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From Cassius Dio on the downfall of Sejanus, murdered praetorian prefect of Rome’s second emperor:

They hurled down, beat down, and dragged down all his images, as though they were thereby treating the man himself with contumely, and he thus became a spectator of what he was destined to suffer.

Who is the contemporary man this speaks down through the ages to? Not the stubborn southern secessionist. Not exclusively, anyhow. For statues of Ulysses Grant, Abraham Lincoln, Christopher Columbus, George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Jefferson, Hans Christian Heg, and Junipero Serra have all been dragged down; none men of the Confederacy. “The man himself”, then, must be taken as reference to all men of European descent on the North American continent.

Are these ructions about equality, about restitution, or… are they about vengeance? What does that portend for ourselves and our posterity?

 
• Category: Culture/Society, History, Ideology • Tags: Future, History, Secession 
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  1. Video shows that it is predominantly urban whites pulling down the statues. Your point is probably valid, but we must keep sight of who wants to get rid of whom.

    One group of European Americans is out to get another, though they may be egged on or aided by some non-Europeans.

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    Charitably, there are people of European descent who strive for a world of post-descent, where racial sins must first be expunged before the concept of race itself can be expunged.

    , @Not my Economy
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    Never forget this.

    And don’t forget that the destruction of statues and changing of names is careerist. White libs are escalating because a riot is a career building opportunity. They are competing for political jobs, looking for a way in or a way up the ladder if they’re already in. Who wants to bet against the following: you will see things like “organized spontaneous community action resulting in the removal of statue X” on LinkedIn in the next few months. The more admirable version of this is a guy trying to get laid by taking off his shirt and climbing up to rig ropes.

    The (extremely white) black kid who is organizing the removal of Lincoln in DC happens to be a junior at Harvard and happens to have his own 501c3. He doesn’t have easy access to any confederate statues, so he’ll take whatever is available. It’s less antiwhite animus than it is capitalist sociopath.

    The regime is encouraging its supporters to smash statues so it can avoid having to deliver on any material improvement in their lives.

    Replies: @Not my Economy

  2. Audacious, whenever a new religious dispensation takes hold, the ascendant adherents begin by tearing down the old idols, overturning the elder altars. Eventually new holy icons are erected in the desecrated precincts; some of the deposed gods that resisted expunging are rehabilitated as minor saints of the new faith, to placate the stubborn fidelity of the old believers, reassure them that things haven’t changed all that much, while subtly demoralizing them even further when they realize they no longer “know” nor “own” their former deities and heroes. Eventually the whole period of civilizational violence is rewritten as a glorious awakening to truth, a golden age of muscular piety.

    That has been the pattern since time immemorial, encoded in all the stories of “wars in heaven” from ancient myth, evident just beneath the surface of all the stories of “national conversion” underlying the Christianization of Europe. It is what we are witnessing today, overtly in these modern acts of iconoclasm, more slyly in the repurposing of historical figures like Hamilton to fit an alien mythology that senses triumph.

    • Thanks: Talha
  3. I’m not concerned about anything like that. To the extent that there’s any coherent demands at all amongst the rioters, these people are too stupid to not screw things up and trigger a backlash in the end. I’m more concerned about the damage an already battered US is going to take before they do.

    Somewhat OT ramble, but this brings up a topic near and dear to my heart: Sejanus was the one who had really been responsible for the death of Drusus, Tiberius’s son and heir, with whom he clearly shared a very intense bond with, despite our sources implying otherwise in service of their “Tiberius was a monster” pro-aristocrat, pro-Julian agenda. Of course we understand the paternal connection, but for a introverted, gloomy, non-socially adept man like Tiberius, these rare kinds of relationships when you find someone who you can open up to somewhat take on an especially heavy weight. I’m sure he was broken when Drusus died… and when he discovered the truth, I’m sure he was out for blood.

    (Was he a monster? He was probably a cold man who didn’t like his job and got quite cruel during the second half of his reign, but his actions don’t read like those of a madman, especially prior to 23 AD. Next to Domitian-another emperor vilified by the sources-he probably handled Rome’s finances better than any early emperor would, and the realist foreign policy strikes me as an early foreshadowing of what guys like Domitian and Hadrian would eventually think about a consolidated empire focused on the Mediterranean basin rather than going out hunting for more glory.)

    An interesting little anecdote to all of this is that one of the many contacts of Sejanus was a one Pontius Pilate out in Judea right when all of this was happening. Like anybody with any kind of connection to Sejanus, the slightest misstep meant being on the next purge list. I’m sure the Sanhedrin was very aware of this, the emperor’s wrath was hardly a secret to anybody. Another key thing to add is that Sejanus was probably the invariable advocate of radical measures in dealing with troublesome provincial peoples-among them, the Jews-and after his downfall, Tiberius immediately reversed any policy that originated with Sejanus. Pilate would have been under pressure to keep the peace and play nice the locals, and Pilate’s record hadn’t exactly been clean here: he’d already come under scrutiny for outbreaks of violence in his province.

    These two factors meant that Pilate was skating on thin ice by the time of the trial of Jesus. One of the typical complaints about the crucifixion story is that Pilate’s record suggests that he wouldn’t have had to kowtow to the Sanhedrin if he didn’t want to, but that misses the political context. I’m not sure Pilate would have been convinced that Jesus was anything but another millenarian Jewish troublemaker in his files, but the reluctance to cross the Sanhedrin in 33 AD as portrayed in the Gospels is very plausible.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @nebulafox

    Thanks.

    I wonder if you are familiar with Axel Munthe's evocation of Tiberius at Capri in the first chapter of The Story of San Michele?


    "He did not ask for happiness as you do, he only asked for forgetfulness and peace, and he believed he could find it here on this lonely island. I told him the price he would have to pay: the branding of an untarnished name with infamy through all ages."
     
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @nebulafox

    Thanks. A nicely reasoned analysis.

  4. One Roman historian (Tacitus?) says that Augustus allowed republican Sentaors to keep memorabilia of Brutus displayed in their houses. The principate was much more tolerant than modern America/Western Europe

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Kent Nationalist

    Caesar was famously clement. Is such reconciliation possible today?

  5. The concept of envy — the hatred of the superior — has dropped out of our moral vocabulary. The idea that white Christian civilization is hated more for its virtues than its sins doesn’t occur to us . . . . The white man presents an image of superiority even when he isn’t conscious of it. Superiority excites envy. Destroying white civilization is the inmost desire of the league of designated victims we call “minorities.”

    This quote of Joe Sobran, which Steve Sailer posted not long ago, seems to speak to the latest spasm of statue-toppling very closely, though I’m willing to believe that ChrisZ’s “new religious dispensation” is the primary driver. It’s certainly not mere racist acts. Ignorance of the past is not much of an excuse, either. Heg’s exemplary life and death was available to any iconoclast with a smartphone (I single him out because it’s really hard to find anything objectionable in his biography). But Heg was a fine example of white, 19th century American manhood, and no doubt that was enough. It must really burn to choose to define yourself by your race, and then realize that your race hasn’t accomplished much compared to the race you hate. For the self-hating white SJWs, maybe they see these figures as standing in the way of their absolution by blacks, mocking them, even.

    • Thanks: ChrisZ
  6. A few angry kids trash a few monuments and it’s the end of western civilization? Conservative-watching is such a fascinating sport. Folks who imagine themselves the solid crusaders of virtue fall into hysterical overreaction at the slightest challenge to their pretended wisdom.

    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again. A fuzzy Hollywood confection of 1776 and the Old West and WWII is about all most Americans seem to know or care about. Be serious: not one person in a thousand could give you an accurate explanation of who and what these monuments represent.

    People grow old and die, and their values and beliefs die with them, and a new generation comes along, with its values and beliefs, and life goes on, as it always has. We are at a flashpoint where monuments to the past have gone from irrelevant to offensive. If young folks don’t want reminders of the dead (and largely pretty disgusting) past cluttering their public spaces, more power to ’em.

    • Agree: Nodwink
    • Troll: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Observator

    We need to have a "Naive" button.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @Observator


    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again.
     
    An excellent argument against universal suffrage.
    , @anon
    @Observator

    A fuzzy Hollywood confection of 1776 and the Old West and WWII is about all most Americans seem to know or care about.

    Dude, it's not 1980-something. Howard Zinnifcation of history runs deep. Wherever you are commenting from, it's got no American college people around.

    , @Neuday
    @Observator


    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again.
     
    Maybe your history textbooks shouldn't be written by your nation's enemies (e.g. Howard Zinn).

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

  7. “Are these ructions about equality, about restitution, or… are they about vengeance?”

    The rioters are not analytical, reflective, or even especially informed. Inquiring into their motives yields as much information as inquiring into the “motive” of pig weed. The plant just grows toward the sun. That is all it knows. The statues just depict whites. Therefore bad. That is all the rioters know.

    As I keep having occasion to write to all the big brain analysts here at Unz, you are overthinking things. When you have a big brain, everything looks like an analytical problem to solve. But here there is no dialectic to engage, no argument to win, no demand to meet, no understanding to bridge. Hating whitey is the whole of the Revolution. The rest is commentary.

    The Revolution, which speaks only with force and understands only force, will continue until it meets countervailing force. There is no sign that will happen soon.

  8. @Observator
    A few angry kids trash a few monuments and it's the end of western civilization? Conservative-watching is such a fascinating sport. Folks who imagine themselves the solid crusaders of virtue fall into hysterical overreaction at the slightest challenge to their pretended wisdom.

    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again. A fuzzy Hollywood confection of 1776 and the Old West and WWII is about all most Americans seem to know or care about. Be serious: not one person in a thousand could give you an accurate explanation of who and what these monuments represent.

    People grow old and die, and their values and beliefs die with them, and a new generation comes along, with its values and beliefs, and life goes on, as it always has. We are at a flashpoint where monuments to the past have gone from irrelevant to offensive. If young folks don’t want reminders of the dead (and largely pretty disgusting) past cluttering their public spaces, more power to 'em.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Daniel Chieh, @anon, @Neuday

    We need to have a “Naive” button.

    • Agree: 22pp22, trelane
    • Thanks: ChrisZ
    • LOL: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Thanks. When smug prog naivete, if not stupidity, reaches observator levels, it becomes taxing to frame an adequate response.

  9. @nebulafox
    I'm not concerned about anything like that. To the extent that there's any coherent demands at all amongst the rioters, these people are too stupid to not screw things up and trigger a backlash in the end. I'm more concerned about the damage an already battered US is going to take before they do.

    Somewhat OT ramble, but this brings up a topic near and dear to my heart: Sejanus was the one who had really been responsible for the death of Drusus, Tiberius's son and heir, with whom he clearly shared a very intense bond with, despite our sources implying otherwise in service of their "Tiberius was a monster" pro-aristocrat, pro-Julian agenda. Of course we understand the paternal connection, but for a introverted, gloomy, non-socially adept man like Tiberius, these rare kinds of relationships when you find someone who you can open up to somewhat take on an especially heavy weight. I'm sure he was broken when Drusus died... and when he discovered the truth, I'm sure he was out for blood.

    (Was he a monster? He was probably a cold man who didn't like his job and got quite cruel during the second half of his reign, but his actions don't read like those of a madman, especially prior to 23 AD. Next to Domitian-another emperor vilified by the sources-he probably handled Rome's finances better than any early emperor would, and the realist foreign policy strikes me as an early foreshadowing of what guys like Domitian and Hadrian would eventually think about a consolidated empire focused on the Mediterranean basin rather than going out hunting for more glory.)

    An interesting little anecdote to all of this is that one of the many contacts of Sejanus was a one Pontius Pilate out in Judea right when all of this was happening. Like anybody with any kind of connection to Sejanus, the slightest misstep meant being on the next purge list. I'm sure the Sanhedrin was very aware of this, the emperor's wrath was hardly a secret to anybody. Another key thing to add is that Sejanus was probably the invariable advocate of radical measures in dealing with troublesome provincial peoples-among them, the Jews-and after his downfall, Tiberius immediately reversed any policy that originated with Sejanus. Pilate would have been under pressure to keep the peace and play nice the locals, and Pilate's record hadn't exactly been clean here: he'd already come under scrutiny for outbreaks of violence in his province.

    These two factors meant that Pilate was skating on thin ice by the time of the trial of Jesus. One of the typical complaints about the crucifixion story is that Pilate's record suggests that he wouldn't have had to kowtow to the Sanhedrin if he didn't want to, but that misses the political context. I'm not sure Pilate would have been convinced that Jesus was anything but another millenarian Jewish troublemaker in his files, but the reluctance to cross the Sanhedrin in 33 AD as portrayed in the Gospels is very plausible.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Jus' Sayin'...

    Thanks.

    I wonder if you are familiar with Axel Munthe’s evocation of Tiberius at Capri in the first chapter of The Story of San Michele?

    “He did not ask for happiness as you do, he only asked for forgetfulness and peace, and he believed he could find it here on this lonely island. I told him the price he would have to pay: the branding of an untarnished name with infamy through all ages.”

  10. @Observator
    A few angry kids trash a few monuments and it's the end of western civilization? Conservative-watching is such a fascinating sport. Folks who imagine themselves the solid crusaders of virtue fall into hysterical overreaction at the slightest challenge to their pretended wisdom.

    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again. A fuzzy Hollywood confection of 1776 and the Old West and WWII is about all most Americans seem to know or care about. Be serious: not one person in a thousand could give you an accurate explanation of who and what these monuments represent.

    People grow old and die, and their values and beliefs die with them, and a new generation comes along, with its values and beliefs, and life goes on, as it always has. We are at a flashpoint where monuments to the past have gone from irrelevant to offensive. If young folks don’t want reminders of the dead (and largely pretty disgusting) past cluttering their public spaces, more power to 'em.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Daniel Chieh, @anon, @Neuday

    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again.

    An excellent argument against universal suffrage.

    • LOL: Jus' Sayin'...
  11. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    Video shows that it is predominantly urban whites pulling down the statues. Your point is probably valid, but we must keep sight of who wants to get rid of whom.

    One group of European Americans is out to get another, though they may be egged on or aided by some non-Europeans.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone, @Not my Economy

    Charitably, there are people of European descent who strive for a world of post-descent, where racial sins must first be expunged before the concept of race itself can be expunged.

  12. @Kent Nationalist
    One Roman historian (Tacitus?) says that Augustus allowed republican Sentaors to keep memorabilia of Brutus displayed in their houses. The principate was much more tolerant than modern America/Western Europe

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    Caesar was famously clement. Is such reconciliation possible today?

  13. There is a a writer I used to Like, Sir Charles Eliot iirc, a 19th century English diplomat posted in Asia. You will find this curious tidbit in his writings –

    Let me confess that I cannot share the confidence in the superiority of Europeans and their ways which is prevalent in the West….in fact European civilization is not satisfying and Asia can still offer something more attractive to many who are far from Asiatic in spirit

    This is, of course well before the 60s.

    The problem is, the more you read in late 19th century/early 20th century European wtiters, the more you will come across these sentiments.

    Anyone who has read Madame Bovary could have predicted the statue toppling of 2020.

    Anyone who read Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Camus, De Mauppassant, Hamsun, Leopardi, Cioran, Wordsworth, Eliot, and a thousand others, could have predicted the statue toppling of 2020.

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
    @AaronB

    Nonsense. Toppling statues is not some sort of nihilistic performance art expression of the human condition. A look into the abyss is more likely to increase sympathy for the trappings of culture. If Baudelaire were alive, he'd be marching with the gilets jaunes and not antifa. As it turns out, I predicted the statue toppling of 2020, but my prophetic insight wasn't a consequence of reading Flaubert. It was a consequence of reading the New York Times

  14. A desire for equality, restitution or vengeance may all be contributing factors. Another contributing factor to the protests and rioting may just be boredom. I’m a late Boomer. I’ve noticed that a lot of my same age friends have older brothers and sisters who are liberals while they themselves are more conservative. The early Boomers grew up in the quiet peaceful fifties and were ready for some excitement by the time they reached young adulthood in the sixties. The late Boomers grew up in the turbulent sixties and just wanted order and stability when they got older. All the protesting died out when they replaced the older Boomers on college campuses in the seventies.

    Recent years have been relatively quiet. This has been most noticeable in a steady decrease in crime. People had even started the reversal of the out migration from big cities with many areas around big city downtowns having an increase in the middle class. Younger people have never experienced the riots, protests and skyrocketing crime that older people have and aren’t aware of how unpleasant they can be if they continue over a long period of time. There will have to be a great relearning occur. Once that has happened there will be a reaction that will cause a decline in radicalism. This reaction will not come mainly from the current rioters and protestors but from their younger brothers and sisters who are now silently watching what is going on, just as happened among the late Boomers in the sixties.

  15. @Observator
    A few angry kids trash a few monuments and it's the end of western civilization? Conservative-watching is such a fascinating sport. Folks who imagine themselves the solid crusaders of virtue fall into hysterical overreaction at the slightest challenge to their pretended wisdom.

    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again. A fuzzy Hollywood confection of 1776 and the Old West and WWII is about all most Americans seem to know or care about. Be serious: not one person in a thousand could give you an accurate explanation of who and what these monuments represent.

    People grow old and die, and their values and beliefs die with them, and a new generation comes along, with its values and beliefs, and life goes on, as it always has. We are at a flashpoint where monuments to the past have gone from irrelevant to offensive. If young folks don’t want reminders of the dead (and largely pretty disgusting) past cluttering their public spaces, more power to 'em.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Daniel Chieh, @anon, @Neuday

    A fuzzy Hollywood confection of 1776 and the Old West and WWII is about all most Americans seem to know or care about.

    Dude, it’s not 1980-something. Howard Zinnifcation of history runs deep. Wherever you are commenting from, it’s got no American college people around.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
  16. @nebulafox
    I'm not concerned about anything like that. To the extent that there's any coherent demands at all amongst the rioters, these people are too stupid to not screw things up and trigger a backlash in the end. I'm more concerned about the damage an already battered US is going to take before they do.

    Somewhat OT ramble, but this brings up a topic near and dear to my heart: Sejanus was the one who had really been responsible for the death of Drusus, Tiberius's son and heir, with whom he clearly shared a very intense bond with, despite our sources implying otherwise in service of their "Tiberius was a monster" pro-aristocrat, pro-Julian agenda. Of course we understand the paternal connection, but for a introverted, gloomy, non-socially adept man like Tiberius, these rare kinds of relationships when you find someone who you can open up to somewhat take on an especially heavy weight. I'm sure he was broken when Drusus died... and when he discovered the truth, I'm sure he was out for blood.

    (Was he a monster? He was probably a cold man who didn't like his job and got quite cruel during the second half of his reign, but his actions don't read like those of a madman, especially prior to 23 AD. Next to Domitian-another emperor vilified by the sources-he probably handled Rome's finances better than any early emperor would, and the realist foreign policy strikes me as an early foreshadowing of what guys like Domitian and Hadrian would eventually think about a consolidated empire focused on the Mediterranean basin rather than going out hunting for more glory.)

    An interesting little anecdote to all of this is that one of the many contacts of Sejanus was a one Pontius Pilate out in Judea right when all of this was happening. Like anybody with any kind of connection to Sejanus, the slightest misstep meant being on the next purge list. I'm sure the Sanhedrin was very aware of this, the emperor's wrath was hardly a secret to anybody. Another key thing to add is that Sejanus was probably the invariable advocate of radical measures in dealing with troublesome provincial peoples-among them, the Jews-and after his downfall, Tiberius immediately reversed any policy that originated with Sejanus. Pilate would have been under pressure to keep the peace and play nice the locals, and Pilate's record hadn't exactly been clean here: he'd already come under scrutiny for outbreaks of violence in his province.

    These two factors meant that Pilate was skating on thin ice by the time of the trial of Jesus. One of the typical complaints about the crucifixion story is that Pilate's record suggests that he wouldn't have had to kowtow to the Sanhedrin if he didn't want to, but that misses the political context. I'm not sure Pilate would have been convinced that Jesus was anything but another millenarian Jewish troublemaker in his files, but the reluctance to cross the Sanhedrin in 33 AD as portrayed in the Gospels is very plausible.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Jus' Sayin'...

    Thanks. A nicely reasoned analysis.

  17. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Observator

    We need to have a "Naive" button.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    Thanks. When smug prog naivete, if not stupidity, reaches observator levels, it becomes taxing to frame an adequate response.

  18. @Observator
    A few angry kids trash a few monuments and it's the end of western civilization? Conservative-watching is such a fascinating sport. Folks who imagine themselves the solid crusaders of virtue fall into hysterical overreaction at the slightest challenge to their pretended wisdom.

    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again. A fuzzy Hollywood confection of 1776 and the Old West and WWII is about all most Americans seem to know or care about. Be serious: not one person in a thousand could give you an accurate explanation of who and what these monuments represent.

    People grow old and die, and their values and beliefs die with them, and a new generation comes along, with its values and beliefs, and life goes on, as it always has. We are at a flashpoint where monuments to the past have gone from irrelevant to offensive. If young folks don’t want reminders of the dead (and largely pretty disgusting) past cluttering their public spaces, more power to 'em.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Daniel Chieh, @anon, @Neuday

    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again.

    Maybe your history textbooks shouldn’t be written by your nation’s enemies (e.g. Howard Zinn).

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    @Neuday

    Maybe our history tests shouldn't be written as regurgitation of atomized factoids.

    That was what literally made me cry about history class.  I could remember and recite broad trends.  I could not remember specific names and dates.  And that is why I hated the goddamned classes and their "teachers", because all they taught me was to hate them.

  19. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    Video shows that it is predominantly urban whites pulling down the statues. Your point is probably valid, but we must keep sight of who wants to get rid of whom.

    One group of European Americans is out to get another, though they may be egged on or aided by some non-Europeans.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone, @Not my Economy

    Never forget this.

    And don’t forget that the destruction of statues and changing of names is careerist. White libs are escalating because a riot is a career building opportunity. They are competing for political jobs, looking for a way in or a way up the ladder if they’re already in. Who wants to bet against the following: you will see things like “organized spontaneous community action resulting in the removal of statue X” on LinkedIn in the next few months. The more admirable version of this is a guy trying to get laid by taking off his shirt and climbing up to rig ropes.

    The (extremely white) black kid who is organizing the removal of Lincoln in DC happens to be a junior at Harvard and happens to have his own 501c3. He doesn’t have easy access to any confederate statues, so he’ll take whatever is available. It’s less antiwhite animus than it is capitalist sociopath.

    The regime is encouraging its supporters to smash statues so it can avoid having to deliver on any material improvement in their lives.

    • Replies: @Not my Economy
    @Not my Economy

    Im ripping off Curtis Yarvin here but if you’re really going to overthrow the establishment - think about what you’re going to offer the average white liberal “npc” to make their lives better. The establishment is NOT delivering the results they want and it’s trying to buy them off for free. That’s an opportunity.

  20. @Not my Economy
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    Never forget this.

    And don’t forget that the destruction of statues and changing of names is careerist. White libs are escalating because a riot is a career building opportunity. They are competing for political jobs, looking for a way in or a way up the ladder if they’re already in. Who wants to bet against the following: you will see things like “organized spontaneous community action resulting in the removal of statue X” on LinkedIn in the next few months. The more admirable version of this is a guy trying to get laid by taking off his shirt and climbing up to rig ropes.

    The (extremely white) black kid who is organizing the removal of Lincoln in DC happens to be a junior at Harvard and happens to have his own 501c3. He doesn’t have easy access to any confederate statues, so he’ll take whatever is available. It’s less antiwhite animus than it is capitalist sociopath.

    The regime is encouraging its supporters to smash statues so it can avoid having to deliver on any material improvement in their lives.

    Replies: @Not my Economy

    Im ripping off Curtis Yarvin here but if you’re really going to overthrow the establishment – think about what you’re going to offer the average white liberal “npc” to make their lives better. The establishment is NOT delivering the results they want and it’s trying to buy them off for free. That’s an opportunity.

    • Agree: Not Only Wrathful
  21. Destroying the past is a classic Marxist tactic. These are Marxists, not “activists”.

    This has zero to do with blacks, and everything to do with “revolution”.

    These idiots are burning down the System they need to support them.

    Let it burn down.

    A New World Order will rise like a Phoenix from the ashes.

    The Zionist Order is BURNING DOWN.

  22. Audacious Epigone: “Charitably, there are people of European descent who strive for a world of post-descent, where racial sins must first be expunged before the concept of race itself can be expunged.”

    Your choice of the word “sin” is appropriate. This is the Christian moral vision, continued in the West even in the secular world because Christianity once conquered it so completely. Belief in Christ as the literal son of God may be something few take seriously nowadays, but the Christian death cult marches on under the banners of BLM and antifa. The white race seems to have collectively decided that it must lose its life to find it, just as the crucified rabbi urged them to do. To enter Heaven, you first have to die.

  23. @AaronB
    There is a a writer I used to Like, Sir Charles Eliot iirc, a 19th century English diplomat posted in Asia. You will find this curious tidbit in his writings -

    Let me confess that I cannot share the confidence in the superiority of Europeans and their ways which is prevalent in the West....in fact European civilization is not satisfying and Asia can still offer something more attractive to many who are far from Asiatic in spirit
     
    This is, of course well before the 60s.

    The problem is, the more you read in late 19th century/early 20th century European wtiters, the more you will come across these sentiments.

    Anyone who has read Madame Bovary could have predicted the statue toppling of 2020.

    Anyone who read Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Camus, De Mauppassant, Hamsun, Leopardi, Cioran, Wordsworth, Eliot, and a thousand others, could have predicted the statue toppling of 2020.

    Replies: @Craig Nelsen

    Nonsense. Toppling statues is not some sort of nihilistic performance art expression of the human condition. A look into the abyss is more likely to increase sympathy for the trappings of culture. If Baudelaire were alive, he’d be marching with the gilets jaunes and not antifa. As it turns out, I predicted the statue toppling of 2020, but my prophetic insight wasn’t a consequence of reading Flaubert. It was a consequence of reading the New York Times

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  24. @Neuday
    @Observator


    For most people, history is that boring thing they were forced to study in school and hope never to tax themselves with again.
     
    Maybe your history textbooks shouldn't be written by your nation's enemies (e.g. Howard Zinn).

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

    Maybe our history tests shouldn’t be written as regurgitation of atomized factoids.

    That was what literally made me cry about history class.  I could remember and recite broad trends.  I could not remember specific names and dates.  And that is why I hated the goddamned classes and their “teachers”, because all they taught me was to hate them.

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