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From DanHessinMD, the L(ink)OTW:

The correlation between COVID-19 and humidity is massively confirmed in a new study (N=40,000), still in preprints. Just posted 3 days ago.

51 authors on this study, across 27 different institutions. Who ever heard of that many authors and institutions for one paper?

It may have seemed that Florida and Texas and Brazil completely exploded the hypothesis that COVID-19 is seasonal.

Not at all!

It turns out that COVID-19 severity and mortality is perhaps more than 10 times lower under conditions of high humidity. We have seen this in Florida, Texas and Singapore versus late winter in New York, Michigan and Europe. The difference in the mortality rate was massive, an order of magnitude or more.

Cutting to the chase, the working conclusion is that low relative humidity of indoor air is a big contributor in increasing the severity of the disease. This conceivably explains why cases remain high but reported mortality is much lower than was the case a few months ago. I’ve little to add beyond idle conjecture, but it seems like this could turn out to be a big advancement in our collective understanding of the virus.

To the COTW, dfordoom on the terrible effectiveness of firearms as a suicide facilitator:

Most suicide methods have very high failure rates, which is a good thing. It’s remarkably difficult to kill yourself with pills. Driving into a tree is no guarantee of success – you can do that and walk away unscathed. You can slash your wrists but the odds of survival are high.

Whether it’s an impulsive attempt or a planned attempt there’s still the chance that if the attempt fails the person’s life will actually get better and they will no longer want to kill themselves. The tragedy of a gun suicide is that the person never gets the chance to find out if those overwhelming problems weren’t so overwhelming after all.

Cloudbuster on how the revolutionaries have left non-combatants in the Culture War without anywhere to hide:

Thanks to politicizing everything and canceling everyone with the wrong opinions, they are rapidly running out of ways to keep people distracted.

Sports: in-your-face wokism
Film: in-your-face wokism
Having an opinion on social media: in-your-face wokism
Walking down the street without a mask: in-your-face wokism

They may be painting themselves right into a corner.

Keeping your head down while enjoying the innocent pleasures and rhythms of life is no longer an option. If you’re not with them, you’re against them–and if you’re against them, you deserve nothing less than annihilation.

And nebulafox on isonomy, the legal and political dying American Dream:

Equality before the state and the law is not the same thing as “everybody is equal and will have equal outcomes in life”. America’s problem right now is that our insane focus on the latter is letting our elites erode the former.

Personally, I think mocking and devaluing someone with an IQ of 90 for not becoming a doctor is counterproductive and cruel. Understanding and accepting innate differences in intelligence should make one more compassionate, not less.

We can scream profanities at the storm from the bow, or we can objectively assess the storm and make corresponding adjustments to our ship to set ourselves up for the best chance of weathering the storm without ending up at the bottom of the ocean.

 
• Category: Arts/Letters, Culture/Society, Ideology, Science • Tags: COTW 
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  1. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:

    Walking down the street without a mask: in-your-face wokism

    You’ll face a similar level of in-your-face wokism if you drive drunk. Seriously, you’re destroying your credibility with this alignment with stupid people. I can only wish European nationalists well, American nationalism is dead, having became a form of identity politics for D-students.

    • Agree: utu
    • Troll: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @Anonymous

    You’ll face a similar level of in-your-face wokism if you drive drunk.

    I don't worry about my credibility with the sort of people who are prone to this level of crazy hyperbole.

    , @Not Only Wrathful
    @Anonymous

    Why do you support enforcing mask wearing outside on the street?

    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Anonymous

    They shoulda at least of done the mask stuff in April. A little late now, that it's petering out.

  2. The Japanese sure seem to be able to commit suicide effectively without guns. Let’s hear it for Japanese engineering!

  3. @Anonymous

    Walking down the street without a mask: in-your-face wokism
     
    You'll face a similar level of in-your-face wokism if you drive drunk. Seriously, you're destroying your credibility with this alignment with stupid people. I can only wish European nationalists well, American nationalism is dead, having became a form of identity politics for D-students.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DV4iBwJxjyg

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Not Only Wrathful, @Hippopotamusdrome

    You’ll face a similar level of in-your-face wokism if you drive drunk.

    I don’t worry about my credibility with the sort of people who are prone to this level of crazy hyperbole.

  4. @Anonymous

    Walking down the street without a mask: in-your-face wokism
     
    You'll face a similar level of in-your-face wokism if you drive drunk. Seriously, you're destroying your credibility with this alignment with stupid people. I can only wish European nationalists well, American nationalism is dead, having became a form of identity politics for D-students.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DV4iBwJxjyg

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Not Only Wrathful, @Hippopotamusdrome

    Why do you support enforcing mask wearing outside on the street?

  5. I’m not very convinced by the preprint’s conclusions. They show that during warmer weather, fewer patients who tested positive were admitted to the hospital or died. They correct effects for age and sex and say in the Discussion that hospital overwhelming and changes in treatment protocols are not likely to cause this, which is true. But of course because the epidemic started in the winter and now we are in the summer, ‘Temperature’ is basically just a proxy for ‘time since the start of the epidemic’. It went up automatically, but many important changed during this time, very importantly the extent of testing. Based on serological studies there are at least ten untested positives for each tested positive so there is a huge pool of asymptomatic or hardly symptomatic people to discover with more tests. More tests means a less severe disease course on average, and I think this is the only thing they are seeing here. They should include “time since January” or even better, “number of tests administered” as a covariate. That way we would see if people who were admitted on an unusually warm May week (independently from the fact that it was May already and more tests were administed) really had a better disease course. I think seasonality is still pretty much disproved by tropical outbreaks, which is of course great news because we shouldn’t expect a resurgence in temperate areas just because it’s autumn again.

    • Agree: utu
    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @DRA
    @East Hunter

    The metric that I find most intersection is the percent of deaths relative to the total number of resolved cases. You have to calculate it yourself, but the data is available.

    New York and surrounding states were disadvantaged in a number of ways. Primarily, they didn't see it coming in time, and they got to "explore" the characteristics of the pathogen for the rest of us.

    In addition, they were blessed with all sorts of mass transportation: subways, busses, taxis, elevators, and very heavy pedestrian volumes on urban central business district sidewalks. Not to mention folks that worked in cubicles with limited aisle widths. Or without partitions.

    If I recall correctly, the CDC was very concerned with having adequate hospital bed space, which may be where the local governors got the ding-bat idea of moving recovering patients out of hospitals and into nursing homes. And before public health officials even knew how to isolate the relocated patients properly - let alone assure that the nursing homes had time to improve sanction or train staff.

    And no, I do not live in the northeast high population density con-urban.

    Texas, where I do live, currently has about 7% fatalities per resolved cases (either recovered or died), versus about 11% for New York and New Jersey.

    Hopefully Texas, with its current high rate of testing and total cases is climbing the herd immunity curve quickly. But for myself, being in my seventies and fortunatly securely retired, I am sticking very close to home and have increased my Vitamin C, D and zinc intake.

    All said and done, its still a through of the dice. God bless us all!

    , @utu
    @East Hunter

    I was not impressed with the paper.

    , @DanHessinMD
    @East Hunter

    We will have our answer soon enough. If mortality rises sharply again in the dry air of this coming winter, the thesis is as good as proven.

    But East Hunter overlooks many other things.

    1. East Hunter is wrong that the variable is time since disease. Most tropical places have had a very low disease fatality rate all the way through. Singapore, Florida, India, wherever you look, hot and humid places have had lower case mortality rates than cold/dry places even early on.

    2. The claim by East Hunter is that testing is way up so we are finding more cases. But time-since-disease should mean much more dying now than earlier because the disease is much more widespread now, just as the waterfronts in a pool get progressively larger with time since a stone dropped into the water. That hasn't occurred. Notably a huge surge in southern cases did not lead to the expected surge in southern death.

    3. This isn't an unusual correlation. It is exactly what you would expect based on all other viral respiratory infections. Seasonality is the norm and the burden should be on those claiming this time is different.

    4. Low humidity has long been known to be a harmful confounder in respiratory infection. Civilization seems determined these days to ignore all knowledge we once knew and return to the zero point of knowledge, and I suppose that's the case here too. The importance of humidity on respiratory health was once widely known. An abundance of research on respiratory infection confirms this. Steam was once widely applied for pneumonia.

    5. The mechanisms are straightforward and not at all mysterious. Dry air reduces the lungs' ability to fight respiratory infection in at least 2 ways. First is something called mucocilliary clearance. Please look it up. The second is that dry respiratory surfaces simply are more likely to be inflamed just like dry skin is more likely to be inflamed.

    Replies: @Dissident

  6. Thanks to politicizing everything and canceling everyone with the wrong opinions, they are rapidly running out of ways to keep people distracted.

    Sports: in-your-face wokism
    Film: in-your-face wokism
    Having an opinion on social media: in-your-face wokism
    Walking down the street without a mask: in-your-face wokism

    They may be painting themselves right into a corner.

    Yes, that’s about the shape of it.

  7. DRA says:
    @East Hunter
    I'm not very convinced by the preprint's conclusions. They show that during warmer weather, fewer patients who tested positive were admitted to the hospital or died. They correct effects for age and sex and say in the Discussion that hospital overwhelming and changes in treatment protocols are not likely to cause this, which is true. But of course because the epidemic started in the winter and now we are in the summer, 'Temperature' is basically just a proxy for 'time since the start of the epidemic'. It went up automatically, but many important changed during this time, very importantly the extent of testing. Based on serological studies there are at least ten untested positives for each tested positive so there is a huge pool of asymptomatic or hardly symptomatic people to discover with more tests. More tests means a less severe disease course on average, and I think this is the only thing they are seeing here. They should include "time since January" or even better, "number of tests administered" as a covariate. That way we would see if people who were admitted on an unusually warm May week (independently from the fact that it was May already and more tests were administed) really had a better disease course. I think seasonality is still pretty much disproved by tropical outbreaks, which is of course great news because we shouldn't expect a resurgence in temperate areas just because it's autumn again.

    Replies: @DRA, @utu, @DanHessinMD

    The metric that I find most intersection is the percent of deaths relative to the total number of resolved cases. You have to calculate it yourself, but the data is available.

    New York and surrounding states were disadvantaged in a number of ways. Primarily, they didn’t see it coming in time, and they got to “explore” the characteristics of the pathogen for the rest of us.

    In addition, they were blessed with all sorts of mass transportation: subways, busses, taxis, elevators, and very heavy pedestrian volumes on urban central business district sidewalks. Not to mention folks that worked in cubicles with limited aisle widths. Or without partitions.

    If I recall correctly, the CDC was very concerned with having adequate hospital bed space, which may be where the local governors got the ding-bat idea of moving recovering patients out of hospitals and into nursing homes. And before public health officials even knew how to isolate the relocated patients properly – let alone assure that the nursing homes had time to improve sanction or train staff.

    And no, I do not live in the northeast high population density con-urban.

    Texas, where I do live, currently has about 7% fatalities per resolved cases (either recovered or died), versus about 11% for New York and New Jersey.

    Hopefully Texas, with its current high rate of testing and total cases is climbing the herd immunity curve quickly. But for myself, being in my seventies and fortunatly securely retired, I am sticking very close to home and have increased my Vitamin C, D and zinc intake.

    All said and done, its still a through of the dice. God bless us all!

  8. @Anonymous

    Walking down the street without a mask: in-your-face wokism
     
    You'll face a similar level of in-your-face wokism if you drive drunk. Seriously, you're destroying your credibility with this alignment with stupid people. I can only wish European nationalists well, American nationalism is dead, having became a form of identity politics for D-students.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DV4iBwJxjyg

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Not Only Wrathful, @Hippopotamusdrome

    They shoulda at least of done the mask stuff in April. A little late now, that it’s petering out.

  9. The Science Deniers at Facebook strike again. Censoring accurate science about the proven safe and effective, generic CQ/AZ/ZN treatment. (1)

    The press conference featured Rep. Ralph Norman (R-SC) and frontline doctors sharing their views and opinions on coronavirus and the medical response to the pandemic.

    The event, hosted by the organization America’s Frontline Doctors, a group founded by Dr. Simone Gold, a board-certified physician and attorney, and made up of medical doctors, came together to address what the group calls a “massive disinformation campaign” about the coronavirus. Norman also spoke at the event.

    To suppress science, Facebook took down the video stream. You can, at least temporarily, find a copy of the accurate science here:

    https://m.facebook.com/groups/hydroxychloroquine/permalink/2347263242246589/?__tn__=R

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2020/07/27/facebook-censors-viral-video-of-doctors-capitol-hill-coronavirus-press-conference/

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @A123

    Isn't Gold Jewish? I thought we cannot trust this group at all since they are greedy and deceptive. Furthermore, I am led to believe here that women are solipsistic. So why are you seemingly in support of a Jewish female?

    Indeed, on her Facebook account, she demonstrates ardent support for Israel. In 2016, she wrote, “Start here. First, name the one country in the Middle East where Arabs are free. Second, see if you can even find Israel on the below picture of the Middle East, drawn to scale. Third, consider that this tiny desert country not only has become the world leader in several areas including water technology – the most important technology of all – Israel GIVES AWAY WATER TO THE PALESTINIANS. Israel is the solution to the problems in the Middle East.”

    Here is a study that shows that Trump's drug is not a panacea.

    https://scitechdaily.com/malaria-drug-chloroquine-does-not-inhibit-covid-19-infection-in-human-lung-cells

    , @A123
    @A123

    Democrats Lie -- Citizens Die

    Yet more evidence that Science Deniers are suppressing information about the safe and effective CQ generic treatment (1)


    Harvey Risch, professor of epidemiology at Yale School of Public Health, says that hydroxychloroquine is “the key to defeating COVID-19” in a Newsweek op-ed published this past week.

    “I am usually accustomed to advocating for positions within the mainstream of medicine, so have been flummoxed to find that, in the midst of a crisis, I am fighting for a treatment that the data fully support but which, for reasons having nothing to do with a correct understanding of the science, has been pushed to the sidelines,” Risch wrote. “As a result, tens of thousands of patients with COVID-19 are dying unnecessarily. Fortunately, the situation can be reversed easily and quickly.”

    And it can be reversed by the same medication that has become unnecessarily politicized by the media and the Democratic Party over the past several months.
     
    The NaziCrats cannot escape from this lie. If they try to admit the truth, they concede that they are murderers. With 3 months until the election, the truth will be out by then. The Blue Swastikas are poised to suffer a back breaking defeat.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/matt-margolis/2020/07/26/hydroxychloroquine-is-the-key-to-defeating-covid-19-says-yale-epidemiologist-n703802
  10. @East Hunter
    I'm not very convinced by the preprint's conclusions. They show that during warmer weather, fewer patients who tested positive were admitted to the hospital or died. They correct effects for age and sex and say in the Discussion that hospital overwhelming and changes in treatment protocols are not likely to cause this, which is true. But of course because the epidemic started in the winter and now we are in the summer, 'Temperature' is basically just a proxy for 'time since the start of the epidemic'. It went up automatically, but many important changed during this time, very importantly the extent of testing. Based on serological studies there are at least ten untested positives for each tested positive so there is a huge pool of asymptomatic or hardly symptomatic people to discover with more tests. More tests means a less severe disease course on average, and I think this is the only thing they are seeing here. They should include "time since January" or even better, "number of tests administered" as a covariate. That way we would see if people who were admitted on an unusually warm May week (independently from the fact that it was May already and more tests were administed) really had a better disease course. I think seasonality is still pretty much disproved by tropical outbreaks, which is of course great news because we shouldn't expect a resurgence in temperate areas just because it's autumn again.

    Replies: @DRA, @utu, @DanHessinMD

    I was not impressed with the paper.

  11. @East Hunter
    I'm not very convinced by the preprint's conclusions. They show that during warmer weather, fewer patients who tested positive were admitted to the hospital or died. They correct effects for age and sex and say in the Discussion that hospital overwhelming and changes in treatment protocols are not likely to cause this, which is true. But of course because the epidemic started in the winter and now we are in the summer, 'Temperature' is basically just a proxy for 'time since the start of the epidemic'. It went up automatically, but many important changed during this time, very importantly the extent of testing. Based on serological studies there are at least ten untested positives for each tested positive so there is a huge pool of asymptomatic or hardly symptomatic people to discover with more tests. More tests means a less severe disease course on average, and I think this is the only thing they are seeing here. They should include "time since January" or even better, "number of tests administered" as a covariate. That way we would see if people who were admitted on an unusually warm May week (independently from the fact that it was May already and more tests were administed) really had a better disease course. I think seasonality is still pretty much disproved by tropical outbreaks, which is of course great news because we shouldn't expect a resurgence in temperate areas just because it's autumn again.

    Replies: @DRA, @utu, @DanHessinMD

    We will have our answer soon enough. If mortality rises sharply again in the dry air of this coming winter, the thesis is as good as proven.

    But East Hunter overlooks many other things.

    1. East Hunter is wrong that the variable is time since disease. Most tropical places have had a very low disease fatality rate all the way through. Singapore, Florida, India, wherever you look, hot and humid places have had lower case mortality rates than cold/dry places even early on.

    2. The claim by East Hunter is that testing is way up so we are finding more cases. But time-since-disease should mean much more dying now than earlier because the disease is much more widespread now, just as the waterfronts in a pool get progressively larger with time since a stone dropped into the water. That hasn’t occurred. Notably a huge surge in southern cases did not lead to the expected surge in southern death.

    3. This isn’t an unusual correlation. It is exactly what you would expect based on all other viral respiratory infections. Seasonality is the norm and the burden should be on those claiming this time is different.

    4. Low humidity has long been known to be a harmful confounder in respiratory infection. Civilization seems determined these days to ignore all knowledge we once knew and return to the zero point of knowledge, and I suppose that’s the case here too. The importance of humidity on respiratory health was once widely known. An abundance of research on respiratory infection confirms this. Steam was once widely applied for pneumonia.

    5. The mechanisms are straightforward and not at all mysterious. Dry air reduces the lungs’ ability to fight respiratory infection in at least 2 ways. First is something called mucocilliary clearance. Please look it up. The second is that dry respiratory surfaces simply are more likely to be inflamed just like dry skin is more likely to be inflamed.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @DanHessinMD

    Forgive me for this tangential digression, but every time I see the posting handle DanHessinMD, I wonder how it is meant to be parsed. Initially, I had read it as Dan Hessin, M.D. (Medical Doctor). That parsing was intuitive to me, given the single topic that I had and still have seen your posts limited-to (i.e., the relation between air humidity level and the transmission and specific behavior of COVID-19, a distinctly medical matter.)

    Subsequently, however, I came across a comment that mentioned an alternative possible reading of your handle that I found no less plausible, perhaps even more: Dan Hess in MD ("MD" presumably being the standard US postal abbreviation for the state of Maryland).

    Perhaps you would be so kind as to clarify the matter for us. That would be much appreciated.

    Replies: @Rob

  12. If death rate were in summer what it was in winter, we would be looking at maybe 10x as much death right now. Deaths are far lower than at the peak, while total cases are far higher. And yet a simple cure exists.

    Humidity is everything that hydroxychloroquine is not. An absolute miracle cure that cuts the mortality by an order of magnitude. Not really a miracle since it should be common sense, this stuff is so well established. So easy. And we aren’t even trying. Depressing.

    If there is a spike in the death rate this winter we will know exactly why. Not to spread panic but a 2nd wave is coming hard. And the solution is so easy. Anyone can humidify. There will be no second wave in states like Fl and Tx, because they don’t have this seasonality of indoor humidity.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @DanHessinMD

    Serious question--Why not lend your expertise to Johns Hopkins or other medical institutions considering this solution is "so easy" and seemingly escapes the experts there? Have you made inquiries into offering assistance?

    Replies: @Dissident

  13. @A123
    The Science Deniers at Facebook strike again. Censoring accurate science about the proven safe and effective, generic CQ/AZ/ZN treatment. (1)

    The press conference featured Rep. Ralph Norman (R-SC) and frontline doctors sharing their views and opinions on coronavirus and the medical response to the pandemic.
    ...
    The event, hosted by the organization America’s Frontline Doctors, a group founded by Dr. Simone Gold, a board-certified physician and attorney, and made up of medical doctors, came together to address what the group calls a “massive disinformation campaign” about the coronavirus. Norman also spoke at the event.
     
    To suppress science, Facebook took down the video stream. You can, at least temporarily, find a copy of the accurate science here:

    https://m.facebook.com/groups/hydroxychloroquine/permalink/2347263242246589/?__tn__=R

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2020/07/27/facebook-censors-viral-video-of-doctors-capitol-hill-coronavirus-press-conference/

    Replies: @Corvinus, @A123

    Isn’t Gold Jewish? I thought we cannot trust this group at all since they are greedy and deceptive. Furthermore, I am led to believe here that women are solipsistic. So why are you seemingly in support of a Jewish female?

    Indeed, on her Facebook account, she demonstrates ardent support for Israel. In 2016, she wrote, “Start here. First, name the one country in the Middle East where Arabs are free. Second, see if you can even find Israel on the below picture of the Middle East, drawn to scale. Third, consider that this tiny desert country not only has become the world leader in several areas including water technology – the most important technology of all – Israel GIVES AWAY WATER TO THE PALESTINIANS. Israel is the solution to the problems in the Middle East.”

    Here is a study that shows that Trump’s drug is not a panacea.

    https://scitechdaily.com/malaria-drug-chloroquine-does-not-inhibit-covid-19-infection-in-human-lung-cells

  14. @DanHessinMD
    If death rate were in summer what it was in winter, we would be looking at maybe 10x as much death right now. Deaths are far lower than at the peak, while total cases are far higher. And yet a simple cure exists.

    Humidity is everything that hydroxychloroquine is not. An absolute miracle cure that cuts the mortality by an order of magnitude. Not really a miracle since it should be common sense, this stuff is so well established. So easy. And we aren't even trying. Depressing.

    If there is a spike in the death rate this winter we will know exactly why. Not to spread panic but a 2nd wave is coming hard. And the solution is so easy. Anyone can humidify. There will be no second wave in states like Fl and Tx, because they don't have this seasonality of indoor humidity.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Serious question–Why not lend your expertise to Johns Hopkins or other medical institutions considering this solution is “so easy” and seemingly escapes the experts there? Have you made inquiries into offering assistance?

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @Corvinus

    Corvinus asks DanHessinMD (concerning the latter's claims about the benefits of humid air in relation to COVID) "Why not lend your expertise to Johns Hopkins or other medical institutions". Perhaps a germane question but if so, it raises the question as to whether posting to a Crimethink site such as UR was prudent on the part of Dr. or Mr. Hess(in?).

    Replies: @iffen

  15. @A123
    The Science Deniers at Facebook strike again. Censoring accurate science about the proven safe and effective, generic CQ/AZ/ZN treatment. (1)

    The press conference featured Rep. Ralph Norman (R-SC) and frontline doctors sharing their views and opinions on coronavirus and the medical response to the pandemic.
    ...
    The event, hosted by the organization America’s Frontline Doctors, a group founded by Dr. Simone Gold, a board-certified physician and attorney, and made up of medical doctors, came together to address what the group calls a “massive disinformation campaign” about the coronavirus. Norman also spoke at the event.
     
    To suppress science, Facebook took down the video stream. You can, at least temporarily, find a copy of the accurate science here:

    https://m.facebook.com/groups/hydroxychloroquine/permalink/2347263242246589/?__tn__=R

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2020/07/27/facebook-censors-viral-video-of-doctors-capitol-hill-coronavirus-press-conference/

    Replies: @Corvinus, @A123

    Democrats Lie — Citizens Die

    Yet more evidence that Science Deniers are suppressing information about the safe and effective CQ generic treatment (1)

    Harvey Risch, professor of epidemiology at Yale School of Public Health, says that hydroxychloroquine is “the key to defeating COVID-19” in a Newsweek op-ed published this past week.

    “I am usually accustomed to advocating for positions within the mainstream of medicine, so have been flummoxed to find that, in the midst of a crisis, I am fighting for a treatment that the data fully support but which, for reasons having nothing to do with a correct understanding of the science, has been pushed to the sidelines,” Risch wrote. “As a result, tens of thousands of patients with COVID-19 are dying unnecessarily. Fortunately, the situation can be reversed easily and quickly.”

    And it can be reversed by the same medication that has become unnecessarily politicized by the media and the Democratic Party over the past several months.

    The NaziCrats cannot escape from this lie. If they try to admit the truth, they concede that they are murderers. With 3 months until the election, the truth will be out by then. The Blue Swastikas are poised to suffer a back breaking defeat.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/matt-margolis/2020/07/26/hydroxychloroquine-is-the-key-to-defeating-covid-19-says-yale-epidemiologist-n703802

    • Thanks: Mr. Rational
  16. The tag #HCQworks is taking off much to the dismay of the Science Deniers.

    You can view it using your tool of choice.

    https://tweet-per-sec.com/?q=%2523HCQworks&lang=en

    PEACE 😇

  17. @DanHessinMD
    @East Hunter

    We will have our answer soon enough. If mortality rises sharply again in the dry air of this coming winter, the thesis is as good as proven.

    But East Hunter overlooks many other things.

    1. East Hunter is wrong that the variable is time since disease. Most tropical places have had a very low disease fatality rate all the way through. Singapore, Florida, India, wherever you look, hot and humid places have had lower case mortality rates than cold/dry places even early on.

    2. The claim by East Hunter is that testing is way up so we are finding more cases. But time-since-disease should mean much more dying now than earlier because the disease is much more widespread now, just as the waterfronts in a pool get progressively larger with time since a stone dropped into the water. That hasn't occurred. Notably a huge surge in southern cases did not lead to the expected surge in southern death.

    3. This isn't an unusual correlation. It is exactly what you would expect based on all other viral respiratory infections. Seasonality is the norm and the burden should be on those claiming this time is different.

    4. Low humidity has long been known to be a harmful confounder in respiratory infection. Civilization seems determined these days to ignore all knowledge we once knew and return to the zero point of knowledge, and I suppose that's the case here too. The importance of humidity on respiratory health was once widely known. An abundance of research on respiratory infection confirms this. Steam was once widely applied for pneumonia.

    5. The mechanisms are straightforward and not at all mysterious. Dry air reduces the lungs' ability to fight respiratory infection in at least 2 ways. First is something called mucocilliary clearance. Please look it up. The second is that dry respiratory surfaces simply are more likely to be inflamed just like dry skin is more likely to be inflamed.

    Replies: @Dissident

    Forgive me for this tangential digression, but every time I see the posting handle DanHessinMD, I wonder how it is meant to be parsed. Initially, I had read it as Dan Hessin, M.D. (Medical Doctor). That parsing was intuitive to me, given the single topic that I had and still have seen your posts limited-to (i.e., the relation between air humidity level and the transmission and specific behavior of COVID-19, a distinctly medical matter.)

    Subsequently, however, I came across a comment that mentioned an alternative possible reading of your handle that I found no less plausible, perhaps even more: Dan Hess in MD (“MD” presumably being the standard US postal abbreviation for the state of Maryland).

    Perhaps you would be so kind as to clarify the matter for us. That would be much appreciated.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Dissident

    I’ve asked him before, and he didn’t answer. I take that to mean he lives in Maryland. A lot more people are named ‘Hess’ than ‘Hessin.’ That’s not proof, but it is suggestive.

    Even if he isn’t a doctor, that does not necessarily mean he’s wrong about dry air.

    Replies: @Dissident

  18. @Corvinus
    @DanHessinMD

    Serious question--Why not lend your expertise to Johns Hopkins or other medical institutions considering this solution is "so easy" and seemingly escapes the experts there? Have you made inquiries into offering assistance?

    Replies: @Dissident

    Corvinus asks DanHessinMD (concerning the latter’s claims about the benefits of humid air in relation to COVID) “Why not lend your expertise to Johns Hopkins or other medical institutions”. Perhaps a germane question but if so, it raises the question as to whether posting to a Crimethink site such as UR was prudent on the part of Dr. or Mr. Hess(in?).

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Dissident

    Crimethink site such as UR

    You think that this is a crimethink site?

    Replies: @A123

  19. @Dissident
    @Corvinus

    Corvinus asks DanHessinMD (concerning the latter's claims about the benefits of humid air in relation to COVID) "Why not lend your expertise to Johns Hopkins or other medical institutions". Perhaps a germane question but if so, it raises the question as to whether posting to a Crimethink site such as UR was prudent on the part of Dr. or Mr. Hess(in?).

    Replies: @iffen

    Crimethink site such as UR

    You think that this is a crimethink site?

    • Replies: @A123
    @iffen

    HTML badly needs (sarcasm) (/sarcasm) tags.

    Dissident's statement was almost surely intended as humor.... I certainly read it that way.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Dissident

  20. @iffen
    @Dissident

    Crimethink site such as UR

    You think that this is a crimethink site?

    Replies: @A123

    HTML badly needs (sarcasm) (/sarcasm) tags.

    Dissident’s statement was almost surely intended as humor…. I certainly read it that way.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @A123


    HTML badly needs (sarcasm) (/sarcasm) tags.
     
    I fear I may be missing something here. I would have thought that there could be little doubt but that it was iffen who was the one being sarcastic. Has the meaning of crimethink reversed while I wasn't looking?
  21. Rob says:
    @Dissident
    @DanHessinMD

    Forgive me for this tangential digression, but every time I see the posting handle DanHessinMD, I wonder how it is meant to be parsed. Initially, I had read it as Dan Hessin, M.D. (Medical Doctor). That parsing was intuitive to me, given the single topic that I had and still have seen your posts limited-to (i.e., the relation between air humidity level and the transmission and specific behavior of COVID-19, a distinctly medical matter.)

    Subsequently, however, I came across a comment that mentioned an alternative possible reading of your handle that I found no less plausible, perhaps even more: Dan Hess in MD ("MD" presumably being the standard US postal abbreviation for the state of Maryland).

    Perhaps you would be so kind as to clarify the matter for us. That would be much appreciated.

    Replies: @Rob

    I’ve asked him before, and he didn’t answer. I take that to mean he lives in Maryland. A lot more people are named ‘Hess’ than ‘Hessin.’ That’s not proof, but it is suggestive.

    Even if he isn’t a doctor, that does not necessarily mean he’s wrong about dry air.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @Rob


    I’ve asked him before, and he didn’t answer.
     
    Thanks. Perhaps it was your comment, then, that I had seen.

    I take that to mean he lives in Maryland. A lot more people are named ‘Hess’ than ‘Hessin.’
     
    Yes, that is what seems most likely to me as well.

    Even if he isn’t a doctor, that does not necessarily mean he’s wrong about dry air.
     
    Absolutely true, as is the inverse: Being a doctor wouldn't necessarily mean that he is correct. On this, matter, I have no opinion at this time. And nothing I have written should be taken as insinuation one way or the other.
  22. @Rob
    @Dissident

    I’ve asked him before, and he didn’t answer. I take that to mean he lives in Maryland. A lot more people are named ‘Hess’ than ‘Hessin.’ That’s not proof, but it is suggestive.

    Even if he isn’t a doctor, that does not necessarily mean he’s wrong about dry air.

    Replies: @Dissident

    I’ve asked him before, and he didn’t answer.

    Thanks. Perhaps it was your comment, then, that I had seen.

    I take that to mean he lives in Maryland. A lot more people are named ‘Hess’ than ‘Hessin.’

    Yes, that is what seems most likely to me as well.

    Even if he isn’t a doctor, that does not necessarily mean he’s wrong about dry air.

    Absolutely true, as is the inverse: Being a doctor wouldn’t necessarily mean that he is correct. On this, matter, I have no opinion at this time. And nothing I have written should be taken as insinuation one way or the other.

  23. @A123
    @iffen

    HTML badly needs (sarcasm) (/sarcasm) tags.

    Dissident's statement was almost surely intended as humor.... I certainly read it that way.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Dissident

    HTML badly needs (sarcasm) (/sarcasm) tags.

    I fear I may be missing something here. I would have thought that there could be little doubt but that it was iffen who was the one being sarcastic. Has the meaning of crimethink reversed while I wasn’t looking?

  24. Equality before the state and the law is not the same thing as “everybody is equal and will have equal outcomes in life”. America’s problem right now is that our insane focus on the latter is letting our elites erode the former.

    Equality of outcome vs. equality of opportunity.

    The latter would seem to generally be a noble and constructive ideal to strive toward. The former is not only impossible to achieve but quite detrimental to attempt to achieve. One cannot draw blood from a rock but one can lose a lot of blood trying to.

    A recent comment of mine that would appear apropos here:
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/scott-alexander-was-right-to-fear-doxing-after-all-cnn-doxes-a-tucker-carlson-writer/#comment-4033752

    We can scream profanities at the storm from the bow, or we can objectively assess the storm and make corresponding adjustments to our ship to set ourselves up for the best chance of weathering the storm without ending up at the bottom of the ocean.

    Good metaphor. Reality yields to no one. One either yields to it or is crushed by it.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Dissident


    Equality of outcome vs. equality of opportunity.

    The latter would seem to generally be a noble and constructive ideal to strive toward. The former is not only impossible to achieve but quite detrimental to attempt to achieve.
     
    What about a focus not on complete equality of outcome, but on a greater degree of equality of outcome than we have now? What about a focus on reducing, rather than eliminating, inequalities of outcome? Is that not a noble and constructive ideal to strive toward?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

  25. @Dissident

    Equality before the state and the law is not the same thing as “everybody is equal and will have equal outcomes in life”. America’s problem right now is that our insane focus on the latter is letting our elites erode the former.
     
    Equality of outcome vs. equality of opportunity.

    The latter would seem to generally be a noble and constructive ideal to strive toward. The former is not only impossible to achieve but quite detrimental to attempt to achieve. One cannot draw blood from a rock but one can lose a lot of blood trying to.

    A recent comment of mine that would appear apropos here:
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/scott-alexander-was-right-to-fear-doxing-after-all-cnn-doxes-a-tucker-carlson-writer/#comment-4033752

    We can scream profanities at the storm from the bow, or we can objectively assess the storm and make corresponding adjustments to our ship to set ourselves up for the best chance of weathering the storm without ending up at the bottom of the ocean.
     
    Good metaphor. Reality yields to no one. One either yields to it or is crushed by it.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Equality of outcome vs. equality of opportunity.

    The latter would seem to generally be a noble and constructive ideal to strive toward. The former is not only impossible to achieve but quite detrimental to attempt to achieve.

    What about a focus not on complete equality of outcome, but on a greater degree of equality of outcome than we have now? What about a focus on reducing, rather than eliminating, inequalities of outcome? Is that not a noble and constructive ideal to strive toward?

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @dfordoom

    A UBI strikes me as the most realistic way of attaining this.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  26. @dfordoom
    @Dissident


    Equality of outcome vs. equality of opportunity.

    The latter would seem to generally be a noble and constructive ideal to strive toward. The former is not only impossible to achieve but quite detrimental to attempt to achieve.
     
    What about a focus not on complete equality of outcome, but on a greater degree of equality of outcome than we have now? What about a focus on reducing, rather than eliminating, inequalities of outcome? Is that not a noble and constructive ideal to strive toward?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    A UBI strikes me as the most realistic way of attaining this.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Audacious Epigone


    A UBI strikes me as the most realistic way of attaining this.
     
    Agreed, but it needs to be a much more generous UBI than anything I've heard proposed so far. Much more generous.

    How about instead of a UBI set at a level just sufficient to keep people alive we talked about a UBI sufficient to allow everyone to live a decent comfortable life?

    Of course the libertarians will start foaming at the mouth about communism, but who cares?

    Would it really be so terrible for every citizen to be able to live a decent comfortable life?

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

  27. @Audacious Epigone
    @dfordoom

    A UBI strikes me as the most realistic way of attaining this.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    A UBI strikes me as the most realistic way of attaining this.

    Agreed, but it needs to be a much more generous UBI than anything I’ve heard proposed so far. Much more generous.

    How about instead of a UBI set at a level just sufficient to keep people alive we talked about a UBI sufficient to allow everyone to live a decent comfortable life?

    Of course the libertarians will start foaming at the mouth about communism, but who cares?

    Would it really be so terrible for every citizen to be able to live a decent comfortable life?

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    @dfordoom


    How about instead of a UBI set at a level just sufficient to keep people alive we talked about a UBI sufficient to allow everyone to live a decent comfortable life?
     
    "When all men are paid for existing,
    And no man must pay for his sins...."

    Be careful what you wish for.

    http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_copybook.htm

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

  28. @dfordoom
    @Audacious Epigone


    A UBI strikes me as the most realistic way of attaining this.
     
    Agreed, but it needs to be a much more generous UBI than anything I've heard proposed so far. Much more generous.

    How about instead of a UBI set at a level just sufficient to keep people alive we talked about a UBI sufficient to allow everyone to live a decent comfortable life?

    Of course the libertarians will start foaming at the mouth about communism, but who cares?

    Would it really be so terrible for every citizen to be able to live a decent comfortable life?

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

    How about instead of a UBI set at a level just sufficient to keep people alive we talked about a UBI sufficient to allow everyone to live a decent comfortable life?

    “When all men are paid for existing,
    And no man must pay for his sins….”

    Be careful what you wish for.

    http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_copybook.htm

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    @Mr. Rational

    Drat it, I got errors on each post and the edit timer had expired by the time I saw what had happened.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

  29. @Mr. Rational
    @dfordoom


    How about instead of a UBI set at a level just sufficient to keep people alive we talked about a UBI sufficient to allow everyone to live a decent comfortable life?
     
    "When all men are paid for existing,
    And no man must pay for his sins...."

    Be careful what you wish for.

    http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_copybook.htm

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

    Drat it, I got errors on each post and the edit timer had expired by the time I saw what had happened.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @Mr. Rational

    There can never be too much GOTCH.

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

  30. @Mr. Rational
    @Mr. Rational

    Drat it, I got errors on each post and the edit timer had expired by the time I saw what had happened.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    There can never be too much GOTCH.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    @Audacious Epigone

    Not even Urban Dictionary is helping me with GOTCH in this context.

  31. @Audacious Epigone
    @Mr. Rational

    There can never be too much GOTCH.

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

    Not even Urban Dictionary is helping me with GOTCH in this context.

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