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Warsaw by Night.

Happy New Year to all my loyal readers!

Just returned from Poland. Will have an extensive writeup (see Romania) soon, though you already saw glimpses of my impressions at the comments to the previous Open Thread and on Twitter.

While in Poland I had an interview with South African expat Radio Hussar (part 1/part 2). Follow him on Twitter.

For those of you who know Russian, my classic article on the basics of intelligence research for Sputnik & Pogrom has been made into a video.

 

 
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  1. This is the current Open Thread, where anything goes – within reason.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
  2. My new year’s wishes is a simple one. Less censorship and more free debate.

    Let us not forget that Assange is still illegally imprisoned and likely tortured. Something which the so-called “reporters without borders” NGO doens’t even consider to be an imprisonment of a journalist. A scandal in of itself. Attacks on free speech is coming against both the alternative left and right. We must unite against this scourge, whatever our petty political arguments.

  3. melanf says:

    good wishes to all

    Russian Christmas Tree

    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @AP
  4. The past year’s population growth rate in the United States was the slowest in a century due to declining births, increasing deaths and the slowdown of international migration, according to figures released Monday by the US Census Bureau.

    The US grew from 2018 to 2019 by almost a half per cent, or about 1.5 million people, with the population standing at 328 million this year, according to population estimates.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/30/us-population-growth-census-2020

    • Replies: @John Arthur
    , @SafeNow
  5. AP says:

    Happy New Year to all!

    20 years ago I celebrated the new millenium right off Red Square.

    • Thanks: John Arthur, Blinky Bill
  6. AP says:
    @melanf

    To you also. A nice video!

  7. @Blinky Bill

    So Trump has significantly slowed down immigration, since the mass increase of illegals in America probably counted in that international migration stat the Guardian put there.
    Nice!

    Though for real demographic change, we will need tax policy and fiscal policy boosting birthrates of people we like, and depressing birthrates of people we dont like.

    I have wondered how this hypothetical policy of three parts played out
    1. Whites with kids have a lower income tax of 10/20 percentage points
    2. Blacks with kids have a higher income tax of 10/20 percentage points
    3. Immigration is relegated to ethnic groups with low crime rates.

    I wonder what would be the effect, as unlike Hungary’s policy in the 1990s, this policy takes into account effects of inflation unlike a set fiscal transfer. Even if the policy failed to significantly boost White birthrates, it would sharply depress Black birthrates at least.

    Or if a policy on race is too hard then this policy
    1. People with math/science college degree(from some institution of quality see a tax decrease of 10/20 percentage points)
    2. People with criminal backgrounds who have kids have a tax increase of 10/20 percentage
    3. Immigration is cut by half to boost wages and improve family formation

  8. We wish you a happy new year! We wish a happy new year! We wish you a happy new year and a happy New Decade !!!! 🙂

  9. songbird says:

    2020 was a year that American politicians used to like to throw around for their crazy, distant economic and environmental plans.

    I wonder if it was the same thing in Europe or not? Part of it seems to have obviously been simple, low-syllable-count repetition; “twenty-twenty.” But then in American English it also has an extra meaning. 20/20 vision is the normal vision of people who have no trouble seeing. Not quite the same as perfect vision, but close enough.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
    , @jimmyriddle
    , @Kali
  10. @songbird

    Serbia was supposed to be in the EU before 2020
    Oh well

    Happy New year folks

    • Replies: @songbird
  11. Putin wished Zelensky a happy New Year, looking forward to Keverich writing an angry wall of text about it

    • LOL: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Not Raul
  12. @songbird

    3 hours to go before the UK is hit with a Siberian climate + droughts, floods and nuclear war

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2004/feb/22/usnews.theobserver

    • Replies: @songbird
  13. Matra says:

    Now that it is 2020 congratulations to all the Indian (whether confirmed and suspected) commenters here on India becoming a superpower!

  14. Not Raul says:
    @Korenchkin

    I hope that Putin & Zelensky both have a happy New Year. Slav lives matter.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    , @neutral
  15. My ghostery add-on informs me that facebook and twitter both track me on unz.com. I do not have accounts at facebook or twitter and their keeping tabs on me is part of the reason that I do not consciously patronize those slime scum suckers. I would call them swine but that would be an insult to pigs.

    Is there a tracker-block that people are using to cut that shit out?

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  16. songbird says:
    @jimmyriddle

    Ah, so that is what the Siberian-Britain meme was about. I wasn’t sure if it was a Russophobic meme about the Tories rounding Pakis up and putting them in camps or something.

    I don’t know if 2020 ever worked well as a year for future-alarmism. It seems like it was always too close, since, before, the big scare was Y2K. Now, 2050 or 2100 might work. Though, in truth, we have passed a lot of worrisome demographic benchmarks.

  17. songbird says:
    @Korenchkin

    Nothing against Serbia, but I am glad the EU stopped expanding.

    Firstly, it needs serious reforms, and I think the idea of it shrinking, might help those reforms. Probably, it is unlikely, but better some chance than zero.

    Secondly, there were a lot of people who wanted Turkey and North Africa to join, and I am sure it wouldn’t have stopped there.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  18. Max Payne says:

    It’s 2020 and we are not at war with Iran. This is utter bullshit.

  19. Mitleser says:
    @Not Raul

    Does the green Jew count as a Slav?

    • Replies: @songbird
    , @Not Raul
  20. @Matra

    I’ve clicked “Troll” by accident. I meant to click “LOL” because your reference made me smile. Happy New Year. 🙂

  21. @Max Payne

    Regarding age-old desires for war with Iran, someone should make a drama-comedy movie about Paul van Riper and Millennium Challenge 2002. As painful as it is that “our” federal government wastes our money on exercises that only prove the folly of war with Iran, it would be better to have some artful way to laugh at it.

    • Replies: @Max Payne
  22. I saw Clint Eastwood’s ‘Richard Jewell’ recently.

    The normie media intensely condemned the film for supposedly attacking the intregrity of journalists, blah blah blah.

    Putting all that sort of bullshit aside, it is a decent movie that is worth seeing. I enjoyed it.

  23. Anon 2 says:

    Happy New Year to All!

    Sadly, trillions that could be used to create paradise on earth
    are being spent on military defense and police forces,
    proving conclusively that the dominant emotion of humanity today is fear.

    To which I respond – There is nothing to fear. Therefore be of good cheer!

    Our spiritual technology has become so advanced that it is now possible
    for certain individuals to realize that, surrounding and permeating our
    mortal physical body, we have another body, often called subtle, that is
    made up of eternal Light and therefore is immortal. The vast majority
    of people are incapable of perceiving the subtle body directly, and only
    become aware of it at the point of death. To perceive this body now
    requires perfect mental stillness, i.e., extinguishing the mental chatter
    of the ego at least for awhile, and that requires many years of training.
    But then nothing worthwhile can be achieved without training. A perfectly
    still, coherent mind is extremely powerful – it becomes like a laser beam
    that can cut through steel.

    If you play the Game of Life well, you’ll become highly evolved, i.e., you’ll
    understand the rules that your specific simulation (or lucid dream, if you like)
    obeys, and you’ll know on an experiential level that there is no reason to
    fear death. In contrast to Gnosticism, this is not to disparage our
    physical bodies. They are our avatars, our learning devices, and will serve
    us well for awhile if we can discern and follow the specific Will of God for
    our particular life. But to discern the Will of God, again requires mental
    stillness.

    I sometimes refer to humans as smart chimps because indeed we have
    primate physical bodies but we also have a spark of divinity within us.
    Unfortunately, at this point we are operating at perhaps one-thousandth
    of our spiritual potential. And that’s a tragedy.

  24. SafeNow says:
    @Blinky Bill

    “population growth in the U.S. was the slowest in a century”

    Except nobody knows how many new people came to S. California. A frequent radio traffic alert is ““mattress in lane.” I see mattress stores in strip malls all over the place in S. Calif. I suspect this is widespread.

  25. songbird says:
    @Mitleser

    It is interesting to compare and contrast the US and the Ukraine, when it comes to Zelensky and Hillary Clinton:

    In the US, there is a TV show called Madame Secretary about a tough, no-nonsense, blond, female secretary of state, which was launched in 2014 to help build HRC’s presidential election prospects.

    Meanwhile, in the Ukraine, there was was a show called Servant of the People launched in 2015, starring Zelensky as the president of Ukraine. In 2018, a political party with the same name was started by the people who produced the show.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  26. Kali says:
    @songbird

    The 2020 meme is related to the deployment of UN Agenda 21.

    When it became clear that climate sceptics and political analysts were reporting that agenda as a mechanism for global totalitarianism it was repackaged as, for example in the city of Liverpool, UK, “Vission 2020”.

    Every local authority within signatory states is tasked with the implementation of A21 policies at a local level. Each has rebranded the agenda to make it at once obscure and socially acceptable.

    Additionally, Agenda 2030 has been ratified, in part, I believe, to address delays/difficulties in the roll out of A21. So maybe we can expect further rebranding over the next decade as “climate emergency” hyseria is pummelled down out collective throats?

    Blessings for the Gregorian year 2020 – may you see clearly the way ahead. 🙂

    Kali.

  27. Miro23 says:

    There was a big split in the UK elections by age group. 18-24 year olds alone would have produced an overwhelming Labour victory. With older age groups alone it would be all Conservative-

    ElectionMapsUK

    Corbyn was offering more or less free university education.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  28. Mikhail says: • Website

    Joe Biden’s Russia hand, Michael Carpenter, is thoroughly demolished:

    https://www.rt.com/op-ed/477209-us-policy-russia-biden/

    This debunking of Carpenter is applicable to a number of Republicans, including Mitt Romney, Marco Rubio and Lindsey Graham. On the subject of Russia, Rand Paul stands out as being reasonable.

    • Replies: @Gerad. 14
  29. @Miro23

    The Brexit vote is basically an age-related vote.

    But what has happened is that the Tories have also completely erased the Labour party’s traditional class advantage.

    DE is the lowest social class and AB is highest. All through 1990-2000s, Labour had a fairly sizable lead. From 2010 onwards the slowly situation changed until completey flipped in 2019.

    This is the same demographic that propelled Trump: older, more rural whites from lower-economic strata. This is the dying demographic that once formed the backbone of both the US and the UK and most likely the most patriotic one. Both are replaced by younger, non-white and metropolitan populations. The difference is that the UK’s voting population is much whiter. The US voting population is something like 72% white (against a general population share of around 62%). In the UK the voting population is above 90% white and will remain very white for years if not decades to come.

    I think the UK’s odd-man out position of being the only European country without a populist-right wing party (UKIP were essentially libertarians with Farage boasting about taking in more blacks as a result of Brexit) cannot be sustained for much longer. These trends are partly a generational divide but also an ethnic cleavage and urban-rural conflict. All three rolled into one. I can’t see how that will resolved smoothly without major conflict ahead even after Brexit is done.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
  30. China is a cool place.

    • Agree: Korenchkin, Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Mitleser
  31. Germany’s energy grid becomes 46% renewable in 2019. Up from 23% in 2011, the year of the Fukushima disaster.

    https://energy-charts.de/energy_pie.htm?year=2019

    The renewable skeptics were all wrong. And Nuclear is too expensive anyway.

    The sole remaining argument left for nuclear is “muh base load power” but even that is being rapidly eroded by plummeting battery prices which makes storage through battery power – which solves the intermittency problem – a far stronger proposition than even a decade ago.

    • Agree: Brás Cubas
  32. Mitleser says:
    @Thulean Friend

    What turned out to be so damn expensive were the renewables.

    Germany has the highest electricity prices in Europe both for households and industry, according to EU data. German households are the only ones in the EU which paid more than 30 eurocents per kilowatt hour (KWh) in 2017 in the consumption band compared, in contrast to an EU average of slightly below 20 eurocents/KWh. The country’s industrial companies on average pay more than 14 eurocents/KWh, also an EU record, compared to an EU average of slightly over 10 eurocents.

    https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/german-households-and-industry-pay-highest-power-prices-europe

    “Rapidly falling costs”

    If this is the case, why did the German wind energy sector perform so badly in the last year compared to previous years in the last two decades?

    All over Germany, only 35 new windmills with a combined output of a mere 290 MW were installed in the first half of 2019 — a decline of more than 80% compared with the same period last year and the lowest total in almost two decades. In 2018, Germany installed wind turbines with a total capacity of 2,800 MW. That in itself was a sharp drop from 2017, when Germany added more than 5,000 MW of wind capacity on land.

    On top of the numerous legal risks, there is a growing commercial risk for the wind power industry, which threatens to scare off potential investors. By introducing a market-based tendering model for new capacity, the government forced the industry to cut costs and face stronger competition.

    As of next year, wind turbines with a total capacity of 4,000 MW will drop out of the state subsidy scheme, which was guaranteed 20 years ago under Germany’s Renewable Energy Law (EEG).

    Luise Pörtner, the managing director of BayWa re., a leading renewable energy developer, already speaks of “a massive impact on the onshore wind industry.” She estimates that a quarter of the existing wind power could be cut off by 2025 when older turbines become unprofitable.

    “We need a great deal of re-powering,” says Pörtner, referring to the replacement of outdated wind turbines on the same site. She admits, though, that approval procedures have become so strict that about 45% of turbines approved two decades ago, are likely to be refused today under the new rules.

    Another initiative to boost onshore facilities — the corporate Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) — is also failing to get off the ground. These long-term power supply agreements between turbine operators and power companies aim to guarantee a set price for a certain period of time, mostly five years. But these contracts are considered risky because no one knows how the price of electricity will trend.

    Growing investor reluctance is already showing in the number of wind power projects tendered this year. Of the more than 1,350 MW offered by the government so far in 2019, only 746 MW materialized due to a lack of participation in the public auction rounds.

    https://www.dw.com/en/german-wind-energy-stalls-amid-public-resistance-and-regulatory-hurdles/a-50280676

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  33. @Thulean Friend

    The costs of existing nuclear plants have risen as most of the global nuclear fleet consists of generation II reactors constructed a generation (or more) ago, leading to an increase in O & M costs as they substantially exceed their service lives. Here’s a recent story:

    https://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-03-30/nuclear-power-once-cheap-squeezed-by-mounting-costs

    A decade ago the cost nuclear power in the USA was under 2 cents per kwh: https://atomicinsights.com/nuclear-energy-is-cheap-and-disruptive-controlling-the-initial-cost-of-nuclear-power-plants-is-a-solvable-problem/

    And this is a technology whose development has been under continuous attack by atomophobes for over fifty years. Nuclear can be made much, much cheaper. We just need to ignore the atomophobes.

    It’s a great partner with renewables as well. Nuclear provides cheap, reliable baseload. Solar helps meet peak demand. Hydro provides additional baseload as well as pumped energy storage and non-energy related water services. I’m less sold on wind, but no doubt it has some valid applications.

    It’s unlikely that grid-connected batteries will ever be cheaper than using hydroelectric dams for energy storage, but where that is not possible they’ll have a role. Especially as the mix I described is not viable everywhere either. There are flat, dry areas which do not receive much solar radiation for instance. Nuclear + battery might be cheaper then than excess nuclear or very long distance transmission.

    I would also add that if we want to meet climate targets, we will need nuclear for more than simply electricity generation. Nuclear can replace fossil fuels for residential heating (China has an experimental nuclear district heating reactor) and also for industrial process heat in applications like petroleum refining and cement production (one of the world’s major industrial carbon emitters).

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  34. @Thorfinnsson

    Nuclear can be made much, much cheaper

    We can agree on that. Nuclear is horribly overpriced as things stand.

    Solar helps meet peak demand.

    Not in Northern Europe, which is my vantage point. Our peak demand comes in the winter. We still use “peaker plants” which are essentially fossil fuel-based. We have to use them less and less as the winters get milder, but they are still on stand-by for when and if it happens. Fossil fuel-based peaker plants are also used in France, where atomic energy constitutes >80% of their grid.

    It’s unlikely that grid-connected batteries will ever be cheaper than using hydroelectric dams for energy storage

    I don’t think most people are aware just how much battery prices fell over the decade.

    https://www.electrive.com/2019/12/03/battery-prices-fell-87-in-2019/

    Consider that Solid State batteries are very close to commercialisation and even before that, there’s still a lot to improve when it comes to Lithium-based batteries. We’re looking at another doubling of energy density at the same price point over the coming decade, minimum. The amount of money spent on R&D and investment is really staggering.

    Nuclear can replace fossil fuels for residential heating (China has an experimental nuclear district heating reactor) and also for industrial process heat in applications like petroleum refining and cement production (one of the world’s major industrial carbon emitters).

    This is a fair point. I have polite disagreements with deep ecology types who oppose nuclear energy on moral/ethical grounds. I am a bit more pragmatic and if nuclear energy became price-competitive, I wouldn’t mind it.

    However, as long as the prices stay where they are, I see little reason to change my mind. Bill Gates has invested a lot of time and energy into getting next-gen nuclear power plants going and so far his efforts have been mostly wasted. I’m not talking about economies of scale effects but simply getting the stuff off the ground.

  35. @Mitleser

    Transitory costs. Germany’s grid is going to become cheaper in comparative terms to, say, the Dutch which is still very polluting because carbon pricing in the EU has been shamefully low but this is now changing fast.

    https://www.businessgreen.com/bg/news-analysis/3078778/eu-carbon-price-hits-11-year-high-as-europe-eyes-tougher-carbon-policies

    Germany also taxes its electricity much more than every country except Denmark and Portugal. The tax differentials is important to keep in mind, because this is set by the governments.

    Lastly, just blindly looking at costs ignores the fact that paying a few cents more is well worth if it means slowing and eventually reversing climate change. Carbon pricing must massively increase.

    I don’t have an ideological axe to grind vs nuclear, but even its fans must admit that there are huge cost disease problems with the technology now. France has reasonably low prices because it lives off the rent of the late 70s/early 80s build-out spree. Anyone willing to pay attention to the EDF’s struggles will understand that this period of low costs is coming to an end as huge upgrades have to be made. These upgrade costs have to be absorbed into the electricity price. That’s why France is dithering on their upgrade path.

    https://www.thelocal.fr/20191028/french-nuclear-power-plant-is-seven-years-late-and-costs-have-tripled

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  36. @Thulean Friend

    Right wing nationalist politics is difficult to promote, especially in Western Europe and the US, etc, because regardless of all the problems with mass immigration, and other left wing agendas, the standard of living and disposable income of the average person has never been higher in practically all of human history.

    It’s difficult to promote the idea that the way the Western world is run is in need of a radical overhaul and that the elites have it all wrong when the vast majority of people in the Western world have literally never had it better in material terms. Yes there are a few whites in ethnically “diverse” areas who have complaints about the level of mass immigration, but the vast majority of white people in the Western world have no real desire to see any radical political shift take place, they are very content with the way things are at the moment.

    • Agree: iffen
  37. @songbird

    there were a lot of people who wanted Turkey and North Africa to join

    That’s what Prodi Romano envisioned, George Bush reacted with a funny remark “sounds a lot like the Roman Empire, Romano”

    I am glad the EU stopped expanding

    So am I man, Bulgaria got gutted by immigration to the EU
    Serbia would’ve had the same fate

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  38. utu says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Germany Bulldozes Old Villages For Coal Despite Lower Emissions Goals
    https://www.npr.org/2018/08/06/635911260/germany-turns-to-brown-coal-to-fill-its-energy-gap

    “He says that since Merkel made the decision to switch off nuclear power, 3,000 people have been displaced in Germany because of mining for lignite — the technical name for brown coal — and another 2,500 are currently in danger of losing their homes.”

    “Lignite is a low-grade, waterlogged form of coal, mined from vast, shallow, open pits. It’s considered the dirtiest of coals because it is inefficient. Greenpeace warns that for the same amount of energy extracted from high-grade anthracite (black, hard coal), burning lignite releases between two and four times as much CO2 into the atmosphere.”

    “Last year, 37 percent Germany’s electricity was powered by coal, and 23 percent of it by brown coal, according to the Economy Ministry.”

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  39. Mitleser says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Germany also taxes its electricity much more than every country except Denmark and Portugal. The tax differentials is important to keep in mind, because this is set by the governments.

    2/5 of that is EEG Surcharge (EEG-Umlage) whose purpose is to subsidize the renewables.
    Without these subsidies, it would not be higher than France’s or Italy’s.

    Anyone willing to pay attention to the EDF’s struggles will understand that this period of low costs is coming to an end as huge upgrades have to be made

    And why does it seems so?

    Your battery article offers a hint.

    Bloomberg primarily attributes the cost reductions achieved in 2019 to the increasing order volumes, the general sales growth with BEV and the growing spread of cathodes with higher energy density over the last nine years.

    What did the French nuclear industry have to deal with in the last decades in France? Much less nuclear reactors were ordered/sold in France.

    During the 1990s, they were mostly finishing reactors whose construction had begun in the 1980s.
    In the 2000s, no new reactors were contructed between early 2002 and late 2007.
    Flamanville-3 has remained the only French nuclear reactor whose construction began in the 21st century.
    Because so little was invested in new nuclear reactors, expertise was lost and the costs per new reactor greatly increased.
    More orders would lower the costs per reactor once again.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  40. New details of Ukraine-Russia gas deal have been revealed by Zelensky. He now says that Ukraine will earn $7 billion during 5 years. This suggests that transit tariffs haven’t changed.

    Also, this suggests that Ukrainian energy minister was bullshitting earlier (Hello, AP!)

    https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2019/12/31/russia-ukraine-deal-gas-transit-europe-a68784

    • Replies: @AP
  41. Mitleser says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I was wondering why Thulean Fiend would care.

  42. @Korenchkin

    So am I man, Bulgaria got gutted by immigration to the EU
    Serbia would’ve had the same fate

    Isn’t Serbia losing large amounts of workers regardless? According to Eurostat figures the amount of Serbs who migrated to the EU has risen from 27K in 2015 to 52K in 2018. This is despite decent economic growth and a drop in unemployment over this period.

    Serbia has 6.9 million people and maybe 4 million people of working age. 50K per year out of that sum is a lot. More than 1% of your working population per year that you are losing. This is especially bad as most migrants tend to be those under the age of 35. I can understand why you’d be against joining the EU, but it seems to me that you’re increasingly getting the bad effects of EU membership (labour drain) without the money.

  43. @Mitleser

    2/5 of that is EEG Surcharge (EEG-Umlage) whose purpose is to subsidize the renewables.
    Without these subsidies, it would not be higher than France’s or Italy’s.

    Indeed, that’s the whole point of the energiwende. To increase the addition of renewables. Italy has largely stopped because they are too broke and France is living off their old nuclear rents which are unsustainable over the longer term as the new upgrade costs are spiralling out of control.

    Because so little was invested in new nuclear reactors, expertise was lost and the costs per new reactor greatly increased.

    This is true, but it has happened and it is now water under the bridge. To regain price competiveness, nuclear must now receive a massive dose of investment. Basically the state should act as a “loss-leader”. This is the same argument that was made for renewables that you’re now admitting must be done for nuclear.

    My question is: why? Might as well finish the renewable track as costs are already lower than for new nuclear plants. France’s nuclear costs are old rents, it is not indicative of new capacity costs.

    The only reason I can see why you’d invest despite losing money is because of security reasons. Nukes. But why would Sweden or any other smaller/mid-sized country need that? Even nuclear states like France may not need more than one or two plants. And it’d make more sense to roll that extra cost into the defence budget and be upfront on why you have these expensive plants.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  44. @utu

    Look at the source data I posted in OP.

    2016: Hard coal (18.1%) + Brown coal (24.5%)
    2017: Hard coal (14.8%) + Brown coal (24.3%)
    2018: Hard coal (13.2%) + Brown coal (24%)
    2019: Hard coal (9.4%) + Brown coal (19.7%)

    The meme that coal has somehow won or even increased is simply false. Yes, some new capacity has been added but there have been net declines for a number of years now.

    The energiwende did not just aim at phasing out nuclear but also coal.

  45. Mitleser says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Indeed, that’s the whole point of the energiwende.

    And what is the point of relying on uncompetitive and volatile renewables?

    My question is: why?

    Because it is superior, providing competitive, non-volatile energy without industrialising the landscape.

    Might as well finish the renewable track as costs are already lower than for new nuclear plants.

    That could have been convincing if renewables had ceased to rely on subsidies and “finish the renewable track” was viable in a densely populated country with a lot of demand for energy.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  46. @Mitleser

    providing competitive energy

    Manifestly untrue if you look at newly commissioned plants. Costs are uncontrollably spiralling out of control, which you admitted a few comments ago.

    non-volatile energy

    I’ve already dealt with the intermittency fallacy in previous comments.

    When you plan an energy system, you must plan decades ahead. Both renewable and battery prices have seen huge price declines and they show no sign of stopping.

    Newly commissioned nuclear plants are stuck in a cost disease spiral. If new nuclear plant prices were to become competitive again, I’d reconsider. As long as that does not happen, there are no major reasons outside of military purposes to consider them over renewables.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  47. Let’s hope he’ll treat his Serbian wife better than Einstein treated his. Pandya is one of the best-paid cricketeers in the world. She had a lot of competition. Her momma must be satisfied.

  48. Mitleser says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Cheap nuclear power is not something that relies on anticipated, but not certain price declines in the future. And if you must plan decades ahead, you have to be conservative.

  49. @Europe Europa

    This is why we must begin to eat the rich or, better yet, the upper middle class.

    • LOL: iffen
  50. New year is the continuation of the previous one: Trump again said that he expects Europeans to give money to Ukraine. Standard American modus operandi: leave a pile of shit and expect someone else to clean up. Ukraine is becoming like a dead cat: everyone throws it over the fence in disgust and hopes that the neighbor will bury it.

  51. @Thulean Friend

    Thank you for this truly nauseating aperitif to finish my New Year’s day supper. 🙂

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
  52. @Morton's toes

    Nothing new: Big Brother is watching you. Has been predicted by Orwell decades ago.

  53. @Thulean Friend

    Where I come from, “hard coal” refers to anthracite, which we once mined in great quantities. We call bituminous and semi-bituminous “soft coal.” I assume this “hard coal” of yours refers to German bituminous?

    While on the subject, behold the glory of an American anthracite culm dump (also called a “slag heap” or pile in the bituminous regions) 🙂

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  54. @songbird

    And the show in Ukraine goes on. Although the clown, having become president, does not play piano with his dick any more.

    • Replies: @songbird
  55. SteveK9 says:

    The cost of nuclear power skyrocketed for one reason, excessive risk reduction. You can reduce the risk of anything to zero by making the cost infinite. Nuclear power’s safety record is by far the best of any advanced technology ever developed. Would be virtually zero fatalities without Chernobyl … people should realize that an incredible set of circumstances made that accident possible. They were actually conducting an ill-advised experiment which caused the failure, there was a delay to the test, and the experienced operators were not present, etc., etc. It really took a lot of incredibly dumb decisions, a poor design, and bad luck to cause that accident, which accounts for almost all the fatalities due to nuclear power. I know about the calculation about excess deaths, and don’t believe them. In any case, excess deaths due to coal burning are many orders of magnitude larger.

    The ridiculous costs that one sees quoted for France, Britain, should be compared to the costs in China, or Russia, or even Russian-built reactors abroad, they are about 5X lower, and those reactors are SAFE.

    At the end of the day, nuclear power will provide almost all the energy for mankind. It is inevitable. Nuclear fuel is a million times more potent than any fossil fuel. The current generation of ‘renewables’ will be the one and only. When they wear out in 30 years, the nuclear option will have become obvious to all, and they won’t be rebuilt.

  56. Dougal MacDonald of the University of Alberta in Canada went under fire for rejecting the ‘holodomor’ narrative about millions dying in a 1930s Stalin-imposed Ukraine famine … Tho apparently this was less career-fatal than denying the Jewish holocaust at the same university

    MacDonald was following in the footsteps of Canadian Marxist Douglas Tottle (1944-2003?), who wrote a 1987 book, ‘Fraud, Famine, and Fascism: The Ukrainian Genocide Myth from Hitler to Harvard’, arguing the holodomor story was built on dodgy 3rd Reich anti-Bolshevik propaganda, that book free online here
    http://www.rationalrevolution.net/special/library/famine.htm

    MacDonald cites earlier holodomor denialists, some of whom went personally to Ukraine in the 1930s: George Bernard Shaw, H G Wells, French Prime Minister Edouard Herriot, John Maynard, Herbert & Beatrice Webb, Walter Duranty, & Louis Fischer
    https://artssquared.wordpress.com/2019/11/28/dougal-macdonald-the-holodomor-and-free-speech/
    https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/03/03/the-holodomor-and-the-film-bitter-harvest-are-fascist-lies/

    Here’s a rejection of the Cambodia Pol Pot genocide narrative by Unz’s own Israel Shamir
    https://www.counterpunch.org/2012/09/18/pol-pot-revisited/

    One can find rejection of the standard Jewish WW2 holocaust narrative by at least 9 prominent Jews:
    (1) Joseph Ginzburg (1908-90) aka Joseph G. Burg, Austrian-Russian Jew who interviewed Auschwitz survivors
    https://www.henrymakow.com/2017/09/Josef-Burg.html
    (2) Roger Guy Dommergue (1924-2013), French-Jewish medical-scientific expert
    (3) Bobby Fischer (1943-2008), USA-Jewish chessmaster
    http://www.renegadetribune.com/bobby-fischer-speaks-jews/
    (4) Jacob Cohen (b. 1944), Moroccan-born French Jew

    (5) Robert Litoff (b. 1945)
    http://www.realjewnews.com/?p=943
    (6) Gerard Menuhin (b. 1948) ‘biggest lie in history’, 2015 book ‘Tell the Truth and Shame the Devil’
    (7) Nathanael Kapner (b. 1950) – see link above for Litoff
    (8) Ron Unz (b.1961), our host
    https://www.unz.com/runz/american-pravda-holocaust-denial/
    (9) David Christopher Cole aka David Stein (b. 1968)


    Rejection of the Armenian genocide narrative by the Turkish foreign ministry
    http://www.mfa.gov.tr/the-armenian-allegation-of-genocide-the-issue-and-the-facts.en.mfa

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  57. Epigon says:

    Whoever tries to push batteries, battery storage and battery cars as “green” tech is either an imbecile or involved with the industry.

    I feel nothing but contempt and disgust for shills pushing CO2 and climate nonsense when the real issues are polution, habitat degradation and resource exhaustion.

    I also like how Greenpeace can deny the basic laws of physics/chemical reaction enthalpy and get away with it.

    PS: Since biomass is a renewable, lets start making charcoal again.

  58. @Epigon

    is either an imbecile or involved with the industry

    Don’t we stand to benefit from increased battery demand? What with those newly discovered lithium fields near Mačva.

    • Replies: @Epigon
  59. songbird says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Wish that I could say that American TV wasn’t as crass. Don’t know if it represents the average person, or just what they want to push to the average person. Maybe, a little of column A and a little of column B, but I am glad that I don’t have to watch it.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  60. Epigon says:
    @Korenchkin

    Serbia will benefit from lithium deposits to the same degree Serbia benefited from copper and gold deposits in Bor region.

    And how Chileans, Peruvians, Zambians and Congolese benefited from having vast majority of world copper production. Or Bolivians and their neighbours from Lithium salt water lakes.

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Replies: @Korenchkin
    , @AnonFromTN
  61. Check out this bizarre tweet from Russian foreign ministry:

    • Replies: @Denis
  62. @songbird

    Agree. I did not watch TV (any TV) for 15+ years and feel that I did not lose anything, but gained lots of time.

  63. @Epigon

    Well, if it weren’t for lithium and copper, the Empire wouldn’t bother to oust legitimate president of Bolivia and install murderous scum in power.

  64. MarkinPNW says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Well, at first I thought the recently concluded gas transit contract between Russian and Ukraine was some kind of Putinesque 5 dimensional chess move for Russia to keep selling gas to Europe regardless of American sanctions on Northstream.

    Now I wonder if it is really a Trumpesque 5 dimensional chess move to get Russia, and then Europe through their gas purchases from Russia, to be the ones giving money to Ukraine through Gazprom’s $2.9 billion settlement as part of the new contract.

    Or maybe Trump and Putin really are in cahoots, except is it Putin controlling Trump as claimed by the DNC with its impeachment circus, or is it Trump controlling Putin and Gazprom, to get them to agree to the $2.9 billion settlement which Russia and Putin finally agreed to on the principle that Gazprom will recover the settlement fees in it gas sales to Europe, making it Europe which eventually does provide the money to Ukraine!

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  65. @MarkinPNW

    I don’t think either Trump or Putin is capable of playing 5D chess. I don’t even think they need to be.

    I am not sure Ukraine looms large in the calculations of grown-ups. It just happened to benefit by chance, which would postpone the inevitable catastrophe, but won’t prevent it. I think that Gazprom considered that breach-of-contract fees in Europe would amount to more than $2.9 billion, and/or that it does not want to cede any share of European natural gas market to anyone. Hence, Trump lost a chance to increase the US share of that market. That’s why the US and its lackeys like Porky did not seem happy about Russia-Ukraine agreement. Besides, the EU strong-armed Ukraine into agreeing to reasonable transit fees, rather than outrageous ones they wanted. So, basically the US sanctions forced Russia to continue transit via Ukraine and therefore settle with it financially, but failed to push American LNG onto the European market. If one is to believe Gazprom honchos, Russia currently sells more LNG to Europe than the US.

    Russia certainly was shortsighted and did not build its own pipe-loading ships with the abilities of those that Allseas used. Now the US pushed Russia’s hand, so I am sure they will get their own capabilities, which means that companies like Allseas will lose business in the future. It would take Russia 2-3 years, though. Basically, these sanctions are just like the previous ones: short-term pain with long-term gain.

    • Replies: @MarkinPNW
  66. Denis says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I don’t doubt for a second that the emigration would be greater if Serbia was in the EU.

  67. Denis says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Come to think of it, we wouldn’t gain most of the potential benefits from joining the EU now anyways since the some of the greatest benefits would have been to allow Serbia’s unemployed to find work elsewhere and for Serbia to receive subsidies. Now, the unemployment problem has been mitigated somewhat, and if I recall correctly the EU has become more stingy with subsidies since the financial crisis and the spats with the Visegrad nations.

    • Agree: Korenchkin
  68. Denis says:
    @Felix Keverich

    What is so bizarre about it?

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
  69. @Denis

    EVERYTHING.
    To start, the accompanying image…

  70. @AnonFromTN

    Bad take. It’s a different faction in power. Maidan-Ukraine isn’t Trump’s mess, it’s a mess that he inherited from his domestic enemies – neocons, Obama appointees, CIA and so on – and his foreign enemies ie. the European Union whose elites are completely aligned with the leftist/neocon elites of America.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Partnership

    The European Union tried to expand its sphere of influence into Ukraine and under the previous Obama administration American money, military, intelligence resources etc were poured into supporting Europe’s expansion. The only benefit to Americans have been business deals for Trump’s enemies and containment of Russia, something that Trump’s faction didn’t even want as they wanted to woo Russia into their anti-China coalition.

    It’s perfectly sane for Trump to expect to pass the costs of the attempt to some of the people that actually created it and expected to profit from it. It’s not possible to pass any of the bill to the Democrat party but it is possible to pass it to the EU. The EU simply doesn’t have the military and intelligence capabilities to continue the project so if the Americans threaten walk away the EU has to either agree to pay more of the bill or to abandon its Eastern policy and suffer another prestige loss right after Brexit.

    It’s also another move that would sow division in the EU as there isn’t actually much of a consensus on Eastern policy and states like Spain, Italy etc that have no interest in the anti-Russian crusade have only been playing along because it hasn’t cost them much.

  71. AP says:
    @Thulean Friend

    The meme that coal has somehow won or even increased is simply false. Yes, some new capacity has been added but there have been net declines for a number of years now.

    Is this claim below correct?

    https://streetwiseprofessor.com/died-of-a-theory-energiewende-edition/

    Germany is counting on its status as a net exporter of power to help it brace it for potential shortfalls as nuclear and coal power wind down in stages. It transmitted about 53 terawatt-hours of power to its European partners in the nine months through September, compared with 31 terrawatt-hours of imports, monitoring group AG Energiebilanzen reported Monday.

    It…demonstrates the failure to think through the effects of their actions. If the Germans export less, will those who currently import from them… will build generating capacity. And it won’t be largely renewable. Meaning that Germany closing coal plants will not lead to an equivalent reduction in the number of coal plants, but a displacement of those plants to other countries, or the building of gas plants outside Germany. So the amount of global emissions reduction will be a fraction of the amount of German emissions reduction.

  72. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich

    New details of Ukraine-Russia gas deal have been revealed by Zelensky. He now says that Ukraine will earn $7 billion during 5 years. This suggests that transit tariffs haven’t changed.

    Also, this suggests that Ukrainian energy minister was bullshitting earlier

    It does. He was correct about the 2.9 billion but wrong about the 15 billion if this is the case. However the 7 billion is the minimum, it could go higher depending on how badly Nordstream2 is delayed.

    • Replies: @Gerad. 14
  73. MarkinPNW says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Yea, half-in-jest and half-serious “body language” doesn’t necessarily transmit through the internet all that well, and perhaps even less well when basic cultural background (growing up in Soviet Union vs. US with all the cold war baggage from both sides) doesn’t help. I do appreciate your posts and point of view, though.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  74. neutral says:
    @Not Raul

    Slav lives matter

    (((Zelensky))) is no Slav. Putin is more about jew lives matter, the jews kill Russians in Syria and then he invites the jew leader to the Moscow parade, how do you say cuck in Russian?

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
  75. Max Payne says:
    @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Pshh fuck that hippy shit. I want to see what the US would do if Iran managed to capture 100+ US PoWs. When Iran denounces Israel on TV and demands the US give concessions for their release… will the US media actually portray their plight or succumb to their Israeli masters like the little bitches they are…

    Ugh… why is life so fucking boring. People are gay….

  76. @Thulean Friend

    Serbia has 6.9 million people and maybe 4 million people of working age. 50K per year out of that sum is a lot. More than 1% of your working population per year that you are losing. This is especially bad as most migrants tend to be those under the age of 35.

    Yes, it’s bad. Still, if you take a look at the context of emigration from Balkan countries that neighbor Serbia, then it’s less severe. Albania loses around 60k people per year, yet it has less than half Serbia’s population. Even worse for Albanians on Kosovo. Croatia is a Balkan EU state, yet it loses between 40-50k people from emigration (almost same as Serbia), even though it’s population is below 4 million. Bosnia also suffers from serious emigration that proportionally affects each of the three ethno-religious groups inside it.

    The mass emigration of many Albanians, Bosnian Muslims, Roma and etc from the Balkans is really one excellent an upside of all this though.

    I can understand why you’d be against joining the EU, but it seems to me that you’re increasingly getting the bad effects of EU membership (labour drain) without the money.

    Actual EU membership is not an option for Serbia (it never really was) since it has been conditioned on Serbia surrendering it’s De jure control over Kosovo, which is really worth more than EU membership. No amount of EU scraps is worth more than one’s legitimate claim to their ancient land on Haemus Mons peninsula …

  77. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    The mass emigration of many Albanians, Bosnian Muslims, Roma and etc from the Balkans is really one excellent an upside of all this though.

    Serbia’s relative demographic balance of power is possibly increasing but does this make any material difference if you can’t do anything useful with it? Remember 1999? Russia’s friendship counted for nothing then and nothing now.

    If Serbia ever tried something – and I am more sympathetic to Serbs over Albanians – then there would be instant western retaliation and intervention. There would be no help from the Kremlin.

  78. @Epigon

    climate nonsense […] when the real issues are pollution, habitat degradation and resource exhaustion.

    The most common fallacy that people who are ignorant of climate issues push is that there is a neat separation, that all these issues can be viewed in silos. In reality, of course, it is all interconnected.

    Pollution, ecosystem degradation and global warming. All these factors are drawn from the same root cause: we are using an unsustainable model of development wherein we are destroying the earth in the process as we get richer. This cannot go on and indeed all the data is pointing us to the fact that it won’t on planet Earth.

    • Replies: @Epigon
    , @AnonFromTN
  79. @Thulean Friend

    Serbia’s relative demographic balance of power is possibly increasing but does this make any material difference if you can’t do anything useful with it?

    This is why I personally do my small little bit to strengthen Serbia’s relative demographic balance of power by donating to a legit Serb charity that takes care of poor Serb families with many kids (reduces poverty, emigration, death rates, etc). Anyone else interested can also give some gibs as well if they like (I don’t want to aggressively advertise for gibs unless someone expresses interest since I’ve tried it in AK’s previous threads and it didn’t work anyway).

    Remember 1999? Russia’s friendship counted for nothing then and nothing now.

    Not entirely true. In 1999 Russia was a third world country with nukes that was led by a drunkard and had an elite that believed subservience to the Western world would get it somewhere.

    Even then, NATO almost started WW3 with Russia in 1999 because Russia dared to send its peacekeepers from Bosnia to Kosovo in order to occupy Pristina Airport after the Kumanovo Agreement (UNSC 1244 and withdrawal of Serb Army) was signed. NATO General Wesley Clark was insane enough to order that the nearby British contingent attack the Russians at the airport, but WW3 was avoided because the British officer on the ground rejected Clark’s orders and the Russians eventually had to withdraw because their supply lines were blocked by Bulgaria, Romania and Hungary.

    From 1999-2020, Russia has again become a serious country on the world stage (although its power levels shouldn’t be over-estimated) that has helped Serbia to a significant extent in many areas. These include blocking so called “Kosova” UN membership, vetoing the UK’s insulting UN Srebrenica genocide resolution, military-technical co-operation, and a bunch of other things. In general, a strong Russia means a secure and successful Serbia. Even if Russia doesn’t directly do much, whenever Russia was weak in the last 220 years, bad things have always happened to Serbs …

    If Serbia ever tried something – and I am more sympathetic to Serbs over Albanians – then there would be instant western retaliation and intervention.

    Why “try something” in such obviously unfavorable circumstances? The greater problem is that Serbs are simply being pushed into a scenario where they may end up with no choice but to go into an unfavorable confrontation in which they “try something” …

    Take a look at what’s happening right now in Montenegro with NATO and Milo Djukanovich actively going to steal the Serbian Orthodox Church’s property (currently resisted by under-reported mass protests of Serbs in Montenegro), Muslims in Bosnia trying to get rid of Republika Srpska and turn Bosnia into a Muslim Caliphate, and the Albanians trying to slow-motion get rid of all the Serbs from Kosovo …

  80. araana says:

    news from the old world, some greek cathedratic are absolutely sure that the phoenician alphabet is actually mycenian greek,a little extract

    The Phoenicians never developed an alphabet. Their achievement was a consonantal script , not an alphabet, which was written in cuneiform: reed imprints. The assumption that the Greeks learnt the alphabet from the Phoenicians is based on Herodotus who made that claim in his Histories. What Herodotus did not know was that his ancestors were literate. Nearly one thousand years before his birth Achaean Greeks were writing in the script we know as Linear B. Indeed, the history of Mycenaean civilization, its subsequent collapse and the colonies these Mycenaeans set up in Kyprus (Cyprus) and along the Levantine coast to Gaza, is instrumental in understanding how the “Phoenicians” came to adopt Greek-Mycenaean symbols to write with; and then adopted Greek/Mycenaean shipping to trade along the same sea-routes that had been established by the Minoans & then Mycenaeans before them. (And as to what the ships used by the Minoans and Mycenaeans looked like, we can learn from the wall-paintings at Thera which date to before c. 1623 BC).

    and it have been proved genetically that the philistines were mycenian greeks

    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/04/world/philistines-european-dna-trnd/index.html

    The deciphering of Linear B by Michael Ventris in 1953 was accomplished because the Cypriot Script was already understood & known to be Greek. It is of interest that the Phoenicians set up posts in the 9th century BC in Kyprus (Cyprus), & that the Phoenicians already had a consonant “alphabet” written in cuneiform ( Ugarit tablets). Cyprus already had Mycenaean colonists in the west of that island from the 12th century BC which predate Phoenician settlements.

    The development of the alphabet and the introduction of a script of symbols to replace the cuneiform is not explained in current assessments. It is only when it is realised that this script was derived from the Minoan/Mycenaean Linears A and B (respectively), that an explanation becomes possible. And it is this script which was introduced to the Levant from the west which occurs only after the Mycenaeans settled in the Levant en masse after the collapse of Bronze Age civilizations. To understand how the alphabet proper which accommodates all sounds (and not simply consonants) could have developed, has to take into account all historical information, and not limit itself to propounding what has become orthodox ideologically-driven dogma. The Greek Linear B was a syllabic system which combined a consonant with a vowel. The pre-“Phoenician” (as they later came to be called by Greeks) Canaanites themselves had a history of adopting different writing systems and throwing out as ballast sounds other than consonants.

    These pre-Phoenician “Canaanites” already used, in this way, Egyptian logograms and cuneiform to express consonants. Therefore the adoption of another system, this time one from Mycenae, could be seen to be consistent with their history. However, the “Phoenicians” simply took up incised symbols replacing their reed-imprint symbols; that is they adopted and adapted for their use the syllabic symbols of the Linear A/B/Cypriot Scripts & used those symbols to represent their own consonantal script.

    On this basis it would appear that the Greeks then took back their own Minoan/Mycenaean script which had been modified by Phoenicians and modified it again by re-introducing vowels. The only problem that remains here is the question of why abandon the cuneiform when it obviously worked? It has to be remembered that cuneiform was never replaced in the hinterland for another 700 years after the “Phoenicians” adopted an incised script – so it is not as if it was any more difficult to express ideas using reed-imprints. This could be answered in the context of the changing traditions in writing materials and technology.

    The increasing use of papyrus would have made it increasingly cumbersome to draw small triangles when a series of lines would be a far simpler and clearer task. Even when using clay, it is much simpler to incise lines than to make multiple imprints into a pattern which is the basis of cuneiform. But it is only when it is taken into consideration that the “Sea-People” Philistines were Mycenaean, as evidenced at settlements such as those at Ekron, that any explanation of why those who wrote their Semitic language in cuneiform adopted the Greek “grapsas” can be explained: In Ekron the Mycenaean Philistines had, by 900BC, abandoned their own language and adopted the Semitic language of the people they had settled among. Mycenaean-Greek scribes adapted the Semitic language to their grapsas style of writing.

    The evidence actually points to Mycenaean scribes adapting the same (similar) sets of symbols to represent both languages. The evidence actually shows that the Greek alphabet and the Phoenician alphabet have the same common point of origin in the lands in which settled the already literate Sea-People. The so-called “phoenician” alphabet using incised symbols arose at the same time as did the Greek.

    The Jewish Old Testament refers to both Phoenicians, and Philistines as being Kretans:
    Jeremiah 47.1-4
    “This is the word of the LORD that came to Jeremiah the prophet concerning the Philistines before Pharaoh attacked Gaza…the day has come to destroy all the Philistines and to cut off all survivors who could help Tyre and Sidon. The LORD is about to destroy the Philistines, the remnant from the coasts of Caphtor [Krete].”
    The Septuagint version of the same passage reads:

    Jeremias 24.1-4
    “Behold, waters come up from the north… in the day that is coming to destroy all the Philistines: and I will destroy Tyre and Sidon… for the Lord will destroy the remaining inhabitants of the islands.”
    The Philistines and Phoenicians were considered to be the same people whose origins lay in the islands and were not native to the Levantine coast.

  81. araana says:

    View post on imgur.com

    Above: an inscription written in both Classical Greek and the Cypriot-Greek Script which co-existed until Alexander.

    View post on imgur.com

    Above: a tablet found in Ugarit of early Hebraic script dated to the 700s BC. The similarities in appearance with the Cypriot script (left) are unmistakable.

    The decipherment of LInear B by Ventris was dependant on his realisation that Linear B was Greek, and that Greek written in a near identical script in Cyprus was related to it.

    Below, an example of the consonantal script which is wrongly termed “alphabetic” from Ugarit (it is not a true alphabet as it only represents consonants). This tablet representing consonants is an exact contemporary of the “Mycenaean” Greek Syllabic Script represented in Linear B.

    View post on imgur.com

    Compare the reed-imprint (cuneiform) of the Levantine-coast script (above) with its contemporary Linear B Greek script (below) which is incised (“scratched”). The reed-imprint version of the Semitic script was abandoned only on the Levantine littoral and only after the “Sea People” invasions. It was replaced by a new incised script based on the method employed to write the Greek Linear B. (In the hinterland, where there were no “Sea People” settlements and the cuneiform did not go out of use until after Alexander.) The Mycenaean scribes had already adopted the Minoan Linear A syllabry to accommodate their own language, Greek. The evidence indicates that it was non-Semitic scribes, “Philistine” Mycenaeans, who adapted their practice of incision to scratch symbols to represent the characters of the Semitic language instead of imprinting them, and that it was these same scribes who adapted these symbols to represent their own language, Greek.

    It is not coincidence that the aftermath of the Sea-People invasions saw the Semites of the Levantine coast with different style of script, nor is it coincidence that the setting up of trading colonies by the “Phoenicians” commenced only after this period when Mycenaeans had settled among them, and that these “Phoenicians” set up trading posts where there previously had been Mycenaean ones. Both the script style, and the maritime ventures have a Mycenaean/Aegean precedent, not a Levantine one.

    • Replies: @Germanon
  82. @Thulean Friend

    Remember 1999? Russia’s friendship counted for nothing then and nothing now.

    You cannot be serious with this statement, especially since you are on this blog and know the difference between 1999 Russia and 2020 Russia, hell even 99 Russia tried to help with Russian troops racing from Bosnia to Kosovo in order to force NATO to let them be part of KFOR
    After the Russian troops withdrew the massive 2004 attacks on Serbs happened
    They aren’t stupid enough to start another World War over us, but we can at least count on a Syria scenario
    Milošević was after all toppled by a color revolution

    If Serbia ever tried something – and I am more sympathetic to Serbs over Albanians – then there would be instant western retaliation and intervention.

    It’s obvious that the Americans care more about this then the Germans or French, if the number of Kosovo recognitions drops then we’ll have more of a legal justification for actions there
    A good security blanket could be to station Russian troops in Serbia, something that was recently suggested
    Supposed to be near Niš iirc

    Though my compatriots may disagree, I think it is more important for Serbs to focus on fixing our society, getting the birthrate even higher so our demographic leverage in the region gets better and reabsorbing Republika Srpska and Montenegro before Kosovo can be tackled

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  83. Epigon says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Do you have any idea how damaging, polluting and ultimately ineffective (energy-wise) batteries are? How much fossil fuels and conventional energy is spent in the cycle?

    When raw resource mining, chemical extraction, processing and manufacturing are taken into account?
    What about spent batteries and pollution associated with them?

    If only 1/3 of cars would become electric, the investments needed to make the electric grid capable of serving them would be immense – both generation and transmission/distribution.

    Germany exports 51 and imports 31 unit of electric energy. Why? Because they export the wind generated energy which occurs during periods of low demand. Sometimes at negative price.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  84. araana says:

    View post on imgur.com

    Phoenician > Linear B Translation of the Gezer Agricultural calendar

    *Linear B translation is noticeably shorter than the proto-Hebrew original

    *Linear B’s amazing capacity to shortcut text by telescoping it into the much smaller discrete elements, logograms, ideograms and supersyllabograms, this Linear B syllabary preceded both the Phoenician and Paleo-Hebrew alphabet.

    *Linear B is also unable to account for the presence of final or ultimate consonants, which are extremely common in ancient Greek i.e keda(LB) = cedar(GK)

    Neither Minoan Linear A nor Mycenaean Linear B are the offshoots of Egyptian hieroglyphics

    – 12 of 61 or 20 % of Linear B syllabograms look strikingly like Phoenician
    letters

    – Minoan Linear A predates the Phoenician Alphabet by at least 700 years

    • Replies: @iffen
  85. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    A good while ago you said you had evidence of Serbs in Kosovo having a 2.1 TFR
    Mind posting it? I’d love to see it
    I know that Northern and Southern KiM had one of the lowest abortion rates in Europe back in 2010, comparable to areas where it is illegal to have one

    • Replies: @AP
    , @TheTotallyAnonymous
  86. AP says:
    @Korenchkin

    Luhansk – abortion capital of the former USSR (and this was in 2010, before the war, mind you).

  87. iffen says:
    @araana

    Why, in an age of supercomputers, can we not “read” Linear A?

    • Replies: @araana
  88. @Korenchkin

    A good while ago you said you had evidence of Serbs in Kosovo having a 2.1 TFR
    Mind posting it? I’d love to see it

    I only have evidence that the Serb TFR on Kosovo since 2000 has been increasing and is higher than the Albanian one, not on what its specific number is. I’m honestly not sure whether anyone actually bothered to record what the specific TFR of the Kosovo Serb population is. I personally think numbering the Kosovo Serb TFR at around 2.1 or above is a reasonable assumption to make based on the available information.

    Here are my sources (secondary ones, of course):

    http://thesrpskatimes.com/baby-boom-in-serbian-maternity-wards-in-kosovo-and-metohija/

    http://www.pressonline.rs/info/politika/45796/srpkinje-sa-kosova-sve-vise-radjaju.html

    https://www.blic.rs/vesti/drustvo/raste-stopa-nataliteta-u-srpskim-sredinama-na-kosovu-rodeno-930-beba/w6y1ffd

    https://www.blic.rs/vesti/srbija/raste-natalitet-kosovskih-srba/2ygds8l

    https://www.telegraf.rs/vesti/politika/2857885-radja-se-vise-srpskih-beba-nego-albanskih-pristina-ih-ne-priznaje-video

    https://rs-lat.sputniknews.com/analize/201903091119093800-albanci-kosovo-/

    https://rs-lat.sputniknews.com/komentari/201710201113136988-malagurski-albanci-kosovo/

    Some of these aren’t exactly the most reliable of sources, but it still points to something. Also consider that the number of Serbs on Kosovo is around 100,000 meaning that it only takes for Serbs on Kosovo to have at least around 2-3,000 babies a year for their numbers to be at a replacement or growth rate. The days of high Albanian TFR (also for Bosnian Muslims) have been over since 2000 due to a number of factors. The time of high Serb TFR on Kosovo is coming (if it isn’t already here).

    At any rate, in order to truly confirm anything, one should personally take the time to actually visit (something I aspire to in my lifetime) areas of Kosovo with the Serb population (Kosovska Mitrovica and some Serb enclaves), which is something that not very many Serbs actually do …

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
    , @silviosilver
  89. araana says:
    @iffen

    there have been a lot of progress in the last years decoding the order of noun and verb but using the linear b as guide .

    the material was one of the advantages that Ventris had in deciphering the B-line. There were 20,000 examples of Lineal B signs in the inscriptions, compared with only 7,000 examples of Lineal A signs. That’s like three or four A4 pages.

    Mathematicians tell us that if we are going to decipher Lineal A we will need between 10,000 and 12,000 examples of signs, which means we are not that far off, but it all depends on archaeology. Discoveries are still being made, so I’m optimistic, but what we really need to find is a palace archive, which is where we’ll probably find enough Linear A to finally decipher it.

  90. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    You gotta admire the power of Globo Homo to annihilate birthrates though, they even got Albanians below 2 tfr

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
  91. araana says:

    speaking about super computers they have been able to decode the sumerian language, in this case there is more than enought material.

    Peter Z. Revesz used a computational science data-mining method to analyse the Sumerian vocabulary. A dichotomy of the cognate associations of the Emeĝir and the Emesal dialects was found, “with the former having mostly Dravidian and the later mostly Uralic cognates, indicating that Sumerian arose by the combination of two languages from those language families.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Euphratean_language

    thats why it was so dificult to cathegorize sumerian language it was the fusion of two language proto fino ugric that arise in the samarra culture and dravidian language that came much later around 3000bc .

    its incredible that this discovery didnt reach the main stream

    • Replies: @Arthurp
  92. @Korenchkin

    It’s not that hard. It’s women’s rights really (the hard part is in undoing this). That is the single largest factor in causing low birth rates. Everything else is of secondary importance at most. Of course, no one wants to discuss how women’s rights cause low birth rates because most people have severe delusions and illusions about the nature of women. Women are all universally more or less the same, but are only different from each other in collective groups by how well their men control them.

    Of course, Albanians were also wonderfully blessed with depleted uranium over most of Kosovo by their NATO overlords in 1999. They can enjoy their rewards for all I care.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  93. Arthurp says:
    @araana

    We wuz sumerian and sheeeet

    • Replies: @araana
    , @iffen
  94. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    I think he hard part is reversing the mindsets and culture of people
    It’d probably take the same subversive tactics that the enemy uses
    Making media with pro-natalist propaganda should go on the checklist, but it has to be something people are willing to watch

    • Replies: @Jatt Ak47
  95. araana says:
    @Arthurp

    it must be hard to asimilate that the origin of the middle eastern civilizacions reside elsewhere but thats not my problem science have spoke clearly .

    deal with it

  96. iffen says:
    @Arthurp

    We’s all Africans.

    It’s just a matter of timing.

  97. Germanon says:
    @araana

    The Phoenicians who came with Cadmus—amongst whom were the Gephyraei—introduced into Greece, after their settlement in the country, a number of accomplishments, of which the most important was writing, an art till then, I think, unknown to the Greeks. At first they used the same characters as all the other Phoenicians, but as time went on, and they changed their language, they also changed the shape of their letters. At that period most of the Greeks in the neighbourhood were Ionians; they were taught these letters by the Phoenicians and adopted them, with a few alterations, for their own use, continuing to refer to them as the Phoenician characters—as was only right, as the Phoenicians had introduced them.

    Even Herodotus said clearly that lesrned it from phoenicians

    • Replies: @araana
  98. araana says:
    @Germanon

    Original writing of Herodotus: «58.Οι δε Φοίνικες ούτοι οι συν Κάδμω απικόμενοι τών ήσαν Γεφυραίοι άλλα τε πολλά οικήσαντες ταύτην την χώρην εισήγαγον διδασκάλια ες τους Έλληνας και δη και γράμματα, ουκ εόντα πριν Έλλησι ως εμοί δοκέει, πρώτα μεν τοίσι και άπαντες χρέωνται Φοίνικες· μετά δε χρόνου προβαίνοντος άμα τη φωνή μετέβαλλον και τον ρυθμόν των γραμμάτων».
    «Περιοίκεον δε σφέας τα πολλά των χώρων τούτον τον χρόνον Ελλήνων Ίωνες οι παραλαβόντες διδαχή παρά των Φοινίκων τα γράμματα, μεταρυθμίσαντες σφέων ολίγα εχρέωντο, χρεώμενοι δε εφάτισαν, ώσπερ και το δίκαιον έφερε εισαγαγόντων Φοινίκων ες την Ελλάδα, Φοινίκηια κεκλήσθαι».

    Actual translation: “These Phoenicians who arrived with Cadmus, including the Gefyrae, who settled many parts of this land(Greece), imported/brought with them new arts as well as an alphabet that was unknown to the Greeks, which I think(/in my opinion) all the Phoenicians were using, but with the passing of time they’ve(the Phoenicians) changed their language and scripture/alphabet (to the one used in Greece).”
    “Many Ionian Greeks used to live in the (Phoenician) lands those days, who have taught the Phoenicians an alphabet, reforming their writing style. Knowing this, the Greeks (Boetians), have decided it was fair to call this alphabet Phoenician, as it was imported by the Phoenicians.”

    So Herodotus is pretty much saying/estimating the opposite thing. That the Phoenicians were taught by Ionian Greeks and that the mainland Greeks of Boetia(Aeolians, very ‘weird’ dialect compared to rest of Greek) called it Phoenician because Phoenician Greeks (Gefyrae) brought them with them.

    This mistranslation is the origin of the Phoenician origin of the Greek alphabet. And as professor Rembroke said about the Phoenicians, it’s been convenient to give them the role of the intermediary in history when they had to fill in the blanks.

    The convenience in which some things are adored and some things ignored when they come from Greek history is astonishing, whether we’re talking about Herodotus, Thycidides, Plato, Aristotle, Xenophon, Plutarch, Strabo or whoever… And the mistranslations are also incredible. eg Isocrates, Plato, Plutarch, Strabo, Herodotus … Herodotus for example said that the Egyptians copied many things from the Greeks, but no one comments on that. On the other hand, a mistranslation has become gospel in the field of linguistics and anyone who tries to use the proper evidence to refute it is called a nationalist and a racist apparently….

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
  99. araana says:

    Now let’s see if logic can prevail for once:

    1) Phoenicians got their proto-sinaitic syllabary from the Egyptians. This is totally unrelated to the “Phoenician alphabet” and shares almost no characters.
    2) Greek historians suggest that many Greeks migrated to Phoenicia (and have been called Phoenician ever since, same way they were called Carian, Phrygian, Hittite etc but most often followed by the ethnic tribe- Dorian, Achaean, Aeolian, Ionian)
    3) Greeks and Phoenicians have been trading for a very long time
    4) According to most Greek historians(there aren’t any Phoenician ones, sorry), the Greeks introduced their alphabet to Phoenicia. Until that time, the Phoenicians were using the proto-sinaitic.
    5) The Greek alphabet and the Phoenician syllabary share more characters/letters with Linear A and Linear B, who were scripts used in the Greek mainland, than the Proto-Sinaitic and the Egyptian scripts.
    6) The Phoenicians did not have vowels on their syllabary. Linear A probably did not have constants either and was similar. Both probably derive from the same origin (let’s agree on Egypt)
    7) The Greek alphabet had vowels. The Phoenicians were unfamiliar with scripted vowels and use the symbols as some sort of evolved “hieroglyphs”.
    8) The Phoenicians receive the Greek alphabet and adapt it to their language(according to Herodotus, Plutarch, Strabo, Polybios etc)
    9) The Phoenicians never reach a point where they have vowels in their “alphabet” and it remains a syllabary, closer to ‘hieroglyphic’ than an alphabet.
    10) There is no literature from Phoenicians, but they had an evolved writing system to the Greeks, who have written almost all of the ancient sources we possess. Egyptians also were commented by Greek historians as people who have advance writing. Babylonians as well. Not Phoenicians though
    —–
    end)
    > Phoenicians gave Greeks their alphabet. This does not add up.

    i will be clear im absolutely sure that the only reason why this farce is mantained in the academic world is because phoenicians are viewed as the ancestors and cousins of the jews and they want a little leverage against the incredible achieviments of greeks the real founders of the western world.

    • Replies: @Germanon
  100. Germanon says:
    @araana

    so much speculation and we wuzery to a nation that is literally banckrupted .

    Where is that greek genious now?

  101. @Epigon

    I assume you’re thinking about the IFO institute’s widely debunked “study” from last year about how supposedly diesel was cleaner than batteries. The problem? It was completely trashed in Germany. (IFO is a German institute). For those wanting to a quick rundown, the former IFO president summarised the findings here.

    There are lots of issues with the “study”:

    [MORE]

    1) The IFO piece incorrectly assumes that EV batteries become “hazardous waste” after 150,000 km. However, this is shorter than the typical warranty period for an EV battery (a federally-mandated 100,000 miles [160,000 km] in the US, and 150,000 miles in California). Furthermore, many automakers and others are working on recycling EV batteries, which are still quite valuable after reaching the end of their service lives. Today, the EU prescribes a recycling quota of 50 percent of lithium-ion batteries. Furthermore, Li-ion batteries are not officially considered hazardous waste in the US, but the lead-acid batteries used in all diesel vehicles are.

    2) The report compares a Tesla Model 3 with a 75 kWh battery pack to a Mercedes C220 diesel, an apples-to-oranges comparison. The Tesla vehicle’s power output is up to 473 hp, whereas that of the Mercedes is 194 hp. It’s also worth mentioning that the powerful Tesla is far from the most efficient EV available, whereas the C220 is one of the most efficient diesel vehicles on the German market.

    3) The IFO authors inexplicably calculate CO2 emissions for Model 3 that are 16 percent higher than the official figures published by Germany’s Federal Environmental Agency.
    The article uses figures from the old NEDC test regimen, which is famously inaccurate, and is in the process of being replaced by the newer WLTP standard. WirtschaftsWoche calls the figures used in the IFO article “fairy-tale values that have nothing in common with reality,” and asks why Dr. Sinn chose to work with “the outdated, demonstrably inferior laboratory standard, where even more appropriate standards such as WLTP or EPA and even empirical consumption values ​​are easily accessible for both vehicles.”

    4) In its calculations of full-lifecycle emissions, the article includes the emissions from electricity generation for EVs, but does not include the emissions generated in producing and transporting the fuel for diesel vehicles.

    5) The IFO writers assume that every German EV is powered by the average mix of electricity sources supplying the German grid. In fact, an increasing number of EV drivers use electricity from their own photovoltaic systems. Many German utility customers also have the option of purchasing 100 percent renewably-generated electricity.

    This kind of “study” tries to perpetuate what is commonly known as the “Long Tailpipe Myth”. And it is precisely this myth that you’ve bought hook, line and sinker. You can do better than this.

    • Replies: @Epigon
  102. @Korenchkin

    It’s obvious that the Americans care more about this then the Germans or French

    NATO is a four letter word to write out America. They have more than 70% of the resources of NATO and run the show. France and Germany will meekly protest at best. France might even join in on the US’ side given Macron recent comments about how he prefers legal African migrants over illegal Balkan ones. France has also been a very enthusiastic member of various imperialist interventions (Libya, Syria) whereas Germany has been more wisely circumspect. In any event, Germany would not intervene on your side but at best passively sit out any bombing of Serbia.

    if the number of Kosovo recognitions drops then we’ll have more of a legal justification for actions there

    Legal justifications don’t matter. Blair and Bush are both war criminals under even very lenient interpretations of international law. Neither will ever be held accountable for their crimes because power politics ultimately matters, not the written word.

    Though my compatriots may disagree, I think it is more important for Serbs to focus on fixing our society, getting the birthrate even higher so our demographic leverage in the region gets better and reabsorbing Republika Srpska and Montenegro before Kosovo can be tackled

    I agree with you 100% here. That is the best course of action. And stopping emigration of course.

    They aren’t stupid enough to start another World War over us, but we can at least count on a Syria scenario

    As strange as it sounds, Serbia is further away geographically from Russia than Syria is. Syria is only a few hundred km from Russia’s border. More importantly, if the Syrian civil war had been won by radical jihadists, then there would have been massive spillover risk to Russia’s soft underbelly in their jihadist southern regions. Russia knew that if they didn’t intervene in Syria, then the war would come to them in due time anyway. They’ve already fought two wars against jihadists over the past few decades and they’d fight a third as an inflow of highly motivated jihadists would have spilled over. They had to nip it in the bud. No such risk emanates from the Balkans, regardless which side would win. They’d prefer you to win, as I would, but the geopolitical risks are an order of a magnitude lower.

  103. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    I don’t think the risk are direct Russian-NATO confrontation. But Russia wouldn’t be able to stop them from bombing your cities and cause huge carnage, setting back your recent economic progress years if not decades.

    You have to remember that the West was more lenient towards Russia in 1999 precisely because the drunkard was our puppet. As crazy as it sounds, Russia joining NATO was not perceived as far-fetched in those years (including the early years of Putin). So Russia had to do something for you in order not to look weak, but the West also had an incentive in not escalating too far. Clark’s idiocy was an abberation.

    Today, there is zero good will towards Russia, particularly in the US deep state. There still wouldn’t be a war, but the pushback against Russia in terms of sanctions (such as the SWIFT transaction system etc) would likely be a far higher likelihood. All this would raise the costs of engagement for Russia. I still think they would help you in various ways, but I doubt they’d spill serious blood. If the economic cost was very high, voices would start to be raised within Russia’s internal debate if little Serbia truly is worth sacrificing all this trouble for.

    By comparison, Russia has almost no tools whatsoever to punish the West economically. I want to emphasise that I’d be rooting for you, but my voice would be an extreme minority here. Regardless, I perceive the odds of any of such a conflict happening in the near future to be very minor.

    This is why I personally do my small little bit to strengthen Serbia’s relative demographic balance of power by donating to a legit Serb charity that takes care of poor Serb families with many kids (reduces poverty, emigration, death rates, etc).

    You just made me like you a bit more. Stop that.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  104. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    British contingent attack the Russians at the airport, but WW3 was avoided because the British officer on the ground rejected Clark’s orders

  105. @MarkinPNW

    Yep, “you can take the boy out the hood but You can’t take the hood out the boy”

    And you are right in another thing: Internet is as bad at transducing tong-in-cheek as it is in transducing smells.

  106. @Thulean Friend

    Are you aware that Spaniards invented a new word to describe climate change propagandists followers of Greta: gretinos. I think it does not need translation.

    On a more serious note, considering that weather forecasts based on existing models cannot even be correct for the next 12 h, how seriously should I consider their predictions for the next few decades?

    Also, let me remind you of an interesting historic precedent. Back in 1980s is was fashionable in the USSR to pontificate that the fall of the level of Caspian Sea is caused by the fact that most of Volga water that used to flow there is taken away and used for agriculture. Sounded logical until the level of Caspian Sea began to rise without any change in water distribution. Now it is higher than when the speculations about man-made catastrophe started. Bottom line is, we don’t know a lot more than we know. Scientists are aware of that and behave humbly. In contrast, ignorant gretinos shout very loudly. The less they know and understand, the louder they get.

    There is another precedent: Mesozoic era. The climate on Earth was many degrees warmer than today. Mind you, back then there were no humans and no fossil fuel burning. As well as no gretinos to shout about it.

  107. Epigon says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I’ve never read the IFO study.

    Do you have a background in Physics, Anorganic/Physical Chemistry or Electric Engineering? I need to know in order to adapt my response.

    In short: downtown areas, city centres, daily commutes – EV yes – air quality, health benefits, historic building facade preservation, less noise.
    Road transport outside of cities – no, never.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  108. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Some of these aren’t exactly the most reliable of sources, but it still points to something.

    They don’t point to any evidence whatsoever to justify your wishful speculation about Serbian fertility in Kosovo.

    Also consider that the number of Serbs on Kosovo is around 100,000 meaning that it only takes for Serbs on Kosovo to have at least around 2-3,000 babies a year for their numbers to be at a replacement or growth rate.

    The use of the word ‘only’ here is completely unjustified. Just because ‘only’ 2000 babies might be needed doesn’t lessen the burden on the Serbian women/families who’d have to provide them compared to women in Serbia proper (or women anywhere).

    (something I aspire to in my lifetime)

    So you yourself have yet to take this supposedly essential step, yet you’re happy to wildly speculate all the same.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  109. Gerad. 14 says:
    @Mikhail

    But the problem is, with the exception of yourself, the whole of the mainstream English language “pro-russia” section is complete garbage and largely 5th column.
    RT is full of liberast cretins, Pozner an idiot, Nylon etcetera. This fact completely neutralises the braindead arguments promoted by mainstream “anti-russia” apparatus

    In order to reverse this situation RT should hire you as a guest, and get you to say, live and repeatedly on-air, that Bill Browder is a paedophile….and that he is engaging in this activity as you speak. Browder refuses to receive any summons to court, so I take it that he can’t actually sue anyone.

  110. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    From 1999-2020, Russia has again become a serious country on the world stage (although its power levels shouldn’t be over-estimated) that has helped Serbia to a significant extent in many areas. These include blocking so called “Kosova” UN membership, vetoing the UK’s insulting UN Srebrenica genocide resolution, military-technical co-operation, and a bunch of other things. In general, a strong Russia means a secure and successful Serbia. Even if Russia doesn’t directly do much, whenever Russia was weak in the last 220 years, bad things have always happened to Serbs …

  111. araana says:

    poles are learning to make good music

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  112. Gerad. 14 says:
    @AP

    Lol!!! What a farce

    But it seems this is even worse than these dumb bandera maggots sacrificing 180 billion dollars enacting de-russification policy from 2014-now, just for the purposes of getting 7 billion from following US policy of keeping it’s gas transit. No surprise Galician contribution to mathematics is nothing over history ( and everything else, except prostitution)

    These retards could easily have got something like agreement of continuous 80-90 billion cubic meters of gas delivered annually throughout the 5 year deal, had they not been typical demented Banderetards and demanded full payment of the Stockholm court 2.9 billion dollars.
    It appears they have sacrificed even more billions into their already barren national finances….just to allow them to celebrate the “peremoga” over Moscow that they have “waited over 1000 years” for, by insisting on this specific decision being enforced . I am nearly crying with laughter.

    So, in order to “support” their already flimsy and fake national identity….. corrupt court decisions from a foreign court are what they need for this as symbolism ,ahead of increased money into the budget ! I thought the reverse-gas thing was bad ( paying triple for imported “non-russian ” gas from the EU, that is in fact Russian )…but this much worse

    After all, even though the initial strategy has been to not finance this nazi regime, by cicumventing Ukrop GTS…….with the much increased supply of Russian natural gas to EU+delays in NS2+gayropa limits on Opal pipe+any theoretical delay on Eugal……eliminating Ukrop gas transit was not going to be possible or even desirable.

    And yes, as usual a Ukrop minister billshitting.

  113. araana says:
    @anonymous coward

    no literally YOU are the ones we wuzing with greek history

    • Replies: @songbird
  114. Not Raul says:
    @Mitleser

    [Sorry, AK, I had intended to respond to Mitleser’s comment, rather than my own.]

    Zelensky is Slavic enough if he cuts a deal with Putin, and respects the diverse viewpoints and language preferences in all of the regions of Ukraine.

    If he is able to pull Ukraine out of the proxy war between Russia and the West, and focuses on improving the lives of those who have suffered the most from this war, he’s a better Slav in spirit than Poro, or whatshername.

    It’s what you actually do that counts.

    • Replies: @neutral
    , @Gerad. 14
  115. songbird says:
    @anonymous coward

    Historical pride is part of ethnocentrism. In general, ethnocentrism helps one to be based, and therefore should be encouraged.

  116. Jatt Ak47 says:
    @Korenchkin

    No it’s just female education.

    Ban women from having beyond an 8th or 10th grade education & you’d actually increase TFR beyond the uneducated.

    Not really complicated at all..

    The bigger mindset change is associating education with status for women.

    Even that can be undone in at most a generation if not half by just relentless propaganda while uniting people against a common foe.


    You don’t need pro-natalist propoganda. Just put a gun to soap opera writer’s heads to show women with multiple kids..

    The problems of the world are simple, getting the power to fix them is complicated or time-consuming.

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Replies: @Toronto Russian
  117. neutral says:
    @Not Raul

    Zelensky is Slavic enough

    A jew can NEVER be Slavic, German, American, French, British, etc. This race (because they are ultimately a race) cannot be all of these things at the same time.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
  118. songbird says:
    @araana

    LMAO. Actually, this even enters into one of my favorite Irish songs (A Nation Once Again, 1844). I will just quote a stanza:

    When boyhood’s fire was in my blood
    I read of ancient freemen,
    For Greece and Rome who bravely stood,
    Three hundred men and three men;
    And then I prayed I yet might see
    Our fetters rent in twain,
    And Ireland. long a province, be
    A Nation Once Again!

    The 300 are of course the Spartans, and the 3 are Horatius and friends, at the bridge. Good lines. I have no objection to them, though obviously the story of Cú Chulainn is objectively superior to that of Horatius.

    I am not Greek, but I am kind of annoyed by the attempts to make the alphabet a Phoenician invention, at the very least, Greeks were responsible for spreading it East, and that should be acknowledged, rather than reduced to these other scripts supposedly being derived from Phoenician.

    I’m also irked by the attempts by “good whites” to pretend that stuff like Kevin Sorbo being Hercules is blackface, and that it was really Northern Euros who had their boot on Greek’s necks for hundreds of years, not the Turks. And that the Rock as Hercules is good casting.

  119. Gerad. 14 says:
    @Not Raul

    He is not just a jew, financed by an oligarch slug 1930’s nazi sterotype of a jew, with a Jewish Press secretary (equivalent of Peskov)……He is also a jew who claimed that the only Russians he has spoken to in his private time in the last year…..are 2 Jews(1 of them Makarevich)!!

    As for “diverse viewpoints” I don’t count US Banderite diaspora morons who spread poison, run the country to further failure for 1 or 2 years and then f**k off back to the US as “diverse viewpoints “, nor Soros funded cretins, nor Galician idiot population who make Chechens look extremely sophisticated by comparison and prosperity…and voting like lemmings 95% for one guy, then at the same number for the same guy they voted against in the next election all the time.

    Also, “diverse viewpoints” is not renaming streets named originally after heroes of Russian-world…..into Chechnya terrorists and Banderite sadist loser-scum.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
  120. Mr. Hack says:
    @araana

    Minimalist, electronic techno drivel. Quite boring actually. A two note massive blunder, reminds one of a parody of or a dark nightmare inspired by Enigma of the 80’s….

  121. Denis says:
    @Korenchkin

    Karlin says it’s working on arab muslims as well.

  122. Denis says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Serbia’s relative demographic balance of power is possibly increasing but does this make any material difference if you can’t do anything useful with it? Remember 1999? Russia’s friendship counted for nothing then and nothing now.

    It makes a difference in that it helps us continue our existence as a nation.

    Serbia’s relative demographic balance of power is possibly increasing but does this make any material difference if you can’t do anything useful with it? Remember 1999? Russia’s friendship counted for nothing then and nothing now.

    Which is why Serbia isn’t trying anything, and why people like us take these discussions about the future of our country so seriously; as it stands we face a very difficult situation.

  123. @silviosilver

    They don’t point to any evidence whatsoever to justify your wishful speculation about Serbian fertility in Kosovo.

    Riiiight. Because you’re totally an expert on the demographics of Kosovo.

    The use of the word ‘only’ here is completely unjustified. Just because ‘only’ 2000 babies might be needed doesn’t lessen the burden on the Serbian women/families who’d have to provide them compared to women in Serbia proper (or women anywhere).

    Why are you such a white knight beta male?

    So you yourself have yet to take this supposedly essential step, yet you’re happy to wildly speculate all the same.

    Like you’ve ever been to Kosovo …

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  124. Epigon says:

    Abu Mahdi al-Mohandes alongside IRGC Quds Force commander Qasem Soleimani apparently assassinated by US airstrike on Baghdad Airport.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    , @Denis
  125. Epigon says:

    Did they really drone strike a civilian airport?

    Will they plunge Iraq into another civil war?

    • Replies: @German_reader
  126. Mr. XYZ says:
    @Epigon

    WOW! They really got the kingfish this time around, didn’t they?

  127. Mr. XYZ says:
    @neutral

    One can be part-Jewish and part Slavic/German/French/British/et cetera, though.

  128. Mr. XYZ says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Anatoly, since you are a fan of alternate history (and so am I!), I was hoping to ask you an alternate history question:

    Had the Whites won the Russian Civil War (or, alternatively, had the Russian Provisional Government survived until the end of WWI) and Russia would have subsequently went Fascist (and let’s face it, the odds of an eventual right-wing dictatorship in Russia in this scenario would have probably been pretty high since all Central European, Southern European, and Eastern European countries other than Czechoslovakia became dictatorships by 1938 in real life), what would this Fascist Russia’s foreign policy aims and goals would have been? Would it have been as expansionist as Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, and Imperial Japan were in real life? If so, in which direction(s)?

    Also, if this Fascist Russia would have started any major wars in this scenario, would it have won this war/these wars or would it have lost this war/these wars just like Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, and Imperial Japan did in real life?

    In addition, would this Fascist Russia have experienced an eventual collapse and breakup similar to the Soviet Union in real life?

    • Replies: @Denis
    , @Anatoly Karlin
  129. @Epigon

    It won’t be just civil war, it will be war in the whole region and maybe beyond (plus millions of refugees streaming into Europe). The big one is coming, there’s no way Iran isn’t going to retaliate to this. You can’t intentionally assassinate a high-level military commander of another country like that and not expect a reaction. It’s clear the US will stop at literally nothing (not even outright murder, because that’s what this is) in its effort to topple the Iranian regime, so why should the Iranians still be restrained in any way?
    Have to say I’m stunned by this, my God, how could the Americans do something like this? Downright evil. A lot of Americans will now do their usual flag-waving routine and “Don’t tread on me! They started it!” nonsense, but this war will be entirely America’s fault, it all comes back to Trump’s abrogation of the nuclear deal and maximum pressure campaign. And I hope the Americans will pay a very high price for starting this war, they deserve it. Let’s just hope Russia and China won’t get directly involved.

    • Replies: @iffen
  130. Denis says:
    @Mr. XYZ

    Fascism in real-life arose to a great extent as a reaction to communism.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
  131. Denis says:
    @Epigon

    Holy shit! These guys are incredible, they’re daring the Iranians to hit back!

  132. Question is, hows Iran planning on retaliating
    Saudi refineries are probably about to eat it

  133. This means the big one is coming, there is no way Iran isn’t going to retaliate. War in the entire Mideast, plus millions of refugees streaming into Europe. You can’t murder the high-level military commander of another country like that and not expect a reaction, this is obviously an act of war. The US has shown it will stop at nothing (not even murder, under the ridiculous fig leaf of designation as terrorists) in its effort to topple Iran’s government, there’s no reason anymore why the Iranians should act restrained.
    Lots of MAGA cretins will now be doing the usual chauvinistic “Don’t tread on me, they started it!” routine (of course completely disregarding that this entire escalation started with Trump’s abrogation of the nuclear deal and maximum pressure campaign against Iran). Meh, once might have been an aberration, but again after Iraq 2003? Maybe all the anti-American stereotypes actually were true.
    I hope America will pay a very heavy price for starting this war, it will be well-deserved. Let’s just hope that Russia and China won’t get involved directly.

    • Agree: eugyppius
    • Replies: @iffen
  134. Mr. XYZ says:
    @Denis

    And there would still be a Communist coup in Russia in 1917 in this scenario; it’s just that the Communists aren’t going to be able to permanently hold onto power in Russia in this scenario but rather get quickly overthrown and defeated by the Russian Whites in this scenario.

  135. @Epigon

    In short: downtown areas, city centres, daily commutes – EV yes – air quality, health benefits, historic building facade preservation, less noise.

    I disagree here. I view EVs as a coward’s attempt to preserve deeply dysfunctional urban planning mistakes. The goal should be to get rid of EVs – and all cars – out of cities completely. It’s long past time we reclaim our cities for the way cities are meant to be lived in. The car-centric approach has been a complete cancer over the past century.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    , @songbird
  136. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Riiiight. Because you’re totally an expert on the demographics of Kosovo.

    You’re the one who made the claim about Kosovo demographics. I simply assessed the evidence you provided – and found it woefully lacking.

    It’d be nice if you were right, of course. I just see no reason to think you are. Your claims are nothing more than classic nationalist wishful thinking. It’s better to nip these delusions in the bud than allow desperate people to glom onto them and stubbornly (albeit vainly) defend them against all reason. (We see the same thing among the Russophiles here vis a vis Ukraine. It’s not a pretty sight.)

    Why are you such a white knight beta male?

    We’re talking about the pretty basic workings of demographic reality here, not what rights I think women should or shouldn’t have.

    Like you’ve ever been to Kosovo …

    You’re the one who believes visiting that place is an essential step to being able to say something meaningful about its demographics, not I.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  137. @Thulean Friend

    The goal should be to get rid of EVs – and all cars – out of cities completely.

    How are you defining ‘city’ here? For example, wiki gives three different Area figures for Stockholm, depending on the definition of city used: “Capital City” – 188km2, “Urban” – 382km2, “Metro” – 6519km2.

    Personally, I think it would be ridiculously excessive to ban cars even from the “Capital City” definition above. The most I could justify is banning in them in some small core area of perhaps 2-5km2. But who knows, perhaps you’d ban them all the way to the outer edges of the “Metro” definition.

  138. @Thulean Friend

    Regardless, I perceive the odds of any of such a conflict happening in the near future to be very minor.

    Me too. It’s why I think this speculation may ultimately and hopefully will end up to be pointless in the long term (despite many provocations with the most recent one of taking away Serbian Orthodox Church property in Montenegro right now). Anyway, I took the time to read Korenchkin’s comment 86 which I think is an even better and slightly more nuanced take than mine on this matter.

    You just made me like you a bit more. Stop that.

    Sounds so cute lol.

  139. @silviosilver

    You’re the one who made the claim about Kosovo demographics. I simply assessed the evidence you provided – and found it woefully lacking.

    Again lol. Are you an expert or something? On what basis is that claim “woefully lacking”?

    It’d be nice if you were right, of course. I just see no reason to think you are. Your claims are nothing more than classic nationalist wishful thinking.

    Why are you trying to flex your Yugo-Communist attitudes in such a pathetic way?

    We’re talking about the pretty basic workings of demographic reality here, not what rights I think women should or shouldn’t have.

    Again, are you some kind of expert on this?

    You’re literally not capable of doing anything more than saying “you’re wrong” without any reasoning or evidence, and expect people to take you seriously. Get lost retard.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  140. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Again lol. Are you an expert or something? On what basis is that claim “woefully lacking”?

    Well, if you claimed that Belgrade was ablaze on 01/01/20 and you linked to a news report that talked about efforts to extinguish the flames and described their consequences, such evidence would substantiate your claim. But if you linked to a news report that talked about the efforts of the fire brigades to upgrade their fire engines in anticipation of future fires, evidence that Belgrade was ablaze would be “woefully lacking” in that report. So it was with the news reports you linked to in an effort to substantiate your claim of skyrocketing Serbian fertility rates in Kosovo – there was simply nothing in them to substantiate the claim.

    And yes, I am an expert. So there.

    Again, are you some kind of expert on this?

    The sad thing for you is that no great expertise is required to understand that 2000 babies a year for a population of 100,000 is the equivalent of 2,000,000 babies per year for a population of 100,00,000. The former is not easier to achieve because the total number of babies is “only” 2000.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  141. Another time.

    • Replies: @araana
  142. @silviosilver

    your claim of skyrocketing Serbian fertility rates in Kosovo – there was simply nothing in them to substantiate the claim.

    First, i claimed that Serb fertility rates in Kosovo are around 2.1, not that they are “skyrocketing”.

    Second, i have cited several sources to substantiate this reasonable and realistic claim.

    And yes, I am an expert. So there.

    lol

    The sad thing for you is that no great expertise is required to understand that 2000 babies a year for a population of 100,000 is the equivalent of 2,000,000 babies per year for a population of 100,00,000. The former is not easier to achieve because the total number of babies is “only” 2000.

    On what basis? Care to enlighten me?

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  143. iffen says:
    @German_reader

    this war will be entirely America’s fault

    First one ever, eh?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  144. iffen says:
    @German_reader

    MAGA cretins

    And to think that I defended you against a charge of being a Nazi.

    No good deed goes unpunished.

  145. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Second, i have cited several sources to substantiate this reasonable and realistic claim.

    I don’t require several, just one will do. Quote from it and link it.

    On what basis? Care to enlighten me?

    What is required is a certain fertility rate. Increasing the present fertility rate to the required fertility rate isn’t going to be any easier in Kosovo compared to, say, Serbia proper just because the total number of babies is smaller in Kosovo.

    • Troll: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  146. songbird says:
    @Thulean Friend

    The goal should be to get rid of EVs – and all cars – out of cities completely. It’s long past time we reclaim our cities for the way cities are meant to be lived in.

    Aren’t you being just a little extreme? Cities were never fully-built around walking, unless you are talking about ancient cities in Mezo-America, or even more ancient settlements in Eurasia, like Göbekli Tepe.

    Cities used to be full of horses. 3/3 of my great grandfathers who lived in cities worked with horses at some point in their lives. Cars were an improvement in many ways, though they would not leave gifts for your garden.

    In your ideal city have you committed euthanasia on the elderly and handicapped? Because there are many people who have trouble walking, and the car is their connection to others.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  147. araana says:
    @Priss Factor

    lol the maga crowd petit bourgeois dream

  148. Putin is showing more backbone with Belarus, than he did with Ukrainian regime: shipments of Russian oil have been halted.

    Belarus has the right to buy Russian oil at domestic prices, and then resells it to Europe at international prices. It’s the main source of income for the country.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  149. @Felix Keverich

    I would be extremely surprised if Belarus wasn’t annexed into Russia by the middle of this decade. Russia has huge leverage and Lukashenko’s empty threats about the West going to war over Belarus are so deluded I doubt even he believes them.

    I think Putin is trying to stage-manage the transition smoothly and giving plenty of offramps to Lukashenko which he refuses to take. This should be seen as a steady escalation of pressure. If nothing else works I think Lukashenko will be forced out either by a coup or assassinated. But Belarus will be part of Russia within the coming five years.

    Putin’s Ukraine policy is different. Ukraine cannot easily be swallowed and even most vatniks have abandoned the delusions of a collapsing Ukraine. Another thing you are missing is that Putin didn’t give in to Ukraine. The insistence of giving Ukraine those billions nominally came from Germany but in reality from Germany’s master, the US. Ukraine was merely the passive beneficiary of that.

  150. @songbird

    Aren’t you being just a little extreme?

    This is extreme:

    I’m being entirely sensible in returning to a more organic and wholesome form of urban living.

    In your ideal city have you committed euthanasia on the elderly and handicapped?

    Isn’t this a bit melodramatic?

    Because there are many people who have trouble walking, and the car is their connection to others.

    Are the only two modes of transportation cars or walking?

    Cities were never fully-built around walking

    Again this fixation with only walking. I’m not advocating doing away with modern technology, but just adapting it in a sustainable way. I wouldn’t abolish buses, metros, trams etc. Though I would structure cities along diagonal travel lines far more, which would be easier with smaller and heightened biking lanes.

    There’s much more to be said about urban architecture, beyond sustainability. Take Paris. It is often falsely portrayed as a well-designed city because of Haussman. But some of the things he did had nothing to do with urban comfort but more to do with the needs of the ruling class to crack down on their people, such as the choice of wide avenues. It was judged that such a layout would make it harder to rebel and much easier for an army to move around the city. When architectual decisions are being made with the interests of a narrow ruling class in mind rather than the broad population then that is by default an ethnically bankrupt decision. Democracy in this broader sense must also inform urban planning, because genuine democracy is essential. It must influence all aspects of our lives, including how we live them, as long as it does not give in to selfish interests that destroy our environment.

    • Replies: @songbird
    , @silviosilver
  151. @Thulean Friend

    I think Putin is kind of sucker and a wimp. He dumped $100 billion into Belarus, and got nothing but insults and threats in exchange. After 20 years Lukashenka feels entitled to Russian subsidies, and I don’t see a smooth way out of this situation.

    Ukraine cannot easily be swallowed and even most vatniks have abandoned the delusions of a collapsing Ukraine.

    Of course, it didn’t collapse. How could it when Putin keeps giving them money?

    I just don’t see political will in the Kremlin to resolve the Ukrainian question, or Belorussian question for that matter.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
  152. songbird says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I’m being provocative. I don’t mean to suggest you are for killing them, but I am just thinking of how my family used to drive into the city to pick up my Great Aunt Sally (I have changed her name) who was near 100. I am sure, it was possible for a young person who lived in her apartment to take mass transit to the commuter rail to visit us, during frigid winter, but that is not an option for frail people.

    Anyway, have you ever been on a bus, when a guy in a wheelchair got on? It is not convenient, to say the least.

    My point is that you really need something more than mass transit, plus bikes. You need cars – and there is absolutely no replacement for them. Mass transit requires people to walk or bike to nodes. (something some people cannot do). Plus it has other inconveniences – you are rarely traveling in a straight line. Your journey time increases, and typically the state of our society is so decayed that we can’t even have public bathrooms.

    I sympathize with your vision. I have been to a certain German city, and enjoyed the bike lanes – a sharp contrast to America. Though, there are structural problems. German cities were bombed flat; they probably had some room to remake things.

    In America, when they make bike lanes, they do it a few ways. Converting old, unused rail – this is few and far between. Taking lanes from cars – bad idea that doesn’t improve traffic. Spending some horrendous amount of money to smooth out the narrow shoulder of the road – something that still makes it a tight fit and probably will be thoroughly destroyed by freeze/thaw cycles and plows.

    Your vision really requires bulldozing cities and rebuilding them. I can appreciate your ideas – I will even add one of my one: bike tunnels, for bad weather. But these ideas seem utopian. In real life, bums would be defecating in these tunnels, druggies injecting, and gays having orgies.

    And I feel extreme alienation in most cities. This is not caused by the car, but by shocking demographic transformation, even in Europe. I’d much rather have a city where I felt I belonged, than being a minority in a bikeable city.

    • Agree: AP
  153. @Thulean Friend

    Again this fixation with only walking. I’m not advocating doing away with modern technology, but just adapting it in a sustainable way.

    Love the way you use “sustainable” as a synonym for “my personal preference.” I have no idea why electric buses and trains would be sustainable but electric cars – powered, at some point, by 100% renewable energy – unsustainable.

    And since I’ve mentioned it, on this topic of 100% renewable, I have yet to hear a convincing explanation by skeptics of why exactly the world some day – not some day soon, just some day – could not be powered by 100% renewable. They’re full of sound and fury and scary statistics about what an enormous undertaking it would be, but all of that only seems to be an issue of how long it will take and how much it would cost, rather than it being physically impossible.

    Well, we quite literally have all the time in the world to do it, so it seems to come down to cost. In that case, if it’s truly unaffordable then we’ll eventually find out. But why not just start and see how far we get before costs make it economically unfeasible? The skeptics, for no good reason that I can discern, seem adamant that even starting down that road would be the mistake of the century. As much as I loath conceding anything to envirofags, this strikes me as bizarre.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
  154. @songbird

    Mass transit is another way that, as the tweet Thule linked to suggested, environmental and climate policy becomes politically viable only when linked to “racist” social policy. Posit public transport to any white American and shoot me if the first thing he thinks of isn’t the masses of naggers and mexers he’ll have to endure. I much prefer the car myself, but in Australia I used public transport for years, at one point making a round trip of close to four hours. Since it was overwhelmingly European (except for occasional thick crowds of mostly placid Asians on some journeys) it was either a pleasurable or neutral affair. In America, I quickly came to dislike it. I never had any actual negative experiences, but some bus and train rides in LA were nothing but blacks and mexers, and to me that was thoroughly alienating.

    • Replies: @songbird
  155. songbird says:
    @silviosilver

    There really should be policies that recognize the importance of bioculture. I guess there are for a few small groups. But it is absurd to have this double standard, where they seek to preserve Andaman Islanders, but replace Europeans.

    A lot of people want to invade the West to derive the economic benefits that are to be had from living in the society of Europeans. It is not just about welfare, though that is a draw. The whole problem is that people do not recognize the importance of boundaries. That it is possible to kill the goose that laid the golden egg.

    There are probably economic benefits that Third World countries might be able to gain by hosting small segregated foreign communities. And I’m not talking about changing their countries demographics, I mean relatively small communities, limited to one or two places, under 99-year lease with discrete physical boundaries limiting their outgrowth. With say, a neighborhood school to make it attractive to parents, and their own police force and court. Something that they would have to broadly consent to, for it to be built.

    But people don’t think that something like this is possible. They believe we must let them endlessly invade us, or else we would have to endlessly invade them, and that would be evil. But it is not a dichotomy.

    The idea of a Chinatown in NYC isn’t inherently bad – there are benefits that can be derived from it – but the idea of whites being a minority in NYC is bad (and they are.)

  156. Jatt Desi says:

    https://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2014/07/triglav-trojan-trinity-trimurti-agni.html

    Thoughts on this?

    It’s a Serbian saying this..

    Names are same more or less.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  157. @Jatt Desi

    Completely possible.

    I’ve read about similar propositions on Serbian Cyrillic sites.

    In fact, I’m actually inclined to believe it.

    Take a look at the video below from 0:00-7:20 and the concept of Serbs migrating from the Indian subcontinent as a part of the collective Indo-European peoples’ makes sense.

    Otherwise, the video above is a decent overall summary of Serbian history but it is much better in some parts than others.

    The part about the Serbs in Lustaia or Sorbs in Germany also makes perfect sense.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Korenchkin
  158. @Jatt Ak47

    Ban women from having beyond an 8th or 10th grade education &

    …you will lose to emigration all the people capable of productive work and be stuck in the company of hungry, lazy, incompetent dregs of society.

    Look at Pakistani immigrants, they make their daughters study like crazy in most high-effort majors. I mean intellectual families that come to Canada, not goat herders that come to the UK. The two local Islamic schools leave majority-Chinese schools behind in terms of grades (seen as stats on the district school board website), and they educate boys and girls together.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
  159. @songbird

    You need cars – and there is absolutely no replacement for them

    I take your example with a 100 year old woman as a fair point, but that is an extreme edge case. Public policy cannot be centered around small minorities. This is what we’re currently doing in sexual education, where the tiny minority (LGBT) dictates to the supermajority. You’re essentially saying this same kind of hostage scenario should apply here as well.

    My proposition is a moderate middle-ground. Allow transport of specialised vehicles for older people, but this ownership should be controlled by the local municipality so as to avoid fraudulent claims by others.

    Anyway, have you ever been on a bus, when a guy in a wheelchair got on? It is not convenient, to say the least.

    There are technical solutions to this, such as that either the bus lowers its elevation or there is a special offramp.

    And I feel extreme alienation in most cities. This is not caused by the car, but by shocking demographic transformation, even in Europe.

    Can’t “blame” urban planning, but rather immigration policy.

    And I can’t say I quite relate to this. I think it is better to segregate people based on character/emotional profile rather than ethnicity or race. I don’t think most people fundamentally change. When I look back at my childhood, the basic character traits visible in the children I grew up with essentially stayed. Some got sharper, some got smoother but the core remained the same.

    I’d much rather be around people with similar emotional and intellectual characteristics than just having them have the same skin color as me. The problem is that the world is still stuck in the 18th century when it comes to classification of peoples. This is a problem in the educational sector too. We only sort by achievement but a more sensible way would be to sort by intellectual capability and character type.

    • Disagree: German_reader
    • Replies: @songbird
  160. Save Assange.

  161. @iffen

    The 2003 Iraq War was entirely America’s fault. Maybe there are some others, but in the Yugoslavia bombing of 1999 and the Libya intervention you had some accomplices who were at least as guilty (Libya) or at least shared the blame (Yugoslavia). Though both were unprovoked acts of aggression.

    In most other wars your enemies shared a substantial part of the blame. The Korean War was arguably the fault of North Korea and Red China and the USSR (at least they were more to blame), and the Vietnam War also cannot be described as some unprovoked American aggression.

    • Replies: @iffen
    , @Mr. XYZ
  162. @silviosilver

    The very small Serb population in Kosovo is probably already a self-selected group of based blood and soil nationalist types, whose religiosity might also be significantly higher than that of the rest of Serbdom. So in a sense that might be truly easier to raise their fertility (or keep it higher) than elsewhere.

    I have zero information if that’s the case in Kosovo among Serbs, mind you, so it was just a general statement.

  163. iffen says:
    @reiner Tor

    The 2003 Iraq War was entirely America’s fault.

    Yes and no. I view it as a colossal mistake on our part. The only thing that makes sense to me is that the desire for revenge for 9/11 among the dedicated imperialists and warmongers, Rumsfeld, Cheney, et al. had not been sated and Iraq was the Moslem country that drew the short straw.

    I attribute some degree of instigation to the Ben Laden types and the anti-Americanism among ME Moslems in general. I am not using this as a justification, just pointing out that the warmongers would have had a far more difficult time pulling it off without its existence.

  164. @silviosilver

    Carbon is required to manufacture steel from iron ore. The good news is that steel demand tends to mature at a certain level of prosperity (reached in the 1970s for the advanced countries), and much steel demand can be satisfied from recycling.

    Fossil fuels will also continue to be required for manufacturing petrochemicals. In same cases plant matter can substitute, but that’s not as green as people think since it either requires increased land use or takes plant matter away from other purposes (e.g. silage and compost).

    There are some other areas where replacing fossil fuels is possible, but atomophobia prevents it. Mostly heating applications. The non-nuclear “green” alternative is to use electricity, which is inherently less efficient and won’t work for industrial process heat applications, let alone cement manufacturing.

    Air travel is a tough nut to crack. The energy density of batteries is appalling compared to kerosene, so electric powered aircraft are a pipe dream (or at any rate far more expensive). Nuclear powered aircraft are possible in principle, but again atomophobia stands in our way. And the technical challenges are substantial.

    Some low-hanging fruit is commercial shipping. In additional to marine nuclear propulsion being a mature technology, there is no reason that much shipping cannot simply revert to sail. On many shipping routes sail powered ships would actually be faster than fuel powered ships, and with modern technology they no longer require more labor either.

    At any rate globally the goal should be to eliminate fossil fuels from as many applications as possible, starting with applications where costs are not higher. Atomophobes should, of course, be sent to concentration camps. At the same time, the global agricultural system must be transitioned to regenerative agriculture in which top soil is built up rather than strip mined. This will in turn trap carbon in the soil, where it will support healthy microbiota and plant growth.

    • Replies: @iffen
    , @songbird
  165. iffen says:
    @Thorfinnsson

    but that’s not as green as people think since it either requires increased land use or takes plant matter away from other purposes (e.g. silage and compost).

    Atomophobes should, of course, be sent to concentration camps.

    Concentration camps take up a lot of space and require energy imputs. If everyone that deserves it is sent to a concentration camp, we won’t have enough agricultural land left to grow needed food. Any other solutions come to mind?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @Thorfinnsson
  166. @iffen

    The Final Solution to the Atomophobe Question.

  167. @Toronto Russian

    I can’t speak for Pakistan, but in India at present the main function of higher education for women is as a marital signaling device–the MRS Degree as it was once known in North America. Urban, higher educated females are less likely to be in the labor force. It’s considered a sign of low status for a professional man’s wife to work.

    It should also be pointed out that this sort of marriage market is by itself insufficient to maintain robust birth rates–these sorts of Indians have undergone the modern fertility transition and have only one or two children in general these days.

    That said, Jatt AK47’s proposal is somewhat sensible. At the very least it stops the most valuable years of a woman’s life from being squandered in school.

    As always, of course, there are trade-offs. A suitable wife for a man in a higher social class for instance needs a certain level of education in order to be a successful hostess and party guest. And while obviously the main objective of female social policy should be to raise the (legitimate, eugenic) birth rate, this is not wholly incompatible with female participation in the labor force either.

  168. @iffen

    Concentration camps require less living space per person than housing does, and would help take some of the pressure off hot property markets.

    Additionally, concentration camps can and should be net producers of energy. The most recalcitrant atomophobes who cannot be reformed can be processed via thermal depolymerization into useful hydrocarbons as well as minerals. Financial cost is around $60/bbl, roughly the same price as WTI on the NYMEX.

    • LOL: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @iffen
  169. AP says:
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    According to this theory Serbs are a type of gypsy.

    It’s nonsense.

    • Agree: Korenchkin
  170. songbird says:
    @Thorfinnsson

    Nuclear powered aircraft are possible in principle

    The USSR actually built one…. (wiki)

    The Soviet program of nuclear aircraft development resulted in the experimental Tupolev Tu-119, or the Tu-95LAL (Russian: LAL- Летающая Атомная Лаборатория, lit. ‘Flying Nuclear Laboratory’) which derived from the Tupolev Tu-95 bomber. It had two conventional turboprop engines and two direct-cycle nuclear jet engines, and got around the shielding weight issue by simply not including it. According to a letter from test pilot E.A. Guryenov to Scottish Journalist George Kerevan:

    “We had all been irradiated, but we ignored it. Of the two crews, only three men survived- a young navigator, a military navigator and me. The first to go, a young technician, took only three years to die”.

    The aircraft is alleged to have been flown up to 40 times from 1961 to 1969.[10]. Several other projects, like the supersonic Tupolev Tu-120[11] reached only the design phase.[12][13]

  171. iffen says:
    @Thorfinnsson

    take some of the pressure off hot property markets.

    Note to iffen: When Thor gets proclaimed Benevolent Dictator for Life, immediately move all money out of REITS.

    takes plant matter away from other purposes (e.g. silage and compost).

    processed via thermal depolymerization into useful hydrocarbons as well as minerals.

    Ashes make a very good ingredient for compost.

  172. songbird says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I think that there are many more infirm people than there are freaks. This includes some young people or middle-aged people, not just the ultra-elderly. I myself have been in reduced physical circumstances before where I felt travel on the subway was uncomfortable – though still possible. This experience helped imbue a sympathy in me.

    Maybe, some of these concerns could be addressed by design changes, but in our current society if you build an elevator – people will urinate in it. IMO, that is one of the prices of diversity. There is a relaxed system of expectations and consequences. At least in general – I am sure in Singapore they would give such person the proper treatment.
    —————–
    I appreciate that you are open to the idea of segregation – I think it has a lot of untapped potential that is overlooked based on mere prejudice.

    I can think of countless examples that don’t even involve race – like it is batshit insane to randomly assign dorm-mates in college – at the very least some effort should be made to match sleeping habits. Similarly, in my public school, I don’t think it would have passed public health laws for the number of restrooms open. There was a tendency to close them and monitor them. You had to sign-in. This is just absolutely ridiculous, I thought to myself – why am I forced to go to school with these people?

    But your thoughts are alien to me when you talk about skin color not mattering. Maybe, you haven’t had the same experiences?

    To give you one: I can go into the city. I will not see any white schoolkids with bookbags. Absolutely zero. No white kids playing on corners. This in a city that in my father’s time was 97% white. My mother’s city – a European city was whiter, I believe only 20 years ago. But now, it is only about 85%, and rapidly dropping.

    Over there, there are Nigerians holding up signs calling my people “racists” and campaigning to infinitely invade. You can even see black faces in the extremely isolated village that my grandfather knew, that was near parts of the country that didn’t have electricity until the 1970s. This is a place, where I don’t think they even used saddles or harnesses in the early 1700s – the “roads” were nearly impassible. It is a place, where they keep the nearly murdered language of my ancestors alive, just barely.

    I understand what is happening – it is not confined to one city or one region – and it is deeply alienating. It is not really about skin color. Skin color is just a proxy for a lot of other things like sharing genes, culture, and being cooperative. You see, I don’t really care as much about eye color, or hair color, because they are not as good a predictor of those other things.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  173. Mr. XYZ says:
    @reiner Tor

    Technically speaking, though, one can say that Saddam Hussein himself paved the way for the Iraq War by invading Kuwait back in 1990.

  174. @Thulean Friend

    Other storage options – biogas, compressed air, liquidised air. I wasn’t a believer. I was a nuclear fan. However I recently saw figures which suggested the worst case for no sun and no wind in the UK was 55 hours (in January). But then, electric cars and in the UK, electric only heating at home!

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
  175. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    The Western edge of the South Wales coal field is anthracite. We also call it stone coal. It was literally joined to Pennsylvania in the Carboniferous. Scranton is full of Welsh Americans who followed the coal. We call the intermediate grades Steam Coal and then there is coking coal for the steel works is the East, full of gas. All the deep mines have gone. Only open cast now. Mountain top removal does happen but not like Appalachia.

  176. @Brabantian

    Gareth Jones, the one reporter who actually travelled to the region, described it as a Soviet famine directed at the Kulaks, not at Ukrainians.

    https://www.garethjones.org/soviet_articles/soviet_articles.htm

    He describes problems in the Lower Volga not just Ukraine. He spoke accentless Russian. His Welsh mother was the governess to John Hughes’s grandchildren in Donetsk – originally Hughesovka.

  177. @Philip Owen

    Compressed air may be very useful in the UK owing to the large number of shuttered deep collieries.

  178. @songbird

    You are feeling alienation because you are pre-programmed to do so. In the past, a lot of human conflict basically boiled down to tribal warfare. It didn’t matter what you believed, it only mattered who you were. Our skins essentially became our uniforms.

    These genetic drivers have not gone away, of course, but my view is why should I be enslaved to them in perpetuity? I used to cope by explaining to myself that the cluster of behaviours I deem most important – a care for the environment, a general niceness, cleanliness and discipline and honesty – were most concentrated in my own people. I still believe that. However, being the least bad out of a lot of bad peoples still doesn’t make you good on aggregate.

    I just don’t find racial and ethnic classifications to be all that useful, because they are too blunt a tool. I have far more in common with a human rights organiser in, say, India trying to educate girls and protect the environment than I do with some local low-level locust parasite who doesn’t give a shit about the impact he has on his surroundings, takes no effort to live a moral life and treats other people badly. Should I side with that individual simply because of my genetics? That is a very crude and unsatisfying way of living your life.

  179. Good.

    • Disagree: Thorfinnsson
    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  180. @Thulean Friend

    You now have the full set of standard radical progressive opinions, except way more insane.

    • LOL: iffen
    • Replies: @silviosilver
  181. @Thulean Friend

    …even most vatniks have abandoned the delusions of a collapsing Ukraine.

    The so-called ‘country’ is already collapsed by any sane definition of the word. It’s the real reason why Ukraine won’t be annexed any time soon – the cost of rebuilding that failed state is astronomical, and as far as capital investment goes, Russia prioritizes its eastern half anyways.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  182. @reiner Tor

    You could see it coming couldn’t you. It would shock absolutely no one if he started taking black cock after deciding he was tired of being enslaved in perpetuity to the genetic drive to be attracted to only to females. Perhaps even a sex change is in the offing – you only live once, so why not live life to max and sample all its possibilities?

    • Replies: @iffen
  183. @anonymous coward

    The so-called ‘country’ is already collapsed by any sane definition of the word.

    Go on, define collapse for us.

  184. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Serbs migrating from the Indian subcontinent

    My eyes are about to roll out of my skull ◔_◔
    Idiocy like this only harms us in the long run, when kooks who say “Portugal/India/Ukraine is Serbia” (and they do exist) get screentime on Television it devalues our actual claims, suddenly the claim that Montenegro or parts of Bosnia are Serbian seem like just another part of Serb delusions

    Lusatia

    Most likely where the Serbian tribe came from to the Balkans, a shame it literally went unmentioned in my History class, I guess you could call this the White Serbia which preceded current Serbia


    This picture is a good summary of it, but the Sorbian lands were much bigger in the past, perhaps it was pressure by the advancing Germans which drove settlement into the Balkans, I wish we got some books on this instead of the ancient conflict between Serbs and Atlantis (a real book)

  185. iffen says:
    @Korenchkin

    Some people say that the Irish and Italians in America went from being nonwhite to white. Are you saying that the white Serbs migrated to the Balkans and are no longer white Serbs? Dang! What kind of assimilation y’all got going on down there?

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  186. @Korenchkin

    Idiocy like this

    If it helps you, Hungarians descend from the star system Sirius. Exactly like the Japanese, our DNA helix turns nine times, just like the Japanese. We wuz Hunz, but we also wuz Sumerians. Jesus was Hungarian. Magyar was the original language of mankind. No other language allows for such clarity of expression as Magyar. Magyars have lived in the Carpathian Basin for 40,000 years now. (Just one more reason why Trianon was the most monstrous crime ever.) Among many other things, the secret (underground?) pyramids in Bosnia prove this. All this was kept secret by a secret Freemason-Vatican-Habsburg-Judeo-Bolshevik conspiracy for centuries, but the documents in the secret Vatican vaults prove it beyond doubt. Trianon was only concluded for a hundred years, and is set to expire in 2020. All we have to do is to sign this petition to the International Court of Justice, because this 100-year expiry clause is being kept secret, only so that we’d miss the deadline!

    I’m not saying a majority of nationalists believe in such nonsense, but each of the above big-brained ideas have believers numerous enough to make it a profitable business selling books about them.

    So don’t worry, Serb nationalists do not have bigger brains than Hungarian nationalists. Maybe you might get a close second place.

  187. @Thulean Friend

    …because you are pre-programmed to do so.

    Think again. Not everybody is an NPC like you.

  188. @silviosilver

    ‘Ukraine’ is a failed state, meaning it is a territory without functioning governing, legal or social structures.

    Granted, it’s still a place full of white people with high IQ, so it’s miles above places that are both failed states and full of low-IQ brown people.

    But are ramifications – for example, when doing any sort of market analysis or planning, ‘Ukraine’ doesn’t figure at all, no more than Somalia does. It makes no sense to sell products in a place that has no rule or law or working governments.

    • Replies: @AP
  189. iffen says:
    @reiner Tor

    We wuz Hunz

    Are there any Attila shrines or statues in Hungary? Any that have been desecrated or torn down? Any slated to be built?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  190. @iffen

    The first Hungarian dynasty, the House of Árpád (Árpád was the first prince of the conquering Magyars in the late 9th and early 10th centuries), considered themselves descended from Attila, as attested to in 13th century codices. This might have been a fancy, but untrue, genealogy (Attila was a well-known nomadic prince, and Magyars were known to have been nomads before), but it’s also possible that it was true: nomadic princes often intermarried, nomadic tribal alliances kept shifting around, so some descent from Attila all the way to Árpád is far from impossible. Recent genetic studies have shown that the Árpád dynasty had R1a Y haplogroup, which is common among Finno-Ugric peoples, but also among Slavic, Indo-Iranian and Turkic peoples. Could Attila have been an R1a as well? Of course. Could members of the Árpád dynasty be all-male line descendants of Attila? Possible, though not terribly likely. If we allow female descendants, the possibility increases considerably, but nowhere near certainty. I don’t think the idea totally kooky (unlike some other ideas), but it’s very far from proven. The only proofs we have are a couple medieval chronicles (probably working from the same source, which no longer exists; it is well known that medieval kings enjoyed creating fancy genealogies for themselves) and the R1a haplogroup. (The latter is hardly evidence of anything, really.) And of course even if descent from Attila was proven, it wouldn’t mean that Magyars were descended from Huns. (We don’t even know what language the Huns spoke, but it was likely unrelated to Hungarian.)

    Otherwise Attila is a pretty common name in Hungary, but was rare until the second half of the 20th century, when it became highly popular. Probably to a large extent because one of the greatest Hungarian poets (or perhaps the single greatest), Attila József, had this name. (He wrote about how his relatives had discussed in his presence that the name Attila didn’t even exist. His parents chose a highly unusual name for him.) He had been a member of the tiny illegal communist party for a short time (but left it and wrote some anti-Stalinist poems), which could be played up. (He died in the 1930s at a young age, so he conveniently wasn’t around to protest being held up as an example of “socialist realist” poetry.)

    When introducing colleagues of that name to foreigners, it took me some time before I realized that foreigners didn’t just think it was a normal name, but rather associated it with the Scourge of God. It’s simply a normal name in Hungary. I’d even say for cultured Hungarians the first famous person with that name mentioned would be the leftist poet rather than the Hun king.

  191. @iffen

    His carnal obsession with black men is undeniable at this point.

  192. @iffen

    Real Serbs are BLACK

  193. EldnahYm says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I just don’t find racial and ethnic classifications to be all that useful, because they are too blunt a tool. I have far more in common with a human rights organiser in, say, India trying to educate girls and protect the environment than I do with some local low-level locust parasite who doesn’t give a shit about the impact he has on his surroundings, takes no effort to live a moral life and treats other people badly. Should I side with that individual simply because of my genetics? That is a very crude and unsatisfying way of living your life.

    A person from your own ethnic group who behaves in the manner you described is bad for their own ethnic group. Since one should want one’s own people to be better, one should disfavor this individual in most situations. An exception might be if your group is in an existential struggle with another group and that flawed individual’s contributions towards defeating the opposing group outweigh his negative qualities.

    The point of using racial and ethnic classification is not to pick out random individuals and assign them qualities. Individuals with rare exceptions do not have much impact on the world. It is to judge the quality of the group as a whole. What is the impact of the group as a whole? For that ethnic classification is useful. I can make quite general statements about the inherent worth of having 12 million Zulus in this world for example. One can also frame questions about what impact group x had in a historical scenario vs group y.

    Also, since group conflict is inevitable in humans, it makes sense to be some extent group identifying. You may choose not to identify with your own group, but plenty of other people will, including people on the other side who may want to destroy you, and by not being sufficiently group identifying you are helping those hostile to you. What other people think and how they behave should matter to you. You talk as if nothing analogous to tribal warfare exists today. But that’s nonsense. Ethnic politics is alive and well.

    One can have both general principles about what’s good and still generally favor one’s own group. You are presenting a scenario where these two things are 100% incompatible but that is mostly not the case.

    Human rights is a pernicious idea that should be done away with. It’s not particularly compatible with environmentalism or any sort of naturalistic view of the world either. Genghis Khan is probably history’s greatest environmentalist.

    • Replies: @iffen
    , @Thulean Friend
  194. iffen says:
    @EldnahYm

    You may choose not to identify with your own group

    You don’t get to tell me with which groups I should identify; it’s agin the rules. You only get to say for yourself so stop with the overreaching.

  195. AP says:
    @anonymous coward

    Anonymous coward has the record of being the most wrong poster here, probably over 90% of his claims are false. Anyways:

    ‘Ukraine’ is a failed state, meaning it is a territory without functioning governing, legal or social structures.

    Government: Tax collection up, functioning police, schools, public transportation, etc.

    Legal: 2017 homicide rate lower than that of Russia:

    https://www.indexmundi.com/facts/indicators/VC.IHR.PSRC.P5/rankings

    Social: Higher church attendance than Russia, lower abortion rate than Russia.

    According to anonymous coward’s “thinking”, Russia is a failed state.

    It makes no sense to sell products in a place that has no rule or law or working governments.

    Ukraine consumer spending up 20% in 2018 compared to 2017:

    https://www.macrotrends.net/countries/UKR/ukraine/consumer-spending

    Per capita consumer spending in 2018 was higher than in 2012, just a bit lower than in 2013 (but will be higher in 2019).

    Total consumer spending in 2018 was more than in Kazakhstan, Hungary, Algeria, Morocco, Belarus, etc:

    https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NE.CON.PRVT.CD?most_recent_value_desc=true&year_high_desc=true

  196. songbird says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I can sympathize with your misanthropy. Every group has it scumbags, as well as its good people, but that’s no reason to be indifferent to replacism.

    Diversity just makes for a less healthy society. IQ is a contributor of course, but it is much more complicated. And we should all want a healthy society.

    Numerous times, I have heard white women scold teenage white boys who were strangers to them, for what they saw as antisocial behavior. This doesn’t cross racial lines. A mixed neighborhood loses this self-corrective power, where stranger-mothers are willing to scold kids who are not their own children.

    A lot of people don’t have children. Sometimes it is because of bad luck, rather than bad planning. These people still need to feel a sense of belonging, a sense of non-materialistic continuance. They are able to feel it in the nation-state, but not in a multicult society. If they lose this feeling, it effects other people.

    Children also require a sense of identity to be healthy, IMO. Part of it is about having something more than simple consumerism. Just think of all the crap they try to push on kids.

    You cannot unilaterally disarm your sense of tribalism.

    More tribalistic groups will win, every time – it is easy to simulate mathematically. And here is the thing: for some reason or other, we (Europeans) are starting from a lower point of tribalism. It is easy to understand why Jews, or upper-caste Hindus, who have been self-selecting for tribalism, for over 2500 years can knock us dead, but it is harder to understand why it is so with these other groups. IMO, we need to build our sense of tribalism to a healthier level.

    Besides, even if you enjoy cosmopolitanism – it simply does not require replacism. There could be cosmopolitan zones, like Neom, built in the desert, so not destroying any people or cultures.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  197. @silviosilver

    The postal service stops working. The state loses control of violence.

  198. @Thulean Friend

    Prices have had something to do with that. The Irish were reducing supply ahead of Brexit.

  199. @Korenchkin

    ancient conflict between Serbs and Atlantis (a real book)

    Where can I buy this book?

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
  200. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    For purchase:
    https://www.korisnaknjiga.com/prorocanstvo-srbima-od-deda-vukana-naslov-4688
    PDF:

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  201. • LOL: songbird
  202. Счастливого рождества from Mine to Yours.

  203. @songbird

    Thanks for a high quality comment.

    Diversity just makes for a less healthy society. IQ is a contributor of course, but it is much more complicated. And we should all want a healthy society.
    Numerous times, I have heard white women scold teenage white boys who were strangers to them, for what they saw as antisocial behavior. This doesn’t cross racial lines. A mixed neighborhood loses this self-corrective power, where stranger-mothers are willing to scold kids who are not their own children.

    Social cohesion is probably the single best argument against a social order predicated on an ethos. Nevertheless, the limitations of the argument are the same that I critiqued previously. It rests on a very narrow long-term view that is fundamentally pessimistic: that we cannot change human nature and must work within its constraints. That is not a flawed argument on its face: it is certainly congruent with historical past trends.

    My counter is simply to ask people to raise their gaze. I am willing to take a calculated risk that the societal trade-offs of having lower ethnic and cultural cohesion are worth it if there is a robust sorting mechanism that would place highly ethical people – regardless of cultural and social background – in a cluster. There would likely still be some tribalism, and perhaps even a bit of social alienation (at least for those belonging to the smallest population groups), but the social good gained on aggregate would vastly outweigh the negatives.

    Simply put, given the right kind of people, I am in fact highly optimistic on humanity’s capacity to solve even the most pressing problems. The problem is that these type of people constitute a very small fraction of every nation, so instead of bogging them down in their respect group, pool them together into one unified group and cut off the rest.

    You cannot unilaterally disarm your sense of tribalism.

    Culturally speaking, no. I am not a blank slatist in that sense. You’re correct about the dead-weight of tribalism. My hope would be that genetic engineering would solve this issue. I think it will be technically feasible within the next few decades at most. The bigger stumbling block would be the political-economy piece of the puzzle. No group would want to unilaterally disarm their own tribalism, and some groups who are already very tribal may even secretely want to increase theirs at others’ expense. The method of making sure everyone would be de-tribalised would be very hard to achieve culturally/politically, even if technically possible when and if it becomes doable.

    This goes back to my partial misanthropy – and why I believe it is more important to reach across the barriers to other people who are concerned with the same issues.

    More tribalistic groups will win, every time

    As you yourself conceded, this maxim does not accede to reality. Europeans are arguably one of the less tribal groups and yet Europeans was the most successful race in the history of mankind – by a longshot. It is true that Europeans were more tribal in the recent past, but even back then, there are strong reasons to suspect this lower tribalism was still partly genetic. After all, Europeans unilaterally forbade slavery (and rightly so) before anyone else. European colonialism may not have been as benevolent as many right-wing historians like to delude themselves, but it was certainly not genocidal or exploitative the way Mongols or Timurids were.

    As I’ve been pointing out many times, there is an inherent irony with right-wingers extolling the greatness of western civilisation when the rise of the west was co-terminus with the rise of liberalism and the two were feeding off each other in a feedback loop. The enlightenment was nothing else but a series of liberal revolutions following each other, and we’re all the better off for it as a result.

    • Agree: iffen
    • Replies: @songbird
    , @EldnahYm
  204. @EldnahYm

    A person from your own ethnic group who behaves in the manner you described is bad for their own ethnic group. Since one should want one’s own people to be better, one should disfavor this individual in most situations.

    Or better yet: I am not responsible for that person’s bad behaviour and given that I find most Swedes to be morally inferior and wanting, why should I expend any significant amount of resources in trying to help or even identify with them?

    group conflict is inevitable in humans

    Group conflict has been on a consistent and secular decline, which is well documented. I’d be vary of using broad statements about inevitability. Perhaps some amount of conflict is “inevitable”, but the intensity surely isn’t and it keeps falling decade by decade. That alone shows you that dark fantasies of endless race war and/or societal collapse are nonsensical. The latter can still happen, but rather as a result of collective human failures with regards to our environment, how we live our lives, how we organise our societies in an unsustainable manner etc.

    You may choose not to identify with your own group, but plenty of other people will, including people on the other side who may want to destroy you, and by not being sufficiently group identifying you are helping those hostile to you.

    This is a pessimistic view of the world, which takes for granted that human beings are doomed to perpetuate blood fueds into eternity. As I already pointed out, human conflict is in fact receding when viewed through the lens of centures. So this pessimism is already being challenged as we speak.

    The onus is on you to explain why this should suddenly shift. As I think I mentioned to songbird in a previous debate, higher intelligence is linked to higher ethical standards and increase moral behaviour among humans, something which Heiner Rindermann has written about extensively. As we augment our brains in exchange for higher intellectualism, why wouldn’t the moral reasoning also increase in tandem? It has in the past and it is already in the present. Liberal ideas are strongly correlated with intelligence. Raise the intellectual base of the entire population, get a more liberal population, too.

    Genghis Khan is probably history’s greatest environmentalist.

    Unironically correct, though his environmentalism was purely incidental, so I won’t credit him that much. Sorry Genghis!

    • Replies: @EldnahYm
  205. @Thulean Friend

    >educate girls

    Fuck off and stay out of India!

    • LOL: songbird
  206. If you ban AaronB & Thulean I will cease India posting for 2 years (1 for each).

  207. EldnahYm says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Or better yet: I am not responsible for that person’s bad behaviour and given that I find most Swedes to be morally inferior and wanting, why should I expend any significant amount of resources in trying to help or even identify with them?

    Perhaps because other groups are even worse? Or perhaps because nothing will improve if people adopt your attitude?

    Group conflict has been on a consistent and secular decline, which is well documented. I’d be vary of using broad statements about inevitability. Perhaps some amount of conflict is “inevitable”, but the intensity surely isn’t and it keeps falling decade by decade. That alone shows you that dark fantasies of endless race war and/or societal collapse are nonsensical. The latter can still happen, but rather as a result of collective human failures with regards to our environment, how we live our lives, how we organise our societies in an unsustainable manner etc.

    It is unwise to base decisions on a questionable extrapolation mostly based around post-WW2 declines.

    I was talking about group conflicts in general, not just about race.

    This is a pessimistic view of the world, which takes for granted that human beings are doomed to perpetuate blood fueds into eternity. As I already pointed out, human conflict is in fact receding when viewed through the lens of centures. So this pessimism is already being challenged as we speak.

    There is nothing pessimistic about taking sensible steps to avoid trouble later.

    This is a pessimistic view of the world, which takes for granted that human beings are doomed to perpetuate blood fueds into eternity. As I already pointed out, human conflict is in fact receding when viewed through the lens of centures. So this pessimism is already being challenged as we speak.

    The onus is on you to explain why this should suddenly shift. As I think I mentioned to songbird in a previous debate, higher intelligence is linked to higher ethical standards and increase moral behaviour among humans, something which Heiner Rindermann has written about extensively. As we augment our brains in exchange for higher intellectualism, why wouldn’t the moral reasoning also increase in tandem? It has in the past and it is already in the present. Liberal ideas are strongly correlated with intelligence. Raise the intellectual base of the entire population, get a more liberal population, too.

    Are you always this fond of extrapolation or is it only when it happens to align with your prejudices? Surely it is yourself who would need to explain why we can expect human conflict to decline indefinitely. It has increased and decreased before, that much is clear.

    Here’s an extrapolation: The extinction rate of non-human species has been increasing for centuries. Therefore, it will continue to increase in the future, so why should I care about environmentalist’s optimistic fantasies about saving them? They will continue to die out, and the onus should be on you to explain why this should suddenly shift. (Note that I do not actually believe this)

    Variables may correlate, but variables can also be measured and isolated separately to varying degrees, and that two things correlate at one time period does not mean this has always been so or always will be. Surely I do not need to point you to historical examples of intelligent people with illiberal views to prove it is possible to be both intelligent and illiberal

    Of course if you had an actual causal reason to explain why intelligent people are highly unlikely to be illiberal, I may take your concerns seriously. If one take’s the views of people like Edward Dutton seriously(I’m not sure to what extent I do), IQs have actually been decreasing in Western societies since the Industrial Revolution. Certainly we can say that currently intelligent people are not reproducing relative to the less intelligent. Perhaps we should ask if liberal societies are themselves sustainable. Even speaking of the environment, most of the destruction you so bemoan has been done by modern, liberal societies.

    My position is not that we should become less moral. It is that your form of morality is incorrect. Your universalist, undiscriminating attitude is incorrect. It is the equivalent of the claim that parents should not favor their own children over people in Mogadishu. It is based upon a false view of human nature, and in the main it will accomplish a breakdown of group solidarity, not to the betterment of overall human flourishing, but to the betterment of groups who are able to resist these universalizing tendencies while accumulating power for themselves. Liberal systems fail due to their own success.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @EldnahYm
    , @Thulean Friend
  208. songbird says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Muslims in Nigeria thought that the polio vaccine was some sort of ZOG conspiracy to sterilize them. No half-rational parent would agree to heavy genetic modification of their child’s deep-seated instincts about group identity. We are stuck with them, and must work within our boundaries.

    The success of Europeans is an eroding legacy from a different technological era, when our bioculture was not under attack and our natural defenses were sufficient – before deregulated airlines could offer cheap flights from Lagos.

    Low tribalism is patently maladaptive to the jet-age.

    Now, our failures are piling up, just as our successes once did. Medieval villages are being replaced wholesale. We are rapidly losing territory, and are being mocked by savages in our own countries, an obvious sign of failure. Spoiler alert: the new groups are some of the least intellectually capable in the world. It is like the ground is being salted.

    Innovation is decreasing. There are fundamental societal problems like low fertility, dysgenics, and local brain-drain, which need addressing, but which we cannot address because of multicult distractions.

    If things go on like this – if East Asia is susceptible too – I think it is entirely possibly that the US of the 1960s will have been much more capable of great things, like the moon landing, than the entire world of 2100 working together. Brazil is not something to which one should aspire.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  209. EldnahYm says:
    @EldnahYm

    Correction here: When mentioning Dutton, it’s not that IQs have declined, but intelligence has declined(which has been offset by the Flynn effect).

  210. EldnahYm says:
    @Thulean Friend

    As I’ve been pointing out many times, there is an inherent irony with right-wingers extolling the greatness of western civilisation when the rise of the west was co-terminus with the rise of liberalism and the two were feeding off each other in a feedback loop. The enlightenment was nothing else but a series of liberal revolutions following each other, and we’re all the better off for it as a result.

    There are also various leftists who will claim with some justification that so-called scientific racism, eugenics, and various forms of thought based upon biological classification of humans are a product of the Enlightenment. Aren’t you just picking and choosing certain aspects of the Enlightenment and constructing a narrative around those selective facts? Well, rights wingers also have things they like and dislike.

    I would claim that Western civilization is fundamentally flawed and should therefore be altered. Aesthetically my preferences would be in more line with the Romantic movement than the Enlightenment or Counter-Enlightenment, although no system constructed by humans should be swallowed whole.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  211. Lol only warrior stories matter.

    • Replies: @songbird
  212. @EldnahYm

    There are also various leftists who will claim with some justification that so-called scientific racism, eugenics, and various forms of thought based upon biological classification of humans are a product of the Enlightenment.

    They aren’t wrong, though I would take umbrage with the term “scientific racism”. It is just science to observe natural human differences. To call science racism is anti-liberal and also a brazen attempt to censor. I am very strongly in favor of free speech, even when the findings make people uncomfortable. That does not mean we must undertake ghoulish policies, which is where I depart from some of the extreme-right.

    Aesthetically my preferences would be in more line with the Romantic movement than the Enlightenment or Counter-Enlightenment, although no system constructed by humans should be swallowed whole.

    I like the romantic movement, too. A lot of right-wingers focus on the most apparent nationalistic aspects, but conveniently ignore its more daring critiques of industrial capitalism and how it undermined traditional ways of life, including destruction of the environment. Social bonds were frayed in ways which alienated a lot of people, which in turn allowed the rise of mass move A lot of reactionary critiques of the 1800s were far more esoteric and subtle than the low-level neoliberal muh freedom garbage which passes for ‘conservatism’ these days.

    Romantic art was also far more appealing, with its focus on humans living in harmony with nature.

  213. @songbird

    The success of Europeans is an eroding legacy from a different technological era, when our bioculture was not under attack

    Is this plausible? Look at the Ottoman empire, the Mongol invasions, the North African barbery slavers/pirates, the arab Islamic invasion of Spain, the huns and many more. Europe has been under constant attack for most of its modern history and the genetic composition of Europe has changed as a result. Some entire European nations are here because they were originally invaders, e.g. Hungarians. The only reason why this recurring pattern of invasions stopped is because Europe rose to greatness and started colonising others instead of being colonised itself.

    Innovation is decreasing. There are fundamental societal problems like low fertility, dysgenics, and local brain-drain, which need addressing, but which we cannot address because of multicult distractions.

    Can be solved through eugenics, though why take a slow road of fertility patterns when you can just do genetic augmentation?

    • Replies: @songbird
  214. @EldnahYm

    If one take’s the views of people like Edward Dutton seriously(I’m not sure to what extent I do), IQs have actually been decreasing in Western societies since the Industrial Revolution.

    Dysgenic fertility patterns. Though Sweden is a notable exception.

    Perhaps we should ask if liberal societies are themselves sustainable. Even speaking of the environment, most of the destruction you so bemoan has been done by modern, liberal societies.

    This is a very good argument and it reminds me of my polite disagreements with Deep Ecology types. They call me too moderate in thinking that our current system can be saved/salvaged. They are far less sanguine in believing that capitalism in of itself is the root cause and has no chance at being reformed. These people are not really communists – which is industrial in its assumptions as well – as much as they believe in a primordial “return to nature” type of living.

    I am instinctively against such views, because I believe in human progress and in overcoming our constraints. I just believe that most of humanity’s riff-raff isn’t capable of it and need to be dumped. The constraint in my eyes is primarily human weaknesses whereas in theirs it is economic/systemic. They view any merging with machines as inherently evil or alien, whereas I can’t wait to dump my outdated and outmoded body, given that it has barely evolved in its design over the last 10K+ years. Human ‘consciousness’ is ultimately what living is about, the discrete physical form that takes is of a lesser significance. In other words, why not extend your life time in the simulation when or if you can?

    • Disagree: iffen
  215. songbird says:
    @Jatt Sengh

    I heard of this theory a few years ago. It is interesting. I like it, but I’m kind of skeptical of it.

    Words and DNA are a better indicator of these relationships. Stories travel in a different way than words. You get more versions of them. People are creative, but there are only so many story possibilities.

    Find a story in Italy, and there will be dozens of versions of it in Italy, and you will find it all over Europe. There was trade and itinerant story-tellers, spreading these stories.

  216. songbird says:
    @Thulean Friend

    when our bioculture was not under attack

    Yes, I misspoke here. I guess the idea nearer to the truth would be that it was almost always under attack, except the magnitude and danger of that attack was much less. The point being that it is much easier to move people today. Just look at a Greek or Hungarian’s DNA, today. They are pretty European.

    the North African barbery slavers/pirates

    Their activity was tragic, but I don’t think it qualifies as an attack on bioculture, as they weren’t immigrating. They may have even worked to preserve our biolculture by limiting contact with the East.

    The only reason why this recurring pattern of invasions stopped is because Europe rose to greatness and started colonising others instead of being colonised itself.

    Now we would need to welfare-invade countries, to do tit for tat. Only it would probably just be surplus blacks and Arabs migrating from Europe to better pastures.

    why take a slow road of fertility patterns when you can just do genetic augmentation?

    I’ve never advocated uplifting other groups. In fact, I’d strongly caution against it.

  217. funny but true

  218. On this day, 9th January in the year 1992, Republika Srpska (formally and initially called Serb Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina) was founded by Serbs in the Socialist Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina because their legitimate concerns about leaving Yugoslavia were completely ignored by Croats and Muslims.

    Happy Republika Srpska Day everyone! 🙂

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @iffen
  219. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Why is it Srpska and not Srbska? Are they Serps?

  220. fnn says:

    Some celebrated Soviet-Russian science now discovered to be at least somewhat fake:
    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/russian-foxes-tameness-domestication

    But that story is flawed, some researchers now claim. The foxes weren’t totally wild to begin with, and some of the traits attributed to domestication existed long before the experiment began, Elinor Karlsson, a biologist at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, and her colleagues argue. What’s more, the researchers cast doubt on whether domestication syndrome even exists, in a paper published online December 3 in Trends in Ecology and Evolution.

    The impressively long silver fox experiment, ongoing at the Russian Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Cytology and Genetics in Novosibirsk since 1960, didn’t seek to breed foxes that looked so different from their wild counterparts. But several generations after geneticist Dmitry Belyaev took 130 silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Soviet fur farms and began selecting for friendliness toward humans, the physical changes emerged. Floppy ears, piebald coats and other traits were known in other domesticated mammals, so the changes have since been thought of as a syndrome of traits inherently linked to the process of domestication of wild animals.

    It’s no secret that the foxes weren’t truly “wild,” Karlsson says. The Soviet foxes originally came from fur farms on Prince Edward Island in Canada, with selective breeding dating back to at least the 1880s. One of Karlsson’s colleagues, on vacation on the island, stumbled across fur farm photographs from the 1920s during a visit to a local museum. Those foxes appeared tame with spotted coats — one of the same domestication traits claimed as a by-product of the Russian experiment that supposedly took generations to emerge.

    “These photos dated from decades before the project had even started,” Karlsson says. The images “seemed to raise a lot of questions about exactly what had happened during the course of that project in terms of genetic changes in that population.”

  221. @reiner Tor

    I’m honestly not fully sure why.

    I suspect it’s because Serbia proper is formally called the Republic of Serbia, so in order to differentiate the two, the term “Srpska” from the “Srp” base was used (Sirp is what Turks call Serbs, btw). So Republic of Serpska, or as it is more commonly called, Republika Srpska, was instead used as a term.

    • Thanks: reiner Tor
  222. How is this ugly sounding Philip Owen? Ur Welsh so I take that seriously..

    I esp like how Katar or Tufang (Musket) turns into Kataran or Tufangan as a poetic device
    Like Barshay (Lance) Kataran evokes imagery of them being used vs just describing them
    Idk the english grammatical term because I’m hetero||

    Anyone who follows the English here for the full 5min will understand

    Why, it’s pointless to be anything but a Ksyatriya||

  223. iffen says:
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Y’all need to get a new PR firm.

    We thought that it was all about Greater Serbia which is why most of us weren’t upset by the bombings.

    If we had known that it was just a valiant crusade for independence, it might have made a difference.

  224. @iffen

    Y’all need to get a new PR firm.

    The biggest problem with this is that Serbs never had any PR firm to begin with in America or other Western countries. Serb enemies basically had the most powerful PR firms in the world such as Ruder Finn.

    We thought that it was all about Greater Serbia

    Not really. The reality is that everyone in the Balkans has a Greater nation state ideology. That’s why it’s nothing more than pathetic and outrageous double standards to pretend as if it is exceptionally sinister for Serbs to have one.

    Just search up some maps of Greater Croatia (there are even different variations), Alija Izetbegovic’s Islamic Declaration (especially the part about no co-existence with non-Muslims), Greater Albania, and hell, even Greater “North Macedonia” (lol).

    Since Serbs are pitted against greater nation state ideologies from hostile ethnic groups that are de facto backed by NATO/USA and other non-Balkan actors, why shouldn’t Serbs try to form their own greater nation state?

    During the 1990’s, the objective of Serbs was in essence the following two things:

    1: Keep the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia together by fighting aggressive separatist forces.

    This quickly proved to be impossible, since both the Western and Muslim world made this impossible.

    2: Preserve Serb ethnic areas and the existence of Serbs in regions where their survival was mortally endangered.

    This could only truly be done with a Greater Serbia, but since this was vetoed by the Western world, Serbs formed their own autonomous ethnic states (Republic of Serb Krajina, or RSK, and Republika Srpska, the former fell in 1995) in order to reliably secure the existence and survival of Serbs in Krajina-Slavonia and Bosnia-Herzegovina upon their ancestral homelands.

    most of us weren’t upset by the bombings.

    Well, on a basic level you should be upset since it lead to the deaths of hundreds and thousands of innocent civilians (mostly Serbs). Especially because this was done in the name of hoaxes, fabrications and distortions based upon any combination of complete lies, half-truths and lies by omission (I can’t be bothered going into all the dirty tricks myself, take the time to read alternate perspectives about Srebrenica 1995 and Racak 1999 if you care enough).

    A direct consequence of international sanctions placed upon Yugoslavia and Republika Srpska:

    http://thesrpskatimes.com/7965-2/

    A direct result from NATO bombing:

    http://thesrpskatimes.com/precisely-20-years-ago-nato-bombs-took-little-milica-rakic-forever-the-tragedy-of-the-century-will-remain-unpunished/

    If we had known that it was just a valiant crusade for independence, it might have made a difference.

    Republika Srpska’s struggle was initially to fight to stay within Yugoslavia, but this quickly became impossible. It’s fight was then to secure the existence of the Serb people in Bosnia and Herzegovina and resist the conquest of Serb territory by Croats and Muslims (something NATO/USA helped).

    Currently, Republika Srpska is struggling to become independent from Muslim rule of the so called “Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina” and “Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina”. Republia Srpska aims to unite and merge with Serbia since the Muslims wish to turn all of Bosnia and Herzegovina into an Islamic state and get rid of Republika Srpska by turning Bosnia and Herzegovina into a unitary state through centralization and abolition of the rights of both Serbs and Croats (the status of Croats in Bosnia under Muslim rule is an awkward topic for most anti-Serbs).

    • Replies: @iffen
    , @silviosilver
  225. @iffen

    Oh and by the way, here are the comments of a French senator about 2020’s celebration of Republika Srpska Day:

    http://thesrpskatimes.com/french-senator-celebration-of-the-republic-of-srpska-day-is-proof-of-patriotism-and-great-love/

    Also the comments of the de facto leader of Republika Srpska on its importance to the Serbian people of Bosnia and Herzegovina:

    http://thesrpskatimes.com/dodik-srpska-is-a-synonym-for-freedom-of-the-serbian-people/

  226. iffen says:
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    The biggest problem with this is that Serbs never had any PR firm to begin with in America or other Western countries. Serb enemies basically had the most powerful PR firms in the world such as Ruder Finn.

    Try and hire the one that the Kurds use.

    Well, on a basic level you should be upset since it lead to the deaths of hundreds and thousands of innocent civilians (mostly Serbs).

    I think that the consensus was to stop all sides from killing each other. It is unfortunate that the way to get that done was for NATO to kill some Serbs. It worked, until next time.

  227. What is the real agenda behind the so called “gender pay gap”? Almost no one seriously believes that women are paid less for doing the same job as men, practically all jobs have a set pay scale that employees receive, gender doesn’t come into it.

    What is the real end game with this agenda? I don’t believe that even most of the people who promote the idea that there is a “gender pay gap” seriously believe it, so something else must be going on here.

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  228. @Europe Europa

    From what I can tell, they seriously believe it. The people sharing the stories on Facebook, I’m not necessarily talking about the media rulers.

  229. Putin should’ve told the rebels to accept responsibility for MH17 already on the afternoon of July 17, 2014. And immediately started blaming the Ukrainians for using the civilian airliners as human shields, or at least attacking from the air while still not closing the airspace, making such accidents likely.

    He would look much better now. Instead, he was peddling the stories of the “Spanish air traffic controller” and similar nonsense.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  230. Anatoly,
    I was reading about fertility and found this wikipedia article about Russia’s childless tax.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tax_on_childlessness

    For people without kids, it was a 6% garnishment of your wages.

    It was apparently very successful, and fertility fell by half in the years following it’s repeal, even after Russia regained the living standards it once had back pre-collapse

    Do you think a similar tax would boost birthrates in the west today? It seems very difficult to boost birthrates nowadays, but perhaps some delayed punitive tax like this might just do the trick.

    Or maybe a tax that offers a permanent lowering of your income tax for every kid that you have. That might even work better.
    E.X: A lowering of an income tax of 5 percentage points for every kid that you have, becomes permanent if the kid lives to become the legal age of independence and is in good health. I suspect while only a few would take the deal, every parent who does will have like 2+ kids. This at least will sharply boost fertility. You can also make it race conscious, though I think that would be more difficult.

  231. Mitleser says:
    @reiner Tor

    No, he would look worse.

    The enemy would only see the weakness and the fighters on the ground betrayel.

    It would not even be the right thing because we do know that it is the truth.

    https://insomniacresurrected.com/2019/07/26/mh17call-for-justice/

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  232. @Mr. XYZ

    … what would this Fascist Russia’s foreign policy aims and goals would have been?

    White Russia held to an official policy of non-determination regarding Russia’s future political system, but all factions agreed that a new Constitution would have to be written by a Constituent Assembly. Whether a monarchy or not, it is inevitable that it would have had democratic elements to it. Presumably, there’s a good chance it would have gone authoritarian in the 1930s, along with the rest of Eastern Europe. Or perhaps not – after all, that very development was substantially predicated on the existence of a Communist threat.

    In foreign policy, the White slogan was “Russia – united, great, and undivided”. There’d have been efforts to reestablish the Russian Empire’s old borders, and to make the Entente honor its promises to the Russian Empire. But I suspect they’d have limited themselves to swallowing up Belorussia and the Ukraine, since wading into Poland or Turkey would have been very unpopular and probably impractical after the destruction of a civil war.

    If Russia did go Fascist, perhaps there’d have been a war with Poland over Lvov; greater expansionism/war with Japan over Manchuria; maybe some more territories get gobbled back up, such as Finland. If it was under some nutjob like Rodzaevsky, I assume there’d have also been major expulsions of Jews. I think the chances of Germany going Nazi in this scenario are very small (again, no Communism). Though if it did… A fascist Russia would have had more people, a bigger economy (if not much more heavy industry), and much more human capital than its Soviet counterpart; fascists usually also make for motivated soldiers. So I don’t expect it to have done badly in any wars.

    I assume it would moderate over time, like Spain/Portugal, and make a political transition with no major economic collapse (why would it? no central planning). Perhaps some imperial loot acquired during the Fascist period (e.g. Finland?) would splinter off at this time.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
  233. @reiner Tor

    It’s just a sound change that languages go through for reasons which remain mysterious to me, but once they’re internalized they sound “correct.”

    Eg in English, house–houses, knife–knives, breath (noun)–breathe (verb).

  234. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    The reality is that everyone in the Balkans has a Greater nation state ideology. That’s why it’s nothing more than pathetic and outrageous double standards to pretend as if it is exceptionally sinister for Serbs to have one.

    This “double standard” exists only in the minds of nationalists. In reality, there was no western support for any “Greater” ideology. Even grudging, lukewarm support for Greater Israel has only been achieved through a fifty-year blanket propaganda campaign requiring endless political contributions (ie bribes).

    • Disagree: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  235. @silviosilver

    This “double standard” exists only in the minds of nationalists. In reality, there was no western support for any “Greater” ideology.

    Of course. There’s absolutely no Western support for a Greater Bosnian Islamic state (as per Alija Izetbegovic’s Islamic Declaration) that will abolish Republika Srpska and any forms of Croat self rule in Bosnia despite Office of the High Representative Valetntin Inzko and almost everyone imaginable droning on about “Srebrenica Genocide”, “reforming Dayton peace agreement” (clearly part of an agenda to centralize Bosnia into a unitary state if you didn’t understand) and etc.

    There’s also no form of Western support whatsoever for a Greater Albania (not to mention KLA and 1999 Kosovo War) in the Balkans despite the British ambassador openly meeting with Kosovo Albanian leadership that put up an Albanian flag at their meeting. Never mind Albanian expansionist attempt against North Macedonia in 2001 or in the Presevo Valley and Medvedje where the Albanians were assisted by NATO short of it going directly to war on their behalf. Of course, there’s also absolutely no pressure whatsoever on Serbia at all to renounce it’s de jure ownership of Kosovo which blocks Serbia from being absorbed into NATO and etc …

    Even grudging, lukewarm support for Greater Israel has only been achieved through a fifty-year blanket propaganda campaign requiring endless political contributions (ie bribes).

    That doesn’t count as Western de facto support Greater Israel though does it???

    Why are you such a clueless retard that pretends he knows everything?

    How about you learn some basic knowledge and common sense before making empty, pompous and incorrect statements fucktard?

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  236. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    There’s nothing you’ve said here that I haven’t heard a thousand times before from nationalist nitwits. A unitary Bosnian state would indeed be a repudiation of Daytona, so they need to tread cautiously, but the point of it — in western eyes — would certainly not be to impose an Islamic state on Bosnia’s non-muslims.

    Support for Albanians in Kosovo and Macedonia was based on assessments that they were being victimized. This was to an extent true, but what westerners overlooked was that Albanians were at least as much recalcitrant nationalist shitheads as the people allegedly oppressing them. Nonetheless, this doesn’t amount to support for a greater Albania.

    That doesn’t count as Western de facto support Greater Israel though does it???

    Why not? You were earlier bemoaning the effects of PR firms (Rudder Finn — a staple of anti-Serb conspiracy theory demonology). Westerners don’t have any great “natural” inclination to support a Greater Israel, so that support has had to be manufactured, through PR and bribes.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  237. Mr. XYZ says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    White Russia held to an official policy of non-determination regarding Russia’s future political system, but all factions agreed that a new Constitution would have to be written by a Constituent Assembly. Whether a monarchy or not, it is inevitable that it would have had democratic elements to it.

    I’m presuming that the democratic elements would be necessary to appeal to the Russian masses and to consolidate the support of the new White Russian regime?

    Presumably, there’s a good chance it would have gone authoritarian in the 1930s, along with the rest of Eastern Europe. Or perhaps not – after all, that very development was substantially predicated on the existence of a Communist threat.

    FWIW, Communism wasn’t the only thing threatening Eastern Europe during this time. Rather, some Eastern European countries had to worry about threats of revanchism and/or aggression from some of their neighbors. For instance, the Balts and Finns had to worry about Russia, the Poles had to worry about Russia, Lithuania, and Germany, the Czechs and Slovaks had to worry about Germany, Poland, and Hungary, Romania had to worry about Russia, Hungary, and Bulgaria, Albania had to worry about Greece, Italy, and Yugoslavia while Yugoslavia had to worry about Hungary and Italy (and maybe about Germany as well once Austria would have united with the German Reich). So, even without Communism, there would be an awful lot of territorial disputes in post-WWI Europe–territorial disputes that could create a feeling of vulnerability among various Eastern European countries and thus play into the hands of potential strongmen. For instance, I’ve previously heard that Jozef Pilsudski was able to seize power in Poland in 1926 by capitalizing on the fear of German revanchism and the perceived inability of Poland’s elected politicians to handle Germany. Granted, though, these factors might not actually be applicable to Russia if Hitler and the Nazis don’t actually come to power in Germany. After all, a non-Nazi Germany would probably be unlikely to seriously threaten Russia. (Indeed, Weimar-Russian relations were very good in real life, and in a White Russia, they might be even better since there won’t be the threat of world Communist revolution like there was in real life.)

    In foreign policy, the White slogan was “Russia – united, great, and undivided”. There’d have been efforts to reestablish the Russian Empire’s old borders, and to make the Entente honor its promises to the Russian Empire. But I suspect they’d have limited themselves to swallowing up Belorussia and the Ukraine, since wading into Poland or Turkey would have been very unpopular and probably impractical after the destruction of a civil war.

    What about going into the Baltic countries, the Caucasian countries, Central Asia, and Bessarabia? (I’m presuming that Finland would fail to be conquered by the Russian Whites–at least for the time being.)

    Also, does Poland still manage to conquer the Kresy (its territories east of the Curzon Line) in this scenario?

    If Russia did go Fascist, perhaps there’d have been a war with Poland over Lvov; greater expansionism/war with Japan over Manchuria; maybe some more territories get gobbled back up, such as Finland.

    Do you think that Russia could also make a play for Xinjiang, Afghanistan, and/or Persia/Iran in this scenario?

    If it was under some nutjob like Rodzaevsky, I assume there’d have also been major expulsions of Jews.

    If so, this would have involved Stalinist-like mass deportations to the middle of nowhere as opposed to outright Nazi-like mass murder, correct? After all, Russia would be large enough for the Jews to get deported en masse somewhere where almost no one is actually going to see or hear them again–but where the goal of massive Jew removal can easily be achieved without extremely drastic measures such as mass murder.

    I think the chances of Germany going Nazi in this scenario are very small (again, no Communism). Though if it did… A fascist Russia would have had more people, a bigger economy (if not much more heavy industry), and much more human capital than its Soviet counterpart; fascists usually also make for motivated soldiers. So I don’t expect it to have done badly in any wars.

    That makes sense. Also, I’m presuming that a Russo-Franco-British alliance on the eve of WWII (if it still occurs in this scenario, that is) is much more likely than it was in real life, correct? Also, if WWII does start in this scenario, would it be likely to start over Czechoslovakia rather than over Poland? After all, I can’t imagine a Pan-Slavist and possibly Fascist Russia be very willing to throw the Czechoslovaks under the Nazi German bus.

    I assume it would moderate over time, like Spain/Portugal, and make a political transition with no major economic collapse (why would it? no central planning). Perhaps some imperial loot acquired during the Fascist period (e.g. Finland?) would splinter off at this time.

    Do you think that the Baltic states would also break away from Russia after the end of Fascism in this scenario?

  238. @silviosilver

    A unitary Bosnian state would indeed be a repudiation of Dayton, so they need to tread cautiously

    You a fan of this, since you think a little advice on this matter is appropriate?

    but the point of it — in western eyes — would certainly not be to impose an Islamic state on Bosnia’s non-muslims.

    No, of course not. That’s just irrational paranoia. Amirite?

    what westerners overlooked was that Albanians were at least as much recalcitrant nationalist shitheads as the people allegedly oppressing them. Nonetheless, this doesn’t amount to support for a greater Albania.

    Of course not. A 78 day bombing campaign and land invasion (via Albania) of a sovereign UN member state (FRY) based upon distorting the truth about an event in Racak in early 1999 (not to mention the general situation in Kosovo from 1945-1999), falsely presenting giving an ultimatum for full military occupation of a sovereign state as “negotiations”, bypassing the UNSC and any form of international law in order to de facto separate a territory from a country to empower an ethnic minority with its criminal-narco-terrorist KLA/UCK thug elite whose members are open Greater Albania nationalists doesn’t amount to support for anything. Amirite?

    By the way, never mind the assumption that nationalism is an inherently bad thing.

    You were earlier bemoaning the effects of PR firms (Rudder Finn — a staple of anti-Serb conspiracy theory demonology). Westerners don’t have any great “natural” inclination to support a Greater Israel, so that support has had to be manufactured, through PR and bribes.

    What the majority population of Western countries perceives, understands and thinks their states support in the world is very different from what their states are de facto supporting across the world. What truly matters is what Western states de facto support in places such as the Balkans and the Middle East. That’s evidently something too high IQ for you to process when you spit out your cocky smol-brained takes.

    The fact that you clearly can’t understand the difference between what most Western people think their countries are doing in the world and what their states are de facto supporting begs the question:

    Are you trolling or just genuinely retarded?

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