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Adverse Reactions to Covid-19 Shots by Age
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The young are at much lesser risk from Covid-19 than the elderly. That doesn’t appear to be the case with the vaccine shots, though. If anything, the opposite is true:

Rogan was right, or at least eminently reasonable, when he hypothetically advised a healthy man in his twenties to forego the shot. There is a one-in-three chance the jab comes with unpleasant side effects. Compare that to a slight chance of contracting the virus at all and an infinitesimal chance of having a rough go of it, and it’s difficult to find fault with young people who want nothing to do with it. Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.

 
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  1. Useful and actionable information, thanks.

  2. Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.

    Given that –

    1. the Corona Chan “vaccines” are untested experimental drugs that have not completed trials to verify either their safety or efficiacy,

    2. the “vaccine” manufacturers themselves openly admit that their “vaccines” neither stop people from catching or spreading Corona Chan,

    3. abundant evidence from around the world has already shown that the Corona Chan “vaccines” kill far more people than the Corona Chan bug, and

    4. a variety of cheap, safe medicinal and nutritional remedies have been emphatically demonstrated to be effective in preventing and curing Corona Chan,

    then mandating that anyone at all get the “shot” is not only categorically abusive, it constitutes a crime against humanity according to the Nuremburg code for which a menagerie of Nazi doctors were hung by the neck until dead.

    • Agree: Dutch Boy
    • Replies: @A.R.
    @Ultrafart the Brave

    Indeed.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Ultrafart the Brave

    If mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive, pushing the injection on pregnant women is arguably insane. Does no one remember Thalidomide?

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Ultrafart the Brave


    hung by the neck until dead
     
    Hanged. Hanged by the neck until dead. (A pet peeve, even tough 'hanged' seems so awkward).

    Apart from that, Strongly Agree - although it would also be nice if the perpetrators were torn to pieces in the public square... pour encourager les autres.

    Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave

  3. The vaccine issue has become ridiculously politicized and emotive.
    Older people should think about getting it. If they don’t want it, fine.
    Younger people mostly don’t need it. If they want to take it anyway for the as-yet unquantified, altruistic goal of preventing infection of others, fine.
    Kids should not be given experimental vaccines with known side effects just to protect the elderly.
    No one should be forced to take it just to live their life, nor hounded as a retard for taking it.
    The whole vaccine issue is like a jetski – it brings out the inner dickhead in everyone. This comment thread is about to melt down into acrimony as everyone is accuses everyone else of being a murderer, a dumbarse and a Nazi. I’m outta here.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @res
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    Agreed. At this point I just want all of the mask militants to get themselves vaccinated and then shut up.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @RSDB
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    Well, you have certainly been proven a true prophet.

  4. Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.

    There are people with weakened immune systems for whom vaccination is not safe. Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus and offer some protection for this group and the group that is too dumb to get vaccinated.

    • Replies: @Realist
    @iffen


    There are people with weakened immune systems for whom vaccination is not safe. Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus and offer some protection for this group and the group that is too dumb to get vaccinated.
     
    The dumb ones are those that are getting vaccinated with a substance that is, unknown, untested, and carries no manufacturer liability...for a virus that has the death rate of a bad cold.

    I'm pretty sure you have been vaccinated.
    , @Ultrafart the Brave
    @iffen


    Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus...
     
    Would it really?

    Perhaps you might care to explain for the rest of us exactly how being "vaccinated" will reduce the circulation of the virus, when the CDC and the "vaccine" manufacturers themselves openly admit that their "vaccines" neither stop infection or transmission of Corona Chan?

    ...and offer some protection for this group and the group that is too dumb to get vaccinated.
     
    Perhaps you should think about sharing your wisdom with the Norwegian government which stopped "vaccinating" their population when they determined that it was killing more of their people than Corona Chan. Maybe the Norwegian people are "too dumb" to willingly kill their own people with an untested experimental drug, unlike "smart" people such as yourself.

    Incidentally, define "vaccination"? Your contribution to the forum here demonstrates very clearly that you think being injected with a Corona Chan "vaccine" confers immunity from infection with Corona Chan. That's an exceedingly foolish and completely unfounded assumption to make. The CDC and the "vaccine" manufacturers themselves state no such thing - their untested experimental drugs are only designed to "reduce the symptoms" when an individual is infected with Corona Chan, and even that hasn't been verified because we are now in the midst of Phase III testing of the effects of these "vaccines" on unwitting, uninformed live human specimens such as yourself.

    How is the "vaccine" testing going so far? Well, we already know that the mRNA "vaccines" kill way more people than the Corona Chan bug. Here's a sampling of reports from Norway and Israel which show this to be true:

    https://anti-empire.com/norways-health-authority-says-further-use-of-astrazeneca-riskier-than-covid-recommends-pulling-vaccine-permanently/

    https://www.unz.com/gatzmon/the-israeli-people-committees-april-report-on-the-lethal-impact-of-vaccinations/

    https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/experimental-vaccine-death-rate-for-israels-elderly-40-times-higher-than-covid-19-deaths-researchers
     
    Just in passing, I hope you're comfortable in the knowledge that prior efforts to create mRNA coronavirus vaccines killed 100% of the test animals. That's perfectly fine, of course, because this time around they completely skipped any testing on animals. This time around, YOU are the "test animal".

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @Dumbo
    @iffen


    Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus and offer some protection for this group
     
    So... Let me see if I understand... Billions of children, who are basically immune to the disease, should be vaccinated with a toxic substance (spike protein) with unknown long-term effects and which has caused bad side-effects in some, with the unproven hope that it might help prevent the spread of the disease in others and not just reduce symptoms as the manufacturers themselves say is the main objective... All this supposedly to protect the 1% of people with "weakened immune systems" who will be vaccinated and die anyway (because if they vaccinate children, what's to stop them from vaccinating anyone else).

    You sir, are an idiot or a mass murderer. I hope for their benefit that you don't have children.

  5. @iffen
    Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.

    There are people with weakened immune systems for whom vaccination is not safe. Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus and offer some protection for this group and the group that is too dumb to get vaccinated.

    Replies: @Realist, @Ultrafart the Brave, @Dumbo

    There are people with weakened immune systems for whom vaccination is not safe. Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus and offer some protection for this group and the group that is too dumb to get vaccinated.

    The dumb ones are those that are getting vaccinated with a substance that is, unknown, untested, and carries no manufacturer liability…for a virus that has the death rate of a bad cold.

    I’m pretty sure you have been vaccinated.

  6. I’m from a very low risk group. I’ve also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I’ll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I’ve taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won’t be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Triteleia Laxa

    That’s what I’ve been curious about - what may potentially be off limits to non-jabees. I see one Caribbean cruise lines that sails out of Florida has backed off their requirement to prove jab status in order to board, after DeSantis signed legislation making that illegal. I guess we’ll see how it plays out.

    , @jsinton
    @Triteleia Laxa

    It's your funeral.

    , @V. K. Ovelund
    @Triteleia Laxa


    I’m from a very low risk group. I’ve also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I’ll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I’ve taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won’t be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?
     

    Here is one data point: in a blue lockdown state of the U.S., my fifteen-year-old daughter is finishing her school year this week, so no more masks—except she has a part-time job. Of the 40 or 50 employees, all but two have been vaccinated or claim to have been vaccinated. However, my daughter, being fifteen and already having had the virus, is one of the two unvaccinated (the other works a different shift), so the state is humiliating my daughter at work by making her the only masked person in the building.

    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.

    Giddy leftists think that they can get away with this, and they probably could, if they would exercise moderate self-control; but apparently, they won't. I do not believe that they can get away with it. Despite their demographic advantage, I believe that they will fail.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @Jay Fink, @Twinkie

    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Just lie about it. Some employers are requiring vaccination to be allowed maskless back into the workspace, but as of now, they are not allowed to request that you show proof of vaccination. Something to do with medical privacy.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

  7. @Triteleia Laxa
    I'm from a very low risk group. I've also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I'll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I've taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won't be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?

    Replies: @usNthem, @jsinton, @V. K. Ovelund, @Hapalong Cassidy

    That’s what I’ve been curious about – what may potentially be off limits to non-jabees. I see one Caribbean cruise lines that sails out of Florida has backed off their requirement to prove jab status in order to board, after DeSantis signed legislation making that illegal. I guess we’ll see how it plays out.

  8. Compare that to a slight chance of contracting the virus at all and an infinitesimal chance of having a rough go of it

    Infinitesimal? You don’t know what you’re talking about.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Alexander Turok

    85% of deaths in Brazil were over 60. 83% were already unhealthy. Those two numbers have a lot of overlap, but it leaves very little space for healthy 20 somethings. I wonder what the chances actually are?

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Alexander Turok

    You're right.

    You gonna call the hyperbole police, or is it better if AE self-abases?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    , @res
    @Alexander Turok

    Remember he is talking about for a healthy man in his 20s. What number would you propose for the chance of having a rough go of it for someone like that?

    Also remember that the popular definition of infinitesimal (extremely small) is different from the mathematical definition.

  9. @Alexander Turok

    Compare that to a slight chance of contracting the virus at all and an infinitesimal chance of having a rough go of it
     
    Infinitesimal? You don't know what you're talking about.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @TomSchmidt, @res

    85% of deaths in Brazil were over 60. 83% were already unhealthy. Those two numbers have a lot of overlap, but it leaves very little space for healthy 20 somethings. I wonder what the chances actually are?

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @Triteleia Laxa

    "Death" is not the same thing as "having a rough go of it."

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  10. @Triteleia Laxa
    I'm from a very low risk group. I've also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I'll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I've taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won't be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?

    Replies: @usNthem, @jsinton, @V. K. Ovelund, @Hapalong Cassidy

    It’s your funeral.

  11. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    The vaccine issue has become ridiculously politicized and emotive.
    Older people should think about getting it. If they don't want it, fine.
    Younger people mostly don't need it. If they want to take it anyway for the as-yet unquantified, altruistic goal of preventing infection of others, fine.
    Kids should not be given experimental vaccines with known side effects just to protect the elderly.
    No one should be forced to take it just to live their life, nor hounded as a retard for taking it.
    The whole vaccine issue is like a jetski - it brings out the inner dickhead in everyone. This comment thread is about to melt down into acrimony as everyone is accuses everyone else of being a murderer, a dumbarse and a Nazi. I'm outta here.

    Replies: @res, @RSDB

    Agreed. At this point I just want all of the mask militants to get themselves vaccinated and then shut up.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @res

    The thing is that the masked militants already are vaccinated. My personal observation is that the folks who already got the jab are the ones most likely to still be masked up in public.

    It's about demonstrating right thinking adherence to the proper doctrines. It's virtue signalling pure and simple.

    At this point pretty much anyone that really wants the vaccine has had ample opportunity to do so. It's past time to get back to normal, and we will have to force the government's hand by doing it ourselves. We can either make the restrictions obsolete by ignoring them or be ruled by the most hypochondriac segment of the population in perpetuity.

    Because remember...You Can Never Be Safe Enough.

    Replies: @Commentator Mike

  12. @Triteleia Laxa
    I'm from a very low risk group. I've also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I'll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I've taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won't be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?

    Replies: @usNthem, @jsinton, @V. K. Ovelund, @Hapalong Cassidy

    I’m from a very low risk group. I’ve also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I’ll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I’ve taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won’t be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?

    Here is one data point: in a blue lockdown state of the U.S., my fifteen-year-old daughter is finishing her school year this week, so no more masks—except she has a part-time job. Of the 40 or 50 employees, all but two have been vaccinated or claim to have been vaccinated. However, my daughter, being fifteen and already having had the virus, is one of the two unvaccinated (the other works a different shift), so the state is humiliating my daughter at work by making her the only masked person in the building.

    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.

    Giddy leftists think that they can get away with this, and they probably could, if they would exercise moderate self-control; but apparently, they won’t. I do not believe that they can get away with it. Despite their demographic advantage, I believe that they will fail.

    • Thanks: Triteleia Laxa
    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.
     
    Wow, I was under the impression the army was all about freedom and doing your own thing and being able to see eff you to authority figures.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    , @Jay Fink
    @V. K. Ovelund

    I live in a red county and I have read our vaccination rate is well below the state and national average. The majority of people I have talked to have not been vaccinated and many speak out passionately against it.

    My workplace follows the CDC guidelines, masks are not required if you are vaccinated. To my surprise masks are still the norm, around 80% still wear them. I think it's a case of many of the workers making it well known they are not vaccinated. It's too late to lie and say they have.

    As someone who is not vaccinated I appreciate living in a city full of my fellow deplorables. I wouldn't want to be in a situation where I was one of few not vaccinated and treated like an outcast.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.
     
    The armed forces have been to this dance before: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthrax_Vaccine_Immunization_Program

    https://health.mil/Military-Health-Topics/Health-Readiness/Immunization-Healthcare/Vaccine-Preventable-Diseases/Anthrax

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22874851/

    To protect troops against the use of anthrax as a biological weapon, the US Department of Defense began an anthrax vaccination program in 1998. 14 years after the inception of the vaccination program, there is no evidence suggesting vaccination against anthrax carries long-term health risks for Active Duty Soldiers.
     
  13. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Alexander Turok

    85% of deaths in Brazil were over 60. 83% were already unhealthy. Those two numbers have a lot of overlap, but it leaves very little space for healthy 20 somethings. I wonder what the chances actually are?

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

    “Death” is not the same thing as “having a rough go of it.”

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Alexander Turok

    In England it is...

    I do also get your point. My question was more one made out of curiosity than to disagree with you. Having said that, I feel AE is closer to the mark than you are.

  14. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Triteleia Laxa


    I’m from a very low risk group. I’ve also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I’ll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I’ve taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won’t be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?
     

    Here is one data point: in a blue lockdown state of the U.S., my fifteen-year-old daughter is finishing her school year this week, so no more masks—except she has a part-time job. Of the 40 or 50 employees, all but two have been vaccinated or claim to have been vaccinated. However, my daughter, being fifteen and already having had the virus, is one of the two unvaccinated (the other works a different shift), so the state is humiliating my daughter at work by making her the only masked person in the building.

    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.

    Giddy leftists think that they can get away with this, and they probably could, if they would exercise moderate self-control; but apparently, they won't. I do not believe that they can get away with it. Despite their demographic advantage, I believe that they will fail.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @Jay Fink, @Twinkie

    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.

    Wow, I was under the impression the army was all about freedom and doing your own thing and being able to see eff you to authority figures.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Alexander Turok

    You are a good writer who brings a worthwhile perspective when you are not dealing grief. Insofar as flamewars are uninteresting, can you and I call it pax? I do not recall doing anything to offend you, but if I did, please pardon.

    You are right that the Army is not about doing your own thing.

  15. @Alexander Turok
    @Triteleia Laxa

    "Death" is not the same thing as "having a rough go of it."

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    In England it is…

    I do also get your point. My question was more one made out of curiosity than to disagree with you. Having said that, I feel AE is closer to the mark than you are.

  16. @Alexander Turok
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.
     
    Wow, I was under the impression the army was all about freedom and doing your own thing and being able to see eff you to authority figures.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    You are a good writer who brings a worthwhile perspective when you are not dealing grief. Insofar as flamewars are uninteresting, can you and I call it pax? I do not recall doing anything to offend you, but if I did, please pardon.

    You are right that the Army is not about doing your own thing.

  17. Shoot.

    Mandating (or otherwise coercing) shots for anyone in the age group for my wife and myself (Aged 45-64 here) is also “arguably abusive.” Why?” Because, 24% report negative reactions. A far smaller percentage ever have any big problem just suffering through the illness, and they end up producing their own antibodies, no shots needed.

    I am convinced of what another blogger here on UR says: This is just a rebranding of the flu. I don’t get flu shots, and I haven’t had the flu in many, many years.

    SARS-CoV-2 is a rebranding of the flu,
    complete with all the repeating, annual shots you will all be encouraged (or coerced) to get for the rest of your lives.

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I am convinced of what another blogger here on UR says: This is just a rebranding of the flu
     
    No: https://gray-kbtx-prod.cdn.arcpublishing.com/resizer/AbeHehq1diC_Sr2cCal03W_mVoU=/980x0/smart/cloudfront-us-east-1.images.arcpublishing.com/gray/2CQ3SD6B6VBF5MSV5KHVVHHW5Q.png

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Triteleia Laxa, @Kratoklastes

    , @gabriel alberton
    @Buzz Mohawk

    In one of your other posts you mentioned how other countries' inhabitants never tasted freedom like those in yours have. Which might be true. But if your country enables its citzens to be free like nowhere else, you shouldn't need to excuse yourself from taking the shot because of possible negative reactions. The shot could have no chance to cause any negative reactions whatsoever. It could be extensively documented that it was absolutely safe. If you were free, you'd still have the right to refuse it, without having to give a reason. That's freedom.
    Having to, or feeling you have to bring up possible side effects in order to be excused from taking the vaccine: not freedom. It's admitting others have control over you and trying to get off based on a technicality.

  18. @Ultrafart the Brave

    Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.
     
    Given that -

    1. the Corona Chan "vaccines" are untested experimental drugs that have not completed trials to verify either their safety or efficiacy,

    2. the "vaccine" manufacturers themselves openly admit that their "vaccines" neither stop people from catching or spreading Corona Chan,

    3. abundant evidence from around the world has already shown that the Corona Chan "vaccines" kill far more people than the Corona Chan bug, and

    4. a variety of cheap, safe medicinal and nutritional remedies have been emphatically demonstrated to be effective in preventing and curing Corona Chan,

    then mandating that anyone at all get the "shot" is not only categorically abusive, it constitutes a crime against humanity according to the Nuremburg code for which a menagerie of Nazi doctors were hung by the neck until dead.

    Replies: @A.R., @Almost Missouri, @Kratoklastes

    Indeed.

  19. @Buzz Mohawk
    Shoot.

    Mandating (or otherwise coercing) shots for anyone in the age group for my wife and myself (Aged 45-64 here) is also "arguably abusive." Why?" Because, 24% report negative reactions. A far smaller percentage ever have any big problem just suffering through the illness, and they end up producing their own antibodies, no shots needed.

    I am convinced of what another blogger here on UR says: This is just a rebranding of the flu. I don't get flu shots, and I haven't had the flu in many, many years.

    SARS-CoV-2 is a rebranding of the flu,
    complete with all the repeating, annual shots you will all be encouraged (or coerced) to get for the rest of your lives.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @gabriel alberton

    I am convinced of what another blogger here on UR says: This is just a rebranding of the flu

    No:

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alexander Turok

    Take a look at your whole scale, buddy. The whole scale from bottom up. What you are showing me is a bad flu season, a little bit bigger than every year in the very short time frame you include. The great bulk of deaths is below the curve you think should alarm the reader. Not scary enough. Sorry.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

    , @Triteleia Laxa
    @Alexander Turok

    It looks like "the threshold for excess deaths" is a lot lower in the Covid time period than before. Shouldn't it be higher, as the population is getting bigger and older? Or am I not seeing it correctly?

    It looks like the gap between the orange and the blue would be a lot smaller if the orange were a little raised rather than substantially lowered.

    Replies: @Jtgw

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Alexander Turok

    The monthly (and weekly) all-cause mortality data exists back to 2005 (in some jurisdictions, it can be had all the way back to 1990)... yet you have chosen to show it starting in 2017.

    Why is that?

    (Don't both responding: I already know the answer. If you take the series back to 2005 or 1990, there are several years that are significantly worse than 2020/21. Deliberately presenting a limited, selective timespan is only going to convince retards; that makes you a charlatan or a bullshitter).

  20. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Triteleia Laxa


    I’m from a very low risk group. I’ve also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I’ll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I’ve taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won’t be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?
     

    Here is one data point: in a blue lockdown state of the U.S., my fifteen-year-old daughter is finishing her school year this week, so no more masks—except she has a part-time job. Of the 40 or 50 employees, all but two have been vaccinated or claim to have been vaccinated. However, my daughter, being fifteen and already having had the virus, is one of the two unvaccinated (the other works a different shift), so the state is humiliating my daughter at work by making her the only masked person in the building.

    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.

    Giddy leftists think that they can get away with this, and they probably could, if they would exercise moderate self-control; but apparently, they won't. I do not believe that they can get away with it. Despite their demographic advantage, I believe that they will fail.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @Jay Fink, @Twinkie

    I live in a red county and I have read our vaccination rate is well below the state and national average. The majority of people I have talked to have not been vaccinated and many speak out passionately against it.

    My workplace follows the CDC guidelines, masks are not required if you are vaccinated. To my surprise masks are still the norm, around 80% still wear them. I think it’s a case of many of the workers making it well known they are not vaccinated. It’s too late to lie and say they have.

    As someone who is not vaccinated I appreciate living in a city full of my fellow deplorables. I wouldn’t want to be in a situation where I was one of few not vaccinated and treated like an outcast.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jay Fink

    Well said. Here's wishing you all the best, fellow deplorable.

    I just lie when anyone is outrageous enough to ask if I've been vaccinated, and I no longer wear a mask anywhere it is not absolutely required.

    I am still alive.

    My friends and relatives in Europe, however, have to show papers or vaccination cards in some situations. As my wife, from there, says: "They don't know anything else." She means they have never really tasted what we still call freedom here in what used to be my country.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Alexander Turok

  21. @Triteleia Laxa
    I'm from a very low risk group. I've also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I'll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I've taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won't be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?

    Replies: @usNthem, @jsinton, @V. K. Ovelund, @Hapalong Cassidy

    Just lie about it. Some employers are requiring vaccination to be allowed maskless back into the workspace, but as of now, they are not allowed to request that you show proof of vaccination. Something to do with medical privacy.

    • Thanks: Triteleia Laxa
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Hapalong Cassidy


    Just lie about it. Some employers are requiring vaccination to be allowed maskless back into the workspace, but as of now, they are not allowed to request that you show proof of vaccination. Something to do with medical privacy.
     
    Currently it's on the honor system in my workplace.

    Of course, if you are a scummy contractor it doesn't matter because you are not permitted to access the system they use for entering vax status and issuing the big green, "VACCINATED," badges.

  22. There is a one-in-three chance the jab comes with unpleasant side effects.

    The most common side effect is having a sore arm at the injection site. My mother, my wife, and I all had this “unpleasant side effect,” which resolved in a couple of days. Children (12-15) also had a more robust antibody response than the adults did in the clinical trials.

  23. @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I am convinced of what another blogger here on UR says: This is just a rebranding of the flu
     
    No: https://gray-kbtx-prod.cdn.arcpublishing.com/resizer/AbeHehq1diC_Sr2cCal03W_mVoU=/980x0/smart/cloudfront-us-east-1.images.arcpublishing.com/gray/2CQ3SD6B6VBF5MSV5KHVVHHW5Q.png

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Triteleia Laxa, @Kratoklastes

    Take a look at your whole scale, buddy. The whole scale from bottom up. What you are showing me is a bad flu season, a little bit bigger than every year in the very short time frame you include. The great bulk of deaths is below the curve you think should alarm the reader. Not scary enough. Sorry.

    • LOL: Jtgw
    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The part that's below the curve is the time before the pandemic started(except for a brief period around Jan, 18, that's a "bad flu season."

  24. @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I am convinced of what another blogger here on UR says: This is just a rebranding of the flu
     
    No: https://gray-kbtx-prod.cdn.arcpublishing.com/resizer/AbeHehq1diC_Sr2cCal03W_mVoU=/980x0/smart/cloudfront-us-east-1.images.arcpublishing.com/gray/2CQ3SD6B6VBF5MSV5KHVVHHW5Q.png

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Triteleia Laxa, @Kratoklastes

    It looks like “the threshold for excess deaths” is a lot lower in the Covid time period than before. Shouldn’t it be higher, as the population is getting bigger and older? Or am I not seeing it correctly?

    It looks like the gap between the orange and the blue would be a lot smaller if the orange were a little raised rather than substantially lowered.

    • Replies: @Jtgw
    @Triteleia Laxa

    I think threshold is average of previous five years. So last years stats will no doubt skew the threshold for next five years.

  25. @Jay Fink
    @V. K. Ovelund

    I live in a red county and I have read our vaccination rate is well below the state and national average. The majority of people I have talked to have not been vaccinated and many speak out passionately against it.

    My workplace follows the CDC guidelines, masks are not required if you are vaccinated. To my surprise masks are still the norm, around 80% still wear them. I think it's a case of many of the workers making it well known they are not vaccinated. It's too late to lie and say they have.

    As someone who is not vaccinated I appreciate living in a city full of my fellow deplorables. I wouldn't want to be in a situation where I was one of few not vaccinated and treated like an outcast.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Well said. Here’s wishing you all the best, fellow deplorable.

    I just lie when anyone is outrageous enough to ask if I’ve been vaccinated, and I no longer wear a mask anywhere it is not absolutely required.

    I am still alive.

    My friends and relatives in Europe, however, have to show papers or vaccination cards in some situations. As my wife, from there, says: “They don’t know anything else.” She means they have never really tasted what we still call freedom here in what used to be my country.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I just lie when anyone is outrageous enough to ask if I’ve been vaccinated
     
    You are free to choose to be unvaccinated, but you should not lie. Just as you have the freedom not to be vaccinated, businesses and organizations are free to choose whom to employee or serve based on vaccination status. You can certainly refuse to answer, but then the others will likely treat you as if you are unvaccinated.

    If enough people like you lie and end up creating new clusters of community transmission, there will be a negative reaction to the lying people and there will be a greater pressure to implement more stringent measures such as vaccine passports.

    Exercise your freedom, but be honest, so that others also can.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @Diversity Heretic

    , @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Dumbo, @iffen, @Ultrafart the Brave

  26. @iffen
    Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.

    There are people with weakened immune systems for whom vaccination is not safe. Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus and offer some protection for this group and the group that is too dumb to get vaccinated.

    Replies: @Realist, @Ultrafart the Brave, @Dumbo

    Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus…

    Would it really?

    Perhaps you might care to explain for the rest of us exactly how being “vaccinated” will reduce the circulation of the virus, when the CDC and the “vaccine” manufacturers themselves openly admit that their “vaccines” neither stop infection or transmission of Corona Chan?

    …and offer some protection for this group and the group that is too dumb to get vaccinated.

    Perhaps you should think about sharing your wisdom with the Norwegian government which stopped “vaccinating” their population when they determined that it was killing more of their people than Corona Chan. Maybe the Norwegian people are “too dumb” to willingly kill their own people with an untested experimental drug, unlike “smart” people such as yourself.

    Incidentally, define “vaccination”? Your contribution to the forum here demonstrates very clearly that you think being injected with a Corona Chan “vaccine” confers immunity from infection with Corona Chan. That’s an exceedingly foolish and completely unfounded assumption to make. The CDC and the “vaccine” manufacturers themselves state no such thing – their untested experimental drugs are only designed to “reduce the symptoms” when an individual is infected with Corona Chan, and even that hasn’t been verified because we are now in the midst of Phase III testing of the effects of these “vaccines” on unwitting, uninformed live human specimens such as yourself.

    How is the “vaccine” testing going so far? Well, we already know that the mRNA “vaccines” kill way more people than the Corona Chan bug. Here’s a sampling of reports from Norway and Israel which show this to be true:

    https://anti-empire.com/norways-health-authority-says-further-use-of-astrazeneca-riskier-than-covid-recommends-pulling-vaccine-permanently/

    https://www.unz.com/gatzmon/the-israeli-people-committees-april-report-on-the-lethal-impact-of-vaccinations/

    https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/experimental-vaccine-death-rate-for-israels-elderly-40-times-higher-than-covid-19-deaths-researchers

    Just in passing, I hope you’re comfortable in the knowledge that prior efforts to create mRNA coronavirus vaccines killed 100% of the test animals. That’s perfectly fine, of course, because this time around they completely skipped any testing on animals. This time around, YOU are the “test animal”.

    • Troll: Jtgw
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Ultrafart the Brave

    Thanks for the links.

  27. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Alexander Turok

    It looks like "the threshold for excess deaths" is a lot lower in the Covid time period than before. Shouldn't it be higher, as the population is getting bigger and older? Or am I not seeing it correctly?

    It looks like the gap between the orange and the blue would be a lot smaller if the orange were a little raised rather than substantially lowered.

    Replies: @Jtgw

    I think threshold is average of previous five years. So last years stats will no doubt skew the threshold for next five years.

  28. Since I received my first dose of the Pfizer vaccine, I have been having horrific nightmares. Lucid dreams, such as you get with being very sick, with a high fever. The dreams are so vivid, gory and involving intense scenarios, that I don’t feel comfortable recommending the Pfizer vaccine to anyone. After the second dose, the nightmares amped up. I haven’t been able to sleep, more than 3 hours per night. If given a legitimate choice whether to be vaccinated, I would choose not to have been.

    • Thanks: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Catdog
    @Michelle

    Spooky

    , @Curle
    @Michelle

    They aren’t dreams. Biden really is the president.

    , @Twinkie
    @Michelle

    You might need a psych consult. ;)

  29. Interesting that the younger experience worse side effects. I wonder why that is. I don’t think there’s much evidence for permanent harm, however.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jtgw

    I don’t think there’s much evidence for permanent harm, however.

    What would you consider "evidence for permanent harm"?

    Replies: @Jtgw

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jtgw

    Look, everybody here might think they are smart (even including me!) but the fact is, you and I and nobody here knows even the slightest bit about the truth of any of this.

    Whenever I am given lousy graphs like that one, I remember that the person posting it knows nothing, nothing at all, about where the data came from, or how true those data are.

    Admit the fact that you don't know what is really going on. Furthermore, admit the fact that even the worst case scenarios, even as presented in that graph by the reply to me, are not even enough to merit the panic desired by the poster.

    We are being played. It is scary, but we are being played.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @nebulafox

    , @Twinkie
    @Jtgw


    Interesting that the younger experience worse side effects.
     
    A higher percentage has side effects, likely because the younger have a stronger reactivity including antibody response. The vast majority of side effects are quite minor - soreness on the injection area, arm, or sometimes chills, headache, fatigue, etc. that resolve in 1-3 days. During the trials, two out of hundreds/thousands had anaphylaxis, which were treated with no further issue.

    Here is more info on where the trials stand on kids: https://www.verywellhealth.com/covid19-vaccine-clinical-trials-for-kids-5184260
  30. anon[358] • Disclaimer says:

    The mrna vax doesnt stay in the shoulder muscle, and the spike protien it teaches the body to make so the immune system will learn to attack it seems to aggregate in the females ovaries in disproportionate numbers. This should lead to a lot of inflamation around the ovaries.

    Hmmm……..and Bill Gates is all about depopualtion huh? Maybe women can by his designer eggs when their immune system destroys their ovaries after 10 years of mrna booster shots.

  31. @Jtgw
    Interesting that the younger experience worse side effects. I wonder why that is. I don’t think there’s much evidence for permanent harm, however.

    Replies: @anon, @Buzz Mohawk, @Twinkie

    I don’t think there’s much evidence for permanent harm, however.

    What would you consider “evidence for permanent harm”?

    • Replies: @Jtgw
    @anon

    Depends what you got. There were like six out of millions that got some rare blood clotting disorder. That does not seem more severe than getting Covid.

    Replies: @anon, @iffen

  32. @Jtgw
    Interesting that the younger experience worse side effects. I wonder why that is. I don’t think there’s much evidence for permanent harm, however.

    Replies: @anon, @Buzz Mohawk, @Twinkie

    Look, everybody here might think they are smart (even including me!) but the fact is, you and I and nobody here knows even the slightest bit about the truth of any of this.

    Whenever I am given lousy graphs like that one, I remember that the person posting it knows nothing, nothing at all, about where the data came from, or how true those data are.

    Admit the fact that you don’t know what is really going on. Furthermore, admit the fact that even the worst case scenarios, even as presented in that graph by the reply to me, are not even enough to merit the panic desired by the poster.

    We are being played. It is scary, but we are being played.

    • Agree: gabriel alberton
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Buzz Mohawk


    We are being played. It is scary, but we are being played.
     
    Absolutely, Buzz.

    Just look at the lunatic vax lotteries being staged by California and Ohio.

    Those alone are proof there is nothing good in this for the average person that's just trying to make a living in these crazy times.
    , @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    >Look, everybody here might think they are smart

    I don't. Seriously: I don't. This isn't false humility. I have good reason to not think so. Appearances online can be deceiving.

    I'm quick. There's a difference. And it's important to realize that. People who are quick can deceive others, and are dangerous to themselves and others as a result.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Audacious Epigone

  33. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Just lie about it. Some employers are requiring vaccination to be allowed maskless back into the workspace, but as of now, they are not allowed to request that you show proof of vaccination. Something to do with medical privacy.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    Just lie about it. Some employers are requiring vaccination to be allowed maskless back into the workspace, but as of now, they are not allowed to request that you show proof of vaccination. Something to do with medical privacy.

    Currently it’s on the honor system in my workplace.

    Of course, if you are a scummy contractor it doesn’t matter because you are not permitted to access the system they use for entering vax status and issuing the big green, “VACCINATED,” badges.

  34. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jtgw

    Look, everybody here might think they are smart (even including me!) but the fact is, you and I and nobody here knows even the slightest bit about the truth of any of this.

    Whenever I am given lousy graphs like that one, I remember that the person posting it knows nothing, nothing at all, about where the data came from, or how true those data are.

    Admit the fact that you don't know what is really going on. Furthermore, admit the fact that even the worst case scenarios, even as presented in that graph by the reply to me, are not even enough to merit the panic desired by the poster.

    We are being played. It is scary, but we are being played.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @nebulafox

    We are being played. It is scary, but we are being played.

    Absolutely, Buzz.

    Just look at the lunatic vax lotteries being staged by California and Ohio.

    Those alone are proof there is nothing good in this for the average person that’s just trying to make a living in these crazy times.

  35. So, Spotify is now pushing a Not Past It podcast episode called,

    The Vax that Got Axed

    Did you know there was almost an AIDS vaccine? On June 3, 1998: AIDSVAX VAX004 reached the final stage of trials before widespread approval. Simone gets the facts on the vax and why it never made it to the masses.

    The people running the simulation are just funnin’ with us now.

    I hate this timeline.

  36. @Ultrafart the Brave
    @iffen


    Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus...
     
    Would it really?

    Perhaps you might care to explain for the rest of us exactly how being "vaccinated" will reduce the circulation of the virus, when the CDC and the "vaccine" manufacturers themselves openly admit that their "vaccines" neither stop infection or transmission of Corona Chan?

    ...and offer some protection for this group and the group that is too dumb to get vaccinated.
     
    Perhaps you should think about sharing your wisdom with the Norwegian government which stopped "vaccinating" their population when they determined that it was killing more of their people than Corona Chan. Maybe the Norwegian people are "too dumb" to willingly kill their own people with an untested experimental drug, unlike "smart" people such as yourself.

    Incidentally, define "vaccination"? Your contribution to the forum here demonstrates very clearly that you think being injected with a Corona Chan "vaccine" confers immunity from infection with Corona Chan. That's an exceedingly foolish and completely unfounded assumption to make. The CDC and the "vaccine" manufacturers themselves state no such thing - their untested experimental drugs are only designed to "reduce the symptoms" when an individual is infected with Corona Chan, and even that hasn't been verified because we are now in the midst of Phase III testing of the effects of these "vaccines" on unwitting, uninformed live human specimens such as yourself.

    How is the "vaccine" testing going so far? Well, we already know that the mRNA "vaccines" kill way more people than the Corona Chan bug. Here's a sampling of reports from Norway and Israel which show this to be true:

    https://anti-empire.com/norways-health-authority-says-further-use-of-astrazeneca-riskier-than-covid-recommends-pulling-vaccine-permanently/

    https://www.unz.com/gatzmon/the-israeli-people-committees-april-report-on-the-lethal-impact-of-vaccinations/

    https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/experimental-vaccine-death-rate-for-israels-elderly-40-times-higher-than-covid-19-deaths-researchers
     
    Just in passing, I hope you're comfortable in the knowledge that prior efforts to create mRNA coronavirus vaccines killed 100% of the test animals. That's perfectly fine, of course, because this time around they completely skipped any testing on animals. This time around, YOU are the "test animal".

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    Thanks for the links.

  37. @Alexander Turok

    Compare that to a slight chance of contracting the virus at all and an infinitesimal chance of having a rough go of it
     
    Infinitesimal? You don't know what you're talking about.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @TomSchmidt, @res

    You’re right.

    You gonna call the hyperbole police, or is it better if AE self-abases?

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @TomSchmidt

    The chance that a young, healthy person both contracts the virus and then suffers severely from it is vanishingly small. The comparison should not be between getting the shot and how bad infection will be, it should be between getting the shot and the small fractional chance of contracting the virus multiplied by the small fractional chance of having a severe go of it.

  38. @Jtgw
    Interesting that the younger experience worse side effects. I wonder why that is. I don’t think there’s much evidence for permanent harm, however.

    Replies: @anon, @Buzz Mohawk, @Twinkie

    Interesting that the younger experience worse side effects.

    A higher percentage has side effects, likely because the younger have a stronger reactivity including antibody response. The vast majority of side effects are quite minor – soreness on the injection area, arm, or sometimes chills, headache, fatigue, etc. that resolve in 1-3 days. During the trials, two out of hundreds/thousands had anaphylaxis, which were treated with no further issue.

    Here is more info on where the trials stand on kids: https://www.verywellhealth.com/covid19-vaccine-clinical-trials-for-kids-5184260

    • Thanks: Triteleia Laxa
  39. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jay Fink

    Well said. Here's wishing you all the best, fellow deplorable.

    I just lie when anyone is outrageous enough to ask if I've been vaccinated, and I no longer wear a mask anywhere it is not absolutely required.

    I am still alive.

    My friends and relatives in Europe, however, have to show papers or vaccination cards in some situations. As my wife, from there, says: "They don't know anything else." She means they have never really tasted what we still call freedom here in what used to be my country.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Alexander Turok

    I just lie when anyone is outrageous enough to ask if I’ve been vaccinated

    You are free to choose to be unvaccinated, but you should not lie. Just as you have the freedom not to be vaccinated, businesses and organizations are free to choose whom to employee or serve based on vaccination status. You can certainly refuse to answer, but then the others will likely treat you as if you are unvaccinated.

    If enough people like you lie and end up creating new clusters of community transmission, there will be a negative reaction to the lying people and there will be a greater pressure to implement more stringent measures such as vaccine passports.

    Exercise your freedom, but be honest, so that others also can.

    • Troll: Catdog
    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    businesses and organizations are free to choose whom to employee or serve based on vaccination status.
     
    Don't you think that's setting an incredibly dangerous precedent? Refusing to be vaccinated is perfectly legal, but you think that discrimination against people for doing so is A-OK?

    Do you think it's also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?

    You seem to be using the same logic that drives Cancel Culture.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Alexander Turok

    , @V. K. Ovelund
    @Twinkie


    You are free to choose to be unvaccinated, but you should not lie.
     
    Duress.

    Besides, the authorities issuing orders regarding vaccines and masks lie nonstop.

    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach. The lies are baked in, now; and the question is not asked for an honest purpose, anyway. Vaccination has been made a sacrament of the atheistic Church of the Woke.

    A growing number of workplaces no longer tolerate employees who do not lie.

    Most of us do not work in hospitals. Health care is not our business. We're just trying to get along, somehow, in a world gone mad. Having lost my own career for failing to lie with sufficient enthusiasm, I would not tell others to follow either my example or your advice. Your advice is not realistic in this instance in my opinion.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Diversity Heretic
    @Twinkie

    Lying to evade illegal totalitarian restrictions is not morally blameworthy. People who aided the resistance in occupied countries during World War II routinely lied to occupation authorities and acted morally and patriotically in doing so. This is no different. Authorities that require "vaccination" order people to take an experimental medical treatment without informed consent. That's illegal. I'm hopeful that they'll be an active market in counterfeit vaccination certificates.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

  40. @anon
    @Jtgw

    I don’t think there’s much evidence for permanent harm, however.

    What would you consider "evidence for permanent harm"?

    Replies: @Jtgw

    Depends what you got. There were like six out of millions that got some rare blood clotting disorder. That does not seem more severe than getting Covid.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jtgw

    There were like six out of millions that got some rare blood clotting disorder.

    Over what period of time? Could you please define "permanent"?

    , @iffen
    @Jtgw

    That does not seem more severe than getting Covid.

    Unless you are one of six.

    Replies: @Jtgw

  41. June 3, 2021 ‘We Made a Big Mistake’ — COVID Vaccine Spike Protein Travels From Injection Site, Can Cause Organ Damage
    Research obtained by a group of scientists shows the COVID vaccine spike protein can travel from the injection site and accumulate in organs and tissues including the spleen, bone marrow, the liver, adrenal glands and in “quite high concentrations” in the ovaries.
    Source: https://childrenshealthdefense.org/defender/covid-vaccine-spike-protein-travels-from-injection-site-organ-damage

    • Thanks: Jay Fink
  42. @Michelle
    Since I received my first dose of the Pfizer vaccine, I have been having horrific nightmares. Lucid dreams, such as you get with being very sick, with a high fever. The dreams are so vivid, gory and involving intense scenarios, that I don't feel comfortable recommending the Pfizer vaccine to anyone. After the second dose, the nightmares amped up. I haven't been able to sleep, more than 3 hours per night. If given a legitimate choice whether to be vaccinated, I would choose not to have been.

    Replies: @Catdog, @Curle, @Twinkie

    Spooky

  43. @Michelle
    Since I received my first dose of the Pfizer vaccine, I have been having horrific nightmares. Lucid dreams, such as you get with being very sick, with a high fever. The dreams are so vivid, gory and involving intense scenarios, that I don't feel comfortable recommending the Pfizer vaccine to anyone. After the second dose, the nightmares amped up. I haven't been able to sleep, more than 3 hours per night. If given a legitimate choice whether to be vaccinated, I would choose not to have been.

    Replies: @Catdog, @Curle, @Twinkie

    They aren’t dreams. Biden really is the president.

    • LOL: iffen, Twinkie
  44. @Jtgw
    @anon

    Depends what you got. There were like six out of millions that got some rare blood clotting disorder. That does not seem more severe than getting Covid.

    Replies: @anon, @iffen

    There were like six out of millions that got some rare blood clotting disorder.

    Over what period of time? Could you please define “permanent”?

  45. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alexander Turok

    Take a look at your whole scale, buddy. The whole scale from bottom up. What you are showing me is a bad flu season, a little bit bigger than every year in the very short time frame you include. The great bulk of deaths is below the curve you think should alarm the reader. Not scary enough. Sorry.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

    The part that’s below the curve is the time before the pandemic started(except for a brief period around Jan, 18, that’s a “bad flu season.”

  46. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jay Fink

    Well said. Here's wishing you all the best, fellow deplorable.

    I just lie when anyone is outrageous enough to ask if I've been vaccinated, and I no longer wear a mask anywhere it is not absolutely required.

    I am still alive.

    My friends and relatives in Europe, however, have to show papers or vaccination cards in some situations. As my wife, from there, says: "They don't know anything else." She means they have never really tasted what we still call freedom here in what used to be my country.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Alexander Turok

    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.

    • Replies: @Jay Fink
    @Alexander Turok

    Why do vaccinated people have such a problem with the non-vaccinated? Shouldn't the vaccination be enough to stop the fear of getting bad Covid regardless of who you encounter?

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Barbarossa

    , @Dumbo
    @Alexander Turok

    I am assuming that this comment is serious and not sarcastic, in which case you are an idiot and a freak. Wear that if you want, also insert a microchip with all your health information in your anus to be scanned by all relevant authorities for your added safety and benefit, but leave other people alone.

    What is it about this disease that make people freak out? Diseases were always part of life. But now, just to even get your normal citizenship rights, you have to prove that you are "vaccinated", and be assured this is going to not be to limited to "Covid", it's going to be a part of life in the new society. Supposedly "for our health and safety". Just like they protect us from "terrorism" by scanning old ladies and not allowing us to bring water bottles into planes.

    Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave, @Alexander Turok

    , @iffen
    @Alexander Turok

    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.

    Can't they just scan the nanochip that was implanted at the injection site?

    , @Ultrafart the Brave
    @Alexander Turok


    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.
     
    An enquiring mind wants to know - WHY???

    If you are "vaccinated", why do you give a rat's arse if someone else is not?

    The "vaccine" doesn't stop you or anyone else, whether "vaccinated" or not, from catching and spreading Corona Chan.

    The only difference between the "vaccinated" and "unvaccinated", as freely admitted by the CDC and the "vaccine" manufacturers themselves, is that the experimental "vaccine" manufacturers CLAIM that their product MAY reduce your Corona Chan symptoms once you've been infected with Corona Chan. None of this is even susbstantiated yet - we are still in the midst of Phase III trials, rolled out upon a clueless, unsuspecting population of human guinea pigs!

    All this for a coronavirus bug that, according to the CDC's own published figures, is hardly any worse than a regular old influenza virus - a bug for which anyone middle aged and under is already practically immune. And to top it all off, without the highly suspicious "spike protein", Corona Chan would just be another plain old common cold bug.

    A relatively trivial bug for which governments and medical institutions have coordinated worldwide to block and stamp out the proven cheap, safe and effective medicinal and nutritional remedies.

    So why are you so enthusiastically embracing the fake "vaccines" and insisting that everyone line up for their injection?

    And why are you so determined to tag everyone with a scannable ID tag?

    Yes, yes, we have the official narrative, now being embellished with the new "deadly variants", etc etc, just in time to force the "vaccination" of everyone right down to 6 month old babies - who will all be tagged with a scannable ID to track, monitor and control their lives, for the rest of their lives.

    All over a nothing-burger bug with compulsory "vaccines" that do nothing (except injure and kill lots and lots of people).


    Vaccines are more dangerous than Corona Chan

    [ https://anti-empire.com/norways-health-authority-says-further-use-of-astrazeneca-riskier-than-covid-recommends-pulling-vaccine-permanently/ ]

    [ https://www.unz.com/gatzmon/the-israeli-people-committees-april-report-on-the-lethal-impact-of-vaccinations/ ]

    [ https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/experimental-vaccine-death-rate-for-israels-elderly-40-times-higher-than-covid-19-deaths-researchers ]
     

    Forgive me for being paranoid, but I smell George Orwell somewhere in the background.
  47. @Twinkie
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I just lie when anyone is outrageous enough to ask if I’ve been vaccinated
     
    You are free to choose to be unvaccinated, but you should not lie. Just as you have the freedom not to be vaccinated, businesses and organizations are free to choose whom to employee or serve based on vaccination status. You can certainly refuse to answer, but then the others will likely treat you as if you are unvaccinated.

    If enough people like you lie and end up creating new clusters of community transmission, there will be a negative reaction to the lying people and there will be a greater pressure to implement more stringent measures such as vaccine passports.

    Exercise your freedom, but be honest, so that others also can.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @Diversity Heretic

    businesses and organizations are free to choose whom to employee or serve based on vaccination status.

    Don’t you think that’s setting an incredibly dangerous precedent? Refusing to be vaccinated is perfectly legal, but you think that discrimination against people for doing so is A-OK?

    Do you think it’s also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?

    You seem to be using the same logic that drives Cancel Culture.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @dfordoom


    Do you think it’s also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?
     
    I subscribe to the freedom of association, so yes. I’m also “A-OK” for businesses to refuse to serve people who are East Asian, for example. They shouldn’t get government money or contracts, and I’d hope that people of good intentions wouldn’t patronize such businesses, but the state should not bar such conduct. That’s real freedom.

    You might not have been to Utah, but there is an “unofficial” religious test for a lot of jobs, including that for doctors and nurses (which is why I always say that Mormons make great neighbors… until they are the majority).

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @Alexander Turok
    @dfordoom

    It's not really the same as any company that announced that it didn't hire feminists would be sued to oblivion under anti-discrimination laws. Repeal anti-discrimination and "harassment" laws and then we can talk about freedom of association.

  48. @Twinkie
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I just lie when anyone is outrageous enough to ask if I’ve been vaccinated
     
    You are free to choose to be unvaccinated, but you should not lie. Just as you have the freedom not to be vaccinated, businesses and organizations are free to choose whom to employee or serve based on vaccination status. You can certainly refuse to answer, but then the others will likely treat you as if you are unvaccinated.

    If enough people like you lie and end up creating new clusters of community transmission, there will be a negative reaction to the lying people and there will be a greater pressure to implement more stringent measures such as vaccine passports.

    Exercise your freedom, but be honest, so that others also can.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @Diversity Heretic

    You are free to choose to be unvaccinated, but you should not lie.

    Duress.

    Besides, the authorities issuing orders regarding vaccines and masks lie nonstop.

    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach. The lies are baked in, now; and the question is not asked for an honest purpose, anyway. Vaccination has been made a sacrament of the atheistic Church of the Woke.

    A growing number of workplaces no longer tolerate employees who do not lie.

    Most of us do not work in hospitals. Health care is not our business. We’re just trying to get along, somehow, in a world gone mad. Having lost my own career for failing to lie with sufficient enthusiasm, I would not tell others to follow either my example or your advice. Your advice is not realistic in this instance in my opinion.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach.
     
    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.

    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?

    Long before this pandemic, Hong Kong government initiated a campaign to increase mask usage during flu seasons and was able to reduce the number of flu patients substantially. The SARS epidemic that hit Hong Kong also contributed to this culture of masks.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Rich

  49. @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    businesses and organizations are free to choose whom to employee or serve based on vaccination status.
     
    Don't you think that's setting an incredibly dangerous precedent? Refusing to be vaccinated is perfectly legal, but you think that discrimination against people for doing so is A-OK?

    Do you think it's also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?

    You seem to be using the same logic that drives Cancel Culture.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Alexander Turok

    Do you think it’s also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?

    I subscribe to the freedom of association, so yes. I’m also “A-OK” for businesses to refuse to serve people who are East Asian, for example. They shouldn’t get government money or contracts, and I’d hope that people of good intentions wouldn’t patronize such businesses, but the state should not bar such conduct. That’s real freedom.

    You might not have been to Utah, but there is an “unofficial” religious test for a lot of jobs, including that for doctors and nurses (which is why I always say that Mormons make great neighbors… until they are the majority).

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Twinkie



    Do you think it’s also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?
     
    I subscribe to the freedom of association, so yes.
     
    I see freedom of association as something that is advantageous if you belong to a dominant group (such as whites and social conservatives and Christians used to be). Not so advantageous if you belong to a relatively powerless group, such as social conservatives and Christians today. Freedom of association is now a weapon that is going to be used against dissenters.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  50. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Twinkie


    You are free to choose to be unvaccinated, but you should not lie.
     
    Duress.

    Besides, the authorities issuing orders regarding vaccines and masks lie nonstop.

    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach. The lies are baked in, now; and the question is not asked for an honest purpose, anyway. Vaccination has been made a sacrament of the atheistic Church of the Woke.

    A growing number of workplaces no longer tolerate employees who do not lie.

    Most of us do not work in hospitals. Health care is not our business. We're just trying to get along, somehow, in a world gone mad. Having lost my own career for failing to lie with sufficient enthusiasm, I would not tell others to follow either my example or your advice. Your advice is not realistic in this instance in my opinion.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach.

    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.

    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?

    Long before this pandemic, Hong Kong government initiated a campaign to increase mask usage during flu seasons and was able to reduce the number of flu patients substantially. The SARS epidemic that hit Hong Kong also contributed to this culture of masks.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Twinkie


    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?
     
    What an idiotic statement. I haven't got a cold in 2016, 2017 and 2018, when there were no social distancing and no masks. What does it prove? Nothing.

    One anecdote is as good as another. I know people who didn't wear masks at all and didn't follow most of the rules, they never got the disease, I also know people who wore masks almost 100% of the time, they got it. No, masks and social distancing DO NOT WORK to stop a pandemic, as it has been widely shown all over the world.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Kratoklastes

    , @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?
     
    Last winter in Australia we had virtually no flu at all. I don't know anybody who had the flu last winter. I don't even know of anyone who had the flu. OK, that's anecdotal, but official figures say the same thing. We basically didn't have a flu season. So it certainly appears that masks and social distancing are very very effective in combating the flu.

    And we didn't have much COVID either.

    You can argue about whether masks and social distancing are or are not an overreaction and you can argue about whether the economic costs are worth it and you can argue about whether they infringe personal freedom, but the evidence does seem to be pretty clear that masks and social distancing do in fact reduce the spread of both flu and COVID.

    Replies: @res

    , @V. K. Ovelund
    @Twinkie


    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.
     

    Yes, true, but ... look, no one whose good opinion is worth earning likes a victim, so I don't want to be one; but I have seen a different side of this than you have. You tip in restaurants, don't you? That is literally corruption. It is bribing someone to do their job, but it became conventional in the United States long ago, and restaurant wages are now adjusted to it, like Mexican police wages are adjusted to Mexican police taking petty bribes for tearing up traffic tickets. If you are the one employee in the restaurant who will not take a tip, then you're not going to survive.

    It one thing to push back when your unethical opponent is pushing you downhill. It is another to push back from the bottom of the cliff: your unethical opponent, standing atop the cliff, won't even realize why you're pushing against the cliff face: he just wonders what weird thing you think you are trying to accomplish down there.

    A tenure-track professor (which I was not) in STEM at a research-oriented American university survives on research grants, mostly federal, dispensed by federal bureaucrats with Ph.D.s who mostly were not talented enough to become tenure-track professors, themselves. I have seen several grant proposals and never a single one that did not egregiously lie about what could be achieved, how much it would cost, how long it would take, and/or what the practical use of it would be. The lies are expected, like restaurant tips, and attempts to be truthful are resented. So what is a tenure-track professor supposed to do: sacrifice his career so someone even more dishonest and more leftist can take his place?

    Gibbon wrote about what happens once the manners of the people have been corrupted. Pertinax was emperor, and look what happened to him. You and I are not emperor.

    Like other Americans, I've got a family to take care of within the constraints of a twisted reality I did not create. I do not mind your criticism and do not take it personally, for ideally I agree with you, strongly; but in the real world, not all of us are well enough situated to indulge our better ethical impulses at work.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    I'm not going to lie because I quite literally can't, or at least not without nasty mental consequences. But I'm under few illusions about what will happen in a society where the head of the pandemic openly cops to lying repeatedly through a crisis on everything from his involvement with the Chinese to fudging the statistics on lockdowns. The response of the media is to gaslight people who have the gall to point out his mendacity. Of course that's not going to result in people trusting him and his cronies with injecting alien stuff in their body. A fish rots from the head.

    (And yeah, I went ahead and got the vaccine. Partly due to you, really, and also partly due to the realization that more likely than not to get out of here I would eventually need proof of it.)

    >If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    For many aspects of life in America, that reality is already there and has been for a while. Hiring through front door channels is a perfect example of a process in modern American society that heavily disincentives telling the truth, with social dynamics behind that turn out to be pretty ugly once you dig beneath the surface.

    The end result? Technological solutions that are not only harder on prospective employer and employee alike, but also encourage further lying.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Twinkie

    , @Rich
    @Twinkie

    If you keep your kids isolated and wearing masks, they will have less opportunity to catch a cold, or anything else. They will also develop a weak immune system and will, unfortunately, get much sicker when older. It was accepted wisdom when my children were young, to allow them to interact with others, to get sick, and to get stronger. You are certainly allowed to do with your children as you please, but I think you're doing them a disservice.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  51. ‘If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.’

    To not lie is to submit. I say this as someone who — to this point — has been obsessively honest.

    But if one finds oneself living under an authoritarian regime, lying is one of the few ways of subverting it.

  52. @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Dumbo, @iffen, @Ultrafart the Brave

    Why do vaccinated people have such a problem with the non-vaccinated? Shouldn’t the vaccination be enough to stop the fear of getting bad Covid regardless of who you encounter?

    • Agree: Ultrafart the Brave
    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Jay Fink

    They are like slaves who has been punished and so want all other slaves to be punished as well, out of spite.

    Also, fear is a potent motivator. They have an irrational fear of "unvaccinated people full of germs". The propaganda to paint every normal healthy people as "asymptomatic super spreaders" really got to them.

    They probably also think that the ritual of throwing away bottled water and having to x-ray their shoes every time they board a plane and harassing children and old ladies is protecting them from scary terrorism.

    , @Barbarossa
    @Jay Fink

    The non-vaccinated are heretics to the true Covid believers. It's a simple as that.

    My Dad got the jab, as he has lung issues and other comorbidities but my much healthy Mom decided to forgo it. My truly Covid fanatical Aunt, who has been fully vaccinated, refuses to let my Mom, her own sister, visit her this summer because of her lack of vaccination.

    This is not an isolated incident. I could relate several other similar situations from personal experience.

    One would think logically that the vaccinated would be chilled out now that they have their shot, but I think it deeply bothers some people that not everyone is 100% on board with the full spectrum Covid freakout.

    Replies: @Commentator Mike

  53. @iffen
    Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.

    There are people with weakened immune systems for whom vaccination is not safe. Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus and offer some protection for this group and the group that is too dumb to get vaccinated.

    Replies: @Realist, @Ultrafart the Brave, @Dumbo

    Vaccinating children would reduce the circulation of the virus and offer some protection for this group

    So… Let me see if I understand… Billions of children, who are basically immune to the disease, should be vaccinated with a toxic substance (spike protein) with unknown long-term effects and which has caused bad side-effects in some, with the unproven hope that it might help prevent the spread of the disease in others and not just reduce symptoms as the manufacturers themselves say is the main objective… All this supposedly to protect the 1% of people with “weakened immune systems” who will be vaccinated and die anyway (because if they vaccinate children, what’s to stop them from vaccinating anyone else).

    You sir, are an idiot or a mass murderer. I hope for their benefit that you don’t have children.

  54. @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach.
     
    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.

    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?

    Long before this pandemic, Hong Kong government initiated a campaign to increase mask usage during flu seasons and was able to reduce the number of flu patients substantially. The SARS epidemic that hit Hong Kong also contributed to this culture of masks.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Rich

    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?

    What an idiotic statement. I haven’t got a cold in 2016, 2017 and 2018, when there were no social distancing and no masks. What does it prove? Nothing.

    One anecdote is as good as another. I know people who didn’t wear masks at all and didn’t follow most of the rules, they never got the disease, I also know people who wore masks almost 100% of the time, they got it. No, masks and social distancing DO NOT WORK to stop a pandemic, as it has been widely shown all over the world.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Dumbo


    What an idiotic statement.
     
    Do you have small children? If you did, you'd know what I am talking about.

    Replies: @Dumbo

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Dumbo

    You're the type of cynical SOB who refuses to buy my anti-Werewolf bananas.

    For the record: anti-Werewolf bananas are useful for reducing the severity of werewolf attacks.

    They don't
    (1) stop werewolves from transforming, or
    (2) make werewolves less likely to attack, or
    (3) reduce the chance that a given werewolf attack turns the victim into a werewolf.

    In my preliminary study, anti-Werewolf bananas outperformed placebo by about a billion percent.

    Replies: @anon

  55. @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Dumbo, @iffen, @Ultrafart the Brave

    I am assuming that this comment is serious and not sarcastic, in which case you are an idiot and a freak. Wear that if you want, also insert a microchip with all your health information in your anus to be scanned by all relevant authorities for your added safety and benefit, but leave other people alone.

    What is it about this disease that make people freak out? Diseases were always part of life. But now, just to even get your normal citizenship rights, you have to prove that you are “vaccinated”, and be assured this is going to not be to limited to “Covid”, it’s going to be a part of life in the new society. Supposedly “for our health and safety”. Just like they protect us from “terrorism” by scanning old ladies and not allowing us to bring water bottles into planes.

    • Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave
    @Dumbo

    You are spot on target.

    And this -


    But now, just to even get your normal citizenship rights, you have to prove that you are “vaccinated”, and be assured this is going to not be to limited to “Covid”, it’s going to be a part of life in the new society. Supposedly “for our health and safety”.
     
    The unanswered question is - who exactly decided to spring this "new society" on us, in one coordinated movement right across the Western world?

    The answer is obvious by looking at whose agenda is being served. A certain Uncle Klaus and creepy Bill come immediately to mind.

    A perhaps more troubling concern is how did they manage to turn our own "democratic" governments, medical officials, regulatory agencies and media organs against us, in global unison?

    How deep does the treason go?
    , @Alexander Turok
    @Dumbo

    I had to show proof of vaccination status to attend college long before the beer virus. This is no new thing under the sun.


    I am assuming that this comment is serious and not sarcastic, in which case you are an idiot and a freak. Wear that if you want, also insert a microchip with all your health information in your anus to be scanned by all relevant authorities for your added safety and benefit, but leave other people alone.
     
    That's the idea, the people who don't have the tag will be assumed to be anti-vaxxers.

    Replies: @Dumbo

  56. @Twinkie
    @dfordoom


    Do you think it’s also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?
     
    I subscribe to the freedom of association, so yes. I’m also “A-OK” for businesses to refuse to serve people who are East Asian, for example. They shouldn’t get government money or contracts, and I’d hope that people of good intentions wouldn’t patronize such businesses, but the state should not bar such conduct. That’s real freedom.

    You might not have been to Utah, but there is an “unofficial” religious test for a lot of jobs, including that for doctors and nurses (which is why I always say that Mormons make great neighbors… until they are the majority).

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Do you think it’s also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?

    I subscribe to the freedom of association, so yes.

    I see freedom of association as something that is advantageous if you belong to a dominant group (such as whites and social conservatives and Christians used to be). Not so advantageous if you belong to a relatively powerless group, such as social conservatives and Christians today. Freedom of association is now a weapon that is going to be used against dissenters.

    • Agree: Catdog
    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @dfordoom


    I see freedom of association as something that is advantageous if you belong to a dominant group
     
    You would see it this way if you viewed society in terms of power relationships only (which, by the way, is the lens through which "woke" ideas on thing such as race relations viewed).

    Freedom of association is an intrinsic good.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  57. @Ultrafart the Brave

    Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.
     
    Given that -

    1. the Corona Chan "vaccines" are untested experimental drugs that have not completed trials to verify either their safety or efficiacy,

    2. the "vaccine" manufacturers themselves openly admit that their "vaccines" neither stop people from catching or spreading Corona Chan,

    3. abundant evidence from around the world has already shown that the Corona Chan "vaccines" kill far more people than the Corona Chan bug, and

    4. a variety of cheap, safe medicinal and nutritional remedies have been emphatically demonstrated to be effective in preventing and curing Corona Chan,

    then mandating that anyone at all get the "shot" is not only categorically abusive, it constitutes a crime against humanity according to the Nuremburg code for which a menagerie of Nazi doctors were hung by the neck until dead.

    Replies: @A.R., @Almost Missouri, @Kratoklastes

    If mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive, pushing the injection on pregnant women is arguably insane. Does no one remember Thalidomide?

    • Agree: Ultrafart the Brave
    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Almost Missouri


    If mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive, pushing the injection on pregnant women is arguably insane.
     
    My understanding is that the mRNA does not cross the placenta threshold. However, the antibody response in the mother does, so that the fetus gets the antibody benefit.

    Does no one remember Thalidomide?
     
    Unlikely for most readers here, as the misuse occurred in the 1950's (it only became medically approved in the U.S. in the 1990's). Even in those countries (Germany mostly), it was taken off the market in the early 1960's.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Ultrafart the Brave

  58. @Dumbo
    @Twinkie


    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?
     
    What an idiotic statement. I haven't got a cold in 2016, 2017 and 2018, when there were no social distancing and no masks. What does it prove? Nothing.

    One anecdote is as good as another. I know people who didn't wear masks at all and didn't follow most of the rules, they never got the disease, I also know people who wore masks almost 100% of the time, they got it. No, masks and social distancing DO NOT WORK to stop a pandemic, as it has been widely shown all over the world.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Kratoklastes

    What an idiotic statement.

    Do you have small children? If you did, you’d know what I am talking about.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Twinkie

    I do, and no, I don't know what you're talking about. I don't think small children should wear masks, which are useless. Since you appear to be Asian, I suppose masks are part of your culture. Enjoy them, but don't tell me that they "stopped Covid", as they obviously didn't.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  59. @dfordoom
    @Twinkie



    Do you think it’s also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?
     
    I subscribe to the freedom of association, so yes.
     
    I see freedom of association as something that is advantageous if you belong to a dominant group (such as whites and social conservatives and Christians used to be). Not so advantageous if you belong to a relatively powerless group, such as social conservatives and Christians today. Freedom of association is now a weapon that is going to be used against dissenters.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    I see freedom of association as something that is advantageous if you belong to a dominant group

    You would see it this way if you viewed society in terms of power relationships only (which, by the way, is the lens through which “woke” ideas on thing such as race relations viewed).

    Freedom of association is an intrinsic good.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    You would see it this way if you viewed society in terms of power relationships only
     
    I think it's realistic to see power relationships as being pretty significant.

    Freedom of association is an intrinsic good.
     
    That's a valid point of view. I don't agree with it but it is a valid point of view.

    Replies: @iffen

  60. @Almost Missouri
    @Ultrafart the Brave

    If mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive, pushing the injection on pregnant women is arguably insane. Does no one remember Thalidomide?

    Replies: @Twinkie

    If mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive, pushing the injection on pregnant women is arguably insane.

    My understanding is that the mRNA does not cross the placenta threshold. However, the antibody response in the mother does, so that the fetus gets the antibody benefit.

    Does no one remember Thalidomide?

    Unlikely for most readers here, as the misuse occurred in the 1950’s (it only became medically approved in the U.S. in the 1990’s). Even in those countries (Germany mostly), it was taken off the market in the early 1960’s.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Twinkie


    However, the antibody response in the mother does, so that the fetus gets the antibody benefit.
     
    Yep, here's one mother and fetus who got the "antibody benefit":

    https://news.yahoo.com/brazil-health-agency-calls-halt-110722688.html

    Fool.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Ultrafart the Brave
    @Twinkie


    My understanding is that the mRNA does not cross the placenta threshold. However, the antibody response in the mother does, so that the fetus gets the antibody benefit.
     
    You've taken a reasoned approach to assessing the "vaccines" effect on a pregnant woman, but it sounds like you are working with information provided by vested interests. I see this amongst many of my friends here in Australia - the only information they have comes from controlled mainstream and other "authoritative" sources, and so that's all they have to work with to construct their understanding of the Corona Chan "pandemic" and the global "vaccination" campaign.

    One crucial fact exposes the danger inherent in all the experimental "vaccines" - they all introduce the Corona Chan "spike protein" into the target's body, in astonomical numbers. Without the "spike protein", Corona Chan is basically just a common cold virus. The "spike protein" is how the Corona Chan bug makes weak people sick and kills some of them, though not many at all (no worse than a bad influenza bug, according to the CDC's own published figures). It's a different game entirely when the "vaccines" introduce the "spike protein" - without the Corona Chan bug - in huge numbers into a person's blood stream - really bad with the adenovirus-based Astrazeneca and Johnson & Johnson products, but 10 times worse with the Moderna and pFizer mRNA "vaccines", because they make the person's body manufacture trillions of "spike proteins" with no off switch!

    The "spike protein" in the blood stream travels effortlessly throughout the body, into all the organs, through the blood-brain barrier and presumably through the placenta. Note the hundreds of post-vaccination miscarriages already reported in the USA - and that's likely just the tip of the iceberg, with VAERS reporting acknowledged to be between just 1-10% of actual adverse events. I've also read accounts of breast-fed babies falling ill and dying shortly after their mothers were injected with the "vaccine".

    Some medical professionals are trying to raise the alarm over this, but are being silenced by medical officialdom and the controlled media. Here's just one recent example -

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/06/no_author/we-made-a-big-mistake-covid-vaccine-spike-protein-travels-from-injection-site-can-cause-organ-damage/

    Highly qualified medical experts have been trying to warn us about the danger posed by these "vaccines" right from the outset, but most people don't realise this because, governments, medical officialdom, the mainstream media organs and social media ( https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/06/joseph-mercola/facebook-insider-blows-whistle-on-vaccine-censorship/ ) have run a global campaign to block and suppress any such information - so far, very successfully.

    FWIW, here's some links to real experts speaking on the subject of Corona Chan and the "vaccines" (you may notice that none of these videos are on YouTube - that's because YouTube bans any material that questions the official Corona Chan narrative) -


    Dr. Sherri Tenpenny Interviewed About Vaccines (19 May 2020)

    [ https://www.bitchute.com/video/Gks7Z6HUVBZY/ ]


    Follow-Up Interview with Dr.Sherri Tenpenny - 10 ways the mRNA "vaccines" will kill you

    [ https://www.bitchute.com/video/fhhNpDM9Ahwf/ ]


    Highwire Interview with Dr.Richard Fleming

    [ https://rumble.com/embed/vee4uf/ ]

     

    This next interview with Dr.Peter McCullough may inspire suspicion about the management of the Corona Chan "pandemic" and the drive to inject everyone with experimental "vaccines" -

    Dr. Peter McCullough speaks on the Corona Chan "vaccines"

    Short Version (16 minutes)
    [ https://rumble.com/embed/vf328h/ ]
    [ https://rumble.com/vhp8e1-massive-world-renowned-doctor-blows-lid-off-of-covid-vaccine.html ]

    Full Version (1 hour 45 minutes)
    [ https://rumble.com/embed/vf31sl/ ]
    [ https://rumble.com/vhp7y5-full-interview-world-renowned-doctor-blows-lid-off-of-covid-vaccine.html ]
     

    The bottom line is simply this - right across the Western world, we are being coerced to participate in a medical experiment with experimental injections (which are now known to kill way more people than the bug these "vaccines" are supposed to "treat" - see below), without informed consent and largely against our will, allegedly to treat a "deadly pandemic" which the CDC's own published figures show is no worse than a bad influenza virus, and for which cheap, safe and effective medicinal and nutritional remedies have been systematically blocked by governments and medical institutions around the world.

    They hung a whole bunch of Nazi doctors at the Nuremberg trials for exactly this sort of thing -


    Lawyer working on Nuremburg 2 Prosecution of Corona Chan Criminals

    [ https://www.stopworldcontrol.com/fuellmich/ ]

    Corona Chan "Vaccines" - Nuremburg Code

    [ https://seed125.bitchute.com/NYZMjDr6JOG3/IhZuTCSCjjiP.mp4 ]
     

    So far, the American VAERS reporting system lists about ~5,000 Corona Chan "vaccine" deaths, and the European tally is already over 10,000 deaths. These reporting systems are widely acknowledged to capture only between 1-10% of actual adverse vaccine events. Does this mean that Corona Chan "vaccines" are actually killing more people than they should? It depends on your perspective, on what the "vaccines" are actually intended to do - a eugenic billionaire like creepy Bill would be tickled pink right now. But yes, the "vaccines" really do kill more people than they should, in fact these "vaccines" kill way more people than the Corona Chan bug they are supposed to "treat" -

    Vaccines are more dangerous than Corona Chan

    [ https://anti-empire.com/norways-health-authority-says-further-use-of-astrazeneca-riskier-than-covid-recommends-pulling-vaccine-permanently/ ]

    [ https://www.unz.com/gatzmon/the-israeli-people-committees-april-report-on-the-lethal-impact-of-vaccinations/ ]

    [ https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/experimental-vaccine-death-rate-for-israels-elderly-40-times-higher-than-covid-19-deaths-researchers ]
     

  61. @Twinkie
    @Dumbo


    What an idiotic statement.
     
    Do you have small children? If you did, you'd know what I am talking about.

    Replies: @Dumbo

    I do, and no, I don’t know what you’re talking about. I don’t think small children should wear masks, which are useless. Since you appear to be Asian, I suppose masks are part of your culture. Enjoy them, but don’t tell me that they “stopped Covid”, as they obviously didn’t.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Dumbo


    I do, and no, I don’t know what you’re talking about.
     
    Wow. Magical. You have the world's only children who don't get sick seasonally.

    I have a lot of children - from a teenager to all the way down to a gradeschooler. Every fall, winter, and spring, they pick up a cold or two from their activities - Judo, BJJ, ballet, rangers, American Heritage Girls, etc.

    These past 1 1/2 years have been the only ones without a single cold. And my neighbors have the exact same situation - none of their children got sick. Do you think that's a coincidence?

    Since you appear to be Asian, I suppose masks are part of your culture.
     
    Why do you think the Japanese and the Koreans (and Hongkongers) have masked up? Why do you think it's a part of their culture?

    Replies: @Dumbo

  62. @Jay Fink
    @Alexander Turok

    Why do vaccinated people have such a problem with the non-vaccinated? Shouldn't the vaccination be enough to stop the fear of getting bad Covid regardless of who you encounter?

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Barbarossa

    They are like slaves who has been punished and so want all other slaves to be punished as well, out of spite.

    Also, fear is a potent motivator. They have an irrational fear of “unvaccinated people full of germs”. The propaganda to paint every normal healthy people as “asymptomatic super spreaders” really got to them.

    They probably also think that the ritual of throwing away bottled water and having to x-ray their shoes every time they board a plane and harassing children and old ladies is protecting them from scary terrorism.

    • Thanks: Jay Fink
  63. @Twinkie
    @Almost Missouri


    If mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive, pushing the injection on pregnant women is arguably insane.
     
    My understanding is that the mRNA does not cross the placenta threshold. However, the antibody response in the mother does, so that the fetus gets the antibody benefit.

    Does no one remember Thalidomide?
     
    Unlikely for most readers here, as the misuse occurred in the 1950's (it only became medically approved in the U.S. in the 1990's). Even in those countries (Germany mostly), it was taken off the market in the early 1960's.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Ultrafart the Brave

    However, the antibody response in the mother does, so that the fetus gets the antibody benefit.

    Yep, here’s one mother and fetus who got the “antibody benefit”:

    https://news.yahoo.com/brazil-health-agency-calls-halt-110722688.html

    Fool.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Dumbo


    https://news.yahoo.com/brazil-health-agency-calls-halt-110722688.html
     
    First of all, read your own link:

    Brazil's federal government on Tuesday nationally suspended the vaccination of pregnant women with the AstraZeneca COVID-19 shot, after an expectant mother in Rio de Janeiro died from a stroke possibly related to the inoculation.
     
    Read that? "Possibly related to inoculation."

    Fool.
     
    And don't be an ignorant idiot. The AstraZeneca vaccine is a viral vector vaccine. It is not an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer and Moderna.

    Replies: @Dumbo

  64. @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach.
     
    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.

    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?

    Long before this pandemic, Hong Kong government initiated a campaign to increase mask usage during flu seasons and was able to reduce the number of flu patients substantially. The SARS epidemic that hit Hong Kong also contributed to this culture of masks.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Rich

    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?

    Last winter in Australia we had virtually no flu at all. I don’t know anybody who had the flu last winter. I don’t even know of anyone who had the flu. OK, that’s anecdotal, but official figures say the same thing. We basically didn’t have a flu season. So it certainly appears that masks and social distancing are very very effective in combating the flu.

    And we didn’t have much COVID either.

    You can argue about whether masks and social distancing are or are not an overreaction and you can argue about whether the economic costs are worth it and you can argue about whether they infringe personal freedom, but the evidence does seem to be pretty clear that masks and social distancing do in fact reduce the spread of both flu and COVID.

    • Agree: Twinkie
    • Replies: @res
    @dfordoom

    Agreed that this is true (emphasis mine).


    the evidence does seem to be pretty clear that masks and social distancing do in fact reduce the spread of both flu and COVID.
     
    The more interesting questions have to do with which exact measures make that so. The early days of COVID provided some natural experiments which gave clues, but I don't think it was really conclusive. For example, masking when outdoors with reasonable separation (e.g. not engaging in mostly peaceful protests) seems more like theater than an effective countermeasure to me (and I have spent plenty of time on that stage this past year).

    I think the most important measure is reestablishing the norm that people who are sick stay home (or mask/isolate as much as possible if they must go out). Has this happened?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Twinkie

  65. @Twinkie
    @dfordoom


    I see freedom of association as something that is advantageous if you belong to a dominant group
     
    You would see it this way if you viewed society in terms of power relationships only (which, by the way, is the lens through which "woke" ideas on thing such as race relations viewed).

    Freedom of association is an intrinsic good.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    You would see it this way if you viewed society in terms of power relationships only

    I think it’s realistic to see power relationships as being pretty significant.

    Freedom of association is an intrinsic good.

    That’s a valid point of view. I don’t agree with it but it is a valid point of view.

    • Replies: @iffen
    @dfordoom

    Freedom of association should not be extended to businesses that utilize governmental structures and institutions which belong to the commons. This should only apply to categories that have been lawfully deemed to be protected, such as race or religion. Unfortunately these protections have been extended to "lifestyle" groups. Racial and religious discrimination is wrong and one should not be allowed to use "the law," which belongs to all of us, to enforce or extend one's personal biases.

  66. @Dumbo
    @Twinkie

    I do, and no, I don't know what you're talking about. I don't think small children should wear masks, which are useless. Since you appear to be Asian, I suppose masks are part of your culture. Enjoy them, but don't tell me that they "stopped Covid", as they obviously didn't.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    I do, and no, I don’t know what you’re talking about.

    Wow. Magical. You have the world’s only children who don’t get sick seasonally.

    I have a lot of children – from a teenager to all the way down to a gradeschooler. Every fall, winter, and spring, they pick up a cold or two from their activities – Judo, BJJ, ballet, rangers, American Heritage Girls, etc.

    These past 1 1/2 years have been the only ones without a single cold. And my neighbors have the exact same situation – none of their children got sick. Do you think that’s a coincidence?

    Since you appear to be Asian, I suppose masks are part of your culture.

    Why do you think the Japanese and the Koreans (and Hongkongers) have masked up? Why do you think it’s a part of their culture?

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Twinkie

    You know, if you want your own children to wear masks in school all the time, and play with other children masked up, so that they don't catch a cold, fine with me. You may also try to make them wear helmets and knee protectors 100% of the time, as children tend to fall often.

    But don't come telling me that everyone has now to become a freaking germophobe and turn even their own children into germophobes.

    You know what else protects children from disease? Keeping them inside a giant air bubble and never letting them go out outside to play with other children. Try that maybe.

  67. @Dumbo
    @Twinkie


    However, the antibody response in the mother does, so that the fetus gets the antibody benefit.
     
    Yep, here's one mother and fetus who got the "antibody benefit":

    https://news.yahoo.com/brazil-health-agency-calls-halt-110722688.html

    Fool.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    https://news.yahoo.com/brazil-health-agency-calls-halt-110722688.html

    First of all, read your own link:

    Brazil’s federal government on Tuesday nationally suspended the vaccination of pregnant women with the AstraZeneca COVID-19 shot, after an expectant mother in Rio de Janeiro died from a stroke possibly related to the inoculation.

    Read that? “Possibly related to inoculation.”

    Fool.

    And don’t be an ignorant idiot. The AstraZeneca vaccine is a viral vector vaccine. It is not an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer and Moderna.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Twinkie

    So? What do you expects journalists to say? That's standard phrasing.

    Anyway, if you insist, lot of deaths in the pandemic are "possibly related to Covid".

    As for adenovirus or mRNA, in this case it's about the same thing, as it appears that it's the spike protein by itself that is related to strokes (perhaps when entering the bloodstream - I don't know the details, but there are studies)

    Listen, if you like the mRNA vaccine, by all means, take it, and vaccinate all your children and pregnant women in your family with it. I'm fine with that. Just leave the rest of society alone, and free to choose.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  68. @Twinkie
    @Dumbo


    I do, and no, I don’t know what you’re talking about.
     
    Wow. Magical. You have the world's only children who don't get sick seasonally.

    I have a lot of children - from a teenager to all the way down to a gradeschooler. Every fall, winter, and spring, they pick up a cold or two from their activities - Judo, BJJ, ballet, rangers, American Heritage Girls, etc.

    These past 1 1/2 years have been the only ones without a single cold. And my neighbors have the exact same situation - none of their children got sick. Do you think that's a coincidence?

    Since you appear to be Asian, I suppose masks are part of your culture.
     
    Why do you think the Japanese and the Koreans (and Hongkongers) have masked up? Why do you think it's a part of their culture?

    Replies: @Dumbo

    You know, if you want your own children to wear masks in school all the time, and play with other children masked up, so that they don’t catch a cold, fine with me. You may also try to make them wear helmets and knee protectors 100% of the time, as children tend to fall often.

    But don’t come telling me that everyone has now to become a freaking germophobe and turn even their own children into germophobes.

    You know what else protects children from disease? Keeping them inside a giant air bubble and never letting them go out outside to play with other children. Try that maybe.

    • Agree: Catdog
    • Troll: Twinkie
  69. @Jtgw
    @anon

    Depends what you got. There were like six out of millions that got some rare blood clotting disorder. That does not seem more severe than getting Covid.

    Replies: @anon, @iffen

    That does not seem more severe than getting Covid.

    Unless you are one of six.

    • Replies: @Jtgw
    @iffen

    Yes if you are utterly innumerate I can see why you’d think the two risks are the same.

  70. @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Dumbo, @iffen, @Ultrafart the Brave

    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.

    Can’t they just scan the nanochip that was implanted at the injection site?

  71. @Twinkie
    @Dumbo


    https://news.yahoo.com/brazil-health-agency-calls-halt-110722688.html
     
    First of all, read your own link:

    Brazil's federal government on Tuesday nationally suspended the vaccination of pregnant women with the AstraZeneca COVID-19 shot, after an expectant mother in Rio de Janeiro died from a stroke possibly related to the inoculation.
     
    Read that? "Possibly related to inoculation."

    Fool.
     
    And don't be an ignorant idiot. The AstraZeneca vaccine is a viral vector vaccine. It is not an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer and Moderna.

    Replies: @Dumbo

    So? What do you expects journalists to say? That’s standard phrasing.

    Anyway, if you insist, lot of deaths in the pandemic are “possibly related to Covid”.

    As for adenovirus or mRNA, in this case it’s about the same thing, as it appears that it’s the spike protein by itself that is related to strokes (perhaps when entering the bloodstream – I don’t know the details, but there are studies)

    Listen, if you like the mRNA vaccine, by all means, take it, and vaccinate all your children and pregnant women in your family with it. I’m fine with that. Just leave the rest of society alone, and free to choose.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Dumbo


    I’m fine with that. Just leave the rest of society alone, and free to choose.
     
    If you read what I wrote above, you’d realize that I’m against forced vaccination.
  72. @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    You would see it this way if you viewed society in terms of power relationships only
     
    I think it's realistic to see power relationships as being pretty significant.

    Freedom of association is an intrinsic good.
     
    That's a valid point of view. I don't agree with it but it is a valid point of view.

    Replies: @iffen

    Freedom of association should not be extended to businesses that utilize governmental structures and institutions which belong to the commons. This should only apply to categories that have been lawfully deemed to be protected, such as race or religion. Unfortunately these protections have been extended to “lifestyle” groups. Racial and religious discrimination is wrong and one should not be allowed to use “the law,” which belongs to all of us, to enforce or extend one’s personal biases.

  73. @iffen
    @Jtgw

    That does not seem more severe than getting Covid.

    Unless you are one of six.

    Replies: @Jtgw

    Yes if you are utterly innumerate I can see why you’d think the two risks are the same.

  74. @Twinkie
    @Almost Missouri


    If mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive, pushing the injection on pregnant women is arguably insane.
     
    My understanding is that the mRNA does not cross the placenta threshold. However, the antibody response in the mother does, so that the fetus gets the antibody benefit.

    Does no one remember Thalidomide?
     
    Unlikely for most readers here, as the misuse occurred in the 1950's (it only became medically approved in the U.S. in the 1990's). Even in those countries (Germany mostly), it was taken off the market in the early 1960's.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Ultrafart the Brave

    My understanding is that the mRNA does not cross the placenta threshold. However, the antibody response in the mother does, so that the fetus gets the antibody benefit.

    You’ve taken a reasoned approach to assessing the “vaccines” effect on a pregnant woman, but it sounds like you are working with information provided by vested interests. I see this amongst many of my friends here in Australia – the only information they have comes from controlled mainstream and other “authoritative” sources, and so that’s all they have to work with to construct their understanding of the Corona Chan “pandemic” and the global “vaccination” campaign.

    One crucial fact exposes the danger inherent in all the experimental “vaccines” – they all introduce the Corona Chan “spike protein” into the target’s body, in astonomical numbers. Without the “spike protein”, Corona Chan is basically just a common cold virus. The “spike protein” is how the Corona Chan bug makes weak people sick and kills some of them, though not many at all (no worse than a bad influenza bug, according to the CDC’s own published figures). It’s a different game entirely when the “vaccines” introduce the “spike protein” – without the Corona Chan bug – in huge numbers into a person’s blood stream – really bad with the adenovirus-based Astrazeneca and Johnson & Johnson products, but 10 times worse with the Moderna and pFizer mRNA “vaccines”, because they make the person’s body manufacture trillions of “spike proteins” with no off switch!

    The “spike protein” in the blood stream travels effortlessly throughout the body, into all the organs, through the blood-brain barrier and presumably through the placenta. Note the hundreds of post-vaccination miscarriages already reported in the USA – and that’s likely just the tip of the iceberg, with VAERS reporting acknowledged to be between just 1-10% of actual adverse events. I’ve also read accounts of breast-fed babies falling ill and dying shortly after their mothers were injected with the “vaccine”.

    Some medical professionals are trying to raise the alarm over this, but are being silenced by medical officialdom and the controlled media. Here’s just one recent example –

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/06/no_author/we-made-a-big-mistake-covid-vaccine-spike-protein-travels-from-injection-site-can-cause-organ-damage/

    Highly qualified medical experts have been trying to warn us about the danger posed by these “vaccines” right from the outset, but most people don’t realise this because, governments, medical officialdom, the mainstream media organs and social media ( https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/06/joseph-mercola/facebook-insider-blows-whistle-on-vaccine-censorship/ ) have run a global campaign to block and suppress any such information – so far, very successfully.

    FWIW, here’s some links to real experts speaking on the subject of Corona Chan and the “vaccines” (you may notice that none of these videos are on YouTube – that’s because YouTube bans any material that questions the official Corona Chan narrative) –

    Dr. Sherri Tenpenny Interviewed About Vaccines (19 May 2020)

    (https://www.bitchute.com/video/Gks7Z6HUVBZY/ ]

    Follow-Up Interview with Dr.Sherri Tenpenny – 10 ways the mRNA “vaccines” will kill you

    (https://www.bitchute.com/video/fhhNpDM9Ahwf/ ]

    Highwire Interview with Dr.Richard Fleming

    (https://rumble.com/embed/vee4uf/ ]

    This next interview with Dr.Peter McCullough may inspire suspicion about the management of the Corona Chan “pandemic” and the drive to inject everyone with experimental “vaccines” –

    Dr. Peter McCullough speaks on the Corona Chan “vaccines”

    Short Version (16 minutes)
    (https://rumble.com/embed/vf328h/ ]
    (https://rumble.com/vhp8e1-massive-world-renowned-doctor-blows-lid-off-of-covid-vaccine.html ]

    Full Version (1 hour 45 minutes)
    (https://rumble.com/embed/vf31sl/ ]
    (https://rumble.com/vhp7y5-full-interview-world-renowned-doctor-blows-lid-off-of-covid-vaccine.html ]

    The bottom line is simply this – right across the Western world, we are being coerced to participate in a medical experiment with experimental injections (which are now known to kill way more people than the bug these “vaccines” are supposed to “treat” – see below), without informed consent and largely against our will, allegedly to treat a “deadly pandemic” which the CDC’s own published figures show is no worse than a bad influenza virus, and for which cheap, safe and effective medicinal and nutritional remedies have been systematically blocked by governments and medical institutions around the world.

    They hung a whole bunch of Nazi doctors at the Nuremberg trials for exactly this sort of thing –

    Lawyer working on Nuremburg 2 Prosecution of Corona Chan Criminals

    (https://www.stopworldcontrol.com/fuellmich/ ]

    Corona Chan “Vaccines” – Nuremburg Code

    (https://seed125.bitchute.com/NYZMjDr6JOG3/IhZuTCSCjjiP.mp4 ]

    So far, the American VAERS reporting system lists about ~5,000 Corona Chan “vaccine” deaths, and the European tally is already over 10,000 deaths. These reporting systems are widely acknowledged to capture only between 1-10% of actual adverse vaccine events. Does this mean that Corona Chan “vaccines” are actually killing more people than they should? It depends on your perspective, on what the “vaccines” are actually intended to do – a eugenic billionaire like creepy Bill would be tickled pink right now. But yes, the “vaccines” really do kill more people than they should, in fact these “vaccines” kill way more people than the Corona Chan bug they are supposed to “treat” –

    Vaccines are more dangerous than Corona Chan

    (https://anti-empire.com/norways-health-authority-says-further-use-of-astrazeneca-riskier-than-covid-recommends-pulling-vaccine-permanently/ ]

    (https://www.unz.com/gatzmon/the-israeli-people-committees-april-report-on-the-lethal-impact-of-vaccinations/ ]

    (https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/experimental-vaccine-death-rate-for-israels-elderly-40-times-higher-than-covid-19-deaths-researchers ]

  75. @Dumbo
    @Twinkie

    So? What do you expects journalists to say? That's standard phrasing.

    Anyway, if you insist, lot of deaths in the pandemic are "possibly related to Covid".

    As for adenovirus or mRNA, in this case it's about the same thing, as it appears that it's the spike protein by itself that is related to strokes (perhaps when entering the bloodstream - I don't know the details, but there are studies)

    Listen, if you like the mRNA vaccine, by all means, take it, and vaccinate all your children and pregnant women in your family with it. I'm fine with that. Just leave the rest of society alone, and free to choose.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    I’m fine with that. Just leave the rest of society alone, and free to choose.

    If you read what I wrote above, you’d realize that I’m against forced vaccination.

  76. One has to wonder just what the “adverse effects” are

    I took Sputnik back in April – after the first dose I was sleepy – after the second I was kinda feverish for 2 days – I suspect because I had a slight cold the week before. Either way, not what I’d really describe as “adverse”

  77. This isn’t a pure “compliance or resist” question, but what to do with the vaccine and without the vaccine, especially sharp since the youth have a long life (if you don’t go with the radical depopulation scenarios). This needs hard thinking on the purpose of their lives, what goals are there, how they should spend their time and how to socially organize, with the segregation at hand.

  78. @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Dumbo, @iffen, @Ultrafart the Brave

    This is why we need a special, scannable RFID tag to be worn to verify vaccination status.

    An enquiring mind wants to know – WHY???

    If you are “vaccinated”, why do you give a rat’s arse if someone else is not?

    The “vaccine” doesn’t stop you or anyone else, whether “vaccinated” or not, from catching and spreading Corona Chan.

    The only difference between the “vaccinated” and “unvaccinated”, as freely admitted by the CDC and the “vaccine” manufacturers themselves, is that the experimental “vaccine” manufacturers CLAIM that their product MAY reduce your Corona Chan symptoms once you’ve been infected with Corona Chan. None of this is even susbstantiated yet – we are still in the midst of Phase III trials, rolled out upon a clueless, unsuspecting population of human guinea pigs!

    All this for a coronavirus bug that, according to the CDC’s own published figures, is hardly any worse than a regular old influenza virus – a bug for which anyone middle aged and under is already practically immune. And to top it all off, without the highly suspicious “spike protein”, Corona Chan would just be another plain old common cold bug.

    A relatively trivial bug for which governments and medical institutions have coordinated worldwide to block and stamp out the proven cheap, safe and effective medicinal and nutritional remedies.

    So why are you so enthusiastically embracing the fake “vaccines” and insisting that everyone line up for their injection?

    And why are you so determined to tag everyone with a scannable ID tag?

    Yes, yes, we have the official narrative, now being embellished with the new “deadly variants”, etc etc, just in time to force the “vaccination” of everyone right down to 6 month old babies – who will all be tagged with a scannable ID to track, monitor and control their lives, for the rest of their lives.

    All over a nothing-burger bug with compulsory “vaccines” that do nothing (except injure and kill lots and lots of people).

    Vaccines are more dangerous than Corona Chan

    (https://anti-empire.com/norways-health-authority-says-further-use-of-astrazeneca-riskier-than-covid-recommends-pulling-vaccine-permanently/ ]

    (https://www.unz.com/gatzmon/the-israeli-people-committees-april-report-on-the-lethal-impact-of-vaccinations/ ]

    (https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/experimental-vaccine-death-rate-for-israels-elderly-40-times-higher-than-covid-19-deaths-researchers ]

    Forgive me for being paranoid, but I smell George Orwell somewhere in the background.

  79. @Michelle
    Since I received my first dose of the Pfizer vaccine, I have been having horrific nightmares. Lucid dreams, such as you get with being very sick, with a high fever. The dreams are so vivid, gory and involving intense scenarios, that I don't feel comfortable recommending the Pfizer vaccine to anyone. After the second dose, the nightmares amped up. I haven't been able to sleep, more than 3 hours per night. If given a legitimate choice whether to be vaccinated, I would choose not to have been.

    Replies: @Catdog, @Curle, @Twinkie

    You might need a psych consult. 😉

  80. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Triteleia Laxa


    I’m from a very low risk group. I’ve also had Covid, through extreme and frequent exposure. I reckon I’ll have to get the vaccine anyway, as forgoing it might mean I forgo normal freedoms. I’ve taken higher risk substances for less benefit.

    Or maybe, there won’t be any formal recrimination for avoiding the vaccine?
     

    Here is one data point: in a blue lockdown state of the U.S., my fifteen-year-old daughter is finishing her school year this week, so no more masks—except she has a part-time job. Of the 40 or 50 employees, all but two have been vaccinated or claim to have been vaccinated. However, my daughter, being fifteen and already having had the virus, is one of the two unvaccinated (the other works a different shift), so the state is humiliating my daughter at work by making her the only masked person in the building.

    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.

    Giddy leftists think that they can get away with this, and they probably could, if they would exercise moderate self-control; but apparently, they won't. I do not believe that they can get away with it. Despite their demographic advantage, I believe that they will fail.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @Jay Fink, @Twinkie

    Here is another data point: my son got the virus in his Army barracks last year. The Army vaccinated him a month ago, anyway. I had thought that I had read that the vaccine was optional for the troops, but my son tells me that no one asked his leave: they just lined up his platoon and jabbed them all.

    The armed forces have been to this dance before: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthrax_Vaccine_Immunization_Program

    https://health.mil/Military-Health-Topics/Health-Readiness/Immunization-Healthcare/Vaccine-Preventable-Diseases/Anthrax

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22874851/

    To protect troops against the use of anthrax as a biological weapon, the US Department of Defense began an anthrax vaccination program in 1998. 14 years after the inception of the vaccination program, there is no evidence suggesting vaccination against anthrax carries long-term health risks for Active Duty Soldiers.

  81. @Alexander Turok

    Compare that to a slight chance of contracting the virus at all and an infinitesimal chance of having a rough go of it
     
    Infinitesimal? You don't know what you're talking about.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @TomSchmidt, @res

    Remember he is talking about for a healthy man in his 20s. What number would you propose for the chance of having a rough go of it for someone like that?

    Also remember that the popular definition of infinitesimal (extremely small) is different from the mathematical definition.

  82. res says:
    @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?
     
    Last winter in Australia we had virtually no flu at all. I don't know anybody who had the flu last winter. I don't even know of anyone who had the flu. OK, that's anecdotal, but official figures say the same thing. We basically didn't have a flu season. So it certainly appears that masks and social distancing are very very effective in combating the flu.

    And we didn't have much COVID either.

    You can argue about whether masks and social distancing are or are not an overreaction and you can argue about whether the economic costs are worth it and you can argue about whether they infringe personal freedom, but the evidence does seem to be pretty clear that masks and social distancing do in fact reduce the spread of both flu and COVID.

    Replies: @res

    Agreed that this is true (emphasis mine).

    the evidence does seem to be pretty clear that masks and social distancing do in fact reduce the spread of both flu and COVID.

    The more interesting questions have to do with which exact measures make that so. The early days of COVID provided some natural experiments which gave clues, but I don’t think it was really conclusive. For example, masking when outdoors with reasonable separation (e.g. not engaging in mostly peaceful protests) seems more like theater than an effective countermeasure to me (and I have spent plenty of time on that stage this past year).

    I think the most important measure is reestablishing the norm that people who are sick stay home (or mask/isolate as much as possible if they must go out). Has this happened?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @res


    Agreed that this is true (emphasis mine).

    the evidence does seem to be pretty clear that masks and social distancing do in fact reduce the spread of both flu and COVID.
     
    The more interesting questions have to do with which exact measures make that so.
     
    Yes, it is a pertinent question. In the part of Australia in which I live mask-wearing has never become general, apart from a couple of brief periods in which it was enforced. When mask-wearing hasn't been compulsory, and most of the time it hasn't been, most people haven't bothered with masks. Which could suggest that social distancing and the banning of large gatherings have been the main factors contributing to the very low incidence of both flu and COVID.

    My own suspicion is that mask-wearing may not have helped all that much, and that social distancing and lockdowns may have been more effective. But it's only a suspicion on my part. Lockdowns do seem to have been very effective. When lockdowns have been enforced in Australia COVID outbreaks have been brought under control very quickly.

    Of course in Australia we've also had periodic closings of state borders which seem to have been very effective in isolating outbreaks.

    There are arguments that can be made against lockdowns and border closures but the argument that they don't work seems pretty unconvincing.
    , @Twinkie
    @res


    For example, masking when outdoors with reasonable separation (e.g. not engaging in mostly peaceful protests) seems more like theater than an effective countermeasure to me (and I have spent plenty of time on that stage this past year).
     
    Absolutely. I think the evidence is pretty clear that the vast majority of transmissions occurred indoors. It makes perfect sense when you think about it - this is foremost a respiratory illness from a coronavirus!

    I think the benefits of wearing masks, whether modest or significant, increase when indoors with high density, i.e. lots of people crammed in a small space, a situation with which East Asian are quite familiar.

    I think the most important measure is reestablishing the norm that people who are sick stay home (or mask/isolate as much as possible if they must go out). Has this happened?
     
    Although they are now suffering from earlier cockiness and not getting on the vaccination train, the likes of Hong Kongers, Taiwanese, and Koreans handled the early waves well - they quarantined the sick and engaged in aggressive contact-tracing. That's really the price one has to be willing to pay if one doesn't want general lockdowns. But that kind of aggressive contact-tracing is culturally, legally, and politically very difficult in the U.S.
  83. @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach.
     
    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.

    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?

    Long before this pandemic, Hong Kong government initiated a campaign to increase mask usage during flu seasons and was able to reduce the number of flu patients substantially. The SARS epidemic that hit Hong Kong also contributed to this culture of masks.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Rich

    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.

    Yes, true, but … look, no one whose good opinion is worth earning likes a victim, so I don’t want to be one; but I have seen a different side of this than you have. You tip in restaurants, don’t you? That is literally corruption. It is bribing someone to do their job, but it became conventional in the United States long ago, and restaurant wages are now adjusted to it, like Mexican police wages are adjusted to Mexican police taking petty bribes for tearing up traffic tickets. If you are the one employee in the restaurant who will not take a tip, then you’re not going to survive.

    It one thing to push back when your unethical opponent is pushing you downhill. It is another to push back from the bottom of the cliff: your unethical opponent, standing atop the cliff, won’t even realize why you’re pushing against the cliff face: he just wonders what weird thing you think you are trying to accomplish down there.

    A tenure-track professor (which I was not) in STEM at a research-oriented American university survives on research grants, mostly federal, dispensed by federal bureaucrats with Ph.D.s who mostly were not talented enough to become tenure-track professors, themselves. I have seen several grant proposals and never a single one that did not egregiously lie about what could be achieved, how much it would cost, how long it would take, and/or what the practical use of it would be. The lies are expected, like restaurant tips, and attempts to be truthful are resented. So what is a tenure-track professor supposed to do: sacrifice his career so someone even more dishonest and more leftist can take his place?

    Gibbon wrote about what happens once the manners of the people have been corrupted. Pertinax was emperor, and look what happened to him. You and I are not emperor.

    Like other Americans, I’ve got a family to take care of within the constraints of a twisted reality I did not create. I do not mind your criticism and do not take it personally, for ideally I agree with you, strongly; but in the real world, not all of us are well enough situated to indulge our better ethical impulses at work.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @V. K. Ovelund

    >You tip in restaurants, don’t you?

    It's not bribery, it's politeness. Odds are that the person serving you in a restaurant needs that money a lot more than you do.

  84. Racial and religious discrimination is wrong.

    Nah, not in small businesses. For example, Amish make and grow various stuff: they shouldn’t be required to hire my son as a condition of doing it. There used to be Greek-run restaurants and then, later, south Asian-run convenience stores and Vietnamese-run hair and nail salons. Perhaps the Greeks, the south Asians and the Vietnamese should not have been admitted to the country in such numbers, but given that they were admitted, to force them and the rest of us to work alongside people who we find alienating and among whom we feel uncomfortable is unnecessary, oppressive and unkind—and does not solve any real, actual problems. Not in small business.

    It’s okay for people to prefer to work with others they like, understand and trust.

    [MORE]

    Have you looked at roofing crews while you’re driving around? You see Mexican roofing crews and white ex-convict roofing crews. The two don’t really mix, but either gets the roof done.

    That people in the U.S. repeatedly and persistently tend to self-segregate when not hectored to do otherwise should tell us something. There are some exceptions like U.S. Koreans but those are not the rule. (If you had witnessed the remarkable self-segregation in my university classes, whose students were young and disproportionately cosmopolitan but self-segregated, anyway, then you might see the matter in a different light.)

    Freedom of association should not be extended to businesses that utilize governmental structures and institutions which belong to the commons.

    The economy being interconnected, everything utilizes those. This is a poor pretext to crush liberty. The law is pretty much only enforced against non-Hispanic whites, anyway.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund



    Racial and religious discrimination is wrong.
     
    Nah, not in small businesses. For example, Amish make and grow various stuff: they shouldn’t be required to hire my son as a condition of doing it.
     
    It's an insoluble problem. Once you accept that racial discrimination is OK in some cases then there's no way you can oppose discrimination against whites.

    And once you accept that it's OK for Amish to only hire other Amish then you can't complain if atheists refuse to hire Christians.

    But obviously there are areas where it makes sense to discriminate. It's obviously desirable for Catholic schools to be allowed to hire only Catholic teachers and for Islamic schools to hire only Muslim teachers but then you're going to have a problem when public schools start refusing to hire Christian teachers.

    And it is highly likely that Christians are going to face more and more discrimination as time goes on. It is highly likely that Christians will find many avenues of employment closed to them. Ask Israel Folau, a professional footballer in Australia who was banned from playing rugby (and thus had his livelihood taken away from him) because of his Christian beliefs.

    It's a tricky problem and I don't see an easy answer.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

  85. @Dumbo
    @Alexander Turok

    I am assuming that this comment is serious and not sarcastic, in which case you are an idiot and a freak. Wear that if you want, also insert a microchip with all your health information in your anus to be scanned by all relevant authorities for your added safety and benefit, but leave other people alone.

    What is it about this disease that make people freak out? Diseases were always part of life. But now, just to even get your normal citizenship rights, you have to prove that you are "vaccinated", and be assured this is going to not be to limited to "Covid", it's going to be a part of life in the new society. Supposedly "for our health and safety". Just like they protect us from "terrorism" by scanning old ladies and not allowing us to bring water bottles into planes.

    Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave, @Alexander Turok

    You are spot on target.

    And this –

    But now, just to even get your normal citizenship rights, you have to prove that you are “vaccinated”, and be assured this is going to not be to limited to “Covid”, it’s going to be a part of life in the new society. Supposedly “for our health and safety”.

    The unanswered question is – who exactly decided to spring this “new society” on us, in one coordinated movement right across the Western world?

    The answer is obvious by looking at whose agenda is being served. A certain Uncle Klaus and creepy Bill come immediately to mind.

    A perhaps more troubling concern is how did they manage to turn our own “democratic” governments, medical officials, regulatory agencies and media organs against us, in global unison?

    How deep does the treason go?

  86. @res
    @dfordoom

    Agreed that this is true (emphasis mine).


    the evidence does seem to be pretty clear that masks and social distancing do in fact reduce the spread of both flu and COVID.
     
    The more interesting questions have to do with which exact measures make that so. The early days of COVID provided some natural experiments which gave clues, but I don't think it was really conclusive. For example, masking when outdoors with reasonable separation (e.g. not engaging in mostly peaceful protests) seems more like theater than an effective countermeasure to me (and I have spent plenty of time on that stage this past year).

    I think the most important measure is reestablishing the norm that people who are sick stay home (or mask/isolate as much as possible if they must go out). Has this happened?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Twinkie

    Agreed that this is true (emphasis mine).

    the evidence does seem to be pretty clear that masks and social distancing do in fact reduce the spread of both flu and COVID.

    The more interesting questions have to do with which exact measures make that so.

    Yes, it is a pertinent question. In the part of Australia in which I live mask-wearing has never become general, apart from a couple of brief periods in which it was enforced. When mask-wearing hasn’t been compulsory, and most of the time it hasn’t been, most people haven’t bothered with masks. Which could suggest that social distancing and the banning of large gatherings have been the main factors contributing to the very low incidence of both flu and COVID.

    My own suspicion is that mask-wearing may not have helped all that much, and that social distancing and lockdowns may have been more effective. But it’s only a suspicion on my part. Lockdowns do seem to have been very effective. When lockdowns have been enforced in Australia COVID outbreaks have been brought under control very quickly.

    Of course in Australia we’ve also had periodic closings of state borders which seem to have been very effective in isolating outbreaks.

    There are arguments that can be made against lockdowns and border closures but the argument that they don’t work seems pretty unconvincing.

  87. @V. K. Ovelund

    Racial and religious discrimination is wrong.
     
    Nah, not in small businesses. For example, Amish make and grow various stuff: they shouldn't be required to hire my son as a condition of doing it. There used to be Greek-run restaurants and then, later, south Asian-run convenience stores and Vietnamese-run hair and nail salons. Perhaps the Greeks, the south Asians and the Vietnamese should not have been admitted to the country in such numbers, but given that they were admitted, to force them and the rest of us to work alongside people who we find alienating and among whom we feel uncomfortable is unnecessary, oppressive and unkind—and does not solve any real, actual problems. Not in small business.

    It's okay for people to prefer to work with others they like, understand and trust.

    Have you looked at roofing crews while you're driving around? You see Mexican roofing crews and white ex-convict roofing crews. The two don't really mix, but either gets the roof done.

    That people in the U.S. repeatedly and persistently tend to self-segregate when not hectored to do otherwise should tell us something. There are some exceptions like U.S. Koreans but those are not the rule. (If you had witnessed the remarkable self-segregation in my university classes, whose students were young and disproportionately cosmopolitan but self-segregated, anyway, then you might see the matter in a different light.)


    Freedom of association should not be extended to businesses that utilize governmental structures and institutions which belong to the commons.
     
    The economy being interconnected, everything utilizes those. This is a poor pretext to crush liberty. The law is pretty much only enforced against non-Hispanic whites, anyway.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Racial and religious discrimination is wrong.

    Nah, not in small businesses. For example, Amish make and grow various stuff: they shouldn’t be required to hire my son as a condition of doing it.

    It’s an insoluble problem. Once you accept that racial discrimination is OK in some cases then there’s no way you can oppose discrimination against whites.

    And once you accept that it’s OK for Amish to only hire other Amish then you can’t complain if atheists refuse to hire Christians.

    But obviously there are areas where it makes sense to discriminate. It’s obviously desirable for Catholic schools to be allowed to hire only Catholic teachers and for Islamic schools to hire only Muslim teachers but then you’re going to have a problem when public schools start refusing to hire Christian teachers.

    And it is highly likely that Christians are going to face more and more discrimination as time goes on. It is highly likely that Christians will find many avenues of employment closed to them. Ask Israel Folau, a professional footballer in Australia who was banned from playing rugby (and thus had his livelihood taken away from him) because of his Christian beliefs.

    It’s a tricky problem and I don’t see an easy answer.

    • Agree: iffen
    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @dfordoom


    It’s an insoluble problem.
     
    As recently as the 1950s, the insoluble problem was solved.

    Once you accept that racial discrimination is OK in some cases then there’s no way you can oppose discrimination against whites.
     
    I take your meaning to be, there is no way I can do that if I am reasonable.

    However, I do not oppose discrimination. Why would I? Antidiscrimination, even if it would protect me in theory, only harms me in practice. Antidiscrimination does not defend me and never will. It only attacks.

    The purpose and intent of antidiscrimination is to take what I have and to give it to someone else, while confusing me with a load of nonsense about justice. I may have no choice but to suffer this, but I do not buy into it.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  88. @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund



    Racial and religious discrimination is wrong.
     
    Nah, not in small businesses. For example, Amish make and grow various stuff: they shouldn’t be required to hire my son as a condition of doing it.
     
    It's an insoluble problem. Once you accept that racial discrimination is OK in some cases then there's no way you can oppose discrimination against whites.

    And once you accept that it's OK for Amish to only hire other Amish then you can't complain if atheists refuse to hire Christians.

    But obviously there are areas where it makes sense to discriminate. It's obviously desirable for Catholic schools to be allowed to hire only Catholic teachers and for Islamic schools to hire only Muslim teachers but then you're going to have a problem when public schools start refusing to hire Christian teachers.

    And it is highly likely that Christians are going to face more and more discrimination as time goes on. It is highly likely that Christians will find many avenues of employment closed to them. Ask Israel Folau, a professional footballer in Australia who was banned from playing rugby (and thus had his livelihood taken away from him) because of his Christian beliefs.

    It's a tricky problem and I don't see an easy answer.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    It’s an insoluble problem.

    As recently as the 1950s, the insoluble problem was solved.

    Once you accept that racial discrimination is OK in some cases then there’s no way you can oppose discrimination against whites.

    I take your meaning to be, there is no way I can do that if I am reasonable.

    However, I do not oppose discrimination. Why would I? Antidiscrimination, even if it would protect me in theory, only harms me in practice. Antidiscrimination does not defend me and never will. It only attacks.

    The purpose and intent of antidiscrimination is to take what I have and to give it to someone else, while confusing me with a load of nonsense about justice. I may have no choice but to suffer this, but I do not buy into it.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund



    It’s an insoluble problem.
     
    As recently as the 1950s, the insoluble problem was solved.
     
    There were lots of problems that were solvable in the 1950s but are now no longer solvable. Mostly because every problem today is a political problem and political problems are inherently unsolvable.

    The purpose and intent of antidiscrimination is to take what I have and to give it to someone else, while confusing me with a load of nonsense about justice. I may have no choice but to suffer this, but I do not buy into it.
     
    It all comes down to who has the power and who doesn't.

    If you don't have the power then things like freedom of association become just more weapons that will be used against you. Politics is about power.
  89. @res
    @Nikolai Vladivostok

    Agreed. At this point I just want all of the mask militants to get themselves vaccinated and then shut up.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    The thing is that the masked militants already are vaccinated. My personal observation is that the folks who already got the jab are the ones most likely to still be masked up in public.

    It’s about demonstrating right thinking adherence to the proper doctrines. It’s virtue signalling pure and simple.

    At this point pretty much anyone that really wants the vaccine has had ample opportunity to do so. It’s past time to get back to normal, and we will have to force the government’s hand by doing it ourselves. We can either make the restrictions obsolete by ignoring them or be ruled by the most hypochondriac segment of the population in perpetuity.

    Because remember…You Can Never Be Safe Enough.

    • Replies: @Commentator Mike
    @Barbarossa

    Vaccines are not 100% effective so continuing with masks, social distancing and other measures seems reasonable to those who wish to minimise exposure.

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Rich

  90. @Jay Fink
    @Alexander Turok

    Why do vaccinated people have such a problem with the non-vaccinated? Shouldn't the vaccination be enough to stop the fear of getting bad Covid regardless of who you encounter?

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Barbarossa

    The non-vaccinated are heretics to the true Covid believers. It’s a simple as that.

    My Dad got the jab, as he has lung issues and other comorbidities but my much healthy Mom decided to forgo it. My truly Covid fanatical Aunt, who has been fully vaccinated, refuses to let my Mom, her own sister, visit her this summer because of her lack of vaccination.

    This is not an isolated incident. I could relate several other similar situations from personal experience.

    One would think logically that the vaccinated would be chilled out now that they have their shot, but I think it deeply bothers some people that not everyone is 100% on board with the full spectrum Covid freakout.

    • Thanks: Jay Fink
    • Replies: @Commentator Mike
    @Barbarossa

    It seems that they want to get 100% of the population vaccinated. But since this is a long term experiment there really should be a large non-vaccinated control group so that both can be followed through the years. And if the vaccinated are all going to die, as some predict, then at least some of humanity can be saved by the non-vaccinated. And the same if the non-vaccinated all eventually die of Covid-19, the vaccinated can save the race.

  91. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Twinkie


    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.
     

    Yes, true, but ... look, no one whose good opinion is worth earning likes a victim, so I don't want to be one; but I have seen a different side of this than you have. You tip in restaurants, don't you? That is literally corruption. It is bribing someone to do their job, but it became conventional in the United States long ago, and restaurant wages are now adjusted to it, like Mexican police wages are adjusted to Mexican police taking petty bribes for tearing up traffic tickets. If you are the one employee in the restaurant who will not take a tip, then you're not going to survive.

    It one thing to push back when your unethical opponent is pushing you downhill. It is another to push back from the bottom of the cliff: your unethical opponent, standing atop the cliff, won't even realize why you're pushing against the cliff face: he just wonders what weird thing you think you are trying to accomplish down there.

    A tenure-track professor (which I was not) in STEM at a research-oriented American university survives on research grants, mostly federal, dispensed by federal bureaucrats with Ph.D.s who mostly were not talented enough to become tenure-track professors, themselves. I have seen several grant proposals and never a single one that did not egregiously lie about what could be achieved, how much it would cost, how long it would take, and/or what the practical use of it would be. The lies are expected, like restaurant tips, and attempts to be truthful are resented. So what is a tenure-track professor supposed to do: sacrifice his career so someone even more dishonest and more leftist can take his place?

    Gibbon wrote about what happens once the manners of the people have been corrupted. Pertinax was emperor, and look what happened to him. You and I are not emperor.

    Like other Americans, I've got a family to take care of within the constraints of a twisted reality I did not create. I do not mind your criticism and do not take it personally, for ideally I agree with you, strongly; but in the real world, not all of us are well enough situated to indulge our better ethical impulses at work.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    >You tip in restaurants, don’t you?

    It’s not bribery, it’s politeness. Odds are that the person serving you in a restaurant needs that money a lot more than you do.

  92. @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach.
     
    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.

    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?

    Long before this pandemic, Hong Kong government initiated a campaign to increase mask usage during flu seasons and was able to reduce the number of flu patients substantially. The SARS epidemic that hit Hong Kong also contributed to this culture of masks.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Rich

    I’m not going to lie because I quite literally can’t, or at least not without nasty mental consequences. But I’m under few illusions about what will happen in a society where the head of the pandemic openly cops to lying repeatedly through a crisis on everything from his involvement with the Chinese to fudging the statistics on lockdowns. The response of the media is to gaslight people who have the gall to point out his mendacity. Of course that’s not going to result in people trusting him and his cronies with injecting alien stuff in their body. A fish rots from the head.

    (And yeah, I went ahead and got the vaccine. Partly due to you, really, and also partly due to the realization that more likely than not to get out of here I would eventually need proof of it.)

    >If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    For many aspects of life in America, that reality is already there and has been for a while. Hiring through front door channels is a perfect example of a process in modern American society that heavily disincentives telling the truth, with social dynamics behind that turn out to be pretty ugly once you dig beneath the surface.

    The end result? Technological solutions that are not only harder on prospective employer and employee alike, but also encourage further lying.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @nebulafox


    For many aspects of life in America, that reality is already there and has been for a while. Hiring through front door channels is a perfect example of a process in modern American society that heavily disincentives telling the truth, with social dynamics behind that turn out to be pretty ugly once you dig beneath the surface.
     
    @Twinkie

    If it eases your conscience on my behalf, though @nebulafox is exactly right (as usual), hiring is one situation in which I do not lie. I do not exaggerate, either.

    The problem is, the hiring manager to whom one lies is the same person whose trust one must earn and keep following the hire. A lie seems to me a bad way to start that relationship.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Twinkie
    @nebulafox


    I went ahead and got the vaccine. Partly due to you
     
    I appreciate the confidence, but with medical and legal issues, I’d advise you to seek counsel locally, with physicians and attorneys, respectively, who know your circumstances in depth.
  93. anon[201] • Disclaimer says:

    This little bit of work was published one year ago, in June 2020

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/343390023_Ivermectin_docks_to_the_SARS-CoV-2_spike_receptor-binding_domain_attached_to_ACE2

    We carried out a docking study to determine if ivermectin might be able to attach to the SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor-binding domain bound with ACE2. Materials and methods: We used the program AutoDock Vina Extended to perform the docking study. Results: Ivermectin docked in the region of leucine 91 of the spike and histidine 378 of the ACE2 receptor. The binding energy of ivermectin to the spike-ACE2 complex was -18 kcal/mol and binding constant was 5.8 e-08. Conclusion: The ivermectin docking we identified may interfere with the attachment of the spike to the human cell membrane.

    Over one year ago, simulation showed that Ivermectin could block SARS-2 spikes from bonding to human cells.

    Clinical trials now underway should determine whether ivermectin is an effective treatment for SARS-Cov2 infection.

    I’ll look for those trials, but if they are anything like the “trials” of Hydroxychloroquine the methodology was bad, intentionally very bad.

    Of course the actual trials of Ivermectin have been performed in the field; in Mexico, in Goa, in Bangladesh, in the Dominican Republic and other places. Possibly Hydroxychloroquine provides a similar “docking protection”, and perhaps that plays a role in case loads in parts of Africa.

    However, to admit that treatments existed, that they generally are well tolerated, and that they could be obtained for pennies per dose would have rendered moot any emergency authorization of vaccines experimental treatments, not to mention the very expensive, on-patent treatment Remdesivir.

    A choice was made multiple times, and every time the decision came down to death. Let people die, rather than treat them with inexpensive medications and likely save them.

    Our elites are excrement. Pure, unadulterated, straight-from-the-pig-pen shit. A shovel is needed.

  94. @Dumbo
    @Alexander Turok

    I am assuming that this comment is serious and not sarcastic, in which case you are an idiot and a freak. Wear that if you want, also insert a microchip with all your health information in your anus to be scanned by all relevant authorities for your added safety and benefit, but leave other people alone.

    What is it about this disease that make people freak out? Diseases were always part of life. But now, just to even get your normal citizenship rights, you have to prove that you are "vaccinated", and be assured this is going to not be to limited to "Covid", it's going to be a part of life in the new society. Supposedly "for our health and safety". Just like they protect us from "terrorism" by scanning old ladies and not allowing us to bring water bottles into planes.

    Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave, @Alexander Turok

    I had to show proof of vaccination status to attend college long before the beer virus. This is no new thing under the sun.

    I am assuming that this comment is serious and not sarcastic, in which case you are an idiot and a freak. Wear that if you want, also insert a microchip with all your health information in your anus to be scanned by all relevant authorities for your added safety and benefit, but leave other people alone.

    That’s the idea, the people who don’t have the tag will be assumed to be anti-vaxxers.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Alexander Turok

    As I said before, insert an anal probe in your body to be scanned and x-rayed by all relevant authorities and leave me alone. You're exactly like the "woke" retards, they are not happy to just be "woke" themselves, they want to force everyone to be too, by hook or crook.

  95. @dfordoom
    @Twinkie


    businesses and organizations are free to choose whom to employee or serve based on vaccination status.
     
    Don't you think that's setting an incredibly dangerous precedent? Refusing to be vaccinated is perfectly legal, but you think that discrimination against people for doing so is A-OK?

    Do you think it's also A-OK for businesses and organisations to refuse to employ somebody (or to refuse to serve somebody) for doing something else that is perfectly legal? Such as voting for Trump? Or maybe for being a Christian?

    You seem to be using the same logic that drives Cancel Culture.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Alexander Turok

    It’s not really the same as any company that announced that it didn’t hire feminists would be sued to oblivion under anti-discrimination laws. Repeal anti-discrimination and “harassment” laws and then we can talk about freedom of association.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
  96. @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    I'm not going to lie because I quite literally can't, or at least not without nasty mental consequences. But I'm under few illusions about what will happen in a society where the head of the pandemic openly cops to lying repeatedly through a crisis on everything from his involvement with the Chinese to fudging the statistics on lockdowns. The response of the media is to gaslight people who have the gall to point out his mendacity. Of course that's not going to result in people trusting him and his cronies with injecting alien stuff in their body. A fish rots from the head.

    (And yeah, I went ahead and got the vaccine. Partly due to you, really, and also partly due to the realization that more likely than not to get out of here I would eventually need proof of it.)

    >If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    For many aspects of life in America, that reality is already there and has been for a while. Hiring through front door channels is a perfect example of a process in modern American society that heavily disincentives telling the truth, with social dynamics behind that turn out to be pretty ugly once you dig beneath the surface.

    The end result? Technological solutions that are not only harder on prospective employer and employee alike, but also encourage further lying.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Twinkie

    For many aspects of life in America, that reality is already there and has been for a while. Hiring through front door channels is a perfect example of a process in modern American society that heavily disincentives telling the truth, with social dynamics behind that turn out to be pretty ugly once you dig beneath the surface.

    If it eases your conscience on my behalf, though is exactly right (as usual), hiring is one situation in which I do not lie. I do not exaggerate, either.

    The problem is, the hiring manager to whom one lies is the same person whose trust one must earn and keep following the hire. A lie seems to me a bad way to start that relationship.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund

    “I’m lying, because others are” is a guaranteed way to create hell.

    Please do not misunderstand me - there is such a thing as discretion in, say, withholding opinion that is unpopular. But lying about vaccination status is far beyond that courtesy.

    What would you think about an anti-vaccination mom who doesn’t inculcate her child against measles and then lies about it to get her kid in the same facility as your (future) little grandson who - due to age - couldn’t be vaccinated with MMR?

    You don’t fight dishonesty with dishonesty - you fight it by shaming those who are dishonest and, far more importantly, by being honest.

  97. @Barbarossa
    @res

    The thing is that the masked militants already are vaccinated. My personal observation is that the folks who already got the jab are the ones most likely to still be masked up in public.

    It's about demonstrating right thinking adherence to the proper doctrines. It's virtue signalling pure and simple.

    At this point pretty much anyone that really wants the vaccine has had ample opportunity to do so. It's past time to get back to normal, and we will have to force the government's hand by doing it ourselves. We can either make the restrictions obsolete by ignoring them or be ruled by the most hypochondriac segment of the population in perpetuity.

    Because remember...You Can Never Be Safe Enough.

    Replies: @Commentator Mike

    Vaccines are not 100% effective so continuing with masks, social distancing and other measures seems reasonable to those who wish to minimise exposure.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Commentator Mike

    I understand that, but also feel like that is kind of neurotic thinking. After all, nothing in life is ever 100% safe. We all take a pretty sizable risk, for example, every time we hop in the car and drive across town.

    In my own age group (mid 30's in good health) I actually have a greater statistical risk of dying in a car accident than of Covid. So while I don't go around licking public toilets or anything, I'm not really too concerned over my own risk of Covid.

    Where does this sort of expectation of 100% theoretical safety end? And why would people develop such a deeply unrealistic attitude, which can never possibly be realistically satisfied?

    , @Rich
    @Commentator Mike

    I enjoy the masking because I don't have to look at as many ugly people as I normally would. And social distancing means I don't have to stand close to as many idiots as I used to. Fact is though, masks don't block the tiny particles that make up the virus and social distancing, at least in NY, is impossible. But please, keep your mask on and stay as far away from me as possible. I appreciate it.

    Replies: @Jay Fink

  98. @Barbarossa
    @Jay Fink

    The non-vaccinated are heretics to the true Covid believers. It's a simple as that.

    My Dad got the jab, as he has lung issues and other comorbidities but my much healthy Mom decided to forgo it. My truly Covid fanatical Aunt, who has been fully vaccinated, refuses to let my Mom, her own sister, visit her this summer because of her lack of vaccination.

    This is not an isolated incident. I could relate several other similar situations from personal experience.

    One would think logically that the vaccinated would be chilled out now that they have their shot, but I think it deeply bothers some people that not everyone is 100% on board with the full spectrum Covid freakout.

    Replies: @Commentator Mike

    It seems that they want to get 100% of the population vaccinated. But since this is a long term experiment there really should be a large non-vaccinated control group so that both can be followed through the years. And if the vaccinated are all going to die, as some predict, then at least some of humanity can be saved by the non-vaccinated. And the same if the non-vaccinated all eventually die of Covid-19, the vaccinated can save the race.

  99. @Commentator Mike
    @Barbarossa

    Vaccines are not 100% effective so continuing with masks, social distancing and other measures seems reasonable to those who wish to minimise exposure.

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Rich

    I understand that, but also feel like that is kind of neurotic thinking. After all, nothing in life is ever 100% safe. We all take a pretty sizable risk, for example, every time we hop in the car and drive across town.

    In my own age group (mid 30’s in good health) I actually have a greater statistical risk of dying in a car accident than of Covid. So while I don’t go around licking public toilets or anything, I’m not really too concerned over my own risk of Covid.

    Where does this sort of expectation of 100% theoretical safety end? And why would people develop such a deeply unrealistic attitude, which can never possibly be realistically satisfied?

  100. @Buzz Mohawk
    Shoot.

    Mandating (or otherwise coercing) shots for anyone in the age group for my wife and myself (Aged 45-64 here) is also "arguably abusive." Why?" Because, 24% report negative reactions. A far smaller percentage ever have any big problem just suffering through the illness, and they end up producing their own antibodies, no shots needed.

    I am convinced of what another blogger here on UR says: This is just a rebranding of the flu. I don't get flu shots, and I haven't had the flu in many, many years.

    SARS-CoV-2 is a rebranding of the flu,
    complete with all the repeating, annual shots you will all be encouraged (or coerced) to get for the rest of your lives.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @gabriel alberton

    In one of your other posts you mentioned how other countries’ inhabitants never tasted freedom like those in yours have. Which might be true. But if your country enables its citzens to be free like nowhere else, you shouldn’t need to excuse yourself from taking the shot because of possible negative reactions. The shot could have no chance to cause any negative reactions whatsoever. It could be extensively documented that it was absolutely safe. If you were free, you’d still have the right to refuse it, without having to give a reason. That’s freedom.
    Having to, or feeling you have to bring up possible side effects in order to be excused from taking the vaccine: not freedom. It’s admitting others have control over you and trying to get off based on a technicality.

  101. @Ultrafart the Brave

    Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.
     
    Given that -

    1. the Corona Chan "vaccines" are untested experimental drugs that have not completed trials to verify either their safety or efficiacy,

    2. the "vaccine" manufacturers themselves openly admit that their "vaccines" neither stop people from catching or spreading Corona Chan,

    3. abundant evidence from around the world has already shown that the Corona Chan "vaccines" kill far more people than the Corona Chan bug, and

    4. a variety of cheap, safe medicinal and nutritional remedies have been emphatically demonstrated to be effective in preventing and curing Corona Chan,

    then mandating that anyone at all get the "shot" is not only categorically abusive, it constitutes a crime against humanity according to the Nuremburg code for which a menagerie of Nazi doctors were hung by the neck until dead.

    Replies: @A.R., @Almost Missouri, @Kratoklastes

    hung by the neck until dead

    Hanged. Hanged by the neck until dead. (A pet peeve, even tough ‘hanged’ seems so awkward).

    Apart from that, Strongly Agree – although it would also be nice if the perpetrators were torn to pieces in the public square… pour encourager les autres.

    • Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave
    @Kratoklastes


    Hanged. Hanged by the neck until dead.
     
    English is such a dynamic language.

    I accept your correction. "Hung" is past tense.

    ...it would also be nice if the perpetrators were torn to pieces in the public square...
     
    I rather lean toward burning them at the stake, or ye old English tradition of drawing and quartering. Sends a persistent warning message.
  102. @Alexander Turok
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I am convinced of what another blogger here on UR says: This is just a rebranding of the flu
     
    No: https://gray-kbtx-prod.cdn.arcpublishing.com/resizer/AbeHehq1diC_Sr2cCal03W_mVoU=/980x0/smart/cloudfront-us-east-1.images.arcpublishing.com/gray/2CQ3SD6B6VBF5MSV5KHVVHHW5Q.png

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Triteleia Laxa, @Kratoklastes

    The monthly (and weekly) all-cause mortality data exists back to 2005 (in some jurisdictions, it can be had all the way back to 1990)… yet you have chosen to show it starting in 2017.

    Why is that?

    (Don’t both responding: I already know the answer. If you take the series back to 2005 or 1990, there are several years that are significantly worse than 2020/21. Deliberately presenting a limited, selective timespan is only going to convince retards; that makes you a charlatan or a bullshitter).

    • Agree: acementhead
  103. @Dumbo
    @Twinkie


    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?
     
    What an idiotic statement. I haven't got a cold in 2016, 2017 and 2018, when there were no social distancing and no masks. What does it prove? Nothing.

    One anecdote is as good as another. I know people who didn't wear masks at all and didn't follow most of the rules, they never got the disease, I also know people who wore masks almost 100% of the time, they got it. No, masks and social distancing DO NOT WORK to stop a pandemic, as it has been widely shown all over the world.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Kratoklastes

    You’re the type of cynical SOB who refuses to buy my anti-Werewolf bananas.

    For the record: anti-Werewolf bananas are useful for reducing the severity of werewolf attacks.

    They don’t
    (1) stop werewolves from transforming, or
    (2) make werewolves less likely to attack, or
    (3) reduce the chance that a given werewolf attack turns the victim into a werewolf.

    In my preliminary study, anti-Werewolf bananas outperformed placebo by about a billion percent.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Kratoklastes

    In my preliminary study, anti-Werewolf bananas outperformed placebo by about a billion percent.

    No one should even consider arguing with such strong science!

  104. @Kratoklastes
    @Dumbo

    You're the type of cynical SOB who refuses to buy my anti-Werewolf bananas.

    For the record: anti-Werewolf bananas are useful for reducing the severity of werewolf attacks.

    They don't
    (1) stop werewolves from transforming, or
    (2) make werewolves less likely to attack, or
    (3) reduce the chance that a given werewolf attack turns the victim into a werewolf.

    In my preliminary study, anti-Werewolf bananas outperformed placebo by about a billion percent.

    Replies: @anon

    In my preliminary study, anti-Werewolf bananas outperformed placebo by about a billion percent.

    No one should even consider arguing with such strong science!

  105. @V. K. Ovelund
    @dfordoom


    It’s an insoluble problem.
     
    As recently as the 1950s, the insoluble problem was solved.

    Once you accept that racial discrimination is OK in some cases then there’s no way you can oppose discrimination against whites.
     
    I take your meaning to be, there is no way I can do that if I am reasonable.

    However, I do not oppose discrimination. Why would I? Antidiscrimination, even if it would protect me in theory, only harms me in practice. Antidiscrimination does not defend me and never will. It only attacks.

    The purpose and intent of antidiscrimination is to take what I have and to give it to someone else, while confusing me with a load of nonsense about justice. I may have no choice but to suffer this, but I do not buy into it.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    It’s an insoluble problem.

    As recently as the 1950s, the insoluble problem was solved.

    There were lots of problems that were solvable in the 1950s but are now no longer solvable. Mostly because every problem today is a political problem and political problems are inherently unsolvable.

    The purpose and intent of antidiscrimination is to take what I have and to give it to someone else, while confusing me with a load of nonsense about justice. I may have no choice but to suffer this, but I do not buy into it.

    It all comes down to who has the power and who doesn’t.

    If you don’t have the power then things like freedom of association become just more weapons that will be used against you. Politics is about power.

  106. @Alexander Turok
    @Dumbo

    I had to show proof of vaccination status to attend college long before the beer virus. This is no new thing under the sun.


    I am assuming that this comment is serious and not sarcastic, in which case you are an idiot and a freak. Wear that if you want, also insert a microchip with all your health information in your anus to be scanned by all relevant authorities for your added safety and benefit, but leave other people alone.
     
    That's the idea, the people who don't have the tag will be assumed to be anti-vaxxers.

    Replies: @Dumbo

    As I said before, insert an anal probe in your body to be scanned and x-rayed by all relevant authorities and leave me alone. You’re exactly like the “woke” retards, they are not happy to just be “woke” themselves, they want to force everyone to be too, by hook or crook.

  107. @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    I'm not going to lie because I quite literally can't, or at least not without nasty mental consequences. But I'm under few illusions about what will happen in a society where the head of the pandemic openly cops to lying repeatedly through a crisis on everything from his involvement with the Chinese to fudging the statistics on lockdowns. The response of the media is to gaslight people who have the gall to point out his mendacity. Of course that's not going to result in people trusting him and his cronies with injecting alien stuff in their body. A fish rots from the head.

    (And yeah, I went ahead and got the vaccine. Partly due to you, really, and also partly due to the realization that more likely than not to get out of here I would eventually need proof of it.)

    >If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    For many aspects of life in America, that reality is already there and has been for a while. Hiring through front door channels is a perfect example of a process in modern American society that heavily disincentives telling the truth, with social dynamics behind that turn out to be pretty ugly once you dig beneath the surface.

    The end result? Technological solutions that are not only harder on prospective employer and employee alike, but also encourage further lying.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Twinkie

    I went ahead and got the vaccine. Partly due to you

    I appreciate the confidence, but with medical and legal issues, I’d advise you to seek counsel locally, with physicians and attorneys, respectively, who know your circumstances in depth.

  108. @V. K. Ovelund
    @nebulafox


    For many aspects of life in America, that reality is already there and has been for a while. Hiring through front door channels is a perfect example of a process in modern American society that heavily disincentives telling the truth, with social dynamics behind that turn out to be pretty ugly once you dig beneath the surface.
     
    @Twinkie

    If it eases your conscience on my behalf, though @nebulafox is exactly right (as usual), hiring is one situation in which I do not lie. I do not exaggerate, either.

    The problem is, the hiring manager to whom one lies is the same person whose trust one must earn and keep following the hire. A lie seems to me a bad way to start that relationship.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    “I’m lying, because others are” is a guaranteed way to create hell.

    Please do not misunderstand me – there is such a thing as discretion in, say, withholding opinion that is unpopular. But lying about vaccination status is far beyond that courtesy.

    What would you think about an anti-vaccination mom who doesn’t inculcate her child against measles and then lies about it to get her kid in the same facility as your (future) little grandson who – due to age – couldn’t be vaccinated with MMR?

    You don’t fight dishonesty with dishonesty – you fight it by shaming those who are dishonest and, far more importantly, by being honest.

  109. @Twinkie
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I just lie when anyone is outrageous enough to ask if I’ve been vaccinated
     
    You are free to choose to be unvaccinated, but you should not lie. Just as you have the freedom not to be vaccinated, businesses and organizations are free to choose whom to employee or serve based on vaccination status. You can certainly refuse to answer, but then the others will likely treat you as if you are unvaccinated.

    If enough people like you lie and end up creating new clusters of community transmission, there will be a negative reaction to the lying people and there will be a greater pressure to implement more stringent measures such as vaccine passports.

    Exercise your freedom, but be honest, so that others also can.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @Diversity Heretic

    Lying to evade illegal totalitarian restrictions is not morally blameworthy. People who aided the resistance in occupied countries during World War II routinely lied to occupation authorities and acted morally and patriotically in doing so. This is no different. Authorities that require “vaccination” order people to take an experimental medical treatment without informed consent. That’s illegal. I’m hopeful that they’ll be an active market in counterfeit vaccination certificates.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Diversity Heretic


    Lying to evade illegal totalitarian restrictions is not morally blameworthy.
     
    I agree with you but am unable to deny that Twinkie's point stands the high ground. For what did the martyrs give their lives, if the Christians who profess to admire them will not speak truth even in small matters?

    If bishops would tell the truth, then maybe I would still find the strength to do likewise; but I am not strong enough to do it on my own.

    The world would be a better place if more of us were like Twinkie. I used to agree with him, but life has beaten me down.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

  110. You can still pass the bug on to old people. Old people vote Republican (on average).

  111. @Diversity Heretic
    @Twinkie

    Lying to evade illegal totalitarian restrictions is not morally blameworthy. People who aided the resistance in occupied countries during World War II routinely lied to occupation authorities and acted morally and patriotically in doing so. This is no different. Authorities that require "vaccination" order people to take an experimental medical treatment without informed consent. That's illegal. I'm hopeful that they'll be an active market in counterfeit vaccination certificates.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    Lying to evade illegal totalitarian restrictions is not morally blameworthy.

    I agree with you but am unable to deny that Twinkie’s point stands the high ground. For what did the martyrs give their lives, if the Christians who profess to admire them will not speak truth even in small matters?

    If bishops would tell the truth, then maybe I would still find the strength to do likewise; but I am not strong enough to do it on my own.

    The world would be a better place if more of us were like Twinkie. I used to agree with him, but life has beaten me down.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @V. K. Ovelund

    You're not alone V.K. Given the hassles of being unvacinated, I will probably get a vaccine. But I want to avoid the messenger RNA and the adenovirus "vaccines." They creep me out. I'm hoping to be able to get an attenuated virus or a protein fragment vaccine, if and when the necessity arises. Not the ideal solution, but like you, I have to bend. But take heart; the willow tree may bend, but it almost never breaks!!

    Replies: @Twinkie

  112. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Diversity Heretic


    Lying to evade illegal totalitarian restrictions is not morally blameworthy.
     
    I agree with you but am unable to deny that Twinkie's point stands the high ground. For what did the martyrs give their lives, if the Christians who profess to admire them will not speak truth even in small matters?

    If bishops would tell the truth, then maybe I would still find the strength to do likewise; but I am not strong enough to do it on my own.

    The world would be a better place if more of us were like Twinkie. I used to agree with him, but life has beaten me down.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

    You’re not alone V.K. Given the hassles of being unvacinated, I will probably get a vaccine. But I want to avoid the messenger RNA and the adenovirus “vaccines.” They creep me out. I’m hoping to be able to get an attenuated virus or a protein fragment vaccine, if and when the necessity arises. Not the ideal solution, but like you, I have to bend. But take heart; the willow tree may bend, but it almost never breaks!!

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Diversity Heretic

    Attenuated virus has not been been shown to be nearly as effective as an mRNA vaccine. Do your own research if you disbelieve.

    My oldest boy is a highly competitive, nationally-ranked athlete (Judo and BJJ), but I have kept him home and trained him myself rather than letting him back to his clubs until he was vaccinated (he is now, so he will return).

    It's not because I thought that he'd get seriously ill or die from Covid-19, but more because of possible long-term consequences of the illness. I read of a number of combat athletes who contracted this coronavirus and recovered, but has continued to suffer significant respiratory issues that prevented their return to high intensity training.

    Some people are freaked out by the potential long-term consequences of an mRNA vaccine even though the "messenger" is destroyed by the body, but they don't seem to think of possible long-term consequences from covid infection such as reduced respiratory function, loss of smell/taste, etc. as well as unknown contingencies.

  113. Rich says:
    @Commentator Mike
    @Barbarossa

    Vaccines are not 100% effective so continuing with masks, social distancing and other measures seems reasonable to those who wish to minimise exposure.

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Rich

    I enjoy the masking because I don’t have to look at as many ugly people as I normally would. And social distancing means I don’t have to stand close to as many idiots as I used to. Fact is though, masks don’t block the tiny particles that make up the virus and social distancing, at least in NY, is impossible. But please, keep your mask on and stay as far away from me as possible. I appreciate it.

    • Replies: @Jay Fink
    @Rich

    I don't like masking in part because I don't get to look at pretty women's faces. I think unattractive women like mask mandates because they take away some of the beauty gap that normally exists.

  114. Rich says:
    @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It is too late for the do-not-lie approach.
     
    If everyone just lied, there will be more stringent, repressive, and technological solutions that will be imposed on us. Mark my word.

    We get the government we deserve.

    By the way, my kids never came down with a cold in 1.5 years. And the same for all my neighbors’ kids. And no flu either. Masks and social distancing don’t work, eh?

    Long before this pandemic, Hong Kong government initiated a campaign to increase mask usage during flu seasons and was able to reduce the number of flu patients substantially. The SARS epidemic that hit Hong Kong also contributed to this culture of masks.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @dfordoom, @V. K. Ovelund, @nebulafox, @Rich

    If you keep your kids isolated and wearing masks, they will have less opportunity to catch a cold, or anything else. They will also develop a weak immune system and will, unfortunately, get much sicker when older. It was accepted wisdom when my children were young, to allow them to interact with others, to get sick, and to get stronger. You are certainly allowed to do with your children as you please, but I think you’re doing them a disservice.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Rich


    You are certainly allowed to do with your children as you please, but I think you’re doing them a disservice.
     
    You clearly missed the comment of mine, in which I mentioned that my kids would get sick seasonally through doing Judo, BJJ, ballet, rangers, AHGs, etc. I wasn't suggesting isolating children (which is also socially unhealthy).

    I brought up the fact that the incidents of other respiratory illnesses such as cold, flu, etc. have been waaaaaaaaaay down through the lockdowns, masks, social distancing, etc. Every parent knows that kids get sick from other kids in ordinary times, but this past year has been an exception. In other words, those measures certainly did work in curbing transmission of respiratory (and other infectious) illnesses - and the Covid-19 pandemic would have been much worse without them.

    Whether the benefits were worth the costs is a separate conversation.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Rich

  115. @Kratoklastes
    @Ultrafart the Brave


    hung by the neck until dead
     
    Hanged. Hanged by the neck until dead. (A pet peeve, even tough 'hanged' seems so awkward).

    Apart from that, Strongly Agree - although it would also be nice if the perpetrators were torn to pieces in the public square... pour encourager les autres.

    Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave

    Hanged. Hanged by the neck until dead.

    English is such a dynamic language.

    I accept your correction. “Hung” is past tense.

    …it would also be nice if the perpetrators were torn to pieces in the public square…

    I rather lean toward burning them at the stake, or ye old English tradition of drawing and quartering. Sends a persistent warning message.

  116. @Rich
    @Commentator Mike

    I enjoy the masking because I don't have to look at as many ugly people as I normally would. And social distancing means I don't have to stand close to as many idiots as I used to. Fact is though, masks don't block the tiny particles that make up the virus and social distancing, at least in NY, is impossible. But please, keep your mask on and stay as far away from me as possible. I appreciate it.

    Replies: @Jay Fink

    I don’t like masking in part because I don’t get to look at pretty women’s faces. I think unattractive women like mask mandates because they take away some of the beauty gap that normally exists.

  117. @res
    @dfordoom

    Agreed that this is true (emphasis mine).


    the evidence does seem to be pretty clear that masks and social distancing do in fact reduce the spread of both flu and COVID.
     
    The more interesting questions have to do with which exact measures make that so. The early days of COVID provided some natural experiments which gave clues, but I don't think it was really conclusive. For example, masking when outdoors with reasonable separation (e.g. not engaging in mostly peaceful protests) seems more like theater than an effective countermeasure to me (and I have spent plenty of time on that stage this past year).

    I think the most important measure is reestablishing the norm that people who are sick stay home (or mask/isolate as much as possible if they must go out). Has this happened?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Twinkie

    For example, masking when outdoors with reasonable separation (e.g. not engaging in mostly peaceful protests) seems more like theater than an effective countermeasure to me (and I have spent plenty of time on that stage this past year).

    Absolutely. I think the evidence is pretty clear that the vast majority of transmissions occurred indoors. It makes perfect sense when you think about it – this is foremost a respiratory illness from a coronavirus!

    I think the benefits of wearing masks, whether modest or significant, increase when indoors with high density, i.e. lots of people crammed in a small space, a situation with which East Asian are quite familiar.

    I think the most important measure is reestablishing the norm that people who are sick stay home (or mask/isolate as much as possible if they must go out). Has this happened?

    Although they are now suffering from earlier cockiness and not getting on the vaccination train, the likes of Hong Kongers, Taiwanese, and Koreans handled the early waves well – they quarantined the sick and engaged in aggressive contact-tracing. That’s really the price one has to be willing to pay if one doesn’t want general lockdowns. But that kind of aggressive contact-tracing is culturally, legally, and politically very difficult in the U.S.

  118. @Rich
    @Twinkie

    If you keep your kids isolated and wearing masks, they will have less opportunity to catch a cold, or anything else. They will also develop a weak immune system and will, unfortunately, get much sicker when older. It was accepted wisdom when my children were young, to allow them to interact with others, to get sick, and to get stronger. You are certainly allowed to do with your children as you please, but I think you're doing them a disservice.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    You are certainly allowed to do with your children as you please, but I think you’re doing them a disservice.

    You clearly missed the comment of mine, in which I mentioned that my kids would get sick seasonally through doing Judo, BJJ, ballet, rangers, AHGs, etc. I wasn’t suggesting isolating children (which is also socially unhealthy).

    I brought up the fact that the incidents of other respiratory illnesses such as cold, flu, etc. have been waaaaaaaaaay down through the lockdowns, masks, social distancing, etc. Every parent knows that kids get sick from other kids in ordinary times, but this past year has been an exception. In other words, those measures certainly did work in curbing transmission of respiratory (and other infectious) illnesses – and the Covid-19 pandemic would have been much worse without them.

    Whether the benefits were worth the costs is a separate conversation.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Twinkie


    Every parent knows that kids get sick from other kids in ordinary times, but this past year has been an exception.
     
    The difference as experienced in my home has indeed been remarkable. Anecdotal, yet remarkable.

    The family's bout with COVID itself was not great fun for me or my wife (hardly terrible, but not great fun). However, the lack of other viruses was nice. Anyway, you can include me among the “every parent knows.”

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Rich
    @Twinkie

    You're missing my point. It isn't the masking that's preventing kids from getting respiratory illnesses, it's the lack of interaction with other children. A kid who lives in a bubble, won't catch cold or flu or much of anything. The problem with that, at least historically, was that it prevented the immune system from getting stronger. Think American Indians and their first contact with European diseases.

  119. @Diversity Heretic
    @V. K. Ovelund

    You're not alone V.K. Given the hassles of being unvacinated, I will probably get a vaccine. But I want to avoid the messenger RNA and the adenovirus "vaccines." They creep me out. I'm hoping to be able to get an attenuated virus or a protein fragment vaccine, if and when the necessity arises. Not the ideal solution, but like you, I have to bend. But take heart; the willow tree may bend, but it almost never breaks!!

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Attenuated virus has not been been shown to be nearly as effective as an mRNA vaccine. Do your own research if you disbelieve.

    My oldest boy is a highly competitive, nationally-ranked athlete (Judo and BJJ), but I have kept him home and trained him myself rather than letting him back to his clubs until he was vaccinated (he is now, so he will return).

    It’s not because I thought that he’d get seriously ill or die from Covid-19, but more because of possible long-term consequences of the illness. I read of a number of combat athletes who contracted this coronavirus and recovered, but has continued to suffer significant respiratory issues that prevented their return to high intensity training.

    Some people are freaked out by the potential long-term consequences of an mRNA vaccine even though the “messenger” is destroyed by the body, but they don’t seem to think of possible long-term consequences from covid infection such as reduced respiratory function, loss of smell/taste, etc. as well as unknown contingencies.

  120. @Twinkie
    @Rich


    You are certainly allowed to do with your children as you please, but I think you’re doing them a disservice.
     
    You clearly missed the comment of mine, in which I mentioned that my kids would get sick seasonally through doing Judo, BJJ, ballet, rangers, AHGs, etc. I wasn't suggesting isolating children (which is also socially unhealthy).

    I brought up the fact that the incidents of other respiratory illnesses such as cold, flu, etc. have been waaaaaaaaaay down through the lockdowns, masks, social distancing, etc. Every parent knows that kids get sick from other kids in ordinary times, but this past year has been an exception. In other words, those measures certainly did work in curbing transmission of respiratory (and other infectious) illnesses - and the Covid-19 pandemic would have been much worse without them.

    Whether the benefits were worth the costs is a separate conversation.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Rich

    Every parent knows that kids get sick from other kids in ordinary times, but this past year has been an exception.

    The difference as experienced in my home has indeed been remarkable. Anecdotal, yet remarkable.

    The family’s bout with COVID itself was not great fun for me or my wife (hardly terrible, but not great fun). However, the lack of other viruses was nice. Anyway, you can include me among the “every parent knows.”

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Anecdotal, yet remarkable.
     
    I don’t think it’s just anecdotal. I think flu deaths in the US and East Asia were all down last year.
  121. Rich says:
    @Twinkie
    @Rich


    You are certainly allowed to do with your children as you please, but I think you’re doing them a disservice.
     
    You clearly missed the comment of mine, in which I mentioned that my kids would get sick seasonally through doing Judo, BJJ, ballet, rangers, AHGs, etc. I wasn't suggesting isolating children (which is also socially unhealthy).

    I brought up the fact that the incidents of other respiratory illnesses such as cold, flu, etc. have been waaaaaaaaaay down through the lockdowns, masks, social distancing, etc. Every parent knows that kids get sick from other kids in ordinary times, but this past year has been an exception. In other words, those measures certainly did work in curbing transmission of respiratory (and other infectious) illnesses - and the Covid-19 pandemic would have been much worse without them.

    Whether the benefits were worth the costs is a separate conversation.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Rich

    You’re missing my point. It isn’t the masking that’s preventing kids from getting respiratory illnesses, it’s the lack of interaction with other children. A kid who lives in a bubble, won’t catch cold or flu or much of anything. The problem with that, at least historically, was that it prevented the immune system from getting stronger. Think American Indians and their first contact with European diseases.

  122. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Twinkie


    Every parent knows that kids get sick from other kids in ordinary times, but this past year has been an exception.
     
    The difference as experienced in my home has indeed been remarkable. Anecdotal, yet remarkable.

    The family's bout with COVID itself was not great fun for me or my wife (hardly terrible, but not great fun). However, the lack of other viruses was nice. Anyway, you can include me among the “every parent knows.”

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Anecdotal, yet remarkable.

    I don’t think it’s just anecdotal. I think flu deaths in the US and East Asia were all down last year.

  123. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jtgw

    Look, everybody here might think they are smart (even including me!) but the fact is, you and I and nobody here knows even the slightest bit about the truth of any of this.

    Whenever I am given lousy graphs like that one, I remember that the person posting it knows nothing, nothing at all, about where the data came from, or how true those data are.

    Admit the fact that you don't know what is really going on. Furthermore, admit the fact that even the worst case scenarios, even as presented in that graph by the reply to me, are not even enough to merit the panic desired by the poster.

    We are being played. It is scary, but we are being played.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @nebulafox

    >Look, everybody here might think they are smart

    I don’t. Seriously: I don’t. This isn’t false humility. I have good reason to not think so. Appearances online can be deceiving.

    I’m quick. There’s a difference. And it’s important to realize that. People who are quick can deceive others, and are dangerous to themselves and others as a result.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @nebulafox

    Here's to you. The smartest people are the ones who can and do identify what they don't know. As a deliberate, obsessive person who had his intellectual talents ripped away from him, I fully agree with you about the quick part. So often, quick is bullshit, and 10,000 words written quickly about 100,000 words read quickly is more shit.

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @nebulafox

    You have an enormous store of historical information at your synaptic fingertips, Razib Khan-level. And it's checks out--I can tell from the ~20% or so of what you write about that I'm familiar with. The smartest commenters are the ones who insist they're not that smart. Very Socratic.

  124. I notice that all of the MSM stories about how the South is lagging behind in vaccination rate comparisons are illustrated with white people.

    OT: I also have noticed a steady drumbeat from the warmongering press that we need to stop the Afghanistan withdrawal. The latest proposing that the Pentagon should get the okay to bomb Kabul after the Taliban take it over.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @iffen


    OT: I also have noticed a steady drumbeat from the warmongering press that we need to stop the Afghanistan withdrawal.
     
    We're seeing that from the right-wing media in Australia, the argument being that withdrawal from Afghanistan will endanger Afghan feminism.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    , @anon
    @iffen

    I notice that all of the MSM stories about how the South is lagging behind in vaccination rate comparisons are illustrated with white people.

    https://blog.capterra.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Joker.gif

    , @Audacious Epigone
    @iffen

    Prediction: The empire will still be in Afghanistan at the end of September. Bold call, I know, but my chips are on the table!

    Replies: @iffen

  125. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    >Look, everybody here might think they are smart

    I don't. Seriously: I don't. This isn't false humility. I have good reason to not think so. Appearances online can be deceiving.

    I'm quick. There's a difference. And it's important to realize that. People who are quick can deceive others, and are dangerous to themselves and others as a result.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Audacious Epigone

    Here’s to you. The smartest people are the ones who can and do identify what they don’t know. As a deliberate, obsessive person who had his intellectual talents ripped away from him, I fully agree with you about the quick part. So often, quick is bullshit, and 10,000 words written quickly about 100,000 words read quickly is more shit.

  126. @iffen
    I notice that all of the MSM stories about how the South is lagging behind in vaccination rate comparisons are illustrated with white people.

    OT: I also have noticed a steady drumbeat from the warmongering press that we need to stop the Afghanistan withdrawal. The latest proposing that the Pentagon should get the okay to bomb Kabul after the Taliban take it over.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @anon, @Audacious Epigone

    OT: I also have noticed a steady drumbeat from the warmongering press that we need to stop the Afghanistan withdrawal.

    We’re seeing that from the right-wing media in Australia, the argument being that withdrawal from Afghanistan will endanger Afghan feminism.

    • Replies: @Audacious Epigone
    @dfordoom

    That's weaponized Wokeness in the service of the neo-liberal establishment at its finest right there.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  127. Mandating children get the shot is arguably abusive.

    Which is why the scum who rule us want it. And masking children outdoors is abuse.

  128. @iffen
    I notice that all of the MSM stories about how the South is lagging behind in vaccination rate comparisons are illustrated with white people.

    OT: I also have noticed a steady drumbeat from the warmongering press that we need to stop the Afghanistan withdrawal. The latest proposing that the Pentagon should get the okay to bomb Kabul after the Taliban take it over.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @anon, @Audacious Epigone

    I notice that all of the MSM stories about how the South is lagging behind in vaccination rate comparisons are illustrated with white people.

  129. Top CDC official warns US not ready for next pandemic

    Iffen says: Not with this CDC, nor any time soon.

    Why is the prescription for failed governmental institutions always more money for the failed institutions and the people employed by them?

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @iffen


    Why is the prescription for failed governmental institutions always more money for the failed institutions and the people employed by them?
     
    Amen, brother. Why, indeed?

    Not with this CDC, nor any time soon.
     
    I might prefer to take my chances with the next Spanish Flu than to submit to administration by this kind of incompetence and political gamesmanship. Like most other citizens, I assumed when COVID first arrived that CDC knew what it was doing. I will not make the same assumption next time.

    I do not wish to argue over which specific points were points of incompetence. CDC probably did some things right, but when the present result is that I am being pushed to get a vaccine CDC knows I do not need (for I have had actual COVID, confirmed by a test), the result does not build confidence in CDC.

  130. @iffen
    Top CDC official warns US not ready for next pandemic

    Iffen says: Not with this CDC, nor any time soon.

    Why is the prescription for failed governmental institutions always more money for the failed institutions and the people employed by them?

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    Why is the prescription for failed governmental institutions always more money for the failed institutions and the people employed by them?

    Amen, brother. Why, indeed?

    Not with this CDC, nor any time soon.

    I might prefer to take my chances with the next Spanish Flu than to submit to administration by this kind of incompetence and political gamesmanship. Like most other citizens, I assumed when COVID first arrived that CDC knew what it was doing. I will not make the same assumption next time.

    I do not wish to argue over which specific points were points of incompetence. CDC probably did some things right, but when the present result is that I am being pushed to get a vaccine CDC knows I do not need (for I have had actual COVID, confirmed by a test), the result does not build confidence in CDC.

  131. @TomSchmidt
    @Alexander Turok

    You're right.

    You gonna call the hyperbole police, or is it better if AE self-abases?

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    The chance that a young, healthy person both contracts the virus and then suffers severely from it is vanishingly small. The comparison should not be between getting the shot and how bad infection will be, it should be between getting the shot and the small fractional chance of contracting the virus multiplied by the small fractional chance of having a severe go of it.

  132. @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    >Look, everybody here might think they are smart

    I don't. Seriously: I don't. This isn't false humility. I have good reason to not think so. Appearances online can be deceiving.

    I'm quick. There's a difference. And it's important to realize that. People who are quick can deceive others, and are dangerous to themselves and others as a result.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Audacious Epigone

    You have an enormous store of historical information at your synaptic fingertips, Razib Khan-level. And it’s checks out–I can tell from the ~20% or so of what you write about that I’m familiar with. The smartest commenters are the ones who insist they’re not that smart. Very Socratic.

  133. @iffen
    I notice that all of the MSM stories about how the South is lagging behind in vaccination rate comparisons are illustrated with white people.

    OT: I also have noticed a steady drumbeat from the warmongering press that we need to stop the Afghanistan withdrawal. The latest proposing that the Pentagon should get the okay to bomb Kabul after the Taliban take it over.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @anon, @Audacious Epigone

    Prediction: The empire will still be in Afghanistan at the end of September. Bold call, I know, but my chips are on the table!

    • Replies: @iffen
    @Audacious Epigone

    Prediction: The empire will still be in Afghanistan at the end of September.

    When Biden's delay of the withdrawal was announced, I assumed that it was to give our Deep State the time to arrange mercenary attacks on the remaining forces thereby creating a huge "public" outcry to remain. Now, I'm hoping that it is just part of the "Biden reverses Trump decisions" headlines propaganda trope.

  134. @dfordoom
    @iffen


    OT: I also have noticed a steady drumbeat from the warmongering press that we need to stop the Afghanistan withdrawal.
     
    We're seeing that from the right-wing media in Australia, the argument being that withdrawal from Afghanistan will endanger Afghan feminism.

    Replies: @Audacious Epigone

    That’s weaponized Wokeness in the service of the neo-liberal establishment at its finest right there.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Audacious Epigone


    That’s weaponized Wokeness in the service of the neo-liberal establishment at its finest right there.
     
    Yep. And that's why Wokeness isn't going away any time soon. It provides the neo-liberal establishment with wonderful justifications for foreign policy interventionism. We must bomb Country X because homophobia. We must invade Country Y because feminism.

    Wokeness is the best thing that has ever happened from the point of view of the warmongers.
  135. @Audacious Epigone
    @dfordoom

    That's weaponized Wokeness in the service of the neo-liberal establishment at its finest right there.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    That’s weaponized Wokeness in the service of the neo-liberal establishment at its finest right there.

    Yep. And that’s why Wokeness isn’t going away any time soon. It provides the neo-liberal establishment with wonderful justifications for foreign policy interventionism. We must bomb Country X because homophobia. We must invade Country Y because feminism.

    Wokeness is the best thing that has ever happened from the point of view of the warmongers.

  136. @Audacious Epigone
    @iffen

    Prediction: The empire will still be in Afghanistan at the end of September. Bold call, I know, but my chips are on the table!

    Replies: @iffen

    Prediction: The empire will still be in Afghanistan at the end of September.

    When Biden’s delay of the withdrawal was announced, I assumed that it was to give our Deep State the time to arrange mercenary attacks on the remaining forces thereby creating a huge “public” outcry to remain. Now, I’m hoping that it is just part of the “Biden reverses Trump decisions” headlines propaganda trope.

  137. @Nikolai Vladivostok
    The vaccine issue has become ridiculously politicized and emotive.
    Older people should think about getting it. If they don't want it, fine.
    Younger people mostly don't need it. If they want to take it anyway for the as-yet unquantified, altruistic goal of preventing infection of others, fine.
    Kids should not be given experimental vaccines with known side effects just to protect the elderly.
    No one should be forced to take it just to live their life, nor hounded as a retard for taking it.
    The whole vaccine issue is like a jetski - it brings out the inner dickhead in everyone. This comment thread is about to melt down into acrimony as everyone is accuses everyone else of being a murderer, a dumbarse and a Nazi. I'm outta here.

    Replies: @res, @RSDB

    Well, you have certainly been proven a true prophet.

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