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McConnell wants the GOP to dump Trump but the voters would prefer to ditch Mitch:

It’s hard not to sympathize with the independents’ bipartisan negative assessments across the board. Julian Assange continues to rot in inhumane captivity and Edward Snowden remains exiled in a land admittedly less oppressive to the human spirit than our own. Our elites are horrible.

 
• Category: Culture/Society, Ideology • Tags: Election 2020, Politics, Polling 
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  1. Liz Warren is already being primaried by a state Senator in Wyoming, but she needs the leave House leadership before that. McConnell sucks. The GOP needs a new Senate Minority Leader. I suspect that may happen after next year’s elections. There will be a bumper crop of new GOP Senators, few of whom will want to publicly associate themselves with McConnell’s era.

    • Troll: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Servant of Gla'aki

    "Liz Warren is already being primaried by a state Senator in Wyoming, but she needs the leave House leadership before that."

    Drink something.

    Replies: @Brian Reilly

    , @The Alarmist
    @Servant of Gla'aki


    There will be a bumper crop of new GOP Senators....
     
    Did you pay attention to what happened in the 2018 and 2020 elections, not mention earlier ones? There are more than a few Republican candidates who won on election day but lost days later after all the “votes” were found and counted.
  2. It is immediately interesting that Independents find everyone from both parties objectionable. If either party can find a path to appeal to the independents, it could have big returns in future elections.

    The GOP should have the easier road as the opposition. They can craft messages with no expectation of immediate action as they are out of power. Unfortunately, Globalist voices voices like Romney will make those Populist appeals less powerful as it will cause legitimate doubts about the GOP’s intent & capability to deliver.
    ____

    The bogus impeachment vote in the House has angered many. The mainline GOP revolt against anti-Trump establishment RINO’s has already begun. (1)

    Twenty percent of the caucus, or 42 members, is needed to force a meeting on whether to strip her of her title as chair of the House Republican Conference. Then a simple majority is needed to actually do the deed. That would require 106 members, less than the number that’s already signed a petition supporting her removal.

    It’s not just Cheney who has something at stake in this vote. Remember that Kevin McCarthy has signaled that he doesn’t want Cheney replaced as conference chair. If it ends up happening anyway, it would mean that he’s lost control of his caucus.

    Spiking the $2,000 payments right before the Georgia Special Election was a destructive decision by Mitch. However, he covered it with a seemingly conservative patina.

    While those of us who have been paying attention have Mitch as a high priority problem. The fools in the House who kicked Trump while he was on the way out have focused negative energy on themselves. The focus is likely to stay on the House GOP for some time if Mitch quashes he foolish impeachment farce and avoids new high profile provocations.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://hotair.com/archives/allahpundit/2021/01/19/reports-half-house-republicans-sign-petition-replace-liz-cheney-conference-chair/

  3. Wyoming Republicans have publicly excoriated Liz Cheney, a state Senator has announced his plan to oppose her in the 2022 primary.

    https://www.wyomingnews.com/news/local_news/bouchard-announces-plan-to-run-against-cheney-in-2022-primary/article_24018a67-b16d-5c85-b235-3bb5ddaeec11.html

  4. Our elites are horrible.

    Truly.

  5. Dear Audacious Epigone,

    I note that earlier today, I made a comment in reply to DanHessinMD on another thread. It is visible in my commenting history, but is mot currently showing up in the blog thread. Unless you are shadowbanning me somehow and for some reason, it must be a technical issue with the commenting system. Maybe you should run it by Ron Unz?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Chrisnonymous

    Try leaving Ron a comment on his bugs & suggestions page ... he is fairly responsive.

    https://www.unz.com/announcement/bugs-suggestions/#comments

    Accessible from the main page too.

    , @Intelligent Dasein
    @Chrisnonymous

    Chrisnonymous,

    Any updates on this? I've noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I'm wondering what's going on.

    A shadowban? A Purge? Self-isolation? And is anyone seeing my comments?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom, @Chrisnonymous, @Old Palo Altan

  6. McConnell wants the GOP to dump Trump but the voters would prefer to ditch Mitch:

    Then why didn’t they, he has been a corrupt cuck since day one?

    Julian Assange continues to rot in inhumane captivity and Edward Snowden remains exiled in a land admittedly less oppressive to the human spirit than our own.

    Just one more proof Trump was a minion of the Deep State…he was never a friend to America. Americans have been played a million times.

  7. It’s hard not to sympathize with the independents’ bipartisan negative assessments across the board.

    Negative assessments of politicians are healthy. I am much to the right of 95% of the people taking the poll, and I’d have a negative assessment across the board, INCLUDING TRUMP.

    Some of the independents are just wishy-washy or would like “just the right mix, in the middle, who would be nice and make everything ALL BETTER.” Yeah. Others are smart enough to see that there is one big Party, with 2 color-coded squads, when it comes to the politicians themselves, and it is NOT on our side.

    Julian Assange continues to rot in inhumane captivity and Edward Snowden remains exiled in a land admittedly less oppressive to the human spirit than our own.

    Yet almost all of these a-holes would use the word Libertards. (Hey, not all Libertarians are open-borders cucks like the folks at Reason magazine, you know.) These people may be Libertarians but not even know it.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Achmed E. Newman

    On these favorable/unfavorable polls, I always wonder how many people, say, have an "unfavorable" view of Trump because he failed to be Trumpy enough. For example, that he failed to build the wall or arrest Hillary, etc.

    It's a very different kind of "unfavorability" than most people are thinking of when they see the bottom line numbers. Also, that kind of "unfavorable" respondent isn't ever going to vote against him, although they might conceivably stay home.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  8. Rather funny that leftist Antifa anti-Biden riots are breaking out in several US cities already, it may not be too long before many more Americans wish Trump had done the full Executive Order ‘storm’

    Even the rightist commentariat is missing the depth of popular fondness for the symbolism of Trump, his faults and failings aside … Trump was ultra-symbolically and thus indeed to a degree actually, maybe indeed ‘the last bulwark against globalism’

    9am US time 20 January 2021, as Air Force One taxi’d down the runway and then took off from Andrews in Donald Trump’s final flight as President, was a poetry-worthy swan song as Frank Sinatra singing ‘My Way’ played … one saw a huge outpouring of emotion on online chat screens, tears flowing from millions of people’s eyes … here’s video of that 5-minute, quite moving, aeroplane departure, Trump and Sinatra


    • Replies: @36 ulster
    @brabantian

    George and Sons seem to be losing control of the mini-golems they created. Gotta get some popcorn.

    , @The Alarmist
    @brabantian

    I was crying because 28000 is a beautiful machine from the days when the USA was the pinnacle of Aerospace technology.

    , @Sollipsist
    @brabantian

    Seems like Biden showing force to put down Antifa would be a crafty move to appeal to centrists on both sides. He's not going to win any points with real progressives anyway; his record is too well known among them.

    This could be totally orchestrated to cement the middle-of-the-road bloc that wants to appear woke but has reservations about the past year's chaos. You know, kind of a night of the long knives move.

  9. In 2014 I was active on Twitter (I have since deleted my account). McConnell had a great primary opponent but unfortunately defeated him. I then encouraged Kentucky conservatives to vote for Democrat Alison Grimes to send McConnell home so we would get a different Majority leader.

    The conservatives on Twitter did not understand my strategy and were very hostile towards me. I was literally getting death threats. Others were calling me names like Socialist and Communist. I noticed the Republicans responding to me had the mentality that anyone with an (R) in front of their name was good by default. Now I’m sure a lot of those same people hate McConnell. They should have listened to me from the start.

    • Replies: @Rich
    @Jay Fink

    There are no "conservatives" on twitter. But voting for the Grimes gal would've been a disaster. McConnell is no Jesse Helms, but he's center-right and isn't anti-White. Most Whites will not vote for a hard core rightist, we can't get elected. We can't let the search for the perfect candidate allow even more leftists to get elected.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @Nodwink

  10. @Servant of Gla'aki
    Liz Warren is already being primaried by a state Senator in Wyoming, but she needs the leave House leadership before that. McConnell sucks. The GOP needs a new Senate Minority Leader. I suspect that may happen after next year's elections. There will be a bumper crop of new GOP Senators, few of whom will want to publicly associate themselves with McConnell's era.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @The Alarmist

    “Liz Warren is already being primaried by a state Senator in Wyoming, but she needs the leave House leadership before that.”

    Drink something.

    • Replies: @Brian Reilly
    @Jim Christian

    Jim, Surely he meant Liz Cheney? A bit of charity, perhaps? We will all need all the good will we can find in what portend to be very challenging circumstances.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Servant of Gla'aki

  11. @Jim Christian
    @Servant of Gla'aki

    "Liz Warren is already being primaried by a state Senator in Wyoming, but she needs the leave House leadership before that."

    Drink something.

    Replies: @Brian Reilly

    Jim, Surely he meant Liz Cheney? A bit of charity, perhaps? We will all need all the good will we can find in what portend to be very challenging circumstances.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Brian Reilly


    Jim, Surely he meant Liz Cheney? A bit of charity, perhaps?
     
    Charity? I'm fresh out.
    , @Servant of Gla'aki
    @Brian Reilly


    Jim, Surely he meant Liz Cheney? A bit of charity, perhaps? We will all need all the good will we can find in what portend to be very challenging circumstances.
     
    I didn't realize, until just now, that I typed "Warren".

    Yes, I did mean to reference Liz Cheney.

    Sorry for the confusion.
  12. @Brian Reilly
    @Jim Christian

    Jim, Surely he meant Liz Cheney? A bit of charity, perhaps? We will all need all the good will we can find in what portend to be very challenging circumstances.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Jim, Surely he meant Liz Cheney? A bit of charity, perhaps?

    Charity? I’m fresh out.

  13. @Jay Fink
    In 2014 I was active on Twitter (I have since deleted my account). McConnell had a great primary opponent but unfortunately defeated him. I then encouraged Kentucky conservatives to vote for Democrat Alison Grimes to send McConnell home so we would get a different Majority leader.

    The conservatives on Twitter did not understand my strategy and were very hostile towards me. I was literally getting death threats. Others were calling me names like Socialist and Communist. I noticed the Republicans responding to me had the mentality that anyone with an (R) in front of their name was good by default. Now I'm sure a lot of those same people hate McConnell. They should have listened to me from the start.

    Replies: @Rich

    There are no “conservatives” on twitter. But voting for the Grimes gal would’ve been a disaster. McConnell is no Jesse Helms, but he’s center-right and isn’t anti-White. Most Whites will not vote for a hard core rightist, we can’t get elected. We can’t let the search for the perfect candidate allow even more leftists to get elected.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @Rich

    I agree.

    In all fairness, I feel obliged to point out that Mitch McConnell has been instrumental over the decades in nullifying a lot of Leftist appointments and in killing a lot of EuroSoc-type legislation like climate bills and whatnot.

    He is something of a sleaze, yes; but he has saved America a great deal of grief.

    I'm not willing to stop supporting the Senate GOP just yet. They did more for us than we give them credit for.

    , @Nodwink
    @Rich

    I am not an American, but it only took a few clicks to find out that McConnell, who took office in 1985, has overseen a massive invasion of immigrants to your country. What did Yertle do to stop this? There are parts of Minnesota that are jokingly referred to as "Little Mogadishu" -- this happened while Mitch was one of the most powerful political figures in the US. Why did your GOP friends allow this to happen?

  14. Dianne Feinstein: 87.
    Nancy Pelosi: 80.
    Mitch McConnell, Joe Biden: 78.
    Donald Trump: 74.
    Chuck Schumer: 70.
    Cuomo, Graham, Pence: 60s.

    It’s official: our top politicians are older than the latter day Soviet Politburo ever was.

    If it seems like America’s political class lives in an alternate reality when they talk about America’s capabilities and why we should all be optimistic, they probably do. Combine their ages with the fact that they are largely immune from the consequences of their own policies, and you end up with rulers who have no real idea of what life is like for people outside the elite. Their shock and anger at discontent and disrespect seems genuine, however farcical and cynical it may appear to us.

    • Agree: Nodwink
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @nebulafox

    Yeah, NB, but with stem cells, hyperbaric chambers. brain transplants, botox, and new types of marijuana, our leaders SHOULD be able to go longer than those old crusty Politburo guys. C'mon, man! This is the 21st century.


    Their shock and anger at discontent and disrespect seems genuine, however farcical and cynical it may appear to us.
     
    Seriously now, you make a really good point with this. Are they really that out of touch? It's quite possible.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  15. The two-party system is not working (if it ever did). It is time for America to change its system, if it wants to keep any form of democratic government. Of course, it might be too late for that, given that the latest elections were a farce, partly because of fraud, and partly because of “electing a new people”, which is worse than fraud.

    However, it is clear that now neither Demoncraps nor Rethuglycans currently represent the majority of Americans, not anyone other than themselves, and their pay checks (courtesy of AIPAC, Big Business, etc).

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Dumbo


    and their pay checks (courtesy of AIPAC, Big Business, etc).
     
    AIPAC doesn't donate. They lobby and frighten. Their donors donate.
  16. @nebulafox
    Dianne Feinstein: 87.
    Nancy Pelosi: 80.
    Mitch McConnell, Joe Biden: 78.
    Donald Trump: 74.
    Chuck Schumer: 70.
    Cuomo, Graham, Pence: 60s.

    It's official: our top politicians are older than the latter day Soviet Politburo ever was.

    If it seems like America's political class lives in an alternate reality when they talk about America's capabilities and why we should all be optimistic, they probably do. Combine their ages with the fact that they are largely immune from the consequences of their own policies, and you end up with rulers who have no real idea of what life is like for people outside the elite. Their shock and anger at discontent and disrespect seems genuine, however farcical and cynical it may appear to us.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, NB, but with stem cells, hyperbaric chambers. brain transplants, botox, and new types of marijuana, our leaders SHOULD be able to go longer than those old crusty Politburo guys. C’mon, man! This is the 21st century.

    Their shock and anger at discontent and disrespect seems genuine, however farcical and cynical it may appear to us.

    Seriously now, you make a really good point with this. Are they really that out of touch? It’s quite possible.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Achmed E. Newman

    As I've said in previous comments, the Soviets had 20 million+ men killed in WWII, a demographic hit that was as much as anything a reason they lost the Cold War: in some ways, it's more astounding (and, I suppose, a testament to Russian tenacity and hard-headedness) that Communism lasted as long as it did than that it eventually failed. That made their failed gerontocracy somewhat understandable, if not excusable. We, on the other hand, just have a political class in power through inertia, despite decades of incompetence and venality that would lead to personnel replacement in other nations. And there is absolutely no reason-none at all-that it needs to be this way.

    As I've also said, it isn't simply that these people have assumptions about how the world works that are highly outdated, or grew up in a world so removed from ours today that it might as well have been the era of powdered wigs. It's that societal dynamics ensure that they don't learn, because they'll never feel the impact of their own policies. I think it is highly telling that our political class regularly flouted lockdown rules, despite belonging to the demographic that was disproportionately vulnerable to the virus. They just don't think of it as a threat to them.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

  17. Ditch Mitch

    Mitch McConnell is a chinless weasel boy treasonous politician whore for the evil and unpatriotic plutocrat globalizers. Weasels have pronounced necks and heads and lower portions of their top part of their coconut though.

    I wrote this about Mitch McConnell on November 6 2020:

    Trump is a duplicitous backstabber who treated Jeff Sessions in a horrible and ungentlemanly manner and now Tommy of the Tubervilles is gonna be a US Senator from Alabama and Tommy is a complete and total corporate whore and politician whore and this nasty puke Tuberville is a fairly representative example of a rancid Republican Party sleazebag politician.

    White Core American Gentlemen voters refused to support that nasty prevaricating slob Trump and now those White Core American Gentlemen voters have a mission from the Founding Fathers:

    DESTROY THE REPUBLICAN PARTY NOW!

    Both the rancid and treasonous Republican Party and the evil and treasonous Democrat Party push mass legal immigration and mass illegal immigration and amnesty for illegal alien invaders.

    Joe Biden Pushes WHITE GENOCIDE.

    Mitch McConnell is a nasty geezer globalizer treasonite who voted for Ronald Reagan’s 1986 amnesty for illegal alien invaders and Mitch McConnell has crawled into bed with a Chinese woman who has very public and very clear and very shady ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

    John Derbyshire has managed to marry a Chinese woman who goes spelunking in a bathing suit and she is presumably not a Chinese woman with close and profitable ties to the ruling class of China. How come Mass Immigration Extremist McConnell couldn’t do the same?

    DESTROY THE REPUBLICAN PARTY NOW!

    Tweets from 2015:

    https://www.unz.com/anepigone/racial-gender-and-sexual-orientation-distributions-of-trump-and-biden-voters/#comment-4267806

  18. Mitch McConnell is an unpatriotic globalizer geezer with no trace of chin to speak of.

    I wrote this in September of 2020 about shady politician whore McConnell:

    McConnell voted for Reagan’s nation-wrecking amnesty for illegal alien invaders in 1986 and McConnell is literally in bed with a woman who has clear and very public ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

    McConnell is a treasonous globalizer financializer bastard.

    Don’t vote for the Republican Party or the Democrat Party.

    The Republican Party is a DODO and it will hasten its croaking on November 3.

    https://www.unz.com/anepigone/democrat-voters-trump-only-cares-about-wealthy-white-men/#comment-4145005

  19. Joe Biden and Mitch McConnell are treasonous globalizer geezers who do the bidding of unpatriotic plutocrat scoundrels.

    Joe Biden and Mitch McConnell both push mass legal immigration and mass illegal immigration and sovereignty-sapping trade deal scams and unnecessary overseas war on behalf of the Israel Lobby.

    Joe Biden and Mitch McConnell are nation-wrecking geezer boy politician whores and Biden and McConnell are clear and present threats to the safety and security and sovereignty of the United States of America.

  20. Mitch has been the real power running the United States for the entire Trump Presidency. (In fact, Mitch was arguably in charge for most of the Obama Presidency as well). As long as Trump didn’t cross Mitch, Mitch protected him from investigations. Now Trump cost Mitch the Senate, and Mitch is pissed. History suggests Mitch will win this battle easily.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Did Trump cost Mitch the Senate, or did Mitch cost Mitch the Senate? The number of people talking about the $2000 they thought they'd get if both Democrats were elected after Mitch signaled he wouldn't support it after Trump said he would was legion. It's not often I feel confident asserting that if he'd said this thing or not said thing it would've changed the outcome but in this case I think it really would have.

  21. @brabantian
    Rather funny that leftist Antifa anti-Biden riots are breaking out in several US cities already, it may not be too long before many more Americans wish Trump had done the full Executive Order 'storm'

    Even the rightist commentariat is missing the depth of popular fondness for the symbolism of Trump, his faults and failings aside ... Trump was ultra-symbolically and thus indeed to a degree actually, maybe indeed 'the last bulwark against globalism'

    9am US time 20 January 2021, as Air Force One taxi'd down the runway and then took off from Andrews in Donald Trump's final flight as President, was a poetry-worthy swan song as Frank Sinatra singing 'My Way' played ... one saw a huge outpouring of emotion on online chat screens, tears flowing from millions of people's eyes ... here's video of that 5-minute, quite moving, aeroplane departure, Trump and Sinatra
    https://www.bitchute.com/video/Z07jLm9topAo/

    Replies: @36 ulster, @The Alarmist, @Sollipsist

    George and Sons seem to be losing control of the mini-golems they created. Gotta get some popcorn.

  22. @Rich
    @Jay Fink

    There are no "conservatives" on twitter. But voting for the Grimes gal would've been a disaster. McConnell is no Jesse Helms, but he's center-right and isn't anti-White. Most Whites will not vote for a hard core rightist, we can't get elected. We can't let the search for the perfect candidate allow even more leftists to get elected.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @Nodwink

    I agree.

    In all fairness, I feel obliged to point out that Mitch McConnell has been instrumental over the decades in nullifying a lot of Leftist appointments and in killing a lot of EuroSoc-type legislation like climate bills and whatnot.

    He is something of a sleaze, yes; but he has saved America a great deal of grief.

    I’m not willing to stop supporting the Senate GOP just yet. They did more for us than we give them credit for.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
  23. @Servant of Gla'aki
    Liz Warren is already being primaried by a state Senator in Wyoming, but she needs the leave House leadership before that. McConnell sucks. The GOP needs a new Senate Minority Leader. I suspect that may happen after next year's elections. There will be a bumper crop of new GOP Senators, few of whom will want to publicly associate themselves with McConnell's era.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @The Alarmist

    There will be a bumper crop of new GOP Senators….

    Did you pay attention to what happened in the 2018 and 2020 elections, not mention earlier ones? There are more than a few Republican candidates who won on election day but lost days later after all the “votes” were found and counted.

  24. @Chrisnonymous
    Dear Audacious Epigone,

    I note that earlier today, I made a comment in reply to DanHessinMD on another thread. It is visible in my commenting history, but is mot currently showing up in the blog thread. Unless you are shadowbanning me somehow and for some reason, it must be a technical issue with the commenting system. Maybe you should run it by Ron Unz?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Intelligent Dasein

    Try leaving Ron a comment on his bugs & suggestions page … he is fairly responsive.

    https://www.unz.com/announcement/bugs-suggestions/#comments

    Accessible from the main page too.

  25. @brabantian
    Rather funny that leftist Antifa anti-Biden riots are breaking out in several US cities already, it may not be too long before many more Americans wish Trump had done the full Executive Order 'storm'

    Even the rightist commentariat is missing the depth of popular fondness for the symbolism of Trump, his faults and failings aside ... Trump was ultra-symbolically and thus indeed to a degree actually, maybe indeed 'the last bulwark against globalism'

    9am US time 20 January 2021, as Air Force One taxi'd down the runway and then took off from Andrews in Donald Trump's final flight as President, was a poetry-worthy swan song as Frank Sinatra singing 'My Way' played ... one saw a huge outpouring of emotion on online chat screens, tears flowing from millions of people's eyes ... here's video of that 5-minute, quite moving, aeroplane departure, Trump and Sinatra
    https://www.bitchute.com/video/Z07jLm9topAo/

    Replies: @36 ulster, @The Alarmist, @Sollipsist

    I was crying because 28000 is a beautiful machine from the days when the USA was the pinnacle of Aerospace technology.

  26. @Brian Reilly
    @Jim Christian

    Jim, Surely he meant Liz Cheney? A bit of charity, perhaps? We will all need all the good will we can find in what portend to be very challenging circumstances.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Jim, Surely he meant Liz Cheney? A bit of charity, perhaps? We will all need all the good will we can find in what portend to be very challenging circumstances.

    I didn’t realize, until just now, that I typed “Warren”.

    Yes, I did mean to reference Liz Cheney.

    Sorry for the confusion.

  27. Perhaps both ought to take responsibility, right? Although, I do harbor some empathy for them, as there is legitimacy to the claim they were merely pulling a Daniel Ellsberg.

    “Julian Assange continues to rot in inhumane captivity…”

    No, his current accommodations at Belmarsh are not remotely close to “inhumane captivity”. Inmates there are offered access to education, workshops, two gyms, one focusing on Physical Education courses and one recreational, with use of a sports hall and a fitness room.

    “and Edward Snowden remains exiled in a land admittedly less oppressive to the human spirit than our own.

    Admittedly by Who/Whom?

    “Our elites are horrible.”

    They’re not as bad as you (and others) make it seem. Of course, we would have to put Donald Trump in that camp, so perhaps you COULD be right just by his inclusion…

    • Disagree: Nodwink
  28. @brabantian
    Rather funny that leftist Antifa anti-Biden riots are breaking out in several US cities already, it may not be too long before many more Americans wish Trump had done the full Executive Order 'storm'

    Even the rightist commentariat is missing the depth of popular fondness for the symbolism of Trump, his faults and failings aside ... Trump was ultra-symbolically and thus indeed to a degree actually, maybe indeed 'the last bulwark against globalism'

    9am US time 20 January 2021, as Air Force One taxi'd down the runway and then took off from Andrews in Donald Trump's final flight as President, was a poetry-worthy swan song as Frank Sinatra singing 'My Way' played ... one saw a huge outpouring of emotion on online chat screens, tears flowing from millions of people's eyes ... here's video of that 5-minute, quite moving, aeroplane departure, Trump and Sinatra
    https://www.bitchute.com/video/Z07jLm9topAo/

    Replies: @36 ulster, @The Alarmist, @Sollipsist

    Seems like Biden showing force to put down Antifa would be a crafty move to appeal to centrists on both sides. He’s not going to win any points with real progressives anyway; his record is too well known among them.

    This could be totally orchestrated to cement the middle-of-the-road bloc that wants to appear woke but has reservations about the past year’s chaos. You know, kind of a night of the long knives move.

  29. @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s hard not to sympathize with the independents’ bipartisan negative assessments across the board.
     
    Negative assessments of politicians are healthy. I am much to the right of 95% of the people taking the poll, and I'd have a negative assessment across the board, INCLUDING TRUMP.

    Some of the independents are just wishy-washy or would like "just the right mix, in the middle, who would be nice and make everything ALL BETTER." Yeah. Others are smart enough to see that there is one big Party, with 2 color-coded squads, when it comes to the politicians themselves, and it is NOT on our side.

    Julian Assange continues to rot in inhumane captivity and Edward Snowden remains exiled in a land admittedly less oppressive to the human spirit than our own.
     
    Yet almost all of these a-holes would use the word Libertards. (Hey, not all Libertarians are open-borders cucks like the folks at Reason magazine, you know.) These people may be Libertarians but not even know it.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    On these favorable/unfavorable polls, I always wonder how many people, say, have an “unfavorable” view of Trump because he failed to be Trumpy enough. For example, that he failed to build the wall or arrest Hillary, etc.

    It’s a very different kind of “unfavorability” than most people are thinking of when they see the bottom line numbers. Also, that kind of “unfavorable” respondent isn’t ever going to vote against him, although they might conceivably stay home.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Hypnotoad666

    Right. Most poll question are asked too stupidly to get good information. I was polled by Gallup a couple of months ago, and out of 30 to 45 minutes, there was only one question with which I thought I was making any kind of clear statement with my answer.

  30. @Hypnotoad666
    @Achmed E. Newman

    On these favorable/unfavorable polls, I always wonder how many people, say, have an "unfavorable" view of Trump because he failed to be Trumpy enough. For example, that he failed to build the wall or arrest Hillary, etc.

    It's a very different kind of "unfavorability" than most people are thinking of when they see the bottom line numbers. Also, that kind of "unfavorable" respondent isn't ever going to vote against him, although they might conceivably stay home.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Right. Most poll question are asked too stupidly to get good information. I was polled by Gallup a couple of months ago, and out of 30 to 45 minutes, there was only one question with which I thought I was making any kind of clear statement with my answer.

  31. @Dumbo
    The two-party system is not working (if it ever did). It is time for America to change its system, if it wants to keep any form of democratic government. Of course, it might be too late for that, given that the latest elections were a farce, partly because of fraud, and partly because of "electing a new people", which is worse than fraud.

    However, it is clear that now neither Demoncraps nor Rethuglycans currently represent the majority of Americans, not anyone other than themselves, and their pay checks (courtesy of AIPAC, Big Business, etc).

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    and their pay checks (courtesy of AIPAC, Big Business, etc).

    AIPAC doesn’t donate. They lobby and frighten. Their donors donate.

  32. @Rich
    @Jay Fink

    There are no "conservatives" on twitter. But voting for the Grimes gal would've been a disaster. McConnell is no Jesse Helms, but he's center-right and isn't anti-White. Most Whites will not vote for a hard core rightist, we can't get elected. We can't let the search for the perfect candidate allow even more leftists to get elected.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @Nodwink

    I am not an American, but it only took a few clicks to find out that McConnell, who took office in 1985, has overseen a massive invasion of immigrants to your country. What did Yertle do to stop this? There are parts of Minnesota that are jokingly referred to as “Little Mogadishu” — this happened while Mitch was one of the most powerful political figures in the US. Why did your GOP friends allow this to happen?

  33. @Chrisnonymous
    Dear Audacious Epigone,

    I note that earlier today, I made a comment in reply to DanHessinMD on another thread. It is visible in my commenting history, but is mot currently showing up in the blog thread. Unless you are shadowbanning me somehow and for some reason, it must be a technical issue with the commenting system. Maybe you should run it by Ron Unz?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Intelligent Dasein

    Chrisnonymous,

    Any updates on this? I’ve noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I’m wondering what’s going on.

    A shadowban? A Purge? Self-isolation? And is anyone seeing my comments?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Intelligent Dasein


    I’ve noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I’m wondering what’s going on.
     
    Yes, quite a few regulars have suddenly disappeared. The comments section here is unusually quiet.

    It might be that people are weary of endless post-mortems on the election but those regulars aren't even chiming in on subjects that usually interest them.

    Maybe some of them were commenting using work computers and UR is getting harder and harder to access? Maybe it's UR that is being quietly disappeared?

    And is anyone seeing my comments?
     
    Your comments are still appearing.

    The missing commenters aren't really hardline fanatical Trumpists so it's not that they're grieving.

    I think commenters are increasingly annoyed by Ron's comments limitation system that has had the effect of making it more difficult to keep healthy discussions going.

    And the atmosphere on UR has been getting crazier and more hostile over the past year. Maybe it's that (although AE at least tries to maintain a civil atmosphere on his blog).

    Or maybe people are coming to the conclusion that politics just isn't worth the aggravation these days?

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Audacious Epigone

    , @dfordoom
    @Intelligent Dasein


    Any updates on this? I’ve noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I’m wondering what’s going on.
     
    I have a theory that all online discussion groups/forums (not just political ones) have a natural life cycle. After a while all the interesting topics have been discussed to death and people start to lose interest.

    Slightly OT: what happened to your proposed post on African birth rates? I'm serious. I think it's an important topic. I personally suspect that Steve Sailer's Most Important Graph in the World which supposedly shows the whole world becoming sub-Saharan African will turn out to be as much of a myth as Paul Ehrlich's doomsday predictions on the population explosion half a century ago. I suspect that sub-Saharan African fertility will collapse.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @iffen

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I was switching between devices. On one, my sign-in info is saved--i.e., I am "signed in". On the other, it is not saved, but after I post a comment, I am "signed in".

    After experimenting with being signed in or not, I concluded that the most likely explanation is that when you post a comment on iSteve, it tells you you are awaiting confirmation, but when you post a comment on AE, it looks like your comment is live, but in reality you are awaiting confirmation. Either that, or there was a technical glitch. I'm not sure.

    , @Old Palo Altan
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Self-Isolator here.

    On the Sunday before the election I was asked if I thought Trump would win. My reply: "Yes, but it will have to be a landslide, or it will be stolen from him."

    I got up on Wednesday morning after a difficult night, turned on the computer, said a prayer, and then saw my worst fears confirmed: no landslide, or at least not one which was not being stolen from him right before our eyes, in real, excruciating time.

    I looked around the comments, here and elsewhere that day and perhaps the next. Only you and Vinteuil (but no doubt there were a few others) had immediately understood the enormity of what was happening.

    At that moment I cursed this world below and vowed to live for other things, those which in fact meant more to me in any case and which neither Biden nor Bergoglio, nor the minions of either could take from me, ever: Truth, Beauty, Goodness, and the pursuit of all three (which are, of course, One).

    I didn't look at this or similar sites again for six weeks. Mostly I re-read War and Peace and listened to Bach and Gregorian chant. Around the time of the 6th of January I peeked in once or twice, and then a bit more, and now, again, every evening more or less.

    But the enemy, now triply emboldened, is staring through some no longer secret door, and takes it all down. dfordoom has it right: commentators (not me; here I am but an occasionally obstreperous observer) need to force a directional change. The doom won't be put off, but the time left to us will be more stimulating, and thus more fruitful.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @dfordoom

  34. @Achmed E. Newman
    @nebulafox

    Yeah, NB, but with stem cells, hyperbaric chambers. brain transplants, botox, and new types of marijuana, our leaders SHOULD be able to go longer than those old crusty Politburo guys. C'mon, man! This is the 21st century.


    Their shock and anger at discontent and disrespect seems genuine, however farcical and cynical it may appear to us.
     
    Seriously now, you make a really good point with this. Are they really that out of touch? It's quite possible.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    As I’ve said in previous comments, the Soviets had 20 million+ men killed in WWII, a demographic hit that was as much as anything a reason they lost the Cold War: in some ways, it’s more astounding (and, I suppose, a testament to Russian tenacity and hard-headedness) that Communism lasted as long as it did than that it eventually failed. That made their failed gerontocracy somewhat understandable, if not excusable. We, on the other hand, just have a political class in power through inertia, despite decades of incompetence and venality that would lead to personnel replacement in other nations. And there is absolutely no reason-none at all-that it needs to be this way.

    As I’ve also said, it isn’t simply that these people have assumptions about how the world works that are highly outdated, or grew up in a world so removed from ours today that it might as well have been the era of powdered wigs. It’s that societal dynamics ensure that they don’t learn, because they’ll never feel the impact of their own policies. I think it is highly telling that our political class regularly flouted lockdown rules, despite belonging to the demographic that was disproportionately vulnerable to the virus. They just don’t think of it as a threat to them.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @nebulafox


    We, on the other hand, just have a political class in power through inertia, despite decades of incompetence and venality that would lead to personnel replacement in other nations.
     
    I hadn't heard that the Iron Law of Oligarchy had been repealed. The more entrenched they are, the harder they are to dis-entrench. They might be incompetent at managing the nation in the citizens' interests, but they are extremely competent at managing the nation in their own interests. And in that game, venality is a virtue rather than a vice.
  35. anon[233] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s that societal dynamics ensure that they don’t learn, because they’ll never feel the impact of their own policies. I think it is highly telling that our political class regularly flouted lockdown rules, despite belonging to the demographic that was disproportionately vulnerable to the virus. They just don’t think of it as a threat to them.

    The obvious example of this is obvious. Compare and contrast the reactions of the social / political / economic elite to the burning of Minneapolis, Kenosha, occupation of Capitol Hill in Seattle, etc. with the mostly harmless and comic “invasion” of the Capitol building in DC. Just this week Antifa was active again in Seattle and Portland, Oregon – there were no public announcements of how the FBI is gonna track them all down. Yet not just the Capitol invaders, but apparently everyone who was outside on the National Mall is in an FBI database now.

    MSNBC was full of grown men with their voices quavering like high school girls as they talked about the “invasion” and how it is totally a good thing to put those people on the no-fly list, cancel all their credit, etc. There was none of that talk last summer, when vanloads of “just an idea” Antifa rolled into midwestern cities, burned down bookstores, burned down small groceries, looted then burned big box stores and burned down police stations.

    One of these events featured an almost comic-operatta “threat” to the elites, while the other events actually ruined the lives of many ordinary, middle class people. Which one requires more Federal legislation giving even more power to the alphabet agencies?

    Who? Whom? for sure.

    Oh, and PS for the older people: some of the imagery featured in this week’s Biden’s inauguration is right out of the “Hunger Games”. Gaga is an obvious example from head to foot. Ask your kids or grandkids who read the books and/or saw the movies about President Snow’s character.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @anon

    >MSNBC was full of grown men with their voices quavering like high school girls as they talked about the “invasion” and how it is totally a good thing to put those people on the no-fly list, cancel all their credit, etc.

    https://www.air.tv/watch?v=tFt4RHLpSAKj4wMRrILeOg

    You can almost smell the estrogen.

  36. @nebulafox
    @Achmed E. Newman

    As I've said in previous comments, the Soviets had 20 million+ men killed in WWII, a demographic hit that was as much as anything a reason they lost the Cold War: in some ways, it's more astounding (and, I suppose, a testament to Russian tenacity and hard-headedness) that Communism lasted as long as it did than that it eventually failed. That made their failed gerontocracy somewhat understandable, if not excusable. We, on the other hand, just have a political class in power through inertia, despite decades of incompetence and venality that would lead to personnel replacement in other nations. And there is absolutely no reason-none at all-that it needs to be this way.

    As I've also said, it isn't simply that these people have assumptions about how the world works that are highly outdated, or grew up in a world so removed from ours today that it might as well have been the era of powdered wigs. It's that societal dynamics ensure that they don't learn, because they'll never feel the impact of their own policies. I think it is highly telling that our political class regularly flouted lockdown rules, despite belonging to the demographic that was disproportionately vulnerable to the virus. They just don't think of it as a threat to them.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    We, on the other hand, just have a political class in power through inertia, despite decades of incompetence and venality that would lead to personnel replacement in other nations.

    I hadn’t heard that the Iron Law of Oligarchy had been repealed. The more entrenched they are, the harder they are to dis-entrench. They might be incompetent at managing the nation in the citizens’ interests, but they are extremely competent at managing the nation in their own interests. And in that game, venality is a virtue rather than a vice.

  37. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Chrisnonymous

    Chrisnonymous,

    Any updates on this? I've noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I'm wondering what's going on.

    A shadowban? A Purge? Self-isolation? And is anyone seeing my comments?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom, @Chrisnonymous, @Old Palo Altan

    I’ve noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I’m wondering what’s going on.

    Yes, quite a few regulars have suddenly disappeared. The comments section here is unusually quiet.

    It might be that people are weary of endless post-mortems on the election but those regulars aren’t even chiming in on subjects that usually interest them.

    Maybe some of them were commenting using work computers and UR is getting harder and harder to access? Maybe it’s UR that is being quietly disappeared?

    And is anyone seeing my comments?

    Your comments are still appearing.

    The missing commenters aren’t really hardline fanatical Trumpists so it’s not that they’re grieving.

    I think commenters are increasingly annoyed by Ron’s comments limitation system that has had the effect of making it more difficult to keep healthy discussions going.

    And the atmosphere on UR has been getting crazier and more hostile over the past year. Maybe it’s that (although AE at least tries to maintain a civil atmosphere on his blog).

    Or maybe people are coming to the conclusion that politics just isn’t worth the aggravation these days?

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom


    es, quite a few regulars have suddenly disappeared. The comments section here is unusually quiet.
     
    I have a suspicion that people are afraid. Rightly so, but stopping commenting is illogical because anyone who can and is willing to doxx you will go back through old comments to doxx old commenters too. Two things that would help are (1) Unz making comments disappear after some period of months or (2) Unz being more confidence-inducing that his security measures are adequate.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @dfordoom

    Maybe it’s UR that is being quietly disappeared?

    G has a clear bias against UR in search results. And links to UR cannot even be shared in Facebook messenger anymore, let alone Facebook itself. The pretense is Covid misinformation. Something like 80% of Americans have a FB account, so that's a big handicap for the site. Commenter Mark G mentioned also that USG sites have UR blocked for "hate and racism" or something like that, so the censors are definitely at work.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  38. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Chrisnonymous

    Chrisnonymous,

    Any updates on this? I've noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I'm wondering what's going on.

    A shadowban? A Purge? Self-isolation? And is anyone seeing my comments?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom, @Chrisnonymous, @Old Palo Altan

    Any updates on this? I’ve noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I’m wondering what’s going on.

    I have a theory that all online discussion groups/forums (not just political ones) have a natural life cycle. After a while all the interesting topics have been discussed to death and people start to lose interest.

    Slightly OT: what happened to your proposed post on African birth rates? I’m serious. I think it’s an important topic. I personally suspect that Steve Sailer’s Most Important Graph in the World which supposedly shows the whole world becoming sub-Saharan African will turn out to be as much of a myth as Paul Ehrlich’s doomsday predictions on the population explosion half a century ago. I suspect that sub-Saharan African fertility will collapse.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @dfordoom


    Slightly OT: what happened to your proposed post on African birth rates?
     
    My domestic situation was making it difficult. (Translation: My wife hates it when I spend time writing instead of helping around the house.)

    I'll try to get something going with it nonetheless.

    I have a theory that all online discussion groups/forums (not just political ones) have a natural life cycle. After a while all the interesting topics have been discussed to death and people start to lose interest.
     
    Yes, I've seen it happen with one forum after another since I started my serious internet commenting career c. 2004. Everything eventually becomes a self-licking ice cream cone.

    One of the things I loved about the old internet was all the old phpBB forums. I found it fascinating to read through threads that had been dead for years, just seeing what people's opinions were at the time and how they responded to one another. The archaeology of old conversations is interesting stuff once all the passions have cooled and there is nothing really left to discuss.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @iffen
    @dfordoom

    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we've said everything several times and there's not much of any importance left to say.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom

  39. @anon
    It’s that societal dynamics ensure that they don’t learn, because they’ll never feel the impact of their own policies. I think it is highly telling that our political class regularly flouted lockdown rules, despite belonging to the demographic that was disproportionately vulnerable to the virus. They just don’t think of it as a threat to them.

    The obvious example of this is obvious. Compare and contrast the reactions of the social / political / economic elite to the burning of Minneapolis, Kenosha, occupation of Capitol Hill in Seattle, etc. with the mostly harmless and comic "invasion" of the Capitol building in DC. Just this week Antifa was active again in Seattle and Portland, Oregon - there were no public announcements of how the FBI is gonna track them all down. Yet not just the Capitol invaders, but apparently everyone who was outside on the National Mall is in an FBI database now.

    MSNBC was full of grown men with their voices quavering like high school girls as they talked about the "invasion" and how it is totally a good thing to put those people on the no-fly list, cancel all their credit, etc. There was none of that talk last summer, when vanloads of "just an idea" Antifa rolled into midwestern cities, burned down bookstores, burned down small groceries, looted then burned big box stores and burned down police stations.

    One of these events featured an almost comic-operatta "threat" to the elites, while the other events actually ruined the lives of many ordinary, middle class people. Which one requires more Federal legislation giving even more power to the alphabet agencies?

    Who? Whom? for sure.

    Oh, and PS for the older people: some of the imagery featured in this week's Biden's inauguration is right out of the "Hunger Games". Gaga is an obvious example from head to foot. Ask your kids or grandkids who read the books and/or saw the movies about President Snow's character.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    >MSNBC was full of grown men with their voices quavering like high school girls as they talked about the “invasion” and how it is totally a good thing to put those people on the no-fly list, cancel all their credit, etc.

    https://www.air.tv/watch?v=tFt4RHLpSAKj4wMRrILeOg

    You can almost smell the estrogen.

  40. @dfordoom
    @Intelligent Dasein


    Any updates on this? I’ve noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I’m wondering what’s going on.
     
    I have a theory that all online discussion groups/forums (not just political ones) have a natural life cycle. After a while all the interesting topics have been discussed to death and people start to lose interest.

    Slightly OT: what happened to your proposed post on African birth rates? I'm serious. I think it's an important topic. I personally suspect that Steve Sailer's Most Important Graph in the World which supposedly shows the whole world becoming sub-Saharan African will turn out to be as much of a myth as Paul Ehrlich's doomsday predictions on the population explosion half a century ago. I suspect that sub-Saharan African fertility will collapse.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @iffen

    Slightly OT: what happened to your proposed post on African birth rates?

    My domestic situation was making it difficult. (Translation: My wife hates it when I spend time writing instead of helping around the house.)

    I’ll try to get something going with it nonetheless.

    I have a theory that all online discussion groups/forums (not just political ones) have a natural life cycle. After a while all the interesting topics have been discussed to death and people start to lose interest.

    Yes, I’ve seen it happen with one forum after another since I started my serious internet commenting career c. 2004. Everything eventually becomes a self-licking ice cream cone.

    One of the things I loved about the old internet was all the old phpBB forums. I found it fascinating to read through threads that had been dead for years, just seeing what people’s opinions were at the time and how they responded to one another. The archaeology of old conversations is interesting stuff once all the passions have cooled and there is nothing really left to discuss.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Intelligent Dasein


    Yes, I’ve seen it happen with one forum after another since I started my serious internet commenting career c. 2004. Everything eventually becomes a self-licking ice cream cone.
     
    A self-licking ice cream cone sums it up.

    Maybe the combination of commenting frenzy over the virus and commenting frenzy over the election led to premature burnout for a lot of commenters.

    The only way to keep an online forum alive is to provide a constant infusion of new blood. That no longer seems to be happening at UR - Ron can hire new writers but the commentariat seems to be rather stagnant. How many worthwhile new commenters have popped up here in the past six months?

    Of course it doesn't help that it's now difficult for new readers to find UR since it's been effectively shadowbanned by all the places which would normally be directing them here.

    Is this the way UR will end, not with a bang but a whimper?
  41. @Intelligent Dasein
    @dfordoom


    Slightly OT: what happened to your proposed post on African birth rates?
     
    My domestic situation was making it difficult. (Translation: My wife hates it when I spend time writing instead of helping around the house.)

    I'll try to get something going with it nonetheless.

    I have a theory that all online discussion groups/forums (not just political ones) have a natural life cycle. After a while all the interesting topics have been discussed to death and people start to lose interest.
     
    Yes, I've seen it happen with one forum after another since I started my serious internet commenting career c. 2004. Everything eventually becomes a self-licking ice cream cone.

    One of the things I loved about the old internet was all the old phpBB forums. I found it fascinating to read through threads that had been dead for years, just seeing what people's opinions were at the time and how they responded to one another. The archaeology of old conversations is interesting stuff once all the passions have cooled and there is nothing really left to discuss.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Yes, I’ve seen it happen with one forum after another since I started my serious internet commenting career c. 2004. Everything eventually becomes a self-licking ice cream cone.

    A self-licking ice cream cone sums it up.

    Maybe the combination of commenting frenzy over the virus and commenting frenzy over the election led to premature burnout for a lot of commenters.

    The only way to keep an online forum alive is to provide a constant infusion of new blood. That no longer seems to be happening at UR – Ron can hire new writers but the commentariat seems to be rather stagnant. How many worthwhile new commenters have popped up here in the past six months?

    Of course it doesn’t help that it’s now difficult for new readers to find UR since it’s been effectively shadowbanned by all the places which would normally be directing them here.

    Is this the way UR will end, not with a bang but a whimper?

  42. @dfordoom
    @Intelligent Dasein


    Any updates on this? I’ve noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I’m wondering what’s going on.
     
    I have a theory that all online discussion groups/forums (not just political ones) have a natural life cycle. After a while all the interesting topics have been discussed to death and people start to lose interest.

    Slightly OT: what happened to your proposed post on African birth rates? I'm serious. I think it's an important topic. I personally suspect that Steve Sailer's Most Important Graph in the World which supposedly shows the whole world becoming sub-Saharan African will turn out to be as much of a myth as Paul Ehrlich's doomsday predictions on the population explosion half a century ago. I suspect that sub-Saharan African fertility will collapse.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @iffen

    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we’ve said everything several times and there’s not much of any importance left to say.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @iffen


    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we’ve said everything several times and there’s not much of any importance left to say.
     
    Yeah, that's what happens to all internet forums. Every relevant topic has been exhausted.

    The only answer is a complete change of direction. We don't need any more discussions on the election, or the coronavirus, or BLM, or immigration, or whether Joe Biden is senile or whether Mitt Romney is a poopy-head. Because although they might be important subjects there is nothing left to say that hasn't been said a hundred times.

    Unz Review doesn't need any more articles on the Second World War or any more discussions of 9/11 conspiracy theories.

    We need to find totally new topics that are still going to be relevant to the regular commenters, or genuinely original twists on old topics.

    That's why I was encouraging ID to do his article on African population growth. The idea that African population growth is a myth is certainly a new twist on an old topic.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    , @dfordoom
    @iffen


    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we’ve said everything several times and there’s not much of any importance left to say.
     
    OK, here's a new-ish topic.

    Were the hippies wrong about everything?

    I grew up with the assumption that hippies were scum and really were wrong about everything. I think it's now obvious they were right about some things. They were right about the police. They were right about the CIA. They were right about the FBI. They were right about the military. They were right about imperialist wars. On the Vietnam War they were right, although possibly for the wrong reasons.

    What's really interesting is that a lot of the criticisms that the late 50s/60s counter-culture made of western society are not that dissimilar to sentiments that get expressed regularly by far rightists right here on UR - that society had become too materialistic, that people were too obsessed with status, that the military-industrial complex was dangerous. The counter-culture was also suspicious of politicians, from both parties (they hated Nixon but they hated LBJ as well).

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

  43. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Chrisnonymous

    Chrisnonymous,

    Any updates on this? I've noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I'm wondering what's going on.

    A shadowban? A Purge? Self-isolation? And is anyone seeing my comments?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom, @Chrisnonymous, @Old Palo Altan

    I was switching between devices. On one, my sign-in info is saved–i.e., I am “signed in”. On the other, it is not saved, but after I post a comment, I am “signed in”.

    After experimenting with being signed in or not, I concluded that the most likely explanation is that when you post a comment on iSteve, it tells you you are awaiting confirmation, but when you post a comment on AE, it looks like your comment is live, but in reality you are awaiting confirmation. Either that, or there was a technical glitch. I’m not sure.

  44. @dfordoom
    @Intelligent Dasein


    I’ve noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I’m wondering what’s going on.
     
    Yes, quite a few regulars have suddenly disappeared. The comments section here is unusually quiet.

    It might be that people are weary of endless post-mortems on the election but those regulars aren't even chiming in on subjects that usually interest them.

    Maybe some of them were commenting using work computers and UR is getting harder and harder to access? Maybe it's UR that is being quietly disappeared?

    And is anyone seeing my comments?
     
    Your comments are still appearing.

    The missing commenters aren't really hardline fanatical Trumpists so it's not that they're grieving.

    I think commenters are increasingly annoyed by Ron's comments limitation system that has had the effect of making it more difficult to keep healthy discussions going.

    And the atmosphere on UR has been getting crazier and more hostile over the past year. Maybe it's that (although AE at least tries to maintain a civil atmosphere on his blog).

    Or maybe people are coming to the conclusion that politics just isn't worth the aggravation these days?

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Audacious Epigone

    es, quite a few regulars have suddenly disappeared. The comments section here is unusually quiet.

    I have a suspicion that people are afraid. Rightly so, but stopping commenting is illogical because anyone who can and is willing to doxx you will go back through old comments to doxx old commenters too. Two things that would help are (1) Unz making comments disappear after some period of months or (2) Unz being more confidence-inducing that his security measures are adequate.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Chrisnonymous



    yes, quite a few regulars have suddenly disappeared. The comments section here is unusually quiet.
     
    I have a suspicion that people are afraid.
     
    That's my feeling as well. A lot of commenters who have something to lose (good jobs, homes, families) probably no longer think it's worth taking the risks involved in frequenting sites like UR.

    Unfortunately the commenters who have gone MIA include some of the most interesting commenters we had.
  45. @iffen
    @dfordoom

    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we've said everything several times and there's not much of any importance left to say.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom

    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we’ve said everything several times and there’s not much of any importance left to say.

    Yeah, that’s what happens to all internet forums. Every relevant topic has been exhausted.

    The only answer is a complete change of direction. We don’t need any more discussions on the election, or the coronavirus, or BLM, or immigration, or whether Joe Biden is senile or whether Mitt Romney is a poopy-head. Because although they might be important subjects there is nothing left to say that hasn’t been said a hundred times.

    Unz Review doesn’t need any more articles on the Second World War or any more discussions of 9/11 conspiracy theories.

    We need to find totally new topics that are still going to be relevant to the regular commenters, or genuinely original twists on old topics.

    That’s why I was encouraging ID to do his article on African population growth. The idea that African population growth is a myth is certainly a new twist on an old topic.

    • Agree: Intelligent Dasein
    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @dfordoom

    I want a contributor's spot here. I think I've earned it. And I have by no means exhausted the relevant topics I need to talk about.

    Somebody should say something to Ron.

    The problem is, I'm not an independent scholar. I am not independently wealthy; quite the contrary. I am a family man with a day job and a somewhat delicate domestic situation, so I can't afford to just do everything pro bono.

    If I'm going to contribute I need to be compensated. If not with money, then at least with the respectability of an actual byline.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @anon

  46. @iffen
    @dfordoom

    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we've said everything several times and there's not much of any importance left to say.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom

    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we’ve said everything several times and there’s not much of any importance left to say.

    OK, here’s a new-ish topic.

    Were the hippies wrong about everything?

    I grew up with the assumption that hippies were scum and really were wrong about everything. I think it’s now obvious they were right about some things. They were right about the police. They were right about the CIA. They were right about the FBI. They were right about the military. They were right about imperialist wars. On the Vietnam War they were right, although possibly for the wrong reasons.

    What’s really interesting is that a lot of the criticisms that the late 50s/60s counter-culture made of western society are not that dissimilar to sentiments that get expressed regularly by far rightists right here on UR – that society had become too materialistic, that people were too obsessed with status, that the military-industrial complex was dangerous. The counter-culture was also suspicious of politicians, from both parties (they hated Nixon but they hated LBJ as well).

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @dfordoom

    More parsimoniously, the dissident right is the new counterculture, for better or worse.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  47. @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom


    es, quite a few regulars have suddenly disappeared. The comments section here is unusually quiet.
     
    I have a suspicion that people are afraid. Rightly so, but stopping commenting is illogical because anyone who can and is willing to doxx you will go back through old comments to doxx old commenters too. Two things that would help are (1) Unz making comments disappear after some period of months or (2) Unz being more confidence-inducing that his security measures are adequate.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    yes, quite a few regulars have suddenly disappeared. The comments section here is unusually quiet.

    I have a suspicion that people are afraid.

    That’s my feeling as well. A lot of commenters who have something to lose (good jobs, homes, families) probably no longer think it’s worth taking the risks involved in frequenting sites like UR.

    Unfortunately the commenters who have gone MIA include some of the most interesting commenters we had.

  48. @dfordoom
    @iffen


    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we’ve said everything several times and there’s not much of any importance left to say.
     
    Yeah, that's what happens to all internet forums. Every relevant topic has been exhausted.

    The only answer is a complete change of direction. We don't need any more discussions on the election, or the coronavirus, or BLM, or immigration, or whether Joe Biden is senile or whether Mitt Romney is a poopy-head. Because although they might be important subjects there is nothing left to say that hasn't been said a hundred times.

    Unz Review doesn't need any more articles on the Second World War or any more discussions of 9/11 conspiracy theories.

    We need to find totally new topics that are still going to be relevant to the regular commenters, or genuinely original twists on old topics.

    That's why I was encouraging ID to do his article on African population growth. The idea that African population growth is a myth is certainly a new twist on an old topic.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    I want a contributor’s spot here. I think I’ve earned it. And I have by no means exhausted the relevant topics I need to talk about.

    Somebody should say something to Ron.

    The problem is, I’m not an independent scholar. I am not independently wealthy; quite the contrary. I am a family man with a day job and a somewhat delicate domestic situation, so I can’t afford to just do everything pro bono.

    If I’m going to contribute I need to be compensated. If not with money, then at least with the respectability of an actual byline.

    • LOL: iffen
    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Intelligent Dasein


    I want a contributor’s spot here.
     
    I'd have no problems with that. I often disagree with you but I think you'd spark some fascinating discussions. God knows you'd be more interesting than some of the other contributors here. Your perspective seems to me to fall into the category of "Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media."
    , @anon
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Somebody should say something to Ron.

    You're a real go getter, dude!

    lol

  49. @Intelligent Dasein
    @dfordoom

    I want a contributor's spot here. I think I've earned it. And I have by no means exhausted the relevant topics I need to talk about.

    Somebody should say something to Ron.

    The problem is, I'm not an independent scholar. I am not independently wealthy; quite the contrary. I am a family man with a day job and a somewhat delicate domestic situation, so I can't afford to just do everything pro bono.

    If I'm going to contribute I need to be compensated. If not with money, then at least with the respectability of an actual byline.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @anon

    I want a contributor’s spot here.

    I’d have no problems with that. I often disagree with you but I think you’d spark some fascinating discussions. God knows you’d be more interesting than some of the other contributors here. Your perspective seems to me to fall into the category of “Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media.”

  50. @Intelligent Dasein
    @dfordoom

    I want a contributor's spot here. I think I've earned it. And I have by no means exhausted the relevant topics I need to talk about.

    Somebody should say something to Ron.

    The problem is, I'm not an independent scholar. I am not independently wealthy; quite the contrary. I am a family man with a day job and a somewhat delicate domestic situation, so I can't afford to just do everything pro bono.

    If I'm going to contribute I need to be compensated. If not with money, then at least with the respectability of an actual byline.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @anon

    Somebody should say something to Ron.

    You’re a real go getter, dude!

    lol

  51. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Chrisnonymous

    Chrisnonymous,

    Any updates on this? I've noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I'm wondering what's going on.

    A shadowban? A Purge? Self-isolation? And is anyone seeing my comments?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @dfordoom, @Chrisnonymous, @Old Palo Altan

    Self-Isolator here.

    On the Sunday before the election I was asked if I thought Trump would win. My reply: “Yes, but it will have to be a landslide, or it will be stolen from him.”

    I got up on Wednesday morning after a difficult night, turned on the computer, said a prayer, and then saw my worst fears confirmed: no landslide, or at least not one which was not being stolen from him right before our eyes, in real, excruciating time.

    I looked around the comments, here and elsewhere that day and perhaps the next. Only you and Vinteuil (but no doubt there were a few others) had immediately understood the enormity of what was happening.

    At that moment I cursed this world below and vowed to live for other things, those which in fact meant more to me in any case and which neither Biden nor Bergoglio, nor the minions of either could take from me, ever: Truth, Beauty, Goodness, and the pursuit of all three (which are, of course, One).

    I didn’t look at this or similar sites again for six weeks. Mostly I re-read War and Peace and listened to Bach and Gregorian chant. Around the time of the 6th of January I peeked in once or twice, and then a bit more, and now, again, every evening more or less.

    But the enemy, now triply emboldened, is staring through some no longer secret door, and takes it all down. dfordoom has it right: commentators (not me; here I am but an occasionally obstreperous observer) need to force a directional change. The doom won’t be put off, but the time left to us will be more stimulating, and thus more fruitful.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @Old Palo Altan

    My goodness!

    All I can say is, I'm so thankful you broke quarantine to drop me a line. I've been thinking about you and praying for you, and I missed you.

    I hope I will see you hereabouts again. I'm sure AE is aware of what I and dfordoom have been saying about a directional change, and we will politely continue to do so.

    I am completely serious about offering myself as a contributor to this website, despite the LOLs of certain snarky commenters.

    , @dfordoom
    @Old Palo Altan


    dfordoom has it right: commentators (not me; here I am but an occasionally obstreperous observer) need to force a directional change. The doom won’t be put off, but the time left to us will be more stimulating, and thus more fruitful.
     
    Given that at the moment the neoliberals are in complete control there's not much we can do (in the short term) to challenge the regime. But I think there is an advantage to be gained in making ourselves more psychologically healthy. We can do this by not giving in to craziness and bizarre conspiracy theories. Not destroying ourselves with madness. I think there's also an advantage in not seeking self-destruction.

    At some point in the future an opportunity may arise to present an effective political challenge. We're not going to be able to seize such an opportunity if we turn ourselves into psychological wrecks.

    And I speak of "we" because although I tend further left (in an Old School Left sort of way) than most people here I'm still a dissident and I still despise the neoliberal Establishment.

    Timing is everything. You don't start planning an all-out frontal offensive when the odds are stacked against you. You wait until circumstances are favourable. While you wait you keep yourself sane.
  52. @Old Palo Altan
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Self-Isolator here.

    On the Sunday before the election I was asked if I thought Trump would win. My reply: "Yes, but it will have to be a landslide, or it will be stolen from him."

    I got up on Wednesday morning after a difficult night, turned on the computer, said a prayer, and then saw my worst fears confirmed: no landslide, or at least not one which was not being stolen from him right before our eyes, in real, excruciating time.

    I looked around the comments, here and elsewhere that day and perhaps the next. Only you and Vinteuil (but no doubt there were a few others) had immediately understood the enormity of what was happening.

    At that moment I cursed this world below and vowed to live for other things, those which in fact meant more to me in any case and which neither Biden nor Bergoglio, nor the minions of either could take from me, ever: Truth, Beauty, Goodness, and the pursuit of all three (which are, of course, One).

    I didn't look at this or similar sites again for six weeks. Mostly I re-read War and Peace and listened to Bach and Gregorian chant. Around the time of the 6th of January I peeked in once or twice, and then a bit more, and now, again, every evening more or less.

    But the enemy, now triply emboldened, is staring through some no longer secret door, and takes it all down. dfordoom has it right: commentators (not me; here I am but an occasionally obstreperous observer) need to force a directional change. The doom won't be put off, but the time left to us will be more stimulating, and thus more fruitful.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @dfordoom

    My goodness!

    All I can say is, I’m so thankful you broke quarantine to drop me a line. I’ve been thinking about you and praying for you, and I missed you.

    I hope I will see you hereabouts again. I’m sure AE is aware of what I and dfordoom have been saying about a directional change, and we will politely continue to do so.

    I am completely serious about offering myself as a contributor to this website, despite the LOLs of certain snarky commenters.

    • LOL: iffen
  53. Thanks. Prayers reciprocated.

    Unz should take up your offer. If he doesn’t, at least your comments (and those of some few others here) will always be worth the detour.

  54. @Old Palo Altan
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Self-Isolator here.

    On the Sunday before the election I was asked if I thought Trump would win. My reply: "Yes, but it will have to be a landslide, or it will be stolen from him."

    I got up on Wednesday morning after a difficult night, turned on the computer, said a prayer, and then saw my worst fears confirmed: no landslide, or at least not one which was not being stolen from him right before our eyes, in real, excruciating time.

    I looked around the comments, here and elsewhere that day and perhaps the next. Only you and Vinteuil (but no doubt there were a few others) had immediately understood the enormity of what was happening.

    At that moment I cursed this world below and vowed to live for other things, those which in fact meant more to me in any case and which neither Biden nor Bergoglio, nor the minions of either could take from me, ever: Truth, Beauty, Goodness, and the pursuit of all three (which are, of course, One).

    I didn't look at this or similar sites again for six weeks. Mostly I re-read War and Peace and listened to Bach and Gregorian chant. Around the time of the 6th of January I peeked in once or twice, and then a bit more, and now, again, every evening more or less.

    But the enemy, now triply emboldened, is staring through some no longer secret door, and takes it all down. dfordoom has it right: commentators (not me; here I am but an occasionally obstreperous observer) need to force a directional change. The doom won't be put off, but the time left to us will be more stimulating, and thus more fruitful.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @dfordoom

    dfordoom has it right: commentators (not me; here I am but an occasionally obstreperous observer) need to force a directional change. The doom won’t be put off, but the time left to us will be more stimulating, and thus more fruitful.

    Given that at the moment the neoliberals are in complete control there’s not much we can do (in the short term) to challenge the regime. But I think there is an advantage to be gained in making ourselves more psychologically healthy. We can do this by not giving in to craziness and bizarre conspiracy theories. Not destroying ourselves with madness. I think there’s also an advantage in not seeking self-destruction.

    At some point in the future an opportunity may arise to present an effective political challenge. We’re not going to be able to seize such an opportunity if we turn ourselves into psychological wrecks.

    And I speak of “we” because although I tend further left (in an Old School Left sort of way) than most people here I’m still a dissident and I still despise the neoliberal Establishment.

    Timing is everything. You don’t start planning an all-out frontal offensive when the odds are stacked against you. You wait until circumstances are favourable. While you wait you keep yourself sane.

    • Agree: iffen
  55. @Peter Akuleyev
    Mitch has been the real power running the United States for the entire Trump Presidency. (In fact, Mitch was arguably in charge for most of the Obama Presidency as well). As long as Trump didn't cross Mitch, Mitch protected him from investigations. Now Trump cost Mitch the Senate, and Mitch is pissed. History suggests Mitch will win this battle easily.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    Did Trump cost Mitch the Senate, or did Mitch cost Mitch the Senate? The number of people talking about the $2000 they thought they’d get if both Democrats were elected after Mitch signaled he wouldn’t support it after Trump said he would was legion. It’s not often I feel confident asserting that if he’d said this thing or not said thing it would’ve changed the outcome but in this case I think it really would have.

    • Agree: iffen
  56. @dfordoom
    @Intelligent Dasein


    I’ve noticed many formerly frequent commenters seem to be MOA and I’m wondering what’s going on.
     
    Yes, quite a few regulars have suddenly disappeared. The comments section here is unusually quiet.

    It might be that people are weary of endless post-mortems on the election but those regulars aren't even chiming in on subjects that usually interest them.

    Maybe some of them were commenting using work computers and UR is getting harder and harder to access? Maybe it's UR that is being quietly disappeared?

    And is anyone seeing my comments?
     
    Your comments are still appearing.

    The missing commenters aren't really hardline fanatical Trumpists so it's not that they're grieving.

    I think commenters are increasingly annoyed by Ron's comments limitation system that has had the effect of making it more difficult to keep healthy discussions going.

    And the atmosphere on UR has been getting crazier and more hostile over the past year. Maybe it's that (although AE at least tries to maintain a civil atmosphere on his blog).

    Or maybe people are coming to the conclusion that politics just isn't worth the aggravation these days?

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Audacious Epigone

    Maybe it’s UR that is being quietly disappeared?

    G has a clear bias against UR in search results. And links to UR cannot even be shared in Facebook messenger anymore, let alone Facebook itself. The pretense is Covid misinformation. Something like 80% of Americans have a FB account, so that’s a big handicap for the site. Commenter Mark G mentioned also that USG sites have UR blocked for “hate and racism” or something like that, so the censors are definitely at work.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Audacious Epigone


    G has a clear bias against UR in search results. And links to UR cannot even be shared in Facebook messenger anymore, let alone Facebook itself. The pretense is Covid misinformation. Something like 80% of Americans have a FB account, so that’s a big handicap for the site. Commenter Mark G mentioned also that USG sites have UR blocked for “hate and racism” or something like that, so the censors are definitely at work.
     
    Yep. Censorship is a lot more sophisticated than it used to be. There's no longer any need to ban things. They can just be quietly suffocated. Which is almost certainly what will happen to UR.

    The First Amendment has been exposed as worthless. In practice, as distinct from theory, freedom of speech is already a thing of the past.
  57. @dfordoom
    @iffen


    Maybe we should consider the possibility that we’ve said everything several times and there’s not much of any importance left to say.
     
    OK, here's a new-ish topic.

    Were the hippies wrong about everything?

    I grew up with the assumption that hippies were scum and really were wrong about everything. I think it's now obvious they were right about some things. They were right about the police. They were right about the CIA. They were right about the FBI. They were right about the military. They were right about imperialist wars. On the Vietnam War they were right, although possibly for the wrong reasons.

    What's really interesting is that a lot of the criticisms that the late 50s/60s counter-culture made of western society are not that dissimilar to sentiments that get expressed regularly by far rightists right here on UR - that society had become too materialistic, that people were too obsessed with status, that the military-industrial complex was dangerous. The counter-culture was also suspicious of politicians, from both parties (they hated Nixon but they hated LBJ as well).

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    More parsimoniously, the dissident right is the new counterculture, for better or worse.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Audacious Epigone


    More parsimoniously, the dissident right is the new counterculture, for better or worse.
     
    Unfortunately the dissident right is a counterculture that seems determined to lose the culture wars.

    The old counterculture had a plan for winning.
  58. @Audacious Epigone
    @dfordoom

    Maybe it’s UR that is being quietly disappeared?

    G has a clear bias against UR in search results. And links to UR cannot even be shared in Facebook messenger anymore, let alone Facebook itself. The pretense is Covid misinformation. Something like 80% of Americans have a FB account, so that's a big handicap for the site. Commenter Mark G mentioned also that USG sites have UR blocked for "hate and racism" or something like that, so the censors are definitely at work.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    G has a clear bias against UR in search results. And links to UR cannot even be shared in Facebook messenger anymore, let alone Facebook itself. The pretense is Covid misinformation. Something like 80% of Americans have a FB account, so that’s a big handicap for the site. Commenter Mark G mentioned also that USG sites have UR blocked for “hate and racism” or something like that, so the censors are definitely at work.

    Yep. Censorship is a lot more sophisticated than it used to be. There’s no longer any need to ban things. They can just be quietly suffocated. Which is almost certainly what will happen to UR.

    The First Amendment has been exposed as worthless. In practice, as distinct from theory, freedom of speech is already a thing of the past.

  59. @Audacious Epigone
    @dfordoom

    More parsimoniously, the dissident right is the new counterculture, for better or worse.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    More parsimoniously, the dissident right is the new counterculture, for better or worse.

    Unfortunately the dissident right is a counterculture that seems determined to lose the culture wars.

    The old counterculture had a plan for winning.

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