunting is a lucrative and popular pastime, there are no witches worth a damn. If there were witches, witch-hunters would end up hanging upside-down from the tree at the crossroads with their head shrunk to the size of a baseball.

Double-dipping on the theme, Criticas excerpts from an essay by Paul Graham I recall first reading in what feels like a lifetime ago, though the subject is an evergreen one–greener now than when he wrote it in the mid-oughts:

Let’s start with a test: Do you have any opinions that you would be reluctant to express in front of a group of your peers?

If the answer is no, you might want to stop and think about that. If everything you believe is something you’re supposed to believe, could that possibly be a coincidence? Odds are it isn’t. Odds are you just think what you’re told.

The other alternative would be that you independently considered every question and came up with the exact same answers that are now considered acceptable. That seems unlikely, because you’d also have to make the same mistakes. Mapmakers deliberately put slight mistakes in their maps so they can tell when someone copies them. If another map has the same mistake, that’s very convincing evidence.

If you’ve the time, read the whole thing. It’d be interesting for Graham, an honest leftist, to provide an updated edition. He’d surely have to revise this, for instance:

For example, at the high water mark of political correctness in the early 1990s, Harvard distributed to its faculty and staff…

Thank goodness the intellectually stifling environment of the early 1990s is in the rear view mirror!

 
• Category: Arts/Letters, Culture/Society, Ideology • Tags: COTW 
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  1. songbird says:

    1990s, the height of political correctness:

    Funny idea, but nevertheless, somewhat thought-provoking. How did technology encourage political correctness before the internet became mainstream? I can think of a few ways. To mention one: when VHS became mainstream, it became easy for any teacher to show something like Schindler’s List – they could tape it off the TV, at their home and bring it in. In fact, I bet it cost a lot less to produce VHS tapes and to send them out to schools than it did to buy reels of films. Wouldn’t be surprised, if leftist organizations did it.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
    , @SFG
  2. Odds Are You Just Think What You’re Told

    I bet you are right.

  3. Arr, the 90’s….Wasn’t that the decade when psychologists discovered the “repressed memory” ? You know — without any conscious memory, it could be discovered that as a child you had experienced the most traumatic of experiences…usually some form of child molestation…..And then came that fad for treating kids with “anal dilation” tests to discover whether the molestation was recent. They were right into trauma in those days…among a 1000 other egregious ideas & practices.

  4. Wielgus says:
    @songbird

    Quite handy. Educational programmes in Britain used to show some good stuff in the small hours. So I would put a blank VHS in the machine and programme it to record during a set time and channel, then go to bed. I would watch the recording the next day.
    DVDs are not so easy to use in the same way.

    • Agree: songbird
  5. As a life long contrarian, whatever I’m told, I assume is a lie until I can prove to myself otherwise.

  6. Any U.S. reader that is not laying up food, water and heating fuel—plus maybe ammunition—might be taking an unnecessary risk. You probably won’t need the supplies but, in case you do, now would be the time to beat the rush.

    [MORE]

    Why do I mention it? Because I enjoy being mocked as a prepper? No, the mockery is predictable and does not much interest me—and, anyway, I am fairly lame as preppers go—but it is to my advantage that Unz readers not be caught out. Besides, I like many of you here. Why would I want you to suffer? I have little to lose by pseudonymously warning you.

    One assumes that, if you have clicked MORE above and are reading this, the warning interests you. What you do about the warning is up to you.

    You need not build a fallout bunker, dig a moat, or construct a stationary tandem bicycle-powered electric generator (you won’t have time, anyway); nor will you want a three-year cache (which would be seized from you by force, anyway), but a few basics are indicated. Store enough to get you through the winter. You probably won’t actually need the storage, but if you do, that property insurer you have been paying all these years cannot help you. Your little storage can.

    As AE and numerous others (even in conventional, tepid sources like The Wall Street Journal) have documented, a disputed election result next month is not unlikely. I do not predict the course such a dispute might take, but if you believe that the disasters of history lie all in the past, you might be in for a rude awakening in a few weeks.

    Excepting for ammo, prices are reasonable at the moment. Just lay up some food, water and fuel.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    , @songbird
  7. “Thinking what you’re told” is the reason why so many of the more quantishly and sciency educated contributors here were so wrong about corona. This is not a quip; it’s significant in the sense that the whole official medical/biological understanding of virology is being openly defied by reality and therefore needs to be amended.

    I have been trying to work on an essay to this end, but it’s been difficult to find the time lately.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  8. @V. K. Ovelund

    Because I enjoy being mocked as a prepper?

    My wife stopped mocking me when the stores started going stock-out on various necessities.

    Excepting for ammo, prices are reasonable at the moment. Just lay up some food, water and fuel.

    and Toilet Paper….

    BTW, You’ll never stock enough water, so consider buying a rain barrel and a good water filtering device, like a Katadyn®️… if the tap water is still flowing, it still might not be safe.

  9. There will be enough perfectly filled out ballots discovered to make up for any that are disqualified. They have plenty of people who can manage it and near zero risk of getting caught.

    And big doubt that dem governors, dem Secretaries of State, etc will simply allow dem voter ballots to be disqualified. If it happens to minorities, it is therefore racism. GOP doesn’t have a legal leg to stand on to argue this, and esoteric dweeb legalism is the only leg they had to begin with. Dem ballots are going to get counted regardless of what is wrong.

    Republican poll watchers were physically removed, literally pushed out, from
    Philly vote locations and election offices.

    GOP filed a lawsuit, won, got an injunction or whatever, but did not get their guys physically back into the locations. They were just pushed out again.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  10. @The Alarmist

    … stopped mocking me when the stores started going stock-out on various necessities.

    The mockery is darned peculiar, isn’t it? Some people put more effort into mocking folks over prepping than over almost anything else, except maybe over Holocaust skepticism. If I started wearing a dress in public, it would generate less mockery.

    And then a shortage arises and they heatedly accuse you of hoarding (if they somehow find out that you have a hoard).

    All one can do is to take care of one’s own preparation. Should the disaster arrive, the mockers will have to fend for themselves.

  11. anon[104] • Disclaimer says:

    You know what pisses everybody off, from either of the authorized party lifestyles? Pointing out the blindingly obvious: that when an organization has institutionalized impunity and two sets of books, they’re in charge. Like when some guys have Section 202 et seq., the Intelligence Identities Protection Act, the operational files exemption, dotted-line reports, COG, SFFAS 56, and judicial doctrines of utmost deference, deference upon deference, political questions, and state secrets… that is your government, period. Everything else is their flunkies.

    Your government has one branch, CIA.

    Try telling people, you pissed away your life idolizing and reviling a bunch of muppets; you’re not only a helpless lumpen, you’re a dupe; your American freedom is bullshit. The painstakingly inculcated conspiracy-theory reflex of 1035-960 wards off catastrophic cognitive dissonance and humiliation, which gets puked out on your shirt when you obtrude impermissible facts.

    Try it. You’ll see. They’ll sit you down with Haji and the blind guy like Kroger at Omega Theta Pi.

  12. Am I correct that Bush v. Gore, 2000, concluded that [a] state legislatures can appoint whatever electors they like but [b] federal courts decide whether procedures dictated by state legislatures have been followed?

    Does it follow that the U.S. Supreme Court is likely, effectively, to usurp and concentrate the authority of all 50 state election commissions into the Court’s own hands, on a strained doctrine of ministeriality? Ominous, if so.

    The whole issue is murky to me. I am aware of the disputed election of 1876, but I do not really understand the relevant precedents in the matter.

    • Replies: @Curle
  13. @The Alarmist

    A long sequence of comments on preparation would stray off topic (to the extent to which I have not already strayed off), yet this note of yours is acknowledged:

    BTW, You’ll never stock enough water, so consider buying a rain barrel and a good water filtering device, like a Katadyn®️… if the tap water is still flowing, it still might not be safe.

    I have the rain barrel but not the filter. Good idea. Appreciated.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  14. @V. K. Ovelund

    Base Camp 10l might be worth looking at.

  15. songbird says:
    @V. K. Ovelund

    David Brin’s scifi novel The Postman was psychologically interesting in that the titular protagonist became a hero because people saw him as a government employee in a post apocalyptic environment, after he donned a postman’s clothes which he found. But the villains were survivalists – survivalists in a post apocalyptic environment (which seems very strange.)

    Brin, as one might guess from the unrelated Sergei of Google fame, was Jewish. It does show a bit in his books, (the last I read had the word “xenophobia” in it) though I think they are still enjoyable, if one keeps that in mind, and filters out some of the small messages.

    • Thanks: V. K. Ovelund
  16. @Not my economy

    Republican poll watchers were physically removed, literally pushed out, from Philly vote locations and election offices.

    The solution to that is to deputize them as Federal agents.  Anyone interfering with them can then be arrested and removed themselves.

    Since Trump has already established this as precedent for halting riots and whatnot, expect it to be in the bag of tricks on election day.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    , @Bill
  17. “If witch hunting is a lucrative and popular pastime, there are no witches worth a damn. If there were witches, witch-hunters would end up hanging upside-down from the tree at the crossroads with their head shrunk to the size of a baseball.”

    The full essay by Moldbug is superb. Some excerpts:

    https://www.unqualified-reservations.org/2013/09/technology-communism-and-brown-scare/

    Brown Scare? Or dare I say… #BrownScare? But what else to name America’s ginormous, never-ending, profoundly insane witch-hunt for fascists under the bed?

    For there’s nothing new here. At the height of the lame, doomed “Red Scare,” the Brown Scare was ten times bigger. You may think it was difficult making a living as a communist screenwriter in 1954. It was a lot easier than being a fascist screenwriter. Or even an anticommunist screenwriter. (Same thing, right?) And as any pathetic last shreds of real opposition shrink and die off, the Scare only grows. That’s how winners play it. That’s just how the permanent revolution rolls.

    The logic of the witch hunter is simple. It has hardly changed since Matthew Hopkins’ day. The first requirement is to invert the reality of power. Power at its most basic level is the power to harm or destroy other human beings. The obvious reality is that witch hunters gang up and destroy witches. Whereas witches are never, ever seen to gang up and destroy witch hunters. By this test alone, we can see that the conspiracy is imaginary (Brown Scare) rather than real (Red Scare).

    Think about it. Obviously, if the witches had any power whatsoever, they wouldn’t waste their time gallivanting around on broomsticks, fellating Satan and cursing cows with sour milk. They’re getting burned right and left, for Christ’s sake! Priorities! No, they’d turn the tables and lay some serious voodoo on the witch-hunters. In a country where anyone who speaks out against the witches is soon found dangling by his heels from an oak at midnight with his head shrunk to the size of a baseball, we won’t see a lot of witch-hunting and we know there’s a serious witch problem. In a country where witch-hunting is a stable and lucrative career, and also an amateur pastime enjoyed by millions of hobbyists on the weekend, we know there are no real witches worth a damn.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Bill
  18. @Mr. Rational

    It’s needed now. Actual voting is already taking place. How can you prove those 99% voted districts in Philly didn’t vote before the monitors were there?

    • Replies: @Oldtradesman
  19. songbird says:

    Are liberals (or a subset of liberals) just people who are more intrinsically susceptible to peer pressure or top-down messaging? I sometimes think so. What is weird to me is how they seem to repeat slogans more.

    Though, they seem to think the same about the other side. I believe that is just their blank-slatism shining through. If they are “causier” (more prone to take up causes), I think it would stand to reason that they are more susceptible to memes – although perhaps only those of a certain stripe.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
  20. SIMP simp says:

    We all are unoriginal. Even in this contrarian crowd we get our unpopular and minority views from other contrarians. What we lack is the crimestop response.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @SFG
  21. 216 says:

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
  22. @songbird

    Are liberals (or a subset of liberals) just people who are more intrinsically susceptible to peer pressure or top-down messaging? I sometimes think so. What is weird to me is how they seem to repeat slogans more.

    Though, they seem to think the same about the other side.

    Yes, isn’t that strange? They do indeed seem to think the same about the other side.

    If I know the estimable @dfordoom, when he arrives in the thread, he may judge them to be right. Meanwhile @SIMP simp observes:

    We all are unoriginal. Even in this contrarian crowd we get our unpopular and minority views from other contrarians.

    To fancy themselves original seems more important to liberals than to the other side, so there is one difference.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    , @songbird
  23. @216

    “What you can’t say,” US campus version

    Do campus speakers still have significant impact? Is anyone listening, anyway?

    I wonder if some of the respondents are merely saying, “Look, I’m just here to earn my radiological technician/criminal justice/whatever credential and it’s costing me a zillion bucks and I have homework to do. Does some pundit from out of town really need an auditorium on campus in which to try to agitate bored students? It’s causing trouble.”

  24. 216 says:

    o/t

    We see the newfound partisanship in allegedly non-partisan institutions.

    It’s a literal repeat of the Biden campaign slogan.

    And taxpayers fund it.

    • Replies: @Nodwink
  25. TG says:

    “Just think what you’re told” is, of course, the safest (and possibly the most rational) thing to do.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
  26. @TomSchmidt

    Trump is monitoring the situation.

  27. It’s the BESS factor. Because Everyone Says So.

    Take the stuff about Iran as the most evil country. Why? BESS. Because everyone says so. Democratic politicians, Republican politicians, Deep state goons, mass media shills, etc.

    Just have everyone say the same thing, and most people believe it. Why? Everyone is saying it. Blah blah blah.

    The chain of command? ‘Experts’ in academia set out the ‘truth’. Media people pick it up. It is taught to elite students. It is spread through news and entertainment and public education to the masses.
    Soon, people who were saying A are now saying B.

  28. @Intelligent Dasein

    Anyone who claims to be quantitatively competent who was ‘wrong’ about corona (i.e., fell for the Doomer nonsense)… is not quantitatively competent, because quantitative competency is not purely a question of technique.

    Given how much is known about the corruption of scientific research – going all the way back to the 1950s – qualitative competency requires skepticism about literally any claim made in science, and particularly in epidemiology (where most evidence is associational).

    In any case, being right (where ‘right’ means a guess at excess deaths that is 2 orders of magnitude closer to reality than the Doomer baseline) didn’t require anything more than grade 10 mathematics.

    Now the real work begins: trying to get people to understand that they have to start executing politicians (and their apparatchiki).

    Hopes should not be high, because most of the herd are morons.

    At the end of the day, it is the policy response to this virus that is the direct cause of the majority of the body-count.

    Forcing entire populations to do things that are pointless is one thing, and is to be expected from the political class.

    Forcing vulnerable sub-populations into circumstances that seem tailored to maximise the impact on that sub-population, is a different thing entirely. That is unforgivable, and there is no punishment short of execution that is satisfactory.

    The fact that the political class (y compris the health bureaucracy) converted retirement homes into COVID death camps should never be forgiven, and is directly responsible for an outright majority of deaths.

    It’s a waste of time being outraged on behalf of billions of dumbfounded dipshits. The fact that it is so easy for observably third-rate individuals to exploit their human livestock, just reinforces that outside of the human cognitive élite, ‘homo sapiens sapiens‘ is a double misnomer.

  29. Anonymous[153] • Disclaimer says:

    Dems will win by finding ballots. They have until the 10th in most states to “count” votes.

    Unless Drumpft has some 9d chess going on to prevent this, he will lose.

  30. jsinton says:

    I lost all my friends because of my “radical” opinions. They all read the Washington Post, so I’m all alone.

    • Replies: @Curle
    , @Truth
    , @Lowe
  31. Paul Graham’s most recent essay touching on similar ideas is the following, in which he envisions a different sort of political compass:
    http://paulgraham.com/conformism.html

    It includes an update to his statement from 2004:

    That may not work this time though, due to the unfortunate fact that the latest wave of intolerance began in universities. It began in the mid 1980s, and by 2000 seemed to have died down, but it has recently flared up again with the arrival of social media. This seems, unfortunately, to have been an own goal by Silicon Valley. Though the people who run Silicon Valley are almost all independent-minded, they’ve handed the aggressively conventional-minded a tool such as they could only have dreamed of.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @SFG
  32. Truth says:

    Odds Are You Just Think What You’re Told

    Yes, Old Sport; he’s talking to you!

  33. @The Alarmist

    There’s nothing alarmist about encouraging people to have access to a replenishable source of potable water. It is the most important ‘item’ of all.

  34. SFG says:
    @songbird

    Wasn’t technology, you had Hollywood, the NYT, etc. giving what they thought were the correct ideas.

    I do wonder why they backed off somewhat in the mid-1990s. I read somewhere it was Bill Clinton’s ‘Sister Souljah moment’–he realized he had to tack right culturally to keep the Democrats in the running. I would guess now the brainwashing in the schools has driven the country left so they no longer have to worry about that, but there’s more to it than that, I’m sure.

    • Replies: @songbird
  35. SFG says:
    @SIMP simp

    You can make up your own mind, you just never find a group you agree with on everything. I believe in HBD, but not Qanon or Holocaust denial, and I believe in most of the redpill mindset but also climate change and mask-wearing for coronavirus.

    • Replies: @Curle
  36. SFG says:
    @nobodyofnowhere

    Interesting. I think I’m probably passively independent-minded–I don’t have the resources to survive on my own, but I don’t believe in the orthodoxy and don’t act to help anyone else enforce it.

  37. Curle says:
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Ministeriality?? What have you been reading?

    There are ministerial functions, but not clear how you imagine this relates to SCOTUS or the election.

  38. Curle says:
    @SFG

    “or Holocaust denial”. Agree with you but I refer to it as the western Holodomor.

  39. Curle says:
    @jsinton

    There’s a reason God invented dogs.

  40. Nodwink says:
    @216

    The UN might not be able to do much about Azerbaijan & Armenia, but they can call out dudes and their micro-aggressions:

    • Replies: @songbird
  41. dfordoom says: • Website
    @V. K. Ovelund

    We all are unoriginal. Even in this contrarian crowd we get our unpopular and minority views from other contrarians.

    To fancy themselves original seems more important to liberals than to the other side, so there is one difference.

    That was once important to liberals. Not any more. What is important to liberals today is conformity. That’s partly because today’s liberals aren’t really liberals.

    What is important to people on the far right is to disagree with liberals, and to feel persecuted. The far right is all about wallowing in the paranoia. They believe that if they hold views that normal people consider bizarre and childish and stupid and dangerous that somehow means those views must be right.

    What is important to mainstream conservatives today is to believe whatever is convenient. They’re just whores. A mainstream conservative will be whatever kind of girl you want them to be, if it makes the client happy.

    Yes, I’m in a cynical mood today.

  42. PhilK says:

    Odds Are You Just Think What You’re Told

    And told and told and told and told and told and told and told and told and told and told and told and told. And then told again, just in case you forgot.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Thanks: V. K. Ovelund
  43. songbird says:
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Liberals have a rather strange dichotomy.

    On the one hand, they seem more likely to do something like Hands Across America, or to sway together at concerts – they have this eerie, hive-like quality, of wanting to physically connect together in crowds.

    But, on the other hand, some have these strange, individual affectations which seem to separate them from others, like dying their hair neon colors. Or having dreadlocks or a mohawk. Or a bunch of tattoos. And I think one could predict this sort of thing, from the way they virtue signal. It is just another type of signaling, just as flowers or male birds have bright colors. Probably it is sexual – showing that they are r-selected. (Perhaps it is only certain types.)

    • Thanks: V. K. Ovelund
  44. songbird says:
    @Nodwink

    I’m not sure the UN can be reformed or if it is worth saving, but a preliminary attempt might be to try to ban all woke women. (For instance, only wives or mothers allowed)

  45. songbird says:
    @SFG

    Technology allowed for better distribution. Cable and home video were used to circumvent the censors of TV. CDs to circumvent the radio. It created pressures for censored mediums to compete with uncensored ones.

    TV itself allowed risks to be amortized. You could put some risky idea into one, cheap to produce episode, when the show already had an audience. TV formed part of the impetus to do away with Hays Code. Movies made without the code, then aired on TV, pushing the boundaries more.

  46. Bill says:
    @Mr. Rational

    Anyone defying a court order can also be arrested and removed. But, yeah, filling out another form is a great idea.

  47. Bill says:
    @TomSchmidt

    It’s interesting to contrast these rather sensible sentiments with his views that Jews are not powerful and that Palestinians are.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  48. @Bill

    I don’t recall that sentiment from Moldbug. Do you have a link? I never read the full corpus.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  49. Bill says:

    I assume you mean the sentiment that Palestinians are powerful. Claiming that Jews are not (and that it’s all the Puritans) is pretty much Moldbug’s raison d’etre. Here is one example:

    https://www.unqualified-reservations.org/2009/05/preston-brooks-palestine-lobby-and/

    • Replies: @anon
    , @TomSchmidt
  50. anon[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill

    Claiming that Jews are not (and that it’s all the Puritans) is pretty much (((Moldbug’s))) * raison d’etre.

    * (((Curtis Yarvin))) in real life. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. Except that Moldbuggery tends to lead unthinking people to ignore what’s literally around them in favor of blaming bad stuff on people who died 250 – 300 years ago.

  51. @TomSchmidt

    As wordy as Moldbug is, I wouldn’t expect anyone to have read his full corpus.  I swear, he makes Russians look terse.

  52. Lowe says:
    @jsinton

    Maybe you lost your friends because you did not recognize their limitations.

    Most people are emotionally unable to read or contemplate nonconformist thought, like anything on Unz for example. It is too painful for them.

    People can’t be talked out of their God-given limitations. If they’re genuinely your friends then you won’t try.

  53. @Bill

    Thanks. Worth the read,but I don’t buy his point. It is correct to say thatPalestinian activism must be newer than Jewish nationalism expressed as Zionism. But his projection oof Israel surrendering land to Palestinians is simply not what we see on the ground, at least today.

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