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A substantial minority of Americans do not think their fellow citizens should have the ability to protest against perceived unjust political actions. The following graph shows the percentages of people in opposition (“not sure”, constituting 10% of the sample, are excluded):

We are headed past authoritarianism on our way to totalitarianism.

A sentiment like that would’ve sounded wildly hyperbolic a year ago. It resonates in a way that is very, very real now.

 
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  1. There is a price to pay for defiance of the law and social norms.

    We are about to pay that price.

    • Replies: @anon
    @216

    When the law is oppression and social norms are the rebar of evil, defiance is a moral imperative.

    Replies: @216

    , @Richard B
    @216


    There is a price to pay for defiance of the law and social norms.

    We are about to pay that price.
     
    When they outlaw Whiteness you won't have to do anything.

    You'll just have to be White.
  2. Oh hey, look at America’s problem children opposing the thing they used to get special treatment while they continue to be perennial fuck-ups at the expense of literally every other group.

  3. For jews the blacks are the perfect demographic to lord over. They are dumb, violent, pose absolutely zero threat to their power, blindly believe all the propaganda. If there was ZOG simulation strategy game, then blacks would be considered the ultimate min max way to go.

    • Agree: Jus' Sayin'...
    • Replies: @Aeoli Pera
    @neutral

    Until you need them to invade another country to maintain your global hegemony.

    , @Realist
    @neutral

    Correct on all points.

    , @Richard B
    @neutral


    They are dumb, violent, pose absolutely zero threat to their power, blindly believe all the propaganda.
     
    That describes The KKK perfectly. The Ku Klux Karens.

    White Karens might not all be violent, but they certainly support it. Especially if it's against White men.

    As far as being dumb and believing in propaganda they whole heartedly embarce Protective Stupidity. Which means, for them, Propaganda = Truth.

  4. anon[667] • Disclaimer says:

    O Tempora O Mores.

    Remember this?

    Finally

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
  5. The question contains too many nouns, pronouns and adjectives, which is sloppy, and it’s also severely confusing to low-IQ respondants. It’s also phrased as the inverse assumption of popular opinion, which makes it kind of a trick question with all the clunky words.

    If the question was simply, “do support peaceful protests?” you would have gotten a totally different result.

    You ethnics need to read the how-to guide for speaking English. This is not a Latin language:

    http://www.ourcivilisation.com/smartboard/shop/gowerse/complete/index.htm

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @Janus Knight
    @JohnPlywood


    If the question was simply, “do support peaceful protests?” you would have gotten a totally different result.
     
    Would that result matter? Sure, most people might support their own right to protest, but would they support another group's right to protest? Likewise, many people will say they "do support free speech" while also saying they will "not support hate speech." Your question doesn't really tell us much of anything useful, other than people will support their own rights when asked. Loading the question with dog whistles like "support peaceful protests by hate groups" might better elucidate the situation. My suspicion: minorities are less likely to support free speech and, since they are the future, that freedom will disappear in a future America. You can already see it slipping away.
    , @Mario Partisan
    @JohnPlywood

    Having read the prompt, it seems carefully phrased: “the ability of Americans to protest what they see as unjust political practices.” The survey question is phrased to try to get the respondent to divorce the question of the right to protest from whether they support a particular protest cause.

    “Do you support peaceful protests” does not, as you suggest, get to the same thing. Many survey participants would think of protests that they themselves support and respond “Yes, I support protesting things I oppose.” By adding “the ability” and “what they see” the respondent is encouraged to put themselves in the shoes of someone else.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @JohnPlywood


    Do you oppose “the ability of Americans to protest what they see as unjust political practices.”

     


    The question contains too many nouns, pronouns and adjectives, which is sloppy, and it’s also severely confusing to low-IQ respondants.
     
    Some percentage probably did get confused and think that saying "yes" meant they supported protest.

    In addition, the "what they see as unjust" language, may subtly imply that whatever the hypothetical protesters are bitching about isn't really unjust, they just "see" it that way.

    Finally, since the left controls most of the current "political practices," it's not surprising that women, minorities, and the young, are disproportionately willing to agree that you should just STFU and comply.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  6. The blacks are stupid, but unreliable.
    They may not pose a direct threat to power, but then who cares?
    They are dead weight that waste vital resources.

    Slavery is an outdated concept.
    We have machines that work better and smarter.
    Globalism is just neo-feudalism, an outdated model.

    Globalism will fail. It has little going for it.
    Nations are blood and soil.
    Globalism is a STUPID FANTASY…

  7. WW no degree – 21 vs. WW degree – 8 (lowest of any the categories)

    Rosie is vindicated and all those pooh-pooh head misogynists are proven completely wrong.

    The education of women is beneficial–not detrimental!

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @neutral
    @iffen

    It's pretty safe to assume that the "educated" women that answered were thinking of their vagina hat marches and the negro worship riots. I would bet everything that if they included protests they did not support they would have a different answer.

    Replies: @Realist

    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @iffen

    If the degreed White women were asked the question in a large room with murals of White people protesting forced public school integration, I would imagine that the results would be entirely different.

    Replies: @iffen

    , @Anonymous
    @iffen

    It's not education it's social class and IQ.

    Essentially, low IQ prole white women are authoritarian, and high IQ SWPL women are libertarian.

  8. @iffen
    WW no degree - 21 vs. WW degree - 8 (lowest of any the categories)

    Rosie is vindicated and all those pooh-pooh head misogynists are proven completely wrong.

    The education of women is beneficial--not detrimental!

    Replies: @neutral, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Anonymous

    It’s pretty safe to assume that the “educated” women that answered were thinking of their vagina hat marches and the negro worship riots. I would bet everything that if they included protests they did not support they would have a different answer.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @neutral

    Agree.

  9. @neutral
    For jews the blacks are the perfect demographic to lord over. They are dumb, violent, pose absolutely zero threat to their power, blindly believe all the propaganda. If there was ZOG simulation strategy game, then blacks would be considered the ultimate min max way to go.

    Replies: @Aeoli Pera, @Realist, @Richard B

    Until you need them to invade another country to maintain your global hegemony.

  10. We are headed past authoritarianism on our way to totalitarianism.

    I would say we have arrived.

    A sentiment like that would’ve sounded wildly hyperbolic a year ago. It resonates in a way that is very, very real now.

    Yes, indeed…the indifference and stupidity of the American people is the reason we are in dire straits.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  11. @neutral
    For jews the blacks are the perfect demographic to lord over. They are dumb, violent, pose absolutely zero threat to their power, blindly believe all the propaganda. If there was ZOG simulation strategy game, then blacks would be considered the ultimate min max way to go.

    Replies: @Aeoli Pera, @Realist, @Richard B

    Correct on all points.

  12. @neutral
    @iffen

    It's pretty safe to assume that the "educated" women that answered were thinking of their vagina hat marches and the negro worship riots. I would bet everything that if they included protests they did not support they would have a different answer.

    Replies: @Realist

    Agree.

  13. Thank you. I watched interviews with Andrew Sullivan and Douglas Murray recently about the Capitol Riots and have just been pissed off since then, hearing them talk about the “threats to democracy” from protestors. I know “mastURbating” doesn’t help, but at least it’s nice to see objective evidence that the end of our country is coming by the protestees and not the protestors.

  14. @JohnPlywood
    The question contains too many nouns, pronouns and adjectives, which is sloppy, and it's also severely confusing to low-IQ respondants. It's also phrased as the inverse assumption of popular opinion, which makes it kind of a trick question with all the clunky words.

    If the question was simply, "do support peaceful protests?" you would have gotten a totally different result.

    You ethnics need to read the how-to guide for speaking English. This is not a Latin language:

    http://www.ourcivilisation.com/smartboard/shop/gowerse/complete/index.htm

    Replies: @Janus Knight, @Mario Partisan, @Hypnotoad666

    If the question was simply, “do support peaceful protests?” you would have gotten a totally different result.

    Would that result matter? Sure, most people might support their own right to protest, but would they support another group’s right to protest? Likewise, many people will say they “do support free speech” while also saying they will “not support hate speech.” Your question doesn’t really tell us much of anything useful, other than people will support their own rights when asked. Loading the question with dog whistles like “support peaceful protests by hate groups” might better elucidate the situation. My suspicion: minorities are less likely to support free speech and, since they are the future, that freedom will disappear in a future America. You can already see it slipping away.

  15. @JohnPlywood
    The question contains too many nouns, pronouns and adjectives, which is sloppy, and it's also severely confusing to low-IQ respondants. It's also phrased as the inverse assumption of popular opinion, which makes it kind of a trick question with all the clunky words.

    If the question was simply, "do support peaceful protests?" you would have gotten a totally different result.

    You ethnics need to read the how-to guide for speaking English. This is not a Latin language:

    http://www.ourcivilisation.com/smartboard/shop/gowerse/complete/index.htm

    Replies: @Janus Knight, @Mario Partisan, @Hypnotoad666

    Having read the prompt, it seems carefully phrased: “the ability of Americans to protest what they see as unjust political practices.” The survey question is phrased to try to get the respondent to divorce the question of the right to protest from whether they support a particular protest cause.

    “Do you support peaceful protests” does not, as you suggest, get to the same thing. Many survey participants would think of protests that they themselves support and respond “Yes, I support protesting things I oppose.” By adding “the ability” and “what they see” the respondent is encouraged to put themselves in the shoes of someone else.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @Mario Partisan


    “Do you support peaceful protests” does not, as you suggest, get to the same thing.
     
    I'd surmise that part of the disparity has to do with the difference between those whose Rorschach filters process the word "protest" as verb (meaning an angry assemblage or mob in the act of turning riotous) versus those who process it as a noun (meaning a formal redress of grievances).

    Blacks, Democrats, and lower class women are bound to belong overwhelmingly to the former category.

    Replies: @Liberty Mike, @JohnPlywood

  16. So, where are all the usual commenters this week? Under special conditions of security pertaining to the Biden inauguration, have all the Deep State trolls gone ghost protocol?

    Just kidding (sort of).

  17. @216
    There is a price to pay for defiance of the law and social norms.

    We are about to pay that price.

    Replies: @anon, @Richard B

    When the law is oppression and social norms are the rebar of evil, defiance is a moral imperative.

    • Replies: @216
    @anon

    Nominating Sarah Palin in 2008 was a mistake.

    The Tea Party was a mistake

    Birtherism was a huge mistake

    Privatization of Medicare was the hugest mistake of any 21st century campaign

    Government shutdowns were a mistake

    Trump saying "rapists and Mexico" in the same breath was a mistake

    Trump mocking the disabled reporter was a mistake

    The Access Hollywood tape was a mistake

    Charlottesville was a mistake

    Mask skepticism was a mistake

    "Kids in cages" was a mistake

    The storming of the Capitol was a mistake

    Replies: @22pp22, @Donald A Thomson, @Servant of Gla'aki, @Paulbe

  18. @Mario Partisan
    @JohnPlywood

    Having read the prompt, it seems carefully phrased: “the ability of Americans to protest what they see as unjust political practices.” The survey question is phrased to try to get the respondent to divorce the question of the right to protest from whether they support a particular protest cause.

    “Do you support peaceful protests” does not, as you suggest, get to the same thing. Many survey participants would think of protests that they themselves support and respond “Yes, I support protesting things I oppose.” By adding “the ability” and “what they see” the respondent is encouraged to put themselves in the shoes of someone else.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    “Do you support peaceful protests” does not, as you suggest, get to the same thing.

    I’d surmise that part of the disparity has to do with the difference between those whose Rorschach filters process the word “protest” as verb (meaning an angry assemblage or mob in the act of turning riotous) versus those who process it as a noun (meaning a formal redress of grievances).

    Blacks, Democrats, and lower class women are bound to belong overwhelmingly to the former category.

    • Replies: @Liberty Mike
    @Intelligent Dasein

    What does Donald J. Trump's failure to pardon Messrs. Assange, Snowden, and Ulbricht say about him?

    Replies: @iffen, @Greta Handel, @By-tor

    , @JohnPlywood
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Yes, this is an excellent observaton. People are going to receive questions that have been peppered with their own pragmatics, and our vocabulary has become so stratifed by political orientaton that people can give two opposing answers to something fundamental (like the right to protest) depending on how the queston was asked.

    Language is so complex and nuanced that it is basically useless now. Nothing really has any meaning or accuracy, so it's impossible communicate with honesty. It should be simplified and the number of words greatly reduced, and the use of language greatly reduced by the general population. Ideally we would shift our cognition away from verbal and towards visual-spatial.

  19. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Mario Partisan


    “Do you support peaceful protests” does not, as you suggest, get to the same thing.
     
    I'd surmise that part of the disparity has to do with the difference between those whose Rorschach filters process the word "protest" as verb (meaning an angry assemblage or mob in the act of turning riotous) versus those who process it as a noun (meaning a formal redress of grievances).

    Blacks, Democrats, and lower class women are bound to belong overwhelmingly to the former category.

    Replies: @Liberty Mike, @JohnPlywood

    What does Donald J. Trump’s failure to pardon Messrs. Assange, Snowden, and Ulbricht say about him?

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Liberty Mike

    What does Donald J. Trump’s failure to pardon Messrs. Assange, Snowden, and Ulbricht say about him?

    It says that he is an intelligent American patriot.

    Replies: @Nodwink

    , @Greta Handel
    @Liberty Mike

    In answer to your question, I’ll repeat what I said under the December 29 Giraldi column (“A Pardoning Time of Year”).


    Mr. Trump has been in a position to issue pardons since his inauguration nearly four years ago. Why the assumption that only a politician on his way out the door can even consider doing the right thing against the interests of the Establishment? Washington is a moral vacuum.

    Those charged with the “crime” of exposing Uncle Sam’s — Assange, Snowden, and Manning, too — should receive a full pardon.

    I hope I’m wrong, but:

    1. None of the three will be pardoned. After all, they weren’t part of his administration or otherwise supporters of of the unprincipled Mr. Trump.

    2. This episode of cowardly selfishness will, like all the rest, go ignored by his exploited enthusiasts or, if that’s not practicable, rationalized. (“Those treacherous Jews he naively trusted hid the pardoning stationery!”)

    3. Mr. Biden (if he makes it) and Ms. Harris won’t do the right thing, either. (Cf., President Harding and Eugene Debs.)
     
    , @By-tor
    @Liberty Mike

    Think about the two countries involved in the continued illegal incarceration of Julian Assange for a minute or two. Assange is not being held by the likes of Monaco, Aruba or the Trump Family.

  20. @Liberty Mike
    @Intelligent Dasein

    What does Donald J. Trump's failure to pardon Messrs. Assange, Snowden, and Ulbricht say about him?

    Replies: @iffen, @Greta Handel, @By-tor

    What does Donald J. Trump’s failure to pardon Messrs. Assange, Snowden, and Ulbricht say about him?

    It says that he is an intelligent American patriot.

    • Replies: @Nodwink
    @iffen

    A serf to the very end - SAD!

    Replies: @iffen

  21. @iffen
    WW no degree - 21 vs. WW degree - 8 (lowest of any the categories)

    Rosie is vindicated and all those pooh-pooh head misogynists are proven completely wrong.

    The education of women is beneficial--not detrimental!

    Replies: @neutral, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Anonymous

    If the degreed White women were asked the question in a large room with murals of White people protesting forced public school integration, I would imagine that the results would be entirely different.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    You and neutral, and perhaps others, are arguing from "facts" not present in AE's post. I can imagine all sorts of stuff. In fact, I think my imagination is off the charts compared to many of the commenters here.

    Replies: @Rosie

  22. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @iffen

    If the degreed White women were asked the question in a large room with murals of White people protesting forced public school integration, I would imagine that the results would be entirely different.

    Replies: @iffen

    You and neutral, and perhaps others, are arguing from “facts” not present in AE’s post. I can imagine all sorts of stuff. In fact, I think my imagination is off the charts compared to many of the commenters here.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @iffen


    In fact, I think my imagination is off the charts compared to many of the commenters here.
     
    Come on, iffen, you have to admit the survey-in-a room-full-of-racist-murals thought experiment was pretty original.

    Replies: @iffen

  23. @anon
    @216

    When the law is oppression and social norms are the rebar of evil, defiance is a moral imperative.

    Replies: @216

    Nominating Sarah Palin in 2008 was a mistake.

    The Tea Party was a mistake

    Birtherism was a huge mistake

    Privatization of Medicare was the hugest mistake of any 21st century campaign

    Government shutdowns were a mistake

    Trump saying “rapists and Mexico” in the same breath was a mistake

    Trump mocking the disabled reporter was a mistake

    The Access Hollywood tape was a mistake

    Charlottesville was a mistake

    Mask skepticism was a mistake

    “Kids in cages” was a mistake

    The storming of the Capitol was a mistake

    • Replies: @22pp22
    @216

    If you do nothing, at least you can't make a mistake.

    Replies: @216

    , @Donald A Thomson
    @216

    Kids in ObamaCages. There were no funds voted by the Democrats for TrumpCages. As far as I know, Trump was content to use the ObamaCages. [email protected]

    , @Servant of Gla'aki
    @216


    The Tea Party was a mistake
     
    Yeah, such a catastrophe that we only picked up 63 House seats (and six Senate seats) in the 2010 midterms. I'm not sure we ever quite recovered from that.
    , @Paulbe
    @216

    I always thought that the nominations of Palin and McCain were quite deliberate for the purpose of ensuring the re-election of Obama without having to go too heavy on the vote fraud (which has been endemic in US elections since 2000, and most likely earlier). Unelectable candidates losing is so much easier to explain than midnight vote dumps and digital anomalies in swing seats. This election cycle though has upped the ante on vote fraud and media collusion to a point never before seen, and which they now know they can get away with.

  24. @216
    @anon

    Nominating Sarah Palin in 2008 was a mistake.

    The Tea Party was a mistake

    Birtherism was a huge mistake

    Privatization of Medicare was the hugest mistake of any 21st century campaign

    Government shutdowns were a mistake

    Trump saying "rapists and Mexico" in the same breath was a mistake

    Trump mocking the disabled reporter was a mistake

    The Access Hollywood tape was a mistake

    Charlottesville was a mistake

    Mask skepticism was a mistake

    "Kids in cages" was a mistake

    The storming of the Capitol was a mistake

    Replies: @22pp22, @Donald A Thomson, @Servant of Gla'aki, @Paulbe

    If you do nothing, at least you can’t make a mistake.

    • Replies: @216
    @22pp22

    Everything on that list was an unforced error

    -McCain chooses Tim Pawlenty instead (GOP potentially does better with white graduates)

    -The Tea Party is shut down by the establishment, rather than co-opted (Dems keep Congress, but Blue Dogs remain powerful)

    -Birtherism is repeatedly denounced, rather than coddled (black turnout drops in 2012)

    -Paul Ryan never proposes privatization, and isn't nominated as VP (Romney wins)

    -The government shutdowns never happen

    -Trump never associates Mexico with rape (less Media attacks, more focus on the wall)

    -Trump never mocks the disabled reporter (lots of people take this personally)

    -Trump isn't a figure of moral turpitude (lol)

    -Spencer cancels the rally after the torch parade, after realizing that Antifa outnumbers his people

    -Trump eagerly signs on to mask wearing (White boomers don't flee Trump)

    -Someone at DHS realizes that kids in cages are bad optics (Less AWFL freakout)

    -Trump tells the crown on Jan 6 to "Go home, we lost"

    Replies: @Liberty Mike

  25. @22pp22
    @216

    If you do nothing, at least you can't make a mistake.

    Replies: @216

    Everything on that list was an unforced error

    -McCain chooses Tim Pawlenty instead (GOP potentially does better with white graduates)

    -The Tea Party is shut down by the establishment, rather than co-opted (Dems keep Congress, but Blue Dogs remain powerful)

    -Birtherism is repeatedly denounced, rather than coddled (black turnout drops in 2012)

    -Paul Ryan never proposes privatization, and isn’t nominated as VP (Romney wins)

    -The government shutdowns never happen

    -Trump never associates Mexico with rape (less Media attacks, more focus on the wall)

    -Trump never mocks the disabled reporter (lots of people take this personally)

    -Trump isn’t a figure of moral turpitude (lol)

    -Spencer cancels the rally after the torch parade, after realizing that Antifa outnumbers his people

    -Trump eagerly signs on to mask wearing (White boomers don’t flee Trump)

    -Someone at DHS realizes that kids in cages are bad optics (Less AWFL freakout)

    -Trump tells the crown on Jan 6 to “Go home, we lost”

    • Replies: @Liberty Mike
    @216

    The colonies never object to the Stamp Act (no secession, no war, and no federal leviathan birthed)

    The colonies never throw a hissy fit over the Intolerable Acts (same)

    No First Continental Congress (no Second Continental Congress)

    No Second Continental Congress (no Declaration of Independence and therefore no "all men are created equal")

    Washington does not cross the Delaware (war fever subsides and no leviathan ensues)

    Franklin does more womanizing and less diplomacy while in France (no Yorktown)

    The oligarchs and their representatives do not convene in Philadelphia (no Whiskey Rebellion) (no John Marshall)

    Jefferson does not agree to the Louisiana Purchase (No Credit Mobilier)

    President Grant bans college football in 1870 (no Nick Saban to wash BLM toes)

    This is fun.

  26. @216
    @22pp22

    Everything on that list was an unforced error

    -McCain chooses Tim Pawlenty instead (GOP potentially does better with white graduates)

    -The Tea Party is shut down by the establishment, rather than co-opted (Dems keep Congress, but Blue Dogs remain powerful)

    -Birtherism is repeatedly denounced, rather than coddled (black turnout drops in 2012)

    -Paul Ryan never proposes privatization, and isn't nominated as VP (Romney wins)

    -The government shutdowns never happen

    -Trump never associates Mexico with rape (less Media attacks, more focus on the wall)

    -Trump never mocks the disabled reporter (lots of people take this personally)

    -Trump isn't a figure of moral turpitude (lol)

    -Spencer cancels the rally after the torch parade, after realizing that Antifa outnumbers his people

    -Trump eagerly signs on to mask wearing (White boomers don't flee Trump)

    -Someone at DHS realizes that kids in cages are bad optics (Less AWFL freakout)

    -Trump tells the crown on Jan 6 to "Go home, we lost"

    Replies: @Liberty Mike

    The colonies never object to the Stamp Act (no secession, no war, and no federal leviathan birthed)

    The colonies never throw a hissy fit over the Intolerable Acts (same)

    No First Continental Congress (no Second Continental Congress)

    No Second Continental Congress (no Declaration of Independence and therefore no “all men are created equal”)

    Washington does not cross the Delaware (war fever subsides and no leviathan ensues)

    Franklin does more womanizing and less diplomacy while in France (no Yorktown)

    The oligarchs and their representatives do not convene in Philadelphia (no Whiskey Rebellion) (no John Marshall)

    Jefferson does not agree to the Louisiana Purchase (No Credit Mobilier)

    President Grant bans college football in 1870 (no Nick Saban to wash BLM toes)

    This is fun.

  27. @Liberty Mike
    @Intelligent Dasein

    What does Donald J. Trump's failure to pardon Messrs. Assange, Snowden, and Ulbricht say about him?

    Replies: @iffen, @Greta Handel, @By-tor

    In answer to your question, I’ll repeat what I said under the December 29 Giraldi column (“A Pardoning Time of Year”).

    Mr. Trump has been in a position to issue pardons since his inauguration nearly four years ago. Why the assumption that only a politician on his way out the door can even consider doing the right thing against the interests of the Establishment? Washington is a moral vacuum.

    Those charged with the “crime” of exposing Uncle Sam’s — Assange, Snowden, and Manning, too — should receive a full pardon.

    I hope I’m wrong, but:

    1. None of the three will be pardoned. After all, they weren’t part of his administration or otherwise supporters of of the unprincipled Mr. Trump.

    2. This episode of cowardly selfishness will, like all the rest, go ignored by his exploited enthusiasts or, if that’s not practicable, rationalized. (“Those treacherous Jews he naively trusted hid the pardoning stationery!”)

    3. Mr. Biden (if he makes it) and Ms. Harris won’t do the right thing, either. (Cf., President Harding and Eugene Debs.)

    • Agree: Liberty Mike
  28. Should white supremacist domestic terrorists be permitted to protest the government’s enforcement of the laws for justice and equality?

    • LOL: Rosie
  29. @Liberty Mike
    @Intelligent Dasein

    What does Donald J. Trump's failure to pardon Messrs. Assange, Snowden, and Ulbricht say about him?

    Replies: @iffen, @Greta Handel, @By-tor

    Think about the two countries involved in the continued illegal incarceration of Julian Assange for a minute or two. Assange is not being held by the likes of Monaco, Aruba or the Trump Family.

  30. @216
    @anon

    Nominating Sarah Palin in 2008 was a mistake.

    The Tea Party was a mistake

    Birtherism was a huge mistake

    Privatization of Medicare was the hugest mistake of any 21st century campaign

    Government shutdowns were a mistake

    Trump saying "rapists and Mexico" in the same breath was a mistake

    Trump mocking the disabled reporter was a mistake

    The Access Hollywood tape was a mistake

    Charlottesville was a mistake

    Mask skepticism was a mistake

    "Kids in cages" was a mistake

    The storming of the Capitol was a mistake

    Replies: @22pp22, @Donald A Thomson, @Servant of Gla'aki, @Paulbe

    Kids in ObamaCages. There were no funds voted by the Democrats for TrumpCages. As far as I know, Trump was content to use the ObamaCages. [email protected]

  31. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Mario Partisan


    “Do you support peaceful protests” does not, as you suggest, get to the same thing.
     
    I'd surmise that part of the disparity has to do with the difference between those whose Rorschach filters process the word "protest" as verb (meaning an angry assemblage or mob in the act of turning riotous) versus those who process it as a noun (meaning a formal redress of grievances).

    Blacks, Democrats, and lower class women are bound to belong overwhelmingly to the former category.

    Replies: @Liberty Mike, @JohnPlywood

    Yes, this is an excellent observaton. People are going to receive questions that have been peppered with their own pragmatics, and our vocabulary has become so stratifed by political orientaton that people can give two opposing answers to something fundamental (like the right to protest) depending on how the queston was asked.

    Language is so complex and nuanced that it is basically useless now. Nothing really has any meaning or accuracy, so it’s impossible communicate with honesty. It should be simplified and the number of words greatly reduced, and the use of language greatly reduced by the general population. Ideally we would shift our cognition away from verbal and towards visual-spatial.

  32. @216
    @anon

    Nominating Sarah Palin in 2008 was a mistake.

    The Tea Party was a mistake

    Birtherism was a huge mistake

    Privatization of Medicare was the hugest mistake of any 21st century campaign

    Government shutdowns were a mistake

    Trump saying "rapists and Mexico" in the same breath was a mistake

    Trump mocking the disabled reporter was a mistake

    The Access Hollywood tape was a mistake

    Charlottesville was a mistake

    Mask skepticism was a mistake

    "Kids in cages" was a mistake

    The storming of the Capitol was a mistake

    Replies: @22pp22, @Donald A Thomson, @Servant of Gla'aki, @Paulbe

    The Tea Party was a mistake

    Yeah, such a catastrophe that we only picked up 63 House seats (and six Senate seats) in the 2010 midterms. I’m not sure we ever quite recovered from that.

  33. @iffen
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    You and neutral, and perhaps others, are arguing from "facts" not present in AE's post. I can imagine all sorts of stuff. In fact, I think my imagination is off the charts compared to many of the commenters here.

    Replies: @Rosie

    In fact, I think my imagination is off the charts compared to many of the commenters here.

    Come on, iffen, you have to admit the survey-in-a room-full-of-racist-murals thought experiment was pretty original.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Rosie

    Hey! I'm trying to defend the concept of educated (white) women here.

  34. @iffen
    @Liberty Mike

    What does Donald J. Trump’s failure to pardon Messrs. Assange, Snowden, and Ulbricht say about him?

    It says that he is an intelligent American patriot.

    Replies: @Nodwink

    A serf to the very end – SAD!

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Nodwink

    A serf to the very end – SAD!

    'Please, sir, I want some more.'

  35. @Rosie
    @iffen


    In fact, I think my imagination is off the charts compared to many of the commenters here.
     
    Come on, iffen, you have to admit the survey-in-a room-full-of-racist-murals thought experiment was pretty original.

    Replies: @iffen

    Hey! I’m trying to defend the concept of educated (white) women here.

    • LOL: Rosie
  36. @Nodwink
    @iffen

    A serf to the very end - SAD!

    Replies: @iffen

    A serf to the very end – SAD!

    ‘Please, sir, I want some more.’

  37. @iffen
    WW no degree - 21 vs. WW degree - 8 (lowest of any the categories)

    Rosie is vindicated and all those pooh-pooh head misogynists are proven completely wrong.

    The education of women is beneficial--not detrimental!

    Replies: @neutral, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Anonymous

    It’s not education it’s social class and IQ.

    Essentially, low IQ prole white women are authoritarian, and high IQ SWPL women are libertarian.

  38. @JohnPlywood
    The question contains too many nouns, pronouns and adjectives, which is sloppy, and it's also severely confusing to low-IQ respondants. It's also phrased as the inverse assumption of popular opinion, which makes it kind of a trick question with all the clunky words.

    If the question was simply, "do support peaceful protests?" you would have gotten a totally different result.

    You ethnics need to read the how-to guide for speaking English. This is not a Latin language:

    http://www.ourcivilisation.com/smartboard/shop/gowerse/complete/index.htm

    Replies: @Janus Knight, @Mario Partisan, @Hypnotoad666

    Do you oppose “the ability of Americans to protest what they see as unjust political practices.”

    The question contains too many nouns, pronouns and adjectives, which is sloppy, and it’s also severely confusing to low-IQ respondants.

    Some percentage probably did get confused and think that saying “yes” meant they supported protest.

    In addition, the “what they see as unjust” language, may subtly imply that whatever the hypothetical protesters are bitching about isn’t really unjust, they just “see” it that way.

    Finally, since the left controls most of the current “political practices,” it’s not surprising that women, minorities, and the young, are disproportionately willing to agree that you should just STFU and comply.

    • Agree: JohnPlywood
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Hypnotoad666

    I think it's a bit more subtle than that for the young. For most Americans under 35 years old, a life dominated by impersonal and often capricious forces is all you know, so the notion that you must trade privacy for a chance to participate in the basics of life is thus taken for granted. Getting ahead means getting authority figures to like you, take your side, and endorse you. There are escape hatches for youths ill-fitted for this model of advancement, but they've been getting scarcer for years.

    And in an environment where one slip-up or stroke of bad luck could mean years of having your life frozen before you get a chance again, if at all (anybody who has experienced long-term unemployment in 21st Century America knows what I'm talking about), that creates a generation disinclined to question the rules if they have a chance in the game.

    So, it's not that they all necessarily believe in the nonsense they spout-or consciously fear the consequences of not doing so. It's just the normative culture we've built. Unsurprisingly, people are miserable, but do not know how to change that.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

  39. @Hypnotoad666
    @JohnPlywood


    Do you oppose “the ability of Americans to protest what they see as unjust political practices.”

     


    The question contains too many nouns, pronouns and adjectives, which is sloppy, and it’s also severely confusing to low-IQ respondants.
     
    Some percentage probably did get confused and think that saying "yes" meant they supported protest.

    In addition, the "what they see as unjust" language, may subtly imply that whatever the hypothetical protesters are bitching about isn't really unjust, they just "see" it that way.

    Finally, since the left controls most of the current "political practices," it's not surprising that women, minorities, and the young, are disproportionately willing to agree that you should just STFU and comply.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    I think it’s a bit more subtle than that for the young. For most Americans under 35 years old, a life dominated by impersonal and often capricious forces is all you know, so the notion that you must trade privacy for a chance to participate in the basics of life is thus taken for granted. Getting ahead means getting authority figures to like you, take your side, and endorse you. There are escape hatches for youths ill-fitted for this model of advancement, but they’ve been getting scarcer for years.

    And in an environment where one slip-up or stroke of bad luck could mean years of having your life frozen before you get a chance again, if at all (anybody who has experienced long-term unemployment in 21st Century America knows what I’m talking about), that creates a generation disinclined to question the rules if they have a chance in the game.

    So, it’s not that they all necessarily believe in the nonsense they spout-or consciously fear the consequences of not doing so. It’s just the normative culture we’ve built. Unsurprisingly, people are miserable, but do not know how to change that.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @nebulafox

    I think it’s a bit more subtle than that for the young. For most Americans under 35 years old, a life dominated by impersonal and often capricious forces is all you know, so the notion that you must trade privacy for a chance to participate in the basics of life is thus taken for granted. Getting ahead means getting authority figures to like you, take your side, and endorse you. There are escape hatches for youths ill-fitted for this model of advancement, but they’ve been getting scarcer for years.

    The internet was one such escape hatch, probably the biggest one in existence. They're working hard on closing that down.

  40. @216
    @anon

    Nominating Sarah Palin in 2008 was a mistake.

    The Tea Party was a mistake

    Birtherism was a huge mistake

    Privatization of Medicare was the hugest mistake of any 21st century campaign

    Government shutdowns were a mistake

    Trump saying "rapists and Mexico" in the same breath was a mistake

    Trump mocking the disabled reporter was a mistake

    The Access Hollywood tape was a mistake

    Charlottesville was a mistake

    Mask skepticism was a mistake

    "Kids in cages" was a mistake

    The storming of the Capitol was a mistake

    Replies: @22pp22, @Donald A Thomson, @Servant of Gla'aki, @Paulbe

    I always thought that the nominations of Palin and McCain were quite deliberate for the purpose of ensuring the re-election of Obama without having to go too heavy on the vote fraud (which has been endemic in US elections since 2000, and most likely earlier). Unelectable candidates losing is so much easier to explain than midnight vote dumps and digital anomalies in swing seats. This election cycle though has upped the ante on vote fraud and media collusion to a point never before seen, and which they now know they can get away with.

  41. @216
    There is a price to pay for defiance of the law and social norms.

    We are about to pay that price.

    Replies: @anon, @Richard B

    There is a price to pay for defiance of the law and social norms.

    We are about to pay that price.

    When they outlaw Whiteness you won’t have to do anything.

    You’ll just have to be White.

  42. @neutral
    For jews the blacks are the perfect demographic to lord over. They are dumb, violent, pose absolutely zero threat to their power, blindly believe all the propaganda. If there was ZOG simulation strategy game, then blacks would be considered the ultimate min max way to go.

    Replies: @Aeoli Pera, @Realist, @Richard B

    They are dumb, violent, pose absolutely zero threat to their power, blindly believe all the propaganda.

    That describes The KKK perfectly. The Ku Klux Karens.

    White Karens might not all be violent, but they certainly support it. Especially if it’s against White men.

    As far as being dumb and believing in propaganda they whole heartedly embarce Protective Stupidity. Which means, for them, Propaganda = Truth.

  43. @nebulafox
    @Hypnotoad666

    I think it's a bit more subtle than that for the young. For most Americans under 35 years old, a life dominated by impersonal and often capricious forces is all you know, so the notion that you must trade privacy for a chance to participate in the basics of life is thus taken for granted. Getting ahead means getting authority figures to like you, take your side, and endorse you. There are escape hatches for youths ill-fitted for this model of advancement, but they've been getting scarcer for years.

    And in an environment where one slip-up or stroke of bad luck could mean years of having your life frozen before you get a chance again, if at all (anybody who has experienced long-term unemployment in 21st Century America knows what I'm talking about), that creates a generation disinclined to question the rules if they have a chance in the game.

    So, it's not that they all necessarily believe in the nonsense they spout-or consciously fear the consequences of not doing so. It's just the normative culture we've built. Unsurprisingly, people are miserable, but do not know how to change that.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    I think it’s a bit more subtle than that for the young. For most Americans under 35 years old, a life dominated by impersonal and often capricious forces is all you know, so the notion that you must trade privacy for a chance to participate in the basics of life is thus taken for granted. Getting ahead means getting authority figures to like you, take your side, and endorse you. There are escape hatches for youths ill-fitted for this model of advancement, but they’ve been getting scarcer for years.

    The internet was one such escape hatch, probably the biggest one in existence. They’re working hard on closing that down.

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