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I was rather unexpectedly occupied the past few days. I suppose I should get over my hesitation about posting content-less Open Threads so that my readers have somewhere to continue the discussion.

Anyhow, I should be much freer as of Friday.

I did a 5 day (~120 hour) fast last week because I saw a thread about it on Twitter by Diana S. Fleischman. It was a highly positive experiment, and it is something I would recommend.

I am reading Arthur Kroever’s The Chinese Economy (from an old recommendation by Polish Perspective). Not much that is new to me – thus far – though I was rather surprised that China showed negative growth in its urban share of the population under Maoism (from 20% in the late 1950s to 18% some twenty years later).

 
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  1. This is the current Open Thread, where anything goes – within reason.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

  2. Starts fasting – stops writing .

    Coincidence ?

    I think not .

    Eat some pork .

    AK: Had nothing to do with it. I also set up something I wanted to set up for a long time.

  3. Finally Something at last. We’ve been starving for content and discussion for moar than a week!

  4. You should say something about the submarine disaster. Some say the submarine was an A-12 ‘Losharik’ model.

    https://t.co/oQpjVCsQIx

  5. anon[401] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, Bernie had been uncovered. His true face had been revealed.
    The face of racist, fascist, segregationist, white supremacist.
    This is Bernie, also known as Bull Connor of the North.

    • Replies: @NYMOM
  6. Mikhail says: • Website

    Establishment Leftist on Russophobia

    [MORE]

    Re: https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2019/07/03/the-paradox-of-american-russophobia-a66241 – JRL Promoted

    Excerpt –

    Taking Russiagate as an example, it is not Russophobic to say that the Russian government interfered in the 2016 U.S. election.

    *****

    It’s “Russophobic” to hype the claim of such Russian interference, while comparatively downplaying such a matter with some other countries – never minding the not too distant US government involved efforts in other countries including Russia.

    Excerpt –

    The racist moment is best seen in former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper’s comment that “the historical practices of the Russians, who typically, are almost genetically driven to co-opt, penetrate, gain favor, whatever, which is a typical Russian technique” and that it’s in Russian “genes to be opposed, diametrically opposed, to the United States and Western democracies.

    ****

    The “racist” moment on this particular includes the considerable lack of US establishment outrage over Clapper’s remarks, as evidenced by how CNN (where Clapper is employed) hasn’t (in their propped content) been shy in calling some others racist. This kind of hypocrisy has been evident elsewhere like The NYT, regarding Juliet Macur:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/09022018-western-chauvinism-against-russia-gone-berserk-oped/

    Excerpt –

    Moments before the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympic opening ceremony, CAS came out with another decision on Russian athletes, which contradicts its February 1 ruling. Bigotry has been given a boost over the idea of judging people as individuals. To quote The New York Times’ Juliet Macur: “The whistle-blowers are holding their breath. The Russians and clean athletes are, too.”

    As I noted: “Substitute ‘Russians’ for some other group in such a negatively applied way and see the selective outrage. No NYT journo would write a bigoted comparison that differentiates between law abiding citizens and African-Americans, followed by a utilization of crime statistics as ‘proof’ for such a presented contrast.”

    Along with numerous other Western mass media journalists, some of Macur’s other commentary have a noticeable anti-Russian bias. I wonder if she learned that slant from her father, who she wrote about?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  7. @Anonymoose

    Accidents happen.

    Having one was useful for Russia. Should the US ever make good on /r/politics’ wish to “cut Russia off from the Internet,” it could be used to cut the Transatlantic submarine cables.

  8. blatnoi says:

    Well, I came back from Kazan. I went to a hipster Belgian bar to talk with Russian liberals, but the owner wanted to talk about her divorce with the Belgian (who wrecked the bar during it) too much. Then I did talk with a real Russian liberal a couple of days later. It’s not simply that Putin is a dictator and Russia is evil in everything that it does… it’s so much more than that. It was epic. I cannot describe it in words. Wow. I didn’t know such people existed in real life, but I managed to catch this magnificent beast for three hours, and not let the cognitive dissonance affect me too much and let him continue talking as much as possible. I did expect the racist society and evil army parts, but did not expect the wistful flashbacks to army service about effectively killing jihadis.

    All in all, a great trip and that was only a small part of it.

    • LOL: Anatoly Karlin
  9. Mikhail says: • Website

    Establishment Leftist on Russophobia

    Re: https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2019/07/03/the-paradox-of-american-russophobia-a66241 – JRL Promoted

    Excerpt –

    [MORE]

    Taking Russiagate as an example, it is not Russophobic to say that the Russian government interfered in the 2016 U.S. election.

    *****

    It’s “Russophobic” to hype the claim of such Russian interference, while comparatively downplaying such a matter with some other countries – never minding the not too distant US government involved efforts in other countries including Russia.

    Excerpt –

    The racist moment is best seen in former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper’s comment that “the historical practices of the Russians, who typically, are almost genetically driven to co-opt, penetrate, gain favor, whatever, which is a typical Russian technique” and that it’s in Russian “genes to be opposed, diametrically opposed, to the United States and Western democracies.”

    ****

    The “racist” moment on this particular includes the considerable lack of US establishment outrage over Clapper’s remarks, as evidenced by how CNN (where Clapper is employed) hasn’t (in their propped content) been shy in calling some others racist. This kind of hypocrisy has been evident elsewhere like The NYT, regarding Juliet Macur:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/09022018-western-chauvinism-against-russia-gone-berserk-oped/

    Excerpt –

    Moments before the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympic opening ceremony, CAS came out with another decision on Russian athletes, which contradicts its February 1 ruling. Bigotry has been given a boost over the idea of judging people as individuals. To quote The New York Times’ Juliet Macur: “The whistle-blowers are holding their breath. The Russians and clean athletes are, too.”

    As I noted: “Substitute ‘Russians’ for some other group in such a negatively applied way and see the selective outrage. No NYT journo would write a bigoted comparison that differentiates between law abiding citizens and African-Americans, followed by a utilization of crime statistics as ‘proof’ for such a presented contrast.”

    Along with numerous other Western mass media journalists, some of Macur’s other commentary have a noticeable anti-Russian bias. I wonder if she learned that slant from her father, who she wrote about?

  10. Mikhail says:
    @Mikhail

    Should be deleted as a better formatted version follows.

    AK: Even better idea – could you get your own blog? Instead of spamming mine with your decade old vendetta against David Johnston.

    • Disagree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Not Raul
    , @JL
    , @Mr. Hack
  11. Mr. XYZ says:

    though I was rather surprised that China showed negative growth in its urban share of the population under Maoism (from 20% in the late 1950s to 18% some twenty years later).

    Mao sent a lot of people from the cities to work in the countryside, no? If so, then this decline certainly shouldn’t be surprising.

  12. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mikhail

    AK

    He’s the one with the vendetta, along with some of those who okay such BS.

    As you know, the bulk of my content doesn’t concern him. That includes the one which you put in as “MORE”.

  13. anon[145] • Disclaimer says:

    Trade war poised to end, just like I called it: Huawei unbanned. The US isn’t ruled by a group that’s looking out for the collective national interest. It’s an oligarchy ruled by selfish Boomers and corporations desperate to make as much cash for themselves as possible before cashing out to a nice vacation home in the tropics. Therefore, it’s extremely doubtful to me that 1) this trade war will continue beyond Donald Trump 2) China’s growth can be stopped. I think they will soon come to dominate the world.

    Here’s an article from TAC explaining who really runs the US (and why big tech companies will never be broken up or even regulated):

    “Since Reagan, no president has enforced the spirit or the letter of the Sherman and Clayton Acts. It doesn’t matter what party has controlled the presidency, there has been no difference in policy toward industrial concentration. The budget for antitrust enforcement has shrunk with each president and has never been lower in real inflation-adjusted dollars.

    Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama may have disagreed on many issues, but there was no difference in policy when it came to monopolies and oligopolies. For example, the Bush administration allowed Whirlpool to acquire Maytag even though they controlled up to 75 percent of the market for many home appliances. **Obama’s administration actively killed all FTC probes of Google.** Cell phone providers consolidated from six to four companies. The two biggest now control almost 70 percent of the entire U.S. market.”

    “A 2017 study found that firms connected to politicians that oversee antitrust regulators are more likely to receive favorable merger reviews. Today, except in extreme circumstances, such as outright monopoly, regulators and the courts are unlikely to block mergers because of an increase in market concentration.

    The revolving door works in subtle ways, including in the FTC’s case selection. The Wall Street Journal published internal memos of FTC staff deliberating whether Google was abusing its monopolistic position in the search engine industry and discriminating against its rivals. **The staff’s opinions were overruled by the commissioners, who apparently were more concerned with their future job prospects than enforcing the law.**

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/why-the-regulators-went-soft-on-monopolies/

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    , @Anonymous
    , @Sean
  14. Yevardian says:

    AK stops eating for a week after seeing a water-only diet being promoted by a crazy-faced Jewess on twitter.. how can one man be so based?

  15. I’ve recently lost about 7 kilos, mostly off my belly, eating exclusively meat and salad, and I find that on such a diet I’m able to comfortably skip meals while remaining productive, so that has got me interested in intermittent fasting. (Also, I finally figured out how to fry a good steak: let it come to room temperature before putting it in the pan. Why didn’t anyone tell me that twenty years ago!?)

    Right now is the Orthodox Christian fast of Sts. Peter and Paul, which I’m finding more difficult than usual, mostly due to discomfort with digestion. The transition from meat and salad to grechka, bread, and salad has not gone so smoothly.

    So I’d be especially interested in reading recommendations from people who have experience transitioning between keto, intermittent fasting, and “bivalveganism”, which is comparable to Orthodox fasting. (The youtube video didn’t attract me, but I’ll try again later.)

    (Probably I’ll repost this comment on SSC at some point, since the commentariat there is larger.)

    • Replies: @JL
    , @SFG
    , @notanon
  16. Not Raul says:
    @Mikhail

    Who is David Johnston?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Mitleser
  17. JL says:
    @The Big Red Scary

    I don’t have experience with “bivalveganism”, but I can offer some recommendations on how I’d go about it that could potentially solve some of your digestion issues. First, avoid grains, in general, and gluten grains, in particular. The one exception would be white (NOT brown or wild) rice, which is essentially pure form glucose with the natural toxins removed. Stick with vegetables and substitute root vegetables for the grains, so potatoes, sweet potatoes, parsnips, turnips, that type of thing. Ditch the bread, pasta and grechka.

    You should also have a source of saturated fat, the most recommended would be coconut oil. Your only other choice is palm oil, really. Coconut oil is expensive, but I think you’ll find it’s worth it. Probably the best place to buy it is Auchan where you’ll find it in the refrigerated section next to the butter. Keep in mind that the unrefined oil will have a fairly strong coconut taste, but it’s otherwise an excellent cooking oil with a very high smoke point. Avoid all other vegetable oils, except for olive oil, which you should consume in moderation and not use for high temp cooking.

    As for steak frying, I highly recommend cast iron pans and clarified butter. You’re gonna need good ventilation for this as it will create some serious smoke. Bringing the meat up to room temp is important, especially if your steaks are thick. Also, the thicker the steak, the lower the cooking temperature.

  18. JL says:
    @Mikhail

    You haven’t noticed that nobody ever responds to your posts with coverage of English-language Russia coverage, you need the blog owner to point this out? AK is right, stop spamming.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  19. Mikhail says: • Website
    @JL

    False as someone here above did as has been done in other instances. Is this the Unz Review or something different? Regardless, you made an idiotic swipe.

  20. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Not Raul

    Johnson (not Johnston) to be precise.

    Related:

    http://exiledonline.com/quaker-cuts-off-our-johnson/

    http://us-russia.org/3911-the-obsessive-putin-bashing.html

    I respectfully disagree with the author of the US-Russia.org link for the reason touched on in the Exiled link. JRL’s posting of a criticism of it from Anders Aslund reveals the limits of JRL and Aslund.

    Meantime, my initial set of comments at this thread coherently indicate the shortcomings of a JRL recently promoted piece on Russophobia. Sticking to that topic, let’s see a substantive counter-claim.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
  21. Mitleser says:
    @Not Raul

    Editor-in-Chief of Johnson’s Russia List

    https://russialist.org/about/

    • Replies: @Not Raul
  22. Mitleser says:
    @anon

    Huawei is still on the Entity List and Chinese exports worth hundreds of billions of $ are still hit by Trump’s new tariffs.

  23. Mitleser says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    It will be back.

    President of Russia Vladimir Putin: Mr Shoigu, how is the work progressing in Severomorsk?

    Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu: Mr President, we have made the necessary arrangements and established a headquarters, which is working very actively. We are using the services of the submarine designers and industry representatives to assess the volume and timeframe of repairs.

    Our first conclusion is that the submarine can be repaired. Moreover, this must be done, in this particular case. We are now assessing the timeframe.

    We have pinpointed the main reason for the tragedy: a fire in the battery flat that spread out.

    Vladimir Putin: What about the nuclear power unit?

    Sergei Shoigu: Mr President, the nuclear power unit has been sealed off and all personnel have been removed. Plus, the crew has taken the necessary measures to save the unit, which is in working order. This means we can repair the submersible quickly.

    Vladimir Putin: Completely?

    Sergei Shoigu: Yes, completely.

    http://en.kremlin.ru/events/president/news/60913

  24. Mitleser says:

    Australia vs. dysgenics

    The balance of family support policy in Australia today is very much in favour of working women and, hence, more highly educated women. From one perspective, this is an enlightened policy that has enabled educated women to maintain a fertility rate of around 1.8 births per woman while having a high rate of employment. In addition, 75 per cent of women in highly qualified jobs receive paid maternity leave at their salary level from their employers. On top of this, they are entitled to $14,387 in government-funded paid maternity leave, so long as their individual income is below a very high threshold. The children of working women are also entitled to 50 hours per week of government-subsidised child care. As described above, educated employed women with children are also much more likely to be partnered than the low educated and, in most cases, their partners will also be highly educated and well-paid.

    While policy has been good for highly educated women, government support for women (and their children) who are not employed (a higher proportion of the low educated) has moved strongly downwards since 2011. They are eligible for a Newborn Upfront Payment but this has fallen from $5,294 for each child in 2011 to $1,650 for the first child and $550 for subsequent children today, levels way below the amount paid to employed women through government-funded maternity leave. In addition, their children are eligible for only 20 hours of childcare per week compared to 50 hours for employed women. And lone mothers whose youngest child has turned six receive the extremely low, Newstart (unemployment) payment whereas previously they received a much higher level of benefit.

    http://www.niussp.org/article/in-australia-fertility-is-falling-only-for-low-educated-womenen-australie-la-fecondite-baisse-uniquement-chez-les-femmes-peu-scolarisees/

  25. @Anatoly Karlin

    Having one was useful for Russia.

    Two points: First, the sub is OK.

    Second, it’s not just “a sub”.

    Russia has a whole government agency for deep-sea research and exploration, roughly comparable in size and scope to the Russian space program.

    Unlike the space agencies, this deep-sea agency is run by the Defense Ministry and is top-secret.

    But as far as the number of people involved, the funding, the level of research and danger, etc., it’s broadly similar to space exploration. As far as I can tell.

  26. Passer by says:
    @Mitleser

    Part of this is caused by more and more people having tertiary education. The percentage of such people is continuously growing, and it was lower in the past.

    As the number of average people with university degree grows, you will see “improving” or “better than expected” fertility among the college educated (due to the growing pool of such people, now reaching 50 % in some countries).

    In other words the dysgenics is still there, but is masked by the growing number of university educated people with average intelligence, who are now counted as highly intelligent.

  27. @Yevardian

    Hey, the man is a Russian Scientist, paid by the Russian Government! He doesn’t care about randomized experiments and statistics, showing repeatedly that all this fasting is a crapshoot with no effects one week later. A Jewess on Twitter is more convincing. And she knows it, because Jews were told by God to fast before Easter, so it must be good for your IGF.

    I am vomit.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  28. @Yevardian

    It’s not surprising that a transhumanist is interested in life-extension fads

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  29. A comment about the Democratic Party Debates:

    The Democratic Party wants to FUCKING MURDER WORKING CLASS NATIVE BORN WHITE AMERICAN MALES IN COLD BLOOD!!!!!

    This is just stating the very very obvious…..

    BRING THE TROOPS HOME NOW!!!!!

  30. @Kent Nationalist

    No surprise none of you faggots have heard of autophagy.

  31. neutral says:
    @Mitleser

    That is only part of the dysgenics problem, the main problem is immigration and miscegenation. If you are boosting the fertility rates of white women that are spawning non whites then it is worse than nothing. I have seen those stories of Australia mass importing blacks, and I am also aware of their hard left society, this means dysgenics has totally won in Australia.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  32. The passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act

    Hindu-Jamaican Syphllitic Whore Kamala Harris

    Nuclear War with Christian Russian in 2023

    So this is how it all ends with the 1965 Immigration Reform Act

  33. Anatoly

    I’m already googling….looking for research on autophagy and ALS…..If you are on the diet….be carefull..probably nothing to worry about…..but it’s the potential issues with the microglia and the other extended central nervous system immune cells that I would be worried about-potentially……probably nothing to worry about…but take my comments from the point of view of someone who knows a lot about ALS-unfortunately….

  34. SFG says:
    @The Big Red Scary

    Given the number of religions that have independently invented *some* type of fast, it’s probably got some health benefits.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    , @ussr andy
  35. SFG says:

    I’d argue Trump still deserves your vote.

    1. The Democrats are really, really bad on open borders. They will accelerate demographic replacement. Under Trump there will breathing space to keep fighting back and hopefully begin repopulating. In a democracy, numbers are everything. In a civil war, even more so. (And you really, really don’t want a civil war.)

    2. Restrictionists need to be smarter about pressuring him on the migration issue and take mainstream jobs in the Republican party. Make it clear to the donors that they can have anything else, but increased migration will not be acceptable to the base. That way, when President Buttigieg or Harris or whoever takes office in 2024, anything they do can hopefully be blocked in the Senate. The point is to turn the GOP into a nationalist-populist party rather than a free-market one.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  36. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    To Karlin:

    But he does have a blog of his own. Certainly you’re aware of this as he loves to cite and reference his own pieces from it here at your blog? Oh, I get it, you never bother to access anything that he posts here so you wouldn’t know. No biggee, nobody else seems to either. 🙂

    (he averages about one comment every ten threads!)

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  37. Mr. Hack says:

    In case you haven’t seen it yet, Brenton Sanderson’s thread entitled ‘ Triggered by Bach: Classical Music as Implicit White Supremacy’ here at UNZ is worth a read. The subject matter (Classical music vs other musical forms) has been covered here in some lively discussions, Open threads 69 & 70 and in more depth within ‘New Year: 2018 Prediction Calibration Resources’. Other readers of this blog have already migrated over there. https://www.unz.com/article/triggered-by-bach-classical-music-as-implicit-white-supremacy/

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @Gerard2
    , @E
    , @Anonymous
  38. Max Payne says:

    Don’t listen to women when it comes to nutritional tips or illiteracy like fasting. A mans body is like the Saturn V rocket, a woman’s body is like a bicycle. You need ROCKET FUEL. Not bike oil.

    Why not just drink a cup of protein with a scoop of vegegreen and creatine monohydrate, eat a banana, pop a multi-vitamin, omega 3-6-9 and a pinch of salt (for breakfast). For dinner use protein casein instead, skip the pills and boom. Drink water all you want in between (mix in electrolytes when needed).

    It’s like fasting but better-er.

    Water and salt…

    On an unrelated note:

    https://www.rt.com/business/462816-china-imports-first-iranian-oil/

    I guess China will be disconnected from SWIFT shortly.

    https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/US-Considers-Allowing-China-To-Import-Oil-From-Iran.html

    Oh….

    • Replies: @notanon
  39. @Anatoly Karlin

    I’ve used to train boxing on professional level and I am well aware of this. I’ve experienced all the benefits from it before weightings and I do fast from time to time before I kick in steroid cycle.

    On steroid forums you would find plenty of people into fasting to kickstart their gains. It also helps to control enzymes that are getting nuked after natural test production shuts off.
    Have a nice one Anatoly

    • Replies: @Anon
  40. Whos ready for Murican tanks on display?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  41. Mitleser says:
    @neutral

    Sounds like your are primarly opposed to miscegenation, not dysgenics.

    >muh imported blacks

    The Australian Bureau of Statistics has released new data that identifies India, England and China as some of the top birth countries of the country’s migrants.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    , @neutral
  42. Anon[134] • Disclaimer says:
    @Noiger Blackskingod

    I kick in steroid cycle

    Do you get side effects at all?

    • Replies: @Noiger Blackskingod
  43. Anon000 says:
    @AP

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/ukraine-pride-parade-kiev-lgbt-a8971371.html

    Ukraine holds country’s largest ever gay pride parade

    https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/283824/ukraine-president-jewish-comedian

    Ukraine’s New President Is a Jewish Comedian
    Tablet’s Vladislav Davidzon gained special access to Volodymyr Zelensky, Ukraine’s enigmatic new leader who once played the president on TV. Here, Davidzon shares his impressions of Zelensky and his predictions for Ukraine’s political future.
    By Vladislav Davidzon

    The government has increased support for LGBT rights since a Western-backed leadership came to power in 2014
    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/ukraine-hosts-biggest-ever-gay-121159352.html

    In Gays and Jews you trust.

    Hey Ukraine, you’d better learn to embrace LGBT and mass third-world immigration and multiculturalism. Post haste.

    And don’t bother resisting. You will be silenced by Globohomo.

    • Replies: @AP
  44. Not Raul says:
    @Mikhail

    Thanks.

    I find it odd that JRL can “censor” the eXile.

    I’ve known about the eXile for almost 20 years. I didn’t even know what JRL was, which isn’t surprising, since it appears to be an online newsletter from an academic at a third rate university.

    I’m surprised that people at the eXile would be so concerned about not being in JRL.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  45. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Trade war is not ending. Trump is making conciliatory gestures to buoy the markets and economy going into the election.

    The new Cold War with China started 7 years ago in 2012 during the Obama administration and Hillary Clinton’s tenure as Secretary of State when the “Pivot to Asia” was unveiled. The aim is to gradually pivot away from the Mideast and Europe and towards the Asia-Pacific, shoring up US relations with Asian countries in order to contain China.

    Trump is just a more hawkish, Pentagon aligned iteration of this basic posture.

    Prominent liberals and financiers like George Soros are wary of China, because its authoritarian system makes it more impervious to political control and international finance:

    “Soros blasts China’s Xi as ‘most dangerous opponent’ of open societies”

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/george-soros-blasts-chinas-xi-as-most-dangerous-opponent-of-open-societies-2019-01-24

    Mainstream liberal China watchers are increasingly hostile to China because of its rejection of liberal democracy and human rights ideology, coupled with its increasing power and influence. Conservatives and nationalists are wary because it’s a rising foreign power.

    This stance is increasingly adopted by mainstream politicians, both Democratic and Republican, especially since Trump showed the electoral popularity of such a stance.

  46. @Mr. Hack

    Thanks, I’ve seen it and agree that it’s worth reading. The comment section has a powerful take by one of our (hopefully ex-)regulars.

  47. @Anonymous

    Yes, that’s likely.

    China insists that all new (“trade war”) tariffs must be removed as part of any agreement:

    https://www.scmp.com/economy/china-economy/article/3017295/china-insists-us-must-remove-all-trade-war-tariffs-part-deal

    While Trump has yet to remove Huawei from the blacklisted entities list:

    https://www.cnet.com/news/commerce-department-still-considers-huawei-blacklisted-despite-trumps-deal/

    So probably there was no real agreement. Just fake news, which was in the best interest of both sides, since neither wants some kind of financial panic.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  48. Anonymous[679] • Disclaimer says:

    [This post ended up longer than I intended, so for the sake of readability I’m going to split it into multiple comments.]

    What is the basis for the common (on the alt-right) claim that Israel controls America’s foreign policy and thus America fights wars for Israel? (And, as a corollary, that this suggests that the 9/11 attacks were orchestrated by Israeli intelligence services.)

    The United States has fought three regime change wars in the Middle East since the 9/11 attacks, in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya. Furthermore, it has played a (complicated) role in the Syrian civil war and conducted a “war on terror” through the use of drone strikes/local proxies/special forces etc. against Al-Qaeda and its affiliates in various Islamic countries like Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia.

    None of these countries is a significant adversary of Israel, and none, or at least almost none, of these wars/operations has materially advanced Israel’s interests. (With the debatable exception of Syria, some of the nuances of which I will attempt to explicate below.)

    The Taliban’s Afghanistan posed no threat to Israel. Afghanistan is an extremely poor (and thus conventionally militarily weak) country several hundred miles from Israel and, as far as I can tell, played little if any role in supporting anti-Israel forces under the Taliban’s rule. How did invading and occupying such a country benefit Israel?

    Saddam Hussein’s Iraq circa 2003 also posed no threat to Israel. Indeed, I’m not sure if it ever did pose such a threat, but certainly in the wake of the destruction of Iraqi armed forces in the Gulf War, a decade of barbaric sanctions (although the “500,000 children” meme has been exposed by subsequent research as a fabrication), internal revolts/discontent and almost total international isolation it did not pose a threat to…well, probably anyone (outside its borders). Israel, never having met an illegal war of aggression it didn’t like, voiced support for the war, but it is at best a conspiracy theory—or, more accurately, a baseless fiction—to describe Israel as having instigated, planned or benefited from the US invasion of Iraq. Indeed, to the extent that it’s affected Israeli interests, the Iraq War has harmed them, as the government in Baghdad has gone from extremely hostile to Iran to fairly sympathetic to it, as democracy (or, “democracy”) has significantly empowered Iraq’s Shia Muslim population.

    I like to joke that, according to the “cui bono?” conspiracy theories about 9/11, Iran must have planned and orchestrated the false flag attacks, because Iran’s interests have benefited the most from the US’s invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Qaddafi’s Libya circa 2011 also posed no threat to Israel (as indeed the very underwhelming performance of its armed forces against lightly armed domestic rebels and the NATO bombing campaign would suggest). Furthermore, the bombing campaign, while in my view deeply mistaken, was supported by a fairly expansive coalition of European and Arab countries. Surely not even the most fanatical conspiracy theorist would deny that it seems a little unlikely that Belgium, Denmark, Canada, Sweden, Norway, Qatar, Jordan, etc. are all Zionist-controlled golems who act solely to benefit the state of Israel? (Not to say that these states never cooperate or have overlapping interests, just that they make decisions independently of Israel.)

    Al-Qaeda and similar Islamic groups also do not, somewhat surprisingly/interestingly, really pose a threat to Israel. Despite listing US support for Israel as one of its major grievances, Al-Qaeda does not seem, as far as I can tell, to have ever attacked Israel. In fact, this lends itself to an anti-Israel argument, as e.g. Matt Yglesias made in passing in Heads in the Sand, in that, contra Israeli rhetoric about shared opposition to terrorism, the terrorist groups that the US and Israel fight are in fact very different.

    Indeed, conspiracy theorists get unwittingly entangled by their own arguments here, in that they simultaneously argue that the US/Israel manufacture Islamic terrorist groups like ISIS and Al-Qaeda to fight their enemies…and that the US fights wars against such allegedly US/Israel-created groups to benefit Israel!

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @(((They))) Live
    , @SFG
  49. @Anatoly Karlin

    Fasting for such prolonged a period is utterly unnecessary for good health, appropriate weight, and fitness.

    Apart from being a supporter of yours, I have four children and have not been faking my love for my wife, so no faggot here, but this is unhealthy faddish stuff.

    Your response to Kent nationalist was asinine and unlike you.

    • Agree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  50. @Mitleser

    Don’t think we should be impressed by a total fertility date substantially below replacement level — especially when the tfr declined further from the first time period to the second. White people in Australia, as most everywhere else, are allowing their families and their people to die out.

    Also, we should be concerned about subsidizing women to work outside the home and leave more of their children’s critical early years to others in daycare.

    But of course you’re right that there would tend to be less dysgenic effect to encouraging births by more educated women than by doing nothing or by encouraging births by all women equally.

  51. AP says:
    @Anon000

    1. Ukraine is one of the whitest places on the planet,much more so than wherever you live. Jealous?

    2. Are you a closeted gay? Normal people don’t care about gays. Complaining about a gay parade with a couple hundred participants in a city of 3 million won’t make your urges go away.

  52. @Russian Scientist

    Anatoly is obviously a very bright, engaging, thoughtful guy, and it doesn’t seem like he adopted the fasting without researching it. I like his wide range of interests and his perspective, just didn’t understand this move.

    But as stated in another comment here, I think such prolonged fasting is not necessary for good health, appropriate weight maintenance, fitness, strength, longevity.

  53. @Mitleser

    You make a valid distinction. But one can logically be opposed to both dysgenics without regard to race, and opposed to whites mixing with all other races or at least with certain egregious races (Africans in particular). In fact, both views are prudent.

  54. @SFG

    Welll, religions have invented a lot of practices and viewpoints that are destructive or illogical or arbitrary, including my own religion. so that doesn’t follow.

  55. @SFG

    Your last sentence especially is right on the money.

  56. @Anonymoose

    70 meter long hammerhead?

    no wonder the sub nearly sank.

    wonder if cthulhu is down there too.

    • Replies: @Republic
  57. @Anon

    After 12 years of using Russian pharma grade steroids I can say that I get very little side effects. Most of them are related to my skin – light acne on my back and forehead.
    I usually use slow acting Test-E and I run moderate cycles. After that I run post cycle therapy and get my natural testosterone production back on track. My liver and bloods come back as good, I lead much healthier lifestyle devoid of alcohol, smoking and stress.
    I have strengthened my back muscles without even risking slippage of a disk and I am able to enjoy driving a car.

    Reason for steroid use was absolute desperation after spinal injury related pains that caused my insomnia. And no, doctors didn’t recommend me that. I am very familiar with needles due to me getting regular B12 shots in my quads when I was boxing and I’ve taken some oral steroids (метан, анабол) with very annoying sides when I was 23. It’s good stuff if used correctly and when needed. It can help strengthen and recover muscles that are severely injured and help you if you have joint problems. Basically, works best when you are old. Still, to get any results from steroids you need to sort out food, sleep and training.
    Also, I don’t recommend it.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  58. Passer by says:
    @AP

    Ukraine is one of the whitest places on the planet

    Yep, but TFR 2019 in Ukraine dropped to 1,2, worst in Europe.

    You guys are dying out faster than anyone else among whites.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @Mitleser
    , @AP
  59. @Anonymous

    You can cheat hanger by eating dried fruit or some blueberries or even chewing on a beef jerky.
    But most of it is just mental conditioning. People who run keto diet usually don’t fill their stomachs to the brim and know how to handle hunger.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
  60. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mr. Hack

    So says the troll in you. Not so long ago, you posted a kudos to me and critique of this venue not propping yours truly.

    I know it frustrates you when your view gets demolished:

    https://irrussianality.wordpress.com/2019/06/21/splitter/#comments

    Hence your diversionary tactics.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  61. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Not Raul

    Actually, they made a sort of peace between them. Regardless, JRL remains prone to phony, crony, baloney establishment preferences as evidenced by some of what it favors.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
  62. Mitleser says:
    @Passer by

    In 14 of the 27 countries or areas where the population declined by at least one per cent between 2010 and 2019, the rate of natural increase was negative over that period, that is, the number of deaths exceeded the number of births. Examples include Japan, which recorded 2.6 million more deaths than births from 2010 to 2019, and Ukraine, where deaths exceeded births by close to 2.3 million over that period.

    https://population.un.org/wpp/Publications/Files/WPP2019_Highlights.pdf

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  63. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Noiger Blackskingod

    There’re healthier and more natural ways to feel better in a way that includes improving athletic performance.

    Not too long ago, I tried a blended drink with fresh ingredients that primarily included beets, with some apple, lemon, carrot, ginger and turmeric. I had an immediate pickup followed by two days of above average (for me) training sessions. Upon research, I found out that such a drink is known to improve athletic performance – especially aerobic related.

    What you eat and drink makes a big difference, along with getting enough sleep in a healthy environment.

    • Replies: @Noiger Blackskingod
  64. Anonymous[679] • Disclaimer says:

    [Second part of above comment]

    What are Israel’s interests and who are its enemies, then? I would say that Israel’s main interest is settler colonialism/territorial expansion on its currently existing borders. Its main enemies in this regard are the Palestinians, a large fraction of Lebanon, most importantly Hezbollah/the Shia population, Syria and Iran. There is some degree of actual, contemporary and meaningful conflict between these states/groups, unlike Israel and Afghanistan/Libya/Iraq/Somalia/Yemen etc.

    You’ll notice that the United States has at least intervened less since 9/11 against these actual enemies of Israel than states/groups relatively orthogonal to Israeli interests, as detailed above. Wouldn’t this be kind of unusual if Israel controlled US foreign policy to the degree that it could direct America to fight wars for it? Presumably Israel would want to deploy its American troops against its actual enemies, not random states/terrorist groups on the periphery of the Muslim world, right?

    A seemingly plausible edge case/counter-example would be Syria, which segues into my next line of consideration: the dogs that didn’t bark. In addition to considering whether actual US wars/foreign policy serves Israel’s interests, it is also instructive to examine whether or not there are cases in which Israel/its American proxies emphatically advocated that the United States take a certain course of action, only for the US to ignore its wishes. If there are such cases, it would seem to seriously undermine the hypothesis that the US government is controlled by Israel and fights wars for it.

    This leads us to Syria and the role that the US has played/does play in its civil war. It’s fairly common for (fellow) anti-interventionists/imperialists, including more mainstream ones like Professor Max Abrahms, to describe the US as having fought a war of regime change in Syria, or at least followed a policy to that effect, equivalent to its policies in Iraq and Libya. I do not think that this is a full or accurate characterization of US policy in Syria. (The best explication of the Obama administration’s strategy in Syria that I’ve found is the blog post “What Was Obama’s Syria Strategy?” by Professor Robert Farley.)

    Firstly, the simple matter of fact is that, while the United States has given some support to anti-Assad rebels, and has looked the other way while its regional allies like Turkey and Saudi Arabia gave significantly more, both the Obama and Trump administrations have clearly refrained from giving opposition forces the support they would have needed to overthrow the Damascus government. Either a 1980s Afghanistan-style lavish training and supply campaign, including anti-aircraft capabilities, or a 2011 Libya-style no fly zone/aerial bombardment campaign would have relatively swiftly led to the fall of the Assad government.

    Both such options were proposed (the 2012 Petraeus-Clinton plan and the 2013 chemical weapons crisis) and rejected during the Obama administration. Put simply, if the US had wanted to overthrow Assad, it would have…you know, overthrown Assad.

    And this brings us back to the initial question of Israeli influence over American foreign policy. In 2013, AIPAC lobbied extensively for US intervention against the Damascus government. (Or at least for retaliatory strikes in response to the alleged use of chemical weapons, but probably this was a pretext for escalating actions culminating in regime change.)

    The Obama administration ultimately did not conduct such strikes, however. This seems to be evidence against the hypothesis that Israel controls the US and orders it to fight wars on its behalf. Wouldn’t a US attack on Syria in 2013 do a lot more to advance Israeli interests than e.g. the US attack on Libya in 2011 or Iraq in 2003 did? And, if so, why did America’s Israeli puppet-masters order the latter but not the former?

    Two other examples of this would be the 1980s arms sales to Saudi Arabia and the 2015 Iran deal, both of which were major developments fervently opposed by Israel and its political allies in the US, but went through nonetheless.

    Of course, the irony is that epic, BASED nationalist Donald Trump, who received near-universal alt-right support during his campaign, and indeed arguably was the main catalyst in the creation of the alt-right as a movement, has withdrawn from the JCPOA, appointed insane neoconservatives to top cabinet positions and launched strikes on the Assad government in Syria. (Though it is worth noting that, as of this writing, the United States has still not gone to war with either Iran or Syria and that Trump curtailed funding for Syrian opposition forces.) However, if a Democratic candidate wins the 2020 election, which seems quite plausible, they’ll likely re-enter the Iran deal, so I don’t think that Trump’s buffoonish blundering can be taken as evidence that Israel has a stranglehold on US foreign policy.

  65. Mitleser says:
    @Anonymous

    The new Cold War with China started 7 years ago in 2012 during the Obama administration and Hillary Clinton’s tenure as Secretary of State when the “Pivot to Asia” was unveiled.

    It started earlier and Clinton is to blame.

    The PRC had decent grounds to lobby the United States that the U.S. should recognize the South China Sea as a Chinese core interest and it is alleged that PRC foreign affairs apparatchik Dai Bingguo did exactly that in discussions with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2010.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20110624151625/https://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/31/world/asia/31beijing.html

    If that was the proposal fed into the Clinton foreign policy jiujitsomatic, the output was just the opposite: Hillary Clinton declared that it was the United States, not China that had a national interest in the South China Sea and, as it transpired, conches, corals, marine fishstocks, fisherfolk, foreign oil rigs, and the American warships that ceaselessly crisscross the SCS all had superior claims to American solicitude.

    America loves the SCS mainly because it is a major strategic, diplomatic, and legal liability for the PRC, especially after the Law of the Sea arbitral commission invalidated the Nine-Dash Line, the cartographic exercise the PRC uses to stake its claims in the South China Sea.

    Interestingly, though it is fashionable to regard Barack Obama as the paragon of modern American presidents, especially compared to the current incumbent, in China hawk circles he is detested as the mushy moderate guy who gave away the South China Sea to China by backing off from Clinton’s thumb-in-the-eye approach during his second term.

    The presidency of Hillary Clinton and her more muscular China policy was a much anticipated event, I think, anticipated also in the sense that a China hawk core shouldered aside the Obama-friendly moderates in the DoD and IndoPacom and kicked off the first stage of a planned multi-decade China rollback strategy pretty near the beginning of Obama’s second term.

  66. @AP

    Normal people are precisely the people who need to care about the aggressive promotion of homosexuality — an inherently dysfunctional, unhygienic, unhealthy, genetic-dead-end lifestyle.

    Moreover, do you have children? We do. If you do, you should very much care what your children are made to see, hear, experience, and be indoctrinated with. Even if you don’t have children, you should care about the children growing up in our societies.

    The sodomites and associated perverts and mentally ill (“transgender”) people want to normalize their sickness in many ways. One of them is simply marching in public, displaying “physical affection” in public, getting the young people so used to it that it’s no big deal. HELL NO.

    • Replies: @Noiger Blackskingod
    , @AP
  67. @Mitleser

    Considering Ukraine’s already fairly small population, a net loss of 2.3 million people just from deaths-over-births in a single decade is shocking. Doesn’t even include the net effect of in and outmigration, which surely must have further decreased the ukraine’s Population during that same period.

  68. @Mikhail

    Yes, there are many ways how to improve athletic performance and I wouldn’t recommend anyone below age of 30 to try steroids due to the risk of agrivating or developing growths in UTI, testicles and etc. Not to mention that it makes you pretty much infertile as long as you are on them. Even SARMs are dangerous. There are well researched publications that link steroid usage with testicular cancer. You have to be well into “sports medicine” to know what are you doing. But then again, there is nothing better than steroids to fight conditions like muscle athrophy, joint and spinal injuries where muscle has to be formed from long time of immobility.

    But I fully agree about blended drinks. My wife loves to make smoothies from baby spinach, lemon, carrot, banana and tumeric. They are way too thick for me and I just end up drinking water with lemon or I just dillute her shakes and drink it. My kid also prefers our blended drinks over any fizzed drink or fruit shoots he gets in school.

  69. @RadicalCenter

    Couldn’t out it any better.
    Can anyone who supports homosexually explain this to me and why I should tolerate this degeneracy and it’s normalisation?

  70. Dmitry says:
    @Yevardian

    Perhaps, fasting will help him to develop more spirituality, which might result in deeper insights into the most difficult blog topics, such as raising animal consciousness and of logistics problems in Games of Throne. .

    According to Xenophon, Socrates said, referring to his friend Acumenus : “Stop eating; and you will then find life pleasanter, cheaper, and healthier.”
    http://perseus.uchicago.edu/perseus-cgi/citequery3.pl?dbname=GreekFeb2011&getid=1&query=Xen.%20Mem.%203.13.1

    In another part of the world, more than a century earlier, Gautama Buddha has already attained nirvana, meditating under a tree for 3 days (presumably, without eating)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahabodhi_Temple#The_Buddha

    While five and half centuries later, Jesus followed this water-only diet fashion – although he was a bit more impressive than Karlin, as the craziest Jew does it in the Middle Eastern desert, for 40 days.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temptation_of_Christ

  71. Anon[288] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Looks like you haven’t heard of it. Autophagy cuts down your body proteins. Your midlife crisis is not due to your body being overfilled with protein. You are turning into a mound of lard. Lard is not a protein, but triglycerides. Get used with it.

    • Agree: Other Side
  72. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    AP is correct – regardless of political direction, Ukraine has a high probability to become the “most white” country in the world across the whole 21st century.

    But the reason would be a bit embarrassing, as it is one of the unusual white countries, that no brown people want to immigrate to (and even Belarus has a better economy).

    Reason people immigrate to a country, is to improve their standard of living. That requires the destination country to have a higher standard of living than the country of origin.

    Reason everyone wants to immigrate to Sweden, Australia or Germany, is because they have almost the highest standard of living in the world (as well as generous welfare).

    But current Ukraine solved the problem before it even begins – by carefully having their GDP per capita level below even countries like Mexico, Tunisia, Algeria or Egypt.

    • LOL: AP, Anonymoose
    • Replies: @Rattus Norwegius
  73. Dmitry says:
    @Anonymous

    Yes – but your naivety was expecting conspiracy theories to follow logic and reason.

    Conspiracy theories are primarily a kind of psychology therapy, or self-medication, for the people who construct them. Less the person who makes the theory knows about a topic they theorize about, the better (as it allows more space for “creative freedom”), and also removing a need for logical consistency in the theory can very helpful.

  74. utu says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    No surprise none of you faggots have heard of autophagy.

    I am afraid it was the body building faggots who discovered that fasting before their competitions aka narcissistic body exhibitionism had beneficial effects on skin tightness that would enhance visibility of muscles.

    • Replies: @utu
    , @Matra
  75. @Noiger Blackskingod

    You can cheat hanger by eating…

    So true.

  76. Dmitry says:
    @Anonymoose

    It would be the only interesting reason to watch such a July 4th parade (if there will be something unusual like tanks there).

    But it seems more like a still display? – also with infantry fighting vehicles

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradley_Fighting_Vehicle

    • Replies: @AaronB
  77. AaronB says:

    I support Anatoly’s fasting – it is good both spiritually and physically.

    I expect his belief in HBD to wane, and his God posts to become more numerous and profound.

    The body is not evil, but it is gross materiality – anything we do to reduce and subdue its vulgar appetites, within reason, is good.

    All spiritual people have an innate ascetic impulse, and Anatoly, although he writes in a field teeming with vulgarity, shows faint glimmers of spiritual refinement.

    All you fat cows should fast, and maybe you will be less HBD cucks.

    And Thorfnsson should forego his red, bloody meat habit for a time – it is doing him no good.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  78. AaronB says:
    @Dmitry

    Those soldiers look like they could use a good fast or two.

    Oh, for the Vietnam war, when American soldiers were last properly slender and wiry.

  79. @Anonymous

    Saddam was giving financial support to families of suicide bombers in Gaza and the West Bank, but you are right removing Saddam was a great help to Iran, of course Iran is next on the list for destruction, what was it Wesley Clark told us ? seven countries is five years, well he got the time line wrong, but not much else

    Do you really think the US does anything in the Middle East without checking with Israel first

  80. Anon000 says:
    @AP

    Are you a closeted gay? Normal people don’t care about gays.

    Hmm…

    [In Ukraine] homophobic attitudes remain relatively widespread.

    Almost 47% of Ukrainians think that rights of sexual minorities should be limited

    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/ukraine-hosts-biggest-ever-gay-121159352.html

    Just what I suspected. Half of Ukrainians aren’t normal.

    Ukraine is one of the whitest places on the planet,much more so than wherever you live. Jealous?

    I’m a cisgender hetero fourth-gen American male living in Boston. America, i.e., the country which now owns you. Maybe we’ll decide to knock down your shit-shack house to build an airbase? Who knows? But whatever we decide, you and your countrymen will have no say in the matter.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @LatW
  81. AP says:
    @Passer by

    Yep, but TFR 2019 in Ukraine dropped to 1,2, worst in Europe.

    You guys are dying out faster than anyone else among whites.

    1. The Sovietized parts are dying out the most.

    2. So it will be a 100% European country with the population it had in 1930 or whatever. There are worse tragedies. I wouldn’t want to switch places with Germany or France, demographically.

    • Replies: @Rattus Norwegius
  82. AP says:
    @Anon000

    Hmm…

    [In Ukraine] homophobic attitudes remain relatively widespread.

    Almost 47% of Ukrainians think that rights of sexual minorities should be limited

    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/ukraine-hosts-biggest-ever-gay-121159352.html

    Just what I suspected. Half of Ukrainians aren’t normal.

    Saying in a poll that one wants gays’ rights limited (a normal thing to do), is not the same as getting ones panties in a bunch over a parade somewhere, as in your case.

    Ukraine is one of the whitest places on the planet,much more so than wherever you live. Jealous?

    I’m a cisgender hetero fourth-gen American male living in Boston. America.

    So you live in a country where white people will be a minority in a couple of decades. This explains your bitterness towards Ukraine, which is 100% white and will remain so.

    BTW what percentage of your people in Boston love gay parades 🙂

    i.e., the country which now owns you

    Very cute. You probably think the USA won World War II also 🙂

    The closest USA came to “owning” Ukraine was in 2014, when things were desperate.

    • Replies: @Anon000
    , @Gerard2
  83. AP says:
    @RadicalCenter

    Normal people are precisely the people who need to care about the aggressive promotion of homosexuality — an inherently dysfunctional, unhygienic, unhealthy, genetic-dead-end lifestyle.

    Homosexuality appears to be a congenital birth defect. There have been many great people with this problem. Normal people don’t care much if there is a small gay parade somewhere. While creating a hero out of someone just because he is gay (or obese, or whatever) is abnormal, so is homophobic hysteria.

    Moreover, do you have children?

    Yes of course.

    If you do, you should very much care what your children are made to see, hear, experience, and be indoctrinated with.

    I would keep them away from the small gay parade that happens once a year. I would also keep them away from bars where straight people get drunk and find someone to fornicate with, strip clubs, etc.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @RadicalCenter
  84. @Dmitry

    Ukraine scores better on HDI than GDP, for what that matters.

    Ukraine HDI: 0,751 (High), nr 88
    Ukraine GDP Nominal per Capita: 3 220, nr 128
    Ukraine GDP PPP per Capita: 9 743$, nr 111

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Matra
  85. @AP

    Do you know about any good reads about Ukraine’s demography?

  86. Dmitry says:
    @Rattus Norwegius

    And they also still have some very excellent infrastructure as a result of the USSR and Soviet engineering. For example, Kiev metro will be better designed and higher quality construction, than many Western countries’ metros.

    However, why would you immigrate to Ukraine? Even if you are a person from a poor, brown country – there is no money for welfare in Ukraine, and few opportunities to improve your life; you might be better living unemployed in Sweden or Norway, than as a doctor in Ukraine.

    (even Swedish and Norwegian high-security prisons, can look like at least two star hotels).

  87. Anon000 says:
    @AP

    You probably think the USA won World War II

    Um, my l’il vassal state friend, yeah, I do think this. And we landed on the moon as well.

    Happy 4th! 🇺🇸 👊🏻


    • Replies: @AP
  88. Rosie says:
    @AaronB

    The body is not evil, but it is gross materiality – anything we do to reduce and subdue its vulgar appetites, within reason, is good.

    Groans. I hate to think of it that way, but there’s a part of me that does. I’ve been doing a lot of research about sex trafficking lately, and it is so horrific. Did you know that ballet used to be a disreputable art, if not a outright front for upscale prostitution? If you were a ballet dancer, society would assume the worst about you.

    I can understand why so many men have hated their own sexuality throughout history. Still, I think contempt for the body can actually make the problem worse. Asian women are still bought and sold like cattle, and I think part of the reason is their attitude toward the body as not really part of them, but rather more like a vehicle, an outfit, or even a prison. They can convince themselves that it’s not really all bad, and it probably helps the men soothe their own uneasy consciences as well.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @AaronB
  89. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    Not so long ago, you posted a kudos to me and critique of this venue not propping yours truly.

    One of my more sanguine moments, to be sure. But I’m touched that you remember it, and feel shamed now that you’ve uncovered how duplicitous I can be. I’ll forever be in penance for this! 🙁

    I know it frustrates you when your view gets demolished:

    I didn’t make any posts to that thread, but it does look like an interesting one. Thanks!

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  90. utu says:
    @utu

    Nihil novi sub sole..

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_Hazzard
    Linda Burfield Hazzard (December 18, 1867 – June 24, 1938), nicknamed the Starvation “Doctor”[1] was an American quack doctor noted for her promotion of fasting as a treatment; she was imprisoned by the state of Washington for a number of deaths resulting from this at a sanitarium she operated there in the early 20th century. She was born 1867 in Carver County, Minnesota, and died during a fast in 1938.

    Starvation Heights: The True Story of an American Doctor and the Murder of a British Heiress
    https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-446-60341-6

  91. Dmitry says:
    @Rosie

    AaronB’s view sounds like he is copying Buddhist style views from Schopenhauer, and your post also reminds of Schopenhauer – although Schopenhauer concludes that we should not have marriage because of it ( “In London alone there are 80,000 prostitutes. Then what are these women who have come too quickly to this most terrible end but human sacrifices on the altar of monogamy?”).

    In real life, Schopenhauer was pushing old people down the stairs, and not exactly living like Jesus and the Buddha – so perhaps he is not the best person to listen to.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  92. AaronB says:
    @Rosie

    Hey Rosie,

    I don’t advocate contempt for the body. That’s just going to the other extreme, and is a different kind of mistake.

    But certainly to a certain extent the body must be subdued and cannot simply be wantonly indulged – so a certain amount of asceticism without going overboard.

    I would describe it as living “simply”, which is a spiritual virtue. And I intend to do all the Jewish fasts this year. But I don’t advocate self mortification.

    Lately I’m going meatless during the week, and eating mostly cheese and some eggs perhaps for protein – then on Friday and Saturday, I might buy a high-quality grass fed and finished steak or two, which is also more humane to animals.

    In Judaism, you aren’t supposed to hate the body, rather, you’re supposed to sanctify it through correct behavior, etc.

    And in Buddhism, Hindu style extreme asceticism is specifically repudiated, and a “middle way” between indulgence and mortification is advocated.

    But some level of asceticism seems indispensable to spiritual refinement.

    I’m not at all surprised about women in ballet being thought disreputable – I believe female actresses were thought of the same way, as practically prostitutes, for a long time. These are after all exhibitionist art forms, especially ballet, and in traditional societies that is bound to have certain associations.

    The Asian attitude to sex and prostitution seems to me quite extreme – perhaps similar to pagan Rome in its decadent phase. So many women seem willing to be prostitutes – even girls from good families who just want some extra cash, and men see nothing wrong whatsoever with it.

    I’m far from being anti-sex, but what goes on in Asia just seems a bit too much.

    I don’t know if its based on contempt for the body – I suspect the attitude is a kind of nihilistic denial of the procreative aspect of sex as part of the sacred order, and a tendency to view it as a meaningless physical activity, like eating.

    So perhaps, in a sense, it is a kind of failure to appreciate the body’s significance as part of the sacred order – which is indeed a kind of contempt.

    But asceticism is a way of elevating the body and making it sacred, by not using it merely for gross physical satisfaction. Its not the same as mortification.

    To say a kind word about Asians to balance my earlier remarks, prostitution there often has a certain emotional, and even affectionate, element, in many instances, an element of illusion, and is not pure physicality – although that certainly exists there’s too.

  93. AaronB says:
    @Dmitry

    Hmmm, why accuse me of copying Buddhist style views from Schopenhauer – and not straight from Buddhism?

    Or any of the world great spiritual traditions, who all advocate some level of asceticism?

    I guess because you can then point out that good old Schop was a hypocrite, as he indeed was.

    Rosie seems to be experiencing the inklings of a desire for spirituality. Good for her.

    Maybe well get you next, Dmitry 🙂

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Rosie
  94. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    bars where straight people get drunk

    Lol it is funny people criticize you for liberalism, considering your views are so social conservative.

    How do you live like this in America – being in this topic, quite against mainstream culture of both Russia/Ukraine and also America (outside some places like Salt Lake City).

    Half of even most boring singers in America, are singing about bars, and being drunk

    And how can you stop your children from youth lifestyle of beer and weed, which was even in films about the 1970s?

    • Replies: @AP
  95. Dmitry says:
    @AaronB

    View expressed in your first comment is really like Schopenhauer, not Buddhism/Hinduism.

    It’s because Schopenhauer is primarily “Buddhist understanding of Kant”, mixed up with some kind of esoteric ideas expressed by secretive Gnostic geniuses (that we have been incarnated in a some evil world, perhaps created by a demiurge).

    E.g.

    – anything we do to reduce and subdue its vulgar appetites, within reason, is good.

    For Schopenhauer, the will is a malevolent force, which unfortunately creates the existence of the world.

    Anything we do to quiet the will, and disengage from the world, (even listening to music or reading a contemplative novel) is a spiritual elevation – for Schopenhauer – as we are weakening the will, which our engagement with is what has created this malevolent world itself.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  96. Rosie says:
    @AaronB

    Rosie seems to be experiencing the inklings of a desire for spirituality. Good for her.

    I’ve been down the ascetic road and back, but that was many years ago, in my youth. I never took it to extremes, though.

  97. Rosie says:
    @Dmitry

    For Schopenhauer, the will is a malevolent force, which unfortunately creates the existence of the world.

    Is this not the Buddhist doctrine of Dependent Origination?

    https://encyclopediaofbuddhism.org/wiki/Twelve_links_of_dependent_origination

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  98. Gerard2 says:
    @Mr. Hack

    cmon you cretin Mr Hack/Spack/Boston Strangler – the only Bach pieces you have ever heard of are the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor ( most likely you don’t know the D Minor bit) and one of his preludes – and even those you only know those through following Liberace …………..so please don’t pass yourself off as a classical music aficionado you dummy.

    Anyway, although I am a big fan of him I don’t think Bach is anywhere the top of classical music composers that white or highly educated whites listen to. Rachmaninoff ( of course), Grieg, Mozart, Sibelius , the frenchman Chopin, Elgar, Beethoven all rank higher.

    I reckon I could ask 99% of white professors or top managers in the UK or US or Canada about a great piece of music to play , such as the Passacaglia and Fugue in C Minor… and about 0% of them would have ever heard of it or even know Bach composed it

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  99. Dmitry says:
    @Rosie

    That is an interesting link ^

    Schopenhauer uses these ideas of Buddhism.

    But in Buddhism, the problem is that this is just an illusion. And by believing in it and reacting to it, we are trapped in a cycle of rebirths.

    Schopenhauer believes that under our illusory perception of the world, there is really an evil will – which is evil in itself. So Schopenhauer’s view seems a lot more sinister than the Buddhist one, and influenced by gnostic views (where they think we have been born on the wrong planet or something very depressing like that).

    AaronB sounds like Schopenhauer, because his view that anything to reduce the body’s “materiality” is good. (I’ve read this comment more or less, in Schopenhauer).

    Buddhists don’t recommend this kind of general rule, but Schopenhauer does.

    Schopenhauer is a very cool and crazy writer. But I would not go to that writing for spiritual advice, especially considering his very depressing perspectives (which are obviously designed to match his depressing personality) and his unhappy life.

    His writing is like:

    Unless suffering is the direct and immediate object of life, our existence must entirely fail of its aim. It is absurd to look upon the enormous amount of pain that abounds everywhere in the world, and originates in needs and necessities inseparable from life itself, as serving no purpose at all and the result of mere chance. Each separate misfortune, as it comes, seems, no doubt, to be something exceptional; but misfortune in general is the rule…

    The pleasure in this world, it has been said, outweighs the pain… If the reader wishes to see shortly whether this statement is true, let him compare the respective feelings of two animals, one of which is engaged in eating the other.

    We are like lambs in a field, disporting themselves under the eye of the butcher, who chooses out first one and then another for his prey. So it is that in our good days we are all unconscious of the evil Fate may have presently in store for us — sickness, poverty, mutilation, loss of sight or reason.

    https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/schopenhauer/arthur/pessimism/chapter1.html

    • Replies: @AaronB
  100. @RadicalCenter

    I am tired of that crew (Yevardian, Kent Nationalist) quietly sniping at me in every other thread. I wonder why the former in particular doesn’t fuck off already.

  101. AaronB says:
    @Dmitry

    Correct, the Buddhist view – at least the Mahayana version – is that the world is an illusion.

    However, to penetrate the veil, one must reduce the pull of the body. And since the physical world is an illusion, bodily desires lose in importance anyways – ultimate satisfaction is not to be found there.

    Buddhism is at bottom optimistic, Schopenhauer more pessimistic, yes, but with a silver lining – escape is possible.

    I hope I have clarified that my view is not to reject the body, but to elevate it and sanctify it while it is alive – which involves self denial and asceticism to some degree, to use it on a holy way.

    And ultimately, to see beyond the body.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Dmitry
  102. Rosie says:
    @AaronB

    Buddhism is at bottom optimistic

    About our prospects for overcoming suffering, yes, but that’s not saying much. It still doesn’t acknowledge any affirmative meaning in life.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    , @Dmitry
  103. Gerard2 says:
    @AP

    So you live in a country where white people will be a minority in a couple of decades. This explains your bitterness towards Ukraine, which is 100% white and will remain so.

    BTW what percentage of your people in Boston love gay parades

    LOL – where to start? How about with what must be about 50000 words in about 2 days from a sick freak as yourself.

    So the country with a Jewish PM, a jewish Priminister, a Muslim as it’s most richest man ,an Afghan as “leader” of it’s failed revolution, more jews, plenty of Gruzians in high positions in politics and the military, Chechens, Armenians, 100% controlled by Americans, not to mention the schizophrenic denial of its geneology with Russia ….gets to be claimed as “100% white” by some deranged retard with zero knowledge of the place and who has certainly zero intention of ever living there ( LOL that “attempt” at Russian/Ukrainian linguistics – what POS doesn’t even know the meaning of “mir”? Seriously?)

    as for the nonsense of claiming it as 100% white – that is as doublethink/disingenuous as an advertising group omitting the plane attack and promoting ground zero, New York on september 12th 2001 as the worlds best scrap metal site, or Pyongyang as a great place for those wanting a dairy-free diet. Ukraine is a country hemorrhaging people and an absolute horror story you imbecile

    • Replies: @AP
  104. Matra says:
    @Rattus Norwegius

    Normal people don’t care much if there is a small gay parade somewhere.

    Like Mitt Romney and his foreign policy the 80s called…

    You sound like a suburban American conservative. They always take a couple of decades longer than everybody else to notice things.

  105. Matra says:

    AK,

    Are you still going to Prague some time this summer? As the city I know best on the continent I’m curious to know what you think of it.

  106. Matra says:
    @utu

    Body building “bros” might be the single most boring men in the world. Women don’t like them either as they know they’d rather look at themselves than at their girlfriends.

  107. AaronB says:
    @Rosie

    Well, Buddhism just says the physical world on its own has no value.

    But if you believe there is more than the physical world, this need not be pessimistic.

    The modern world sees Buddhism as pessimistic because it does not believe in another world.

    So it really depends on your premises.

    In Buddhism, once you become Enlightened and see the world as it truly is, you see the world of separate physical objects as an illusion, and the underlying unity that is finally revealed as glorious and satisfying.

    But to be honest, I think Western religions may be better is the for us, although there is tremendous overlap.

  108. Dmitry says:
    @AaronB

    Schopenhauer understands Kant, then disobeys Kant, and infers (sinister) things about what is noumenal world, from clues (or hints of evil he can perceive) in the phenomenal world.

    Schopenhauer’s asceticism is quite general, as he does not want to “feed energy” into what he has inferred as a hostile will that created the phenomenal world.

    What Schopenhauer perceives is often of course correct.

    E.g. his famous quote: “Compare the respective feelings of two animals, one of which is engaged in eating the other.”

    It is correct observation – even in a simple quantitative sense, pain in the world is far more extreme than pleasure.

    But Schopenhauer ‘s histrionic temperament is also not very helpful. You can hear the related advice from a more sober man like Epicurus.

    Let us not accuse the flesh as the cause of great evils, neither let us attribute our distresses to outward things. Let us rather seek the causes of this distress within our own souls. Let us cut off every vain craving and hope for things which are fleeting… For a person is unhappy either from fear or from unlimited and vain desires.

    Also compare Schopenhauer’s famous story of the porcupines, to Epicurus’ “eating without a friend is the life of a lion or a wolf.” You can just see which one is the depresed

    • Replies: @AaronB
  109. anonymous[152] • Disclaimer says:

    In related news, (((Disney))) just made (((Ariel))) the half fish woman black.

    Internet consumed with rage.
    Is it white genocide?
    Is the white race finished?
    Your opinions about this most important news needed.

  110. AaronB says:
    @Dmitry

    I generally agree with you here.

    I have the highest respect respect for old Schop and think he is a brilliant writer, and I went through my Schopenhauer phase.

    But ultimately he does not get at the marrow of life, and is superficial. Ontological pessimism is ultimately superficial.

    And true Buddhism is ultimately more optimistic – there is a reason Buddha is portrayed with a serene smile of joy – and not what he thought it was.

    And yes, Kant cleared away theories about the thing in itself – it was not legitimate to characterize it as evil, or as will. Kant merely showed through rigorous logic what mystics had been saying all along – you cannot characterize the Absolute.

    In Kabbalah the highest aspect of God is nothingness, like in Buddhism – that which is beyond characterization.

    But Europe as a whole was going through a period of nihilistic and self hate, and Schop had limited tools to work with.

    He’s still a great man.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    , @Dmitry
  111. AaronB says:
    @AaronB

    However, Epicurus, merely remains on the psychological plane, and does not answer our religious need.

    And yes, Dmitry, you do have a religious need 🙂

    God willing, both if us will have long stopped wasting time on this stupid site by the time you turn to religion – but remember my words.

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
  112. Dmitry says:
    @AaronB

    I’m not sure it is fair to say Schopenhauer is superficial, at least all the time.

    He had some kind of “cosmically high IQ”, and he sometimes uses it to “swim deep”.

    There is a “deep” part in his book (“World as Will”) where he is even proving that our soul had chosen what person we were born in, before we were born.

    It looked like a very complicated argument. But I will have to read that again one day, to understand his crazy idea.

    I think his superficiality is often intentional. Actually he wrote some comments about how only the most intelligent people, enjoy being the most superficial.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  113. AaronB says:
    @Dmitry

    There is a part in his book (“World as Will”) where he is “proving” that we had chosen what person we were born in, before we were born.

    Yes, his basic idea is that “free will” – necessary for morality, which he thought was the essence of life – exists, but since the European philosophies of the time “proved” determinism in this world, free will could only exist anterior to this world.

    It is an exceedingly subtle piece of reasoning, and actually has a certain foundation in the Buddhist theory of Karma.

    Schop certainly isn’t superficial overall – I meant only that his ontological pessimism, ultimately, does not go deep enough. Nietzsche made the point that if you search life to the deepest layer, ontological pessimism makes no sense.

    I have great affection fur Schop.

  114. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mr. Hack

    You’re quite welcome, as that link provides further evidence that the JRL court appointed Russia friendly regulars aren’t always the best go to option. **** those who don’t like my pointing that out.

    Today as you know is the 4th. On the matter of fireworks and patriotism, I came across this:

    HAPPY FOURTH!

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
  115. Dmitry says:
    @Rosie

    But belief is less important, compared to lifestyle.

    Whatever you think of their beliefs, at least methodology of Buddhist meditation, seems to create the most positive brainscans, (in professionals who had meditated 50,000 times).

    Neuroscientist Richard Davidson wired up Ricard’s skull with 256 sensors at the University of Wisconsin four years ago as part of research on hundreds of advanced practitioners of meditation.

    The scans showed that when meditating on compassion, Ricard’s brain produces a level of gamma waves — those linked to consciousness, attention, learning and memory — “never reported before in the neuroscience literature”, Davidson said.

    The scans also showed excessive activity in his brain’s left prefrontal cortex compared to its right counterpart, giving him an abnormally large capacity for happiness and a reduced propensity towards negativity, researchers believe.

    “We’ve found remarkable results with long-term practitioners who did 50,000 rounds of meditation, but also with three weeks of 20 minutes a day, which of course is more applicable to our modern times.”

    https://www.businessinsider.com/how-scientists-figured-out-who-the-worlds-happiest-man-is-2012-11

    • Replies: @AaronB
    , @Rosie
  116. E says:
    @Mr. Hack

    I did read through that article. I theoretically would have a lot to contribute to that discussion, but I’m a bit bored by it, especially as the way it was laid out was rather crude.

    It’s one thing to point out that the literate European music tradition (“classical music”) has reached heights of complexity analogous to the literate European storytelling tradition (the novel), and compares very favourably in certain criteria (harmonic progression, in particular) to other musical regions cited in the article (gamelan, Arabic…).

    But in other areas, it’s simpler. The Arabic system of scales is more complex (17+ notes, not 12). The solo instrumental improvising tradition in places like Afghanistan is arguably stronger, capable of expressing a greater range of emotion (or equal, at least) to the concerto form.

    If we compare non-written folk music (a more apples-to-apples comparison), this is even more obvious. Native English, Scandinavian and German folk music has very simple chord progressions and melodic structures.

    It suggests a people who are a straightforward, practical, somewhat unimaginative lot.

    If the gamelan is simple (and I don’t think it is), the native European folk music equivalent is also often very simple.

    European classical music is rooted in its folk music. Notation allowed it to become complex in certain areas (just like the printing press made the novel possible).

    And my main problem with that article: its aggrieved tone. Music performance is one of the most meritocratic of all fields. There is no room for racist affirmative action BS – you can either play your part, or you can’t. Black performers absolutely can and do succeed in classical music, if they’re talented and practice hard; that’s all there is to it. Some of them start off in jazz then migrate to the classical world.

    Repertoire selection is where the SJW stuff is actually likely to be felt, but then that’s been going on for decades, beginning with feminism and the inclusion of more female composers in the “canon”.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  117. AaronB says:
    @Dmitry

    Religion is not, ultimately, about dogmas and words and theories.

  118. Rosie says:
    @Dmitry

    Whatever you think of their beliefs, at least methodology of Buddhist meditation, seems to create the most positive brainscans, (in professionals who had meditated 50,000 times).

    Yes, I’ve been down that road as well. The whole business of detachment (anatta, mindfulness meditation, etc.) is simply incompatible with joyful and fully-engaged motherhood. The day will come for me to start detaching from things, but that won’t be anytime soon.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  119. SafeNow says:

    Simply add “ncbi” to your medical Google search, to get away from faddish hits and lay-oriented websites. The ncbi will make your hits medical journal articles. For example,
    “autophagy fasting ncbi.” The medical journal articles are not very difficult for anyone who is a participant on Unz, and peer-reviewed articles by MD PhD‘s are more reliable than Twitter threads, blogs, etc. If you research your medical condition in this way prior to a doctors appointment, your diplomatic skills will be tested.

    • Replies: @DSLR
  120. Mr. Hack says:
    @Gerard2

    I listen on average of up to 4 hours of classical music daily, 3 hours of jazz, pop and world music too.The only two on your list of top classical composers that I’m not enamored with are Sibelius and Elgar. I’d add Vivaldi, Teleman, Handel and DeBusy to your list of greats, and we would be on the same page. Bach was certainly great too, don’t know why you’ve assigned him to me though?…

    Oh, and I really enjoy Rachmaninoff too. 🙂

    When I was younger, I thought a lot of of good things about Stravinsky too…

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Gerard2
  121. anon[129] • Disclaimer says:

    “Huawei is still on the Entity List and Chinese exports worth hundreds of billions of $ are still hit by Trump’s new tariffs.”

    Don’t expect that to last beyond Trump. Most likely, the corporations that run the United States will get their way. And when I hear people say “electoral popularity” I say, “where?” I have yet to see any evidence this issue has made any significant difference in any American election, regardless of polling data. These things are all coming down within the next five years. By 2025, most of these tariffs will be gone absent a major international incident like a military conflict involving China. There’s just too much money flowing to corrupt American politicians, too many government bureaucrats wanting high-paying sinecures with the companies fighting Trump’s trade policies for there not to be a rollback. Anyone who thinks otherwise has too much faith in the federal government and too little understanding of how it works.

    Even though you might be able to cite some superficial evidence that the public supports tariffs on China, there are several things not considered by proponents:

    1) Those same polls indicate far more republicans than democrats support tariffs, and republicans are about to be locked out of power forever.

    2) Consumers fear these tariffs will hurt them economically. The next recession is predicted by many to occur around Q1 or Q2 of 2020, so expect the short-sighted public to make a connection between the two when it happens. Other polls already show the public thinks they are the ones paying for these tariffs, not China; many fear they will hurt their state’s economy.

    3) Corporations oppose these tariffs and at least one large study that I’m aware of demonstrates public feeling has statistically no impact on policy adopted by the federal government. The US system is just too corrupt, the corporations have too much power for these tariffs to last indefinitely. Eventually, there will be a rollback. Exactly when it it comes – sooner or later – is immaterial. It will happen.

  122. Curious says:

    Strong case to be made that humanity will face another ‘chokepoint’ event in a few decades time:

    https://phys.org/news/2019-07-insect-apocalypse-german-bug-watchers.html

    Scientists have also been warning about the rise of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria for years now due to overuse of antibiotics. We could well reach the point where simple bacteria starts killing off humans in huge droves again due to resistance to antibiotics.

    All of this is connected to overpopulation, overconsumption and living beyond our means. I don’t take the view that we are destined to be doomed. I’m just saying it will be a break-or-make moment and we shouldn’t be so presumptious or arrogant to think that it will be a cakewalk.

    People shouldn’t take perpetual technological progress for granted. History has been full of reversal, some lasting centuries. And right now, things are not looking bright for humanity unless we see large-scale technological breakthroughs that restore balance in a very rapidly decaying ecosystem, on which we depend on for our existance.

  123. AP says:
    @Anon000

    You forgot the best one:

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  124. SFG says:
    @Anonymous

    I think Israel has too much influence on foreign policy in the USA. Iraq was indeed a regional competitor, and getting rid of it removed another threat to Israel. A lot of the neocons were eager to go to war there…of course, quite a few of them wanted the oil too. And the weird lengths congressmen go to bending over backwards to demonstrate their support for Israel creep me out. We don’t do that for Canada or Australia.

    As you say, the USA does plenty of stupid things and engages in plenty of moronic wars that aren’t Israel’s fault. That doesn’t exonerate Tel Aviv.

    I tend to see it more like a freeloading cousin rather than a real enemy…they’re ripping us off and we should make them stop, but they ultimately want us to be powerful if only so they have a more powerful ally. It’s not an actual geostrategic competitor like Russia or China.

    (No offense intended to Anatoly…I don’t dislike Russia, I expect them to pursue their global interests just like any other nation…they just happen to conflict with the USA’s. I’m against demonizing Russia or Putin, but we are not always going to see eye to eye given the size and global importance of both nations.)

  125. DSLR says:
    @SafeNow

    There are problems even with NCBI. Almost every medical student and medical faculty in US has to “do some science”, meaning there are lots of opinion papers, lots of case reports (the equivalent of an anecdote), and some nontrivial data manipulation.

    Worse, there are way more Indian medical professors, and many of them bypass the requirement for peer review by creating their own journals. They have “scientific journals” about dosa, agni, and cow pee. Koreans are mad about plant extracts. Some Russians write in NCBI-indexed journals about the benefits of electrical stimulation.

    Yes, NCBI is a good starting point, but you have to go deeper, and cut even some of that. We know very little, but we pay an exponentially-increasing number of people to claim that we know a lot more.

    In contrast, AK writes with a straight face about Twitter advice from a random Jew. This, on a website where every other comment indicates Jews would write persuasively about anything, for fame and money. And then he wonders why the commentards get triggered.

  126. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mr. Hack

    You’re quite the renaissance man. Some changes and you’ll be awesome.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  127. AP says:
    @Gerard2

    So the country with a Jewish PM, a jewish Priminister, a Muslim as it’s most richest man

    So Ashkenazi Jews aren’t white in your world? Here is Ukraine’s “Non-white” President:

    Meanwhile, Russia is about 10% Muslim officially, probably around 15% if you include guest-workers. Map of European countries by Muslim %:

    (Ukraine is shaded a little darker because of Crimea, this has been fixed because Russia has helpfully taken for itself)

    LOL that “attempt” at Russian/Ukrainian linguistics – what POS doesn’t even know the meaning of “mir”

    If I recall you didn’t know the meaning of that word, Sovok.

    “Mir” means world in Russian, but in Ukrainian and Polish it means peace. Thus a Russian using “mir” to say “world” would not be understood by a Ukrainian or a Polish speaker who doesn’t know Russian. It’s an example of a word that differentiates Polish and Ukrainian from Russian.

    You didn’t know that?

    as for the nonsense of claiming it as 100% white

    Facts are bitter for you, that’s why you stalk my posts 🙂

    Ukraine is a country hemorrhaging people and an absolute horror story

    Here is the Ukrainian “horror show” – Kiev, the whitest city of 3 million in the world:

    Even the crazy lady dressed like a Hindu at the end of the video is white, LARPing as an Indian.

    It hurts and horrifies you, doesn’t it 🙂

  128. AP says:
    @Dmitry

    How do you live like this in America – being in this topic, quite against mainstream culture of both Russia/Ukraine and also America (outside some places like Salt Lake City).

    There is nothing weird in America about keeping kids out of bars and strip clubs. What do you think America is like?

    And how can you stop your children from youth lifestyle of beer and weed, which was even in films about the 1970s?

    By “children” I don’t mean 18 year olds. And it isn’t the 1970s anymore – today’s youth are much more puritanical.

    Here is trend of marijuana use in the USA among adolescents:

    Compare 1970s to today. A different world.

    Moreover, this decline is even more dramatic because use is much higher in the ghettos among those of non-European descent. Despite the European population shrinking, there has still been this huge decline.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  129. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    Cut it out Mickey, this mutual admiration lovefest is going too far. BTW, being a New Yorker, have you ever been to the Ukrainian museum of Art? Any latent urges to rename it the ‘Little Russian museum of Art’? 🙂

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  130. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    Ron Unz might consider using this as the theme song for his website? 🙂

  131. Mr. Hack says:
    @E

    Black performers absolutely can and do succeed in classical music, if they’re talented and practice hard; that’s all there is to it.

    And vice-versa, as eloquently pronounced by the commenter ‘Skeptikal’ in comment 304 within the other article. I reprint a part of his comment, and urge you to read all of it. Quite an intelligent and articulate individual:

    Of course any good jazz musician can do this, and a thought to the point of “instinct” grasp of music theory—the harmonic structure of and relationships between keys— is the essence of improvisation, the ability to move freely around this whole system at will. This is why—as I have read—the best jazz musicians come from a classical background. Most classically trained musicians—although they may be able to transpose written music to different keys—do not have the ability to improvise. This improvisational ability was one of the hallmarks of Mozart’s musical genius, which inspired awe and incredulity. Of course, Mozart had been trained in music on a virtually militaristic disciplinary

  132. Anonymous[240] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Don’t forget Ravel and Stravinsky were writing “Jazz” decades before anyone else. But hey, according to our modern culture this is black music.

  133. LondonBob says:
    @Anonymous

  134. LatW says:
    @Anon000

    You won’t be building any bases there because it’s too close to Russia and you’re afraid of Russia. You can’t penetrate their shield. Besides Ukraine has its own airbases, cheap anti tank missiles and unlike you – real combat experience against a gigantic world class military.

    Obviously you haven’t been anywhere near the USG – otherwise you’d know that you don’t own anything, everything has to be actively lobbied in. And by far not everything passes through.

    What matters more than the gay pride is straight people’s habits – are they diligent, well dressed, cultured, do their relationships last, do they have kids and raise them well to have a strong cohesive nation.

    And yes apparently that radar system that Azov blew up cost 10M and there are only 8 of them.

    • Replies: @Anon000
  135. Gerard2 says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Dear Boston Strangler/Elephant Man/Mr Hack,

    Big surprise to hear you list Teleman there, not a man I know much about except maybe a flute sonata composition- I’ll listen out for him and hopefully be pleasantly surprised

    I’m very piano-centric in tastes – not that I don’t love orchestral/other instrument classical music – but because the piano is the instrument I learned and can play to a decent level, and have plenty of the piano manuscripts to play to at home when I have the time…… it came to dominate my classical music listening tastes (Lizst was another guy I should have put on the list)

    Net result is I listen to alot more Rachmaninoff, Lizst, Bach( organ/piano transcribed versions of his pieces) then Chaikovsky, Vivaldi, Sibelius etcet.

    On youtube, great pianist Valentina Lisitsa plays all movements of Rachmaninoff’s piano concertos without the orchestra – I’m perfectly content just listening to it in that format – maybe more so

    As for my level of piano – I’m quite satisfied – it’s a level that all professional piano players would consider me extremely garbage( too fast, bad touch, bad technique) – but the average person would think I was amazing – so pieces that are quite simple but look hard to play ( third movement of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata) I can play with great confidence and speed, or a much harder and finger-straining piece like the Chopin Etude No 1 in C major (Waterfall) I can play through – again, at a level which a professional , seasoned observer would consider very bad but the average person on the street would think I was a genius. For years the book of Bach two and 3 point inventions was the one I would use to “warm up” on the piano – instead of playing scales just play 4 or 5 of those pieces in a row without even thinking.

  136. Mitleser says:

    Globalist aesthetic

  137. neutral says:
    @Mitleser

    Sounds like your are primarly opposed to miscegenation, not dysgenics.

    Miscegenation is dysgenics, I can’t think of anything more dysgenic than inferior races mixing with superior ones.

    • Replies: @BengaliCanadianDude
  138. Gerard2 says:
    @AP

    So Ashkenazi Jews aren’t white in your world? Here is Ukraine’s “Non-white” President:

    Meanwhile, Russia is about 10% Muslim officially, probably around 15% if you include guest-workers. Map of European countries by Muslim %:

    LOL this takes comedy and schizophrenia, attention-seeking to new levels. By your idiotic logic about 40% of Afghans and Pakistanis are welcome to become Ukrainian President because of their even fairer skin .Then shamelessly you mention the muslims even those about 5-7% of that 10-15% of Muslims look easily indistinguisable from many slavic people until they speak or drive or whatever you idiot – with the North Caucasus largely monoculture, all other Muslim areas in Russia largely multicultural with Russians

    Russia is a highly successful, stable country, with a clear national identity and history – “Ukraine” is obviously NONE of that, and never will be – so any comparison is stupid

    If I recall you didn’t know the meaning of that word, Sovok.

    “Mir” means world in Russian, but in Ukrainian and Polish it means peace. Thus a Russian using “mir” to say “world” would not be understood by a Ukrainian or a Polish speaker who doesn’t know Russian. It’s an example of a word that differentiates Polish and Ukrainian from Russian.

    You didn’t know that?

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA -This is beautiful – get proved as a dumb ****- you then bizarrely INCREASE your rate of dumb wakjob fantasist!!

    ‘mir’ has double meaning in Russian you idiot – peace and world( this stupidity lead onto the further exposure that you don’t know the Russian double meaning of svet – again these are BASIC words) – I think I even originally wrote ‘double-meaning’ before typing something shorter – this correction inadvertantly leading you to make even a bigger moron of yourself as it lead you on to do further BS.

    Literally, a mentally retarded Russian-speaking child knows peace/world for ‘mir” – it’s like somebody who has not learned English not knowing the world “hello” – that you would seek to BS on this is extremely disturbing.

    Maybe you could tell me what the french word is for “deja vu” whilst we are here!

    Utterly Hilarious and beneath contempt.

    I think we have already gone over the lying and completely useless element of these videos you nonsensical post as “proof” when all it is doing is trying to waste time

    On a more positve note – even with all these US funded “rule of law” “democracy” shouting Kiev hamster pseudo-intellegentisia dickheads around…or Us funded – western Banderatard Ukronazis………….the head of the Ukrainian Supreme Court is still …..a lady from Donetsk! A Yanukovich appointee too

  139. @Gerard2

    Liszt, not Lizst.

    [MORE]

    In Hungarian, “sz” is almost always pronounced as “s” (Russian Cyrillic “с”), whereas zs is “zh” (Russian Cyrillic “ж”). A standalone “s” is always, without exception pronounced as “sh” (Russian Cyrillic “ш”), and a standalone “z” is always, without exception pronounced as “z” (Russian Cyrillic “з”). (The only ambiguity with the double letters comes from the fact that sometimes it’s simply one “s” and one “z” standing next to each other one way or another, but the only such example I can think of at the moment is the word “igazság,” meaning truth or justice, so it’s not very common.)

  140. neutral says:
    @AP

    Congrats you have a president that looks like he is from the Middle East, now why is that, surely it can’t be because he is from the Middle East. Then you have non white soldiers garrisoning on your land, also add in your arse licking for presidents Obama and Harris, wow what a based great white nation that is.

    Pathetic.

    • Replies: @AP
  141. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mr. Hack

    I first became acquainted with the original version of that building during a long walk from downtown to Penn Station. The Cyrillic lettering on the outside being an eye catcher.

    This Jewish leftist I know with former Russian Empire roots approached that venue a few years ago on a certain proposal. I don’t recall the specifics. He was told by that venue that his idea was too Russian.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  142. AP says:
    @Gerard2

    By your idiotic logic about 40% of Afghans and Pakistanis are welcome to become Ukrainian President because of their even fairer skin .

    Zelensky does not look like a fair-skinned Afghani.

    hen shamelessly you mention the muslims even those about 5-7% of that 10-15% of Muslims look easily indistinguisable from many slavic people

    You are the one who shamelessly mentioned Ukraine’s richest man, Akhmetov 🙂

    He is as lightskinned and Russian-speaking, like any of Russia’s Muslims.

    Compare him to the Uzbek who is one of Russia’s richest people.

    Bottom line, about 10% (plus migrants) of people in Russia are Muslims, compared to about .2% or so of Ukraine’s people.

    It hurts you, thus your desperate responses.

    ‘mir’ has double meaning in Russian

    Of course it does. I’m glad I have taught you this, at least. Your stalking has at least led to some learning.

    But we were discussing Polish and Ukrainian. It does not have this double meaning in those languages. So if a Russian said”mir” a Pole or Ukrainian would hear “peace.” This is an example of a word that separates Russian from the Polish and Ukrainian languages.

  143. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Gerard2

    Then shamelessly you mention the muslims even those about 5-7% of that 10-15% of Muslims look easily indistinguisable from many slavic people until they speak or drive or whatever you idiot – with the North Caucasus largely monoculture, all other Muslim areas in Russia largely multicultural with Russians

    Russia is a highly successful, stable country, with a clear national identity and history – “Ukraine” is obviously NONE of that, and never will be – so any comparison is stupid

    A number of former Soviets frequent a state park near me. Yesterday in that area, I saw a Caucasus looking lad wearing a Russian national team football (soccer) jersey. In another instance there, I saw someone wearing a Ukrainian national shirt in that sport. The parking lot typically has cars with either the Russian or Ukrainian flags. No tensions sensed whatsoever. Theses folks gravitate towards one specific part of the park.

    As for ethnic Russian and and non-ethnic Russian citizens of Russia, I’ve run into my share of ethnic Russians who exhibit self hating Sorosian views of their country. Conversely, I’ve pleasantly run into patriotically pro-Russian perspectives among those with a noticeable non-Russian ethnic makeup. Strength can be thru diversity. IMO, this has helped make Russia a great country, contrary to the Captive Nations Committee BS that lingers on.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    , @Dreadilk
  144. Mr. Hack says:
    @Gerard2

    So, I guess that I’m supposed to think of you as ‘amazing’? What I think of as amazing is that you appear to be somebody with a good solid educational background, and yet you prefer to present yourself (at leat here at this blogsite) as some sort of prole, whose main passion in life might be watching wrestling on TV, and not playing or listening to classical music. Now that’s amazing! 🙂

    • Replies: @AP
  145. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    But you haven’t stepped inside the new building yet to view the great exhibits going on there? What’s the matter, too busy collecting rent from your numerous tenemant units, or perhaps just too busy trying to whitewash the image of Putin’s Russia to poor unaware Americans? Look at what you’re missing:

    http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/

  146. Mikhail says: • Website

    Good rebuttal to the PC crowd:

    https://www.rt.com/usa/463412-time-editor-putins-america-parade/

    ———————————–

    Interesting subjects right up the alley for James Jatras and Mark Sleboda among others:

    https://www.rt.com/shows/crosstalk/463422-foreign-policy-quincy-institute/

    https://www.rt.com/shows/worlds-apart-oksana-boyko/463340-tornike-sharashenidze-russia-georgia/

    Will perhaps watch later.

    ———————————–

    For the car care buffs out there:

    https://www.youtube.com/user/scottykilmer

  147. ussr andy says:
    @SFG

    I think at least some fasts have got to be just sumptuary law type stuff, a hold-over from more Malthusian times, rather than conscious physical or spiritual practice.
    how to tell which is which

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  148. AP says:
    @neutral

    LOL, another “White Nationalist” jealous of Ukraine. How much less white is your country, than Ukraine?

    Congrats you have a president that looks like he is from the Middle East

    He looks more like Macron than like el Sissi

    Then you have non white soldiers garrisoning on your land

    Remind me how many Chechens etc. soldiers are in Russia? How many non-white soldiers in your lands?

    your arse licking for presidents Obama and Harris

    Government supports Trump now.

    ::::::::::::

    I’m surprised you didn’t condemn the gay parade, because you have closet case written all over you. Let me guess – you have Macron’s taste?

  149. anon[413] • Disclaimer says:

    150 comments, and this thread already turned into another Russo-Ukrainian friendly discussion. 🙁

    Why not talk something else – for example slavery reparations.
    Good or bad idea?
    Radical Marxist idea, or true conservative idea that could turn blacks into the most patriotic group of Americans?
    Is this an opportunity for Republican party?
    In the age of Trump, everything is possible.

  150. Anon000 says:
    @LatW

    Whatever. Ukraine is now our bitch and they can’t wipe their own ass without U.S. approval. But shush, we have to let them believe they have autonomy. Lol.

    Besides Ukraine has its own airbases, cheap anti tank missiles and unlike you – real combat experience against a gigantic world class military.

    Troops with the Vicenza, Italy-based 173rd Airborne Brigade will train up to five battalions of Ukrainian soldiers…

    “The training is part of our ongoing efforts to contribute to Ukraine’s long-term military reform and professionalism and to help improve Ukraine’s internal defense capabilities and training capacity,”

    The training was initially conceived as a beefed-up boot camp, with a focus on marksmanship and small unit tactical planning. But because many of the trainees are already hardened from front-line fighting against separatists in Ukraine’s east, the U.S. training has begun incorporating new subjects, including tips on how to counter drone surveillance.

    https://www.stripes.com/news/europe/us-to-begin-training-ukraine-s-active-duty-military-1.368121

    In other words, they have combat experience but are crappy and can’t shoot straight and fight like the Iraqi rebels the U.S. used to defeat in Al Anbar 100 to 0.

    But that aside, most Americans couldn’t care less about Ukraine. Unlike Poland which a thousand times more important to most Americans. Then again, when one thinks of Poland they think of Copernicus, Chopin, Mme. Curie. When one thinks of Ukraine they think of, what, Oksana Baiul and Chernobyl?

    • Replies: @LatW
    , @neutral
  151. Mr. Hack says:

    But that aside, most Americans couldn’t care less about Ukraine. Unlike Poland which a thousand times more important to most Americans. Then again, when one thinks of Poland they think of Copernicus, Chopin, Mme. Curie.

    A thousand times more important to Americans?

    blob:https://www.youtube.com/c531c03b-08ee-4c30-a58f-f40068c924b4

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @LatW
  152. @ussr andy

    Looking at the people of Walmart, it appears that humans were almost certainly better adapted to occasional starvation and malnutrition than to gluttony.

  153. Anon000 says:

    Re: AK’s fast.

    A whole food, plant-based diet (raw vegan) along with regular vigorous exercise also induces autophagy and in the most sustained and healthy way. And for life extension and to protect cognitive function you can simply restrict caloric intake.

  154. LatW says:
    @Anon000

    How do you know what they can or can’t do, are you in on the calls?

    Those are just some trainers and this is now five years later (plus Americans are not the only trainers there) not in 2014 when the real battles took place or nowhere near Avdiivka, Horlivka where there is action right now. Ukrainian soldiers are valiant.

    The Poles in the US are almost assimilated. Soon they will just be a part of that indistinguishable white minority. Then Poland will have to get real about it.

    • Replies: @LatW
  155. neutral says:
    @AP

    Remind me how many Chechens etc. soldiers are in Russia? How many non-white soldiers in your lands?

    First there is a big difference to having black soldiers vs Chechen soldiers, and second those n!ggers that are occupying your land are not even Ukrainian citizens. And yes I have already mentioned your homo cargo cult parade protected by soldiers, its pathetic.

    Your jealous argument is way off the mark. Ukraine being white has zero to do with Ukrainians, it got there because of various past historical event, the brainless acceptance of all things anti white makes it very clear what the end state of the Cuckraine will be. No white nationalist will ever support your extreme levels of cuckholdom, if you want to find the right word to use, then you should use “nauseating” instead.

    • Replies: @AP
  156. neutral says:
    @Anon000

    I am glad you posted that image of that black soldier, it is sure to get all his Ukrainian nationalist zeal going.

  157. LatW says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Mr Hack, since you mentioned you listen to world music, I wanted to make a small recommendation just for you: if you haven’t already, you might want to check out the Ukrainian band DakhaBrakha – they combine world music and ethnotrance with Slavic female singing and they play over ten different folk instruments from around the world. They might be a little too new age’y for your typical identitarian, but you might like them. 🙂 They will be touring West coast this fall.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  158. LatW says:
    @LatW

    Oh, and, btw – don’t get too overly confident, as the US might actually get another Poland on its hands. We don’t yet know how Ukraine will act, but Poland has given the State Dept a lot of headaches. Eastern Slavs can be even feistier…

    • Replies: @Adam
  159. Dmitry says:
    @Rosie

    I haven’t read about those theories (anatta).

    Still, there seems to be quite a lot of scientific evidence showing that Buddhists’ meditation is healthy for the brain.

    It’s strange though – what would be the evolutionary explanation for how meditation keeps peoples’ brains younger?

    In fact, while most people see their cortexes shrink as they age, 50-year-old meditators in the study had the same amount of gray matter as those half their age.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/neuroscience-50-year-olds-brains-of-25-year-olds-habit-2019-4

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  160. Adam says:
    @LatW

    Best chance for all of Europe is a general collapse of American power in Europe, which likely won’t occur for another few decades. It’s pretty laughable to think that small countries like Poland or Ukraine could actually hold out against the immense financial, political, and cultural pressure of globohomo. Russia can barely do it and it has as enormous advantage due to its size and isolation.

    Maybe some of the nationalists distrust the west, but Ukraine as a whole is a truly pathetic example of subservience and cargo cultism.

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
  161. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    I remember it seemed like there was a lack of bars/pubs, when I was visiting American cities, so maybe you have a point.

    I assume this is because people are drinking alcohol more in their home though, not that they are just not drinking people. (With greater distance between everything in many American cities, it seems more convenient to drink in your home, than in the bars/pubs).

    As for how youth are doing less sex and drugs, than in the past. This is according to many surveys, but surveys show it is the same trend in many countries (not only in America).

    My theory is that it is an international Hikkomorization of Generation Z, who are going in a direction of Japan’s Millenials were already famous for 15 years ago (with trends like “herbivore men”).

    • Replies: @Anonymoose
  162. @Dmitry

    what would be the evolutionary explanation for how meditation keeps peoples’ brains younger?

    My guess is that hunter-gatherers live a way more relaxed life than farmers, let alone modern people in industrial or post-industrial societies. Meditation is a method to somehow simulate this more relaxed life, for which we are better adapted.

  163. @reiner Tor

    Looking at the people of Walmart, it appears that humans were almost certainly better adapted to occasional starvation and malnutrition than to gluttony.

    Not really.

    Several points:

    a) “Keto diet” really and truly works.

    b) You can get a “keto diet” by simply cutting out two food products from your life – refined flour and sugar.

    c) Refined flour and sugar are absolutely artificial foods that didn’t even exist a hundred years ago. They were invented because they’re cheap and high in energy, not because they’re healthy.

    d) It is almost impossible to eat today without consuming refined flour and sugar. You’re basically left with eggs, high-end sausage, expensive cheese and green legumes as your only food source. (Expensive stuff.)

    So no, it’s not about “adaptation”, it’s the fact that the majority of the so-called “food” we eat today isn’t actually food, it’s industrially-produced stuff for the purpose of cost-cutting.

  164. Mr. Hack says:
    @LatW

    I saw them towards the end of last year in concert. They are interesting, to be sure. I even bought a CD of theirs. My favorite Ukrainian group over the last 20 years has been ‘Mandry’ (the Wanderers).
    They do nice sort of blend of Ukrainian folk/rock. check them out:

    • Replies: @LatW
  165. ussr andy says:
    @reiner Tor

    maybe. but very, very occasional. the gains to IQ (and tallness) in countries that abolished malnutrition suggests malnutrition is very, very bad. and, tbh, feeling hungry sucks, more than craving smokes, but maybe it’s me

    Walmart… I think it’s more that the modern diet just doesn’t work for many people…

  166. The UK apparently just seized an Iranian oil tanker, because it was in violation of the EU sanctions against Syria.

    It’s pretty interesting what the legal justification for this action might be. Iran, not being member of the EU, is not legally bound to observe EU sanctions against Syria (or any other country, for that matter). The EU embargo against Syria is not UN sanctioned. It’s pretty ironic that the UK is just about to leave the EU anyway.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-07-05/iran-threatens-seizure-uk-oil-tankers-response-royal-marines-boarding-its-own

    Apparently Globohomo no longer feels to even pretend to adhere to international legal principles.

  167. @reiner Tor

    Both Tory candidates are supporters of war with Iran (and more ”skilled” immigration)

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  168. @reiner Tor

    There’s no such thing as a ‘hunter-gatherer’, not really.

    The primitive tribes of today aren’t some sort of time-travelling relic of the past.

    The primitive tribes of today are the outcasts that were driven out of civilization’s mainstream because they’re low IQ, physically weak and/or barbarous.

    Our ancient ancestors weren’t low IQ or barbarous; we know because we came directly from them.

    Chances are the Cro-Magnon men were a lot more similar to us w.r.t. stress and general life complexity than to some loser pygmy tribe of today.

    • Agree: Adam
  169. LatW says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Thanks, it sounds cool, I like the accordion and it sounds just slightly exotic to my ears (a bit Moldovan even?). There are a ton of cool Ukrainian bands, I really like Тінь Сонця, they do lots of folksy riffs and they play that Kobzar’s instrument (a round zither – what is it called?). Also, Широкий Лан. Both bands have such romantic, majestic vocals, great lyrics, nice battery, too.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  170. Mr. Hack says:
    @LatW

    slightly exotic to my ears (a bit Moldovan even?).

    I know what you mean, the same stuff to me sounds kind of like Jewish Klezmer music (not too surprising, as so much Ukrainian folk music and kolomejkas influenced the klezmer sound).
    I’ll check out the groups that you bring up, perhaps this weekend.

    Here’s probably my favorite song that they do. A lover lamenting for his partner. Great accordion accompaniment:

  171. AP says:
    @neutral

    I don’t care about dumb white nationalists, I just think it is very funny when they make fun of a country that is much whiter than theirs is and will remain so forever.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  172. AP says:
    @Mr. Hack

    ? What I think of as amazing is that you appear to be somebody with a good solid educational background,

    No, gerard discussing classical music is like Sharikov walking on two looks – rather grotesque.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  173. LondonBob says:
    @Kent Nationalist

    I am decidedly neutral on ‘Boris’ Johnson but he has occasionally voiced heretical opinions, enough for the neocons to sink his last leadership bid.

    https://sputniknews.com/columnists/201906251076042642-boris-johnson-war-reporter/

    Anyway with any luck the Conservatives are finished.

  174. Rosie says:
    @AP

    will remain so forever.

    Famous last words.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  175. @Mikhail

    As for ethnic Russian and and non-ethnic Russian citizens of Russia, I’ve run into my share of ethnic Russians who exhibit self hating Sorosian views of their country. Conversely, I’ve pleasantly run into patriotically pro-Russian perspectives among those with a noticeable non-Russian ethnic makeup. Strength can be thru diversity. IMO, this has helped make Russia a great country, contrary to the Captive Nations Committee BS that lingers on.

    I Strongly agree with this comment. My favourite Russian Nationalist happens to be part Lak. 😉

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @Mikhail
  176. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Blinky Bill

    Had the recent pleasure of attending a White Russian event, honoring a gentleman who was born on the Black Sea as his family was leaving Russia.

    The entertainment included a group of young dancers with former Soviet roots. Including a Georgian and Jew, this multiethnic lot expressed respectful interest in the host and the hall where the party was held. (I regret not taking a selfie in the background of the two headed eagle with the coat of arms of the provinces and a photo of Russia’s last royal family. Next time.)

    This dance group’s selection included Ukrainian and Georgian folks songs, which were presented to the audience as such. In a touching moment, the Georgian lad presented the honoree with a bottle of Georgian wine, c/o his mother in Tbilisi.

    Some years back, I experienced very much the same at a party a family member of mine held in a non-sovok Russophile setting. The guests were mostly former Soviets having Jewish roots. They expressed a respectful interest in the pre-Soviet Russian art and decor, among other things present from that period.

  177. @AP

    Agree, including your comment about straight promiscuity, which is also unhealthy and detrimental to good health, emotional wellbeing, and stable, strong, growing, loyal families. I’d just note that these kids are bombarded with homosexual imagery in person and in public media a lot more than an annual little parade. You know, Los Angeles?

  178. @neutral

    Yes but what if they are smart or have high IQs, or similar IQs?

  179. @Gerard2

    5-7% of that 10-15% of Muslims

    For that matter, Kazakhs or other central asian muslims aren’t that different either when it comes to looks. We don’t have many in Canada, I’ll give you that, but I’ve rented my basement to these people before. Wonderful people

  180. @AP

    Ramzan Kadyrov and the Chechens are white. You don’t get to deny their whiteness because they happen to be muslim.

  181. @Anonymoose

    Yo Dawg, I heard you like submarines, so I put a submarine on your submarine …

  182. Sean says:
    @anon

    Therefore, it’s extremely doubtful to me that 1) this trade war will continue beyond Donald Trump 2) China’s growth can be stopped. I think they will soon come to dominate the world.

    If China’s growth cannot be stopped by peaceful means then other ways will be found. And remaining world number one is always in the national interest.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  183. @Sean

    You assume (not just now, in all of your comments) far more foresight from the US political leadership than is in evidence. Do you not know, my Sean, with how little wisdom the world is governed?

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @yakushimaru
  184. Dreadilk says:
    @AP

    Retardo Mir is peace in Russian too. A Ukranian and a Pole would have no problem understanding Mir.

    • Replies: @AP
  185. Dmitry says:
    @Rosie

    If Ukraine stays poor, then Ukraine’s demographics will become the most racially purely European country in Europe, just because nobody who is not Ukrainian wants to go there.

    But if Ukraine becomes rich (probably only possible in the second half of 21st century), then eventually brown people will try to move there.

    Another thing is what will happen to the Muslim countries if oil becomes unimportant, oil prices fall, and so their economies collapse? Currently, Muslim countries only are not all third-world because of oil. Without oil revenue, Muslims will try to flood into Western Europe even more than today.

    However, Muslim countries are going through demographic transition now, so it’s possible this threat of exporting emigrants will reduce (e.g. Turkey has recorded below replacement level “total fertility” for the first time in 2018).

    Turkey’s fertility rate reached 1.99 children in 2018, remaining below population’s replacement level of 2.10, said the country’s statistical authority on July 5.

    Last year’s total fertility rate, the average number of live births that a woman would have during her reproductive period, was down from 2.07 in 2017, according to TÜİK ahead of World Population Day on July 11.

    TÜİK projected the current downward trend in fertility rates would continue in the future to become 1.85 by the year 2050.

    http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/turkeys-fertility-rate-drops-in-2018-144722

    Although Turkey is the main threat to Germany, in terms of exportation of brown Muslims – it has almost three times higher GDP per capita than countries like Ukraine. It’s current reality, that Turkish are more threatened by Ukrainians immigrating to Turkey, than vice-versa.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @RadicalCenter
  186. Dreadilk says:
    @Mikhail

    Naw diversity is not strength. It can be tolerated when the percentage is small. I would say 90-95% has to homogeneous. Russia has some work to do to bring that number in line :).

  187. Dmitry says:
    @Dmitry

    Muslim countries only are not all third-world because of oil.

    Well, this sentence of my comment was a bit simple and internally contradicting after I added about Turkey.

    Turkey doesn’t have oil, and still somewhat developed economically (and they have a proportion of much more normal and secular people there as well).

    But countries like Algeria would have a high probability of economic collapse if oil prices would collapse, and this could add further to the exportation of Muslim emigrants to Europe.

    Contrary and more optimistic trend is that a lot of Muslim countries are having some degree of demographic transition now, so hopefully that will reduce the disaster in the future.

  188. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    And yet, look at what he’s claiming…

    Він мабуть тільки любить перетворитися у дурня. 🙂

  189. anon[300] • Disclaimer says:

    “If China’s growth cannot be stopped by peaceful means then other ways will be found. And remaining world number one is always in the national interest.”

    No means will be found. The US establishment is run by corrupt, myopic buffoons. I foresaw the rise of China decades ago. These losers just now noticed it. China has too many smart people to be countered in any meaningful way. The future of global industry rests on who has the most smart people and who can use them the most efficiently. That’s China, not the US. The US Empire will continue mass immigration in a desperate attempt to equalize, but that will only make things worse for the Americans as it will increase internal racial divisions and empower counterproductive Chavezistas like AOC. These losers can’t even protect their own border, and people think they are going to stop China. That’s laughable. One of their presidential candidates, Robert O’Rouke, is campaigning for votes in Mexico as I type this.

    The US is a broken multi-cult country whose core white demographic has had enough of conflict. Polls indicate record lows in patriotism. That’s understandable. Patriotism is a loyalty to hearth and home. The white males of the United States just had their homes stolen from them by the ruling class. They’ aren’t going to fight China, a powerful, patriotic, and unified country filled with hundreds of millions of intelligent people whose average IQ outstrips the US mean by several points. White males aren’t giving up their lives and economic prosperity to fight the “Chicoms” as the Boomernats like to call them. And you can forget about Laquandra and Droshalla drone pilots coming to your rescue. China already leads the world in many areas of defense technology, and the PLA isn’t even close to being at full power.

    A POC mercenary army versus a patriotic Chinese army? Please. A pozzed corporate America that hires based on diversity checklists or a corporate China which hires from a homogeneous pool of geniuses, ensuring efficient workflow and esprit de corps? No contest. Just witness the Japanese game console companies Sony and Nintendo crushing their American rival Microsoft. American car companies are being chased out of entire global markets and Boeing’s planes are falling out of the sky because they are run by short-sighted, greedy corporatists more interested in outsourcing to India than they are in building a white male engineering culture. This thing is going down and no one can stop it at this point. It’s baked in the cake.

  190. @BengaliCanadianDude

    They are substantially white European genetically, yes, not all. They also cluster in some respects more closely with Georgians and Azeris and Ingush, not what we typically call white European, genetically.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
  191. @Dmitry

    Turkey is “Threatened” by Ukrainians immigrating? Doubtful.

    Turkey’s population is more than twice Ukraine’s, and the Ukrainian population is shrinking while turkey’s is not.

    Turkey’s population is also far, far younger on average than Ukraine’s. Turkish median age 30-31 compared to Ukraine median age over FORTY and rising to extinction,

    Ask any decent American, white American especially, if we are threatened by mass Ukrainian immigration, and we will say HELL NO. We will take them all here in the USA, gladly, compared to the people who were actually being inundated with.

    And if turkey is wise, they’ll do whatever it takes to boost that TFR, and simply send more people to continue the takeover of Austria and, eventually, Germany.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Anonymoose
  192. @Dreadilk

    Basically a sound point. The number could be somewhat lower if they all have a common language, common religion or moral philosophy, and there are absolutely no very incompatible or utterly different races such as Africans, Arabs, Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi.

    But since Russians don’t have children, it is mathematically impossible that they will ever reach higher percentage genetic homogeneity (and the related possibility of greater cultural unity and loyalty). Even if nonRussians (mainly Caucasian and Central Asian Muslims?) fall to a subreplacement TFR, the Russians seem to be even lower consistently. So the genetically/ethnically percentage of the Russian and RF populations will keep dropping as far as we can predict now. Tragic and eventually won’t be able to turn it around.

  193. @RadicalCenter

    cluster in some respects more closely with Georgians and Azeris and Ingush, not what we typically call white European, genetically

    Not sure about ‘European’, but if not ‘white’, then what else could they be?

    They’re certainly not Asian, Negro, Dravidian or even Semite. Not Melanesian or of anyone native to the Americas either.

    • Replies: @BengaliCanadianDude
  194. Dmitry says:
    @RadicalCenter

    Ukrainians immigrating? Doubtful.

    According to the data, tens of thousands of Ukrainians emigrate to Turkey. Illegal ones go there with a tourist visa and then work there, and then refuse to leave.

    On the other hand, Turkish citizens who live in Ukraine are only around five thousand (presumably they are there legally).

    It seems there are around 10 Ukrainians in Turkey, for every 1 Turk in Ukraine.

    If Ukraine stays poor, it might in the future, become the most pure white country in Europe (maybe ahead of even Belarus or Poland), because people whether brown or not, will not want to immigrate there.

    Ukraine solves the immigration problem – it does not even need to build a wall on the West, except perhaps to stop people leaving.

    On the other hand, if Ukraine becomes rich (perhaps in the 2040-2050s years), then brown people will try to flood into Ukraine.

    We will take them all here in the USA, gladly

    I doubt it reflects an official position.

    Like any unskilled immigration (of any people in the world), zarobitchane will not be very popular, at least not the illegal ones, and even too many of the legal ones.

    Polish attitude to Ukrainians, reversed very soon with mass legal Ukrainian immigration.

    Poles are also not fans of potentially Bandera sympathies of the immigrants .

    And Ukrainian illegal immigrants are flooding Israel, and Israel deports them all.

    They are part of daily queue in Israeli cities to apply to be refugees together with the Indians, Pakistanis, Georgians, et al (Israel will deport all these Ukrainians immediately, but has to allow Africans to stay due to lack of diplomatic relations).

    Anyway, end result of low income of Ukraine – still quite few number of brown people flooding is evident, even in the capital city streets.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    , @AP
  195. @RadicalCenter

    They being replaced by Kurds though. Kurds have a much higher TFR than ethnic Turks and they form some 15-20% of Turkey’s population. They probably trying to export their excess Kurdish population to Europe.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  196. Dreadilk says:
    @RadicalCenter

    I dont do pessimism. I think Anatoly had a good point a while back that percentage of Russians is increasing in mostly Russian regions. So the worst that will happen is the Caucasian republic’s may secede but that is about it.

    I also think it’s bogus the whole TFR argument. Everyone goes through declines. There was a time when everyone bred like crazy. Even Asians. That time will come back.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  197. @Dmitry

    Perhaps they’re spending too much time on the internet?

  198. @Dmitry

    The official position of the us government does not match the position of white Americans on anything, so why would it match my position on taking Ukrainians.

    Terrible what has happened to the Ukraine. And unnecessary.

  199. @Anatoly Karlin

    was that supposed to be a pun?

  200. @Dreadilk

    Sometimes optimism is more warranted by the apparent evidence, but sometimes not.
    The number of Russians is steadily declining or it isn’t. It is, right?

    For those of us who do not want Russia to become a Muslim country entirely, the number of nonMuslim citizens of the RF is either declining or it isn’t. It is also declining, right?

    Declining more slowly than before is a good start, but decline nonetheless.

    TFR 1.71, median age at 38.9 and heading slowly towards 40, this is still a recipe for the extinction of Russians. Certainly as a major military power, economy, or culture. That’s something I would lament just as I lament the willful die-off and demoralization of my own beloved country.

    Technology will not substitute fully for manpower when a country has as much territory and as long a set of borders to secure as Russia does. Especially when Russia will have life-saving resources that China or others would be glad to seize: vast fertile fields, oil and natural gas reserves, livestock, and timber In abundance relative to its population, when much of the rest of the world will be lacking.

    As for the Caucasus republics, Chechnya and ingushetia and Dagestan are tiny. But do you think that Ramzan Kadyrov’s sons will be content to stay in Chechnya as the number of Russians drops by 25 million and the number of chechens slowly grows by a couple million in the same timeframe. Who will stop young Chechens and Ingush from settling in the towns of southern Russia as the Russians die out or move to MOS or SPB. A bunch of 50- and 60- and 70-year-old Russians? This shouldn’t be allowed to happen, but looks likely that it will. Hopefully trends change. Soon.

  201. Sean says:
    @reiner Tor

    The unwisdom of fighting WW1 or even WW2 is not obvious. History shows the US reacts to any potential threat to its primacy.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  202. Dreadilk says:
    @RadicalCenter

    You would be surprised how attitudes change when things need to be done. All you can do is worry about your self.

    Entire world is coming out of globalist malaise. The next century is going to look very different. TFRs are going to rise everywhere. There will be a huge die off before they rise everywhere too.

    Some races always competed on lower TFR even when they were in overdrive.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  203. NYMOM says:
    @anon

    I think it might have something to do with climate…like how many people lived in Georgia, Florida, Louisana and/or Texas before the invention of air conditioning and refrigeration…

    I think central heating might have kept Vermont pretty underpopulated by any particular race until fairly recently…so it’s not ‘by accident’ but ‘by geography…

  204. NYMOM says:

    What do people think of the British (as instructed by the US) seizure of the Iranian oil tanker delivering oil to Syria…could this sort of action (if continued) result in another world war????

    As I think Russia and even China to a certain extent could feel very threatened by these sorts of action.

    I simply don’t understand Trump’s policies? I mean is he looking to start WWIII or what???

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  205. @Anonymoose

    Thanks. Very clearly white. Why are the wiggers denying their whiteness? Are these wiggers part of the “LA CREATURA” 51 percent people? I swear these kids and Ramzan look whiter than MANY Portuegese, Spaniard, Italians and Greeks. Very swarthy people. Some even match my complexion. The girl in the middle and to the left of the middle standing above Ramzan? White. Easily russian. If you didnt know who they were, you would think they were Russian too.

  206. @Dreadilk

    I love it when a Russian chimes in and says something about his own country, and why a certain idealogy may be fruitful, but then some wigger from some trailer park in Nacogdoches, Texas who has never seen anything outside of his park,nor has been anywhere past the local gas station headbuts himself into the conversation acting as if he has ANY sort of knowledge on the social dynamics of a foreign country he has never visited nor has any sort of correspondence in, and basically tells the Russian guy(who knows about his country) why it won’t work. Seriously. Gotta love these wiggers sometimes lol. He’s not even Russian but he tells them about their own country. The peak of wiggery.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    , @DreadIlk
  207. @RadicalCenter

    The lack of mention of East Asians indicate that this poster might be ailed by a severe case of YELLOW FEVER.

  208. @anonymous coward

    Ignore him. 100% they are white. He’s probably mad Kadyrov is whiter than him

  209. Thomm says:
    @BengaliCanadianDude

    Gotta love these wiggers sometimes lol. He’s not even Russian but he tells them about their own country. The peak of wiggery.

    WN wiggers are THE epitome of the Dunning-Kruger syndrome. They don’t even go outside and interact with heterosexuals much, but still imagine themselves to be people of quality.

    Note that the females of this dysfunctional subgroup are the fat bluehaired feminists. There are virtually no women in the White Trashionalist ideology, so the ‘missing’ women, who happen to have the same personality traits, but fixate on gender more than race, are to be found here.

    • Agree: BengaliCanadianDude
    • Replies: @DreadIlk
  210. DreadIlk says:
    @BengaliCanadianDude

    The word you looking for is a cuck. As in a cuck that thinks different nations within a nation lead to anything but despair.

    Soviet union with it’s globalist religion made a lot of Russian cucks that think nationalism is a dirty word. It’s ok I hear cucks don’t breed well.

    • Replies: @BengaliCanadianDude
  211. @DreadIlk

    You do realize my comment was talking about YOU right? Hears another clue…it wasn’t talking about you kindly at all either lol. Mihail is the Russian, whose opininon I could fathom, and I would give heed to it considering he is russian. You’re the one I was “lambasting”

    • Replies: @Dreadilk
    , @Hyperborean
  212. Dreadilk says:
    @BengaliCanadianDude

    Yes that is why I called you a cuck you sub level IQ troglodyte.

  213. @Gerard2

    What other nicknames does Mr Hack/Spack/Boston Strangler/Elephant Man have? What other names have you given him?

  214. @Gerard2

    What other nicknames does Mr Hack/Spack/Boston Strangler/Elephant Man have? What other names have you given him?

  215. @reiner Tor

    Foresight means war? Wisdom means war?

    I knew all kinds of people say a lot of nice things about Pericles but he’s the one leading Athens into a stupid war.

    Okay Pericles was obviously wise. Now I forget what I’m talking about.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  216. @yakushimaru

    Foresight means a great master plan to destroy upcoming competitors. Sean assumes a rational motive behind every US action, at least the major ones.

    • Replies: @yakushimaru
  217. @Sean

    I question the wisdom of letting China grow at the expense of the US (outsourcing etc.) for decades now. I also question the wisdom of several wars and actions taken or not taken. For example it might have made sense to bomb the North Vietnamese troops in 1975, since this would have prevented them from entering Saigon. On the other hand, they shouldn’t have started the war at all. The Korean War also seems to be a costly mistake – either it shouldn’t have been started, or China should’ve been nuked. Maybe the former – then Korea wouldn’t be a formidable economic rival. The Iraq War is a well known example. Or Afghanistan: what purpose does the US occupation serve there. What did it serve initially?

    • Replies: @yakushimaru
    , @yakushimaru
  218. @BengaliCanadianDude

    Mihail is the Russian, whose opininon I could fathom, and I would give heed to it considering he is russian. You’re the one I was “lambasting”

    Mikhail is a descendant of a White Russian emigré who lives in New York City and doesn’t speak Russian.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  219. @reiner Tor

    What I read the Iranian vessel passed through British (Gibraltar) territorial waters. Though it’s unclear if it’s enough legal justification. Zionists informed us that the blockade of the Straits of Tiran was an act of war. Is closing the Strait of Gibraltar to ships transporting oil to Syria not then also an act of war?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  220. @Hyperborean

    I think he does speak Russian, but only as a second language.

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
  221. @BengaliCanadianDude

    Ramzan Kadyrov and the Chechens are white. You don’t get to deny their whiteness because they happen to be muslim.

    So? They are Caucasians, not Europeans. They are not civilised nor are they even that loyal and they are more trouble than they are worth.

    So really, considering their baggage, why should their phenotype gain them acceptance?

  222. @RadicalCenter

    The number of Russians is steadily declining or it isn’t. It is, right?

    Wrong question.

    Really in the long rung it doesn’t matter if people die at 60 or 90. These years aren’t very productive and they’re not gonna be having kids after 60 anyways.

    What matters is how many kids (in crude numbers) there are right now in 2019, because in 20 years that will be your actual working and reproducing population.

    After a quick Google search, I see that Russia has roughly 25 million children under 15, while Japan has 15.

    Which means that in a generation or two Russia will have 70% more people than Japan.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  223. @reiner Tor

    Transit passage is a concept of the Law of the Sea, which allows a vessel or aircraft the freedom of navigation or overflight solely for the purpose of continuous and expeditious transit of a strait between one part of the high seas or exclusive economic zone and another.

    Transit passage exists throughout the entire strait, not just the area overlapped by the territorial waters of the coastal nations. The ships and aircraft of all nations, including warships, auxiliaries, and military aircraft, enjoy the right of unimpeded transit passage in such straits and their approaches. Submarines are free to transit international straits submerged since that is their normal mode of operation.[3]

    The legal regime of transit passage exists for all straits used for international navigation where there is not a simple alternative route, and where there is no long-standing international convention governing the straits such as for the Danish Straits, the Turkish Straits, and the Strait of Magellan. The major international trade routes of the Strait of Gibraltar, Dover Strait, Strait of Hormuz, Bab-el-Mandeb and Strait of Malacca are covered by the transit passage provisions.[3]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transit_passage?wprov=sfti1

  224. @reiner Tor

    I think he does speak Russian, but only as a second language.

    AP and Mr. Hack were teasing him about it, so that is why I assumed he doesn’t speak Russian.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  225. @Hyperborean

    Yeah, they were teasing his bad Russian.

  226. @AaronB

    God willing, both if us will have long stopped wasting time on this stupid site by the time you turn to religion – but remember my words.

    You’re right – it is a stupid site, so why can’t you stop wasting time here?

  227. Mitleser says:
    @NYMOM

    As I think Russia and even China to a certain extent could feel very threatened by these sorts of action.

    Reminder that Beijing does have the legal right to prevent transit passage of non-Chinese ships in the Taiwan straits, but does not enforce it because the PRC is not powerful enough.

    According to the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, all ships and aircraft enjoy the right of transit passage in straits used for international navigation between one part of the high seas or an exclusive economic zone, and another part of the high seas or an exclusive economic zone. Transit passage is the exercise of the freedom of navigation and overflight solely for the purpose of continuous and expeditious transit.

    Transit passage cannot be hampered, impeded or suspended. But the Law of the Sea also qualifies that right by stating that “if the strait is formed by an island of a state bordering the strait and its mainland, transit passage shall not apply if there exists seaward of the island a route through the high seas or through an exclusive economic zone of similar convenience”.

    Beijing apparently claims that, according to this provision, the right of transit passage does not apply to the Taiwan Strait and that warships in particular should use the alternative route “of similar convenience” through the Luzon Strait between the island of Taiwan and the Philippines. Moreover, in its interpretation of the “One China policy”, it claims that all the waters in the strait are under China’s jurisdiction and comprise its internal waters, territorial seas and its exclusive economic zone.

    The US Navy claims that the waters in the strait are “international”. The then commander of US Pacific Command, Admiral Timothy Keating, said during an official visit to China in 2008: “We don’t need China’s permission to go through the Taiwan Strait. It’s international waters. We will exercise our free right of passage whenever and wherever we choose, as we have done repeatedly in the past and we’ll do in the future.”

    https://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/article/3004863/us-warships-and-pla-jets-whats-really-behind-taiwan-strait

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  228. @Mitleser

    I don’t think international law could be interpreted otherwise than the Chinese interpretation. Except maybe if you consider Taiwan an independent country, and you assume you have their permission.

    Not that China cares much about international law in the South China Sea.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  229. Charles Koch and George Soros are teaming up to set up an anti-interventionist anti-forever war foreign policy think tank.

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2019/06/30/soros-and-koch-brothers-team-end-forever-war-policy/WhyENwjhG0vfo9Um6Zl0JO/story.html

  230. Mitleser says:
    @reiner Tor

    What international law in the SCS are you referring to?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  231. @Mitleser

    Well, China has a highly idiosyncratic interpretation of international law, which allows it to claim extensive economic rights in areas which practically everyone else thinks belong to other countries. Setting aside the question whether Taiwan could be considered a country for these purposes, it affects the Philippines and Vietnam. China has similar disputes with South Korea and Japan, though I don’t know whether those claims are more justified than the ones in the South China Sea.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    , @yakushimaru
  232. @reiner Tor

    Many great men have just enough foresight to start wars. Foresight as defined this way makes me mad.

    Besides, why does economic competition sound like lightweight genocide to you?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  233. @reiner Tor

    Or Afghanistan: what purpose does the US occupation serve there. What did it serve initially?

    What else can USA do to capture Bin Laden? (Not that I like the war or this or that. But there was a practical problem facing the USA back then.)

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  234. @reiner Tor

    The Korean War also seems to be a costly mistake – either it shouldn’t have been started, or China should’ve been nuked.

    Why was defending South Korea a mistake?

    And why the actual outcome is worse than to nuke China?!

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  235. anonymous[221] • Disclaimer says:

    Found this piece of … Moscow Times. It is from February, not “breaking news” any more, but someone retweeted it now.

    Ayn Rand is making a comeback among young Russians in their search for a political alternative

    “If there is any future for Russia, then it will only be possible thanks to the ideas of Ayn Rand”

    WTF Ayn Rand?

    Russia have 145 million people, I am certain that among them are few crazies who admire, of all things, Alisa Rosenbaum, also known as Ayn Rand.
    It is not new – in the most glorious times of capitalism in the 90’s some people tried to bring Ayn Rand worship to Russia. Most prominent of them was Andrey Illarionov, former Putin’s senior economic adviser.

    http://www.enterstageright.com/archive/articles/0500russia.htm

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrey_Illarionov

    But why is this pushed now? Is it just a filler for Moscow Times, or are these people being prepared as new, fresh face of the opposition?

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    , @Dmitry
    , @utu
  236. Mitleser says:
    @reiner Tor

    …which practically everyone else thinks belong to other countries

    Do they? When did the rivaling claims of Vietnam and the Philippines get such universal acknowledgement?

    China has similar disputes with South Korea and Japan

    And South Korea has similar disputes with China, Japan and North Korea and Japan has disputes with all neighbours.

    It does not look like a China-specific issue.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  237. @reiner Tor

    China has a highly idiosyncratic interpretation of international law

    I think it is “border dispute” instead of any problem with interpretation.

  238. Mitleser says:
    @anonymous

    Fringe and cringe.

    Irina Antonova, marketing director of Alpina Publishing Group, which distributes Rand’s books in Russia, says sales of “Atlas Shrugged” were up 40 percent in 2018 compared to 2017.

    And how much did they really sell?

  239. anon[142] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymoose

    Why paste Kadyrov’s ugly mug three times?
    Unrequited love?
    That feeling when you know that Kadyrov will never come to kindap you and add you to his harem… 😉

  240. @Mitleser

    The international arbitral tribunal ruling in favor of the Philippines (which, by the way, corresponds to common sense, in that the Chinese rocks upon which Chinese claims are based are all uninhabited and uninhabitable) was recognized by most countries in the world. Before the ruling, only the Islamic world opposed it (with Russia being neutral), while after the ruling, it was only opposed by Russia (China’s ally) and China (and Taiwan, for reasons of its own) and a few of their allies (Syria, Pakistan, etc.)

    So it’s almost like Russia’s annexation of Crimea, obviously breaking international law. Not that others don’t break it anyway (even on the South China Sea, it appears that the US “freedom of navigation” exercises in the Strait of Taiwan are not really supported by international law), but I don’t like supporting obviously untrue positions, so my position that China is breaking international law in the South China Sea is pretty consistent with reality. I don’t wish China any ill or harm, but facts are facts.

    Same thing with Crimea: Russia broke international law, whether we like it, or not. I don’t wish Crimea to be reconquered by Ukraine, but I think reality needs to be recognized in our small circle, otherwise our discussion is pointless.

  241. @yakushimaru

    why does economic competition sound like lightweight genocide to you?

    It doesn’t. I was responding to Sean’s comments, which posited that the US was always violently opposing any upcoming threat to its primacy. However, American leadership showed no signs of worry during China’s previous rise. It seems pretty shortsighted to only start worrying now. And maybe other shortsighted things are going to distract the Americans now anyway.

  242. @yakushimaru

    Osama was hiding in Pakistan, so at least in retrospect, it’s obvious that there was no way to find him in Afghanistan. But it would’ve been enough to just keep a couple small airbases in Afghanistan (supplied from the air), and send special forces to the mountains to search for Osama. It was always more a special forces and intelligence services job which was never much helped by the military occupation at all.

    Also, they should never have tried to nation build in Afghanistan. Anyone with half a brain knew that Afghanistan was never going to be a democracy or even a stable moderately liberal dictatorship, the best we could hope for was some kind of moderate Islamism. Luckily, Taliban has just transformed itself into something like that. (They will still behead lots of people, but a good many of those will probably deserve it anyway. And don’t look there, children. Life is cruel, the current crop of bacha bazi enthusiasts aren’t any better anyway.)

  243. @yakushimaru

    Well, Sean posited that the US was ruthlessly destroying any up and coming threat to its primacy. I would think that a ruthless policy of destroying any such threats would be better served by America nuking China, or not protecting Korea at all. What they chose was probably not very bad, but from a ruthless American Supremacist position which Sean thinks has always been a guide of American foreign policy since WW1 at least, the Korean War was a complete disaster. Its only two accomplishments were to protect South Korea and Taiwan, both of whom became high technology powerhouses, and ironically both are likely leaking those technologies to China. So maybe it’d have been better to just let them be absorbed by the DPRK and the PRC, respectively.

  244. Anon[134] • Disclaimer says:
    @reiner Tor

    The international arbitral tribunal

    You are a joke. Do you know what it is or what it does? and which countries belong to it and who controls it?

    Russia broke international law

    Maybe or maybe not. But it is a lot more legal than the Iraq war.

  245. Mitleser says:
    @reiner Tor

    China (and Taiwan, for reasons of its own)

    Because the PCA denied reality in favour of anti-China politics.
    They classified Taiping island, an island the RoC has controlled since the 1950s as a rock not entitled to an EEZ despite being a proper island.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  246. @reiner Tor

    So it’s almost like Russia’s annexation of Crimea, obviously breaking international law.

    You’re retarded.

    a) Crimea was an autonomous Republic before and after the USSR breakup.

    b) The citizens of Crimea voted in a referendum to leave Ukraine and join Russia not once, but twice in a space of 25 years.

    Call the annexation of Crimea whatever you want, but one thing it is definitely, definitely not is illegal according to international law.

    Maybe you feel that the spirit of the law was violated somehow, but that doesn’t make it illegal.

    • Replies: @Vishnugupta
    , @reiner Tor
  247. @Hyperborean

    They are still white and that was what I was replying to. Plus, they are native to Russia. This is where they belong. This is their home.

  248. @anonymous coward

    Reiner Tor is correct as per international law.

    Crimea is analogous to Kosovo whose independence from Serbia is also illegal.

    It doesn’t matter that most residents of Kosovo wanted independence from Serbia. Just like Muslim Chechen,Kashmiri and Uighur’s want independence from Russia,India and China respectively and would probably vote for secession if a plebiscite was held . Kosovo was legitimately Serbian territory just like Crimea was legally Ukrainian territory.

    • Replies: @Epigon
    , @anonymous coward
  249. Dmitry says:
    @anonymous

    Why ‘wtf’? It’s not the USSR. Ayn Rand’s books have been popular selling books for years in Russia/Ukraine/Belarus.

    If you want to look at the booksellers.

    Atlas shrugs is on the front page of Ozon for modern prose.
    https://www.ozon.ru/category/sovremennaya-proza-40004/

    And on LitRes it is on the front page for popular books this week on its whole website (so it is the most popular selling classic book on LitRes this week, as others on the front page are new books)
    https://www.litres.ru/luchshie-knigi/

    However, you can see on any book review website, a mix of 1 star reviews and 5 star reviews, with hundreds of 1 star reviews.

    Among classics in this genre, George Orwell’s 1984 is both more much universally positively reviewed, in websites of any language (and I would recommend it).

  250. Dmitry says:
    @anonymous coward

    It’s not useful, because the population pyramid of Russia between age-cohorts has “waves”.

    So in some times, a certain age cohort is in the top of the wave, and in other times it will be at the bottom of the wave. Currently large cohort of children is a result of currently large cohort of people age 25-40.

    This is why demographers look instead at fertility rate, as the determinant of natural population replacement.

    Problem is that “total fertility rate” estimate is an extremely primitive and inaccurate method, which produces more noise than signal whenever people change timing of births. Between individual years, “total fertility rate” is often just pure noise.

    So you have to wait many years to know what is really happening, and then look at the eventual fertility rate.

    However, Russia, we can see eventual fertility rate seems like it has and will be very stable for women born since around 1965-1970 – fertility rate is around 1,6.

    The story of Russian fertility is that it fell to around 1,6 for women born from 1970. But since then, it’s been stable.

    If you want to compare to Japan. Japan has cohort fertility rate falling below 1,5 for women born since around 1970. They have probably stablized after but Japan has fallen (and likely stabilized) to a lower fertility rate than Russia.

  251. Miro23 says:

    Interesting that Epstein has just been re-arrested. This is highly unusual in the US insider world.

    It looks like some top level insider conflict. Maybe we’re going to get the full story on Clinton’s, Trump’s, Dershowitz’, Prince Andrew’s etc. activities on Epstein’s Pedo Island and this is a serious attempt to abandon ship.

    Or maybe Trump is taking on his extortionists?

    https://teapartypac.org/muellers-star-witness-against-trump-once-arrested-for-child-porn-hung-out-with-pedos-clinton-and-epstein-photos/

    • Replies: @utu
  252. Dmitry says:
    @Hyperborean

    What is this strange argument lol?

    Chechens are mixed population which includes both white and brown races, similar to in Georgia. Some of them are white people and some of them are brown people.

    And who cares about that? Why does melanin make a difference?

    Problem is effects of a terrible war, continuing of cultural Islamization/Arabization, and in addition, that tens of billions of dollars has been transferred to this small place from the federal budget.

    There should be a choice – either allow cultural Islamization/Arabization, or receive tens of billions of federal money. Yet Kadyrov has both. He can increase cultural Islamization and receive tens of billions of federal money.

    This was very different in the USSR. Grozny was once highly multinational and secular, European style city.

    Look at the multinationality of the students at 11:00 in this video

    And what they are like in its university today

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
  253. Mitleser says:

    Soviet Freezer: Kennan edition

    • Replies: @Epigon
    , @utu
  254. @Dmitry

    Are you really disagreeing with me, or not?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  255. Epigon says:
    @Vishnugupta

    LOL. Kosovo is just the endgame.
    The serious international law trampling came in 1991 when separatist leaders were courted by German-supported European delegations.

    So the sovereignity of a UN founding nation, Helsinki Accords and even Versailles Treaty where Kingdom of Serbia negotiated the borders of future Kingdom of Yugoslavia were all trampled by a foreign commission led by Badinter which proclaimed internal administrative borders, instituted by a communist dictator, as national borders.
    But the West couldn’t be happy with that, because they went the extra mile and supported unconstitutional Muslim-Croat usurpation of Bosnia&Herzegovina / coup, and trampled their own principle by directly violating their own conclusions.

    You see the schizophreania of these disgusting vermin when they (Wesley Clark) proclaim that national, homogenous states are a thing of past, so they proceeded to dismantle Yugoslavia, support 90+% homogenous Slovenia, Croatia and act as an airforce to ethnoreligious rebels/terrorists in Bosnia and Kosovo, as a result Serbs were cleansed there as well.
    And their only bombing target was the most multinational of all ex-Yugoslav states, Serbia.

    This and other historical events are the reason why there can be no such thing as “White” or “pan-European” movements.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @reiner Tor
  256. @Vishnugupta

    False.

    I repeat again: Crimea was an autonomous republic that inherited its special status from the USSR just like Ukraine itself did.

    They had a right to secede just like Ukraine itself did.

    Now, other regions inside the Ukraine didn’t. It’s only Crimea that was special.

    This is all according to international law, “wants” and “votes” have no relevance here.

    The legal situation w.r.t. borders and administrative bounds was very complicated after the USSR’s breakup.

    • Replies: @AP
  257. Epigon says:
    @Mitleser

    A very sinister, malicious operative.
    Unlike neocons, think tank ‘tards and “experts” in circulation at present, George Kennan had a clear, long-term vision and knew exactly what had to be done.

  258. Dmitry says:
    @Hyperborean

    Not particularly – I am commenting about this topic, which a lot of people are talking about above.

  259. I’ve been reading this blog for years, and never yet read the expression “pohuism.” This must be a serious deficiency.

  260. AP says:
    @Dreadilk

    Retardo, I was discussing the word for “world” not “peace.” A Russian saying “mir” to mean “world” would not be understood by a Pole or a Ukrainian.

  261. Thomm says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    What have these readers heard about?

    Autophagy? No

    Auto-faggy? Hell yeah. They do it all the time.

  262. utu says:
    @Mitleser

    Kennan about NATO expansion in 1998:

    https://www.nytimes.com/1998/05/02/opinion/foreign-affairs-now-a-word-from-x.html
    ”I think it is the beginning of a new cold war,” said Mr. Kennan from his Princeton home. ”I think the Russians will gradually react quite adversely and it will affect their policies. I think it is a tragic mistake. There was no reason for this whatsoever. No one was threatening anybody else. This expansion would make the Founding Fathers of this country turn over in their graves. We have signed up to protect a whole series of countries, even though we have neither the resources nor the intention to do so in any serious way. [NATO expansion] was simply a light-hearted action by a Senate that has no real interest in foreign affairs.”

    ”What bothers me is how superficial and ill informed the whole Senate debate was,” added Mr. Kennan, who was present at the creation of NATO and whose anonymous 1947 article in the journal Foreign Affairs, signed ”X,” defined America’s cold-war containment policy for 40 years. ”I was particularly bothered by the references to Russia as a country dying to attack Western Europe. Don’t people understand? Our differences in the cold war were with the Soviet Communist regime. And now we are turning our backs on the very people who mounted the greatest bloodless revolution in history to remove that Soviet regime.

    ”And Russia’s democracy is as far advanced, if not farther, as any of these countries we’ve just signed up to defend from Russia,” said Mr. Kennan, who joined the State Department in 1926 and was U.S. Ambassador to Moscow in 1952. ”It shows so little understanding of Russian history and Soviet history. Of course there is going to be a bad reaction from Russia, and then [the NATO expanders] will say that we always told you that is how the Russians are — but this is just wrong.”

  263. utu says:
    @Miro23

    Or maybe Trump is taking on his extortionists?

    Or they are taking on Trump?

  264. utu says:
    @anonymous

    But why is this pushed now?

    IMHO Alisa Rosenbaum was a part of a very successful psy-op which however took some time to bear fruits but it eventually did in 1980’s when Keynesian economics in the US was dismantled by cooling off economy with high interest rates (Volcker) that allowed the destruction of rust belt that lead do dismantling the trade unions in the US. The next step was NAFTA during Bush/Clinton and building up China by manufacturing and technology transfer and Clinton killing the Glass-Steagal act. While most people were oblivious to these changes when they were taking place (the neoliberal age started by Thatcher and Reagan) it did not have great opposition in the US partly because of indoctrination by Ayn Rand books and other libertarian literature. Libertarians were always groomed to be the useful idiots of oligarchy and neoliberalism. One can add to it the pro-immigration stance which is a part of libertarian belief system. Flooding countries with immigrants will destroy all pre-neoliberal institutions that were created in the previous era of more gentle capitalism and social-democracy.

    Sweden is a good example of country which socio-economic system that is contrary to the neoliberal ideology is slated for destruction.

  265. notanon says:
    @The Big Red Scary

    don’t know about “bivalveganism” (until i google it in a moment) but

    The transition from meat and salad to grechka, bread, and salad has not gone so smoothly.

    when i push keto to vegetarians i say have your salads with a lot of olive oil (salad dressing) for calories and/or avocados and drop the bread.

  266. AP says:
    @anonymous coward

    I repeat again: Crimea was an autonomous republic that inherited its special status from the USSR just like Ukraine itself did.

    Wrong as usual. USSR constitution allowed Soviet republics to leave the Union but did not allow for autonomous republics such as Crimea or Chechnya to secede from their republics.

  267. @Epigon

    However, the breakup of the USSR and to a lesser extent Czechoslovakia created a precedent. These countries (federations, though originally only nominally federated) basically voluntarily ceased to exist. The world had to recognize that, prohibition on border changes notwithstanding, because it would’ve been pretty retarded for the rest of the world not to recognize the independence of Ukrainem or even Russia and Czechia.

    The solution was obvious, and it was already declared at the time: that borders could, of course, change, if the issue is the breakup of a former federation or confederation (I think Yugoslavia was nominally a confederation), even if, of course, those federations were federations in name only.

    As to the question of borders, the internal borders of the former federation were recognized, and if you come to think about it, there was basically nothing else that could’ve been chosen, because other than warfare, there was no obvious solution to delineate borders any other way.

    As to commie dictators setting the borders, it’s not like other borders (like Kaliningrad or even the Hungarian border vis-à-vis Romania) weren’t set by them. (Romania fought on the side of the Axis, too, so the Americans and the British wanted to let Hungary keep a small portion of its 1940 gains, but Stalin vetoed it. The area in question was ethnically 90% Hungarian. Similar border changes could’ve been done with Slovakia, instead five villages, each of them majority Hungarian, were given to Czechoslovakia, again, a decision by Stalin.)

    Once Croatia declared independence, there was no obvious way to renegotiate borders. Yes, it sucked for the Serbs. Yes, many countries (including Hungary) were happy to see Yugoslavia broken up. But, what else could’ve been done? Would crushing the independent Croatian state have been more just in any way?

    Kosovo was totally different, because it broke any reasonable previous precedent. The stipulation that the federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina couldn’t be broken up was again contrary to the precedents just set up.

    In other words, apparently international law only applies to the Serbs when it’s bad for them.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Mr. XYZ
  268. AP says:
    @Dmitry

    If Ukraine stays poor, it might in the future, become the most pure white country in Europe (maybe ahead of even Belarus or Poland), because people whether brown or not, will not want to immigrate there.

    Ukraine doesn’t need to stay poor, it only needs to stay poorer than its neighbors. Poland is not poor, but almost all the brown people on their own prefer to settle in Germany because its a lot richer. The few Filipinos or Nepalis who come to Poland are recruited by Poland; migrants on their own choose Germany.

    Ukraine should certainly become richer, but staying less-rich than the neighbors is a price worth paying if it means avoiding a massive influx of foreigners.

  269. @AP

    USSR constitution allowed Soviet republics to leave the Union but did not allow for autonomous republics such as Crimea or Chechnya to secede from their republics

    Here’s the official source, you pinhead moron:

    https://ru.wikisource.org/wiki/%D0%97%D0%B0%D0%BA%D0%BE%D0%BD_%D0%A1%D0%A1%D0%A1%D0%A0_%D0%BE%D1%82_03.04.1990_%E2%84%96_1409-I

    Статья 3. В союзной республике, имеющей в своем составе автономные республики, автономные области и автономные округа, референдум проводится отдельно по каждой автономии. За народами автономных республик и автономных образований сохраняется право на самостоятельное решение вопроса о пребывании в Союзе ССР или в выходящей союзной республике, а также на постановку вопроса о своем государственно правовом статусе.

    And yes, technically Chechnya had a right to secede. They didn’t manage to put together a real referendum, which was their mistake.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  270. @Epigon

    A couple unrelated questions.

    How is Hungary viewed in Serbia?

    I’ve noticed some positive sentiment about Serbia among Hungarian nationalists. For example there’s a nationalist site on Facebook I’m following, and they often share pro-Serb stories from the Kosovo war. The comments are often mixed (some people are “muh Kosovo should be independent”), but it seems the majority supports Serbs against Muslims. The cases of older battles (like János Hunyadi) are often brought up in that context, too. Also, there’s a positive reputation of Serbs as tough warriors.

    Also, there’s Zoltán Dani, who’s become a minor celebrity in nationalist circles. Apparently he modified his radar in contravention of orders from the Serb high command. It was not really his personal idea (other commanders clearly would’ve done so, had they been permitted), but only he broke the orders prohibiting it.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @Epigon
  271. @AP

    USSR constitution allowed Soviet republics to leave the Union but did not allow for autonomous republics such as Crimea or Chechnya to secede from their republics

    Here’s the proof, you pinhead moron:

    https://ru.wikisource.org/wiki/%D0%97%D0%B0%D0%BA%D0%BE%D0%BD_%D0%A1%D0%A1%D0%A1%D0%A0_%D0%BE%D1%82_03.04.1990_%E2%84%96_1409-I

    Статья 3. В союзной республике, имеющей в своем составе автономные республики, автономные области и автономные округа, референдум проводится отдельно по каждой автономии. За народами автономных республик и автономных образований сохраняется право на самостоятельное решение вопроса о пребывании в Союзе ССР или в выходящей союзной республике, а также на постановку вопроса о своем государственно правовом статусе.

    And yes, Chechnya technically had a right to secede, if they had managed to put together a real referendum.

    • Replies: @AP
  272. @AP

    USSR constitution allowed Soviet republics to leave the Union but did not allow for autonomous republics such as Crimea or Chechnya to secede from their republics

    Here’s the proof, you pinhead moron:

    https://ru.wikisource.org/wiki/%D0%97%D0%B0%D0%BA%D0%BE%D0%BD_%D0%A1%D0%A1%D0%A1%D0%A0_%D0%BE%D1%82_03.04.1990_%E2%84%96_1409-I

    Статья 3. В союзной республике, имеющей в своем составе автономные республики, автономные области и автономные округа, референдум проводится отдельно по каждой автономии. За народами автономных республик и автономных образований сохраняется право на самостоятельное решение вопроса о пребывании в Союзе ССР или в выходящей союзной республике, а также на постановку вопроса о своем государственно правовом статусе.

    And yes, Chechnya technically had a right to secede, if they had managed to put together a real referendum.

  273. @reiner Tor

    There was also the case of the Hungarian foreign minister making a cameo appearance at the Serb president’s rally.

  274. Epigon says:
    @reiner Tor

    Those in power are trying to build good relations with Hungary for a multitude of reasons.
    The first is that Orban and his policies are probably perceived as an ideal for Serbian transition. Hungary is perceived as a nation hit with hardships and historic injustice that managed to accomplish its goals, stabilize and preserve sovereignity.

    The second is the sizable Hungarian minority in Vojvodina. It is far better to court Hungarian ethnic politicians and minority in concert with Orban than, as was previously the case, to leave Democratic Party (DS) = Titoist-turned-Euroatlanticist Globohomo fifth column form a coalition with Croats and Hungarians and promote “autonomist”=separatist policies there.

    Third – Serbia needs at least some good relations with neighbouring people. This goes as far as current government proclaiming Hungary as Serbia’s greatest ally inside EU. There is obvious trouble on every other front – Shqiptar narcoterrorist dogs are ready to be unleashed by their Atlanticist masters, Bosniak rhetorics and political scene is still in wartime ideological and spiritual mobilization (utterly subhuman political scene and major parties, with few exceptions), Croats were given a bianco cheque long time ago to say and do whatever they want by the West (blow up a Serb house, charge the expenses on the expelled, then confiscate the property for not paying the fine or clearing rubble, ignore Vienna accords on reimbursement of property etc etc) while a more recent development had been Atlanticist soft coups in Montenegro (Bosniaks+Croats+Albanians+Montenegrins which are a mix of Titoist and WW2 Ustashe sidekick fans) and Northern Macedonia – CryptoBulgar Zaev + Albanians vs. centrist/nationalist Slav Macedonian VMRO – you guessed it correctly, there was an immediate gay pride there.

    Fourth, Serbia and Hungary are important transit countries for the international and in the future, Chinese cargo coming from Thessaloniki port. Highways are built, railways are modernized to link up Aegean coast through Serbia to Hungary and onward. At the moment, the Hungary-Serbia route vastly outperforms Slovenia-Croatia-Serbia one.

    Emphasis is put on Hungarian FM commiting suicide for violation of non-aggression pact in 1941, on late Medieval cooperation against Turks and Serbs taking refuge in Hungarian lands or entering military service of Hungarian rulers.
    Naturally, WW1 and WW2 can’t be glossed over, raids and reprisals in Novi Sad etc. but in the recent years finally there has been a definitive effort to portray Hungarians as the least problematic of former Serb enemies – seeing how Trianon predated treatment of Serbia by Communists and West, and how Croats and Bosniaks in Austrian uniform were far worse and more numerous in WW1, let alone their crimes during WW2.

    Serbia doesn’t need Hungarian withdrawal of Kosovo recognition, it needs Hungary as a balancing, pro-sovereignity neighbour that opposes Berlin and worst of Globohomo excesses.

  275. Mikhail says: • Website
    @reiner Tor

    Following up on this discussion, Tito granted Kosovo autonomy within the Serb republic. In turn, Albanian nationalists say this is a basis for Kosovo to leave Yugo/Serbia, adding that Kosovo was represented in the Yugo parliament like other republics. I don’t sense that spin is giving a complete picture.

    By 1989, that autonomy was ended in a a move that had the support of all of the Yugo republics, including some Albanians. Between 1974-89 growing lawlessness occurred in Kosovo, somewhat akin to what Chechnya experienced when it had great autonomy in two different instances circa 1990s.

    • Replies: @Epigon
  276. Mikhail says: • Website
    @anonymous coward

    If I’m not offhand mistaken, Chechnya had a referendum on its status, following (if I’m not mistaken) the two wars there in the 1990s. The result favored remaining in Russia. Of course, the West at large pooh poohed that vote. Notwithstanding, the appeal for Chechen separatism dissipated upon seeing what happened under Dudayev and Maskhadov.

    Under Kadyrov, Chechnya has (comparatively speaking) relative stability along with increased funding from Russia. Among the experts, there’s the belief that at some point, Chechnya could spiral towards a violent separatist streak.

    • Replies: @Epigon
  277. Epigon says:
    @Mikhail

    The autonomy of both autonomous provinces of Serbia – Vojvodina + Kosovo&Metohija wasn’t ended in 1989. Whoever claims so is ignorant or a propagandist.
    What did happen were Constitutional amendments that rectified the situation where Serbia as a republic had no soveregnity and legal authority over its de iure territory while the autonomous provinces exercised legal authority both in their respective territory and in Serbian affairs, Serbian territory.
    The autonomy remained to this day, as in case of Vojvodina – NATO invasion and peace agreement dismantled the autonomous province of K&M.

    The provinces were established by an anti-Serb Croat communist who spent WW1 invading Serbia in Austrian uniform and Interbellum agitating against Serbs and praising Ustashe among others. So instead of organising historical provinces of Slavonia or Dalmatia (never part of Croatia proper during history) he disembowelled Serbia.
    When war against Axis came in April 1941, he and the rest of his vermin like Kardelj greeted it because it was the downfall of “Versailles Serb imperialist government and oppression”.
    During WW2 Tito forbade fighting against Axis aligned Albanians and their atrocities in Kosovo.
    In WW2 aftermath, Tito and Kardelj forbade the return of Serbs who fled from there, and explicitly promised to deliver the region to Albania (!) which is proven in correspondence and meetings with Stalin.
    Every single tribal subhuman who fled “persecution” from Hoxha Albania was welcomed, and over time were given subsidies, educational, linguistic and cultural autonomy.
    So Shqiptar population exploded in west Macedonia and Kosovo as a result and today we suffer the consequences.

    Serbia was cut down to size by an international coalition comprising both German/continental hegemonists, Angloatlanticist globalists and Islamofascists from Middle East – seriously, look up on how Iran, Turkey, Qatar, KSA all worked together in the Balkans, Bosnia and Kosovo.
    The first half had been terrible for Serbs, including the coup/colour revolution, the organized crime and privatizations overseen by Euroatlanticist puppets installed in the aftermath, really Russian ‘90s on steroids.

    There will be a second halftime – the sun rises in the East (Serbia is thoroughly aligned with Russia and China, unlike the rest of Europe) while it will hopefully set in the brown, pozzed, degenerate West that supports the scum surrounding us. It may take 20, 50, 100, 200 years – the Ottoman rule lasted as much and we didn’t give up.
    But the score will be settled in the end.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  278. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Epigon

    Okay. Thanks for clarifying. Noteworthy that Krajina didn’t have autonomy within Yugoslavia.

    • Replies: @Epigon
  279. Epigon says:
    @Mikhail

    And the downside to TOS-1A-ing hypothetical separatist/terrorist uprising in 95+% Chechnya would be?

    My guess is that Russian nationalists would sign up for Mahachkala to be MLRSed to the ground as well.

    But this isn’t the 1990s, this isn’t the Russian Federation of 1990s, and this Russian Army wouldn’t send its tanks with ERA tiles empty no ammo loaded and no covering infantry to cities as a display of force – and the uppity savages and tribals are aware of this.

    There also wouldn’t be enough Russian hostages to be used as live shields.

  280. Epigon says:
    @Mikhail

    There was no Krajina in Yugoslavia because the modern borders were not international, ratified but instead internal administrative borders.
    In addition, the Constitution of Socialist Croatia named Croats and Serbs as Constitutional nations in Croatia with equal rights because Serbs bore the brunt of actual antifascist/resistance against Axis during the war, while Croats were… Axis soldiers and volunteers – more than 300 thousands went through Axis military service during the war.

    Naturally, 1990-1991 came, the Constitution was changed and the green light was given by the West for a separatist war (it was Germans – Genscher-Kohl, and Vatican who initially lobbied for recognition of independence of Slovenia, Croatia – Americans and Brits jumped on board later and overtook the operation politically, even though CIA is implicated in the downfall of Yugoslavia since early 1980s).

  281. AP says:
    @anonymous coward

    There were adopted only in 1990, as the USSR was crumbling and after the Communist Party was no longer given a monopoly on power.

    The (technical) right of the Republics to secede was baked in much earlier.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @reiner Tor
  282. AP says:
    @AP

    The 1936 Constitution:

    ARTICLE 17. To every Union Republic is reserved the right freely to secede from the U.S.S.R.

    ARTICLE 18. The territory of a Union Republic may not be altered without its consent.

    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::

    But actually, your argument is stupid because the Soviet Constitution was no longer in force in Ukraine after independence so the 1990 additions were irrelevant.

    The process of an autonomous republic such as Crimea becoming independent involved approval from the Supreme Soviet and other organs that no longer existed after the USSR became defunct. Therefore, Chechnya or Crimea no longer had any legal right to independence. The process as detailed in the 1990 Constitution was no longer possible. For Crimea to have become legally independent, it would have had to do so after 1990 (prior ot that only the Republics themselves had that right) but while the USSR still existed.

    Here are the laws:

    [MORE]

    http://soviethistory.msu.edu/1991-2/shevarnadze-resigns/shevarnadze-resigns-texts/law-on-secession-from-the-ussr/

    Article 7. The Union republic Supreme Soviet submits the results of the referendum to the USSR Supreme Soviet. The Supreme Soviet of a Union republic possessing within its structure autonomous republics, autonomous formations, or places densely populated by the ethnic groups mentioned in Part 2 of Article 3 of the present law submits to the USSR Supreme Soviet the results of the referendum for each autonomous republic and for each autonomous formation or place densely populated by ethnic groups along with the conclusions and proposals of the relevant organs of state power.

    If it is established that the referendum was carried out in accordance with the law, the USSR Supreme Soviet submits the questions for examination by the Congress of USSR’s People’s Deputies.

    In the event of a violation of the law in holding the referendum the USSR Supreme Soviet schedules within a three-month period a repeat referendum for the republic, or for part of the republic, or for the autonomous formation, of for the place densely populated by the ethnic groups mentioned in Part 2 of Article 3 of the present law.

    Article 8. Within one month the USSR Supreme Soviet sends the results of the referendum on the Union republics’s secession from the USSR and the proposals received from interested parties to the supreme organs of state power of all Union and autonomous republics and also to the organs of state power of autonomous formations for study and evaluation of the consequences arising for each Union and autonomous republic and autonomous formation from the fact of the possible secession of the Union republic in question from the USSR.

    Article 9. The Congress of USSR People’s Deputies examines the results of the referendum in the Union republic on the question of secession from the USSR, and also the opinions of the supreme organs of state power of Union and autonomous republics and the organs of state power of autonomous oblasts and okrugs regarding this matter. At the submission of the USSR Supreme Soviet, coordinated with the Supreme Soviet of the seceding republic, the Congress of USSR’s People’s Deputies lays down a transitional period not exceeding five years within which questions arising in connection with the republic’s secession from the USSR must be resolved.

    The USSR Constitution and USSR laws retain their force on the seceding republic’s territory during the transitional period.

  283. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Not Raul

    You’re quite welcome.

  284. @AP

    I cannot speak Russian, so maybe I’m totally mistaken, but English language sources usually state that autonomous republics (as opposed to oblasts) had the right to decide whether to remain within the USSR in the event of the SSR in question leaving the USSR. So for example in the event of the Georgian SSR deciding to leave the USSR, the ASSRs within Georgia (like Abkhazia or South Ossetia) could decide whether to stay within the USSR (thus leaving Georgia). But it’s unclear from the language if they had the right to secede from both. (Or rather, English language sources don’t say that it had such a right.) Also, it only had this right in the context of the republic in question leaving the USSR: so the moment Ukraine decided to leave the USSR, theoretically speaking, Crimea had the right to secede from Ukraine and remain in the USSR. But it had to be exercised immediately, because, as you mention in your later comment, once Ukraine left the USSR, all USSR laws left their relevance. Also, at least with Google Translate (Russian speakers could feel free to correct me on that one), that’s what the passage seems to imply.

    In other words, such a right of ASSRs to stay within the USSR (even if their SSR left it) is totally irrelevant to Crimea seceding from Ukraine in 2014, over 22 years after the dissolution fo the USSR.

  285. @anonymous coward

    You’re retarded.

    I love you, too.

    The citizens of Crimea voted in a referendum to leave Ukraine and join Russia not once, but twice in a space of 25 years.

    I know of one such referendum, in March 2014. When was the other one?

    Call the annexation of Crimea whatever you want, but one thing it is definitely, definitely not is illegal according to international law.

    Well, Russian troops were not allowed to detain Ukrainian citizens (especially not Ukrainian soldiers), which they did illegally prior to the referendum. The referendum itself was organized by the Russian troops, and it seems unclear whether the local elected politicians even wanted it to happen. (Not because, deep down in their hearts, they didn’t want it, but because they were cowards.) It was organized very quickly, so there was no time for the citizens to consider the questions. There might have been other irregularities with vote counts.

    It was definitely illegal, based on just the bold parts.

  286. @Mitleser

    Taiping island is a rock with a runway on it. It’s not more inhabited than Antarctica, with some military personnel always present. Okay, it’s more habitable than Antarctica, but it’s not even a proper airbase.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  287. melanf says:
    @AP

    1. Ukraine is one of the whitest places on the planet,much more so than wherever you live. Jealous?

    Oh, Yes, incredibly Jealous. But Ukrainians (begging money from Europe) have strong competitors. It is 100% white, very Christian, 100% non-Muslim Irish Gypsies (Irish Travellers).

    It is obvious that Ukrainians and Irish Gypsies represent two highest peaks of the European civilization, and are absolute Champions of truly European spirit. But it’s hard to say which among this whitest Nations causes greatest envy and admiration.

    • Replies: @AP
  288. melanf says:
    @reiner Tor

    I know of one such referendum, in March 2014. When was the other one?

    referendum on January 20, 1991 (81% turnout, 93% voted for secession from Ukraine).

    There were 2 more referendum attempts (initiated by the Crimean Parliament), but the Ukrainian authorities blocked these attempts.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  289. @melanf

    referendum on January 20, 1991 (81% turnout, 93% voted for secession from Ukraine).

    This was not for independence, nor for secession from Ukraine. It was for the re-establishment of the Crimean ASSR. And, lo and behold, it was re-established.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1991_Crimean_sovereignty_referendum

    It was emphatically not about secession from the Ukrainian SSR and joining the RSFSR. Especially not about leaving independent Ukraine and joining the equally independent Russian Federation.

    I’m not saying that that’s not what Crimea’s inhabitants wanted, but certainly they didn’t have a referendum about it in 1991.

    • Replies: @melanf
  290. melanf says:
    @reiner Tor

    This was not for independence, nor for secession from Ukraine.

    It was a referendum on secession from Ukraine.
    (residents of Crimea voted for granting Crimea the status of the Union Republic of the USSR i.e. for secession from Ukraine )

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  291. @melanf

    Based on my non-existing Russian skills, it appears to me that the English translation in Wikipedia is basically good.

    Do you support re-establishing the Crimean Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic as a subject of the Union SSR and a participant of the Union Treaty?

    As explained previously, all ASSRs were subject to the SSSR (СССР) Union Treaty. However, ASSRs were also parts of SSRs. The question clearly wants to establish an ASSR within an already existing SSR. Since it asks nothing about leaving the Ukrainian SSR, or joining another SSR (the RSFSR or any other SSR) it’s obviously not about leaving Ukraine, nor about joining Russia. Nor is it about establishing a separate SSR, because the question clearly refers to an ASSR. (Even I can read Крымской Автономной Советской Социалистической Республики, which is maybe the objective case or something similar of Crimean Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic. So, Crimean ASSR.)

    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @AP
    , @anonymous coward
    , @melanf
  292. AP says:
    @melanf

    Ireland still isn’t as European as Ukraine.

    And one can easily find pictures of poor Russians (or Ukrainians), so?

    I think the white nationalist would like the travellers very much though.

    • Replies: @melanf
  293. AP says:
    @reiner Tor

    You are correct of course.

    Melanf deliberately mistranslated.

    This was the first step towards eventual independence, or union with Russia, according to Soviet laws.

    Once an ASSR was established, the ASSR could then opt to become a separate SSR or to leave the USSR, based on approval from the higher Soviet authorities.

    However the Soviet Union disappeared before the next steps could be fulfilled. So legally there was no right for independence after that.

  294. @reiner Tor

    I know of one such referendum, in March 2014. When was the other one?

    In 1991: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1991_Crimean_sovereignty_referendum

    Technically, according to the letter of the law, it is Ukraine that was illegally occupying Crimea from 1991 to 2014.

    This is a fact.

    (A rather pointless fact due to the fact that there is no such thing as “international law”, in international affairs might makes right, but a fact nonetheless.)

    The referendum itself was organized by the Russian troops

    What?? Where did you get this moronic factoid from?

    The Russian troops don’t own polling stations nor do they have vote counters.

  295. @reiner Tor

    Since it asks nothing about leaving the Ukrainian SSR, or joining another SSR (the RSFSR or any other SSR) it’s obviously not about leaving Ukraine, nor about joining Russia.

    The question is 100% clear and unambiguous. It’s asking whether Crimea should be a republic of the USSR equal in status to Ukraine.

    because the question clearly refers to an ASSR

    The ‘A’ here doesn’t mean anything.

  296. melanf says:
    @reiner Tor

    it appears to me that the English translation in Wikipedia is basically good.

    Do you support re-establishing the Crimean Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic as a subject of the Union SSR and a participant of the Union Treaty?

    That’s right.

    As explained previously, all ASSRs were subject to the SSSR (СССР) Union Treaty.

    This is casuistry. These words “as a subject of the Union SSR and a participant of the Union Treaty” (if we do without legal tricks) have a clear meaning (secession from Ukraine), and residents of the Crimea voted in 1991 for it.

    • Replies: @AP
  297. AP says:
    @melanf

    Autonomous by definition was an ASSR that was part of an SSR.

    • Replies: @melanf
  298. melanf says:
    @AP

    Ireland still isn’t as European as Ukraine.

    Well, sure. But I was not talking about the Irish, but about the Irish Gypsies (this is a special people).

    Irish Gypsies (unlike normal Irish) are the same Europeans as Ukrainians – they are 100% white, very Christian, 100% non-Muslims, also begging for money (though on an individual not at the state level). Undoubtedly, both Irish Gypsies and Ukrainians should become the idol of European nationalists, as well as the object of envy. After all, both ethnos are 100% white.

    And one can easily find pictures of poor Russians

    You can, but for what purpose? unlike Ukrainians and Gypsies we are not Europeans and we do not beg money from Europe

    • Replies: @AP
  299. melanf says:
    @AP

    Autonomous by definition was an ASSR that was part of an SSR.

    The Autonomous republics were not parties to the Union Treaty.

    Well and if “by definition” why it was to bring in the Bulletin on a referendum?

    • Replies: @AP
  300. Mikhail says: • Website
    @reiner Tor

    What came first? In Kiev, a democratically elected president was overthrown by a group which included violent nationalist anti-Russians. Crimea is pro-Russian by a well over 2/3 majority.

    Might essentially makes right in international affairs, with Western action in Kosovo and lame stance on northern Cyprus highlighting the hypocrisy on Crimea. Numerous non-partisan polling confirms Crimea favoring its reunification with Russia.

    Concerning that referendum and other tangential issues:

    https://www.academia.edu/37358188/Michael_Averko_Consistency_and_Reality_Lacking_on_Crimea

  301. Mikhail says: • Website
    @reiner Tor

    What came first? In Kiev, a democratically elected president was overthrown by a group which included violent nationalist anti-Russians. Crimea is pro-Russian by a well over 2/3 majority.

    Might essentially makes right in international affairs, with Western action in Kosovo and lame stance on northern Cyprus highlighting the hypocrisy over Crimea. Numerous non-partisan polling confirms Crimea favoring its reunification with Russia.

    Concerning that referendum and other tangential issues:

    https://www.academia.edu/37358188/Michael_Averko_Consistency_and_Reality_Lacking_on_Crimea

  302. Mitleser says:
    @reiner Tor

    The government of the Philippines argues in its arbitration case that none of the features in the Spratly Islands are capable of sustaining human habitation or economic life of their own, and are therefore legally “rocks.” This includes Itu Aba, the largest feature in the Spratlys. Accordingly, none of the features generate maritime entitlements beyond a 12-nautical-mile territorial sea. The Philippines’ claim is based on a number of arguments, including: (1) there is no fresh water on the island suitable for drinking or capable of sustaining a human settlement; and (2) there is no soil on the island capable of facilitating any kind of agricultural production that could sustain human habitation.

    In accordance with Article 9 of Annex VII of UNCLOS, “[b]efore making its award, the arbitral tribunal must satisfy itself not only that it has jurisdiction over the dispute but also that the claim is well founded in fact and law.” Is the Philippines’ claim regarding fresh water and soil on Taiping Island well founded in fact? In my experience, no. On my four visits to Itu Aba, I ate crops grown on the island and drank from the skimming water well located near its small hospital.

    It is interesting to note the reasons given by Professor Clive Schofield of the University of Wollongong, Australia, who spoke as an expert witness during the oral hearings at The Hague, to explain his change of opinion concerning the legal status of Itu Aba. Schofield previously wrote that “water supply might be one of the most important factors in clarifying the situation [legal status of an island or a rock]. This is because the existence of fresh water is an important indication that human habitation could be sustained.” At that time, he was of the opinion that Itu Aba “may conceivably” be considered a full-fledged island. But during the hearing, Schofield said his “firm belief” is that Itu Aba is a “rock.” Why the sudden change? It seems he accepted the so-called “most authoritative evidence” provided by the Philippines’ legal team.

    During my four visits to Itu Aba, I have seen indigenous plants that are more than 32 feet (10 meters) tall. There is a nearly 4,000-foot (1,200-meter) runway, two piers, a guest-house building, a postal office, a small hospital, a big agricultural garden, livestock, and a temple. In addition to drinkable water that is available at the four skimming wells, indigenous soil on the island has also long been used for growing fruits, including banana, coconut, and papaya, and vegetables such as wild bitter squash, loofah, and cabbage. It should also be noted that internet and cell phone access are available on Itu Aba, along with solar power for electricity.

    https://amti.csis.org/is-there-drinkable-water-and-topsoil-on-itu-aba/

  303. Mr. XYZ says:
    @AP

    So Ashkenazi Jews aren’t white in your world? Here is Ukraine’s “Non-white” President:

    If Jews are White, why not a lot of Tajiks, Pashtuns, Turks, Persians, Arabs, and Berbers as well? I mean, the US Census Bureau still classifies all Middle Easterners and North Africans as White to this very day.

    Granted, some Middle Easterners don’t look that White (such as Saudi Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman), but some do look very White–such as former Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki:

    https://www.thenational.ae/image/policy:1.740192:1528988169/image/2018-05-12T045859Z_267487080_RC16578B3F90_RTRMADP_3_IRAQ-ELECTION.JPG?f=16×9&w=1200&$p$f$w=59c0873

  304. Mr. XYZ says:
    @reiner Tor

    (Romania fought on the side of the Axis, too, so the Americans and the British wanted to let Hungary keep a small portion of its 1940 gains, but Stalin vetoed it. The area in question was ethnically 90% Hungarian.

    Do you have a map of the Anglo-American proposals in regards to this?

    As for the small Czechoslovak annexations after WWII, were they done in order to make Bratislava more defensible in the event that Hungary will ever go rogue again? Or were they done simply to give Czechoslovakia better access to the Danube?

  305. AP says:
    @melanf

    After 1990 the reforms they were able to negotiate with the Union.

  306. AP says:
    @melanf

    Well, sure. But I was not talking about the Irish, but about the Irish Gypsies (this is a special people).

    The issue is countries. Ukraine, the country, is whiter than Ireland, the country. Ukraine and Belarus are probably the whitest places on Earth.

    Every country in Europe has ethnic groups who are white. Germany has Germans, Britain has English, Welsh, Ireland has Irish and these gypsies, etc. But Ukraine has only white ethnic groups (at least, 99.9% of them) unlike those other countries.

    Irish Gypsies (unlike normal Irish) are the same Europeans as Ukrainians

    So are ethnic Irish, Germans, etc. So? There is no country of Irish gypsies.

    But if there was an Irish Gypsy state where 99.9% of the population were those blonde Irish gypsies, white nationalists should be envious of it and it would be very funny of they made fun of it.

    • Replies: @melanf
  307. melanf says:
    @AP

    The issue is countries. Ukraine, the country….

    That’s a valid argument. In fact, if the Irish gypsies had their own state, it would be on the same level of “Europeanism” with Ukraine. But since there is no such state, Ukraine has no rivals.

    Ukraine and Belarus are probably the whitest places on Earth.

    If the country – Belarus, not Ukraine. And the Faroe Islands. If places – there are many such places. If through assessment of the whitest places to take into account nordicmania (typical for nationalists), Ukraine immediately eliminated from the competition.

    • Replies: @AP
  308. AP says:
    @melanf

    In fact, if the Irish gypsies had their own state, it would be on the same level of “Europeanism” with Ukraine.

    Not really, they wouldn’t run pretty and large cities like Lviv, build missiles, etc.

    You seem to have been triggered by my comment though.

    If the country – Belarus, not Ukraine.

    No real difference. With Crimea and Donbas (the most “diverse part of Ukraine after Crimea, though not very diverse) gone thanks to Russia, Ukraine is about 99.95 % European, Belarus about 99.97 or whatever.

    And the Faroe Islands.

    No. There are about 360 out of 48,000 people speaking Asian, African or Middle Eastern languages there. So it’s about the same % as in Ukraine.

  309. Anounder says:
    @reiner Tor

    Pre-state societies (called “hunter-gatherers) are at least as violent as Negroes in Detroit.

    The notion of the peace-loving affluent savage is discredited as the degeneracy it is.

  310. Anounder says:

    What the hell? Unz fucked up on me. Someone delete all the unneeded posts.

  311. @Anounder

    But they don’t spend their days in an office worrying about the bottom line and corporate boardroom intrigue. They do worry about getting murdered, but then they spend enough time resting and sunbathing that they will be overall happier and less in need of meditation.

  312. Anounder says:

    But they don’t spend their days in an office worrying about the bottom line and corporate boardroom intrigue.

    No, they worry about not starving and other little things like that.

    They do worry about getting murdered, but then they spend enough time resting and sunbathing that they will be overall happier and less in need of meditation.

    You’re just regurgitating the old primitive affluence narrative.

    https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/ted-kaczynski-the-truth-about-primitive-life-a-critique-of-anarchoprimitivism

    Enough to say there was never utopia. No “better world.”

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