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PISA Will Now Test for Tolerance
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We are reaching levels of neoliberalism that shouldn’t even be possible.

But the economic think tank has decided to introduce a very different kind of test, addressing the type of skills young people need to navigate a world of “post-truth” and social media “echo chambers”. …

The test will measure tolerance, cultural awareness and how well teenagers can distinguish between reliable sources of information and fake news.

It will consider issues such as racism, cultural identity and prejudice. …

In the USSR, getting a “red diploma” in university – the rough equivalent of a American summa cum laude – was contingent on acing the courses on scientific communism and similar crap.

Interesting to see neoliberalism.txt developing in a similar direction.

Andreas Schleicher, the OECD’s education director, said the success of education systems had to be measured on more than exam results.

Speaking in London at the Education World Forum, he said there had to be a greater awareness of “values”. …

But Mr Schleicher said the “crunch” point was that some countries were reluctant to be compared on these measures.

And there had been a “hesitation” about moving from discussing students’ beliefs to “hard data” from testing them.

“I take a different view. The only way to get serious, the only way to get started with this issue is to look at the truth,” said the OECD’s education chief.

Mr Schleicher said that the test would reveal the countries that paid only “lip service” to the ideas of tolerance and inclusion.

“What do students actually think? What do students actually know?

“That’s the aim of Pisa, to confront us with the real world, not the world of words and beautiful theory,” he said.

The most successful education systems were often the most open and diverse, Mr Schleicher said, giving Canada as an example.

Countries that are not really tolerant and inclusive yet:

But some Western countries including England, the United States, Germany, France, Denmark, the Netherlands, Finland and Ireland have decided not to take the global competence test, although they will take the other core academic subject tests.

Schools in Scotland, Australia and Canada are among those that will take the global competence test, which is being launched this year.

Here are some of the questions that Scots, Australians, and Canadians will be asked in this test:

  • I respect the values of people from different cultures.
  • I value the opinions of people from different cultures.
  • Immigrants should have the opportunity to continue their own customs and lifestyle.

Since possible answers are all variations on Agree/Disagree, wouldn’t it be easier to just ask “How much do you agree with SJWs out of 100”?

 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Education, PISA, SJWs 
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  1. Western countries including England, the United States, Germany, France, Denmark, the Netherlands, Finland and Ireland have decided not to take the global competence test

    Was surprised over Germany and France in there. The US would have been surprising if the decision was taken during the Obama regime, but it doesn’t say exactly when the call was taken to be part of the pro-poz testing or not.

    Regardless, I’ll admit I don’t really get worked up by this as it is voluntary. Secondly, the West is in relative decline. I don’t see this kind of obsession in either China or India, which are the two main rising powers and whose preferences will increasingly shape the global policy direction.

    Finally, this whole thing kind of reminds me of the incessant attacks on the supposed evil of rote learning in the West. The best-performing kid Turns out in order to be creative you have to have a strong grasp on the fundamentals first. s are in North-East Asia where there is a strong emphasis on rote learning. Western conventional wisdom was in the opposite direction for decades and they paid the price for that.

  2. The big problem I see is that those questions are perfectly at home in an opinion survey, they have no place alongside the fact- and knowledge-based tests in reading, math and science. So they will be totaled along the other measures, and the news media will make alarming articles on how [insert country name here]’s rankings are so low, thus urgent reforms are needed.

    Or, if the rank is high enough (i.e. higher than the USA), how great [insert country name here] is, how lucky we are and how everything is fine, so just keep on buying those million dollar crack houses.

  3. I believe ‘Neoliberalism’ refers to program of free-market economics and reductions in government spending. But the term is only used by critics – originally applied to ‘Pinochet’ in Chile.

    Aside from ideological issues now being inserted, as a way to subtly insert the same cultural agenda universally, I am not sure this PISA test is competent.

    Reading the sample test, I cannot understand what this is supposed to be testing? – and there is no way it can be the same across different languages.

    (An old sample test)

    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisaproducts/Take%20the%20test%20e%20book.pdf

    The ‘maths’ paper has no maths in it!

    http://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisaproducts/pisa2012-2006-rel-items-maths-ENG.pdf

    It’s some kind of counting test.

    I guess this is a result of the fact of testing at age 15, which is not yet the age when many youth begin to be able to learn subjects.

    If they start testing at the higher education age – they might get more relevant results.

    I think OECD is useful at is doing things like writing reports of local housing markets. Otherwise it seems to be another money scamming project, like many international bodies (UNESCO, etc).

    • Replies: @El Dato

    I guess this is a result of the fact of testing at age 15, which is not yet the age when many youth begin to be able to learn subjects.
     
    Actually it's already past the age when many youth will ever be able to learn subjects.
  4. I respect the values of people from different cultures.
    I value the opinions of people from different cultures.
    Immigrants should have the opportunity to continue their own customs and lifestyle.

    Is there something really evil, wicked, mean and nasty about these questions? I’m not for Somalis getting every single sort of government entitlement program imaginable (and not imaginable) like they do in Minnesota, but in general, aren’t the values that these questions are probing for just plain old fashioned American virtues? BTW, doesn’t Russia at least nominally try to project these same sorts of values for its Asian and Caucasian immigrants to the hinterlands?…

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    The problem is that ranking values, which are subjective and somewhat vaguely defined (who's to say openness is good, perhaps acting like a extremely nepotistic, clannish SOB is the right thing after all?) are put on the same level as actual, theoretical knowledge, which can be measured and ranked with a generally agreed upon standard.

    "Immigrants should have the opportunity to continue their own customs and lifestyle", nothing ominous about this?

    It is a very weasely phrase, on one hand it can be presented for naïve whites as a "melting pot (with not so much melting) "-esque tolerance with the expectation that the foreigners will eventually assimilate, while on the other hand it provides the justification for the establishment and continuation of what are essentially foreign colonial extensions of the mother country.

    Also, if a country takes the test and gets a "bad" score or even a not full-blown pozzed result, do you think the multi-kulti agitation and propaganda organisations won't find a way to agitate for more indoctrination and re-education "reforms" in the education system than there already is? Why on earth would we want to give them more ammunition?
    , @Thorfinnsson

    but in general, aren’t the values that these questions are probing for just plain old fashioned American virtues?
     
    Absolutely not, cuck.

    Values and opinions of other cultures are only to be valued to the extent those cultures have merit. And even when they do have merit, one should always be biased in favor of one's own people and against nefarious foreigners.

    Immigrants who wish to continue their own customs and lifestyles should go home instead of parasitically leeching off our social capital.
  5. @Mr. Hack

    I respect the values of people from different cultures.
    I value the opinions of people from different cultures.
    Immigrants should have the opportunity to continue their own customs and lifestyle.
     
    Is there something really evil, wicked, mean and nasty about these questions? I'm not for Somalis getting every single sort of government entitlement program imaginable (and not imaginable) like they do in Minnesota, but in general, aren't the values that these questions are probing for just plain old fashioned American virtues? BTW, doesn't Russia at least nominally try to project these same sorts of values for its Asian and Caucasian immigrants to the hinterlands?...

    The problem is that ranking values, which are subjective and somewhat vaguely defined (who’s to say openness is good, perhaps acting like a extremely nepotistic, clannish SOB is the right thing after all?) are put on the same level as actual, theoretical knowledge, which can be measured and ranked with a generally agreed upon standard.

    “Immigrants should have the opportunity to continue their own customs and lifestyle”, nothing ominous about this?

    It is a very weasely phrase, on one hand it can be presented for naïve whites as a “melting pot (with not so much melting) “-esque tolerance with the expectation that the foreigners will eventually assimilate, while on the other hand it provides the justification for the establishment and continuation of what are essentially foreign colonial extensions of the mother country.

    Also, if a country takes the test and gets a “bad” score or even a not full-blown pozzed result, do you think the multi-kulti agitation and propaganda organisations won’t find a way to agitate for more indoctrination and re-education “reforms” in the education system than there already is? Why on earth would we want to give them more ammunition?

  6. In the USSR, getting a “red diploma” in university – the rough equivalent of a American summa cum laude – was contingent on acing the courses on scientific communism and similar crap.

    Define “acing”. But before you define it on the subject of which you have no idea about I’ll give you some info–you couldn’t have “threes” (“Cs”) as a bottom line and the question was in what grades you had on profile, that is professional, subjects of the course of study. Meanwhile, summa cum laude’ rough Soviet equivalent would have been Gold and Silver medals, not Red Diploma. summa cum laude’ altogether would be inapplicable since Soviet serious higher education which amounted to 6 full “Western” academic years was giving what would roughly be defined as Specialist—> Graduate degrees, which Bachelor’s is not. Summa cum laude occurs only for Bachelor’s level of education, which is essentially undergraduate 4-year study.

  7. [“That’s the aim of Pisa, to confront us with the real world, not the world of words and beautiful theory,” he said.]

    Satire is not so much dead as already dissolved in lime.

  8. OT:

    Interesting map on ICOs. Seems Europe is doing rather well, certainly on a per capita basis. ICOs are of course just one small part of the blockchain ecosystem that is growing, but contrary to AK’s skepticism on EE’s adoption of new technologies, our region seems to be doing well.

    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    Fascinating, thanks.

    Blockchain is in its infancy so you have all sorts of unusual players cropping up. By "Europe" ofc we mean primarily Switzerland (one of the most successful and untypical European countries) and Estonia (one of the most successful and untypical E. European countries, whose government has taken an inordinate interest in the blockchain).

    That said, it is encouraging to see Russia and Poland have some notable presence there.
  9. Even simpler than that, the essence of that they are trying ask is: “Am I a good person?”.

  10. Are you sure that we’re not in a simulation universe, specifically that of a sitcom for aliens?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Additional evidence:

    https://twitter.com/sanscrayola/status/954575089688895489
  11. This questions are not sure what the right word is but “meh”.

    I have different views when it comes to the Americas
    vs Europe or China or Nigeria.

    Views on cultures and racial stuff varies.

  12. @Daniel Chieh
    Are you sure that we're not in a simulation universe, specifically that of a sitcom for aliens?
  13. https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/scotland/2018/01/immigration-nicola-sturgeon-s-out-step-england-and-her-own-electorate

    One of the more facetious arguments Scotland’s Yes movement touts is that the nation enjoys a kind of innate moral superiority to England. To them, our big southern neighbour is a country of Trident, Brexit, brutal welfare reforms, unhinged education reforms, NHS privatisation, austerity and neoliberalism. The not-so-subtle message is that England is a thin-lipped land of devil-take-the-hindmost fatcats, racists, isolationists, pompous boors and weepy imperial historicism. Scots, by contrast, are virtuous angels interested only in the common weal. […]

    But Yessers have long argued that separation would allow the Scots to unleash their inner Scandinavian, to break free of the Union’s Anglo-Saxon constraints and construct a society run along more equitable lines. […] This builds on Scotland’s existing “free stuff” culture: no tuition fees, prescription or hospital parking charges, and state-funded care for the elderly. [..] The polls are not currently kind. The National Centre for Social Research reported last week that 63 per cent of Scots want the maintain the same immigration rules as the rest of the UK after Brexit

  14. Proposed “questions” on PISA:

    I respect the values of people from different cultures.
    I value the opinions of people from different cultures.
    Immigrants should have the opportunity to continue their own customs and lifestyle.

    I know this is just SJW smoke screen to compute soy convergence, but Jesus Christ, doesn’t it matter that the “values” of different cultures can include things from having a good work ethic to lobbing queers off tall buildings?

    Ditto “customs and lifestyle”–do we want people practicing human sacrifice of albinos based on tribal superstitions or practicing female circumcision, or throwing widows into their husband’s funeral biers, or my favorite, slavery, and is this any different from hosting a Japanese tea ceremony or an African dance ensemble?

    This stuff is pure bull shit in the absence of context and nuance.

  15. “Do you now or have you ever disapproved of Soros?”

  16. @Dmitry
    I believe 'Neoliberalism' refers to program of free-market economics and reductions in government spending. But the term is only used by critics - originally applied to 'Pinochet' in Chile.

    -

    Aside from ideological issues now being inserted, as a way to subtly insert the same cultural agenda universally, I am not sure this PISA test is competent.

    Reading the sample test, I cannot understand what this is supposed to be testing? - and there is no way it can be the same across different languages.

    (An old sample test)

    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisaproducts/Take%20the%20test%20e%20book.pdf


    The 'maths' paper has no maths in it!

    http://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisaproducts/pisa2012-2006-rel-items-maths-ENG.pdf

    It's some kind of counting test.

    I guess this is a result of the fact of testing at age 15, which is not yet the age when many youth begin to be able to learn subjects.

    If they start testing at the higher education age - they might get more relevant results.

    -

    I think OECD is useful at is doing things like writing reports of local housing markets. Otherwise it seems to be another money scamming project, like many international bodies (UNESCO, etc).

    I guess this is a result of the fact of testing at age 15, which is not yet the age when many youth begin to be able to learn subjects.

    Actually it’s already past the age when many youth will ever be able to learn subjects.

    • Replies: @Dmitry

    Actually it’s already past the age when many youth will ever be able to learn subjects.
     
    Yes, but this PISA 'maths' exam that does not contain any maths? It is completely useless.

    Most kids start learning the most basic or elementary things like completing the square when they are about 15 - so at least wait until they've learnt the first steps before you test them.

    Otherwise, it is like testing someone on tennis before they have picked up a racket.

  17. @El Dato

    I guess this is a result of the fact of testing at age 15, which is not yet the age when many youth begin to be able to learn subjects.
     
    Actually it's already past the age when many youth will ever be able to learn subjects.

    Actually it’s already past the age when many youth will ever be able to learn subjects.

    Yes, but this PISA ‘maths’ exam that does not contain any maths? It is completely useless.

    Most kids start learning the most basic or elementary things like completing the square when they are about 15 – so at least wait until they’ve learnt the first steps before you test them.

    Otherwise, it is like testing someone on tennis before they have picked up a racket.

  18. I completely agree with Tulip here. Indeed, some foreign values are good and some other foreign values–such as executing gay people and oppressing women–are very bad.

    • Replies: @Lemurmaniac
    this thread has turned into a bunch of neoliberal shills running interference

    example above
  19. Oh, come on, those are completely fair questions! I mean if you had a couple of hundred million to invest, wouldn’t you want to know what countries were going to go third world?

    I’m joking, of course, but I detected politics in a local standardized test on the state level in the US like 20 years ago. If anything, it surprises me that an international test wasn’t a higher priority target to subvert, but I suppose we are dealing with a newer dynamic. The replacement mania isn’t that old.

  20. @Polish Perspective
    OT: https://i.imgur.com/Cs70e2B.png

    Interesting map on ICOs. Seems Europe is doing rather well, certainly on a per capita basis. ICOs are of course just one small part of the blockchain ecosystem that is growing, but contrary to AK's skepticism on EE's adoption of new technologies, our region seems to be doing well.

    Fascinating, thanks.

    Blockchain is in its infancy so you have all sorts of unusual players cropping up. By “Europe” ofc we mean primarily Switzerland (one of the most successful and untypical European countries) and Estonia (one of the most successful and untypical E. European countries, whose government has taken an inordinate interest in the blockchain).

    That said, it is encouraging to see Russia and Poland have some notable presence there.

  21. Proposed “questions” on PISA:

    I respect the values of people from different cultures.
    I value the opinions of people from different cultures.
    Immigrants should have the opportunity to continue their own customs and lifestyle.

    Just for starters, these are far too open-ended and subjective.

    For the first two, how about adding the words “as much as I do anyone else’s values/opinions”.

    For the last one, your answer will depend heavily on whether or not you envision “opportunity” as something that includes government-sponsored and funded facilities and laws for doing so.

  22. A lot of you guys are strikingly naive, it should be obvious that these questions are designed to promote hardcore multiculturalism as the official ideology which you shouldn’t dissent from.

    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
  23. Reminds me of a high school English teacher I once had, here in Canada, who put “did you enjoy this examination?” as one of the questions on his end-term exam. Answering anything except “yes” was marked wrong. I was the only idiot to answer “no” and find that out the hard way.

    I imagine it will be the same way here; it will only affect those who are too naive or socially-isolated to know that it would be a foolish thing to make a stand on.

  24. @Mr. Hack

    I respect the values of people from different cultures.
    I value the opinions of people from different cultures.
    Immigrants should have the opportunity to continue their own customs and lifestyle.
     
    Is there something really evil, wicked, mean and nasty about these questions? I'm not for Somalis getting every single sort of government entitlement program imaginable (and not imaginable) like they do in Minnesota, but in general, aren't the values that these questions are probing for just plain old fashioned American virtues? BTW, doesn't Russia at least nominally try to project these same sorts of values for its Asian and Caucasian immigrants to the hinterlands?...

    but in general, aren’t the values that these questions are probing for just plain old fashioned American virtues?

    Absolutely not, cuck.

    Values and opinions of other cultures are only to be valued to the extent those cultures have merit. And even when they do have merit, one should always be biased in favor of one’s own people and against nefarious foreigners.

    Immigrants who wish to continue their own customs and lifestyles should go home instead of parasitically leeching off our social capital.

  25. @Mr. XYZ
    I completely agree with Tulip here. Indeed, some foreign values are good and some other foreign values--such as executing gay people and oppressing women--are very bad.

    this thread has turned into a bunch of neoliberal shills running interference

    example above

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