The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersAudacious Epigone Blog
More Than Merely Sensory Deprivation
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Commentary on Covid from a hawk, a dove, and a retired epidemiologist. Trusted Talha:

I do keep up with my friends that are doctors, many of them ER doctors. These are guys I have known longer than I have been married, I would trust them with my children’s lives – at least one of them has been my kids’ pediatrician before. They are mostly in So Cal where things are particularly bad.

A few things they have told me and from what I have heard directly from relatives and friends…

1. One of them usually fills out 1 or 2 death certificates a month – he is on pace to fill out around 20 this month.
2. One of them said that the hospital he works at was not built to deliver the level of oxygen that they are providing to their patients. They are making sure oxygen trucks are on stand by in case the system is tasked beyond the breaking point.
3. My sister in law’s aunt died last week of Covid.
4. That week they held 7 separate funeral prayers (outside) on just one day (most from Covid) – I confirmed this with my mother – I’ve never heard of anything like this, even if you assume all deaths are being attributed falsely to Covid.
5. In my local mosque in Chicago-area, I hear of requests for prayers for deaths due to Covid on a near-weekly basis. It’s not as bad as So Cal, but there is an uptick in deaths for sure (again, whether they are truly due to Covid or are just being attributed).
6. A brother who is a neurologist that I have known since university and who I consulted about my own father when he was in a unresponsive state after cardiac arrest stated:
“Even for my field as a Neurologist, I have never consulted on as many COVID patients for Coma/Brain Death prognosis in one week as for influenza in the last >10 years.”
7. Another brother said that it’s like a war zone with patients laying out in the hallways, like something out of the movies.

Do with the above info what you will.

I would suggest people get their information from people they know and trust in the medical field; this issue is way too politicized at this point to rely on media sources.

Intriguing Intelligent Dasein:

I am taken ill with it right now. I caught it from a coworker and the rest of my family caught it from me. So this week I am home sick, and caring for the sick.

I now understand why people fear this thing. It’s not that it’s particularly dangerous, because it isn’t. Of all the members of my family, I have gotten much more ill than anyone, and yet I’ve had plenty of colds and flus throughout my life that made me quite a bit more miserable than this has. The experience all in all has been rather mild. I never even developed a fever, but I do have recurring night sweats that still continue even now, 8 days after my symptoms started. I have a cough, my lungs are wheezing a little bit, and I get short of breath when I walk up a flight of stairs. Then there was also the lost sense of smell, but that’s starting to return now for me.

The problem is that the range of symptoms is broad and unusual. I have joint and muscle aches throughout my body and I’ve lost a lot of sensation in my legs. Indeed, I would characterize general presentation of Covid-19 as being a sort of “numbness” that affects multiple tissues, organs, and systems according to their specific nature.

For one thing, the lost sense of smell is more than merely a sensory deprivation. When I was in the thick of the disease, in order to test myself, I opened up a bottle of white vinegar I use for cleaning the kitchen, stuck my nose directly in the spout, and inhaled deeply and repeatedly—and felt nothing. I wasn’t just that I couldn’t smell the vinegar, but I couldn’t feel it either. The chemical astringency of the acetic acid is a different phenomenon from its aroma and, being a more direct physical action, is not subject to the same epistemological doubts arising from the possibility of hallucination, fatigue or other aberrant states of mind attendant upon a bout of illness. This leads me to conclude that my nose had gone completely numb. Since the coronavirus takes up its primary locus of infection in the nasal mucosa, this is where its characteristic numbness is experienced most frequently and severely. The numbness I have in my legs is a more distal instantiation of the same tendency. I suspect that if the “numbness” grows to encompass the lungs, this is when people lose the ability to breathe on their own and either require ventilation or die. If the disease ever reaches that stage, death is quite likely and there isn’t much that any medical science can do about it.

This is why people fear it, other than the media scaremongering of course. The disease manifests itself in such a way that death can be brought about simply by an increase in the degree, not a change in kind, of the symptoms. To experience it at all is to taste the incipient death behind it. The fact that this only happens in a vanishingly small proportion of cases avails little to the imagination of so hysterical an age as ours. The contemporary world is now getting acquainted with a disease that, to a very minor and muted degree, approximates the threat of latent lethality that obtained when cities routinely had to endure outbreaks of tuberculosis, small pox, cholera, and so forth.

Salubrious Jus’ Sayin’…:

The strain on medical facilities is no worse now than it has been in past years of heavy flu outbreaks. The difference is that the current reporting is based solely on overcrowded ERs and ICUs. Other parts of many hospitals are very much under-utilized right now. I’ve determined that to be the case in at least one instance by a personal visit to my local hospital, an affiliate of the Harvard University Medical School. On-line videos of bored nurses and other hospital staff performing impromptu conga lines and other selfie videos on YouTube suggests that this a far from unique situation.

The most rational policy for freeing up hospital ICU and ER beds and dealing with this pandemic would be to set up separate ad hoc medical facilities for dealing with all persons who present with Covid-19 symptoms and quarantining such persons in these facilities. This has been the usual extreme measure for dealing with pandemics like the current one. It worked well in the past, it could have worked well in 2020, and it could still work well if given a chance. Unfortunately our current political, public health, medical, and pharmaceutical establishments are too panicked and/or incompetent, and/or grasping for power and wealth to do the right thing.

Looking at reports of deaths by cause right now, it seems like flu deaths are way down from their usual numbers. This is unlikely. It’s more likely that these missing flu deaths have been improperly reported as due to Covid-19.

There are excess deaths right now. A lot of these are due to Covid-19. Many others are deaths caused by the Rona Panic lockdowns, e.g. suicides, drug ODs, deaths caused by deferred or delayed medical treatment. Making allowances for these deaths and flu deaths mis-coded as being the result of Covid-19, it seems that the numbers of excess deaths, which are likely due to Covid-19, are about the same order of magnitude as the deaths from the Hong Kong Flu, back during the 1968 Hong Kong Flu pandemic.

It’s worth remembering that this country and the world got through that pandemic just fine without any panic or excessive restrictions on individual rights and liberties.

If direct payments to American citizens are good, then it is incumbent upon our Republican incumbents to articulate why prioritizing other legislative spending is even better. That is, after all, what they signaled by refusing to sign onto the $2,000 proto-UBI publicly supported by both Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump. They made no coherent attempt to articulate such a thing, of course. And they never will because their position is rhetorically and philosophically untenable. Direct transfer payments are desirable, but only as long as they are limited to $600 once every nine months? C’mon, man!

No one is buying it, including nebulafox:

If you want to argue that giving away 2,000 dollars per head on fiscal grounds is a bad idea, go ahead and do so. But don’t expect people to take your arguments with a straight face if you can simultaneously still find the money to go and drone wretched Pashtun shepherds or educate Mirpuris on the finer points of 3rd wave feminism. Whether it is part of the same bill or not is irrelevant. The optics do the talking: namely, that the American government will prioritize anything over its own citizens, Democrats and Republicans alike.

Authorities in the United States are not willing to let increasing amounts of Americans work. They also won’t give aid. This won’t end well.

The progressive wing of the Democrat party showed the country it is housebroken by returning Nancy Pelosi to the speakership despite it guaranteeing Medicare-for-all is tabled for at least another two years. Sure, these progressives ran on Medicare-for-all, but now isn’t the time. Maybe it will be time when they can get public support up to 90%. But just 70% support? Nope, definitely not the time!

The problems that got Donald Trump elected are all worse than they were four years ago. The establishment hasn’t spent a day since then reflecting on why the Republican electorate gave them the middle finger by nominating him and then why the American public gave them the middle finger by electing him. This last minute bid to impeach him a second time is an absurd illustration of that. They have no idea what created a president Trump, let alone any clue how to address it. All they can do is shoot the messenger again and again and again. When the corpse is dragged away next week, then what?

 
• Category: Culture/Society, Ideology • Tags: COTW 
Hide 69 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Another brother said that it’s like a war zone with patients laying out in the hallways, like something out of the movies.

    If things were this bad you can be assured that the ZOG outlets would be blaring this out 24/7. The blunt reality is that in terms of pandemics this is the lamest pandemic of all time. Don’t get me wrong, I would certainly support tens of millions Americans dying from a very deadly disease, but this is not it.

    • Replies: @Sollipsist
    @neutral

    Tens of millions is a bit harsh. There's starting to be a marginal probability that someone actually worthwhile is among that number.

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @neutral

    Comments like this increase my feelings of philosemitism. Is that the intention?

  2. The most rational policy for freeing up hospital ICU and ER beds and dealing with this pandemic would be to set up separate ad hoc medical facilities for dealing with all persons who present with Covid-19 symptoms and quarantining such persons in these facilities.

    Japan has done something like this. Some hospitals are designated for dealing with COVID. The problem then is that panic sets in when the designated facilities start filling up.

    I continue to contend that the real solution is for at-risk populations to protect themselves (close nursing homes to visitors, etc) and for everyone else to focus on stopping the disease from progressing to the severe stage rather than locking down in an attempt to stop the spread of the disease altogether. In addition to some supplements like Vit D, there are underutilized resources like monoclonal antibodies. Good summary in the following video.

    As a preventive measure, weight loss and improving symptoms of metabolic syndrome are probably people’s best bet. We are now over 3/4 of a year into the pandemic. What can be achieved in that time? Complete reversal of primary risk. That’s what. The following example took only 5 months. Could you stop eating shit and exercise every day for 5 months to reverse your primary risk of dying in a pandemic?
    https://nypost.com/2019/04/16/dad-loses-92-pounds-after-noticing-he-cant-keep-up-with-kids/

    • Replies: @Wyatt
    @Chrisnonymous


    As a preventive measure, weight loss and improving symptoms of metabolic syndrome are probably people’s best bet.
     
    Well, at the very least the pandemic will wind down as the dems strangle the economy and people start starving. It's still the cheapest form of weight loss out there.
  3. OT:

    Hey Audacious, here’s some NAEP Math-derived 8th grade IQ scores that I think you haven’t covered already, from 2019 unless otherwise stated:

    78 Guam(2000)
    75 Virgin Islands(1992)
    71 Puerto Rico
    59 American Samoa(2000) (Don’t ask me how)

    Ethnic scores on a national level:
    90 Mexican, Mexican American or Chicano
    88 Puerto Ricans
    88 Cubans

    98 Northeast (Census)
    97 Midwest (Census)
    95 South (Census)
    94 West (Census)

    94 City, large
    93 City, midsize
    96 City, small
    98 Suburb, large
    97 Suburb, mid-size
    97 Suburb, small
    95 Town, fringe
    93 Town, distant
    93 Town, remote
    97 Rural, fringe
    95 Rural, distant
    94 Rural, remote

    98 Charlotte
    96 San Diego
    96 Austin
    95 Guilford County (NC)
    95 Boston
    93 Hillsborough County (FL)
    93 Miami-Dade
    93 Chicago
    93 Denver
    93 Duval County (FL)
    93 Houston
    92 Jefferson County (KY)
    92 New York City
    92 Clark County (NV)
    90 District of Columbia (DCPS)
    90 Atlanta
    90 Albuquerque
    89 Fort Worth (TX)
    89 Shelby County (TN)
    88 Dallas
    87 Los Angeles
    85 Philadelphia
    84 Baltimore City
    84 Fresno
    84 Cleveland
    83 Milwaukee
    80 Detroit

    (Remember, the smarter kids are in the suburbs, not the big cities.)

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @neutral
    @Some Guy


    59 American Samoa(2000) (Don’t ask me how)
     
    That has to be a mistake, when you start approaching those numbers you cannot have any functioning society beyond a feral existence.
    , @Realist
    @Some Guy


    (Remember, the smarter kids are in the suburbs, not the big cities.)
     
    Not only kids but also adults...only an idiot would live in a large city.
    , @Almost Missouri
    @Some Guy

    Most of those city and regional scores look like they are mostly just proxies for race.

    Replies: @Some Guy

    , @anonymous
    @Some Guy

    The average IQ of 13 year olds in the United States is about 96? That's amazing considering the under 15 population is 50% white.

    Replies: @Some Guy

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @Some Guy

    NAEP doesn't cover private schools though, and there are more of those in the cities than in the burbs or the sticks.

  4. @Some Guy
    OT:

    Hey Audacious, here's some NAEP Math-derived 8th grade IQ scores that I think you haven't covered already, from 2019 unless otherwise stated:

    78 Guam(2000)
    75 Virgin Islands(1992)
    71 Puerto Rico
    59 American Samoa(2000) (Don't ask me how)

    Ethnic scores on a national level:
    90 Mexican, Mexican American or Chicano
    88 Puerto Ricans
    88 Cubans

    98 Northeast (Census)
    97 Midwest (Census)
    95 South (Census)
    94 West (Census)

    94 City, large
    93 City, midsize
    96 City, small
    98 Suburb, large
    97 Suburb, mid-size
    97 Suburb, small
    95 Town, fringe
    93 Town, distant
    93 Town, remote
    97 Rural, fringe
    95 Rural, distant
    94 Rural, remote

    98 Charlotte
    96 San Diego
    96 Austin
    95 Guilford County (NC)
    95 Boston
    93 Hillsborough County (FL)
    93 Miami-Dade
    93 Chicago
    93 Denver
    93 Duval County (FL)
    93 Houston
    92 Jefferson County (KY)
    92 New York City
    92 Clark County (NV)
    90 District of Columbia (DCPS)
    90 Atlanta
    90 Albuquerque
    89 Fort Worth (TX)
    89 Shelby County (TN)
    88 Dallas
    87 Los Angeles
    85 Philadelphia
    84 Baltimore City
    84 Fresno
    84 Cleveland
    83 Milwaukee
    80 Detroit

    (Remember, the smarter kids are in the suburbs, not the big cities.)

    Replies: @neutral, @Realist, @Almost Missouri, @anonymous, @Audacious Epigone

    59 American Samoa(2000) (Don’t ask me how)

    That has to be a mistake, when you start approaching those numbers you cannot have any functioning society beyond a feral existence.

  5. When the corpse is dragged away next week, then what?

    Then they come for sympathizers and fellow travelers. Hawley? Cruz? AE?

    It’s called hunting down, flushing and killing off stragglers.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @iffen

    As the dollar drops, food and energy prices increase, and tens of millions of Americans face evictions in the next few months, will the Senate dog and pony show to remove an already removed Trump from office be enough to keep the people settled?

    Replies: @iffen

  6. The progressive wing of the Democrat party showed the country it is housebroken by returning Nancy Pelosi to the speakership despite it guaranteeing Medicare-for-all is tabled for at least another two years.

    Trotsky made it possible for Stalin to come to power by providing him with concentration camps, forced labour, and the police-state apparatus, but having made Stalin, it became time to eliminate Trotsky. The Squad has no doubt had their futures exlained to them.

    • Replies: @Wyatt
    @The Alarmist

    I hope the Mexicans get a hold of them. If the Cartels are any indication, they're in for a bad time ^^

    , @nebulafox
    @The Alarmist

    Stalin was a far better politician and organizer than his rivals, Trotsky included, and the kind of "party man" on the rise in the 1920s was a lot more likely to identify on a personal level with the earthy, self-made son of liberated serfs over the pompous Jewish intellectual mainly beloved by foreign bien-pensants.

  7. Rasmussen – Americans feel misled about coronavirus

    Nearly 50% of U.S. voters believe public health officials have offered misleading information on the coronavirus pandemic over the last year, according to a new Just the News Daily Poll with Scott Rasmussen.

    Forty-eight percent of respondents said that public health leaders have “misrepresented the data” on the coronavirus since the pandemic began in early 2020. Just 34% said health officials have “reported the true facts” on the issue. The remaining 18% were unsure one way or the other.

    Interesting how polls in general in lockdown-crazy Western Europe have 75-80% allegedly supporting the lockdowns … but yet only half the populations eager to get the vaccine

    It’s almost as, if it is a question of virtue signalling for what seems destined to happen anyway, people are on board … but if it’s a question of injecting some foreign substance into your body, after which a number of people are dead, some deeper instinct kicks in, and people say No

    Recent chart showing 11 dead and 1000 plus hospitalisations after vaccine injection, from the CDC Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @brabantian

    In reality, many people are enjoying the lockdowns. They don't have to go to work. I am in the same situation. My work has been reduced from 8+ hours 6 days a week to about 6 hours 3-4 days a week. I'm loving it for now, but of course, I know there is a price to pay in the future. Also, if my employer goes under, I'm fucked. But there are probably many people, especially in western Europe, who feel like they are simply living the European welfare state lifestyle on steroids. This is very dangerous for society as it's unsustainable and is one of the main reasons the lockdowns need to end.

    , @Wielgus
    @brabantian

    I would take the polls with more than a grain of salt, considering they can often be massaged to push a certain policy and outright lying is also possible. Moreover, they have not been especially accurate about election results in recent years.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

  8. All the comments above are good comments. Unz.com is being blocked today on my government U.S. Department of Defense computer under the category “Hate and Racism”. I’m at home and switched from my government laptop to my personal laptop to get here. The bloggers at this website like Audacious Epigone, Anatoly Karlin and Steve Sailer along with most of the articles here are really pretty mild compared to some of the more extreme far right websites that were blocked a long time ago. When those websites were banned I noticed there was a double standard. Websites advocating killing blacks and Jews were banned but communist websites advocating kill all the capitalists weren’t banned. Advocating killing any members of a group is wrong.

    The left has been emboldened but will eventually engage in overreach and spin out of control. The modern left goes back to the radical egalitarianism of the French Revolution. That ended badly, unlike the American Revolution which was based on a belief in freedom and individual rights. Jefferson thought that the truth would always win in the end if you have freedom of speech and press. Anyone pressing for censorship is aware the truth is not on their side and they can’t win in a free and open debate.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @Mark G.

    Yes, this country is nearing the bottom of its shit slide to hell.

    Replies: @anon

    , @V. Hickel
    @Mark G.

    you are insane going on this website on a USG computer

  9. @brabantian
    Rasmussen - Americans feel misled about coronavirus

    Nearly 50% of U.S. voters believe public health officials have offered misleading information on the coronavirus pandemic over the last year, according to a new Just the News Daily Poll with Scott Rasmussen.

    Forty-eight percent of respondents said that public health leaders have "misrepresented the data" on the coronavirus since the pandemic began in early 2020. Just 34% said health officials have "reported the true facts" on the issue. The remaining 18% were unsure one way or the other.

     

    Interesting how polls in general in lockdown-crazy Western Europe have 75-80% allegedly supporting the lockdowns ... but yet only half the populations eager to get the vaccine

    It's almost as, if it is a question of virtue signalling for what seems destined to happen anyway, people are on board ... but if it's a question of injecting some foreign substance into your body, after which a number of people are dead, some deeper instinct kicks in, and people say No

    Recent chart showing 11 dead and 1000 plus hospitalisations after vaccine injection, from the CDC Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)
    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-7c2Uic3K988/X_lWF3m0CNI/AAAAAAAA0eg/Wb9ET6w5LhEXKZcJkUIfyzCZpf0hQwHYACLcBGAsYHQ/w378-h673/vaccination%2Bdeath%2Bcorona.jpg

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Wielgus

    In reality, many people are enjoying the lockdowns. They don’t have to go to work. I am in the same situation. My work has been reduced from 8+ hours 6 days a week to about 6 hours 3-4 days a week. I’m loving it for now, but of course, I know there is a price to pay in the future. Also, if my employer goes under, I’m fucked. But there are probably many people, especially in western Europe, who feel like they are simply living the European welfare state lifestyle on steroids. This is very dangerous for society as it’s unsustainable and is one of the main reasons the lockdowns need to end.

    • Agree: Mark G.
  10. When the corpse is dragged away next week, then what?

    I do not know.

    The unwillingness or inability of most of our congressmen to grasp what is agitating middle America is phenomenal. Observe that they can think of no response to the Capitol Hill Riot other than to cry, “Terrorists!”

    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless, was provoked by no one but the congressmen themselves.

    It makes me wonder: is it normal for adults to be as dense as our congressmen seem to be? Am I unwittingly that dense, too?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It makes me wonder: is it normal for adults to be as dense as our congressmen seem to be? Am I unwittingly that dense, too?
     
    Think of the people in the Capitol in The Hunger Games< ... that is DC. Flyover country would be District 13.

    This is uncanny, no?


    https://youtu.be/VUdVIQzNezU?t=1m02s

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    , @Intelligent Dasein
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless,
     
    It wasn't exactly spontaneous. Trump did instigate the thing. He staged a Bay of Pigs rally and left his supporters to twist in the wind.

    It does prove one thing, though: Trump always had a callous disregard for anyone who could have functioned in the capacity of a competent alternative elite who might have actually designed and implemented a realistic nationalist agenda. In the 4 years he had to work with, Trump did not do anything at all to find such people or to place them in positions where they would have the respect, authority, power, and freedom to do what needed to be done. As a result, when he staged his desperate, 11th-hour call for aid, there was no one left to show up but Buffalo Brains and The Standito. He has alienated everyone else.

    Trump missed a chance at greatness that comes to perhaps one man in a century. He could have been one of the most transformative figures is American history. He could have given a dying nation a new lease on life and been a champion to millions of ordinary Americans who had been thrown on the trash heap of history. Instead, all he did was suck up to the very people who hate him and hate the voters who supported him.

    Trump got what was coming to him in all this.

    If I were you, I would not continue to support, lionize, or otherwise endorse the people who broke into the Capitol. This whole thing was ridiculous and embarrassing.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Chrisnonymous

    , @Philip Owen
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Brexit has revealed British politicians on all sides to be stunningly under informed and devoid of the ability to make logical projections. Not so much the EU civil servants, in the main their opposite numbers in negotiation.

    , @usNthem
    @V. K. Ovelund

    No you’re not. However, not only are they dense (many evil) they are cowards.

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Congressional constituents are NPCs to the congress people. They aren't supposed to go off script like that.

  11. anon[299] • Disclaimer says:

    Then what’s a rhetorical question, right? Then the CIA regime does what it has always done since inception: divert resources from protective capacity to repressive capacity.

    To stop this policy of retrograde development we will have to do to the USA what we did to the USSR – knock it over, rip it apart, wreck its defense industrial base.

  12. @V. K. Ovelund

    When the corpse is dragged away next week, then what?
     
    I do not know.

    The unwillingness or inability of most of our congressmen to grasp what is agitating middle America is phenomenal. Observe that they can think of no response to the Capitol Hill Riot other than to cry, "Terrorists!"

    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless, was provoked by no one but the congressmen themselves.

    It makes me wonder: is it normal for adults to be as dense as our congressmen seem to be? Am I unwittingly that dense, too?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Intelligent Dasein, @Philip Owen, @usNthem, @Audacious Epigone

    It makes me wonder: is it normal for adults to be as dense as our congressmen seem to be? Am I unwittingly that dense, too?

    Think of the people in the Capitol in The Hunger Games< … that is DC. Flyover country would be District 13.

    This is uncanny, no?

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @The Alarmist

    The Hunger Games is a perfect allegory for one aspect of the current situation of Europe and European settled countries, an isolated and privileged elite lording it over masses of struggling ordinary people, Clinton's deplorables. I was surprised that those controlling the country's publishing industry ever printed it and even more surprised that Hollywood's establishment ever made the movie series. They must be even blinder and greedier than seemed evident. But I was most surprised that young people didn't respond more with a realization of who's really screwing them over these days. Similar points can be made about a much subtler movie allegory, "The Cabin in the Woods".

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

  13. @The Alarmist

    The progressive wing of the Democrat party showed the country it is housebroken by returning Nancy Pelosi to the speakership despite it guaranteeing Medicare-for-all is tabled for at least another two years.
     
    Trotsky made it possible for Stalin to come to power by providing him with concentration camps, forced labour, and the police-state apparatus, but having made Stalin, it became time to eliminate Trotsky. The Squad has no doubt had their futures exlained to them.

    Replies: @Wyatt, @nebulafox

    I hope the Mexicans get a hold of them. If the Cartels are any indication, they’re in for a bad time ^^

  14. @Some Guy
    OT:

    Hey Audacious, here's some NAEP Math-derived 8th grade IQ scores that I think you haven't covered already, from 2019 unless otherwise stated:

    78 Guam(2000)
    75 Virgin Islands(1992)
    71 Puerto Rico
    59 American Samoa(2000) (Don't ask me how)

    Ethnic scores on a national level:
    90 Mexican, Mexican American or Chicano
    88 Puerto Ricans
    88 Cubans

    98 Northeast (Census)
    97 Midwest (Census)
    95 South (Census)
    94 West (Census)

    94 City, large
    93 City, midsize
    96 City, small
    98 Suburb, large
    97 Suburb, mid-size
    97 Suburb, small
    95 Town, fringe
    93 Town, distant
    93 Town, remote
    97 Rural, fringe
    95 Rural, distant
    94 Rural, remote

    98 Charlotte
    96 San Diego
    96 Austin
    95 Guilford County (NC)
    95 Boston
    93 Hillsborough County (FL)
    93 Miami-Dade
    93 Chicago
    93 Denver
    93 Duval County (FL)
    93 Houston
    92 Jefferson County (KY)
    92 New York City
    92 Clark County (NV)
    90 District of Columbia (DCPS)
    90 Atlanta
    90 Albuquerque
    89 Fort Worth (TX)
    89 Shelby County (TN)
    88 Dallas
    87 Los Angeles
    85 Philadelphia
    84 Baltimore City
    84 Fresno
    84 Cleveland
    83 Milwaukee
    80 Detroit

    (Remember, the smarter kids are in the suburbs, not the big cities.)

    Replies: @neutral, @Realist, @Almost Missouri, @anonymous, @Audacious Epigone

    (Remember, the smarter kids are in the suburbs, not the big cities.)

    Not only kids but also adults…only an idiot would live in a large city.

  15. @V. K. Ovelund

    When the corpse is dragged away next week, then what?
     
    I do not know.

    The unwillingness or inability of most of our congressmen to grasp what is agitating middle America is phenomenal. Observe that they can think of no response to the Capitol Hill Riot other than to cry, "Terrorists!"

    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless, was provoked by no one but the congressmen themselves.

    It makes me wonder: is it normal for adults to be as dense as our congressmen seem to be? Am I unwittingly that dense, too?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Intelligent Dasein, @Philip Owen, @usNthem, @Audacious Epigone

    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless,

    It wasn’t exactly spontaneous. Trump did instigate the thing. He staged a Bay of Pigs rally and left his supporters to twist in the wind.

    It does prove one thing, though: Trump always had a callous disregard for anyone who could have functioned in the capacity of a competent alternative elite who might have actually designed and implemented a realistic nationalist agenda. In the 4 years he had to work with, Trump did not do anything at all to find such people or to place them in positions where they would have the respect, authority, power, and freedom to do what needed to be done. As a result, when he staged his desperate, 11th-hour call for aid, there was no one left to show up but Buffalo Brains and The Standito. He has alienated everyone else.

    Trump missed a chance at greatness that comes to perhaps one man in a century. He could have been one of the most transformative figures is American history. He could have given a dying nation a new lease on life and been a champion to millions of ordinary Americans who had been thrown on the trash heap of history. Instead, all he did was suck up to the very people who hate him and hate the voters who supported him.

    Trump got what was coming to him in all this.

    If I were you, I would not continue to support, lionize, or otherwise endorse the people who broke into the Capitol. This whole thing was ridiculous and embarrassing.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Intelligent Dasein


    If I were you, I would not continue to support, lionize, or otherwise endorse the people who broke into the Capitol. This whole thing was ridiculous and embarrassing.
     
    St. Peter denied Jesus ere the cock crew thrice and Peter was a better man than I, but I will not now deny the patriot heroes that stormed Capitol Hill. Those patriot heroes proved their loyalty to me, to my family, to all my kin, and to the authentic American nation Jan. 6.

    Great deeds of great hearts will not be caviled or quibbled by me. I have neither the honor nor the rashness nor the courage to do what they have done, but at least I will not now turn my back.

    https://vdare.com/public_upload/publication/featured_image/53774/VDARE-brimelow-dc.jpg

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    , @nebulafox
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Seriously, what is more difficult? Admitting you've been conned or spending 5 years in jail on behalf of a con man?

    My greater concern right now is the elite response to 1/6, which is looking more scary and dystopian by the day: pretty much everybody responsible for American catastrophes in the Middle East is back in the saddle for this one. But I have zero sympathy for those idiots. When has Donald Trump displayed any leadership worthy of sacrifice in the last four years?

    Replies: @Talha, @Dumbo

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Intelligent Dasein


    It wasn’t exactly spontaneous. Trump did instigate the thing.
     
    I'm not supportive of the vandalism and assaults that occurred, nor do I like Trump much. But he did not instigate the rioting any more than he is responsible for the rise of Qanon. That is not fair. VKO is correct--the rioting is a response to the Congress itself as well as other elites like the judicial system and tech companies.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

  16. @Mark G.
    All the comments above are good comments. Unz.com is being blocked today on my government U.S. Department of Defense computer under the category "Hate and Racism". I'm at home and switched from my government laptop to my personal laptop to get here. The bloggers at this website like Audacious Epigone, Anatoly Karlin and Steve Sailer along with most of the articles here are really pretty mild compared to some of the more extreme far right websites that were blocked a long time ago. When those websites were banned I noticed there was a double standard. Websites advocating killing blacks and Jews were banned but communist websites advocating kill all the capitalists weren't banned. Advocating killing any members of a group is wrong.

    The left has been emboldened but will eventually engage in overreach and spin out of control. The modern left goes back to the radical egalitarianism of the French Revolution. That ended badly, unlike the American Revolution which was based on a belief in freedom and individual rights. Jefferson thought that the truth would always win in the end if you have freedom of speech and press. Anyone pressing for censorship is aware the truth is not on their side and they can't win in a free and open debate.

    Replies: @Realist, @V. Hickel

    Yes, this country is nearing the bottom of its shit slide to hell.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Realist


    Yes, this country is nearing the bottom of its shit slide to hell.


    I hope you are correct, but it seems doubtful. There is a lot of ruin in a country, and the ruination may only be getting started.

    For example, the DHS / FAA no-fly list being expanded as part of a larger Social Credit system, emulating China. Credit. Housing. ISP's. The list goes on.

    Replies: @Realist

  17. @Chrisnonymous

    The most rational policy for freeing up hospital ICU and ER beds and dealing with this pandemic would be to set up separate ad hoc medical facilities for dealing with all persons who present with Covid-19 symptoms and quarantining such persons in these facilities.
     
    Japan has done something like this. Some hospitals are designated for dealing with COVID. The problem then is that panic sets in when the designated facilities start filling up.

    I continue to contend that the real solution is for at-risk populations to protect themselves (close nursing homes to visitors, etc) and for everyone else to focus on stopping the disease from progressing to the severe stage rather than locking down in an attempt to stop the spread of the disease altogether. In addition to some supplements like Vit D, there are underutilized resources like monoclonal antibodies. Good summary in the following video.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vN30emwcNS4

    As a preventive measure, weight loss and improving symptoms of metabolic syndrome are probably people's best bet. We are now over 3/4 of a year into the pandemic. What can be achieved in that time? Complete reversal of primary risk. That's what. The following example took only 5 months. Could you stop eating shit and exercise every day for 5 months to reverse your primary risk of dying in a pandemic?
    https://nypost.com/2019/04/16/dad-loses-92-pounds-after-noticing-he-cant-keep-up-with-kids/

    Replies: @Wyatt

    As a preventive measure, weight loss and improving symptoms of metabolic syndrome are probably people’s best bet.

    Well, at the very least the pandemic will wind down as the dems strangle the economy and people start starving. It’s still the cheapest form of weight loss out there.

  18. @The Alarmist

    The progressive wing of the Democrat party showed the country it is housebroken by returning Nancy Pelosi to the speakership despite it guaranteeing Medicare-for-all is tabled for at least another two years.
     
    Trotsky made it possible for Stalin to come to power by providing him with concentration camps, forced labour, and the police-state apparatus, but having made Stalin, it became time to eliminate Trotsky. The Squad has no doubt had their futures exlained to them.

    Replies: @Wyatt, @nebulafox

    Stalin was a far better politician and organizer than his rivals, Trotsky included, and the kind of “party man” on the rise in the 1920s was a lot more likely to identify on a personal level with the earthy, self-made son of liberated serfs over the pompous Jewish intellectual mainly beloved by foreign bien-pensants.

  19. @Intelligent Dasein
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless,
     
    It wasn't exactly spontaneous. Trump did instigate the thing. He staged a Bay of Pigs rally and left his supporters to twist in the wind.

    It does prove one thing, though: Trump always had a callous disregard for anyone who could have functioned in the capacity of a competent alternative elite who might have actually designed and implemented a realistic nationalist agenda. In the 4 years he had to work with, Trump did not do anything at all to find such people or to place them in positions where they would have the respect, authority, power, and freedom to do what needed to be done. As a result, when he staged his desperate, 11th-hour call for aid, there was no one left to show up but Buffalo Brains and The Standito. He has alienated everyone else.

    Trump missed a chance at greatness that comes to perhaps one man in a century. He could have been one of the most transformative figures is American history. He could have given a dying nation a new lease on life and been a champion to millions of ordinary Americans who had been thrown on the trash heap of history. Instead, all he did was suck up to the very people who hate him and hate the voters who supported him.

    Trump got what was coming to him in all this.

    If I were you, I would not continue to support, lionize, or otherwise endorse the people who broke into the Capitol. This whole thing was ridiculous and embarrassing.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Chrisnonymous

    If I were you, I would not continue to support, lionize, or otherwise endorse the people who broke into the Capitol. This whole thing was ridiculous and embarrassing.

    St. Peter denied Jesus ere the cock crew thrice and Peter was a better man than I, but I will not now deny the patriot heroes that stormed Capitol Hill. Those patriot heroes proved their loyalty to me, to my family, to all my kin, and to the authentic American nation Jan. 6.

    Great deeds of great hearts will not be caviled or quibbled by me. I have neither the honor nor the rashness nor the courage to do what they have done, but at least I will not now turn my back.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @V. K. Ovelund

    The stars and bars in DC in 2021 is an optical nightmare. Gadsden variations aren't much better. If those flags were stars and stripes and betsy ross, it would've resonated with a lot more people.

  20. @Intelligent Dasein
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless,
     
    It wasn't exactly spontaneous. Trump did instigate the thing. He staged a Bay of Pigs rally and left his supporters to twist in the wind.

    It does prove one thing, though: Trump always had a callous disregard for anyone who could have functioned in the capacity of a competent alternative elite who might have actually designed and implemented a realistic nationalist agenda. In the 4 years he had to work with, Trump did not do anything at all to find such people or to place them in positions where they would have the respect, authority, power, and freedom to do what needed to be done. As a result, when he staged his desperate, 11th-hour call for aid, there was no one left to show up but Buffalo Brains and The Standito. He has alienated everyone else.

    Trump missed a chance at greatness that comes to perhaps one man in a century. He could have been one of the most transformative figures is American history. He could have given a dying nation a new lease on life and been a champion to millions of ordinary Americans who had been thrown on the trash heap of history. Instead, all he did was suck up to the very people who hate him and hate the voters who supported him.

    Trump got what was coming to him in all this.

    If I were you, I would not continue to support, lionize, or otherwise endorse the people who broke into the Capitol. This whole thing was ridiculous and embarrassing.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Chrisnonymous

    Seriously, what is more difficult? Admitting you’ve been conned or spending 5 years in jail on behalf of a con man?

    My greater concern right now is the elite response to 1/6, which is looking more scary and dystopian by the day: pretty much everybody responsible for American catastrophes in the Middle East is back in the saddle for this one. But I have zero sympathy for those idiots. When has Donald Trump displayed any leadership worthy of sacrifice in the last four years?

    • Replies: @Talha
    @nebulafox

    They seem to be going scorched earth at this point. Even a very reasonable and civil gentleman like Dr. Paul is not immune:
    https://www.twitter.com/RonPaul/status/1348694943905308672

    Peace.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Dumbo
    @nebulafox

    It was a trap, like Charlottesville.

    They might have even been well-meaning, but naive.

    Trump should have been smarter, he didn't predict even that simple, non 4-d chess move?

    What purpose did the Capitol protest try to accomplish? It certainly did not help to contest the fraud, as it basically seems to have been forgotten now, as if it had never existed.

    Dems are going for full censorship of course, and banning Trump for ever being elected again (not that he would, anyway; his chance was now).

    Things will get worse, no doubt about it.

  21. @The Alarmist
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It makes me wonder: is it normal for adults to be as dense as our congressmen seem to be? Am I unwittingly that dense, too?
     
    Think of the people in the Capitol in The Hunger Games< ... that is DC. Flyover country would be District 13.

    This is uncanny, no?


    https://youtu.be/VUdVIQzNezU?t=1m02s

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    The Hunger Games is a perfect allegory for one aspect of the current situation of Europe and European settled countries, an isolated and privileged elite lording it over masses of struggling ordinary people, Clinton’s deplorables. I was surprised that those controlling the country’s publishing industry ever printed it and even more surprised that Hollywood’s establishment ever made the movie series. They must be even blinder and greedier than seemed evident. But I was most surprised that young people didn’t respond more with a realization of who’s really screwing them over these days. Similar points can be made about a much subtler movie allegory, “The Cabin in the Woods”.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I'm hardly young, but I spotted the parallels immediately when I read the books.

    As for why the books and movies were let out, Vox Day's theory is that these people have a need to tell their victims what they intend to do in advance.

  22. @Mark G.
    All the comments above are good comments. Unz.com is being blocked today on my government U.S. Department of Defense computer under the category "Hate and Racism". I'm at home and switched from my government laptop to my personal laptop to get here. The bloggers at this website like Audacious Epigone, Anatoly Karlin and Steve Sailer along with most of the articles here are really pretty mild compared to some of the more extreme far right websites that were blocked a long time ago. When those websites were banned I noticed there was a double standard. Websites advocating killing blacks and Jews were banned but communist websites advocating kill all the capitalists weren't banned. Advocating killing any members of a group is wrong.

    The left has been emboldened but will eventually engage in overreach and spin out of control. The modern left goes back to the radical egalitarianism of the French Revolution. That ended badly, unlike the American Revolution which was based on a belief in freedom and individual rights. Jefferson thought that the truth would always win in the end if you have freedom of speech and press. Anyone pressing for censorship is aware the truth is not on their side and they can't win in a free and open debate.

    Replies: @Realist, @V. Hickel

    you are insane going on this website on a USG computer

  23. If the Wuhan Virus is a global emergency ( and it no doubt is for the elderly or those with co-morbidities) it would be nice if we had people with more authority than Dr. Fauci able to tell us why. Governors too could demonstrate they are serious about collecting data but if you peruse the daily data on Worldometer you notice that cases and deaths decline on Sunday and Monday and start soaring Wednesday through Friday. Why is that?

    Well Rhode Island,Missouri, Connecticut, Kansas and Nebraska’s health departments close up shop on the weekends and don’t report data. Everybody in those states could die and we wouldn’t know it until days later. Labcorp and Quest don’t do as many tests either. I guess the governors and public health people just have to wait to get the data on the state of spread. Doesn’t sound like its a serious disease if those counting it can take the weekends off. I guess hospitals report their admissions daily but can’t find anyone to sign death certificates on Sunday and Monday so that is why the death toll declines on those days or maybe it is because hospital administrators won’t let them report deaths in case they assign the death to a less well paying disease.

    I’d like to get vaccinated ( my personal choice) as I’m 69 and I’m tired of having to isolate and wear a mask when I go the store but there isn’t any available. Thing is if masks did any good why do we have cases soaring now? Most everybody I see in the store parking lots is wearing a mask and this is in Florida where we didn’t have any statewide lockdown though Miami imposed a curfew last summer when they were accounting for 25% of the states cases though they are only 12% of the state population. So if masks are effective why has California caught up with Florida in cases per million and will likely overtake Florida in deaths per capita in a week or two. They are a younger population who have been repeatedly locked down?

    • Replies: @Mark G.
    @unit472


    So if masks are effective why has California caught up with Florida in cases per million and will likely overtake Florida in deaths per capita in a week or two. They are a younger population who have been repeatedly locked down?

     

    Johan Giesecke, former state epidemiologist of Sweden, was asked in an interview earlier this year about the failure of the Swedish approach of not locking down. He replied that people need to wait a year and then look again. In June, Sweden all cause mortality for 2020 was higher than the EU average but by the end of the year the EU as a whole had almost caught up. The economic contraction in Sweden was smaller than EU countries as a whole.

    Now, as you point out, heavily locked down California just passed Florida, a state with much fewer restrictions, in number of cases. Lockdowns appear effective at first but just end up spreading the number of cases over a longer period of time. Transmission is mostly in personal settings so doing things like closing stores and restaurants are ineffective. Any sudden case spikes could have been dealt with by setting up temporary field hospitals or other locations for patients. This may be an example of what Frederic Bastiat called the seen and the unseen. People saw the immediate benefits of lockdowns with a slight decrease in case rates but couldn't see the shifting of cases to the future or the eventual widespread economic destruction of long term lockdowns.
    , @Miha
    @unit472

    https://twitter.com/WHOWPRO/status/1243171683067777024
    World Health Organization
    Mar 26, 2020

    But what do they know?

  24. anon[154] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist
    @Mark G.

    Yes, this country is nearing the bottom of its shit slide to hell.

    Replies: @anon


    Yes, this country is nearing the bottom of its shit slide to hell.

    I hope you are correct, but it seems doubtful. There is a lot of ruin in a country, and the ruination may only be getting started.

    For example, the DHS / FAA no-fly list being expanded as part of a larger Social Credit system, emulating China. Credit. Housing. ISP’s. The list goes on.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @anon


    There is a lot of ruin in a country, and the ruination may only be getting started.
     
    But the country is picking up speed as we near the end of the shit slide.
  25. @nebulafox
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Seriously, what is more difficult? Admitting you've been conned or spending 5 years in jail on behalf of a con man?

    My greater concern right now is the elite response to 1/6, which is looking more scary and dystopian by the day: pretty much everybody responsible for American catastrophes in the Middle East is back in the saddle for this one. But I have zero sympathy for those idiots. When has Donald Trump displayed any leadership worthy of sacrifice in the last four years?

    Replies: @Talha, @Dumbo

    They seem to be going scorched earth at this point. Even a very reasonable and civil gentleman like Dr. Paul is not immune:

    Peace.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Talha

    See, I agree with them on the assessment of "these people were scumbag rioters who should have the book thrown at them and Trump is a pathological liar who egged them on". Not disputing that. Might not win me a lot of fans here to say that, but there you go.

    Why I go from that to "still, **** you people and the horse you rode in on" is because of three factors:

    1) The Democrats and their media allies simped for, lied on the behalf of, covered up for, apologized and gaslighted for the worst riots in American history *less than a year ago*. The new President's staffers still are providing money to bail out people responsible for that. There's a certain point where your sheer hypocrisy is going to undermine everything you touch, even the accurate stuff. Let alone the flatly dishonest stuff, like the notion that this was an attempted coup or that Americans should not fear the corporate censorship they are embracing.

    2) The sanctimony of the GOP Establishment wears extremely thin when they are busy feting the same people who launched the Iraq War as advisors for the new "domestic war on terror", helped get us to the point of corporate control of public life as much as anybody, flat out stated that millions of Americans were not worth spending 2,000 dollars on, and were themselves happy to work with Trump for four years as long he passed their stupid tax cuts and appointed the judges they wanted. Enough with the moralism. Revival of public respect for institutions requires the institutions themselves to admit where they've failed and change first.

    3) And no, this wasn't a "coup attempt": this was a bunch of obese LARPers throwing a collective tantrum and forming a lynch mob on the behalf of a narcissist who cowardly disposed of them when he was done with them, like everything else he's touched in life. But an insurrection? A coup? As someone originally from Pakistan presumably old enough to remember military rule, I'm sure know you better than most online commentators what a real coup actually is. You know, tanks in the capital, the military hijacking radio stations, high profile disappearances, that kind of thing.

    The distinction is important because this is the justification that our elites-media, economic, bureaucratic, and political-are going to use for Patriot Act 2.0, Jack Dorsey edition. At what point over the last 12 months have they demonstrated that we should trust them in... anything? If you want to stop "disinformation", then a good start might be getting people vaccinated ASAP and ending lockdowns.

    > Just learned that my cousin’s husband died from Covid in Karachi.

    Aw, nuts. My condolences.

  26. Just learned that my cousin’s husband died from Covid in Karachi. He was late forties or early fifties. No known problems but Covid seemed to exacerbate an underlying problem they didn’t know about. Seems that he contracted Covid (they were being careful but he got it from a close relative, one of the few they were allowing over to their home) and it resulted in some clotting of the blood which caused a cardiac arrest since there was an underlying issue with the health of his heart that wasn’t really exposed otherwise. Would this same thing have happened with just a seasonal flu? No idea.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Talha

    SARS-2 is a vascular disease that is spread by the respiratory route. It can cause leaking blood vessels anywhere, from the toes to the head. This is possibly similar to how deep vein thrombosis can trigger a stroke, for example. Sorry to read of this man's death.

    Would this same thing have happened with just a seasonal flu?

    No, because standard flu is not a vascular disease. However plenty of people die of heart attacks during or after the flu because the disease is a big strain on the overall system. This is why anyone of any age who gets the flu must remain in bed for a full 24 hours after the fever subsides.

    From time to time some real go-getter decides he's bounced back from the flu & rolls back into work, only to wind up on the floor waiting for EMT's to arrive. I have personal knowledge of such cases.

    PS: I talked with local medical people I know yesterday, one local ICU is now having to park some people in the halls because the hospital floor designated for COVID cases is now full. The administrators are frantic to hire more traveler nurses for the COVID and ICU floors at 4x the usual salary -- resulting in more local nurses giving notice, so they too can become travelers. This can only lead to more good things, such as increases in costs, that the same administrators will have to deal with.

    Short term thinking is all around. A lot of poor leaders are being revealed. Crisis does that.

    Replies: @Talha, @Audacious Epigone

  27. @Talha
    @nebulafox

    They seem to be going scorched earth at this point. Even a very reasonable and civil gentleman like Dr. Paul is not immune:
    https://www.twitter.com/RonPaul/status/1348694943905308672

    Peace.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    See, I agree with them on the assessment of “these people were scumbag rioters who should have the book thrown at them and Trump is a pathological liar who egged them on”. Not disputing that. Might not win me a lot of fans here to say that, but there you go.

    Why I go from that to “still, **** you people and the horse you rode in on” is because of three factors:

    1) The Democrats and their media allies simped for, lied on the behalf of, covered up for, apologized and gaslighted for the worst riots in American history *less than a year ago*. The new President’s staffers still are providing money to bail out people responsible for that. There’s a certain point where your sheer hypocrisy is going to undermine everything you touch, even the accurate stuff. Let alone the flatly dishonest stuff, like the notion that this was an attempted coup or that Americans should not fear the corporate censorship they are embracing.

    2) The sanctimony of the GOP Establishment wears extremely thin when they are busy feting the same people who launched the Iraq War as advisors for the new “domestic war on terror”, helped get us to the point of corporate control of public life as much as anybody, flat out stated that millions of Americans were not worth spending 2,000 dollars on, and were themselves happy to work with Trump for four years as long he passed their stupid tax cuts and appointed the judges they wanted. Enough with the moralism. Revival of public respect for institutions requires the institutions themselves to admit where they’ve failed and change first.

    3) And no, this wasn’t a “coup attempt”: this was a bunch of obese LARPers throwing a collective tantrum and forming a lynch mob on the behalf of a narcissist who cowardly disposed of them when he was done with them, like everything else he’s touched in life. But an insurrection? A coup? As someone originally from Pakistan presumably old enough to remember military rule, I’m sure know you better than most online commentators what a real coup actually is. You know, tanks in the capital, the military hijacking radio stations, high profile disappearances, that kind of thing.

    The distinction is important because this is the justification that our elites-media, economic, bureaucratic, and political-are going to use for Patriot Act 2.0, Jack Dorsey edition. At what point over the last 12 months have they demonstrated that we should trust them in… anything? If you want to stop “disinformation”, then a good start might be getting people vaccinated ASAP and ending lockdowns.

    > Just learned that my cousin’s husband died from Covid in Karachi.

    Aw, nuts. My condolences.

  28. @nebulafox
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Seriously, what is more difficult? Admitting you've been conned or spending 5 years in jail on behalf of a con man?

    My greater concern right now is the elite response to 1/6, which is looking more scary and dystopian by the day: pretty much everybody responsible for American catastrophes in the Middle East is back in the saddle for this one. But I have zero sympathy for those idiots. When has Donald Trump displayed any leadership worthy of sacrifice in the last four years?

    Replies: @Talha, @Dumbo

    It was a trap, like Charlottesville.

    They might have even been well-meaning, but naive.

    Trump should have been smarter, he didn’t predict even that simple, non 4-d chess move?

    What purpose did the Capitol protest try to accomplish? It certainly did not help to contest the fraud, as it basically seems to have been forgotten now, as if it had never existed.

    Dems are going for full censorship of course, and banning Trump for ever being elected again (not that he would, anyway; his chance was now).

    Things will get worse, no doubt about it.

  29. @V. K. Ovelund

    When the corpse is dragged away next week, then what?
     
    I do not know.

    The unwillingness or inability of most of our congressmen to grasp what is agitating middle America is phenomenal. Observe that they can think of no response to the Capitol Hill Riot other than to cry, "Terrorists!"

    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless, was provoked by no one but the congressmen themselves.

    It makes me wonder: is it normal for adults to be as dense as our congressmen seem to be? Am I unwittingly that dense, too?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Intelligent Dasein, @Philip Owen, @usNthem, @Audacious Epigone

    Brexit has revealed British politicians on all sides to be stunningly under informed and devoid of the ability to make logical projections. Not so much the EU civil servants, in the main their opposite numbers in negotiation.

    • Thanks: V. K. Ovelund
  30. anon[266] • Disclaimer says:
    @Talha
    Just learned that my cousin’s husband died from Covid in Karachi. He was late forties or early fifties. No known problems but Covid seemed to exacerbate an underlying problem they didn’t know about. Seems that he contracted Covid (they were being careful but he got it from a close relative, one of the few they were allowing over to their home) and it resulted in some clotting of the blood which caused a cardiac arrest since there was an underlying issue with the health of his heart that wasn’t really exposed otherwise. Would this same thing have happened with just a seasonal flu? No idea.

    Peace.

    Replies: @anon

    SARS-2 is a vascular disease that is spread by the respiratory route. It can cause leaking blood vessels anywhere, from the toes to the head. This is possibly similar to how deep vein thrombosis can trigger a stroke, for example. Sorry to read of this man’s death.

    Would this same thing have happened with just a seasonal flu?

    No, because standard flu is not a vascular disease. However plenty of people die of heart attacks during or after the flu because the disease is a big strain on the overall system. This is why anyone of any age who gets the flu must remain in bed for a full 24 hours after the fever subsides.

    From time to time some real go-getter decides he’s bounced back from the flu & rolls back into work, only to wind up on the floor waiting for EMT’s to arrive. I have personal knowledge of such cases.

    PS: I talked with local medical people I know yesterday, one local ICU is now having to park some people in the halls because the hospital floor designated for COVID cases is now full. The administrators are frantic to hire more traveler nurses for the COVID and ICU floors at 4x the usual salary — resulting in more local nurses giving notice, so they too can become travelers. This can only lead to more good things, such as increases in costs, that the same administrators will have to deal with.

    Short term thinking is all around. A lot of poor leaders are being revealed. Crisis does that.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @anon

    Thanks. What region of the country are you talking about; is it California?

    Peace.

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @anon

    4x pay?! Are there nurses out there on track to make $300k/year?

  31. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @The Alarmist

    The Hunger Games is a perfect allegory for one aspect of the current situation of Europe and European settled countries, an isolated and privileged elite lording it over masses of struggling ordinary people, Clinton's deplorables. I was surprised that those controlling the country's publishing industry ever printed it and even more surprised that Hollywood's establishment ever made the movie series. They must be even blinder and greedier than seemed evident. But I was most surprised that young people didn't respond more with a realization of who's really screwing them over these days. Similar points can be made about a much subtler movie allegory, "The Cabin in the Woods".

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

    I’m hardly young, but I spotted the parallels immediately when I read the books.

    As for why the books and movies were let out, Vox Day’s theory is that these people have a need to tell their victims what they intend to do in advance.

  32. Deplatforming notice:  the Second City Cop blog is off-line.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Mr. Rational

    Was it deplatformed by Google or did it "voluntarily" go dark ("voluntarily" in the same way SSC went dark a year ago)?

  33. @Intelligent Dasein
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless,
     
    It wasn't exactly spontaneous. Trump did instigate the thing. He staged a Bay of Pigs rally and left his supporters to twist in the wind.

    It does prove one thing, though: Trump always had a callous disregard for anyone who could have functioned in the capacity of a competent alternative elite who might have actually designed and implemented a realistic nationalist agenda. In the 4 years he had to work with, Trump did not do anything at all to find such people or to place them in positions where they would have the respect, authority, power, and freedom to do what needed to be done. As a result, when he staged his desperate, 11th-hour call for aid, there was no one left to show up but Buffalo Brains and The Standito. He has alienated everyone else.

    Trump missed a chance at greatness that comes to perhaps one man in a century. He could have been one of the most transformative figures is American history. He could have given a dying nation a new lease on life and been a champion to millions of ordinary Americans who had been thrown on the trash heap of history. Instead, all he did was suck up to the very people who hate him and hate the voters who supported him.

    Trump got what was coming to him in all this.

    If I were you, I would not continue to support, lionize, or otherwise endorse the people who broke into the Capitol. This whole thing was ridiculous and embarrassing.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Chrisnonymous

    It wasn’t exactly spontaneous. Trump did instigate the thing.

    I’m not supportive of the vandalism and assaults that occurred, nor do I like Trump much. But he did not instigate the rioting any more than he is responsible for the rise of Qanon. That is not fair. VKO is correct–the rioting is a response to the Congress itself as well as other elites like the judicial system and tech companies.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @Chrisnonymous

    You'll get no argument from me that there is plenty of justified disgust out there, but this was Trump's dance, not Congress'. But enough about this. I find the issue difficult and distasteful to talk about.

    I think we're seeing the start of something big here, something much bigger than Trump. I think this is the beginning of the end for Big Tech. They finally overstepped their bounds and now national governments all over the world have sat up and taken notice.

    Replies: @usNthem

  34. @anon
    @Realist


    Yes, this country is nearing the bottom of its shit slide to hell.


    I hope you are correct, but it seems doubtful. There is a lot of ruin in a country, and the ruination may only be getting started.

    For example, the DHS / FAA no-fly list being expanded as part of a larger Social Credit system, emulating China. Credit. Housing. ISP's. The list goes on.

    Replies: @Realist

    There is a lot of ruin in a country, and the ruination may only be getting started.

    But the country is picking up speed as we near the end of the shit slide.

  35. @V. K. Ovelund

    When the corpse is dragged away next week, then what?
     
    I do not know.

    The unwillingness or inability of most of our congressmen to grasp what is agitating middle America is phenomenal. Observe that they can think of no response to the Capitol Hill Riot other than to cry, "Terrorists!"

    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless, was provoked by no one but the congressmen themselves.

    It makes me wonder: is it normal for adults to be as dense as our congressmen seem to be? Am I unwittingly that dense, too?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Intelligent Dasein, @Philip Owen, @usNthem, @Audacious Epigone

    No you’re not. However, not only are they dense (many evil) they are cowards.

  36. @Chrisnonymous
    @Intelligent Dasein


    It wasn’t exactly spontaneous. Trump did instigate the thing.
     
    I'm not supportive of the vandalism and assaults that occurred, nor do I like Trump much. But he did not instigate the rioting any more than he is responsible for the rise of Qanon. That is not fair. VKO is correct--the rioting is a response to the Congress itself as well as other elites like the judicial system and tech companies.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    You’ll get no argument from me that there is plenty of justified disgust out there, but this was Trump’s dance, not Congress’. But enough about this. I find the issue difficult and distasteful to talk about.

    I think we’re seeing the start of something big here, something much bigger than Trump. I think this is the beginning of the end for Big Tech. They finally overstepped their bounds and now national governments all over the world have sat up and taken notice.

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Damn well better be - the time has come.

  37. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Chrisnonymous

    You'll get no argument from me that there is plenty of justified disgust out there, but this was Trump's dance, not Congress'. But enough about this. I find the issue difficult and distasteful to talk about.

    I think we're seeing the start of something big here, something much bigger than Trump. I think this is the beginning of the end for Big Tech. They finally overstepped their bounds and now national governments all over the world have sat up and taken notice.

    Replies: @usNthem

    Damn well better be – the time has come.

  38. @Some Guy
    OT:

    Hey Audacious, here's some NAEP Math-derived 8th grade IQ scores that I think you haven't covered already, from 2019 unless otherwise stated:

    78 Guam(2000)
    75 Virgin Islands(1992)
    71 Puerto Rico
    59 American Samoa(2000) (Don't ask me how)

    Ethnic scores on a national level:
    90 Mexican, Mexican American or Chicano
    88 Puerto Ricans
    88 Cubans

    98 Northeast (Census)
    97 Midwest (Census)
    95 South (Census)
    94 West (Census)

    94 City, large
    93 City, midsize
    96 City, small
    98 Suburb, large
    97 Suburb, mid-size
    97 Suburb, small
    95 Town, fringe
    93 Town, distant
    93 Town, remote
    97 Rural, fringe
    95 Rural, distant
    94 Rural, remote

    98 Charlotte
    96 San Diego
    96 Austin
    95 Guilford County (NC)
    95 Boston
    93 Hillsborough County (FL)
    93 Miami-Dade
    93 Chicago
    93 Denver
    93 Duval County (FL)
    93 Houston
    92 Jefferson County (KY)
    92 New York City
    92 Clark County (NV)
    90 District of Columbia (DCPS)
    90 Atlanta
    90 Albuquerque
    89 Fort Worth (TX)
    89 Shelby County (TN)
    88 Dallas
    87 Los Angeles
    85 Philadelphia
    84 Baltimore City
    84 Fresno
    84 Cleveland
    83 Milwaukee
    80 Detroit

    (Remember, the smarter kids are in the suburbs, not the big cities.)

    Replies: @neutral, @Realist, @Almost Missouri, @anonymous, @Audacious Epigone

    Most of those city and regional scores look like they are mostly just proxies for race.

    • Replies: @Some Guy
    @Almost Missouri

    That's true, but it's still interesting to know the overall average IMO, gives an indication of how the cities will do in the future.

  39. @unit472
    If the Wuhan Virus is a global emergency ( and it no doubt is for the elderly or those with co-morbidities) it would be nice if we had people with more authority than Dr. Fauci able to tell us why. Governors too could demonstrate they are serious about collecting data but if you peruse the daily data on Worldometer you notice that cases and deaths decline on Sunday and Monday and start soaring Wednesday through Friday. Why is that?

    Well Rhode Island,Missouri, Connecticut, Kansas and Nebraska's health departments close up shop on the weekends and don't report data. Everybody in those states could die and we wouldn't know it until days later. Labcorp and Quest don't do as many tests either. I guess the governors and public health people just have to wait to get the data on the state of spread. Doesn't sound like its a serious disease if those counting it can take the weekends off. I guess hospitals report their admissions daily but can't find anyone to sign death certificates on Sunday and Monday so that is why the death toll declines on those days or maybe it is because hospital administrators won't let them report deaths in case they assign the death to a less well paying disease.

    I'd like to get vaccinated ( my personal choice) as I'm 69 and I'm tired of having to isolate and wear a mask when I go the store but there isn't any available. Thing is if masks did any good why do we have cases soaring now? Most everybody I see in the store parking lots is wearing a mask and this is in Florida where we didn't have any statewide lockdown though Miami imposed a curfew last summer when they were accounting for 25% of the states cases though they are only 12% of the state population. So if masks are effective why has California caught up with Florida in cases per million and will likely overtake Florida in deaths per capita in a week or two. They are a younger population who have been repeatedly locked down?

    Replies: @Mark G., @Miha

    So if masks are effective why has California caught up with Florida in cases per million and will likely overtake Florida in deaths per capita in a week or two. They are a younger population who have been repeatedly locked down?

    Johan Giesecke, former state epidemiologist of Sweden, was asked in an interview earlier this year about the failure of the Swedish approach of not locking down. He replied that people need to wait a year and then look again. In June, Sweden all cause mortality for 2020 was higher than the EU average but by the end of the year the EU as a whole had almost caught up. The economic contraction in Sweden was smaller than EU countries as a whole.

    Now, as you point out, heavily locked down California just passed Florida, a state with much fewer restrictions, in number of cases. Lockdowns appear effective at first but just end up spreading the number of cases over a longer period of time. Transmission is mostly in personal settings so doing things like closing stores and restaurants are ineffective. Any sudden case spikes could have been dealt with by setting up temporary field hospitals or other locations for patients. This may be an example of what Frederic Bastiat called the seen and the unseen. People saw the immediate benefits of lockdowns with a slight decrease in case rates but couldn’t see the shifting of cases to the future or the eventual widespread economic destruction of long term lockdowns.

  40. “All they can do is shoot the messenger again and again and again.”

    They can’t admit that conservatives are right, because it destroys their politics.

    E.g, Charles Murray in Losing Ground: Great Society programs didn’t work. Ignore him.

    Charles Murray in The Bell Curve: modern era benefits cognitive elite and hurts low IQ people. Racist!

    Charles Murray in Coming Apart: Top 25% doing fine; middle 50% so-so. Bottom 25%, men don’t work much and women don’t marry much. Ignore him.

    How can they change now?

    • Agree: Mark G.
  41. @anon
    @Talha

    SARS-2 is a vascular disease that is spread by the respiratory route. It can cause leaking blood vessels anywhere, from the toes to the head. This is possibly similar to how deep vein thrombosis can trigger a stroke, for example. Sorry to read of this man's death.

    Would this same thing have happened with just a seasonal flu?

    No, because standard flu is not a vascular disease. However plenty of people die of heart attacks during or after the flu because the disease is a big strain on the overall system. This is why anyone of any age who gets the flu must remain in bed for a full 24 hours after the fever subsides.

    From time to time some real go-getter decides he's bounced back from the flu & rolls back into work, only to wind up on the floor waiting for EMT's to arrive. I have personal knowledge of such cases.

    PS: I talked with local medical people I know yesterday, one local ICU is now having to park some people in the halls because the hospital floor designated for COVID cases is now full. The administrators are frantic to hire more traveler nurses for the COVID and ICU floors at 4x the usual salary -- resulting in more local nurses giving notice, so they too can become travelers. This can only lead to more good things, such as increases in costs, that the same administrators will have to deal with.

    Short term thinking is all around. A lot of poor leaders are being revealed. Crisis does that.

    Replies: @Talha, @Audacious Epigone

    Thanks. What region of the country are you talking about; is it California?

    Peace.

  42. O/T

    Dehumanization, on Simple Jack’s Twitter

  43. The things referred to as problems that Trump ran claiming to want to solve are not, in fact, seen as problems by the people wh actually run things and determine policy in this nation. A lot of the rest of the world as well, but that is another matter.

    Trump was selected in 2016. The people who make the decisions were all in for Hillary until, for reasons they may or may not have shared with us (physical disability, legal shenanigans, generally found her to be a hateful bitch) or may not, they decided that she was not the best person to move the ball forward for them. So, in 2016, they just did not steal as many votes as they needed to put her in office. That simple. And Trump (for whom I voted every chance I got, to avoid another Repuublican or Clinton or Biden) did as he was told. He ran his mouth while the Deep State ran everything that they wanted to run. They had a full crew of people in place organically that HATED Trump, and he didn’t do a thing to stop them.

    Trump was an entertaining clown. He may or may not have meant what he said, but he did not accomplish much at all.

  44. @Almost Missouri
    @Some Guy

    Most of those city and regional scores look like they are mostly just proxies for race.

    Replies: @Some Guy

    That’s true, but it’s still interesting to know the overall average IMO, gives an indication of how the cities will do in the future.

  45. Take your vitamin D3 (4000-6000 U/d), vit C (2-8 gm/d), Zinc, and quercetin and stop worrying. You will have cut your already slim chances of death from Covid by 90%.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    @Dutch Boy

    I have multiple risk factors, and COVID is one of my smallest worries because I follow a rigid schedule of supplements.  I'm far more worried about the people around me whose lives are being upended by ridiculous lockdowns and may lose the very roofs over their heads.

  46. @neutral

    Another brother said that it’s like a war zone with patients laying out in the hallways, like something out of the movies.
     
    If things were this bad you can be assured that the ZOG outlets would be blaring this out 24/7. The blunt reality is that in terms of pandemics this is the lamest pandemic of all time. Don't get me wrong, I would certainly support tens of millions Americans dying from a very deadly disease, but this is not it.

    Replies: @Sollipsist, @Audacious Epigone

    Tens of millions is a bit harsh. There’s starting to be a marginal probability that someone actually worthwhile is among that number.

  47. @Dutch Boy
    Take your vitamin D3 (4000-6000 U/d), vit C (2-8 gm/d), Zinc, and quercetin and stop worrying. You will have cut your already slim chances of death from Covid by 90%.

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

    I have multiple risk factors, and COVID is one of my smallest worries because I follow a rigid schedule of supplements.  I’m far more worried about the people around me whose lives are being upended by ridiculous lockdowns and may lose the very roofs over their heads.

    • Agree: Mark G., Dutch Boy
    • Thanks: V. K. Ovelund
  48. @brabantian
    Rasmussen - Americans feel misled about coronavirus

    Nearly 50% of U.S. voters believe public health officials have offered misleading information on the coronavirus pandemic over the last year, according to a new Just the News Daily Poll with Scott Rasmussen.

    Forty-eight percent of respondents said that public health leaders have "misrepresented the data" on the coronavirus since the pandemic began in early 2020. Just 34% said health officials have "reported the true facts" on the issue. The remaining 18% were unsure one way or the other.

     

    Interesting how polls in general in lockdown-crazy Western Europe have 75-80% allegedly supporting the lockdowns ... but yet only half the populations eager to get the vaccine

    It's almost as, if it is a question of virtue signalling for what seems destined to happen anyway, people are on board ... but if it's a question of injecting some foreign substance into your body, after which a number of people are dead, some deeper instinct kicks in, and people say No

    Recent chart showing 11 dead and 1000 plus hospitalisations after vaccine injection, from the CDC Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)
    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-7c2Uic3K988/X_lWF3m0CNI/AAAAAAAA0eg/Wb9ET6w5LhEXKZcJkUIfyzCZpf0hQwHYACLcBGAsYHQ/w378-h673/vaccination%2Bdeath%2Bcorona.jpg

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Wielgus

    I would take the polls with more than a grain of salt, considering they can often be massaged to push a certain policy and outright lying is also possible. Moreover, they have not been especially accurate about election results in recent years.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Wielgus


    I would take the polls with more than a grain of salt, considering they can often be massaged to push a certain policy and outright lying is also possible. Moreover, they have not been especially accurate about election results in recent years.
     
    Yes, this is the prudent way to regard the opinion polls. You avoid both extremes.


    I find little reason to regard public opinion polls by familiar pollsters as either (a) accurate or (b) meaningless. Undoubtedly, some pollsters are less accurate than others but I notice that too many of us misjudge polls whose results we like to be more accurate than polls whose results we dislike. The numbers are what they are, yet pollsters are fallen human beings capable of distortion and lies.

    I believe that the published margins of polling error are a statistical fiction. My anecdotal sense of the matter is that the typical public opinion poll by a familiar pollster is accurate within about 14 points and that movement in poll results by a single pollster on different dates is relatively accurate within about 7 points.

    If you're looking for greater accuracy than that, you won't get it from the pollsters. They cannot deliver it and, even if they could, some of them will not deliver it.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  49. My own impression is that “Covid” is more a psychological pandemic than anything else. So many different symptoms! I know a few not very close people who had Covid, all mild cases, with very varying symptoms, some like flu, some mostly headache and coughing, one reporting sense of smell, none of them had to go to the hospital. They might as well have had each different diseases all marked as “Covid” because of the unreliable PCR test. Or maybe Covid is like that, a strange disease that affects everyone differently. I don’t know, I really have no idea.

    What I do know, is that “lockdowns” and “masks” are completely useless to contain it, as shown by the “constant increase of cases” (so they say) in countries that are locked down, so why do such methods keep being used again and again? Lack of imagination? Or simply no Plan B?

    Why don’t we hear about China anymore? Why didn’t they have a “second” or “third wave”?

    Why almost zero Covid in Africa and other non-Western, non-Asian regions?

    Is this really a new disease, or something that was around for a while and we just didn’t notice?

    How come they are discovering a lot of “new variants” exactly now, one year after the first waves, and just about vaccination is starting, where before there was only one supposed variant?

    How did they discover this variant, can the PCR or antibody test identify which variant it is?

    So little time, so many questions.

  50. @unit472
    If the Wuhan Virus is a global emergency ( and it no doubt is for the elderly or those with co-morbidities) it would be nice if we had people with more authority than Dr. Fauci able to tell us why. Governors too could demonstrate they are serious about collecting data but if you peruse the daily data on Worldometer you notice that cases and deaths decline on Sunday and Monday and start soaring Wednesday through Friday. Why is that?

    Well Rhode Island,Missouri, Connecticut, Kansas and Nebraska's health departments close up shop on the weekends and don't report data. Everybody in those states could die and we wouldn't know it until days later. Labcorp and Quest don't do as many tests either. I guess the governors and public health people just have to wait to get the data on the state of spread. Doesn't sound like its a serious disease if those counting it can take the weekends off. I guess hospitals report their admissions daily but can't find anyone to sign death certificates on Sunday and Monday so that is why the death toll declines on those days or maybe it is because hospital administrators won't let them report deaths in case they assign the death to a less well paying disease.

    I'd like to get vaccinated ( my personal choice) as I'm 69 and I'm tired of having to isolate and wear a mask when I go the store but there isn't any available. Thing is if masks did any good why do we have cases soaring now? Most everybody I see in the store parking lots is wearing a mask and this is in Florida where we didn't have any statewide lockdown though Miami imposed a curfew last summer when they were accounting for 25% of the states cases though they are only 12% of the state population. So if masks are effective why has California caught up with Florida in cases per million and will likely overtake Florida in deaths per capita in a week or two. They are a younger population who have been repeatedly locked down?

    Replies: @Mark G., @Miha


    World Health Organization
    Mar 26, 2020

    But what do they know?

  51. @Wielgus
    @brabantian

    I would take the polls with more than a grain of salt, considering they can often be massaged to push a certain policy and outright lying is also possible. Moreover, they have not been especially accurate about election results in recent years.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    I would take the polls with more than a grain of salt, considering they can often be massaged to push a certain policy and outright lying is also possible. Moreover, they have not been especially accurate about election results in recent years.

    Yes, this is the prudent way to regard the opinion polls. You avoid both extremes.

    [MORE]

    I find little reason to regard public opinion polls by familiar pollsters as either (a) accurate or (b) meaningless. Undoubtedly, some pollsters are less accurate than others but I notice that too many of us misjudge polls whose results we like to be more accurate than polls whose results we dislike. The numbers are what they are, yet pollsters are fallen human beings capable of distortion and lies.

    I believe that the published margins of polling error are a statistical fiction. My anecdotal sense of the matter is that the typical public opinion poll by a familiar pollster is accurate within about 14 points and that movement in poll results by a single pollster on different dates is relatively accurate within about 7 points.

    If you’re looking for greater accuracy than that, you won’t get it from the pollsters. They cannot deliver it and, even if they could, some of them will not deliver it.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Undoubtedly, some pollsters are less accurate than others but I notice that too many of us misjudge polls whose results we like to be more accurate than polls whose results we dislike.
     
    I agree. I've noticed that a lot here. The amount of wishful thinking around these parts is extraordinary.

    There's also a failure to understand that most polling questions are so vague as to be effectively meaningless. Unless it's a simple straightforward question (will you vote for Candidate A or Candidate B) the answers are almost certainly meaningless.

    Replies: @A123

  52. The establishment hasn’t spent a day since then reflecting on why the Republican electorate gave them the middle finger by nominating him and then why the American public gave them the middle finger by electing him. This last minute bid to impeach him a second time is an absurd illustration of that. They have no idea what created a president Trump, let alone any clue how to address it. All they can do is shoot the messenger again and again and again.

    A good summary of the issues. Two real gains have been made though:

    -1- DNC = WAR — The NeoCons have been booted from the GOP and returned to their traditional home.
    -2- DNC = CCP — Führer Biden openly embraces China’s Elites, while kicking U.S. Workers to the curb.

    The GOP still has to step up and become the New Workers party. If they do not, a successful 3rd party movement becomes achievable, unlike predictable failures like the Greens & Libertarians.

    PEACE 😇
     

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @A123

    主人 or zhuren is the correct word for master.

  53. @A123

    The establishment hasn’t spent a day since then reflecting on why the Republican electorate gave them the middle finger by nominating him and then why the American public gave them the middle finger by electing him. This last minute bid to impeach him a second time is an absurd illustration of that. They have no idea what created a president Trump, let alone any clue how to address it. All they can do is shoot the messenger again and again and again.
     
    A good summary of the issues. Two real gains have been made though:

    -1- DNC = WAR -- The NeoCons have been booted from the GOP and returned to their traditional home.
    -2- DNC = CCP -- Führer Biden openly embraces China's Elites, while kicking U.S. Workers to the curb.

    The GOP still has to step up and become the New Workers party. If they do not, a successful 3rd party movement becomes achievable, unlike predictable failures like the Greens & Libertarians.

    PEACE 😇
     

    https://i.imgur.com/k3QcKmP.jpg

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    主人 or zhuren is the correct word for master.

  54. @Some Guy
    OT:

    Hey Audacious, here's some NAEP Math-derived 8th grade IQ scores that I think you haven't covered already, from 2019 unless otherwise stated:

    78 Guam(2000)
    75 Virgin Islands(1992)
    71 Puerto Rico
    59 American Samoa(2000) (Don't ask me how)

    Ethnic scores on a national level:
    90 Mexican, Mexican American or Chicano
    88 Puerto Ricans
    88 Cubans

    98 Northeast (Census)
    97 Midwest (Census)
    95 South (Census)
    94 West (Census)

    94 City, large
    93 City, midsize
    96 City, small
    98 Suburb, large
    97 Suburb, mid-size
    97 Suburb, small
    95 Town, fringe
    93 Town, distant
    93 Town, remote
    97 Rural, fringe
    95 Rural, distant
    94 Rural, remote

    98 Charlotte
    96 San Diego
    96 Austin
    95 Guilford County (NC)
    95 Boston
    93 Hillsborough County (FL)
    93 Miami-Dade
    93 Chicago
    93 Denver
    93 Duval County (FL)
    93 Houston
    92 Jefferson County (KY)
    92 New York City
    92 Clark County (NV)
    90 District of Columbia (DCPS)
    90 Atlanta
    90 Albuquerque
    89 Fort Worth (TX)
    89 Shelby County (TN)
    88 Dallas
    87 Los Angeles
    85 Philadelphia
    84 Baltimore City
    84 Fresno
    84 Cleveland
    83 Milwaukee
    80 Detroit

    (Remember, the smarter kids are in the suburbs, not the big cities.)

    Replies: @neutral, @Realist, @Almost Missouri, @anonymous, @Audacious Epigone

    The average IQ of 13 year olds in the United States is about 96? That’s amazing considering the under 15 population is 50% white.

    • Replies: @Some Guy
    @anonymous

    Yes, that would imply the average non-white IQ is about 92. Lot of Hispanics and Asian these days you know!

  55. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Wielgus


    I would take the polls with more than a grain of salt, considering they can often be massaged to push a certain policy and outright lying is also possible. Moreover, they have not been especially accurate about election results in recent years.
     
    Yes, this is the prudent way to regard the opinion polls. You avoid both extremes.


    I find little reason to regard public opinion polls by familiar pollsters as either (a) accurate or (b) meaningless. Undoubtedly, some pollsters are less accurate than others but I notice that too many of us misjudge polls whose results we like to be more accurate than polls whose results we dislike. The numbers are what they are, yet pollsters are fallen human beings capable of distortion and lies.

    I believe that the published margins of polling error are a statistical fiction. My anecdotal sense of the matter is that the typical public opinion poll by a familiar pollster is accurate within about 14 points and that movement in poll results by a single pollster on different dates is relatively accurate within about 7 points.

    If you're looking for greater accuracy than that, you won't get it from the pollsters. They cannot deliver it and, even if they could, some of them will not deliver it.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Undoubtedly, some pollsters are less accurate than others but I notice that too many of us misjudge polls whose results we like to be more accurate than polls whose results we dislike.

    I agree. I’ve noticed that a lot here. The amount of wishful thinking around these parts is extraordinary.

    There’s also a failure to understand that most polling questions are so vague as to be effectively meaningless. Unless it’s a simple straightforward question (will you vote for Candidate A or Candidate B) the answers are almost certainly meaningless.

    • Replies: @A123
    @dfordoom


    most polling questions are so vague as to be effectively meaningless
     
    The polling issue is more conceptual. Asking about attitude is not inherently vague (or bad).

    The problem is translating attitude to action. An individual can only prioritize a limited number of issues. Also, physical reality imposes trade-offs that can place priorities into conflict.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @dfordoom

  56. @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Undoubtedly, some pollsters are less accurate than others but I notice that too many of us misjudge polls whose results we like to be more accurate than polls whose results we dislike.
     
    I agree. I've noticed that a lot here. The amount of wishful thinking around these parts is extraordinary.

    There's also a failure to understand that most polling questions are so vague as to be effectively meaningless. Unless it's a simple straightforward question (will you vote for Candidate A or Candidate B) the answers are almost certainly meaningless.

    Replies: @A123

    most polling questions are so vague as to be effectively meaningless

    The polling issue is more conceptual. Asking about attitude is not inherently vague (or bad).

    The problem is translating attitude to action. An individual can only prioritize a limited number of issues. Also, physical reality imposes trade-offs that can place priorities into conflict.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @A123


    The polling issue is more conceptual. Asking about attitude is not inherently vague (or bad).
     
    A major problem with polling is that people are asked for their opinions on subjects on which they don't really have an opinion. So they give meaningless answers.
  57. @A123
    @dfordoom


    most polling questions are so vague as to be effectively meaningless
     
    The polling issue is more conceptual. Asking about attitude is not inherently vague (or bad).

    The problem is translating attitude to action. An individual can only prioritize a limited number of issues. Also, physical reality imposes trade-offs that can place priorities into conflict.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @dfordoom

    The polling issue is more conceptual. Asking about attitude is not inherently vague (or bad).

    A major problem with polling is that people are asked for their opinions on subjects on which they don’t really have an opinion. So they give meaningless answers.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
  58. @anonymous
    @Some Guy

    The average IQ of 13 year olds in the United States is about 96? That's amazing considering the under 15 population is 50% white.

    Replies: @Some Guy

    Yes, that would imply the average non-white IQ is about 92. Lot of Hispanics and Asian these days you know!

  59. I got COVID in mid-December and Intelligent Dasein’s description is pretty accurate. I first realized how bad my loss of smell was when I held a full liquor bottle under my nose and it was like it was not even there. Spent Christmas alone in my apartment feeling numb. It kind of lingers too; this is the first week since that I didn’t suddenly feel exhausted in the middle of the day.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Jokah Macpherson

    Did you have trouble breathing through your nose or were those breaths just not accompanied by even the faintest sense of smell?

  60. @neutral

    Another brother said that it’s like a war zone with patients laying out in the hallways, like something out of the movies.
     
    If things were this bad you can be assured that the ZOG outlets would be blaring this out 24/7. The blunt reality is that in terms of pandemics this is the lamest pandemic of all time. Don't get me wrong, I would certainly support tens of millions Americans dying from a very deadly disease, but this is not it.

    Replies: @Sollipsist, @Audacious Epigone

    Comments like this increase my feelings of philosemitism. Is that the intention?

  61. @Some Guy
    OT:

    Hey Audacious, here's some NAEP Math-derived 8th grade IQ scores that I think you haven't covered already, from 2019 unless otherwise stated:

    78 Guam(2000)
    75 Virgin Islands(1992)
    71 Puerto Rico
    59 American Samoa(2000) (Don't ask me how)

    Ethnic scores on a national level:
    90 Mexican, Mexican American or Chicano
    88 Puerto Ricans
    88 Cubans

    98 Northeast (Census)
    97 Midwest (Census)
    95 South (Census)
    94 West (Census)

    94 City, large
    93 City, midsize
    96 City, small
    98 Suburb, large
    97 Suburb, mid-size
    97 Suburb, small
    95 Town, fringe
    93 Town, distant
    93 Town, remote
    97 Rural, fringe
    95 Rural, distant
    94 Rural, remote

    98 Charlotte
    96 San Diego
    96 Austin
    95 Guilford County (NC)
    95 Boston
    93 Hillsborough County (FL)
    93 Miami-Dade
    93 Chicago
    93 Denver
    93 Duval County (FL)
    93 Houston
    92 Jefferson County (KY)
    92 New York City
    92 Clark County (NV)
    90 District of Columbia (DCPS)
    90 Atlanta
    90 Albuquerque
    89 Fort Worth (TX)
    89 Shelby County (TN)
    88 Dallas
    87 Los Angeles
    85 Philadelphia
    84 Baltimore City
    84 Fresno
    84 Cleveland
    83 Milwaukee
    80 Detroit

    (Remember, the smarter kids are in the suburbs, not the big cities.)

    Replies: @neutral, @Realist, @Almost Missouri, @anonymous, @Audacious Epigone

    NAEP doesn’t cover private schools though, and there are more of those in the cities than in the burbs or the sticks.

  62. @iffen
    When the corpse is dragged away next week, then what?

    Then they come for sympathizers and fellow travelers. Hawley? Cruz? AE?

    It's called hunting down, flushing and killing off stragglers.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    As the dollar drops, food and energy prices increase, and tens of millions of Americans face evictions in the next few months, will the Senate dog and pony show to remove an already removed Trump from office be enough to keep the people settled?

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Audacious Epigone

    So you are saying that it was a chess move by Trump to lose and let Bidenburg and the Dems own the disaster while he comes riding to the rescue in 2024.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

  63. @V. K. Ovelund

    When the corpse is dragged away next week, then what?
     
    I do not know.

    The unwillingness or inability of most of our congressmen to grasp what is agitating middle America is phenomenal. Observe that they can think of no response to the Capitol Hill Riot other than to cry, "Terrorists!"

    It hardly occurs to our congressmen that the riot, which was spontaneous and leaderless, was provoked by no one but the congressmen themselves.

    It makes me wonder: is it normal for adults to be as dense as our congressmen seem to be? Am I unwittingly that dense, too?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Intelligent Dasein, @Philip Owen, @usNthem, @Audacious Epigone

    Congressional constituents are NPCs to the congress people. They aren’t supposed to go off script like that.

  64. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Intelligent Dasein


    If I were you, I would not continue to support, lionize, or otherwise endorse the people who broke into the Capitol. This whole thing was ridiculous and embarrassing.
     
    St. Peter denied Jesus ere the cock crew thrice and Peter was a better man than I, but I will not now deny the patriot heroes that stormed Capitol Hill. Those patriot heroes proved their loyalty to me, to my family, to all my kin, and to the authentic American nation Jan. 6.

    Great deeds of great hearts will not be caviled or quibbled by me. I have neither the honor nor the rashness nor the courage to do what they have done, but at least I will not now turn my back.

    https://vdare.com/public_upload/publication/featured_image/53774/VDARE-brimelow-dc.jpg

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    The stars and bars in DC in 2021 is an optical nightmare. Gadsden variations aren’t much better. If those flags were stars and stripes and betsy ross, it would’ve resonated with a lot more people.

  65. @anon
    @Talha

    SARS-2 is a vascular disease that is spread by the respiratory route. It can cause leaking blood vessels anywhere, from the toes to the head. This is possibly similar to how deep vein thrombosis can trigger a stroke, for example. Sorry to read of this man's death.

    Would this same thing have happened with just a seasonal flu?

    No, because standard flu is not a vascular disease. However plenty of people die of heart attacks during or after the flu because the disease is a big strain on the overall system. This is why anyone of any age who gets the flu must remain in bed for a full 24 hours after the fever subsides.

    From time to time some real go-getter decides he's bounced back from the flu & rolls back into work, only to wind up on the floor waiting for EMT's to arrive. I have personal knowledge of such cases.

    PS: I talked with local medical people I know yesterday, one local ICU is now having to park some people in the halls because the hospital floor designated for COVID cases is now full. The administrators are frantic to hire more traveler nurses for the COVID and ICU floors at 4x the usual salary -- resulting in more local nurses giving notice, so they too can become travelers. This can only lead to more good things, such as increases in costs, that the same administrators will have to deal with.

    Short term thinking is all around. A lot of poor leaders are being revealed. Crisis does that.

    Replies: @Talha, @Audacious Epigone

    4x pay?! Are there nurses out there on track to make $300k/year?

  66. @Mr. Rational
    Deplatforming notice:  the Second City Cop blog is off-line.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    Was it deplatformed by Google or did it “voluntarily” go dark (“voluntarily” in the same way SSC went dark a year ago)?

  67. @Audacious Epigone
    @iffen

    As the dollar drops, food and energy prices increase, and tens of millions of Americans face evictions in the next few months, will the Senate dog and pony show to remove an already removed Trump from office be enough to keep the people settled?

    Replies: @iffen

    So you are saying that it was a chess move by Trump to lose and let Bidenburg and the Dems own the disaster while he comes riding to the rescue in 2024.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @iffen

    We're on the Titantic, the iceberg has been hit, we're taking on water. It doesn't matter who the captain is, the ship is going down.

  68. @Jokah Macpherson
    I got COVID in mid-December and Intelligent Dasein’s description is pretty accurate. I first realized how bad my loss of smell was when I held a full liquor bottle under my nose and it was like it was not even there. Spent Christmas alone in my apartment feeling numb. It kind of lingers too; this is the first week since that I didn’t suddenly feel exhausted in the middle of the day.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    Did you have trouble breathing through your nose or were those breaths just not accompanied by even the faintest sense of smell?

  69. @iffen
    @Audacious Epigone

    So you are saying that it was a chess move by Trump to lose and let Bidenburg and the Dems own the disaster while he comes riding to the rescue in 2024.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    We’re on the Titantic, the iceberg has been hit, we’re taking on water. It doesn’t matter who the captain is, the ship is going down.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Audacious Epigone Comments via RSS