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The subsequent graph shows how baby boomers, defined as those born from 1946-1964, self-identified when asked about their political orientations in 1974 all the way through how they did so when asked in 2018:

The one demographic trend American conservatives had in their favor–the positive correlation between age and a tendency towards rightwing politics–is at risk of being reversed by deaths of despair and the not unrelated catastrophic social and governmental responses to Covid.

When Boomers finally exit stage left, or right as it were, will subsequent generations follow in their political footsteps or will it be lights out for the Republican party? Stay tuned!

GSS variables used: YEAR, COHORT(1946-1964), POLVIEWS(1-3)(4)(5-7)

 
• Category: Culture/Society, History, Ideology • Tags: Generational storm, GSS 
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  1. My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .

    • Replies: @t
    @Jay Fink

    That's not the case I, right after the election I compared the exit poll results of 18-29 year olds in 2008 with 30-44 year old in 2020 every race was more Republican in 2020 than they had been in 2008.

    Replies: @t

    , @dfordoom
    @Jay Fink


    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent. First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were.
     
    I think we'll see much the same pattern with GenX. But for those born after about the early 80s I suspect it will be different.

    Boomers and GenX (yes I know these generations things are artificial but I'm using it as a convenient shorthand for anyone born earlier than roughly 1980) may have been liberal or leftist or even quite radical when they were young but they were exposed to competing ideas. Anyone born prior to around 1965 had plenty of exposure to competing ideas.

    It's not just that the younger generations don't get any exposure to conservative ideas. They don't get any exposure to dissenting leftist or even dissenting liberal views.

    Replies: @Jay Fink

    , @Mark G.
    @Jay Fink


    Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .
     
    You may need to separate social liberalism and economic liberalism when thinking about where we are going. White Democrats are generally both but that isn't always the case with nonwhites. For example, whites in California voted for gay marriage but it lost at the polls because of nonwhites voting against it. Socially liberal whites may need to decide if they support continued high levels of nonwhite immigration or their pet social liberal causes because they won't be able to have both. In addition to social issues, nonwhites are also more indifferent to environmental issues so you should see a decline in support for this area, even to the point of a lot of the older white environmentalists like John Muir being labeled racists and their names taken off buildings and their statues knocked down.

    At the same time this is happening on the social and environmental side over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety. Expect to see wide scale nationalizations of privately owned businesses, rampant inflation, shortages of basic goods, corrupt courts and police, and the remaining whites demonized and subjected to increasing home invasions and physical assaults in public.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @V. K. Ovelund, @dfordoom

    , @obwandiyag
    @Jay Fink

    Sorry. Blacks and Hispanics and Asians are not "liberal," except on issues relating to their own civil rights. This is well-known.

    Replies: @Jay Fink

    , @Rahan
    @Jay Fink


    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .
     
    In my opinion the "eternal cycle" of people growing up and becoming conservative was only "eternal" while the social mechanisms enabling it were present. As in "you age and become a husband and father (a wife and a mother) and breadwinner and property-owner and a pillar of a local high-trust community" -- this is what helps make older citizens conservative.

    Once you dismantle the family, gender roles, social cohesion, high-trust, self-reliance, and stable working conditions, becoming conservative turns into a rare individual journey, as opposed to a mass phenomenon. Thus the 1990s were probably the last decade in which the previous "young rebels" turned into "grown up conservatives", beyond this point the mechanics of this mostly automatic transformation were dismantled.

    But imported non-whites, especially the Asian and Latino ones, Arab too, would for now at least by much less "indoctrinated" than the "evil whites", so they will definitely become more conservative as they grow older. It's just that in order to succeed by the new rules of the Anglosphere, they will have to take up anti-white politics and thus vote "liberal". While internally being "conservative".

    Sooner or later a "new conservative" movement for the colored folks could take off. In fact, some might say Nick Fuentes is one of the early experiments in that.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Radicalcenter

  2. Of note is the way moderates haven’t changed much. It appears to be former liberals who have become conservatives. People searching for one true way or another when there isn’t one.

    The political life journey here is that of eventually learning that left/right, liberal/conservative, D/R doesn’t describe one at all, or the real world, and that it is all a bunch of crap that people spend endless hours writing and arguing about.

    Screw both major parties, parties in general, and all politics. This is the voice of one who has seen enough.

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @pirelli
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Or it could be that many former liberals are now identifying as moderates and many former moderates as conservatives. No way to tell from the data unless I’m missing something.

    But very much agreed that people waste an obscene amount of time reading writing and talking about politics. I think if you’ve spent 15-30 minutes reading the news, including political news, that’s all you need to do for the day (unless it’s your livelihood).

  3. @Jay Fink
    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today's young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person's political journey .

    Replies: @t, @dfordoom, @Mark G., @obwandiyag, @Rahan

    That’s not the case I, right after the election I compared the exit poll results of 18-29 year olds in 2008 with 30-44 year old in 2020 every race was more Republican in 2020 than they had been in 2008.

    • Replies: @t
    @t

    https://www.unz.com/anepigone/age-is-just-a-number/#comment-4277484


    3) on a related note in 2008 whites 18-29 voted 54-44 for Obama this year White 30-44 largely the same group voted for Trump 51-41; in 2008 blacks 18-29 voted for Obama 95-4(!) this year blacks 30-44 voted for Biden 78-19; in 2008 Hispanics 18-29 voted for Obama 76-19, this year they voted for Biden 62-34.

    Across racial groups early milliianals have swung about 15 points towards republicans as they’ve aged.
     
  4. @t
    @Jay Fink

    That's not the case I, right after the election I compared the exit poll results of 18-29 year olds in 2008 with 30-44 year old in 2020 every race was more Republican in 2020 than they had been in 2008.

    Replies: @t

    https://www.unz.com/anepigone/age-is-just-a-number/#comment-4277484

    3) on a related note in 2008 whites 18-29 voted 54-44 for Obama this year White 30-44 largely the same group voted for Trump 51-41; in 2008 blacks 18-29 voted for Obama 95-4(!) this year blacks 30-44 voted for Biden 78-19; in 2008 Hispanics 18-29 voted for Obama 76-19, this year they voted for Biden 62-34.

    Across racial groups early milliianals have swung about 15 points towards republicans as they’ve aged.

  5. What’s missing here is a representation of actual beliefs, rather than just the labels “liberal” and “conservative”. My parents voted for Carter, then fast-forward 4 decades, they voted for Trump. Basically, their beliefs haven’t changed, except for some more pro-market economic ideas that I would have to describe as superficial. In fact, I can’t even manage to red pill them on HBD issues.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Chrisnonymous


    What’s missing here is a representation of actual beliefs, rather than just the labels “liberal” and “conservative”.
     
    That's quite true of course.

    Is someone who voted for Trump a conservative? Trump himself is a liberal.

    There's very little connection these days between "conservatism" on economic issues (which is mostly neo-liberalism) and "conservatism" on social issues.

    It would be more illuminating to know whether Boomers have changed their views on specific issues. Are they for example more likely to be opposed to abortion now than when they were young?

    Are they more pro-feminist or less pro-feminist? Are they more in favour of things like homosexual marriage? Are they more in favour of the idea that a man can magically transform himself into a woman by putting on a frock? Are they more in favour of censorship of sexual material? Are they more in favour of banning hate speech? Are they more, or less, pro-immigration? Are they more likely to believe that men and women are basically interchangeable?

    Most of the things that present-day conservatives accept unquestioningly would have been considered extreme social liberalism in the early 1970s.

    I'm guessing that on many social issues Boomers are more liberal today than they were in the 70s.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @Rosie
    @Chrisnonymous


    What’s missing here is a representation of actual beliefs, rather than just the labels “liberal” and “conservative”.
     
    This!

    I'm GenX, and I can already see that what we call "conservative" was liberal a couple decades ago.
  6. @Jay Fink
    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today's young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person's political journey .

    Replies: @t, @dfordoom, @Mark G., @obwandiyag, @Rahan

    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent. First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were.

    I think we’ll see much the same pattern with GenX. But for those born after about the early 80s I suspect it will be different.

    Boomers and GenX (yes I know these generations things are artificial but I’m using it as a convenient shorthand for anyone born earlier than roughly 1980) may have been liberal or leftist or even quite radical when they were young but they were exposed to competing ideas. Anyone born prior to around 1965 had plenty of exposure to competing ideas.

    It’s not just that the younger generations don’t get any exposure to conservative ideas. They don’t get any exposure to dissenting leftist or even dissenting liberal views.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @Jay Fink
    @dfordoom

    I am an early Gen X and I don't think we were ever that liberal, especially compared to boomers when they were young or anyone that's under 40 today. We came of age during Reagan and he was popular. Liberalism was not trendy for young people in the 80s.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  7. @Chrisnonymous
    What's missing here is a representation of actual beliefs, rather than just the labels "liberal" and "conservative". My parents voted for Carter, then fast-forward 4 decades, they voted for Trump. Basically, their beliefs haven't changed, except for some more pro-market economic ideas that I would have to describe as superficial. In fact, I can't even manage to red pill them on HBD issues.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Rosie

    What’s missing here is a representation of actual beliefs, rather than just the labels “liberal” and “conservative”.

    That’s quite true of course.

    Is someone who voted for Trump a conservative? Trump himself is a liberal.

    There’s very little connection these days between “conservatism” on economic issues (which is mostly neo-liberalism) and “conservatism” on social issues.

    It would be more illuminating to know whether Boomers have changed their views on specific issues. Are they for example more likely to be opposed to abortion now than when they were young?

    Are they more pro-feminist or less pro-feminist? Are they more in favour of things like homosexual marriage? Are they more in favour of the idea that a man can magically transform himself into a woman by putting on a frock? Are they more in favour of censorship of sexual material? Are they more in favour of banning hate speech? Are they more, or less, pro-immigration? Are they more likely to believe that men and women are basically interchangeable?

    Most of the things that present-day conservatives accept unquestioningly would have been considered extreme social liberalism in the early 1970s.

    I’m guessing that on many social issues Boomers are more liberal today than they were in the 70s.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @dfordoom


    I’m guessing that on many social issues Boomers are more liberal today than they were in the 70s.
     
    I agree. My family is life-long friends with another family in my community. Their son recently declared he is a woman and is "transitioning". In theory, my parents are opposed to transgenderism based on what they've said and their religious affiliation. However, when it comes to accepting this man's psychological problem as a mental illness vs a... what? what do you call it? "authentic gender misalignment"?... They are unable to say that the man is simply either gay or deeply depressed and unable to find sexual fulfillment. Having grown up with him and having spent many weekend nights in his company, I cannot bring myself to refer to him by his new female name (was my friend non-existent or is he dead now?), while they have been decidedly wishy-washy. I can only conclude that they are too old and tired to have the strength to lose friends to Truth.
  8. I graduated from college when Jimmy Carter was president and the economy was in the toilet. Gas lines, high inflation, unemployment and interest rates. You had to go to businesses to apply for a job, and they often told you they were not accepting applications. I remember one HR manager, an older white man, who told me if I was black he could hire me on the spot, but the Affirmative Action quotas had him handcuffed. No job to be had there. Needless to say, I voted for Reagan and my lot in life improved dramatically.

    • Replies: @Liberty Mike
    @Hannah Katz

    Why didn't you ask the HR manager if the company's AA quotas would be satisfied if you went Al Jolson?

  9. I think my views have been remarkably constant over the past 5 decades. In the 1960s and 70s I would have been considered a “liberal”, now most people seem to view me as a reactionary dinosaur (or Nazi).

    • Agree: Rosie
  10. Depends on what “conservative” and “liberal” mean. The GOP has the opportunity to move left on economic issues but stay to the right on cultural issues to solidify gains with minorities and the working/middle class, but how would that be described on the conservative/liberal axis if they actually did so? Likewise, the Dems pay lip service to diversity, but are increasingly corporatist on economics and outright authoritarian on culture.

    • Agree: dfordoom, Radicalcenter
    • Replies: @anon
    @Arclight

    Depends on what “conservative” and “liberal” mean.

    A little bit more than "Chiefs" and "Buccaneers" or "Generals" and "Globetrotters". A little. A bit.

    Is is "Liberal" to give opposite-sex hormones to a healthy 8 year old child? Joe Biden says it's great! Would John Stuart Mill or John Kennedy even understand the question? Would they even believe anyone was serious in asking it?

    As for "Conservatives", meh, they couldn't even conserve the girl's bathroom, lol.

    Probably Nationalist vs. Globalist is where we are and we'll get more. But that's just my semi random opinion. Don't expect to be able to buy a cup of coffee with it.

    , @nebulafox
    @Arclight

    The donors who control the GOP on a national level would sooner sink the ship than give an inch, but why bother with them anyway? Their hatred would be far more politically potent for a candidate than their money. Since when was it a law of nature that to be right-wing and emphasizing personal agency meant fetishizing CEOs and elevating the free market into a religious faith? Political history did not start with Ronald Reagan. Time to think outside the box.

    I'd avoid the "conservative" label, though, for two reasons. 1) Associated way too much with the Gentry Republican crowd, a dumb idea on policy and politics alike, and 2) implies there's anything worth conserving in the status quo for the vast majority of Americans. Screw ideology, offer a platform that treats ideology with total contempt. They'll love you for it.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Charles Pewitt

  11. Ohfergodssake.

    These “generational” categories are about as useless a tool for understanding politics and culture as “left – right.”

    Babies are born each and every single year. Plot births against year, for any multiple-decades time domain you like. It’s not a discontinuous function, nor even close. So we’re to think that someone born in 1964 is a Boomer with certain characteristics, and someone born in 1965 is … what? An X-er? Some other stupid category name? With, obviously, significantly different characteristics?

    If you harbor bitterness toward your parents, and want to blame them for all that is wrong, have at it. It’s an urge as old as mankind. But own it for what it is. This “greatest generation,” boomer, X-er, millennial, zoomer, Y-er, whatever-the-hell-er, it’s worn out. Let it go.

    • Replies: @Franz
    @Reactionary Utopian


    If you harbor bitterness toward your parents, and want to blame them for all that is wrong, have at it. It’s an urge as old as mankind. But own it for what it is. This “greatest generation,” boomer, X-er, millennial, zoomer, Y-er, whatever-the-hell-er, it’s worn out. Let it go.
     
    Agree, but my guess is having something/someone to blame is hardwired in the brain. It feels good to hate strangers for any sort of discomfort. So good you don't notice you're helping the divide-and-rule club and mostly blaming other victims for current state of the world.

    Boomers were the most downsized generation when offshoring began, but how many movies and TV shows have you seen about that massive demographic that will work till they die and maybe use cheap booze (or whatever) to clock out early? So it never happened to most younger folk and all Upper Middle Class folk. Boomers, though, joined Korean War vets and others on the same treadmill to oblivion.

    It was amazing how often an industrial complex waited till the last Depression-WWII era people got their pensions just before the work was offshored and everyone younger got six months of unemployment and lots of luck after. The record number of older workers (even over 85) is growing, but we're "privileged" and fighting each other just like Bezos wants. The USA, as ever, has the dumbest working class in the world.

    A certain sort of collegiate of all ages knows none of this. What they see on TV is gospel.
    , @Craig Nelsen
    @Reactionary Utopian


    This “greatest generation,” boomer, X-er, millennial, zoomer, Y-er, whatever-the-hell-er, it’s worn out. Let it go.
     
    According to De Tocqueville, only the mind of God is infinite and able to see every situation in all its particularities. We humans, having finite minds, are forced to use generalities [i.e., labels] and, therefore, are often in error.

    But it's the best we can do. And labelling has some utility, error-prone as it may be.
  12. The Republican® Party is as dead as Dad’s hatband, if “alive” means to provide a meaningful and viable alternative set of implemented beliefs by those elected to political office. Oh, the corporate GOP is still eating, breathing, and excreting, but it is a parasitical thing. Even if the Boomers went immortal, the GOP is no ship for them (or anyone else not a grifter) to sail in.

    • Agree: Enemy of Earth
  13. When Boomers finally exit stage left, or right as it were, will subsequent generations follow in their political footsteps or will it be lights out for the Republican party?

    It has been lights out for the Republican party for many years…as is the case for the Democrat party. Both parties have been just two sides of the Deep State coin for decades. Heads they win, tails you lose.

    • Agree: Brian Reilly, botazefa
  14. Mr. Epigone says:

    When Boomers finally exit stage left, or right as it were, will subsequent generations follow in their political footsteps or will it be lights out for the Republican party? Stay tuned!

    I say:

    The rancid and treasonous Reagan/Bush Republican Party must be crushed and destroyed and the evil globalizer baby boomer treasonites must be financially liquidated and flushed from the USA like the nation-wrecking offal they are.

    The half Scottish and half German Trump recently blasted that disgusting sleazebag Mitch McConnell but I think that Trumpy forgot to mention that that vile scum McConnell voted for Ronald Reagan’s sovereignty-sapping, nation-wrecking 1986 Amnesty For Illegal Alien Invaders but Trump did mention that McConnell is married to a Chinese woman who has direct and clear and very shady connections to the Chinese Communist Party. That baby boomer human tub of lard named Karl Rove tried to defend that scumbag twat McConnell by suggesting that McConnell’s wife’s family business is out of bounds for discussion and that is exactly what a disgusting baby boomer sleazebag would do.

    LBJ’s 1965 Immigration Act and Reagan’s 1986 Amnesty for Illegal Alien Invaders and George HW Bush’s 1990 Immigration Act were and are direct attacks on the European Christian ancestral core of the USA and the historic American nation and White Core America.

  15. Anecdotal, but plenty of Gen X people I know have drifted rightward as we’ve gone into our forties and beyond.

    • Agree: beavertales
    • Replies: @beavertales
    @AP

    "Anecdotal, but plenty of Gen X people I know have drifted rightward as we’ve gone into our forties and beyond."


    How true. People I'd call 'the alternative set' back then were kind of in opposition to the majority 'normies'. The alternative set had Chomsky and Orwell in their library, the normies aspired to nothing more than a POLO Ralph Lauren shirt and a sports car.

    Now, the two positions have flipped. The 'normies' are falling all over themselves to virtue signal progressive BLM and tranny mantras in the workplace, while the 'alt' people (in private) embrace the Bell Curve and dismiss trannies as people in need of mental health counseling.

    The difference is critical thinking skills. An alternative mindset prepares one for cutting through BS establishment propaganda.

    , @dfordoom
    @AP

    I think there may be several things going on at once which complicate the picture.

    There's the natural tendency of people to become more socially conservative as they get older, but at the same time there has been a massive cultural shift towards social liberalism. Boomers and GenXers are probably responding to both these forces. They've become more socially conservative in the sense of being more disapproving of rapid and radical social changes but they've internalised much of the social liberalism that represents the current status quo.

    In other words they haven't necessarily become socially conservative in absolute terms. They haven't embraced the social conservatism of the generations that preceded them. They haven't embraced what would have been thought of as social conservatism in 1970. They have accepted most of the social liberalism of the 1960s to 1980s. They have accepted most of the feminist and most of the homosexual agenda and they have not returned to the sexual and social mores of the 1950s. Their idea of social conservatism is simply a less radical version of social liberalism.

    It's also likely that they have become more socially conservative in their social behaviour compared to when they were young - they're not dropping acid or engaging in sexual promiscuity any more. But they're probably more socially liberal in their attitudes than they were when they were young.

    They have only become more socially conservative in relative terms - they're more socially conservative than Millennials but they're more socially liberal than their parents were.

    All these surveys really show is that Boomers are more likely to vote Republican today than they were in the 1970s, but the Republican Party today is much much more socially liberal than the Republican Party of Nixon or Reagan so it doesn't mean very much.

  16. @Jay Fink
    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today's young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person's political journey .

    Replies: @t, @dfordoom, @Mark G., @obwandiyag, @Rahan

    Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .

    You may need to separate social liberalism and economic liberalism when thinking about where we are going. White Democrats are generally both but that isn’t always the case with nonwhites. For example, whites in California voted for gay marriage but it lost at the polls because of nonwhites voting against it. Socially liberal whites may need to decide if they support continued high levels of nonwhite immigration or their pet social liberal causes because they won’t be able to have both. In addition to social issues, nonwhites are also more indifferent to environmental issues so you should see a decline in support for this area, even to the point of a lot of the older white environmentalists like John Muir being labeled racists and their names taken off buildings and their statues knocked down.

    At the same time this is happening on the social and environmental side over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety. Expect to see wide scale nationalizations of privately owned businesses, rampant inflation, shortages of basic goods, corrupt courts and police, and the remaining whites demonized and subjected to increasing home invasions and physical assaults in public.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Mark G.


    ... over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety.
     
    Was Chavez a hard leftist?

    I do not say that he wasn't, but how are you and I to know, other than via the same media that has lied to us about everything else?

    I notice that Chavez and his successor keep getting reëlected, somehow. It has been said that the elections are rigged, but again, how are you and I to know?

    They kept telling us that Venezuela was going to be like Cuba. That didn't quite happen as far as I am aware. Enough white Venezuelans have fled to the United States to persuade us that Venezuela has grown much worse for whites, which is a bad thing as far as I am concerned, but it appears to me that the image of Chavez as a brutal leftist dictator might have been oversold.

    As far as Mugabe was concerned, everyone knows that his problem was the poor human capital with which he had to work. Not Edward III, nor Louis IX, nor George Washington, nor Marcus Aurelius himself could have made Zimbabwe a peaceful, orderly, thriving country after the whites were driven out.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    , @V. K. Ovelund
    @Mark G.

    Aha, Mark, I was slow on the uptake. You're saying (at least in part) that demographics like Chavez's or Mugabe's are taking over the U.S., too—and also that socialist ideology does not help. If so, point taken. (And if I still don't get it, feel free to set me straight.)

    , @dfordoom
    @Mark G.


    over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety. Expect to see wide scale nationalizations of privately owned businesses,
     
    ROTFLMAO. I'm waiting expectantly for the communist Biden to nationalise the banks and the tech giants and the giant private defence contractors. Any day now Red Joe will announce that the government is seizing the means of production and introducing the dictatorship of the proletariat.

    I agree with the rest of your comment (and I agree with a lot of your comments) but the claim that economic hard leftism is on the horizon does, I'm afraid to say, sound a bit hysterical and paranoid.
  17. anon[116] • Disclaimer says:
    @Arclight
    Depends on what "conservative" and "liberal" mean. The GOP has the opportunity to move left on economic issues but stay to the right on cultural issues to solidify gains with minorities and the working/middle class, but how would that be described on the conservative/liberal axis if they actually did so? Likewise, the Dems pay lip service to diversity, but are increasingly corporatist on economics and outright authoritarian on culture.

    Replies: @anon, @nebulafox

    Depends on what “conservative” and “liberal” mean.

    A little bit more than “Chiefs” and “Buccaneers” or “Generals” and “Globetrotters”. A little. A bit.

    Is is “Liberal” to give opposite-sex hormones to a healthy 8 year old child? Joe Biden says it’s great! Would John Stuart Mill or John Kennedy even understand the question? Would they even believe anyone was serious in asking it?

    As for “Conservatives”, meh, they couldn’t even conserve the girl’s bathroom, lol.

    Probably Nationalist vs. Globalist is where we are and we’ll get more. But that’s just my semi random opinion. Don’t expect to be able to buy a cup of coffee with it.

  18. @Mark G.
    @Jay Fink


    Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .
     
    You may need to separate social liberalism and economic liberalism when thinking about where we are going. White Democrats are generally both but that isn't always the case with nonwhites. For example, whites in California voted for gay marriage but it lost at the polls because of nonwhites voting against it. Socially liberal whites may need to decide if they support continued high levels of nonwhite immigration or their pet social liberal causes because they won't be able to have both. In addition to social issues, nonwhites are also more indifferent to environmental issues so you should see a decline in support for this area, even to the point of a lot of the older white environmentalists like John Muir being labeled racists and their names taken off buildings and their statues knocked down.

    At the same time this is happening on the social and environmental side over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety. Expect to see wide scale nationalizations of privately owned businesses, rampant inflation, shortages of basic goods, corrupt courts and police, and the remaining whites demonized and subjected to increasing home invasions and physical assaults in public.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @V. K. Ovelund, @dfordoom

    … over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety.

    Was Chavez a hard leftist?

    I do not say that he wasn’t, but how are you and I to know, other than via the same media that has lied to us about everything else?

    I notice that Chavez and his successor keep getting reëlected, somehow. It has been said that the elections are rigged, but again, how are you and I to know?

    They kept telling us that Venezuela was going to be like Cuba. That didn’t quite happen as far as I am aware. Enough white Venezuelans have fled to the United States to persuade us that Venezuela has grown much worse for whites, which is a bad thing as far as I am concerned, but it appears to me that the image of Chavez as a brutal leftist dictator might have been oversold.

    As far as Mugabe was concerned, everyone knows that his problem was the poor human capital with which he had to work. Not Edward III, nor Louis IX, nor George Washington, nor Marcus Aurelius himself could have made Zimbabwe a peaceful, orderly, thriving country after the whites were driven out.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @V. K. Ovelund

    The fact that otherwise-sensible people will regurgitate US-media talking points about foreign political identities, shows what a piss-poor job we're all doing (as a 'movement') at sloughing off 'our' own indoctrination.

    Chavez appeared to be a reasonably capable leader - at least no worse than many South American political leaders since the 1950s (which is about when the US decided it owns South America and can interfere in domestic arrangements in any country that defies its edicts).

    If a leader's political objectives do not align with the desires of the US Death Machine, that leader is always going to be pushing shit uphill. It's reasonably hard for a nation to advance if it's kept out of global capital markets: that doesn't require the presence of formal sanctions - it can be the Game Theoretic consequences of trade relationships ("Don't piss off the US - it's a big market for our exports").

    And as we are all aware, the objectives of the US Death Machine are determined by a clique that is 'incentivised' by cash flows from people who want the untrammelled power to steal other people's (and peoples') shit.

    Castro; Chavez; Maduro; Morales - their respective incumbencies faced 'headwinds' that were entirely generated by a bunch of absolute cunts who willfully punished the respective nations for having the gall to refuse US edicts. (This doesn't entirely overcome my gut-level hatred of anyone who wants to be a political leader - but at least these people were locals).

    It's been a little over 25 years since I lost patience with the US Death Machine's attempts to help its owners steal everyone else's shit. Every instance of blowback - including Blowback Day 2001 - and every strategic and tactical humiliation, is a fraction of what the US Death Machine deserves.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  19. “Conservative” like “America” is a mental image, a sentimentality. Boomer Conservatives conserved nothing. On the contrary. They ushered in Progress. Which required the destruction of the America to which they attached their mental affinity to make way for the future america.

    As that destruction plays out over time, reality deviates further from that image they hold dear. So they become more “conservative” by nature of this deviation revealing the starkly opposed reality of progress. This in turn activates an instinctive grip on that past American ideal. ¡Conservative!

    Sure, their America is one worth preserving. But to actually do so means to stand in the way of progress. The duality of the american ideal being rooted in their experience but also as necessary fuel to be burned in the lamps of progress is how they can claim to “be” conservative but actually do nothing to preserve that ideal. It is part of their identity but also no longer exists in reality.

    Much like their affinity for their own physical youth, long since passed on, they still see themselves as youthful, American, living in America. When in fact they are just burning the days until the actual young in the actual global bazaar of america smother them and what remains of those fleeting memories with their own MyPillows.

    So their notion of “conservative” is more like a feeling of nostalgia than a political orientation. Nostalgia is a kind of death and longing. Its about the past. A feeling. Thats the Boomer conservative.

    Boomers, having the benefit of harvesting and consuming the wealth of their great grand kids, have been able to hold onto the Norman Rockwell America while current art is shit smeared on canvas by an “undocumented” blaxican tranny. They observe this art and exclaim, “I am a conservative”. So stunning and brave.

    GenX has much of the same feelings of conservatism and many of the same reactions but with no delusions that Rockwell still exists. Shit on canvas is just that.

    The next gens have no such anchors in Rockwell America and are steeped in shit-canvas art (Rockwell was a racist pale male) and revisionist history (America was never great).

    They have no past and no future. Only moar progress toward something else. Today is not okay.

    They are more likely to long for cleansing fire than the comforts of nostalgia. But maybe the wishful thinking in these circles that gen z shitlords will rise will come true. And they will call themselves conservatives and we will all sigh in relief.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Screwtape

    I realize that many readers my age and older don't want to hear it, or can't, but @Screwtape has it right.


    The next gens have no such anchors in Rockwell America and are steeped in shit-canvas art (Rockwell was a racist pale male) and revisionist history (America was never great).

    They have no past and no future. Only moar progress toward something else. Today is not okay.
     

    Every white American born before 1975 or so should read and ponder @Screwtape's post.

    It is impossible to win the Millenials back to Rockwell America now. Too late. When we had the chance to raise and educate them right—and just as importantly, the chance to save the United States, their birthright—we let the chance slip away, and now it's irretrievably gone. Nonetheless, now in our final decades, it would do us older Americans some good at least to acknowledge the magnitude of our guilt.

    Replies: @Talha

    , @dfordoom
    @Screwtape


    So their notion of “conservative” is more like a feeling of nostalgia than a political orientation. Nostalgia is a kind of death and longing. Its about the past. A feeling. Thats the Boomer conservative.
     
    There's a lot of truth to that. "Conservatives" born before the early 70s (late Silent, Boomers, early GenXers) are conservative in the sense that they'd like to go back to the way things were in the 80s.

    Which makes them very different from the previous generation of conservatives, who wanted to go back to the way things were in the 50s. And conservatives in the 1920s wanted to go back to the way things were in the late Victorian and Edwardian eras.

    Most people's idea of social conservatism is based very heavily on the period in which they lived from the age of 12 up to when they reached their early thirties.

    When Zoomers get old and turn "conservative" they'll be wanting to turn the clock back to the social conservatism of their youth, when there were only a hundred or so genders instead of thousands, and when dating trannies had not yet been made compulsory.

    Replies: @Talha

  20. @dfordoom
    @Chrisnonymous


    What’s missing here is a representation of actual beliefs, rather than just the labels “liberal” and “conservative”.
     
    That's quite true of course.

    Is someone who voted for Trump a conservative? Trump himself is a liberal.

    There's very little connection these days between "conservatism" on economic issues (which is mostly neo-liberalism) and "conservatism" on social issues.

    It would be more illuminating to know whether Boomers have changed their views on specific issues. Are they for example more likely to be opposed to abortion now than when they were young?

    Are they more pro-feminist or less pro-feminist? Are they more in favour of things like homosexual marriage? Are they more in favour of the idea that a man can magically transform himself into a woman by putting on a frock? Are they more in favour of censorship of sexual material? Are they more in favour of banning hate speech? Are they more, or less, pro-immigration? Are they more likely to believe that men and women are basically interchangeable?

    Most of the things that present-day conservatives accept unquestioningly would have been considered extreme social liberalism in the early 1970s.

    I'm guessing that on many social issues Boomers are more liberal today than they were in the 70s.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    I’m guessing that on many social issues Boomers are more liberal today than they were in the 70s.

    I agree. My family is life-long friends with another family in my community. Their son recently declared he is a woman and is “transitioning”. In theory, my parents are opposed to transgenderism based on what they’ve said and their religious affiliation. However, when it comes to accepting this man’s psychological problem as a mental illness vs a… what? what do you call it? “authentic gender misalignment”?… They are unable to say that the man is simply either gay or deeply depressed and unable to find sexual fulfillment. Having grown up with him and having spent many weekend nights in his company, I cannot bring myself to refer to him by his new female name (was my friend non-existent or is he dead now?), while they have been decidedly wishy-washy. I can only conclude that they are too old and tired to have the strength to lose friends to Truth.

  21. @Hannah Katz
    I graduated from college when Jimmy Carter was president and the economy was in the toilet. Gas lines, high inflation, unemployment and interest rates. You had to go to businesses to apply for a job, and they often told you they were not accepting applications. I remember one HR manager, an older white man, who told me if I was black he could hire me on the spot, but the Affirmative Action quotas had him handcuffed. No job to be had there. Needless to say, I voted for Reagan and my lot in life improved dramatically.

    Replies: @Liberty Mike

    Why didn’t you ask the HR manager if the company’s AA quotas would be satisfied if you went Al Jolson?

  22. @Mark G.
    @Jay Fink


    Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .
     
    You may need to separate social liberalism and economic liberalism when thinking about where we are going. White Democrats are generally both but that isn't always the case with nonwhites. For example, whites in California voted for gay marriage but it lost at the polls because of nonwhites voting against it. Socially liberal whites may need to decide if they support continued high levels of nonwhite immigration or their pet social liberal causes because they won't be able to have both. In addition to social issues, nonwhites are also more indifferent to environmental issues so you should see a decline in support for this area, even to the point of a lot of the older white environmentalists like John Muir being labeled racists and their names taken off buildings and their statues knocked down.

    At the same time this is happening on the social and environmental side over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety. Expect to see wide scale nationalizations of privately owned businesses, rampant inflation, shortages of basic goods, corrupt courts and police, and the remaining whites demonized and subjected to increasing home invasions and physical assaults in public.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @V. K. Ovelund, @dfordoom

    Aha, Mark, I was slow on the uptake. You’re saying (at least in part) that demographics like Chavez’s or Mugabe’s are taking over the U.S., too—and also that socialist ideology does not help. If so, point taken. (And if I still don’t get it, feel free to set me straight.)

  23. @Screwtape
    “Conservative” like “America” is a mental image, a sentimentality. Boomer Conservatives conserved nothing. On the contrary. They ushered in Progress. Which required the destruction of the America to which they attached their mental affinity to make way for the future america.

    As that destruction plays out over time, reality deviates further from that image they hold dear. So they become more “conservative” by nature of this deviation revealing the starkly opposed reality of progress. This in turn activates an instinctive grip on that past American ideal. ¡Conservative!

    Sure, their America is one worth preserving. But to actually do so means to stand in the way of progress. The duality of the american ideal being rooted in their experience but also as necessary fuel to be burned in the lamps of progress is how they can claim to “be” conservative but actually do nothing to preserve that ideal. It is part of their identity but also no longer exists in reality.

    Much like their affinity for their own physical youth, long since passed on, they still see themselves as youthful, American, living in America. When in fact they are just burning the days until the actual young in the actual global bazaar of america smother them and what remains of those fleeting memories with their own MyPillows.

    So their notion of “conservative” is more like a feeling of nostalgia than a political orientation. Nostalgia is a kind of death and longing. Its about the past. A feeling. Thats the Boomer conservative.

    Boomers, having the benefit of harvesting and consuming the wealth of their great grand kids, have been able to hold onto the Norman Rockwell America while current art is shit smeared on canvas by an “undocumented” blaxican tranny. They observe this art and exclaim, “I am a conservative”. So stunning and brave.

    GenX has much of the same feelings of conservatism and many of the same reactions but with no delusions that Rockwell still exists. Shit on canvas is just that.

    The next gens have no such anchors in Rockwell America and are steeped in shit-canvas art (Rockwell was a racist pale male) and revisionist history (America was never great).

    They have no past and no future. Only moar progress toward something else. Today is not okay.

    They are more likely to long for cleansing fire than the comforts of nostalgia. But maybe the wishful thinking in these circles that gen z shitlords will rise will come true. And they will call themselves conservatives and we will all sigh in relief.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @dfordoom

    I realize that many readers my age and older don’t want to hear it, or can’t, but has it right.

    The next gens have no such anchors in Rockwell America and are steeped in shit-canvas art (Rockwell was a racist pale male) and revisionist history (America was never great).

    They have no past and no future. Only moar progress toward something else. Today is not okay.

    Every white American born before 1975 or so should read and ponder ’s post.

    It is impossible to win the Millenials back to Rockwell America now. Too late. When we had the chance to raise and educate them right—and just as importantly, the chance to save the United States, their birthright—we let the chance slip away, and now it’s irretrievably gone. Nonetheless, now in our final decades, it would do us older Americans some good at least to acknowledge the magnitude of our guilt.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It is impossible to win the Millenials back to Rockwell America now. Too late. When we had the chance to raise and educate them right—and just as importantly, the chance to save the United States, their birthright—we let the chance slip away, and now it’s irretrievably gone.
     
    To a degree this is understandable, success and being on top makes one complacent. You rely on institutions, systems that have been working, offloading/outsourcing responsibility to others. It’s the Ibn Khaldunian cycle.

    Being a minority keeps you on your toes. You learn to take the hits, get insulted, rely on yourself and your community. My kids were shocked when I told them that I was made fun off when I was growing up for praying, not eating pepperoni pizza like everyone else, told to my face that I was a sand n***** or that I was going to go to hell. I lost a job opportunity because I declined to shake a female supervisor’s hands. It builds character; you learn to survive and shrug it off. Sometimes I wish they didn’t have it so easy because fragility is a character flaw.

    I sit with my boys 5-6 nights a week for 10-15 minutes where we discuss Islamic topics, learn about our past heroes, cover hadith about character-building, even debate criticisms that they might face in the world and I’m about to introduce them to medieval Sufi poetry in Persian. That’s including some of the other Muslim youth groups they are involved in. Trying to preserve one’s identity forces you out of a stance of laxity.

    Other people notice confidence; my eldest son recently told me that one of the non-Muslim boys in his group is interested in Islam because of him seeing the camaraderie in his Muslim friends and how they stop their life to pray and what not. People can appreciate discipline.

    Maybe whites need to learn these kinds of lessons in how to survive; white fathers need to sit at home with their sons and spend the time talking to them about their heritage, their heroes, their culture and values. You do this in the privacy of your own home while your kids still look to you for guidance. But it requires sacrifice of time and effort. Let them tear down statues; we hardly have any statues or images of any of our heroes, don’t lose sight of the forest for the trees.

    Peace.

    It’s interesting being married to a white wife. Apparently some Eastern European guy at the grocery store started getting rude with her. The guy had left his cart in line to go get something and the checkout lady waived her past his cart since his turn was up and he wasn’t around. Then the guy comes back vocally complaining to the checkout lady that my wife cut in front of him. My wife let out her inner Karen and shut the guy up. I don’t think he was prepared to get spoken back to by a lady in hijab.

    Replies: @MattinLA

  24. It wasn’t baby boomers who passed the 1965 immigration ‘reform’. We couldn’t even vote at the time. We just noticed more and more strange looking people wandering our streets. Baby boomers were not on the Supreme Court writing Roe v. Wade. Many states had laws banning abortion. We could sure use a few million of those destroyed babies today. School integration and busing were inflicted on us by white liberal judges who had never really met a typical negro up close and personal.

    We were the last generation to live in a free United States that still worked. Kids had cap and BB guns and rode bicycles without helmets. The streets were safe and dindu free. On the 4th of July we had fircrackers and cherry bombs to light off. If someone murdered a cop or raped and killed a woman they were going to the electric chair or gas chamber and soon not 2o years later….maybe. Teenagers had jobs doing the work that immigrants now do. Mowing lawns, working at restaurants or doing construction labor. We started driving at 16 and could drink beer in some states at 18. Many mom’s didn’t work. Our fathers could support the family on one income. Balanced budgets were not a rarity and most people had no idea who the Chairman of the Federal Reserve was because he wasn’t that important.

    Why shouldn’t baby boomers be nostalgic and long for the America that was stolen from us?

    • Agree: Mark G., Radicalcenter
    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @unit472


    It wasn’t baby boomers who passed the 1965 immigration ‘reform’.
     
    No, it wasn't.

    How do you think the part the Boomers played in this civilizational catastrophe looks to right-of-center white Americans born after 1975?


    We were the last generation to live in a free United States that still worked.
     
    This is the correct answer. That is how it looks.

    Something the Boomers seldom seem to be able to notice is that they were in generational conflict with their elders when they were young, and are in generational conflict with their youngers when they are old. They think that it's that way with every generation, but it isn't, and wasn't. X does not conflict with Millennial does not conflict with Z to anything like this degree. The GI generation did not conflict to such an extent with the Silents, either. In fact, the Silents don't especially conflict with X, either.

    With rare exceptions, trying to explain this to Boomers is like talking to a stone wall. They always think that they know better, just like they knew better when they were 15 years old.

    The Boomers sat down at the dinner table and ate everything on it; and for dessert, they congratulated themselves on how awful and ungrateful the Millennials the Boomers themselves raised turned out to be.

    Boomers don't listen. @Screwtape explains, but it does no good. With the Boomers, it is always someone else's fault.

    Replies: @unit472, @AceDeuce, @dfordoom

    , @dfordoom
    @unit472


    Why shouldn’t baby boomers be nostalgic and long for the America that was stolen from us?
     
    There's nothing wrong or irrational in thinking that it would be better to go back to the world of the 1980s. It was a better and more sane world.

    Boomers weren't the ones who made the decisions that destroyed Norman Rockwell's America. Those decisions were made by the Silent Generation, and by the generation before the Silent Generation.

    Boomers didn't invent liberalism. They also didn't start the Sexual Revolution. That was started by the Silent Generation. Boomers didn't invent the contraceptive pill. Boomers didn't invent the drug culture. The drug culture was starting to emerge during the late 50s. It was accelerated dramatically by the Vietnam War. And Boomers didn't start the Vietnam War. Boomers weren't the ones who were responsible for mass immigration - those decisions were made by the Greatest Generation and the Silent Generation. Boomers weren't the ones who started pushing the homosexual agenda - that was the Silent Generation as well.

    Boomers had no decisive influence on the culture until the 80s. The 80s was a period of sanity compared to today but the seeds of destruction were sown in the 1950s and the 1960s.

    And none of the crucial decisions that changed our civilisation beyond all recognition were made by ordinary people. They were made by politicians and bureaucrats and academics and (even more especially) by corporate types in the boardrooms of giant corporations.

    Replies: @AP

  25. @Jay Fink
    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today's young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person's political journey .

    Replies: @t, @dfordoom, @Mark G., @obwandiyag, @Rahan

    Sorry. Blacks and Hispanics and Asians are not “liberal,” except on issues relating to their own civil rights. This is well-known.

    • Replies: @Jay Fink
    @obwandiyag

    You forgot economics. It would be more accurate to say minorities are fiscally liberal and socially conservative, except for civil rights. Also, whatever social conservatism they have does not make voting Republican more attractive for the large majority of them.

  26. A Brief History of Boomer Politics is more like

    the founding fathers, WW2, MLK, Reagan, Obama

    that’s pretty much how US history goes in a boomer’s mind.

    • Replies: @unit472
    @prime noticer

    Actually the earlier baby boomers had a much more rigorous curriculum than subsequent generations. The SAT had not been 'dumbed down' and I never heard of SAT tutors or pre SAT tests. You showed up one morning and took it. High schools required at least 3 years of math ( Geometry and two years of Algebra). Chemistry or Physics were also required subjects. American history was taught and not the bastardized deconstructed PC version later generations received. This was for your basic high school diploma. Since the baby boom was so large getting into a good college was very competitive. Diploma Mills had not yet been created to handle the mediocre high school graduates so prevalent today.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

  27. @AP
    Anecdotal, but plenty of Gen X people I know have drifted rightward as we’ve gone into our forties and beyond.

    Replies: @beavertales, @dfordoom

    “Anecdotal, but plenty of Gen X people I know have drifted rightward as we’ve gone into our forties and beyond.”

    How true. People I’d call ‘the alternative set’ back then were kind of in opposition to the majority ‘normies’. The alternative set had Chomsky and Orwell in their library, the normies aspired to nothing more than a POLO Ralph Lauren shirt and a sports car.

    Now, the two positions have flipped. The ‘normies’ are falling all over themselves to virtue signal progressive BLM and tranny mantras in the workplace, while the ‘alt’ people (in private) embrace the Bell Curve and dismiss trannies as people in need of mental health counseling.

    The difference is critical thinking skills. An alternative mindset prepares one for cutting through BS establishment propaganda.

  28. @prime noticer
    A Brief History of Boomer Politics is more like

    the founding fathers, WW2, MLK, Reagan, Obama

    that's pretty much how US history goes in a boomer's mind.

    Replies: @unit472

    Actually the earlier baby boomers had a much more rigorous curriculum than subsequent generations. The SAT had not been ‘dumbed down’ and I never heard of SAT tutors or pre SAT tests. You showed up one morning and took it. High schools required at least 3 years of math ( Geometry and two years of Algebra). Chemistry or Physics were also required subjects. American history was taught and not the bastardized deconstructed PC version later generations received. This was for your basic high school diploma. Since the baby boom was so large getting into a good college was very competitive. Diploma Mills had not yet been created to handle the mediocre high school graduates so prevalent today.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @unit472

    You are fucking retarded. Education standards only increased in the 20th century; millennials had 4 years of math and were doing algebra and geometry by 9th grade. Millennials had to go through calculus to graduate high school - and they were held to rigorous state standardized testing, something boomers never had to do. You would not have made it through high school in the early 2000s.

  29. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Screwtape

    I realize that many readers my age and older don't want to hear it, or can't, but @Screwtape has it right.


    The next gens have no such anchors in Rockwell America and are steeped in shit-canvas art (Rockwell was a racist pale male) and revisionist history (America was never great).

    They have no past and no future. Only moar progress toward something else. Today is not okay.
     

    Every white American born before 1975 or so should read and ponder @Screwtape's post.

    It is impossible to win the Millenials back to Rockwell America now. Too late. When we had the chance to raise and educate them right—and just as importantly, the chance to save the United States, their birthright—we let the chance slip away, and now it's irretrievably gone. Nonetheless, now in our final decades, it would do us older Americans some good at least to acknowledge the magnitude of our guilt.

    Replies: @Talha

    It is impossible to win the Millenials back to Rockwell America now. Too late. When we had the chance to raise and educate them right—and just as importantly, the chance to save the United States, their birthright—we let the chance slip away, and now it’s irretrievably gone.

    To a degree this is understandable, success and being on top makes one complacent. You rely on institutions, systems that have been working, offloading/outsourcing responsibility to others. It’s the Ibn Khaldunian cycle.

    Being a minority keeps you on your toes. You learn to take the hits, get insulted, rely on yourself and your community. My kids were shocked when I told them that I was made fun off when I was growing up for praying, not eating pepperoni pizza like everyone else, told to my face that I was a sand n***** or that I was going to go to hell. I lost a job opportunity because I declined to shake a female supervisor’s hands. It builds character; you learn to survive and shrug it off. Sometimes I wish they didn’t have it so easy because fragility is a character flaw.

    I sit with my boys 5-6 nights a week for 10-15 minutes where we discuss Islamic topics, learn about our past heroes, cover hadith about character-building, even debate criticisms that they might face in the world and I’m about to introduce them to medieval Sufi poetry in Persian. That’s including some of the other Muslim youth groups they are involved in. Trying to preserve one’s identity forces you out of a stance of laxity.

    Other people notice confidence; my eldest son recently told me that one of the non-Muslim boys in his group is interested in Islam because of him seeing the camaraderie in his Muslim friends and how they stop their life to pray and what not. People can appreciate discipline.

    Maybe whites need to learn these kinds of lessons in how to survive; white fathers need to sit at home with their sons and spend the time talking to them about their heritage, their heroes, their culture and values. You do this in the privacy of your own home while your kids still look to you for guidance. But it requires sacrifice of time and effort. Let them tear down statues; we hardly have any statues or images of any of our heroes, don’t lose sight of the forest for the trees.

    Peace.

    [MORE]

    It’s interesting being married to a white wife. Apparently some Eastern European guy at the grocery store started getting rude with her. The guy had left his cart in line to go get something and the checkout lady waived her past his cart since his turn was up and he wasn’t around. Then the guy comes back vocally complaining to the checkout lady that my wife cut in front of him. My wife let out her inner Karen and shut the guy up. I don’t think he was prepared to get spoken back to by a lady in hijab.

    • Replies: @MattinLA
    @Talha

    Good post. A lot to learn about here. Thank you.

    Replies: @Talha

  30. Boomers gave us the dreadful Sesame Street with its muppets. It was an assault on good taste.

    But now that Disney is roping in the muppets, conzos defend them.

    No, I say let Disney destroy the Muppets. They suck.

    You can’t make this stuff up: The Muppet Wars. A Republican has nothing better to do than defend Miss Piggy and Cookie Monster.


    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Priss Factor


    Boomers gave us the dreadful Sesame Street with its muppets.
     
    No they didn't. Sesame Street was created by members of the Silent Generation. The creators of Sesame Street were born in the 1920s. The creator of the Muppets was Silent Generation as well (born in the early 1930s).

    Replies: @Priss Factor

  31. @unit472
    It wasn't baby boomers who passed the 1965 immigration 'reform'. We couldn't even vote at the time. We just noticed more and more strange looking people wandering our streets. Baby boomers were not on the Supreme Court writing Roe v. Wade. Many states had laws banning abortion. We could sure use a few million of those destroyed babies today. School integration and busing were inflicted on us by white liberal judges who had never really met a typical negro up close and personal.

    We were the last generation to live in a free United States that still worked. Kids had cap and BB guns and rode bicycles without helmets. The streets were safe and dindu free. On the 4th of July we had fircrackers and cherry bombs to light off. If someone murdered a cop or raped and killed a woman they were going to the electric chair or gas chamber and soon not 2o years later....maybe. Teenagers had jobs doing the work that immigrants now do. Mowing lawns, working at restaurants or doing construction labor. We started driving at 16 and could drink beer in some states at 18. Many mom's didn't work. Our fathers could support the family on one income. Balanced budgets were not a rarity and most people had no idea who the Chairman of the Federal Reserve was because he wasn't that important.

    Why shouldn't baby boomers be nostalgic and long for the America that was stolen from us?

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @dfordoom

    It wasn’t baby boomers who passed the 1965 immigration ‘reform’.

    No, it wasn’t.

    How do you think the part the Boomers played in this civilizational catastrophe looks to right-of-center white Americans born after 1975?

    We were the last generation to live in a free United States that still worked.

    This is the correct answer. That is how it looks.

    Something the Boomers seldom seem to be able to notice is that they were in generational conflict with their elders when they were young, and are in generational conflict with their youngers when they are old. They think that it’s that way with every generation, but it isn’t, and wasn’t. X does not conflict with Millennial does not conflict with Z to anything like this degree. The GI generation did not conflict to such an extent with the Silents, either. In fact, the Silents don’t especially conflict with X, either.

    With rare exceptions, trying to explain this to Boomers is like talking to a stone wall. They always think that they know better, just like they knew better when they were 15 years old.

    The Boomers sat down at the dinner table and ate everything on it; and for dessert, they congratulated themselves on how awful and ungrateful the Millennials the Boomers themselves raised turned out to be.

    Boomers don’t listen. explains, but it does no good. With the Boomers, it is always someone else’s fault.

    • Replies: @unit472
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Whatever. You are obviously being tendentious to assign singular characteristics to people born between 1945 and 1964. Then you say the rot began in 1975 when the oldest baby boomer was only 30 all though clearly the 'rot' was already taking place in Congress and the Supreme court a decade earlier. The problem I had politically growing up was not the 1960's New Left but the New Deal Democrats left over from the Depression. They voted Democrat until they died. There were also the Unions and I'm not talking about the Teacher's or public employee unions but the Machinists, Iron workers, Miners etc. These unions funded and backed democrats even as the rank and file began to realize the Democrats were anti-American but not until Ronald Reagan did a Republican capture the union working class and these were mostly working class baby boomers.

    The nitwit GOP leadership them tried to foist off tired WW2 relics like Bush and Dole on a country that now had a majority of people born after WW2 or had come to the US as immigrants.It'd be like running a Civil War General for president in 1900!

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    , @AceDeuce
    @V. K. Ovelund

    "With the Boomers, it is always someone else’s fault."

    He says, as he blames the mean ol' Boomers. LOL.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    , @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Something the Boomers seldom seem to be able to notice is that they were in generational conflict with their elders when they were young
     
    The social and cultural revolutions that changed society were a result of the members of the Silent Generation being in generational conflict with their elders.

    The Boomers were just collateral damage in that generational war.

    And mostly it was a result of the actions of a relatively small number of the members of the Silent Generation who were either members of the elite or would-be elites trying to break into the ranks of the elite. It was almost entirely an ideological struggle within the ranks of the elites.

    It was also a result, to some extent, of the Cold War which created an intensely ideological atmosphere.

    I don't mind taking responsibility for things I've actually done in my life but I am not going to feel guilty about things over which I had zero control.
  32. This millennial will be voting for the Democrats for the rest of his life, and directing his father-in-law to pour Chinese funny money into their coffers.

    • Agree: JohnPlywood
  33. @V. K. Ovelund
    @unit472


    It wasn’t baby boomers who passed the 1965 immigration ‘reform’.
     
    No, it wasn't.

    How do you think the part the Boomers played in this civilizational catastrophe looks to right-of-center white Americans born after 1975?


    We were the last generation to live in a free United States that still worked.
     
    This is the correct answer. That is how it looks.

    Something the Boomers seldom seem to be able to notice is that they were in generational conflict with their elders when they were young, and are in generational conflict with their youngers when they are old. They think that it's that way with every generation, but it isn't, and wasn't. X does not conflict with Millennial does not conflict with Z to anything like this degree. The GI generation did not conflict to such an extent with the Silents, either. In fact, the Silents don't especially conflict with X, either.

    With rare exceptions, trying to explain this to Boomers is like talking to a stone wall. They always think that they know better, just like they knew better when they were 15 years old.

    The Boomers sat down at the dinner table and ate everything on it; and for dessert, they congratulated themselves on how awful and ungrateful the Millennials the Boomers themselves raised turned out to be.

    Boomers don't listen. @Screwtape explains, but it does no good. With the Boomers, it is always someone else's fault.

    Replies: @unit472, @AceDeuce, @dfordoom

    Whatever. You are obviously being tendentious to assign singular characteristics to people born between 1945 and 1964. Then you say the rot began in 1975 when the oldest baby boomer was only 30 all though clearly the ‘rot’ was already taking place in Congress and the Supreme court a decade earlier. The problem I had politically growing up was not the 1960’s New Left but the New Deal Democrats left over from the Depression. They voted Democrat until they died. There were also the Unions and I’m not talking about the Teacher’s or public employee unions but the Machinists, Iron workers, Miners etc. These unions funded and backed democrats even as the rank and file began to realize the Democrats were anti-American but not until Ronald Reagan did a Republican capture the union working class and these were mostly working class baby boomers.

    The nitwit GOP leadership them tried to foist off tired WW2 relics like Bush and Dole on a country that now had a majority of people born after WW2 or had come to the US as immigrants.It’d be like running a Civil War General for president in 1900!

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @unit472


    You are obviously being tendentious to assign singular characteristics to people born between 1945 and 1964.
     
    Fair point.

    I overshot my mark. Moreover, I hastily lumped you with persons with whom you may have little in common. You have rightly flagged me on both particulars.

  34. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve often asked my parents about if and how they have changed their political views since they were young. They are classic boomers — my dad says that if you don’t know who Spin and Marty are and can’t sing the Mickey Mouse Club song and remember watching Boston Blackie and Superman on TV you aren’t a real boomer.
    Anyway, they say that they haven’t changed at all, although sometimes they have voted Republican and sometimes Democrat.
    My dad liked Estes Kefauver, the first politician he can recall becoming interested in, other than President Eisenhower. He preferred Nixon over Kennedy, was a huge fan of Barry Goldwater — AuH20, as he called him — but voted for Jimmy Carter over Ford in 1976 because he felt an affinity for him as a fellow naval officer and especially because he liked his approach to foreign policy — Carter questioned the wisdom of stationing American troops overseas, especially in Asia and one of his campaign promises was to withdraw our troops from South Korea. The stationing of ground forces in exposed and static positions abroad is counter to the traditional naval thinking Carter was taught at Annapolis. Air and sea power operating from offshore, augmented by mobile landing forces if needed, are the preferred solutions of naval doctrine.
    My dad, being a naval officer who had flown combat missions over North Viet Nam and called Viet Nam the most useless war in history, felt that Carter could turn away from the Kennedy horrific nonsense of paying any price for “freedom” — whatever that was supposed to be — that had led to the Berlin Wall, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Viet Nam War….
    He voted for Carter against Reagan because, although he knew Reagan as a corporate conservative, he thought he was more an actor playing the role of president rather than a man like Carter who could push through things the Camp David Accords and would be able to do even more in his second term. He voted for Reagan in ’84 because Mondale was, he thought, an incompetent, ditto Bush over Dukakis and Clinton, and Bush II over Gore. He despised Kerry as a medal hound and worthless bullshitter so Bush II again, McCain over Obama — shared life experience as Viet Nam naval aviators and McCain enduring being shot down and captivity, and never mind all the stupid horseshit about McCain published on this website and elsewhere by individuals have no idea…. He didn’t vote in 2012 not liking Romney, but voted for Trump in 2016 and 2020 hoping he could revitalize Americanism.
    My mother’s political journey is almost identical. Her family were Taft Republicans, strong for Eisenhower, strong for Nixon, absolutely hated Johnson — she still calls him Light Bulb Johnson or Long Binh Johnson or the Long Binh Jailer (she served as an Army nurse in Viet Nam); Viet Nam was the seminal event of her life and she hates with a deep and abiding hate Kennedy and Johnson for involving us in that monstrous crime.
    She, too, voted for Carter, admiring his openly professed Christianity, his professionalism, and hating how the press ridiculed him for being honest with his “malaise” speech, and how they depicted him as a moron beset by killer rabbits and believing in UFOs. She distrusted Reagan, too, voting for Carter in 1980, not voting in 1984 because she couldn’t stand Mondale but hated Reagan’s central America policies and general phoniness as she saw it.
    She didn’t vote in ’88 because she did not like or trust Bush I and thought Dukakis was a fool, nor in ’92, thinking Clinton was corrupt. Ditto ’96, not thinking Dole had a chance and not caring for him anyway, and ditto again not voting in 2000, hating the choices, and voted for Kerry against Bush II because she hated the Iraq War and wanted Bush II punished for it.
    She voted for Obama in ’08 hoping that would put all this race crap behind us — Hah! — and didn’t vote in 2012, but voted for Trump in 2016 and 2020, hoping he would restore so much that we had lost as a nation.
    FWIW, I’m an older Millennial, voting for the first time in 2004 for Bush II, because I was influenced by my dad about Kerry and probably being influenced by the image of Bush in his flight jacket on the Abraham Lincoln and the whole mission accomplished thing and also just being a naive fool.
    I voted for McCain in ’08, again being influenced by my dad and admiring McCain for the same reasons my dad did. In 2012 I voted for Romney, because I just had to vote against Obama for…you know… reasons. I was wild for Trump in 2016, absolutely hating Mrs. Clinton. And although, disappointed that he had not parted the seas and brought on the second coming, I voted for Trump in 2020, and if he runs in 2024, I will vote for him again.
    Left, right, liberal, conservative, Democrat, Republican…eh, I don’t even know what they mean and I don’t think my boomer parents do either. They vote for the man and what they believe he stand for.

  35. @V. K. Ovelund
    @Mark G.


    ... over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety.
     
    Was Chavez a hard leftist?

    I do not say that he wasn't, but how are you and I to know, other than via the same media that has lied to us about everything else?

    I notice that Chavez and his successor keep getting reëlected, somehow. It has been said that the elections are rigged, but again, how are you and I to know?

    They kept telling us that Venezuela was going to be like Cuba. That didn't quite happen as far as I am aware. Enough white Venezuelans have fled to the United States to persuade us that Venezuela has grown much worse for whites, which is a bad thing as far as I am concerned, but it appears to me that the image of Chavez as a brutal leftist dictator might have been oversold.

    As far as Mugabe was concerned, everyone knows that his problem was the poor human capital with which he had to work. Not Edward III, nor Louis IX, nor George Washington, nor Marcus Aurelius himself could have made Zimbabwe a peaceful, orderly, thriving country after the whites were driven out.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    The fact that otherwise-sensible people will regurgitate US-media talking points about foreign political identities, shows what a piss-poor job we’re all doing (as a ‘movement’) at sloughing off ‘our’ own indoctrination.

    Chavez appeared to be a reasonably capable leader – at least no worse than many South American political leaders since the 1950s (which is about when the US decided it owns South America and can interfere in domestic arrangements in any country that defies its edicts).

    If a leader’s political objectives do not align with the desires of the US Death Machine, that leader is always going to be pushing shit uphill. It’s reasonably hard for a nation to advance if it’s kept out of global capital markets: that doesn’t require the presence of formal sanctions – it can be the Game Theoretic consequences of trade relationships (“Don’t piss off the US – it’s a big market for our exports“).

    And as we are all aware, the objectives of the US Death Machine are determined by a clique that is ‘incentivised’ by cash flows from people who want the untrammelled power to steal other people’s (and peoples’) shit.

    Castro; Chavez; Maduro; Morales – their respective incumbencies faced ‘headwinds’ that were entirely generated by a bunch of absolute cunts who willfully punished the respective nations for having the gall to refuse US edicts. (This doesn’t entirely overcome my gut-level hatred of anyone who wants to be a political leader – but at least these people were locals).

    It’s been a little over 25 years since I lost patience with the US Death Machine’s attempts to help its owners steal everyone else’s shit. Every instance of blowback – including Blowback Day 2001 – and every strategic and tactical humiliation, is a fraction of what the US Death Machine deserves.

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Kratoklastes

    It’s been a little over 25 years since I lost patience with the US Death Machine’s attempts to help its owners steal everyone else’s shit. Every instance of blowback – including Blowback Day 2001 – and every strategic and tactical humiliation, is a fraction of what the US Death Machine deserves.


    I guess you fell for Persian Excursion 1: Saddam must be stopped, then. I certainly did. Then, at the end, the execrable HW Bush encouraged the Kurds and marsh Arabs to rebel, and let them get cut down by Saddam afterward. That was it for me.

    It will take others a while. I hope all the people who genuinely voted for Biden (and not against Trump) are made to feel shame for the deaths he will inflict by drone, airstrike, etc. I don't wish harm to the grunts who are boots on the ground enforcing this policy, but it has to be obvious now: the entire structure of the USA is rotten, and it started with the Military Industrial complex. I don't have any choice about paying taxes to kill people in Syria, but anyone signing up does have a choice not to.

    Thanks for your outrageous and personal note.

  36. @unit472
    @prime noticer

    Actually the earlier baby boomers had a much more rigorous curriculum than subsequent generations. The SAT had not been 'dumbed down' and I never heard of SAT tutors or pre SAT tests. You showed up one morning and took it. High schools required at least 3 years of math ( Geometry and two years of Algebra). Chemistry or Physics were also required subjects. American history was taught and not the bastardized deconstructed PC version later generations received. This was for your basic high school diploma. Since the baby boom was so large getting into a good college was very competitive. Diploma Mills had not yet been created to handle the mediocre high school graduates so prevalent today.

    Replies: @JohnPlywood

    You are fucking retarded. Education standards only increased in the 20th century; millennials had 4 years of math and were doing algebra and geometry by 9th grade. Millennials had to go through calculus to graduate high school – and they were held to rigorous state standardized testing, something boomers never had to do. You would not have made it through high school in the early 2000s.

  37. @unit472
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Whatever. You are obviously being tendentious to assign singular characteristics to people born between 1945 and 1964. Then you say the rot began in 1975 when the oldest baby boomer was only 30 all though clearly the 'rot' was already taking place in Congress and the Supreme court a decade earlier. The problem I had politically growing up was not the 1960's New Left but the New Deal Democrats left over from the Depression. They voted Democrat until they died. There were also the Unions and I'm not talking about the Teacher's or public employee unions but the Machinists, Iron workers, Miners etc. These unions funded and backed democrats even as the rank and file began to realize the Democrats were anti-American but not until Ronald Reagan did a Republican capture the union working class and these were mostly working class baby boomers.

    The nitwit GOP leadership them tried to foist off tired WW2 relics like Bush and Dole on a country that now had a majority of people born after WW2 or had come to the US as immigrants.It'd be like running a Civil War General for president in 1900!

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    You are obviously being tendentious to assign singular characteristics to people born between 1945 and 1964.

    Fair point.

    I overshot my mark. Moreover, I hastily lumped you with persons with whom you may have little in common. You have rightly flagged me on both particulars.

  38. @AP
    Anecdotal, but plenty of Gen X people I know have drifted rightward as we’ve gone into our forties and beyond.

    Replies: @beavertales, @dfordoom

    I think there may be several things going on at once which complicate the picture.

    There’s the natural tendency of people to become more socially conservative as they get older, but at the same time there has been a massive cultural shift towards social liberalism. Boomers and GenXers are probably responding to both these forces. They’ve become more socially conservative in the sense of being more disapproving of rapid and radical social changes but they’ve internalised much of the social liberalism that represents the current status quo.

    In other words they haven’t necessarily become socially conservative in absolute terms. They haven’t embraced the social conservatism of the generations that preceded them. They haven’t embraced what would have been thought of as social conservatism in 1970. They have accepted most of the social liberalism of the 1960s to 1980s. They have accepted most of the feminist and most of the homosexual agenda and they have not returned to the sexual and social mores of the 1950s. Their idea of social conservatism is simply a less radical version of social liberalism.

    It’s also likely that they have become more socially conservative in their social behaviour compared to when they were young – they’re not dropping acid or engaging in sexual promiscuity any more. But they’re probably more socially liberal in their attitudes than they were when they were young.

    They have only become more socially conservative in relative terms – they’re more socially conservative than Millennials but they’re more socially liberal than their parents were.

    All these surveys really show is that Boomers are more likely to vote Republican today than they were in the 1970s, but the Republican Party today is much much more socially liberal than the Republican Party of Nixon or Reagan so it doesn’t mean very much.

    • Agree: Radicalcenter
  39. @Reactionary Utopian
    Ohfergodssake.

    These "generational" categories are about as useless a tool for understanding politics and culture as "left - right."

    Babies are born each and every single year. Plot births against year, for any multiple-decades time domain you like. It's not a discontinuous function, nor even close. So we're to think that someone born in 1964 is a Boomer with certain characteristics, and someone born in 1965 is ... what? An X-er? Some other stupid category name? With, obviously, significantly different characteristics?

    If you harbor bitterness toward your parents, and want to blame them for all that is wrong, have at it. It's an urge as old as mankind. But own it for what it is. This "greatest generation," boomer, X-er, millennial, zoomer, Y-er, whatever-the-hell-er, it's worn out. Let it go.

    Replies: @Franz, @Craig Nelsen

    If you harbor bitterness toward your parents, and want to blame them for all that is wrong, have at it. It’s an urge as old as mankind. But own it for what it is. This “greatest generation,” boomer, X-er, millennial, zoomer, Y-er, whatever-the-hell-er, it’s worn out. Let it go.

    Agree, but my guess is having something/someone to blame is hardwired in the brain. It feels good to hate strangers for any sort of discomfort. So good you don’t notice you’re helping the divide-and-rule club and mostly blaming other victims for current state of the world.

    Boomers were the most downsized generation when offshoring began, but how many movies and TV shows have you seen about that massive demographic that will work till they die and maybe use cheap booze (or whatever) to clock out early? So it never happened to most younger folk and all Upper Middle Class folk. Boomers, though, joined Korean War vets and others on the same treadmill to oblivion.

    It was amazing how often an industrial complex waited till the last Depression-WWII era people got their pensions just before the work was offshored and everyone younger got six months of unemployment and lots of luck after. The record number of older workers (even over 85) is growing, but we’re “privileged” and fighting each other just like Bezos wants. The USA, as ever, has the dumbest working class in the world.

    A certain sort of collegiate of all ages knows none of this. What they see on TV is gospel.

  40. @Arclight
    Depends on what "conservative" and "liberal" mean. The GOP has the opportunity to move left on economic issues but stay to the right on cultural issues to solidify gains with minorities and the working/middle class, but how would that be described on the conservative/liberal axis if they actually did so? Likewise, the Dems pay lip service to diversity, but are increasingly corporatist on economics and outright authoritarian on culture.

    Replies: @anon, @nebulafox

    The donors who control the GOP on a national level would sooner sink the ship than give an inch, but why bother with them anyway? Their hatred would be far more politically potent for a candidate than their money. Since when was it a law of nature that to be right-wing and emphasizing personal agency meant fetishizing CEOs and elevating the free market into a religious faith? Political history did not start with Ronald Reagan. Time to think outside the box.

    I’d avoid the “conservative” label, though, for two reasons. 1) Associated way too much with the Gentry Republican crowd, a dumb idea on policy and politics alike, and 2) implies there’s anything worth conserving in the status quo for the vast majority of Americans. Screw ideology, offer a platform that treats ideology with total contempt. They’ll love you for it.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @nebulafox


    I’d avoid the “conservative” label, though, for two reasons. 1) Associated way too much with the Gentry Republican crowd, a dumb idea on policy and politics alike, and 2) implies there’s anything worth conserving in the status quo for the vast majority of Americans.
     
    I agree. It's also a good idea to avoid the "right-wing" label - to the kinds of people that you need to reach the Right is synonymous with greed, viciousness and stupidity.

    Screw ideology, offer a platform that treats ideology with total contempt. They’ll love you for it.
     
    Yep. Pragmatism. Support policies that actually work. Who gives a damn whether a policy is supposedly left-wing or right-wing or liberal or conservative? What matters is - will the policy work and will it benefit ordinary people?

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @nebulafox

    Mr Nebulafox says:

    I’d avoid the “conservative” label, though, for two reasons. 1) Associated way too much with the Gentry Republican crowd, a dumb idea on policy and politics alike, and 2) implies there’s anything worth conserving in the status quo for the vast majority of Americans. Screw ideology, offer a platform that treats ideology with total contempt. They’ll love you for it.

    I say:

    Ideology is a bunch of crap and the command and control of the electronics of the American Empire is everything and that means the electronic monetary currency and the electronic propaganda and the electronic control of the nuclear weapons and other weapons systems and the like.

    Pat Buchanan from 2014:

    Yet, when the faith or ideology of a civilization or nation dies, something must replace it. And around the world what peoples and regimes seem to be turning to is nationalism.

    https://vdare.com/articles/the-end-of-ideology-and-the-rebirth-of-nationalism

    Tweets from 2014 and 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/456150310545678338?s=20

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/595310038694014976?s=20

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/525743425350807552?s=20

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/526722989015179264?s=20

  41. @Chrisnonymous
    What's missing here is a representation of actual beliefs, rather than just the labels "liberal" and "conservative". My parents voted for Carter, then fast-forward 4 decades, they voted for Trump. Basically, their beliefs haven't changed, except for some more pro-market economic ideas that I would have to describe as superficial. In fact, I can't even manage to red pill them on HBD issues.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Rosie

    What’s missing here is a representation of actual beliefs, rather than just the labels “liberal” and “conservative”.

    This!

    I’m GenX, and I can already see that what we call “conservative” was liberal a couple decades ago.

  42. @Mark G.
    @Jay Fink


    Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .
     
    You may need to separate social liberalism and economic liberalism when thinking about where we are going. White Democrats are generally both but that isn't always the case with nonwhites. For example, whites in California voted for gay marriage but it lost at the polls because of nonwhites voting against it. Socially liberal whites may need to decide if they support continued high levels of nonwhite immigration or their pet social liberal causes because they won't be able to have both. In addition to social issues, nonwhites are also more indifferent to environmental issues so you should see a decline in support for this area, even to the point of a lot of the older white environmentalists like John Muir being labeled racists and their names taken off buildings and their statues knocked down.

    At the same time this is happening on the social and environmental side over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety. Expect to see wide scale nationalizations of privately owned businesses, rampant inflation, shortages of basic goods, corrupt courts and police, and the remaining whites demonized and subjected to increasing home invasions and physical assaults in public.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @V. K. Ovelund, @dfordoom

    over on the economic side the country will be moving to hard leftism of the Hugo Chavez or Robert Mugabe variety. Expect to see wide scale nationalizations of privately owned businesses,

    ROTFLMAO. I’m waiting expectantly for the communist Biden to nationalise the banks and the tech giants and the giant private defence contractors. Any day now Red Joe will announce that the government is seizing the means of production and introducing the dictatorship of the proletariat.

    I agree with the rest of your comment (and I agree with a lot of your comments) but the claim that economic hard leftism is on the horizon does, I’m afraid to say, sound a bit hysterical and paranoid.

  43. @Screwtape
    “Conservative” like “America” is a mental image, a sentimentality. Boomer Conservatives conserved nothing. On the contrary. They ushered in Progress. Which required the destruction of the America to which they attached their mental affinity to make way for the future america.

    As that destruction plays out over time, reality deviates further from that image they hold dear. So they become more “conservative” by nature of this deviation revealing the starkly opposed reality of progress. This in turn activates an instinctive grip on that past American ideal. ¡Conservative!

    Sure, their America is one worth preserving. But to actually do so means to stand in the way of progress. The duality of the american ideal being rooted in their experience but also as necessary fuel to be burned in the lamps of progress is how they can claim to “be” conservative but actually do nothing to preserve that ideal. It is part of their identity but also no longer exists in reality.

    Much like their affinity for their own physical youth, long since passed on, they still see themselves as youthful, American, living in America. When in fact they are just burning the days until the actual young in the actual global bazaar of america smother them and what remains of those fleeting memories with their own MyPillows.

    So their notion of “conservative” is more like a feeling of nostalgia than a political orientation. Nostalgia is a kind of death and longing. Its about the past. A feeling. Thats the Boomer conservative.

    Boomers, having the benefit of harvesting and consuming the wealth of their great grand kids, have been able to hold onto the Norman Rockwell America while current art is shit smeared on canvas by an “undocumented” blaxican tranny. They observe this art and exclaim, “I am a conservative”. So stunning and brave.

    GenX has much of the same feelings of conservatism and many of the same reactions but with no delusions that Rockwell still exists. Shit on canvas is just that.

    The next gens have no such anchors in Rockwell America and are steeped in shit-canvas art (Rockwell was a racist pale male) and revisionist history (America was never great).

    They have no past and no future. Only moar progress toward something else. Today is not okay.

    They are more likely to long for cleansing fire than the comforts of nostalgia. But maybe the wishful thinking in these circles that gen z shitlords will rise will come true. And they will call themselves conservatives and we will all sigh in relief.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @dfordoom

    So their notion of “conservative” is more like a feeling of nostalgia than a political orientation. Nostalgia is a kind of death and longing. Its about the past. A feeling. Thats the Boomer conservative.

    There’s a lot of truth to that. “Conservatives” born before the early 70s (late Silent, Boomers, early GenXers) are conservative in the sense that they’d like to go back to the way things were in the 80s.

    Which makes them very different from the previous generation of conservatives, who wanted to go back to the way things were in the 50s. And conservatives in the 1920s wanted to go back to the way things were in the late Victorian and Edwardian eras.

    Most people’s idea of social conservatism is based very heavily on the period in which they lived from the age of 12 up to when they reached their early thirties.

    When Zoomers get old and turn “conservative” they’ll be wanting to turn the clock back to the social conservatism of their youth, when there were only a hundred or so genders instead of thousands, and when dating trannies had not yet been made compulsory.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @dfordoom


    they’d like to go back to the way things were in the 80s.
     
    Ah the good old days:
    https://www.abc.net.au/cm/rimage/10680334-3x2-xlarge.jpg

    Peace.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  44. An oldie but a goodie: “If you aren’t a socialist when you’re twenty you have no heart. If you’re still a socialist when you’re forty you have no brain.”

  45. @dfordoom
    @Screwtape


    So their notion of “conservative” is more like a feeling of nostalgia than a political orientation. Nostalgia is a kind of death and longing. Its about the past. A feeling. Thats the Boomer conservative.
     
    There's a lot of truth to that. "Conservatives" born before the early 70s (late Silent, Boomers, early GenXers) are conservative in the sense that they'd like to go back to the way things were in the 80s.

    Which makes them very different from the previous generation of conservatives, who wanted to go back to the way things were in the 50s. And conservatives in the 1920s wanted to go back to the way things were in the late Victorian and Edwardian eras.

    Most people's idea of social conservatism is based very heavily on the period in which they lived from the age of 12 up to when they reached their early thirties.

    When Zoomers get old and turn "conservative" they'll be wanting to turn the clock back to the social conservatism of their youth, when there were only a hundred or so genders instead of thousands, and when dating trannies had not yet been made compulsory.

    Replies: @Talha

    they’d like to go back to the way things were in the 80s.

    Ah the good old days:

    Peace.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Talha

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOiNPxEU4r4

    Replies: @Talha

  46. @V. K. Ovelund
    @unit472


    It wasn’t baby boomers who passed the 1965 immigration ‘reform’.
     
    No, it wasn't.

    How do you think the part the Boomers played in this civilizational catastrophe looks to right-of-center white Americans born after 1975?


    We were the last generation to live in a free United States that still worked.
     
    This is the correct answer. That is how it looks.

    Something the Boomers seldom seem to be able to notice is that they were in generational conflict with their elders when they were young, and are in generational conflict with their youngers when they are old. They think that it's that way with every generation, but it isn't, and wasn't. X does not conflict with Millennial does not conflict with Z to anything like this degree. The GI generation did not conflict to such an extent with the Silents, either. In fact, the Silents don't especially conflict with X, either.

    With rare exceptions, trying to explain this to Boomers is like talking to a stone wall. They always think that they know better, just like they knew better when they were 15 years old.

    The Boomers sat down at the dinner table and ate everything on it; and for dessert, they congratulated themselves on how awful and ungrateful the Millennials the Boomers themselves raised turned out to be.

    Boomers don't listen. @Screwtape explains, but it does no good. With the Boomers, it is always someone else's fault.

    Replies: @unit472, @AceDeuce, @dfordoom

    “With the Boomers, it is always someone else’s fault.”

    He says, as he blames the mean ol’ Boomers. LOL.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @AceDeuce


    He says, as he blames the mean ol’ Boomers. LOL.
     
    As usual for a Boomer, you just don't get it. If you want every other generation, both older and younger, to loathe you right to the end, while you bask in your generation's eternally overweening self-righteousness, go right ahead. I obviously can't stop you.

    Excepting the Vietnam veterans, the typical American Boomer still acts like he's 15 years old; yet like a 15-year-old, is so full of excuses, deflections and rationalizations that he is incapable of recognizing the fact.

    Do you wish to grasp why people dislike your generation so severely? Or do you just want to feel that you are always in the right?

    For what it's worth, unfortunately, I'm a borderline Boomer, myself.

    Replies: @Charles Pewitt, @dfordoom

  47. @Talha
    @dfordoom


    they’d like to go back to the way things were in the 80s.
     
    Ah the good old days:
    https://www.abc.net.au/cm/rimage/10680334-3x2-xlarge.jpg

    Peace.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    • Replies: @Talha
    @nebulafox

    A song ahead of its time:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qs97ZmUeUa4

    Peace.

  48. @nebulafox
    @Talha

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOiNPxEU4r4

    Replies: @Talha

    A song ahead of its time:

    Peace.

  49. @unit472
    It wasn't baby boomers who passed the 1965 immigration 'reform'. We couldn't even vote at the time. We just noticed more and more strange looking people wandering our streets. Baby boomers were not on the Supreme Court writing Roe v. Wade. Many states had laws banning abortion. We could sure use a few million of those destroyed babies today. School integration and busing were inflicted on us by white liberal judges who had never really met a typical negro up close and personal.

    We were the last generation to live in a free United States that still worked. Kids had cap and BB guns and rode bicycles without helmets. The streets were safe and dindu free. On the 4th of July we had fircrackers and cherry bombs to light off. If someone murdered a cop or raped and killed a woman they were going to the electric chair or gas chamber and soon not 2o years later....maybe. Teenagers had jobs doing the work that immigrants now do. Mowing lawns, working at restaurants or doing construction labor. We started driving at 16 and could drink beer in some states at 18. Many mom's didn't work. Our fathers could support the family on one income. Balanced budgets were not a rarity and most people had no idea who the Chairman of the Federal Reserve was because he wasn't that important.

    Why shouldn't baby boomers be nostalgic and long for the America that was stolen from us?

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @dfordoom

    Why shouldn’t baby boomers be nostalgic and long for the America that was stolen from us?

    There’s nothing wrong or irrational in thinking that it would be better to go back to the world of the 1980s. It was a better and more sane world.

    Boomers weren’t the ones who made the decisions that destroyed Norman Rockwell’s America. Those decisions were made by the Silent Generation, and by the generation before the Silent Generation.

    Boomers didn’t invent liberalism. They also didn’t start the Sexual Revolution. That was started by the Silent Generation. Boomers didn’t invent the contraceptive pill. Boomers didn’t invent the drug culture. The drug culture was starting to emerge during the late 50s. It was accelerated dramatically by the Vietnam War. And Boomers didn’t start the Vietnam War. Boomers weren’t the ones who were responsible for mass immigration – those decisions were made by the Greatest Generation and the Silent Generation. Boomers weren’t the ones who started pushing the homosexual agenda – that was the Silent Generation as well.

    Boomers had no decisive influence on the culture until the 80s. The 80s was a period of sanity compared to today but the seeds of destruction were sown in the 1950s and the 1960s.

    And none of the crucial decisions that changed our civilisation beyond all recognition were made by ordinary people. They were made by politicians and bureaucrats and academics and (even more especially) by corporate types in the boardrooms of giant corporations.

    • Replies: @AP
    @dfordoom

    Well said. Boomers eagerly took part in and revelled in these processes, cashed in on them, becoming their face, but the so-called Greatest Generation created them.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  50. @Priss Factor
    Boomers gave us the dreadful Sesame Street with its muppets. It was an assault on good taste.

    But now that Disney is roping in the muppets, conzos defend them.

    No, I say let Disney destroy the Muppets. They suck.

    You can't make this stuff up: The Muppet Wars. A Republican has nothing better to do than defend Miss Piggy and Cookie Monster.

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/Cx3AY07pjcE/

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Boomers gave us the dreadful Sesame Street with its muppets.

    No they didn’t. Sesame Street was created by members of the Silent Generation. The creators of Sesame Street were born in the 1920s. The creator of the Muppets was Silent Generation as well (born in the early 1930s).

    • Replies: @Priss Factor
    @dfordoom


    No they didn’t. Sesame Street was created by members of the Silent Generation.
     
    Maybe the origins are earlier, but the stuff on SS in the 70s were either ghetto or hippie or funky-junk. I hated SS except for Cookie Monster.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUL4T8WcFdA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1SiSUrvUnk

    Electric Company was even worse.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fy7jgSvGICg

    Zoom was like druggy crap.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHjMEwZt5OE

    And who can forget this?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lB3fi7opDBc

    -------------------

    Now, THIS is great kid entertainment.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZww_mLHt8o

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jao0qbOYXjY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_eamxk4N6M
  51. @V. K. Ovelund
    @unit472


    It wasn’t baby boomers who passed the 1965 immigration ‘reform’.
     
    No, it wasn't.

    How do you think the part the Boomers played in this civilizational catastrophe looks to right-of-center white Americans born after 1975?


    We were the last generation to live in a free United States that still worked.
     
    This is the correct answer. That is how it looks.

    Something the Boomers seldom seem to be able to notice is that they were in generational conflict with their elders when they were young, and are in generational conflict with their youngers when they are old. They think that it's that way with every generation, but it isn't, and wasn't. X does not conflict with Millennial does not conflict with Z to anything like this degree. The GI generation did not conflict to such an extent with the Silents, either. In fact, the Silents don't especially conflict with X, either.

    With rare exceptions, trying to explain this to Boomers is like talking to a stone wall. They always think that they know better, just like they knew better when they were 15 years old.

    The Boomers sat down at the dinner table and ate everything on it; and for dessert, they congratulated themselves on how awful and ungrateful the Millennials the Boomers themselves raised turned out to be.

    Boomers don't listen. @Screwtape explains, but it does no good. With the Boomers, it is always someone else's fault.

    Replies: @unit472, @AceDeuce, @dfordoom

    Something the Boomers seldom seem to be able to notice is that they were in generational conflict with their elders when they were young

    The social and cultural revolutions that changed society were a result of the members of the Silent Generation being in generational conflict with their elders.

    The Boomers were just collateral damage in that generational war.

    And mostly it was a result of the actions of a relatively small number of the members of the Silent Generation who were either members of the elite or would-be elites trying to break into the ranks of the elite. It was almost entirely an ideological struggle within the ranks of the elites.

    It was also a result, to some extent, of the Cold War which created an intensely ideological atmosphere.

    I don’t mind taking responsibility for things I’ve actually done in my life but I am not going to feel guilty about things over which I had zero control.

  52. @nebulafox
    @Arclight

    The donors who control the GOP on a national level would sooner sink the ship than give an inch, but why bother with them anyway? Their hatred would be far more politically potent for a candidate than their money. Since when was it a law of nature that to be right-wing and emphasizing personal agency meant fetishizing CEOs and elevating the free market into a religious faith? Political history did not start with Ronald Reagan. Time to think outside the box.

    I'd avoid the "conservative" label, though, for two reasons. 1) Associated way too much with the Gentry Republican crowd, a dumb idea on policy and politics alike, and 2) implies there's anything worth conserving in the status quo for the vast majority of Americans. Screw ideology, offer a platform that treats ideology with total contempt. They'll love you for it.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Charles Pewitt

    I’d avoid the “conservative” label, though, for two reasons. 1) Associated way too much with the Gentry Republican crowd, a dumb idea on policy and politics alike, and 2) implies there’s anything worth conserving in the status quo for the vast majority of Americans.

    I agree. It’s also a good idea to avoid the “right-wing” label – to the kinds of people that you need to reach the Right is synonymous with greed, viciousness and stupidity.

    Screw ideology, offer a platform that treats ideology with total contempt. They’ll love you for it.

    Yep. Pragmatism. Support policies that actually work. Who gives a damn whether a policy is supposedly left-wing or right-wing or liberal or conservative? What matters is – will the policy work and will it benefit ordinary people?

    • Agree: Radicalcenter
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @dfordoom

    I got left-wing views on some things, right-wing views on others. Really, I reject current political divisions as asinine. I suspect this sort of non-coherent mixture is relatively closer to how most American voters feel than your average Beltway denizen. The simple willingness to do things as mundane as talking in policy-specific terms or avoiding a moralizing message will be appealing in an age where an increasing amount of people sense that symbolism is being used to screw them over. This is not about "Who We Are". This is about a government that is willing to do anything except serve its citizens. Once in power, be a speaker of words, but moreso, be a doer of deeds.

    So pop the bubble. And in the words of Ed Koch: you agree with me on 70% of what I say, vote for me, agree with me on 100% of what I say, get your head examined.

    What I'm utterly uncompromising on is smashing the power of a completely failed, venal, and increasingly authoritarian-friendly elite: economic, media, bureaucratic, military, and political. These people need to go if America is to have a chance at solving its deep structural and socioeconomic rot. Who will mourn their loss after the past 30 years? That, and trying to find some way of ensuring that Americans can once again have the ability solve their problems by building, not by trying to get the nearest abstract authority to take their side. Might be too late for my generation, there, but at least our kids don't have to go through the same neuroticizing hell.

    Replies: @Talha

  53. @Talha
    @V. K. Ovelund


    It is impossible to win the Millenials back to Rockwell America now. Too late. When we had the chance to raise and educate them right—and just as importantly, the chance to save the United States, their birthright—we let the chance slip away, and now it’s irretrievably gone.
     
    To a degree this is understandable, success and being on top makes one complacent. You rely on institutions, systems that have been working, offloading/outsourcing responsibility to others. It’s the Ibn Khaldunian cycle.

    Being a minority keeps you on your toes. You learn to take the hits, get insulted, rely on yourself and your community. My kids were shocked when I told them that I was made fun off when I was growing up for praying, not eating pepperoni pizza like everyone else, told to my face that I was a sand n***** or that I was going to go to hell. I lost a job opportunity because I declined to shake a female supervisor’s hands. It builds character; you learn to survive and shrug it off. Sometimes I wish they didn’t have it so easy because fragility is a character flaw.

    I sit with my boys 5-6 nights a week for 10-15 minutes where we discuss Islamic topics, learn about our past heroes, cover hadith about character-building, even debate criticisms that they might face in the world and I’m about to introduce them to medieval Sufi poetry in Persian. That’s including some of the other Muslim youth groups they are involved in. Trying to preserve one’s identity forces you out of a stance of laxity.

    Other people notice confidence; my eldest son recently told me that one of the non-Muslim boys in his group is interested in Islam because of him seeing the camaraderie in his Muslim friends and how they stop their life to pray and what not. People can appreciate discipline.

    Maybe whites need to learn these kinds of lessons in how to survive; white fathers need to sit at home with their sons and spend the time talking to them about their heritage, their heroes, their culture and values. You do this in the privacy of your own home while your kids still look to you for guidance. But it requires sacrifice of time and effort. Let them tear down statues; we hardly have any statues or images of any of our heroes, don’t lose sight of the forest for the trees.

    Peace.

    It’s interesting being married to a white wife. Apparently some Eastern European guy at the grocery store started getting rude with her. The guy had left his cart in line to go get something and the checkout lady waived her past his cart since his turn was up and he wasn’t around. Then the guy comes back vocally complaining to the checkout lady that my wife cut in front of him. My wife let out her inner Karen and shut the guy up. I don’t think he was prepared to get spoken back to by a lady in hijab.

    Replies: @MattinLA

    Good post. A lot to learn about here. Thank you.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @MattinLA

    Most welcome. Related to this; a Muslim scholar that I keep up with suggested a poem by Rudyard Kipling (that old English white guy with his trusty pen) to use as a teaching lesson for young men (which I will, inshaAllah, read with my boys). But this is something white fathers can also read to theirs.

    See below the more tag for “If”.

    Peace.

    If

    If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
    If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;
    If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
    Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
    And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

    If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;
    If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
    Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

    If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
    And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;
    If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
    And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

    If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
    If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;
    If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
    Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
    And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  54. @Jay Fink
    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today's young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person's political journey .

    Replies: @t, @dfordoom, @Mark G., @obwandiyag, @Rahan

    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .

    In my opinion the “eternal cycle” of people growing up and becoming conservative was only “eternal” while the social mechanisms enabling it were present. As in “you age and become a husband and father (a wife and a mother) and breadwinner and property-owner and a pillar of a local high-trust community” — this is what helps make older citizens conservative.

    Once you dismantle the family, gender roles, social cohesion, high-trust, self-reliance, and stable working conditions, becoming conservative turns into a rare individual journey, as opposed to a mass phenomenon. Thus the 1990s were probably the last decade in which the previous “young rebels” turned into “grown up conservatives”, beyond this point the mechanics of this mostly automatic transformation were dismantled.

    But imported non-whites, especially the Asian and Latino ones, Arab too, would for now at least by much less “indoctrinated” than the “evil whites”, so they will definitely become more conservative as they grow older. It’s just that in order to succeed by the new rules of the Anglosphere, they will have to take up anti-white politics and thus vote “liberal”. While internally being “conservative”.

    Sooner or later a “new conservative” movement for the colored folks could take off. In fact, some might say Nick Fuentes is one of the early experiments in that.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund
    • Thanks: Talha
    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Rahan


    Once you dismantle the family, gender roles, social cohesion, high-trust, self-reliance, and stable working conditions, becoming conservative turns into a rare individual journey, as opposed to a mass phenomenon. Thus the 1990s were probably the last decade in which the previous “young rebels” turned into “grown up conservatives”
     
    Good point. It could be said that the 1990s was probably the last decade in which the previous “young rebels” turned into grown-ups.
    , @Radicalcenter
    @Rahan

    This is a superb observation, if a dispiriting one.

    (I will quibble that Fuentes doesn’t appear to be much of a “person of color.”)

    Also, there is little reason to believe that most of the children of those socially-conservative / traditionalist Latino and Asian immigrants will not be thoroughly indoctrinated and perverted by the government schools, Hollywood movies and “culture”, and anti-social media. Particularly given that many of those supposedly normal/traditional parents are too lazy or too stupid to keep their kids away from TV and internet, often prolonged unsupervised tv and internet usage. They also don’t show interest in what sickness the gov schools are pushing on their kids. Many, many, many self-identified homosexual and bisexual Mexicans around our area, seemingly the young Mexican “women” more than anyone. Just like so many morally and sexually confused white kids today. My wife and I see this phenomenon regularly in Los Angeles, and it’s not confined to LA or California.

  55. @Rahan
    @Jay Fink


    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .
     
    In my opinion the "eternal cycle" of people growing up and becoming conservative was only "eternal" while the social mechanisms enabling it were present. As in "you age and become a husband and father (a wife and a mother) and breadwinner and property-owner and a pillar of a local high-trust community" -- this is what helps make older citizens conservative.

    Once you dismantle the family, gender roles, social cohesion, high-trust, self-reliance, and stable working conditions, becoming conservative turns into a rare individual journey, as opposed to a mass phenomenon. Thus the 1990s were probably the last decade in which the previous "young rebels" turned into "grown up conservatives", beyond this point the mechanics of this mostly automatic transformation were dismantled.

    But imported non-whites, especially the Asian and Latino ones, Arab too, would for now at least by much less "indoctrinated" than the "evil whites", so they will definitely become more conservative as they grow older. It's just that in order to succeed by the new rules of the Anglosphere, they will have to take up anti-white politics and thus vote "liberal". While internally being "conservative".

    Sooner or later a "new conservative" movement for the colored folks could take off. In fact, some might say Nick Fuentes is one of the early experiments in that.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Radicalcenter

    Once you dismantle the family, gender roles, social cohesion, high-trust, self-reliance, and stable working conditions, becoming conservative turns into a rare individual journey, as opposed to a mass phenomenon. Thus the 1990s were probably the last decade in which the previous “young rebels” turned into “grown up conservatives”

    Good point. It could be said that the 1990s was probably the last decade in which the previous “young rebels” turned into grown-ups.

  56. @dfordoom
    @Priss Factor


    Boomers gave us the dreadful Sesame Street with its muppets.
     
    No they didn't. Sesame Street was created by members of the Silent Generation. The creators of Sesame Street were born in the 1920s. The creator of the Muppets was Silent Generation as well (born in the early 1930s).

    Replies: @Priss Factor

    No they didn’t. Sesame Street was created by members of the Silent Generation.

    Maybe the origins are earlier, but the stuff on SS in the 70s were either ghetto or hippie or funky-junk. I hated SS except for Cookie Monster.

    Electric Company was even worse.

    Zoom was like druggy crap.

    And who can forget this?

    ——————-

    Now, THIS is great kid entertainment.

  57. ‘Racism’ makes for great entertainment.

  58. @AceDeuce
    @V. K. Ovelund

    "With the Boomers, it is always someone else’s fault."

    He says, as he blames the mean ol' Boomers. LOL.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    He says, as he blames the mean ol’ Boomers. LOL.

    As usual for a Boomer, you just don’t get it. If you want every other generation, both older and younger, to loathe you right to the end, while you bask in your generation’s eternally overweening self-righteousness, go right ahead. I obviously can’t stop you.

    Excepting the Vietnam veterans, the typical American Boomer still acts like he’s 15 years old; yet like a 15-year-old, is so full of excuses, deflections and rationalizations that he is incapable of recognizing the fact.

    Do you wish to grasp why people dislike your generation so severely? Or do you just want to feel that you are always in the right?

    For what it’s worth, unfortunately, I’m a borderline Boomer, myself.

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Mr Ovelund says:

    For what it’s worth, unfortunately, I’m a borderline Boomer, myself.

    I say:

    I am over 50 and old enough to throw a stone into the baby boomer generational cohort myself.

    I implore you good sir please do not begin singing that "Borderline" song by that dreadful baby boomer creature Madonna from Canada and parts unknown for it would stir much rancor within the realm and leave us cold like a hundred miles north of Montreal.

    Hillary Clinton and Madonna look similar to me and they share French-Canadian ancestry and Hillary Clinton had not one ancestor who fought in the American Secessionary War from the British Empire but to admit of something most wicked I say that judging from photographs Hillary didn't look bad in a bathing suit and we've seen much more of Madonna then it would seem pictures would allow.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    , @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Do you wish to grasp why people dislike your generation so severely? Or do you just want to feel that you are always in the right?
     
    Anyone who hates an entire generation is simply irrational. Being irrational isn't helpful.

    I’m a borderline Boomer, myself.
     
    You seem to be consumed by guilt about it.

    Lots of white people are consumed by guilt about being white. They're consumed by guilt about things like slavery. The people who should have felt guilty about slavery were the people who owned and traded in slaves. Even at the time most white people did not own slaves or trade in slaves. Many fought heroically to stamp out slavery.

    You're falling into the same trap. And you're encouraging other people to wallow in collective guilt. Wallowing in collective guilt, and trying to impose collective guilt on others, is what got us into the mess we're in.

    Collective guilt, whether it involves Boomers or white people or whatever, is very destructive. It's the basis of modern liberalism. Don't think like a liberal. Don't get into self-hatred. And don't expect others to get into self-hatred.

    I expect to see you at the next Boomer Pride March.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Resartus

  59. As singer Billy Joel once stated: “We didn’t start the fire”.
    It wasn’t “boomers” who formulated and imposed the so-called “civil-rights (for some)”, “affirmative action” and unrestricted third-world immigration laws and statutes on us. Us “boomers” were forced to live under these laws that were imposed on us by those of “the greatest generation”. Us boomers did not know any better, these laws being put in place while we were still relatively young.
    Some of us boomers protested against these laws, but were “pushed back” by federal and state governments utilizing federal troops.
    Having come of age during the turbulent sixties, I witnessed for myself the underhanded dealings used to push “civil-rights” on us law-abiding whites.
    It was the JEWS…It’s ALWAYS the JEWS. Almost every “civil-rights worker” was a left-wing JEW.
    During the first so-called “civil-rights” movement, we used to have a saying: “Behind every Negro, there is a Jew”. It was no secret that Jews were behind the “civil-rights” movement of the 1950s and 1960s.
    From personal experiences, blacks were not the “non-violent” types who only wanted “equality”, but were always violent racists who demanded that “whitey” acquiesce to their “wants and needs”, quite often taking by force (stealing) what they felt should have been theirs.
    Growing up in 1950s Detroit (which was still a livable city), us whites had to be wary of blacks. Black criminality was quite often ignored by “the powers that be”, the “excuses” being the “racism” and “discrimination” that blacks lived under. This was all orchestrated by the jew civil-rights “experts” attempting to impose a massive guilt trip on us whites. Of course,our protests against integration were drowned out by the jews and the mainstream media of the time, which demonized us whites, even back then. Us whites retreated into our shells, being careful not to offend the jews and their “pets”–blacks, but in the backs of our minds, we knew, even then that the whole “civil-rights” movement was a major factor in the destruction of our society.
    Civil-rights policies initiated in the 1970s didn’t help, either. The imposition of “affirmative action”, forced busing of school students, and the outlawing of aptitude tests for employment assured that substandard, unqualified blacks would be pushed into the workforce. Of course, large corporations and the federal government could easily absorb the incompetence by hiring qualified whites to mentor unqualified blacks, but what about small businesses?
    Even some liberal whites are seeing that this whole “civil-rights” deal is a massive scam perpetrated on whites.

  60. @Rahan
    @Jay Fink


    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were. Also today’s young people are a lot less white. It seems becoming more conservative when you get older is more of a white person’s political journey .
     
    In my opinion the "eternal cycle" of people growing up and becoming conservative was only "eternal" while the social mechanisms enabling it were present. As in "you age and become a husband and father (a wife and a mother) and breadwinner and property-owner and a pillar of a local high-trust community" -- this is what helps make older citizens conservative.

    Once you dismantle the family, gender roles, social cohesion, high-trust, self-reliance, and stable working conditions, becoming conservative turns into a rare individual journey, as opposed to a mass phenomenon. Thus the 1990s were probably the last decade in which the previous "young rebels" turned into "grown up conservatives", beyond this point the mechanics of this mostly automatic transformation were dismantled.

    But imported non-whites, especially the Asian and Latino ones, Arab too, would for now at least by much less "indoctrinated" than the "evil whites", so they will definitely become more conservative as they grow older. It's just that in order to succeed by the new rules of the Anglosphere, they will have to take up anti-white politics and thus vote "liberal". While internally being "conservative".

    Sooner or later a "new conservative" movement for the colored folks could take off. In fact, some might say Nick Fuentes is one of the early experiments in that.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Radicalcenter

    This is a superb observation, if a dispiriting one.

    (I will quibble that Fuentes doesn’t appear to be much of a “person of color.”)

    Also, there is little reason to believe that most of the children of those socially-conservative / traditionalist Latino and Asian immigrants will not be thoroughly indoctrinated and perverted by the government schools, Hollywood movies and “culture”, and anti-social media. Particularly given that many of those supposedly normal/traditional parents are too lazy or too stupid to keep their kids away from TV and internet, often prolonged unsupervised tv and internet usage. They also don’t show interest in what sickness the gov schools are pushing on their kids. Many, many, many self-identified homosexual and bisexual Mexicans around our area, seemingly the young Mexican “women” more than anyone. Just like so many morally and sexually confused white kids today. My wife and I see this phenomenon regularly in Los Angeles, and it’s not confined to LA or California.

    • Thanks: Rahan
  61. Any man who is under 30, and is not a liberal, has no heart; and any man who is over 30, and is not a conservative, has no brains.
    Winston Churchill

    Being from the boomer generation has little to do with political outlook. Every generation gets more conservative as it ages.

  62. @V. K. Ovelund
    @AceDeuce


    He says, as he blames the mean ol’ Boomers. LOL.
     
    As usual for a Boomer, you just don't get it. If you want every other generation, both older and younger, to loathe you right to the end, while you bask in your generation's eternally overweening self-righteousness, go right ahead. I obviously can't stop you.

    Excepting the Vietnam veterans, the typical American Boomer still acts like he's 15 years old; yet like a 15-year-old, is so full of excuses, deflections and rationalizations that he is incapable of recognizing the fact.

    Do you wish to grasp why people dislike your generation so severely? Or do you just want to feel that you are always in the right?

    For what it's worth, unfortunately, I'm a borderline Boomer, myself.

    Replies: @Charles Pewitt, @dfordoom

    Mr Ovelund says:

    For what it’s worth, unfortunately, I’m a borderline Boomer, myself.

    I say:

    I am over 50 and old enough to throw a stone into the baby boomer generational cohort myself.

    I implore you good sir please do not begin singing that “Borderline” song by that dreadful baby boomer creature Madonna from Canada and parts unknown for it would stir much rancor within the realm and leave us cold like a hundred miles north of Montreal.

    Hillary Clinton and Madonna look similar to me and they share French-Canadian ancestry and Hillary Clinton had not one ancestor who fought in the American Secessionary War from the British Empire but to admit of something most wicked I say that judging from photographs Hillary didn’t look bad in a bathing suit and we’ve seen much more of Madonna then it would seem pictures would allow.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @Charles Pewitt


    I implore you good sir please do not begin singing that “Borderline” song by that dreadful baby boomer creature Madonna from Canada and parts unknown for it would stir much rancor within the realm and leave us cold like a hundred miles north of Montreal.
     
    That was the furthest thing from my mind.

    I am over 50 and old enough to throw a stone into the baby boomer generational cohort myself.
     
    Yeah. For men our age in the United States, neither generation quite owns us, which is fine. The Boomers think we're X. The Millennials think we're Boomers. Since the boundaries between the generations are a bit fuzzy at the edges, anyway, 'tis best not to argue the point.

    Obviously, you and I do not belong to the Vietnam-draft-aged core of the Boomer generation, but little purpose is served by denying that we tag along at the ragged trailing rim of subgeneration Jones.

  63. @nebulafox
    @Arclight

    The donors who control the GOP on a national level would sooner sink the ship than give an inch, but why bother with them anyway? Their hatred would be far more politically potent for a candidate than their money. Since when was it a law of nature that to be right-wing and emphasizing personal agency meant fetishizing CEOs and elevating the free market into a religious faith? Political history did not start with Ronald Reagan. Time to think outside the box.

    I'd avoid the "conservative" label, though, for two reasons. 1) Associated way too much with the Gentry Republican crowd, a dumb idea on policy and politics alike, and 2) implies there's anything worth conserving in the status quo for the vast majority of Americans. Screw ideology, offer a platform that treats ideology with total contempt. They'll love you for it.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Charles Pewitt

    Mr Nebulafox says:

    I’d avoid the “conservative” label, though, for two reasons. 1) Associated way too much with the Gentry Republican crowd, a dumb idea on policy and politics alike, and 2) implies there’s anything worth conserving in the status quo for the vast majority of Americans. Screw ideology, offer a platform that treats ideology with total contempt. They’ll love you for it.

    I say:

    Ideology is a bunch of crap and the command and control of the electronics of the American Empire is everything and that means the electronic monetary currency and the electronic propaganda and the electronic control of the nuclear weapons and other weapons systems and the like.

    Pat Buchanan from 2014:

    Yet, when the faith or ideology of a civilization or nation dies, something must replace it. And around the world what peoples and regimes seem to be turning to is nationalism.

    https://vdare.com/articles/the-end-of-ideology-and-the-rebirth-of-nationalism

    Tweets from 2014 and 2015:

  64. @Charles Pewitt
    @V. K. Ovelund

    Mr Ovelund says:

    For what it’s worth, unfortunately, I’m a borderline Boomer, myself.

    I say:

    I am over 50 and old enough to throw a stone into the baby boomer generational cohort myself.

    I implore you good sir please do not begin singing that "Borderline" song by that dreadful baby boomer creature Madonna from Canada and parts unknown for it would stir much rancor within the realm and leave us cold like a hundred miles north of Montreal.

    Hillary Clinton and Madonna look similar to me and they share French-Canadian ancestry and Hillary Clinton had not one ancestor who fought in the American Secessionary War from the British Empire but to admit of something most wicked I say that judging from photographs Hillary didn't look bad in a bathing suit and we've seen much more of Madonna then it would seem pictures would allow.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund

    I implore you good sir please do not begin singing that “Borderline” song by that dreadful baby boomer creature Madonna from Canada and parts unknown for it would stir much rancor within the realm and leave us cold like a hundred miles north of Montreal.

    That was the furthest thing from my mind.

    I am over 50 and old enough to throw a stone into the baby boomer generational cohort myself.

    Yeah. For men our age in the United States, neither generation quite owns us, which is fine. The Boomers think we’re X. The Millennials think we’re Boomers. Since the boundaries between the generations are a bit fuzzy at the edges, anyway, ’tis best not to argue the point.

    Obviously, you and I do not belong to the Vietnam-draft-aged core of the Boomer generation, but little purpose is served by denying that we tag along at the ragged trailing rim of subgeneration Jones.

  65. @V. K. Ovelund
    @AceDeuce


    He says, as he blames the mean ol’ Boomers. LOL.
     
    As usual for a Boomer, you just don't get it. If you want every other generation, both older and younger, to loathe you right to the end, while you bask in your generation's eternally overweening self-righteousness, go right ahead. I obviously can't stop you.

    Excepting the Vietnam veterans, the typical American Boomer still acts like he's 15 years old; yet like a 15-year-old, is so full of excuses, deflections and rationalizations that he is incapable of recognizing the fact.

    Do you wish to grasp why people dislike your generation so severely? Or do you just want to feel that you are always in the right?

    For what it's worth, unfortunately, I'm a borderline Boomer, myself.

    Replies: @Charles Pewitt, @dfordoom

    Do you wish to grasp why people dislike your generation so severely? Or do you just want to feel that you are always in the right?

    Anyone who hates an entire generation is simply irrational. Being irrational isn’t helpful.

    I’m a borderline Boomer, myself.

    You seem to be consumed by guilt about it.

    Lots of white people are consumed by guilt about being white. They’re consumed by guilt about things like slavery. The people who should have felt guilty about slavery were the people who owned and traded in slaves. Even at the time most white people did not own slaves or trade in slaves. Many fought heroically to stamp out slavery.

    You’re falling into the same trap. And you’re encouraging other people to wallow in collective guilt. Wallowing in collective guilt, and trying to impose collective guilt on others, is what got us into the mess we’re in.

    Collective guilt, whether it involves Boomers or white people or whatever, is very destructive. It’s the basis of modern liberalism. Don’t think like a liberal. Don’t get into self-hatred. And don’t expect others to get into self-hatred.

    I expect to see you at the next Boomer Pride March.

    • Replies: @V. K. Ovelund
    @dfordoom


    You seem to be consumed by guilt about it.
     
    Not really. I served in the military, got married, raised five children to be white nationalists, and maintained my children's mother at home as a housewife. And then, as soon as I got the chance, I backed the Alt-Right, not only with my mouth but with my pocketbook. As far as I know, there's not a lot more I could have done to atone, except to sit in a prison cell to keep James Alex Fields, Jr., company.

    But even if I do not feel very guilty to be a borderline boomer, I am embarrassed to be associated with that generation. In the United States, it's the generation that inherited everything, consumed most of it, left little behind, and had the gall to boast of the feat.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @Resartus
    @dfordoom


    Anyone who hates an entire generation is simply irrational. Being irrational isn’t helpful.
     
    Congress probably has less Boomers than War Babies (WWII)...
    Including the current President....
    Only the random change of dates for being a Boomer (changed 3 times since I reached majority)
    places the VP as one.... Before the changes, even Obama would have been an X-Gen...
    Expect the changes were an X-Gen thing for those born in the mid 60s,
    who didn't want to be called one, before they had Millennials to dis on.....
  66. @dfordoom
    @nebulafox


    I’d avoid the “conservative” label, though, for two reasons. 1) Associated way too much with the Gentry Republican crowd, a dumb idea on policy and politics alike, and 2) implies there’s anything worth conserving in the status quo for the vast majority of Americans.
     
    I agree. It's also a good idea to avoid the "right-wing" label - to the kinds of people that you need to reach the Right is synonymous with greed, viciousness and stupidity.

    Screw ideology, offer a platform that treats ideology with total contempt. They’ll love you for it.
     
    Yep. Pragmatism. Support policies that actually work. Who gives a damn whether a policy is supposedly left-wing or right-wing or liberal or conservative? What matters is - will the policy work and will it benefit ordinary people?

    Replies: @nebulafox

    I got left-wing views on some things, right-wing views on others. Really, I reject current political divisions as asinine. I suspect this sort of non-coherent mixture is relatively closer to how most American voters feel than your average Beltway denizen. The simple willingness to do things as mundane as talking in policy-specific terms or avoiding a moralizing message will be appealing in an age where an increasing amount of people sense that symbolism is being used to screw them over. This is not about “Who We Are”. This is about a government that is willing to do anything except serve its citizens. Once in power, be a speaker of words, but moreso, be a doer of deeds.

    So pop the bubble. And in the words of Ed Koch: you agree with me on 70% of what I say, vote for me, agree with me on 100% of what I say, get your head examined.

    What I’m utterly uncompromising on is smashing the power of a completely failed, venal, and increasingly authoritarian-friendly elite: economic, media, bureaucratic, military, and political. These people need to go if America is to have a chance at solving its deep structural and socioeconomic rot. Who will mourn their loss after the past 30 years? That, and trying to find some way of ensuring that Americans can once again have the ability solve their problems by building, not by trying to get the nearest abstract authority to take their side. Might be too late for my generation, there, but at least our kids don’t have to go through the same neuroticizing hell.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @nebulafox


    I got left-wing views on some things, right-wing views on others. Really, I reject current political divisions as asinine.
     
    Beautiful - love it!

    Peace.
  67. @dfordoom
    @unit472


    Why shouldn’t baby boomers be nostalgic and long for the America that was stolen from us?
     
    There's nothing wrong or irrational in thinking that it would be better to go back to the world of the 1980s. It was a better and more sane world.

    Boomers weren't the ones who made the decisions that destroyed Norman Rockwell's America. Those decisions were made by the Silent Generation, and by the generation before the Silent Generation.

    Boomers didn't invent liberalism. They also didn't start the Sexual Revolution. That was started by the Silent Generation. Boomers didn't invent the contraceptive pill. Boomers didn't invent the drug culture. The drug culture was starting to emerge during the late 50s. It was accelerated dramatically by the Vietnam War. And Boomers didn't start the Vietnam War. Boomers weren't the ones who were responsible for mass immigration - those decisions were made by the Greatest Generation and the Silent Generation. Boomers weren't the ones who started pushing the homosexual agenda - that was the Silent Generation as well.

    Boomers had no decisive influence on the culture until the 80s. The 80s was a period of sanity compared to today but the seeds of destruction were sown in the 1950s and the 1960s.

    And none of the crucial decisions that changed our civilisation beyond all recognition were made by ordinary people. They were made by politicians and bureaucrats and academics and (even more especially) by corporate types in the boardrooms of giant corporations.

    Replies: @AP

    Well said. Boomers eagerly took part in and revelled in these processes, cashed in on them, becoming their face, but the so-called Greatest Generation created them.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @AP


    Well said. Boomers eagerly took part in and revelled in these processes, cashed in on them, becoming their face
     
    A lot of Boomers got married and had kids, went to church regularly and voted for Reagan. Even in the late 60s and the 70s most Boomers were not hippies or student activists. Most Boomers were not indulging in group sex, or joining Gay Liberation movements.

    It's a mistake to think of any group as monolithic, and generations in particular are not the slightest bit monolithic.

    "Boomers" did not do anything because the notion of Boomers (or any other generation) as a coherent group is laughably inaccurate.

    but the so-called Greatest Generation created them.
     
    A small element within the Greatest Generation and the Silent Generation created these processes. These processes were already underway in the late 50s which was when the counterculture started.

    Social and cultural revolutions are not mass revolutions. They're invariably elite revolutions, or the result of power struggles within the elite.
  68. This rightward shift is almost all on economic issues I would guess. Boomers are still culturally and socially liberal. Even if they do have conservative tendencies they get scared of being called the R word and acquiesce to whatever the TV talking heads tell them.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Magic Dirt Resident


    This rightward shift is almost all on economic issues I would guess. Boomers are still culturally and socially liberal.
     
    Most older people are moderate cultural and social liberals. Most younger people are extreme cultural and social liberals. So older people are mostly culturally and socially conservative by comparison.

    Being a moderate cultural and/or social liberal isn't the worst thing in the world. If you look at the cultural landscape of the 60s, 70s and 80s and the social and sexual mores of those decades the situation wasn't so awful.

    Crime was a problem but that was mostly due to drugs and social liberals may have a point when they argue that prohibition of drugs made the problem much much worse than it needed to be.

    Those were "live and let live" decades. If you wanted to get married and have kids that was fine. If you didn't want to do that, that was fine as well. If homosexuals wanted to live their lifestyle nobody cared too much as long as it wasn't shoved into their faces. If you wanted to be monogamous that was fine. If you didn't want to be monogamous that was fine.

    Things didn't start to get bad until social media came along. There had been political correctness as far back as the 70s but it was strongly resisted and it was possible to ignore it. Social media changed all that. Social media made it possible for political correctness to be enforced. Social media made it possible for people's lives to be destroyed for offences against political correctness. Social media handed the Thought Police the weapon they needed to enforce rigid social conformity.

    Most older people (those born before the 80s) would probably like to return to the "live and let live" atmosphere of the 60s, 70s and 80s. Moderate social and cultural liberalism without the Thought Police and the Woke Police and the SJW Police.

    I don't think that what older people would like to see is so unreasonable.

    The problem is that social media makes it impossible to return to a Live And Let Live world.

    The problem of social media is a problem for which the Right (both mainstream and dissident right) doesn't seem to have an answer.

    Replies: @Talha

  69. @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Do you wish to grasp why people dislike your generation so severely? Or do you just want to feel that you are always in the right?
     
    Anyone who hates an entire generation is simply irrational. Being irrational isn't helpful.

    I’m a borderline Boomer, myself.
     
    You seem to be consumed by guilt about it.

    Lots of white people are consumed by guilt about being white. They're consumed by guilt about things like slavery. The people who should have felt guilty about slavery were the people who owned and traded in slaves. Even at the time most white people did not own slaves or trade in slaves. Many fought heroically to stamp out slavery.

    You're falling into the same trap. And you're encouraging other people to wallow in collective guilt. Wallowing in collective guilt, and trying to impose collective guilt on others, is what got us into the mess we're in.

    Collective guilt, whether it involves Boomers or white people or whatever, is very destructive. It's the basis of modern liberalism. Don't think like a liberal. Don't get into self-hatred. And don't expect others to get into self-hatred.

    I expect to see you at the next Boomer Pride March.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Resartus

    You seem to be consumed by guilt about it.

    Not really. I served in the military, got married, raised five children to be white nationalists, and maintained my children’s mother at home as a housewife. And then, as soon as I got the chance, I backed the Alt-Right, not only with my mouth but with my pocketbook. As far as I know, there’s not a lot more I could have done to atone, except to sit in a prison cell to keep James Alex Fields, Jr., company.

    But even if I do not feel very guilty to be a borderline boomer, I am embarrassed to be associated with that generation. In the United States, it’s the generation that inherited everything, consumed most of it, left little behind, and had the gall to boast of the feat.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    But even if I do not feel very guilty to be a borderline boomer, I am embarrassed to be associated with that generation.
     
    I don't understand that. Being a member of a particular generation is too vague and amorphous to be a basis for an identity, either positive or negative. It's like being embarrassed to be a football fan because you disapprove of the behaviour of some football fans. Or being embarrassed to be a musician because some musicians are pretentious twerps.

    I've never thought of being a Boomer as being an essential part of my identity anyway. It just isn't a sufficiently meaningful concept. I don't mind being taken to task for bad or stupid things I've actually done, but I can't comprehend the idea of being embarrassed about the year I was born.

    Some Boomers have done stupid things. Some haven't. Some Boomers are idiots. Some aren't.

    Some Millennials have done stupid things. Some haven't. Some Millennials are idiots. Some aren't.

    I think our current prime minister is appalling and he's GenX but I don't blame all GenXers for Scott Morrison's awfulness and folly.
  70. @AP
    @dfordoom

    Well said. Boomers eagerly took part in and revelled in these processes, cashed in on them, becoming their face, but the so-called Greatest Generation created them.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Well said. Boomers eagerly took part in and revelled in these processes, cashed in on them, becoming their face

    A lot of Boomers got married and had kids, went to church regularly and voted for Reagan. Even in the late 60s and the 70s most Boomers were not hippies or student activists. Most Boomers were not indulging in group sex, or joining Gay Liberation movements.

    It’s a mistake to think of any group as monolithic, and generations in particular are not the slightest bit monolithic.

    “Boomers” did not do anything because the notion of Boomers (or any other generation) as a coherent group is laughably inaccurate.

    but the so-called Greatest Generation created them.

    A small element within the Greatest Generation and the Silent Generation created these processes. These processes were already underway in the late 50s which was when the counterculture started.

    Social and cultural revolutions are not mass revolutions. They’re invariably elite revolutions, or the result of power struggles within the elite.

  71. @nebulafox
    @dfordoom

    I got left-wing views on some things, right-wing views on others. Really, I reject current political divisions as asinine. I suspect this sort of non-coherent mixture is relatively closer to how most American voters feel than your average Beltway denizen. The simple willingness to do things as mundane as talking in policy-specific terms or avoiding a moralizing message will be appealing in an age where an increasing amount of people sense that symbolism is being used to screw them over. This is not about "Who We Are". This is about a government that is willing to do anything except serve its citizens. Once in power, be a speaker of words, but moreso, be a doer of deeds.

    So pop the bubble. And in the words of Ed Koch: you agree with me on 70% of what I say, vote for me, agree with me on 100% of what I say, get your head examined.

    What I'm utterly uncompromising on is smashing the power of a completely failed, venal, and increasingly authoritarian-friendly elite: economic, media, bureaucratic, military, and political. These people need to go if America is to have a chance at solving its deep structural and socioeconomic rot. Who will mourn their loss after the past 30 years? That, and trying to find some way of ensuring that Americans can once again have the ability solve their problems by building, not by trying to get the nearest abstract authority to take their side. Might be too late for my generation, there, but at least our kids don't have to go through the same neuroticizing hell.

    Replies: @Talha

    I got left-wing views on some things, right-wing views on others. Really, I reject current political divisions as asinine.

    Beautiful – love it!

    Peace.

  72. @V. K. Ovelund
    @dfordoom


    You seem to be consumed by guilt about it.
     
    Not really. I served in the military, got married, raised five children to be white nationalists, and maintained my children's mother at home as a housewife. And then, as soon as I got the chance, I backed the Alt-Right, not only with my mouth but with my pocketbook. As far as I know, there's not a lot more I could have done to atone, except to sit in a prison cell to keep James Alex Fields, Jr., company.

    But even if I do not feel very guilty to be a borderline boomer, I am embarrassed to be associated with that generation. In the United States, it's the generation that inherited everything, consumed most of it, left little behind, and had the gall to boast of the feat.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    But even if I do not feel very guilty to be a borderline boomer, I am embarrassed to be associated with that generation.

    I don’t understand that. Being a member of a particular generation is too vague and amorphous to be a basis for an identity, either positive or negative. It’s like being embarrassed to be a football fan because you disapprove of the behaviour of some football fans. Or being embarrassed to be a musician because some musicians are pretentious twerps.

    I’ve never thought of being a Boomer as being an essential part of my identity anyway. It just isn’t a sufficiently meaningful concept. I don’t mind being taken to task for bad or stupid things I’ve actually done, but I can’t comprehend the idea of being embarrassed about the year I was born.

    Some Boomers have done stupid things. Some haven’t. Some Boomers are idiots. Some aren’t.

    Some Millennials have done stupid things. Some haven’t. Some Millennials are idiots. Some aren’t.

    I think our current prime minister is appalling and he’s GenX but I don’t blame all GenXers for Scott Morrison’s awfulness and folly.

  73. @Magic Dirt Resident
    This rightward shift is almost all on economic issues I would guess. Boomers are still culturally and socially liberal. Even if they do have conservative tendencies they get scared of being called the R word and acquiesce to whatever the TV talking heads tell them.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    This rightward shift is almost all on economic issues I would guess. Boomers are still culturally and socially liberal.

    Most older people are moderate cultural and social liberals. Most younger people are extreme cultural and social liberals. So older people are mostly culturally and socially conservative by comparison.

    Being a moderate cultural and/or social liberal isn’t the worst thing in the world. If you look at the cultural landscape of the 60s, 70s and 80s and the social and sexual mores of those decades the situation wasn’t so awful.

    Crime was a problem but that was mostly due to drugs and social liberals may have a point when they argue that prohibition of drugs made the problem much much worse than it needed to be.

    Those were “live and let live” decades. If you wanted to get married and have kids that was fine. If you didn’t want to do that, that was fine as well. If homosexuals wanted to live their lifestyle nobody cared too much as long as it wasn’t shoved into their faces. If you wanted to be monogamous that was fine. If you didn’t want to be monogamous that was fine.

    Things didn’t start to get bad until social media came along. There had been political correctness as far back as the 70s but it was strongly resisted and it was possible to ignore it. Social media changed all that. Social media made it possible for political correctness to be enforced. Social media made it possible for people’s lives to be destroyed for offences against political correctness. Social media handed the Thought Police the weapon they needed to enforce rigid social conformity.

    Most older people (those born before the 80s) would probably like to return to the “live and let live” atmosphere of the 60s, 70s and 80s. Moderate social and cultural liberalism without the Thought Police and the Woke Police and the SJW Police.

    I don’t think that what older people would like to see is so unreasonable.

    The problem is that social media makes it impossible to return to a Live And Let Live world.

    The problem of social media is a problem for which the Right (both mainstream and dissident right) doesn’t seem to have an answer.

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
    • Replies: @Talha
    @dfordoom


    Thought Police and the Woke Police and the SJW Police
     
    Nooooooooo!!!!
    https://www.twitter.com/BBCWorld/status/1365148857764622347

    Peace.

    Replies: @Talha

  74. @obwandiyag
    @Jay Fink

    Sorry. Blacks and Hispanics and Asians are not "liberal," except on issues relating to their own civil rights. This is well-known.

    Replies: @Jay Fink

    You forgot economics. It would be more accurate to say minorities are fiscally liberal and socially conservative, except for civil rights. Also, whatever social conservatism they have does not make voting Republican more attractive for the large majority of them.

    • Agree: Mark G.
  75. @dfordoom
    @Jay Fink


    My guess is no we will not see the same pattern with younger generations, at least not to this extent. First of all young people are more deeply indoctrinated than the boomers were.
     
    I think we'll see much the same pattern with GenX. But for those born after about the early 80s I suspect it will be different.

    Boomers and GenX (yes I know these generations things are artificial but I'm using it as a convenient shorthand for anyone born earlier than roughly 1980) may have been liberal or leftist or even quite radical when they were young but they were exposed to competing ideas. Anyone born prior to around 1965 had plenty of exposure to competing ideas.

    It's not just that the younger generations don't get any exposure to conservative ideas. They don't get any exposure to dissenting leftist or even dissenting liberal views.

    Replies: @Jay Fink

    I am an early Gen X and I don’t think we were ever that liberal, especially compared to boomers when they were young or anyone that’s under 40 today. We came of age during Reagan and he was popular. Liberalism was not trendy for young people in the 80s.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Jay Fink


    I am an early Gen X and I don’t think we were ever that liberal, especially compared to boomers when they were young or anyone that’s under 40 today. We came of age during Reagan and he was popular. Liberalism was not trendy for young people in the 80s.
     
    Again it's impossible to make generalisations about entire generations. Lots of Boomers voted for Reagan. Lots of GenXers voted against him.

    By the time Reagan was elected most people accepted most of the moderate liberal agenda. The Reagan Administration certainly didn't turn the clock back to the 1950s.

    Overall I'd say that from the end of WW2 to the early 90s the trend was towards greater and greater acceptance of liberalism, but it was a much more moderate liberalism compared to today's liberalism. Until the 90s the extreme manifestations of liberalism were still pretty fringe.

    Things started to change in the 90s. Extreme social and cultural liberalism started to go mainstream. I still think the really dramatic break occurred with the emergence of social media. Suddenly the fringe groups of social liberal extremists had a means of organising themselves.

    There was also the rise of geek culture which tended to be libertarian.

    The differences between generations have never been as significant as the differences between urban and rural populations and between middle class and working class populations. Radical social liberalism has always been an urban and a middle class thing. Now it's being imposed on everybody and social media has played a large part in that.

    Schools have become more aggressive in pushing radical social agendas and that's happened as the teaching profession has become more dominated by late GenXers and Millennials.

    Boomer and early GenX social liberalism is of the Live And Let Live variety, while the social liberalism of younger generations is of the You Will Conform Or Else variety. It's not so much a question of beliefs on social issues having changed radically - it's increasingly a question of people believing that they can impose their beliefs by force.
  76. @Jay Fink
    @dfordoom

    I am an early Gen X and I don't think we were ever that liberal, especially compared to boomers when they were young or anyone that's under 40 today. We came of age during Reagan and he was popular. Liberalism was not trendy for young people in the 80s.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    I am an early Gen X and I don’t think we were ever that liberal, especially compared to boomers when they were young or anyone that’s under 40 today. We came of age during Reagan and he was popular. Liberalism was not trendy for young people in the 80s.

    Again it’s impossible to make generalisations about entire generations. Lots of Boomers voted for Reagan. Lots of GenXers voted against him.

    By the time Reagan was elected most people accepted most of the moderate liberal agenda. The Reagan Administration certainly didn’t turn the clock back to the 1950s.

    Overall I’d say that from the end of WW2 to the early 90s the trend was towards greater and greater acceptance of liberalism, but it was a much more moderate liberalism compared to today’s liberalism. Until the 90s the extreme manifestations of liberalism were still pretty fringe.

    Things started to change in the 90s. Extreme social and cultural liberalism started to go mainstream. I still think the really dramatic break occurred with the emergence of social media. Suddenly the fringe groups of social liberal extremists had a means of organising themselves.

    There was also the rise of geek culture which tended to be libertarian.

    The differences between generations have never been as significant as the differences between urban and rural populations and between middle class and working class populations. Radical social liberalism has always been an urban and a middle class thing. Now it’s being imposed on everybody and social media has played a large part in that.

    Schools have become more aggressive in pushing radical social agendas and that’s happened as the teaching profession has become more dominated by late GenXers and Millennials.

    Boomer and early GenX social liberalism is of the Live And Let Live variety, while the social liberalism of younger generations is of the You Will Conform Or Else variety. It’s not so much a question of beliefs on social issues having changed radically – it’s increasingly a question of people believing that they can impose their beliefs by force.

  77. @dfordoom
    @Magic Dirt Resident


    This rightward shift is almost all on economic issues I would guess. Boomers are still culturally and socially liberal.
     
    Most older people are moderate cultural and social liberals. Most younger people are extreme cultural and social liberals. So older people are mostly culturally and socially conservative by comparison.

    Being a moderate cultural and/or social liberal isn't the worst thing in the world. If you look at the cultural landscape of the 60s, 70s and 80s and the social and sexual mores of those decades the situation wasn't so awful.

    Crime was a problem but that was mostly due to drugs and social liberals may have a point when they argue that prohibition of drugs made the problem much much worse than it needed to be.

    Those were "live and let live" decades. If you wanted to get married and have kids that was fine. If you didn't want to do that, that was fine as well. If homosexuals wanted to live their lifestyle nobody cared too much as long as it wasn't shoved into their faces. If you wanted to be monogamous that was fine. If you didn't want to be monogamous that was fine.

    Things didn't start to get bad until social media came along. There had been political correctness as far back as the 70s but it was strongly resisted and it was possible to ignore it. Social media changed all that. Social media made it possible for political correctness to be enforced. Social media made it possible for people's lives to be destroyed for offences against political correctness. Social media handed the Thought Police the weapon they needed to enforce rigid social conformity.

    Most older people (those born before the 80s) would probably like to return to the "live and let live" atmosphere of the 60s, 70s and 80s. Moderate social and cultural liberalism without the Thought Police and the Woke Police and the SJW Police.

    I don't think that what older people would like to see is so unreasonable.

    The problem is that social media makes it impossible to return to a Live And Let Live world.

    The problem of social media is a problem for which the Right (both mainstream and dissident right) doesn't seem to have an answer.

    Replies: @Talha

    Thought Police and the Woke Police and the SJW Police

    Nooooooooo!!!!

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @Talha

    It may be due to avoiding potential future legal problems...🤔
    “California lawmakers are considering a bill that would penalize department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other items by gender.”
    https://www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle/california-law-fine-department-stores-1000-separating-toys-gender

    Replies: @Talha

  78. @MattinLA
    @Talha

    Good post. A lot to learn about here. Thank you.

    Replies: @Talha

    Most welcome. Related to this; a Muslim scholar that I keep up with suggested a poem by Rudyard Kipling (that old English white guy with his trusty pen) to use as a teaching lesson for young men (which I will, inshaAllah, read with my boys). But this is something white fathers can also read to theirs.

    See below the more tag for “If”.

    Peace.

    [MORE]

    If

    If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
    If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;
    If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
    Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
    And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

    If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;
    If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
    Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

    If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
    And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;
    If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
    And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

    If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
    If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;
    If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
    Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
    And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

    • Thanks: V. K. Ovelund
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Talha

    "If you can keep your head when all the others around you are losing theirs....

    Maybe you just haven't heard the news."

    As we used to say on Wall Street.

  79. @Talha
    @dfordoom


    Thought Police and the Woke Police and the SJW Police
     
    Nooooooooo!!!!
    https://www.twitter.com/BBCWorld/status/1365148857764622347

    Peace.

    Replies: @Talha

    It may be due to avoiding potential future legal problems…🤔
    “California lawmakers are considering a bill that would penalize department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other items by gender.”
    https://www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle/california-law-fine-department-stores-1000-separating-toys-gender

    • Replies: @Talha
    @Talha

    And then we have these nitwits rolling in some golden idol of the orange god-emperor:
    https://www.twitter.com/projectlincoln/status/1365177633911296002

    Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right...

    Makes one miss Clinton vs Dole:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgBFiCmYedc

  80. @Talha
    @Talha

    It may be due to avoiding potential future legal problems...🤔
    “California lawmakers are considering a bill that would penalize department stores for separating children’s toys, clothing and other items by gender.”
    https://www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle/california-law-fine-department-stores-1000-separating-toys-gender

    Replies: @Talha

    And then we have these nitwits rolling in some golden idol of the orange god-emperor:

    Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right…

    Makes one miss Clinton vs Dole:

  81. @Kratoklastes
    @V. K. Ovelund

    The fact that otherwise-sensible people will regurgitate US-media talking points about foreign political identities, shows what a piss-poor job we're all doing (as a 'movement') at sloughing off 'our' own indoctrination.

    Chavez appeared to be a reasonably capable leader - at least no worse than many South American political leaders since the 1950s (which is about when the US decided it owns South America and can interfere in domestic arrangements in any country that defies its edicts).

    If a leader's political objectives do not align with the desires of the US Death Machine, that leader is always going to be pushing shit uphill. It's reasonably hard for a nation to advance if it's kept out of global capital markets: that doesn't require the presence of formal sanctions - it can be the Game Theoretic consequences of trade relationships ("Don't piss off the US - it's a big market for our exports").

    And as we are all aware, the objectives of the US Death Machine are determined by a clique that is 'incentivised' by cash flows from people who want the untrammelled power to steal other people's (and peoples') shit.

    Castro; Chavez; Maduro; Morales - their respective incumbencies faced 'headwinds' that were entirely generated by a bunch of absolute cunts who willfully punished the respective nations for having the gall to refuse US edicts. (This doesn't entirely overcome my gut-level hatred of anyone who wants to be a political leader - but at least these people were locals).

    It's been a little over 25 years since I lost patience with the US Death Machine's attempts to help its owners steal everyone else's shit. Every instance of blowback - including Blowback Day 2001 - and every strategic and tactical humiliation, is a fraction of what the US Death Machine deserves.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    It’s been a little over 25 years since I lost patience with the US Death Machine’s attempts to help its owners steal everyone else’s shit. Every instance of blowback – including Blowback Day 2001 – and every strategic and tactical humiliation, is a fraction of what the US Death Machine deserves.

    I guess you fell for Persian Excursion 1: Saddam must be stopped, then. I certainly did. Then, at the end, the execrable HW Bush encouraged the Kurds and marsh Arabs to rebel, and let them get cut down by Saddam afterward. That was it for me.

    It will take others a while. I hope all the people who genuinely voted for Biden (and not against Trump) are made to feel shame for the deaths he will inflict by drone, airstrike, etc. I don’t wish harm to the grunts who are boots on the ground enforcing this policy, but it has to be obvious now: the entire structure of the USA is rotten, and it started with the Military Industrial complex. I don’t have any choice about paying taxes to kill people in Syria, but anyone signing up does have a choice not to.

    Thanks for your outrageous and personal note.

  82. @Talha
    @MattinLA

    Most welcome. Related to this; a Muslim scholar that I keep up with suggested a poem by Rudyard Kipling (that old English white guy with his trusty pen) to use as a teaching lesson for young men (which I will, inshaAllah, read with my boys). But this is something white fathers can also read to theirs.

    See below the more tag for “If”.

    Peace.

    If

    If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
    If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;
    If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
    Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
    And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

    If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;
    If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
    Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

    If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
    And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;
    If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
    And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

    If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
    If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;
    If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
    Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
    And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    “If you can keep your head when all the others around you are losing theirs….

    [MORE]

    Maybe you just haven’t heard the news.”

    As we used to say on Wall Street.

    • LOL: Talha
  83. @Buzz Mohawk
    Of note is the way moderates haven't changed much. It appears to be former liberals who have become conservatives. People searching for one true way or another when there isn't one.

    The political life journey here is that of eventually learning that left/right, liberal/conservative, D/R doesn't describe one at all, or the real world, and that it is all a bunch of crap that people spend endless hours writing and arguing about.

    Screw both major parties, parties in general, and all politics. This is the voice of one who has seen enough.

    Replies: @pirelli

    Or it could be that many former liberals are now identifying as moderates and many former moderates as conservatives. No way to tell from the data unless I’m missing something.

    But very much agreed that people waste an obscene amount of time reading writing and talking about politics. I think if you’ve spent 15-30 minutes reading the news, including political news, that’s all you need to do for the day (unless it’s your livelihood).

    • Agree: Audacious Epigone
  84. @dfordoom
    @V. K. Ovelund


    Do you wish to grasp why people dislike your generation so severely? Or do you just want to feel that you are always in the right?
     
    Anyone who hates an entire generation is simply irrational. Being irrational isn't helpful.

    I’m a borderline Boomer, myself.
     
    You seem to be consumed by guilt about it.

    Lots of white people are consumed by guilt about being white. They're consumed by guilt about things like slavery. The people who should have felt guilty about slavery were the people who owned and traded in slaves. Even at the time most white people did not own slaves or trade in slaves. Many fought heroically to stamp out slavery.

    You're falling into the same trap. And you're encouraging other people to wallow in collective guilt. Wallowing in collective guilt, and trying to impose collective guilt on others, is what got us into the mess we're in.

    Collective guilt, whether it involves Boomers or white people or whatever, is very destructive. It's the basis of modern liberalism. Don't think like a liberal. Don't get into self-hatred. And don't expect others to get into self-hatred.

    I expect to see you at the next Boomer Pride March.

    Replies: @V. K. Ovelund, @Resartus

    Anyone who hates an entire generation is simply irrational. Being irrational isn’t helpful.

    Congress probably has less Boomers than War Babies (WWII)…
    Including the current President….
    Only the random change of dates for being a Boomer (changed 3 times since I reached majority)
    places the VP as one…. Before the changes, even Obama would have been an X-Gen…
    Expect the changes were an X-Gen thing for those born in the mid 60s,
    who didn’t want to be called one, before they had Millennials to dis on…..

  85. @Reactionary Utopian
    Ohfergodssake.

    These "generational" categories are about as useless a tool for understanding politics and culture as "left - right."

    Babies are born each and every single year. Plot births against year, for any multiple-decades time domain you like. It's not a discontinuous function, nor even close. So we're to think that someone born in 1964 is a Boomer with certain characteristics, and someone born in 1965 is ... what? An X-er? Some other stupid category name? With, obviously, significantly different characteristics?

    If you harbor bitterness toward your parents, and want to blame them for all that is wrong, have at it. It's an urge as old as mankind. But own it for what it is. This "greatest generation," boomer, X-er, millennial, zoomer, Y-er, whatever-the-hell-er, it's worn out. Let it go.

    Replies: @Franz, @Craig Nelsen

    This “greatest generation,” boomer, X-er, millennial, zoomer, Y-er, whatever-the-hell-er, it’s worn out. Let it go.

    According to De Tocqueville, only the mind of God is infinite and able to see every situation in all its particularities. We humans, having finite minds, are forced to use generalities [i.e., labels] and, therefore, are often in error.

    But it’s the best we can do. And labelling has some utility, error-prone as it may be.

    • Agree: V. K. Ovelund

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