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moscow-night-river

My very busy period has mostly come to an end so I should have more material soon.

One of the best blogs on the Ukraine a few years ago was The Austere Insomniac (even if at least one commenter here will beg to differ). Good news! It’s been resurrected: https://insomniacresurrected.com/

***

Featured

take-land-brazil

* Bolsonaro is now 90% likely to become Brazil Prez according to latest PredictIt numbers.

* Brian Winter: Who is Mr. Bolsonaro? (h/t Polish Perspective)

* Glenn Greenwald: The Stunning Rise of Brazil’s Far Right and What It Shows About Western Democracies. As in the West, it is centrist collapse that has opened up space for the far right.

* India buys 5 S-400 systems from Russia. US threatens sanctions.

* New IPCC report: World heading for 3C of warming. All the usual wailing and gnashing of teeth… but 3C is pretty much the sweet spot for maximizing the planet’s primary productivity.

* Nature: Japan approves human embryo genetic editing

* Rod Dreher: Prelude To A New Civil War?

* Psychology Today: “She has her fox’s laugh“. Commenter AP suggests that domesticated Russian foxes should get the same protections that dogs do.

* Bloomberg: Massive Chinese hack of US tech using compromised chips. But what about muh Russian hackers?

* The ADL has finally noticed Ron Unz’s American Pravda.

***

Russia

* Leonid Bershidsky: 38D Chess? Russia’s clumsy Brit-baiting might be clever plan to cajole Russians to repatriate their offshore money. In that sense, GRU incompetence may not mean that much.

* First victim of British laws on confiscating dodgy wealth? An Azeri woman who spent $20 million at Harrods, who just happens to be the wife of an Azeri banker who fell out with the West-friendly Aliyev regime. It pays to be cynical about these things. The Tories are far too invested in London’s high end real estate market to jeopardize their global clients, however much Putin wants to cajole them into it.

* Emigre Russian tycoon flees MI6 death squads back to Russia.

* Ajay Goyal: Is Moscow the best major city in Europe? This Indian expat thinks yes. (Goyal is an Indian who is well-known in Moscow expat circles).

* Paul Robinson: Khodorkovsky-funded scholar wants to cut funding for study of Russian history and culture, refocus on “Russia’s authoritarianism, kleptocracy and corrupt practices”

* WSJ: Melting ice is opening up the Arctic Ocean to shipping. But lack of infrastructure impedes full exploitation. Tropical Hyperborea slightly delayed.

* New KIIS poll: Ukrainian approval of Russia reaches 48%, the highest it has been since 2014 (disapproval: 32%), though far lower than the 80%+ before that. Russian approval of the Ukraine remains at 33%.

* NORTHERN GABON. Measles rages in the Ukraine (33,000 infected this year). But not a problem in Russia or Belorussia. What’s the matter with these Ukrainians?

* Huge ammo dump exploded in the Ukraine. Ukrs predictably blame their God (Putin)… but it’s basically a yearly occurrence in the Ukraine (and in Russia until several years ago). Smoking, drinking, and gunpowder don’t mix well.

* Bershidsky: “Pro-Russian party” that “won” Latvian elections (apostrophes because they got 20% of the vote and will be excluded as usual) backs EU stance on Russia

* Israel Shamir’s pretty weak defense of Bolshevism. Today’s article on that subject from Mark Weber is stronger.

* Vzglyad: Kiev preparing to topple Alexander Suvorov monument [in Russian]. As I said, these people don’t stop at Lenin monuments. That is why I always say that svidomy is a subset of sovok. Bolshevism in a vyshyvanka.

***

Geopolitics

* RT: BRICS inventor Jim O’Neill: US dollar “overrated”. USA is <20% of world GDP but USD constitutes >60% of global reserve currencies.

* Outgoing warhawk US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley is a “moderate”… according to the NYT

* QZ: British wargaming cyberattacks to black out Moscow if Russia attacks Estonia or “takes control of Libya’s oil reserves”… okay, first one is logical enough, but the second – hilarious thing is, both the US and Russia support the same guy in Libya.

* BLAST FROM THE PAST. So about Jamal Khashoggi… CNN last year: Saudi Arabia’s MBS got classified US info on disloyal royals from Kushner, boasted Trump’s son-in-law was “in his pocket”. I’m sure he’s safe.

***

World

* Guillaume Durocher: Victory, Italian-Style. This “red-brown” alliance is surprisingly successful… alt left answers for economy, alt right handles foreign policy, the globalists get stumped.

* Marine Le Pen and Caesar Salvini distance themselves from Sloppy Steve.

* Steve Sailer: Nationalism isn’t taboo in Israel, so it’s drawing some of the best thinkers

* Turkish demographer predicts Turkey will have 6 million Syrians by next decade (7.5%+ of the population) (h/t German_reader)

* Greece wants $280 billion in gibsmedats WW2 reparations from Germany.

* PEW: American confidence in Pope Francis plummeting amidst pedophilia scandals

* Audacious Epigone: Support for affirmative action by race

* VDARE: “Rape culture”: Brett Kavanaugh… or the Cologne rape spree (2000 victims) and Rotherham grooming scandal

***

Politics

* Facebook and Twitter have recently deplatformed hundreds of political pages.

* On that note, New Samizdat looks like an interesting project (looks like a sort of Drudge Report for alt media), even if it is funded by RT. Powerful Deus Ex vibes.

* The Atlantic: Silent majority (80%) of Americans view political correctness as a problem, including youth. Woke SJWs a small but loud minority.

* Antifa militants patrol streets of Portland, Oregon.

* Politico: Trump is literally triggering libs into insanity lol.

* 1,015 new cases of female genital mutilation against children in England in last 3 months (!!)

* Breitbart: “The Good Censor”: Leaked Google Briefing Admits Abandonment of Free Speech for “Safety And Civility”

* Greek City Times: Huge Christian cross on Greek coast built to commemorate drowned refugees torn down so as not to offend (presumably surviving) non-Christian refugees

***

Science & Culture

* Marginal Revolution: Improving But Not Learning by Doing. Technological improvements can happen without increased understanding – “theory” sometimes even slows progress down.

* Boston Dynamic’s Atlas robot does parkour:

* Emil Kirkegaard: On the East Asian > White advantage on scholastic tests

* OWN GOAL. Toby Young: “This article in the @guardian correctly points out that polygenic risk scores for medical problems are based on genomic data compiled from predominantly European-descended populations. That means you cannot use these data to calculate polygenic risk scores for medical problems for people of non-European descent and that, in turn, means the beneficiaries of the preventative medical interventions based on these scores will be of European descent. The article quotes a letter Professor David Curtis, a geneticist and psychiatrist at UCL, wrote to the leaders of the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust saying that “UK medical science stands at risk of being accused of being institutionally racist”. What Professor Curtis (and Hannah Devlin, the @Guardian’s science correspondent) neglect to mention is that one reason there isn’t more genomic data on non-European populations is that social science activists campaigned against amassing such data 20 years ago. See bottom of page 531 in this essay by Jeremy Freese.

* Google shuts down Google+… I suppose the 200 people who use it will not be happy. (Unfortunately, that includes gwern).

***

Misc

* Subscribe to The Straits Times for the ULTRA LOW price of $15 per month to find out why one of their writers has 20 iPhone cases. You wouldn’t believe #7.

iphone-bugman

* BBC: ‘Quantum physics really helped me understand my queer identity.’ This is what your TV loicence pays for.

* This new NPC meme is great.

npc-meme

taylor-swift-npc

 

If you don’t get this one, you can’t call yourself a Russia expert.

npc-tolokno-dud

* Anton Shekhovtsov’s (expert on NEO-NAZISM and RUSSIAN ACTIVE MEASURES) powerful – as in Putler God of the Khokhols – take on Ukraine vs. Hungary conflict.

take-shekhovtsov-ukraine-hungary-putler

***

 
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  1. S-400 is just a small part of the India Russia arms relationship and the US knows it.

    The fact is no other country will transfer India the sort of bleeding edge stuff that Russia does.

    Nuclear Submarine tech.Russia actually leased a near state of the art Akula 2 N submarine(It is illegal to sell N Submarines) so that the Indian Navy could have first hand operational experience pending commissioning of its on N attack submarines(Almost certainly created with Russian technical hand holding).

    Hypersonic Missiles. Brahmos 2 is basically a Indian built variant of the Zircon missile.A similar arrangement exists for Brahmos and Yakhont.

    ICBMs(4th gen solid fuel tech),Cruise missiles(turbofan engine),Air to Air missiles(RF Seeker tech)etc are other examples of vast and deep technical cooperation between India and Russia.

    Also the fact that the USSR has exercised its veto FIVE times(1948 Kashmir,1961 Goa,1971 War Twice in the UNSC in India’s favour often with the vast majority voting against India)

    It is a mutually beneficial arrangement.We get state of the art tech and the Russian arms industry gets economies of scale and cold hard cash.

    Since the US has a steller record of sabotaging advanced projects of its close allies IAI Lavi(Israel),Avro Arrow(Canada),TSR 2(Well the labor government did most of the wrecking but still..),MBB Lampardyie(W Germany) it is best to avoid too much entanglement with them.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    There is nothing comparable to the S-400 from any other country to begin with, so it's a very wise purchase for many nations.

    Suppressing competition is only logical. What irritates me is that the US has rarely thought to suppress competition in civilian products.

    The Avro Arrow was as much sabotaged by the bitter enmity between Western and Eastern Canada as by American pressure.
    , @Anonymous
    It doesn't matter how much Russian tech India acquires if its military will have Indians operating the weapon systems.

    They are not much better than Saudis at war, and would most likely embarrass themselves if they tried to fight anyone other than Indian type races.

    An Indian shop keeper makes no better a warrior than a Saudi date farmer.
  2. The Bloomberg hacking story is taken as dubious by security experts due to it having lots of problems:

    https://blog.erratasec.com/2018/10/notes-on-bloomberg-supermicro-supply.html

    Black support for Affirmative Action seems pretty overwhelming in real life:

    https://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/state.php?fips=26&year=2006&f=0&off=51&elect=0

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Only an idiot or an American would believe anything told about China or Russia in the MSM.
  3. Interesting AK link above, to the Bloomberg article about Russian exile Sergei Kapchuk, fearing for his life in Britain where he had asylum, moving quietly around Europe in dazed uncertainty, and then getting terrified in Croatia where his UK travel documents were seized because the UK had apparently revoked them

    Calling Putin’s man Boris Titov for help, Kapchuk was then rescued by the Russian embassy from arrest in Croatia, Kapchuk agreeing to go back into mother Russia’s arms despite legal charges involving him there

    From the Bloomberg article, about Titov, a good vignette about Putin’s Russia:

    Back in February, Putin’s business ombudsman, Boris Titov, flew into London with an unusual offer for Kapchuk and a few dozen other wealthy Russians accused of financial crimes. At Pushkin House, a cultural center on Bloomsbury Square, Titov vowed to use the power of his office and an army of lawyers to help the men clear their names through Russian courts. All they had to do was come home.

    This leads to an intriguing area of political analysis

    It is an under-appreciated aspect of Putin that he has in fact let huge numbers of people out of Russia’s prisons early, with numbers said to be in the hundreds of thousands

    Whereas in the USA, e.g., heavy youthful pot smoker Barack Obama never thought of releasing the hundreds of thousands of weed tokers and sellers who languish in the USA’s 2.3 million prisoner gulag (about 25% of all people in jail in the entire world)

    In surprisingly rough or even ‘barbaric’ countries, there is quite often an early release of jailed political figures or even extremist ‘terrorists’, sometimes by tinpot dictatorships who yet seek to get some good PR amidst their local rabble-rousers

    It takes a real Chad to let bygones be bygones … and now after Donald Trump’s meeting with Kanye West, we have talk of Trump doing something radical re American prisons, per his dialogue with Kanye

    Trump could go down in history like ‘Abraham Lincoln ending slavery in the USA’, if he let out of jail a couple of hundred thousand of the blacks and Mexicans in the slammer for non-violent offences … that people that fake progressive black guy Obama left to languish behind bars … would be a brilliant move to embarrass the hell out of the Antifa / SJW shriekers, it might even demolish them 4evah

    • Agree: Tyrion 2
    • Replies: @Dmitry

    and now after Donald Trump’s meeting with Kanye West, we have talk of Trump doing something radical re American prisons, per his dialogue with Kanye
     
    Yes, this would be very good.

    While I think there are many sympathetic aspects about Trump's personality, however - he might unfortunately have too much "authoritarian sympathies", which seems perhaps unusual for a man of his social origin.

    In particular, this strange worship of police which you can hear in his speeches (although, from a cynical point of view, this is perhaps good politics for attracting lower middle voters in such a "police state" as America).

    Probably, one sympathetic aspect (if the only so far attractive aspect), of a future Kanye/Kim Kardashian tandem presidency, is they seem to have interest in prison reform, etc.

    , @anon
    Federal Prisons are around 6% of the total prison population in the US. Obama took a shot at minorities, and spent a lot of time and effort to find 1,000 or so to pardon. He was looking for non violent offenders who could argue that they were over sentenced due to mandatory minimums, etc. He had to exclude potential Willie Hortons. You can look it up.

    So Trump can't really do that much. Further, States have been under pressure to reduce populations and have released the 'low hanging fruit'. There aren't any casual marijuana smokers rotting in prison.

    Why are so many Americans incarcerated? Americans are free to be bad. Our underclass, for example, is armed to the teeth. Of course, everyone has their own ideas, but forget the idea that there are easy solutions.

    , @Wency
    Mass incarceration is the best approach to our criminal underclass that is available within the U.S. Overton window. The only other alternative within the Overton window, mass release, would be terrible. Our country has a weaker genetic stock than most other civilized places and needs a correspondingly harsh approach to law and order in order to keep us safe.

    People tend to conflate "nonviolent offender" with "drug offender" when they cite these stats. The guy who broke into and robbed my home was a "nonviolent offender", but I'd fully advocate keeping him in prison for the remainder of his useful life. Actually, I'd advocate hanging him, if that were in the Overton window. Home invasion is a terrible crime, violent or not.

    Maybe the government could stand to soften up on prosecution of certain drug crimes, but I'm generally OK with where things stand. Worst case, you clean up the streets a bit. Best case, you take out a lot of thieves and assorted lowlifes who can't be busted on any other charge.

    If Trump decided to go soft on law and order and engage in mass pardons, I'd consider it a betrayal of the highest order and would fully support the efforts of Democrats to impeach him. Trump would gain virtually no support for the move but most of his base would abandon him.
  4. As an American, I am appalled by the Ukrainian decision to tear down the Suvorov monument.

    He is more than just a Russian hero – he is a hero for all of European Christian civilization, just like Charles Martel and John Sobieski.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Shortly after the coup against Yanukovych, a monument in Ukraine honoring Kutuzov was demolished. Kutuzov had a presence in Ukraine at a time when the ancestors of modern day Ukrainians were (in overall terms) supportive of Russia - whether in the Austrian Empire or Russian Empire.
  5. The Tories are far too invested in London’s high end real estate market to jeopardize their global clients

    you’d think so and on the face of it the most likely explanation is simply one faction of banksters taking out a rival but i wonder if it may be a sign the London banking mafia are ready to let UK house prices collapse.

    (they needed to keep house prices up while the banks got rid of all their toxic debt from the 2008 crash and one part of that was turning a blind eye to crooks using the high end London property market to launder money).

  6. This new NPC meme is great.

    one of the odd things about “Fight Club” when it came out was how there were all these bright white dudes working low wage jobs

    and now c. 20 years later almost all the cultural creativity in the USA is concentrated in a few thousand alt-righters and i wouldn’t be surprised if half of them were working jobs like that (like #skyking)

    Fight Club was prophecy.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    What does NPC mean? I've seen it several times in the last couple days, but haven't been able to figure it out.
    , @Toronto Russian

    and now c. 20 years later almost all the cultural creativity in the USA is concentrated in a few thousand alt-righters
     
    This stuff isn't original, lol. A sociopathic Harry Potter in Yudkowsky's fanfic (isn't he a leftist?) refers to other people as NPC.

    HPMOR is full of ideas I find incredibly suspect- the only character trait worth anything in the story (both implicitly and explicitly) is intelligence, and the primary use of intelligence within the story is manipulation. This leads to cloying levels of a sort of nerd elitism. Ron and Hagrid are basically dismissed out of hand in this story (Ron explicitly as being useless, Hagrid implicitly so) because they aren’t intelligent enough, and Hariezer explicitly draws implicit NPC vs real-people distinctions.

    The world itself is constructed to back up these assertions- nothing in the wizarding world makes much sense, and characters often behave in silly ways (”like NPCs”) to be a foil for Hariezer.
    https://danluu.com/su3su2u1/hpmor/
     
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Worth elaborating - the NPC meme was partially inspired by studies that a number of humans lack inner speech. This often is assumed to be a general lack of thought, and therefore the idea of action/reaction without consideration:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/pristine-inner-experience/201110/not-everyone-conducts-inner-speech
  7. Next US UN Ambassador

    From the leading US foreign policy establishment realist venue:

    https://nationalinterest.org/feature/race-replace-nikki-haley-33096?page=0%2C1

    The above piece downplays Heather Nauert’s foreign policy shortcomings. Based on Trump’s disappointing performance (from the viewpoint agreeing with much of his foreign policy comments before he became president), don’t be surprised to see the establishment leaning Nauert get the position of US ambassador to the UN.

    Rand Paul is the best suggestion in the above linked piece. The article ends with Trump saying that he’s looking at many competent folks to replace Nikki Haley at the UN. If so, there’s no excuse to not consider Jim Jatras and Tulsi Gabbard as previously recommended:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/12042017-latest-bump-in-us-russian-relations-analysis/

    At issue is how the views of Paul, Jatras and Gabbard appear to differ a bit with the Trump administration likes of Mike Pompeo and John Bolton. Notwithstanding, it’s politically healthy for a US president to have diverse views within the administration.

    An accurately frank overview of Nikki Haley:

    http://theduran.com/all-hat-and-no-cattle-nikki-haley-set-to-cash-in-after-disastrous-u-n-stint-video/

    Contrary to the above linked video, Ivanka Trump has been quoted as saying that she doesn’t want not to replace Haley as US UN ambassador. That spot has become a rhetorically provocative position, which might not be best suited for her. On the other hand, it could be an improvement to have someone who is perhaps not so ideologically misguided as the last two US UN ambassadors (Samantha Power and Haley). Then again, Ivanka Trump led the charge on the faulty claim that the Syrian government used chemical weapons.

    Related:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/07/29/an-unhealthy-trump-putin-summit-fallout.html

    Excerpt -

    Meantime, Trump’s excessively obnoxious (if not bigoted) UN ambassador Nikki Haley, carries on with singling out Russia as a country that the US can never be friends with – never minding that:

    - Germany and Britain each fought two major wars against the US
    - with Japan having carried out the surprise Pearl Harbor attack.

    In contrast, US-Russian relations have had better instances throughout the course of history.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I kind of like the idea of Ivanka as UN Ambassador as it gets her out of the White House, and the UN is a total joke (and founded on completely disgusting principles) anyway so why not nominate a joke candidate?
    , @Bliss

    there’s no excuse to not consider Jim Jatras and Tulsi Gabbard
     
    Here’s an excuse to not consider Tulsi Gabbard, her tweet from just 4 hours ago:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/TulsiGabbard/status/1051217437251825667?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

    Another example of the arms industry dictating US policy - Sec Pompeo more concerned with protecting $2B arms deal than the lives of tens of thousands of children/civilians killed in Yemen by the Saudi-US coalition.

    Gabbard has got to be the freest spirit in American politics today, in stark contrast to Nikki Haley.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/359986-tulsi-gabbard-is-no-snowflake

    In her twenties, Gabbard was a self-defined social conservative. She was anti-choice and anti-gay marriage........Gabbard no longer holds those political positions, views that would be untenable in the Democratic Party today.

    Not long after being elected to Congress, Gabbard took the opportunity to appear on Fox News and bash her fellow Hawaiian Barack Obama for failing to acknowledge that “Islamic extremists are our enemy.”

    After the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States, to the dismay of many Democrats, Gabbard took a very public meeting with the president elect at Trump Tower. According to accounts, Gabbard and Trump discussed foreign policy and the president elect’s strategy for taking on ISIS. Her willingness to meet with Trump irked many Democrats and exacerbated an already tense relationship between the Democratic Party and its “rising star.”

    Not long after meeting with Trump, Gabbard traveled to Syria to meet with its brutal dictator. To many Democrats, myself included, this was a road too far......the congresswoman has said that her meeting with Assad was an attempt to bring democracy to Syria and end the conflict between the government and opposition forces. However, many Democrats and Republicans saw her trip to Syria as a horrific mistake that lent legitimacy to an illegitimate leader. But Gabbard refused to back down. When Assad was once again accused of using sarin gas on his own people, Gabbard was quick to jump to his defense and question the legitimacy of reports, a mind-boggling decision for someone who appears to want to climb the political ladder.

    Gabbard has managed to put together a coalition that is unheard of for Democrats. Never before have we seen a Democrat who has managed to receive praise from Bernie Sanders and Steve Bannon at the same time.......She finds solace in the company of both Democrats and Republicans. She is unafraid and undeterred by attacks from her critics and unbowed by external pressure from the media. In this toxic political climate, rife with blind allegiance, Gabbard has made it clear that she is indebted to no one and unwilling to be just another Democrat.


    She has been accused of being islamophobic and a socialist in the same breath, something unheard of for a member of a party commonly referred to being full of “snowflakes” in conservative media. Tulsi Gabbard is no snowflake. She is an enigma wrapped in a conundrum and could potentially be the future of the Democratic Party. Get your popcorn ready because it is going to be a bumpy ride.
  8. Cohen & Mearsheimer Outnumbered

    Re:

    & https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/10/10/john-mearsheimer-stephen-cohen-take-delusional-neocon-neoliberal-establishment-vital-debate.html

    In the above linked panel, Stephen Cohen and John Mearsheimer were outnumbered 3 to 2, in addition to the establishment leaning moderator. These bogus characterizations were presented without any counter:

    - Russia bombing hospitals in Syria

    - Russian aggression in Crimea, Donbass, South Ossetia, Abkhazia

    - Russia poisoning people in the streets of the UK

    Russia doesn’t have a monopoly on collateral damage. Many civilians have been killed in Iraq and Afghanistan as a result of US military activity. Downplaying the likely greater evil of a rebel victory in Syria is a valid talking point that wasn’t addressed at the NYC Upper Westside event.

    Crimea’s changed territorial status isn’t less valid than what has happened in Kosovo and northern Cyprus. The overwhelming majority of the Donbass rebels have roots on the territory of the former Ukrainian SSR – of that grouping, most of them are from Donbass. A good deal of the blame for the conflict in the former Ukrainian SSR can be attributed to the political establishments of some Western nations and their favorites in Ukraine.

    The Ossetians and Abkhaz prefer Russia over Georgia – a point leading to the observation that Russia isn’t the heavy bad guy as depicted in neocon/neolib and flat out Russia hating circles.

    To date, the poisoning of the Skripals remains sketchy. Someone lacking a formal background of such matter (Eliot Higgins of Bellingcat) has come up with evidence of a supposed Russian government act – something that the professional UK government involved investigators didn’t come up with.

  9. @John Gruskos
    As an American, I am appalled by the Ukrainian decision to tear down the Suvorov monument.

    He is more than just a Russian hero - he is a hero for all of European Christian civilization, just like Charles Martel and John Sobieski.

    Shortly after the coup against Yanukovych, a monument in Ukraine honoring Kutuzov was demolished. Kutuzov had a presence in Ukraine at a time when the ancestors of modern day Ukrainians were (in overall terms) supportive of Russia – whether in the Austrian Empire or Russian Empire.

  10. @Vishnugupta
    S-400 is just a small part of the India Russia arms relationship and the US knows it.

    The fact is no other country will transfer India the sort of bleeding edge stuff that Russia does.

    Nuclear Submarine tech.Russia actually leased a near state of the art Akula 2 N submarine(It is illegal to sell N Submarines) so that the Indian Navy could have first hand operational experience pending commissioning of its on N attack submarines(Almost certainly created with Russian technical hand holding).

    Hypersonic Missiles. Brahmos 2 is basically a Indian built variant of the Zircon missile.A similar arrangement exists for Brahmos and Yakhont.

    ICBMs(4th gen solid fuel tech),Cruise missiles(turbofan engine),Air to Air missiles(RF Seeker tech)etc are other examples of vast and deep technical cooperation between India and Russia.

    Also the fact that the USSR has exercised its veto FIVE times(1948 Kashmir,1961 Goa,1971 War Twice in the UNSC in India's favour often with the vast majority voting against India)

    It is a mutually beneficial arrangement.We get state of the art tech and the Russian arms industry gets economies of scale and cold hard cash.

    Since the US has a steller record of sabotaging advanced projects of its close allies IAI Lavi(Israel),Avro Arrow(Canada),TSR 2(Well the labor government did most of the wrecking but still..),MBB Lampardyie(W Germany) it is best to avoid too much entanglement with them.

    There is nothing comparable to the S-400 from any other country to begin with, so it’s a very wise purchase for many nations.

    Suppressing competition is only logical. What irritates me is that the US has rarely thought to suppress competition in civilian products.

    The Avro Arrow was as much sabotaged by the bitter enmity between Western and Eastern Canada as by American pressure.

  11. Moscow sounds like it would be a great place to visit.

  12. @Mikhail
    Next US UN Ambassador

    From the leading US foreign policy establishment realist venue:

    https://nationalinterest.org/feature/race-replace-nikki-haley-33096?page=0%2C1

    The above piece downplays Heather Nauert's foreign policy shortcomings. Based on Trump's disappointing performance (from the viewpoint agreeing with much of his foreign policy comments before he became president), don't be surprised to see the establishment leaning Nauert get the position of US ambassador to the UN.

    Rand Paul is the best suggestion in the above linked piece. The article ends with Trump saying that he's looking at many competent folks to replace Nikki Haley at the UN. If so, there's no excuse to not consider Jim Jatras and Tulsi Gabbard as previously recommended:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/12042017-latest-bump-in-us-russian-relations-analysis/

    At issue is how the views of Paul, Jatras and Gabbard appear to differ a bit with the Trump administration likes of Mike Pompeo and John Bolton. Notwithstanding, it's politically healthy for a US president to have diverse views within the administration.

    An accurately frank overview of Nikki Haley:

    http://theduran.com/all-hat-and-no-cattle-nikki-haley-set-to-cash-in-after-disastrous-u-n-stint-video/

    Contrary to the above linked video, Ivanka Trump has been quoted as saying that she doesn't want not to replace Haley as US UN ambassador. That spot has become a rhetorically provocative position, which might not be best suited for her. On the other hand, it could be an improvement to have someone who is perhaps not so ideologically misguided as the last two US UN ambassadors (Samantha Power and Haley). Then again, Ivanka Trump led the charge on the faulty claim that the Syrian government used chemical weapons.

    Related:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/07/29/an-unhealthy-trump-putin-summit-fallout.html

    Excerpt -

    Meantime, Trump's excessively obnoxious (if not bigoted) UN ambassador Nikki Haley, carries on with singling out Russia as a country that the US can never be friends with - never minding that:

    - Germany and Britain each fought two major wars against the US
    - with Japan having carried out the surprise Pearl Harbor attack.

    In contrast, US-Russian relations have had better instances throughout the course of history.

     

    I kind of like the idea of Ivanka as UN Ambassador as it gets her out of the White House, and the UN is a total joke (and founded on completely disgusting principles) anyway so why not nominate a joke candidate?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    No on Ivanka. I don't care if it is a joke candidate. First of all we should not be encouraging nepotism or else we will get Jared Kushner as our president.

    Second, Trump himself is not a real conservative. So what makes you think Ivanka is and she would not cuck out on SJW stuff. She already has adopted more time off for working women as her feminist issue.
    , @Mikhail
    Like I said, her drinking the kool aid on the Syrian government using chemical weapons is a turnoff.

    Pretty much agree with the rest of your comments.
    , @John Gruskos

    I kind of like the idea of Ivanka as UN Ambassador as it gets her out of the White House
     
    Not far enough.

    Ivanka for ambassador to Australia!

    Get Saudi puppet Jared Kushner into a different time zone.
  13. Anonymous[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    I kind of like the idea of Ivanka as UN Ambassador as it gets her out of the White House, and the UN is a total joke (and founded on completely disgusting principles) anyway so why not nominate a joke candidate?

    No on Ivanka. I don’t care if it is a joke candidate. First of all we should not be encouraging nepotism or else we will get Jared Kushner as our president.

    Second, Trump himself is not a real conservative. So what makes you think Ivanka is and she would not cuck out on SJW stuff. She already has adopted more time off for working women as her feminist issue.

  14. Anonymous[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @Vishnugupta
    S-400 is just a small part of the India Russia arms relationship and the US knows it.

    The fact is no other country will transfer India the sort of bleeding edge stuff that Russia does.

    Nuclear Submarine tech.Russia actually leased a near state of the art Akula 2 N submarine(It is illegal to sell N Submarines) so that the Indian Navy could have first hand operational experience pending commissioning of its on N attack submarines(Almost certainly created with Russian technical hand holding).

    Hypersonic Missiles. Brahmos 2 is basically a Indian built variant of the Zircon missile.A similar arrangement exists for Brahmos and Yakhont.

    ICBMs(4th gen solid fuel tech),Cruise missiles(turbofan engine),Air to Air missiles(RF Seeker tech)etc are other examples of vast and deep technical cooperation between India and Russia.

    Also the fact that the USSR has exercised its veto FIVE times(1948 Kashmir,1961 Goa,1971 War Twice in the UNSC in India's favour often with the vast majority voting against India)

    It is a mutually beneficial arrangement.We get state of the art tech and the Russian arms industry gets economies of scale and cold hard cash.

    Since the US has a steller record of sabotaging advanced projects of its close allies IAI Lavi(Israel),Avro Arrow(Canada),TSR 2(Well the labor government did most of the wrecking but still..),MBB Lampardyie(W Germany) it is best to avoid too much entanglement with them.

    It doesn’t matter how much Russian tech India acquires if its military will have Indians operating the weapon systems.

    They are not much better than Saudis at war, and would most likely embarrass themselves if they tried to fight anyone other than Indian type races.

    An Indian shop keeper makes no better a warrior than a Saudi date farmer.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    The British Indian Army confined its recruiting to certain Martial Races. The rest were rubbish. The Sikhs and the Nepalis were top of the list. Punjabis in general were OK as I recall. I thought this was still the case in the best regiments.
    , @Vishnugupta
    In the old days your type of low IQ White was assigned the 'cannon fodder' role in various European armies.That arrangement along with the lack of a looser supporting welfare state and legislation like various bastardy laws had the important function of of keeping the European gene pool vital and ensuring unfortunate evolutionary dead ends with limited comprehension capabilities like you did not get to reproduce.

    Alas its all over.UK which 100 years ago ruled 1/4 the world's area and imposed its language and customs throughout the world can today not handle Paki immigrants misbehaving themselves and taking liberties with English white girls in its capital city!Infact they elected a Paki as Mayor of London.
  15. @notanon

    This new NPC meme is great.
     
    one of the odd things about "Fight Club" when it came out was how there were all these bright white dudes working low wage jobs

    and now c. 20 years later almost all the cultural creativity in the USA is concentrated in a few thousand alt-righters and i wouldn't be surprised if half of them were working jobs like that (like #skyking)

    Fight Club was prophecy.

    What does NPC mean? I’ve seen it several times in the last couple days, but haven’t been able to figure it out.

    • Replies: @adreadline
    Non-Player Character. When you play a role-playing video game, they're the characters that serve no purpose but for you, the Player Character, to interact with. NPCs have no souls, no free will, do not really make a difference in the world, etc. unlike the Player Character.

    Anyway. It does seem that Bolso's popularity increases with the number of protests organized against him, both nationally and overseas. He must be enjoying all this.

    , @notanon
    points at what adreadline said
    , @anon
    This means you are dealing with people whose whole life revolves around video games. Take it as a mark of quality or as a warning sign, as you wish.
  16. @Rosie
    What does NPC mean? I've seen it several times in the last couple days, but haven't been able to figure it out.

    Non-Player Character. When you play a role-playing video game, they’re the characters that serve no purpose but for you, the Player Character, to interact with. NPCs have no souls, no free will, do not really make a difference in the world, etc. unlike the Player Character.

    Anyway. It does seem that Bolso’s popularity increases with the number of protests organized against him, both nationally and overseas. He must be enjoying all this.

    • Replies: @Rosie

    When you play a role-playing video game,
     
    No wonder I didn't get it. I generally like geeky stuff. Video games are an exception. I never did get video games. BTW, did you know that rhesus monkeys are better at math when they're in a good mood. I found this article when I was doing a search on math and dopamine. I have a child who's really into math, and we love doing problems together. (Hard ones, I mean.). We always end up giggling, and it occurred to me that solving challenging problems might trigger some sort of dopamine rush.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/12/141205093831.htm

    I didn't find anything on point. Derb?

    But I digress.

    Non-Player Character. When you play a role-playing video game, they’re the characters that serve no purpose but for you, the Player Character, to interact with. NPCs have no souls, no free will, do not really make a difference in the world, etc. unlike the Player Character.

    Anyway. It does seem that Bolso’s popularity increases with the number of protests organized against him, both nationally and overseas. He must be enjoying all this.
     
    Got it. Thanks.
  17. @Rosie
    What does NPC mean? I've seen it several times in the last couple days, but haven't been able to figure it out.

    points at what adreadline said

  18. @Anonymous
    It doesn't matter how much Russian tech India acquires if its military will have Indians operating the weapon systems.

    They are not much better than Saudis at war, and would most likely embarrass themselves if they tried to fight anyone other than Indian type races.

    An Indian shop keeper makes no better a warrior than a Saudi date farmer.

    The British Indian Army confined its recruiting to certain Martial Races. The rest were rubbish. The Sikhs and the Nepalis were top of the list. Punjabis in general were OK as I recall. I thought this was still the case in the best regiments.

    • Replies: @Vishnugupta
    Yes it is but not for the reasons you stated.

    The British East India Company army was overwhelmingly recruited from upper cast Hindus of North India.

    Post 1857 mutiny recruitment was from regions/groups that did not mutiny.

    The Sikhs,Punjabi's,Maratha's and Gurkha's..

    The stated goal of the 1857 mutiny was to restore Mughal rule which was anathema to these group who had spent the better part of 400 years fighting Muslim's.

    The martial race theory was politically convenient nonsense in the age of the gun and now assault rifle temperament and ability to follow complex instructions matter far more than brute strength which is why Muslim's have never won a modern mechanized war against non Muslim's not counting guerilla wars like Afghanistan and small skirmishes like Cyprus.

    India has followed this British era recruitment policy to effectively make India military coup proof. Warrior castes from the north west including Sikhs make up 80%+ of the Indian army though they represent 3% of the Indian population so do not ethnically identify caste/region wise with the whole Indian population..but yes the north west warrior castes have near European levels of grip strength and a non vegetarian diet so they are physically the strongest Indians available.
    , @DFH
    Is there some sort of HBD underlying the martial races? Sikhs generally do seem larger than your average puny Indian.
    , @Gerard2

    The British Indian Army confined its recruiting to certain Martial Races. The rest were rubbish. The Sikhs and the Nepalis were top of the list. Punjabis in general were OK as I recall. I thought this was still the case in the best regiments.
     
    In other words...those who eat meat. Hindu's mostly vegetarian and they cant seriously be expected to have a strong army, which is not to say that here aren't plenty of vegetarian Indians who would make strong and great soldiers....just that it would be alot harder to get together

    Anyway, the British army recruited Africans and Indians ( in Africa) to serve in WW2 under false promises of land....such is the lying scum they can be

    Though the approach was vindicated from a strategic perspective.....it's unheard of for a country in 4 years to refuse it's army to fight a war in an area occupied by the enemy only 35km away(France) but fight it 1000 miles away in desert land, empire land, with civilians merely inquisitive spectators, as the British did in North Africa.

    With respect to the military, that is an enormous luxury to have. But overall in all fields the British actions in WW2 in science/Intelligence/Navy/Air force/timing must be judged to have been a big success
  19. The dollar does seem overrated and has been for a long time. 20% of world GDP, as stated, 40% of world trade (my addition to the debate) and yet 60% of reserves. In terms of trade, the other reserve currencies are in order the Euro, about 40% (often ahead of the dollar – extra EU trade only), the GB Pound at just over 10% and the yen and now renimbi bringing up the rest. Russia used to keep a disproportianately large fraction in GB Pounds.

    • Replies: @utu
    Currency reserves in billions. Total value not all are held in US dollars.

    China $3,161.5
    Japan $1,198.9
    Switzerland $785.7
    Taiwan $456.7
    Hong Kong $437.5
    India $397.2
    Republic of Korea $385.3
    Brazil $359.1
    Russian Federation $356.5
    Singapore $279.8

    The United States had foreign currency reserves of $42.8 billion as of March 2018. The Euro Area had combined foreign currency reserves of $272.7 billion as of March 2018. The UK, which did not make the list, has $112.8 billion in foreign reserves as of March 2018.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    The secret sauce to the Dollar's success isn't world trade but rather American capital markets and assets.

    Its role in world trade will decline over time.
  20. What’s the matter with these Ukrainians?

    Government neglect of public vaccination that dates from before the Maidan and was exacerbated after. Dr Komarovskiy began to alarm the public about it in 2010 as per his article:

    http://www.komarovskiy.net/blog/kor-uzhe-zdes-zhdem-difteriyu.html

    Anti-vaxxer ideas flourished on this substrate, and even though there was no shortage of measles vaccine by 2017, many parents refuse it.

  21. @adreadline
    Non-Player Character. When you play a role-playing video game, they're the characters that serve no purpose but for you, the Player Character, to interact with. NPCs have no souls, no free will, do not really make a difference in the world, etc. unlike the Player Character.

    Anyway. It does seem that Bolso's popularity increases with the number of protests organized against him, both nationally and overseas. He must be enjoying all this.

    When you play a role-playing video game,

    No wonder I didn’t get it. I generally like geeky stuff. Video games are an exception. I never did get video games. BTW, did you know that rhesus monkeys are better at math when they’re in a good mood. I found this article when I was doing a search on math and dopamine. I have a child who’s really into math, and we love doing problems together. (Hard ones, I mean.). We always end up giggling, and it occurred to me that solving challenging problems might trigger some sort of dopamine rush.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/12/141205093831.htm

    I didn’t find anything on point. Derb?

    But I digress.

    Non-Player Character. When you play a role-playing video game, they’re the characters that serve no purpose but for you, the Player Character, to interact with. NPCs have no souls, no free will, do not really make a difference in the world, etc. unlike the Player Character.

    Anyway. It does seem that Bolso’s popularity increases with the number of protests organized against him, both nationally and overseas. He must be enjoying all this.

    Got it. Thanks.

  22. @Mikhail
    Next US UN Ambassador

    From the leading US foreign policy establishment realist venue:

    https://nationalinterest.org/feature/race-replace-nikki-haley-33096?page=0%2C1

    The above piece downplays Heather Nauert's foreign policy shortcomings. Based on Trump's disappointing performance (from the viewpoint agreeing with much of his foreign policy comments before he became president), don't be surprised to see the establishment leaning Nauert get the position of US ambassador to the UN.

    Rand Paul is the best suggestion in the above linked piece. The article ends with Trump saying that he's looking at many competent folks to replace Nikki Haley at the UN. If so, there's no excuse to not consider Jim Jatras and Tulsi Gabbard as previously recommended:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/12042017-latest-bump-in-us-russian-relations-analysis/

    At issue is how the views of Paul, Jatras and Gabbard appear to differ a bit with the Trump administration likes of Mike Pompeo and John Bolton. Notwithstanding, it's politically healthy for a US president to have diverse views within the administration.

    An accurately frank overview of Nikki Haley:

    http://theduran.com/all-hat-and-no-cattle-nikki-haley-set-to-cash-in-after-disastrous-u-n-stint-video/

    Contrary to the above linked video, Ivanka Trump has been quoted as saying that she doesn't want not to replace Haley as US UN ambassador. That spot has become a rhetorically provocative position, which might not be best suited for her. On the other hand, it could be an improvement to have someone who is perhaps not so ideologically misguided as the last two US UN ambassadors (Samantha Power and Haley). Then again, Ivanka Trump led the charge on the faulty claim that the Syrian government used chemical weapons.

    Related:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/07/29/an-unhealthy-trump-putin-summit-fallout.html

    Excerpt -

    Meantime, Trump's excessively obnoxious (if not bigoted) UN ambassador Nikki Haley, carries on with singling out Russia as a country that the US can never be friends with - never minding that:

    - Germany and Britain each fought two major wars against the US
    - with Japan having carried out the surprise Pearl Harbor attack.

    In contrast, US-Russian relations have had better instances throughout the course of history.

     

    there’s no excuse to not consider Jim Jatras and Tulsi Gabbard

    Here’s an excuse to not consider Tulsi Gabbard, her tweet from just 4 hours ago:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/TulsiGabbard/status/1051217437251825667?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

    Another example of the arms industry dictating US policy – Sec Pompeo more concerned with protecting $2B arms deal than the lives of tens of thousands of children/civilians killed in Yemen by the Saudi-US coalition.

    Gabbard has got to be the freest spirit in American politics today, in stark contrast to Nikki Haley.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/359986-tulsi-gabbard-is-no-snowflake

    In her twenties, Gabbard was a self-defined social conservative. She was anti-choice and anti-gay marriage……..Gabbard no longer holds those political positions, views that would be untenable in the Democratic Party today.

    Not long after being elected to Congress, Gabbard took the opportunity to appear on Fox News and bash her fellow Hawaiian Barack Obama for failing to acknowledge that “Islamic extremists are our enemy.”

    After the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States, to the dismay of many Democrats, Gabbard took a very public meeting with the president elect at Trump Tower. According to accounts, Gabbard and Trump discussed foreign policy and the president elect’s strategy for taking on ISIS. Her willingness to meet with Trump irked many Democrats and exacerbated an already tense relationship between the Democratic Party and its “rising star.”

    Not long after meeting with Trump, Gabbard traveled to Syria to meet with its brutal dictator. To many Democrats, myself included, this was a road too far……the congresswoman has said that her meeting with Assad was an attempt to bring democracy to Syria and end the conflict between the government and opposition forces. However, many Democrats and Republicans saw her trip to Syria as a horrific mistake that lent legitimacy to an illegitimate leader. But Gabbard refused to back down. When Assad was once again accused of using sarin gas on his own people, Gabbard was quick to jump to his defense and question the legitimacy of reports, a mind-boggling decision for someone who appears to want to climb the political ladder.

    Gabbard has managed to put together a coalition that is unheard of for Democrats. Never before have we seen a Democrat who has managed to receive praise from Bernie Sanders and Steve Bannon at the same time…….She finds solace in the company of both Democrats and Republicans. She is unafraid and undeterred by attacks from her critics and unbowed by external pressure from the media. In this toxic political climate, rife with blind allegiance, Gabbard has made it clear that she is indebted to no one and unwilling to be just another Democrat.

    She has been accused of being islamophobic and a socialist in the same breath, something unheard of for a member of a party commonly referred to being full of “snowflakes” in conservative media. Tulsi Gabbard is no snowflake. She is an enigma wrapped in a conundrum and could potentially be the future of the Democratic Party. Get your popcorn ready because it is going to be a bumpy ride.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    It'd be an improvement for the US to have a coalition government, consisting of the likes of Rand Paul and Tulsi Gabbard in key positions.
    , @Bliss
    Perhaps one can trace Gabbard’s free, independent spirit to her highly unusual racial and religious mix: her father is a Samoan catholic, her mother a white American hindu. Gabbard chose her mother’s religion. Plus she is a veteran of the Iraq War.

    Btw, it sure looks like this UN job has become reserved for women. The last 3 to hold that position were all women, and even the 2 acting ambassadors in between were women. And it is mostly women who are being mentioned as the next US Ambassador to the UN.

    , @Thorfinnsson
    I agree with Pompeo on this question.

    $2bn in exports is more important than the lives of Yemenis.

    The one thing I worry about is whether or not we provide services to the Saudis for free on behalf og their war.
  23. @Rosie
    What does NPC mean? I've seen it several times in the last couple days, but haven't been able to figure it out.

    This means you are dealing with people whose whole life revolves around video games. Take it as a mark of quality or as a warning sign, as you wish.

    • Replies: @notanon
    i haz ten rat tails what do i get?
  24. Rod Dreher: Prelude To A New Civil War?

    Prelude to the last civil war was this:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bleeding_Kansas

    Pitched battles, burning of towns, hundreds of dead. Not some broken stones and costumed clowns beating each other with sticks.

  25. @Philip Owen
    The dollar does seem overrated and has been for a long time. 20% of world GDP, as stated, 40% of world trade (my addition to the debate) and yet 60% of reserves. In terms of trade, the other reserve currencies are in order the Euro, about 40% (often ahead of the dollar - extra EU trade only), the GB Pound at just over 10% and the yen and now renimbi bringing up the rest. Russia used to keep a disproportianately large fraction in GB Pounds.

    Currency reserves in billions. Total value not all are held in US dollars.

    China $3,161.5
    Japan $1,198.9
    Switzerland $785.7
    Taiwan $456.7
    Hong Kong $437.5
    India $397.2
    Republic of Korea $385.3
    Brazil $359.1
    Russian Federation $356.5
    Singapore $279.8

    The United States had foreign currency reserves of $42.8 billion as of March 2018. The Euro Area had combined foreign currency reserves of $272.7 billion as of March 2018. The UK, which did not make the list, has $112.8 billion in foreign reserves as of March 2018.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    The trade figures are from SWIFT which has been tracking the rise of the Renimbi. I am not quite sure why the pound is still so comparatively strong s most former African colonies use US dollars. Russia actually traded with the UK in pounds up to the invasion of Georgia.
  26. @Anonymous
    It doesn't matter how much Russian tech India acquires if its military will have Indians operating the weapon systems.

    They are not much better than Saudis at war, and would most likely embarrass themselves if they tried to fight anyone other than Indian type races.

    An Indian shop keeper makes no better a warrior than a Saudi date farmer.

    In the old days your type of low IQ White was assigned the ‘cannon fodder’ role in various European armies.That arrangement along with the lack of a looser supporting welfare state and legislation like various bastardy laws had the important function of of keeping the European gene pool vital and ensuring unfortunate evolutionary dead ends with limited comprehension capabilities like you did not get to reproduce.

    Alas its all over.UK which 100 years ago ruled 1/4 the world’s area and imposed its language and customs throughout the world can today not handle Paki immigrants misbehaving themselves and taking liberties with English white girls in its capital city!Infact they elected a Paki as Mayor of London.

    • LOL: Anatoly Karlin
  27. @Bliss

    there’s no excuse to not consider Jim Jatras and Tulsi Gabbard
     
    Here’s an excuse to not consider Tulsi Gabbard, her tweet from just 4 hours ago:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/TulsiGabbard/status/1051217437251825667?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

    Another example of the arms industry dictating US policy - Sec Pompeo more concerned with protecting $2B arms deal than the lives of tens of thousands of children/civilians killed in Yemen by the Saudi-US coalition.

    Gabbard has got to be the freest spirit in American politics today, in stark contrast to Nikki Haley.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/359986-tulsi-gabbard-is-no-snowflake

    In her twenties, Gabbard was a self-defined social conservative. She was anti-choice and anti-gay marriage........Gabbard no longer holds those political positions, views that would be untenable in the Democratic Party today.

    Not long after being elected to Congress, Gabbard took the opportunity to appear on Fox News and bash her fellow Hawaiian Barack Obama for failing to acknowledge that “Islamic extremists are our enemy.”

    After the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States, to the dismay of many Democrats, Gabbard took a very public meeting with the president elect at Trump Tower. According to accounts, Gabbard and Trump discussed foreign policy and the president elect’s strategy for taking on ISIS. Her willingness to meet with Trump irked many Democrats and exacerbated an already tense relationship between the Democratic Party and its “rising star.”

    Not long after meeting with Trump, Gabbard traveled to Syria to meet with its brutal dictator. To many Democrats, myself included, this was a road too far......the congresswoman has said that her meeting with Assad was an attempt to bring democracy to Syria and end the conflict between the government and opposition forces. However, many Democrats and Republicans saw her trip to Syria as a horrific mistake that lent legitimacy to an illegitimate leader. But Gabbard refused to back down. When Assad was once again accused of using sarin gas on his own people, Gabbard was quick to jump to his defense and question the legitimacy of reports, a mind-boggling decision for someone who appears to want to climb the political ladder.

    Gabbard has managed to put together a coalition that is unheard of for Democrats. Never before have we seen a Democrat who has managed to receive praise from Bernie Sanders and Steve Bannon at the same time.......She finds solace in the company of both Democrats and Republicans. She is unafraid and undeterred by attacks from her critics and unbowed by external pressure from the media. In this toxic political climate, rife with blind allegiance, Gabbard has made it clear that she is indebted to no one and unwilling to be just another Democrat.


    She has been accused of being islamophobic and a socialist in the same breath, something unheard of for a member of a party commonly referred to being full of “snowflakes” in conservative media. Tulsi Gabbard is no snowflake. She is an enigma wrapped in a conundrum and could potentially be the future of the Democratic Party. Get your popcorn ready because it is going to be a bumpy ride.

    It’d be an improvement for the US to have a coalition government, consisting of the likes of Rand Paul and Tulsi Gabbard in key positions.

  28. @Thorfinnsson
    I kind of like the idea of Ivanka as UN Ambassador as it gets her out of the White House, and the UN is a total joke (and founded on completely disgusting principles) anyway so why not nominate a joke candidate?

    Like I said, her drinking the kool aid on the Syrian government using chemical weapons is a turnoff.

    Pretty much agree with the rest of your comments.

  29. @Bliss

    there’s no excuse to not consider Jim Jatras and Tulsi Gabbard
     
    Here’s an excuse to not consider Tulsi Gabbard, her tweet from just 4 hours ago:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/TulsiGabbard/status/1051217437251825667?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

    Another example of the arms industry dictating US policy - Sec Pompeo more concerned with protecting $2B arms deal than the lives of tens of thousands of children/civilians killed in Yemen by the Saudi-US coalition.

    Gabbard has got to be the freest spirit in American politics today, in stark contrast to Nikki Haley.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/359986-tulsi-gabbard-is-no-snowflake

    In her twenties, Gabbard was a self-defined social conservative. She was anti-choice and anti-gay marriage........Gabbard no longer holds those political positions, views that would be untenable in the Democratic Party today.

    Not long after being elected to Congress, Gabbard took the opportunity to appear on Fox News and bash her fellow Hawaiian Barack Obama for failing to acknowledge that “Islamic extremists are our enemy.”

    After the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States, to the dismay of many Democrats, Gabbard took a very public meeting with the president elect at Trump Tower. According to accounts, Gabbard and Trump discussed foreign policy and the president elect’s strategy for taking on ISIS. Her willingness to meet with Trump irked many Democrats and exacerbated an already tense relationship between the Democratic Party and its “rising star.”

    Not long after meeting with Trump, Gabbard traveled to Syria to meet with its brutal dictator. To many Democrats, myself included, this was a road too far......the congresswoman has said that her meeting with Assad was an attempt to bring democracy to Syria and end the conflict between the government and opposition forces. However, many Democrats and Republicans saw her trip to Syria as a horrific mistake that lent legitimacy to an illegitimate leader. But Gabbard refused to back down. When Assad was once again accused of using sarin gas on his own people, Gabbard was quick to jump to his defense and question the legitimacy of reports, a mind-boggling decision for someone who appears to want to climb the political ladder.

    Gabbard has managed to put together a coalition that is unheard of for Democrats. Never before have we seen a Democrat who has managed to receive praise from Bernie Sanders and Steve Bannon at the same time.......She finds solace in the company of both Democrats and Republicans. She is unafraid and undeterred by attacks from her critics and unbowed by external pressure from the media. In this toxic political climate, rife with blind allegiance, Gabbard has made it clear that she is indebted to no one and unwilling to be just another Democrat.


    She has been accused of being islamophobic and a socialist in the same breath, something unheard of for a member of a party commonly referred to being full of “snowflakes” in conservative media. Tulsi Gabbard is no snowflake. She is an enigma wrapped in a conundrum and could potentially be the future of the Democratic Party. Get your popcorn ready because it is going to be a bumpy ride.

    Perhaps one can trace Gabbard’s free, independent spirit to her highly unusual racial and religious mix: her father is a Samoan catholic, her mother a white American hindu. Gabbard chose her mother’s religion. Plus she is a veteran of the Iraq War.

    Btw, it sure looks like this UN job has become reserved for women. The last 3 to hold that position were all women, and even the 2 acting ambassadors in between were women. And it is mostly women who are being mentioned as the next US Ambassador to the UN.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    America has some interesting mixes:

    Perhaps one can trace Gabbard’s free, independent spirit to her highly unusual racial and religious mix: her father is a Samoan catholic, her mother a white American hindu. Gabbard chose her mother’s religion. Plus she is a veteran of the Iraq War.
     
    In the US, know someone whose mother’s side is 100% Greek Sephardic (via Italy and before Spain), with a 50-50 Baltic German Ashkenazi Jewish and Russian Orthodox Christian blend on the father’s side. Has a constructively critical appreciation of varying views – something very much lacking in terms of what the global establishment props.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    It's a joke job so why not give it to women? Who are no doubt dumb enough to take it seriously.
  30. @Bliss
    Perhaps one can trace Gabbard’s free, independent spirit to her highly unusual racial and religious mix: her father is a Samoan catholic, her mother a white American hindu. Gabbard chose her mother’s religion. Plus she is a veteran of the Iraq War.

    Btw, it sure looks like this UN job has become reserved for women. The last 3 to hold that position were all women, and even the 2 acting ambassadors in between were women. And it is mostly women who are being mentioned as the next US Ambassador to the UN.

    America has some interesting mixes:

    Perhaps one can trace Gabbard’s free, independent spirit to her highly unusual racial and religious mix: her father is a Samoan catholic, her mother a white American hindu. Gabbard chose her mother’s religion. Plus she is a veteran of the Iraq War.

    In the US, know someone whose mother’s side is 100% Greek Sephardic (via Italy and before Spain), with a 50-50 Baltic German Ashkenazi Jewish and Russian Orthodox Christian blend on the father’s side. Has a constructively critical appreciation of varying views – something very much lacking in terms of what the global establishment props.

    • Replies: @Bliss

    America has some interesting mixes
     
    Indeed. And it is an advantage.
  31. @anon
    This means you are dealing with people whose whole life revolves around video games. Take it as a mark of quality or as a warning sign, as you wish.

    i haz ten rat tails what do i get?

  32. @Mikhail
    America has some interesting mixes:

    Perhaps one can trace Gabbard’s free, independent spirit to her highly unusual racial and religious mix: her father is a Samoan catholic, her mother a white American hindu. Gabbard chose her mother’s religion. Plus she is a veteran of the Iraq War.
     
    In the US, know someone whose mother’s side is 100% Greek Sephardic (via Italy and before Spain), with a 50-50 Baltic German Ashkenazi Jewish and Russian Orthodox Christian blend on the father’s side. Has a constructively critical appreciation of varying views – something very much lacking in terms of what the global establishment props.

    America has some interesting mixes

    Indeed. And it is an advantage.

  33. anon[424] • Disclaimer says:

    Something more into your “moral decay and degeneracy/LGBTQ appreciation” files:

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/institutionalizing-the-trans-revolution/

    TL;DR: Thomas Donelly, a senior national security analyst with the neoconservative American Enterprise Institute, announced his transition and is now Giselle Donelly, and there was much rejoicing all over Washington DC.

    Thomas

    Giselle

    Behold the miracle, Ernst Stavro Blofeld turned into elderly cat lady ;-)

    • Replies: @Abelard Lindsey
    "Look at what the cat dragged in."
  34. @Philip Owen
    The British Indian Army confined its recruiting to certain Martial Races. The rest were rubbish. The Sikhs and the Nepalis were top of the list. Punjabis in general were OK as I recall. I thought this was still the case in the best regiments.

    Yes it is but not for the reasons you stated.

    The British East India Company army was overwhelmingly recruited from upper cast Hindus of North India.

    Post 1857 mutiny recruitment was from regions/groups that did not mutiny.

    The Sikhs,Punjabi’s,Maratha’s and Gurkha’s..

    The stated goal of the 1857 mutiny was to restore Mughal rule which was anathema to these group who had spent the better part of 400 years fighting Muslim’s.

    The martial race theory was politically convenient nonsense in the age of the gun and now assault rifle temperament and ability to follow complex instructions matter far more than brute strength which is why Muslim’s have never won a modern mechanized war against non Muslim’s not counting guerilla wars like Afghanistan and small skirmishes like Cyprus.

    India has followed this British era recruitment policy to effectively make India military coup proof. Warrior castes from the north west including Sikhs make up 80%+ of the Indian army though they represent 3% of the Indian population so do not ethnically identify caste/region wise with the whole Indian population..but yes the north west warrior castes have near European levels of grip strength and a non vegetarian diet so they are physically the strongest Indians available.

    • Replies: @Bliss

    The stated goal of the 1857 mutiny was to restore Mughal rule
     
    That means the “upper caste Hindus” who mutinied against the British were collaborating with the Muslim Mughals before they began collaborating with the Christian British who replaced them as rulers of India. And after a while they decided that mughal rule had been better for them than british rule.

    Correct?
    , @Talha

    which is why Muslim’s have never won a modern mechanized war against non Muslim’s not counting guerilla wars like Afghanistan
     
    Probably why it's best to stick to what we know and do well. If you've read any of the writings of William Lind, he has been keen to point out that many Muslim entities (non-state actors like Hezbollah) understand and apply fourth generation warfare principles quite well. The Hezbollah-Israeli war in 2006 is a case study in how a well-trained and disciplined force could hold its own without any mechanized divisions and zero air power.

    If you are willing to take a good number of casualties and are either used to or can do with significant damage to your infrastructure (think Stalingrad), there are a lot of defensive wars you can win. Offensive wars are no longer necessary nor considered morally justifiable so no need to worry about those.

    Peace.
    , @Anonymous
    Martial race theory still applies today. An Indian coder can follow directions and press buttons, but in a real war it is going to come down to blood and guts as it always has.

    There is real danger in having your military come from such a small population group or region. When times are bad people start to question why they are fighting and who are they fighting for. Seems really unstable to me.
  35. @Philip Owen
    The British Indian Army confined its recruiting to certain Martial Races. The rest were rubbish. The Sikhs and the Nepalis were top of the list. Punjabis in general were OK as I recall. I thought this was still the case in the best regiments.

    Is there some sort of HBD underlying the martial races? Sikhs generally do seem larger than your average puny Indian.

    • Replies: @iffen
    Is there some sort of HBD underlying

    What sort of fag reads this blog and fails to get an inkling of what HBD means? :)

    , @notanon
    i think there's probably truth in the idea of "martial" races but whether that was the actual reason for the British list i don't know.

    i think hunter-gatherers develop killer genes (cos hunters)

    farming selects against those genes over time cos they're not as useful any more so number of generations farming -> less killer genes

    with herders in between cos herders = raiding (usually) so those genes are more useful

    if correct then "martial" races would be from herder populations or farming populations who'd been farming for the least number of generations

    (although probably not as relevant in modern industrial warfare except special forces or other small scale violence like gangsters)
    , @Anon
    Punjabis (including the vast majority of Sikhs) are on average (iirc) taller than your average Indian (I guess that would make them much taller than your average puny Indian?). Gurkhas, on the other hand are ... not.
  36. @Vishnugupta
    Yes it is but not for the reasons you stated.

    The British East India Company army was overwhelmingly recruited from upper cast Hindus of North India.

    Post 1857 mutiny recruitment was from regions/groups that did not mutiny.

    The Sikhs,Punjabi's,Maratha's and Gurkha's..

    The stated goal of the 1857 mutiny was to restore Mughal rule which was anathema to these group who had spent the better part of 400 years fighting Muslim's.

    The martial race theory was politically convenient nonsense in the age of the gun and now assault rifle temperament and ability to follow complex instructions matter far more than brute strength which is why Muslim's have never won a modern mechanized war against non Muslim's not counting guerilla wars like Afghanistan and small skirmishes like Cyprus.

    India has followed this British era recruitment policy to effectively make India military coup proof. Warrior castes from the north west including Sikhs make up 80%+ of the Indian army though they represent 3% of the Indian population so do not ethnically identify caste/region wise with the whole Indian population..but yes the north west warrior castes have near European levels of grip strength and a non vegetarian diet so they are physically the strongest Indians available.

    The stated goal of the 1857 mutiny was to restore Mughal rule

    That means the “upper caste Hindus” who mutinied against the British were collaborating with the Muslim Mughals before they began collaborating with the Christian British who replaced them as rulers of India. And after a while they decided that mughal rule had been better for them than british rule.

    Correct?

    • Replies: @Vishnugupta
    Incorrect.

    The mutiny as far as one can tell was a spontaneous rebellion against the EIC rapacious taxation and program of Christian evangelism.

    It was always confined to the gangetic plains and had no support from South ,west or north west India.

    It was not a failed war of independence as it is now retrospectively portrayed..it had no vision of a British free India like later genuinely nationalist independence movements nor a central coordinated leadership.
  37. @Bliss

    The stated goal of the 1857 mutiny was to restore Mughal rule
     
    That means the “upper caste Hindus” who mutinied against the British were collaborating with the Muslim Mughals before they began collaborating with the Christian British who replaced them as rulers of India. And after a while they decided that mughal rule had been better for them than british rule.

    Correct?

    Incorrect.

    The mutiny as far as one can tell was a spontaneous rebellion against the EIC rapacious taxation and program of Christian evangelism.

    It was always confined to the gangetic plains and had no support from South ,west or north west India.

    It was not a failed war of independence as it is now retrospectively portrayed..it had no vision of a British free India like later genuinely nationalist independence movements nor a central coordinated leadership.

    • Replies: @Bliss

    It was not a failed war........it had no vision of a British free India
     
    Since the “mutiny was to restore Mughal rule” does that not mean that it was to end British rule?
  38. @Vishnugupta
    Incorrect.

    The mutiny as far as one can tell was a spontaneous rebellion against the EIC rapacious taxation and program of Christian evangelism.

    It was always confined to the gangetic plains and had no support from South ,west or north west India.

    It was not a failed war of independence as it is now retrospectively portrayed..it had no vision of a British free India like later genuinely nationalist independence movements nor a central coordinated leadership.

    It was not a failed war……..it had no vision of a British free India

    Since the “mutiny was to restore Mughal rule” does that not mean that it was to end British rule?

    • Replies: @Anon
    Mughal rule had been effectively destroyed more than a century before.

    Afghans & Persians were the Islamic enemies of the day before christcucks.
  39. @Philip Owen
    The dollar does seem overrated and has been for a long time. 20% of world GDP, as stated, 40% of world trade (my addition to the debate) and yet 60% of reserves. In terms of trade, the other reserve currencies are in order the Euro, about 40% (often ahead of the dollar - extra EU trade only), the GB Pound at just over 10% and the yen and now renimbi bringing up the rest. Russia used to keep a disproportianately large fraction in GB Pounds.

    The secret sauce to the Dollar’s success isn’t world trade but rather American capital markets and assets.

    Its role in world trade will decline over time.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    World trade and American capital markets are one in the same. They are part of the same system. If world trade collapses and or the dollar is replaced in favor of something else, Americas economy will collapse.

    American capital markets bring no value to America in and of itself. Only in the context of being able to wage war on other countries and to suck value out of other economic systems.
  40. @Bliss

    there’s no excuse to not consider Jim Jatras and Tulsi Gabbard
     
    Here’s an excuse to not consider Tulsi Gabbard, her tweet from just 4 hours ago:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/TulsiGabbard/status/1051217437251825667?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

    Another example of the arms industry dictating US policy - Sec Pompeo more concerned with protecting $2B arms deal than the lives of tens of thousands of children/civilians killed in Yemen by the Saudi-US coalition.

    Gabbard has got to be the freest spirit in American politics today, in stark contrast to Nikki Haley.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/359986-tulsi-gabbard-is-no-snowflake

    In her twenties, Gabbard was a self-defined social conservative. She was anti-choice and anti-gay marriage........Gabbard no longer holds those political positions, views that would be untenable in the Democratic Party today.

    Not long after being elected to Congress, Gabbard took the opportunity to appear on Fox News and bash her fellow Hawaiian Barack Obama for failing to acknowledge that “Islamic extremists are our enemy.”

    After the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States, to the dismay of many Democrats, Gabbard took a very public meeting with the president elect at Trump Tower. According to accounts, Gabbard and Trump discussed foreign policy and the president elect’s strategy for taking on ISIS. Her willingness to meet with Trump irked many Democrats and exacerbated an already tense relationship between the Democratic Party and its “rising star.”

    Not long after meeting with Trump, Gabbard traveled to Syria to meet with its brutal dictator. To many Democrats, myself included, this was a road too far......the congresswoman has said that her meeting with Assad was an attempt to bring democracy to Syria and end the conflict between the government and opposition forces. However, many Democrats and Republicans saw her trip to Syria as a horrific mistake that lent legitimacy to an illegitimate leader. But Gabbard refused to back down. When Assad was once again accused of using sarin gas on his own people, Gabbard was quick to jump to his defense and question the legitimacy of reports, a mind-boggling decision for someone who appears to want to climb the political ladder.

    Gabbard has managed to put together a coalition that is unheard of for Democrats. Never before have we seen a Democrat who has managed to receive praise from Bernie Sanders and Steve Bannon at the same time.......She finds solace in the company of both Democrats and Republicans. She is unafraid and undeterred by attacks from her critics and unbowed by external pressure from the media. In this toxic political climate, rife with blind allegiance, Gabbard has made it clear that she is indebted to no one and unwilling to be just another Democrat.


    She has been accused of being islamophobic and a socialist in the same breath, something unheard of for a member of a party commonly referred to being full of “snowflakes” in conservative media. Tulsi Gabbard is no snowflake. She is an enigma wrapped in a conundrum and could potentially be the future of the Democratic Party. Get your popcorn ready because it is going to be a bumpy ride.

    I agree with Pompeo on this question.

    $2bn in exports is more important than the lives of Yemenis.

    The one thing I worry about is whether or not we provide services to the Saudis for free on behalf og their war.

    • Replies: @German_reader

    $2bn in exports is more important than the lives of Yemenis.
     
    That's really cynical, one doesn't even need to have a positive view of Yemenis to think that aiding in their intentional starvation is deeply immoral.
    And there's not even a good reason for it...it's not like Saudi-Arabia is a genuine friend or ally.
    One way or another, this will backfire horribly on the Western countries involved with Saudi-Arabia imo.
    , @iffen
    The one thing I worry about is whether or not we provide services to the Saudis for free on behalf og their war.

    The one thing I worry about is whether or not we provide services to the Saudis for free on behalf of zog in their war.

    There.
  41. @Bliss
    Perhaps one can trace Gabbard’s free, independent spirit to her highly unusual racial and religious mix: her father is a Samoan catholic, her mother a white American hindu. Gabbard chose her mother’s religion. Plus she is a veteran of the Iraq War.

    Btw, it sure looks like this UN job has become reserved for women. The last 3 to hold that position were all women, and even the 2 acting ambassadors in between were women. And it is mostly women who are being mentioned as the next US Ambassador to the UN.

    It’s a joke job so why not give it to women? Who are no doubt dumb enough to take it seriously.

    • Replies: @Rosie

    It’s a joke job so why not give it to women? Who are no doubt dumb enough to take it seriously.
     
    https://img1.southernliving.timeinc.net/sites/default/files/styles/responsive_etr_gallery_desktop_portrait/public/image/2016/09/main/pink-pig-nose-130897009_full.jpg?itok=3Ih3Gohr
  42. Five Star’s economic policies are nuts, hope Salvini keeps his distance and nullifies their crazy ideas.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    I agree, that stuff with basic unconditional income seems crazy given Italy's debt.
    , @Anonymous
    That's impossible. At best he'll be able blame them for collapse.
  43. @Thorfinnsson
    I agree with Pompeo on this question.

    $2bn in exports is more important than the lives of Yemenis.

    The one thing I worry about is whether or not we provide services to the Saudis for free on behalf og their war.

    $2bn in exports is more important than the lives of Yemenis.

    That’s really cynical, one doesn’t even need to have a positive view of Yemenis to think that aiding in their intentional starvation is deeply immoral.
    And there’s not even a good reason for it…it’s not like Saudi-Arabia is a genuine friend or ally.
    One way or another, this will backfire horribly on the Western countries involved with Saudi-Arabia imo.

    • Replies: @iffen
    That’s really cynical


    Realistic if we accept that they are really fighting Iran.
    , @iffen
    Also, I no longer view journalists as innocent truth seekers. They are combatants on one side or the other.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    It will probably backfire on Western countries in the form of "refugees".

    Which we have no obligation to accept (not like Saudi Arabia is accepting any).

    So trying to stop Saudi Arabia's war to stop immigration is like what Steve Sailer likes to call a "triple bankshot".

    There is no shortage of things we can criticize Saudi Arabia for, but unlike Israel they actually do pay us. Trump got a $400bn arms deal out of them.

    I suppose the other big risk is they bribe us into attacking Iran.
  44. @LondonBob
    Five Star's economic policies are nuts, hope Salvini keeps his distance and nullifies their crazy ideas.

    I agree, that stuff with basic unconditional income seems crazy given Italy’s debt.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    Is it?

    With the Citizen income it won't be possible to

    1- make immoral purchases (it's still not specified what it means though)
    2- buy electronics
    3- buy cigarettes and lottery tickets
     
    https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=152888404&postcount=1337

    The system sounds quite similar to the one in Romania, with "meal tickets". I think the French have something similar too.

    Basically, you receive each month some cupons, with the value of X. And you can only buy food with them. The shop receives the cupons instead of cash, and then sends the cupons, together with the purchasing bill to the state to get money back.

    If the Italian system works with a card instead of cupons, it's even easier to track it, since the items bought will be electronically bundled together with the card data.

    Sure, there are ways around it, but throughout the years, it worked rather well for its intended purpose.
     
    https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=152891112&postcount=1339

    The foreign press badly translated the thing as "universal basic income", and still does not try to explain in detail what exactly it is.

    BTW, another detail of such system is that those who try to cheat the State will face 6 years of jail.
     
    https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=152902530&postcount=1342
  45. @Thorfinnsson
    I agree with Pompeo on this question.

    $2bn in exports is more important than the lives of Yemenis.

    The one thing I worry about is whether or not we provide services to the Saudis for free on behalf og their war.

    The one thing I worry about is whether or not we provide services to the Saudis for free on behalf og their war.

    The one thing I worry about is whether or not we provide services to the Saudis for free on behalf of zog in their war.

    There.

  46. @DFH
    Is there some sort of HBD underlying the martial races? Sikhs generally do seem larger than your average puny Indian.

    Is there some sort of HBD underlying

    What sort of fag reads this blog and fails to get an inkling of what HBD means? :)

    • Replies: @DFH
    Still fuming about my honest question a week later I see
  47. @German_reader

    $2bn in exports is more important than the lives of Yemenis.
     
    That's really cynical, one doesn't even need to have a positive view of Yemenis to think that aiding in their intentional starvation is deeply immoral.
    And there's not even a good reason for it...it's not like Saudi-Arabia is a genuine friend or ally.
    One way or another, this will backfire horribly on the Western countries involved with Saudi-Arabia imo.

    That’s really cynical

    Realistic if we accept that they are really fighting Iran.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    But that doesn't even seem to be the case, from what I've read Iranian involvement in Yemen is limited and not the primary reason for the conflict.
    And the Saudis' methods would be repellent in any case. There's a new report by an American scholar that they've been intentionally targeting food supplies since 2016 (once they realized they wouldn't get a quick and easy victory)...basically they want to create a famine.
    Even if one accepts that one has to maintain good relations with Saudi-Arabia, there's no good reason imo to support their Yemen war (which might in the end even increase the risk of the Saudi monarchy being overthrown anyway).
  48. @iffen
    That’s really cynical


    Realistic if we accept that they are really fighting Iran.

    But that doesn’t even seem to be the case, from what I’ve read Iranian involvement in Yemen is limited and not the primary reason for the conflict.
    And the Saudis’ methods would be repellent in any case. There’s a new report by an American scholar that they’ve been intentionally targeting food supplies since 2016 (once they realized they wouldn’t get a quick and easy victory)…basically they want to create a famine.
    Even if one accepts that one has to maintain good relations with Saudi-Arabia, there’s no good reason imo to support their Yemen war (which might in the end even increase the risk of the Saudi monarchy being overthrown anyway).

    • Replies: @iffen
    from what I’ve read Iranian involvement in Yemen is limited and not the primary reason for the conflict.

    I will defer to you as I haven't read very much at all on the subject. (Trying to get at the facts can just be too mentally exhausting sometimes.)
  49. @German_reader

    $2bn in exports is more important than the lives of Yemenis.
     
    That's really cynical, one doesn't even need to have a positive view of Yemenis to think that aiding in their intentional starvation is deeply immoral.
    And there's not even a good reason for it...it's not like Saudi-Arabia is a genuine friend or ally.
    One way or another, this will backfire horribly on the Western countries involved with Saudi-Arabia imo.

    Also, I no longer view journalists as innocent truth seekers. They are combatants on one side or the other.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    I have a highly negative view of journalists as well, in general it's a dishonest profession much worse than prostitution imo. But I don't see how that means Saudi-Arabia should be able to send its murder teams to other countries.
  50. @iffen
    Also, I no longer view journalists as innocent truth seekers. They are combatants on one side or the other.

    I have a highly negative view of journalists as well, in general it’s a dishonest profession much worse than prostitution imo. But I don’t see how that means Saudi-Arabia should be able to send its murder teams to other countries.

    • Replies: @Talha

    But I don’t see how that means Saudi-Arabia should be able to send its murder teams to other countries.
     
    While I think what Saudi has done (if true and there is little reason to doubt this is outside their operating procedures) is deplorable, I do not think this counts in this case. Embassies and consulates generally fall under special rules of exemption and are considered pseudo foreign territory within the nation they reside. Once you enter a Saudi consulate, it's (to a degree) as if you walked into Saudi itself:
    "U.S. embassies and consulates abroad, as well as foreign embassies and consulates in the United States, have a special status. While the host government is responsible for the security of U.S. diplomats and the area around an embassy, the embassy itself belongs to the country it represents. Representatives of the host country cannot enter an embassy without permission -- even to put out a fire -- and an attack on an embassy is considered an attack on the country it represents."
    https://www.state.gov/discoverdiplomacy/diplomacy101/places/170537.htm

    Agree with you about Saudi vis-a-vis Yemen - it is horrific what they are doing to that country.

    Peace.

  51. @German_reader
    But that doesn't even seem to be the case, from what I've read Iranian involvement in Yemen is limited and not the primary reason for the conflict.
    And the Saudis' methods would be repellent in any case. There's a new report by an American scholar that they've been intentionally targeting food supplies since 2016 (once they realized they wouldn't get a quick and easy victory)...basically they want to create a famine.
    Even if one accepts that one has to maintain good relations with Saudi-Arabia, there's no good reason imo to support their Yemen war (which might in the end even increase the risk of the Saudi monarchy being overthrown anyway).

    from what I’ve read Iranian involvement in Yemen is limited and not the primary reason for the conflict.

    I will defer to you as I haven’t read very much at all on the subject. (Trying to get at the facts can just be too mentally exhausting sometimes.)

  52. @Thorfinnsson
    It's a joke job so why not give it to women? Who are no doubt dumb enough to take it seriously.

    It’s a joke job so why not give it to women? Who are no doubt dumb enough to take it seriously.

    • Replies: @DFH
    You go gyrl!!!!! Slayyyy queeennn!!!!
  53. @notanon

    This new NPC meme is great.
     
    one of the odd things about "Fight Club" when it came out was how there were all these bright white dudes working low wage jobs

    and now c. 20 years later almost all the cultural creativity in the USA is concentrated in a few thousand alt-righters and i wouldn't be surprised if half of them were working jobs like that (like #skyking)

    Fight Club was prophecy.

    and now c. 20 years later almost all the cultural creativity in the USA is concentrated in a few thousand alt-righters

    This stuff isn’t original, lol. A sociopathic Harry Potter in Yudkowsky’s fanfic (isn’t he a leftist?) refers to other people as NPC.

    HPMOR is full of ideas I find incredibly suspect- the only character trait worth anything in the story (both implicitly and explicitly) is intelligence, and the primary use of intelligence within the story is manipulation. This leads to cloying levels of a sort of nerd elitism. Ron and Hagrid are basically dismissed out of hand in this story (Ron explicitly as being useless, Hagrid implicitly so) because they aren’t intelligent enough, and Hariezer explicitly draws implicit NPC vs real-people distinctions.

    The world itself is constructed to back up these assertions- nothing in the wizarding world makes much sense, and characters often behave in silly ways (”like NPCs”) to be a foil for Hariezer.

    https://danluu.com/su3su2u1/hpmor/

    • Replies: @Toronto Russian
    Not to mention that their favorite metaphor comes from a mainstream (((Hollywood))) movie made by two transsexuals. Such creativity.
    https://i.stack.imgur.com/SSDlE.jpg
    , @notanon
    the NPC meme has an impressive triggering ratio
    , @Pericles
    Lol, the fanfic could have been named "What if Harry Potter was a Jew", as reviewed by Asian physicist. Worth a read.
  54. @German_reader
    I have a highly negative view of journalists as well, in general it's a dishonest profession much worse than prostitution imo. But I don't see how that means Saudi-Arabia should be able to send its murder teams to other countries.

    But I don’t see how that means Saudi-Arabia should be able to send its murder teams to other countries.

    While I think what Saudi has done (if true and there is little reason to doubt this is outside their operating procedures) is deplorable, I do not think this counts in this case. Embassies and consulates generally fall under special rules of exemption and are considered pseudo foreign territory within the nation they reside. Once you enter a Saudi consulate, it’s (to a degree) as if you walked into Saudi itself:
    “U.S. embassies and consulates abroad, as well as foreign embassies and consulates in the United States, have a special status. While the host government is responsible for the security of U.S. diplomats and the area around an embassy, the embassy itself belongs to the country it represents. Representatives of the host country cannot enter an embassy without permission — even to put out a fire — and an attack on an embassy is considered an attack on the country it represents.”

    https://www.state.gov/discoverdiplomacy/diplomacy101/places/170537.htm

    Agree with you about Saudi vis-a-vis Yemen – it is horrific what they are doing to that country.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @iffen
    I think the Saudis should just stick to their story. If it works for the Russians, why can't it work for them?
  55. Anon[970] • Disclaimer says:

    Re. Unz vs ADL, I think people like Karlin are the most screwed.

    It is unclear why Unz writes that crap, but even someone who accepts innate evilness of supremacist clans such as the Jews will have a hard time understanding a person who states “Jews pray to Satan daily”. I mean, who the hell cares about their prayers? They could have worshipped Clefairy, if only they could refrain from taking our money through subterfuge.

    But now, anyone who reads about daily prayers to Satan will conclude Unz is unhinged, and his collaborators must be about the same level of insanity. GG, Jew.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward

    ...will have a hard time understanding a person who states “Jews pray to Satan daily”.
     
    What's so hard to understand about a simple truthful fact?

    I mean, who the hell cares about their prayers?
     
    Christians, for one.

    ...if only they could refrain from taking our money through subterfuge.
     
    I suggest you get a real job, then you'll find other things to care about than money.
    , @Pericles
    I didn't think they had it in them, but in the very last paragraph, the ADL mentions that 'Unz comes from a Jewish background'.
  56. @iffen
    Is there some sort of HBD underlying

    What sort of fag reads this blog and fails to get an inkling of what HBD means? :)

    Still fuming about my honest question a week later I see

    • Replies: @iffen
    Still fuming about my honest question a week later I see

    Not really, but you have got me thinking about whether I've always been a woman these 68 years. I was thinking about coming out, but the commenters here are so hurtful they might laugh at me.

  57. @Rosie

    It’s a joke job so why not give it to women? Who are no doubt dumb enough to take it seriously.
     
    https://img1.southernliving.timeinc.net/sites/default/files/styles/responsive_etr_gallery_desktop_portrait/public/image/2016/09/main/pink-pig-nose-130897009_full.jpg?itok=3Ih3Gohr

    You go gyrl!!!!! Slayyyy queeennn!!!!

  58. @Anon
    Re. Unz vs ADL, I think people like Karlin are the most screwed.

    It is unclear why Unz writes that crap, but even someone who accepts innate evilness of supremacist clans such as the Jews will have a hard time understanding a person who states "Jews pray to Satan daily". I mean, who the hell cares about their prayers? They could have worshipped Clefairy, if only they could refrain from taking our money through subterfuge.

    But now, anyone who reads about daily prayers to Satan will conclude Unz is unhinged, and his collaborators must be about the same level of insanity. GG, Jew.

    …will have a hard time understanding a person who states “Jews pray to Satan daily”.

    What’s so hard to understand about a simple truthful fact?

    I mean, who the hell cares about their prayers?

    Christians, for one.

    …if only they could refrain from taking our money through subterfuge.

    I suggest you get a real job, then you’ll find other things to care about than money.

  59. @DFH
    Still fuming about my honest question a week later I see

    Still fuming about my honest question a week later I see

    Not really, but you have got me thinking about whether I’ve always been a woman these 68 years. I was thinking about coming out, but the commenters here are so hurtful they might laugh at me.

    • Replies: @for-the-record
    I’ve always been a woman these 68 years

    1950? A good vintage then.
  60. @Vishnugupta
    Yes it is but not for the reasons you stated.

    The British East India Company army was overwhelmingly recruited from upper cast Hindus of North India.

    Post 1857 mutiny recruitment was from regions/groups that did not mutiny.

    The Sikhs,Punjabi's,Maratha's and Gurkha's..

    The stated goal of the 1857 mutiny was to restore Mughal rule which was anathema to these group who had spent the better part of 400 years fighting Muslim's.

    The martial race theory was politically convenient nonsense in the age of the gun and now assault rifle temperament and ability to follow complex instructions matter far more than brute strength which is why Muslim's have never won a modern mechanized war against non Muslim's not counting guerilla wars like Afghanistan and small skirmishes like Cyprus.

    India has followed this British era recruitment policy to effectively make India military coup proof. Warrior castes from the north west including Sikhs make up 80%+ of the Indian army though they represent 3% of the Indian population so do not ethnically identify caste/region wise with the whole Indian population..but yes the north west warrior castes have near European levels of grip strength and a non vegetarian diet so they are physically the strongest Indians available.

    which is why Muslim’s have never won a modern mechanized war against non Muslim’s not counting guerilla wars like Afghanistan

    Probably why it’s best to stick to what we know and do well. If you’ve read any of the writings of William Lind, he has been keen to point out that many Muslim entities (non-state actors like Hezbollah) understand and apply fourth generation warfare principles quite well. The Hezbollah-Israeli war in 2006 is a case study in how a well-trained and disciplined force could hold its own without any mechanized divisions and zero air power.

    If you are willing to take a good number of casualties and are either used to or can do with significant damage to your infrastructure (think Stalingrad), there are a lot of defensive wars you can win. Offensive wars are no longer necessary nor considered morally justifiable so no need to worry about those.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Vishnugupta
    You are making a virtue out of a necessity.

    It's not like Muslim's have not tried fighting modern mechanized wars it's just that the anti intellectual conditions of Muslim countries and many generations of inbreeding have lowered the IQ of the smart fraction of Muslim countries who ultimately are responsible for foreign policy and apex decision making including strategic military decisions by atleast 1 SD relative to their non Muslim neighbours with whom they fight wars.

    Take India Pakistan,Armenia and Azerbaijan,Albanians and Serbs in each of these cases the smart fraction of the otherwise genetically similar adversary is 1 SD above the respective Mohammaden country.

    This was paradoxically an advantage in per industrial times as low IQ is positively correlated with high birth rates,propensity to seriously believe in religious myths and willingness to die in large numbers which explains the Muslim world's military success in pre industrialization times.

    Unfortunately for Muslim's in industrialized times a proud brave fool is no match for a relatively intelligent but physically weaker opponent backed by a much more sophisticated industrial base and foreign policy.

    Cheers. :clink
  61. @Talha

    But I don’t see how that means Saudi-Arabia should be able to send its murder teams to other countries.
     
    While I think what Saudi has done (if true and there is little reason to doubt this is outside their operating procedures) is deplorable, I do not think this counts in this case. Embassies and consulates generally fall under special rules of exemption and are considered pseudo foreign territory within the nation they reside. Once you enter a Saudi consulate, it's (to a degree) as if you walked into Saudi itself:
    "U.S. embassies and consulates abroad, as well as foreign embassies and consulates in the United States, have a special status. While the host government is responsible for the security of U.S. diplomats and the area around an embassy, the embassy itself belongs to the country it represents. Representatives of the host country cannot enter an embassy without permission -- even to put out a fire -- and an attack on an embassy is considered an attack on the country it represents."
    https://www.state.gov/discoverdiplomacy/diplomacy101/places/170537.htm

    Agree with you about Saudi vis-a-vis Yemen - it is horrific what they are doing to that country.

    Peace.

    I think the Saudis should just stick to their story. If it works for the Russians, why can’t it work for them?

    • Replies: @Talha
    I think Saudis can come up with anything they want and will face very little repercussions (any more than they did with having 15 out of 19 guys on 9/11 holding Saudi passports). Whether we like it or not, the Saudis are part of the global elite squad - they bought their way in.

    Bin Salman: "Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do...know-what-I'm-sayin'?"
    Putin: "You gotta...what else you gonna do?"

    https://img.maximummedia.ie/joe_ie/eyJkYXRhIjoie1widXJsXCI6XCJodHRwOlxcXC9cXFwvbWVkaWEtam9lLm1heGltdW1tZWRpYS5pZS5zMy5hbWF6b25hd3MuY29tXFxcL3dwLWNvbnRlbnRcXFwvdXBsb2Fkc1xcXC8yMDE4XFxcLzA2XFxcLzE0MjA0MTQwXFxcL1NjcmVlbi1TaG90LTIwMTgtMDYtMTQtYXQtMjAuNDAuMzcucG5nXCIsXCJ3aWR0aFwiOjc2NyxcImhlaWdodFwiOjQzMSxcImRlZmF1bHRcIjpcImh0dHBzOlxcXC9cXFwvd3d3LmpvZS5pZVxcXC9hc3NldHNcXFwvaW1hZ2VzXFxcL2pvZVxcXC9uby1pbWFnZS5wbmc_dj01XCJ9IiwiaGFzaCI6IjFiZWZkMmFjYTMxMzI0MGU1YTAxNWZiMzJkNjZkYjA0ZThlMjAzOTAifQ==/screen-shot-2018-06-14-at-20-40-37.png

    Peace.
  62. @iffen
    I think the Saudis should just stick to their story. If it works for the Russians, why can't it work for them?

    I think Saudis can come up with anything they want and will face very little repercussions (any more than they did with having 15 out of 19 guys on 9/11 holding Saudi passports). Whether we like it or not, the Saudis are part of the global elite squad – they bought their way in.

    Bin Salman: “Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do…know-what-I’m-sayin’?”
    Putin: “You gotta…what else you gonna do?”

    Peace.

    • LOL: iffen
    • Replies: @Abelard Lindsey
    Putin: You know about the guy's (head) they found in Istanbul?

    Bin Salman: Yeah, I heard about it.

    Putin: They're making a big deal about it. Its in all the papers. I mean....this isn't good. You got to tell them to "take care of things...a little better".

    Bin Salman: I'll tell them.
  63. @German_reader
    I agree, that stuff with basic unconditional income seems crazy given Italy's debt.

    Is it?

    With the Citizen income it won’t be possible to

    1- make immoral purchases (it’s still not specified what it means though)
    2- buy electronics
    3- buy cigarettes and lottery tickets

    https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=152888404&postcount=1337

    The system sounds quite similar to the one in Romania, with “meal tickets”. I think the French have something similar too.

    Basically, you receive each month some cupons, with the value of X. And you can only buy food with them. The shop receives the cupons instead of cash, and then sends the cupons, together with the purchasing bill to the state to get money back.

    If the Italian system works with a card instead of cupons, it’s even easier to track it, since the items bought will be electronically bundled together with the card data.

    Sure, there are ways around it, but throughout the years, it worked rather well for its intended purpose.

    https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=152891112&postcount=1339

    The foreign press badly translated the thing as “universal basic income”, and still does not try to explain in detail what exactly it is.

    BTW, another detail of such system is that those who try to cheat the State will face 6 years of jail.

    https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=152902530&postcount=1342

  64. @Talha

    which is why Muslim’s have never won a modern mechanized war against non Muslim’s not counting guerilla wars like Afghanistan
     
    Probably why it's best to stick to what we know and do well. If you've read any of the writings of William Lind, he has been keen to point out that many Muslim entities (non-state actors like Hezbollah) understand and apply fourth generation warfare principles quite well. The Hezbollah-Israeli war in 2006 is a case study in how a well-trained and disciplined force could hold its own without any mechanized divisions and zero air power.

    If you are willing to take a good number of casualties and are either used to or can do with significant damage to your infrastructure (think Stalingrad), there are a lot of defensive wars you can win. Offensive wars are no longer necessary nor considered morally justifiable so no need to worry about those.

    Peace.

    You are making a virtue out of a necessity.

    It’s not like Muslim’s have not tried fighting modern mechanized wars it’s just that the anti intellectual conditions of Muslim countries and many generations of inbreeding have lowered the IQ of the smart fraction of Muslim countries who ultimately are responsible for foreign policy and apex decision making including strategic military decisions by atleast 1 SD relative to their non Muslim neighbours with whom they fight wars.

    Take India Pakistan,Armenia and Azerbaijan,Albanians and Serbs in each of these cases the smart fraction of the otherwise genetically similar adversary is 1 SD above the respective Mohammaden country.

    This was paradoxically an advantage in per industrial times as low IQ is positively correlated with high birth rates,propensity to seriously believe in religious myths and willingness to die in large numbers which explains the Muslim world’s military success in pre industrialization times.

    Unfortunately for Muslim’s in industrialized times a proud brave fool is no match for a relatively intelligent but physically weaker opponent backed by a much more sophisticated industrial base and foreign policy.

    Cheers. :clink

    • Replies: @Talha

    You are making a virtue out of a necessity.
     
    David is always seen as more virtuous than Goliath; Mr. Lind mentions this. Of course this is adaptation by necessity - Muslim countries go not have the best infrastructure nor the capability or countering air power by non-Muslim forces. Like most of the third world (Muslim or not), they buy equipment from

    It’s not like Muslim’s have not tried fighting modern mechanized wars
     
    They indeed have - not many though against non-Muslims. They have mostly been against themselves. They made a few good showings in a couple of theaters here and there, but usually get defeated in an offensive war but the question still stands - why is this necessary? You need mechanized divisions to invade someone. If you really only want to keep your territory intact, then the strategy is different. When the other side has complete air superiority massive amounts of mechanized divisions can be a liability.

    Unfortunately for Muslim’s in industrialized times a proud brave fool is no match for a relatively intelligent but physically weaker opponent backed by a much more sophisticated industrial base and foreign policy.
     
    I'll agree here - this was already established during the days of European colonization - see the lop-sided casualties at the Battle of the Pyramids for example (so this is not news), but the US is going to eventually leave dirt-poor Afghanistan after having accomplished practically none of its stated goals so I still don't see the point. Muslims took a bunch of casualties, had no real infrastructure to destroy anyway, killed a bunch of invaders and still hold their territory. So?

    Peace.
    , @Ali Choudhury
    Muslims in the Indian sub-continent are largely converts from the bottom of the barrel Dalit Hindu castes. Therefore it is no surprise their IQ is lower than that of upper class Brahmins, when the same would have also been true of their unconverted ancestors. Their lack of human capital meant India's Muslim rulers preferred imported Iranians and Central Asians for important roles as well as capable Hindus. Even Aurangzeb had plenty of Hindu ministers and generals rather than employing the descendants of local converrts.

    The Muslim world's success in warfare was due to their expertise in steppe-style cavalry warfare and archery than a numbers advantage. That is why the Turkic Mahmud of Ghazni was able to raid northwest India 17 times and remain undefeated despite usually having much smaller armies than his opponents.
    , @iffen
    the smart fraction of Muslim countries who ultimately are responsible for foreign policy and apex decision making

    It doesn't help that a significant % of this fraction move to countries like the US. In spite of this, I give Talha credit for not abandoning his religion or his people.

    Unlike some people who not only leave their people but become lap and attack dogs for their enemies:

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/democrats-can-defeat-trump-base-only-if-they-ditch-chuck-ncna919841


    One hundred years of searching for magic negroes at the expense of working class whites is enough, Howell.

  65. @Brabantian
    Interesting AK link above, to the Bloomberg article about Russian exile Sergei Kapchuk, fearing for his life in Britain where he had asylum, moving quietly around Europe in dazed uncertainty, and then getting terrified in Croatia where his UK travel documents were seized because the UK had apparently revoked them

    Calling Putin's man Boris Titov for help, Kapchuk was then rescued by the Russian embassy from arrest in Croatia, Kapchuk agreeing to go back into mother Russia's arms despite legal charges involving him there

    From the Bloomberg article, about Titov, a good vignette about Putin's Russia:

    Back in February, Putin’s business ombudsman, Boris Titov, flew into London with an unusual offer for Kapchuk and a few dozen other wealthy Russians accused of financial crimes. At Pushkin House, a cultural center on Bloomsbury Square, Titov vowed to use the power of his office and an army of lawyers to help the men clear their names through Russian courts. All they had to do was come home.
     
    This leads to an intriguing area of political analysis

    It is an under-appreciated aspect of Putin that he has in fact let huge numbers of people out of Russia's prisons early, with numbers said to be in the hundreds of thousands

    Whereas in the USA, e.g., heavy youthful pot smoker Barack Obama never thought of releasing the hundreds of thousands of weed tokers and sellers who languish in the USA's 2.3 million prisoner gulag (about 25% of all people in jail in the entire world)

    In surprisingly rough or even 'barbaric' countries, there is quite often an early release of jailed political figures or even extremist 'terrorists', sometimes by tinpot dictatorships who yet seek to get some good PR amidst their local rabble-rousers

    It takes a real Chad to let bygones be bygones ... and now after Donald Trump's meeting with Kanye West, we have talk of Trump doing something radical re American prisons, per his dialogue with Kanye

    Trump could go down in history like 'Abraham Lincoln ending slavery in the USA', if he let out of jail a couple of hundred thousand of the blacks and Mexicans in the slammer for non-violent offences ... that people that fake progressive black guy Obama left to languish behind bars ... would be a brilliant move to embarrass the hell out of the Antifa / SJW shriekers, it might even demolish them 4evah

    and now after Donald Trump’s meeting with Kanye West, we have talk of Trump doing something radical re American prisons, per his dialogue with Kanye

    Yes, this would be very good.

    While I think there are many sympathetic aspects about Trump’s personality, however – he might unfortunately have too much “authoritarian sympathies”, which seems perhaps unusual for a man of his social origin.

    In particular, this strange worship of police which you can hear in his speeches (although, from a cynical point of view, this is perhaps good politics for attracting lower middle voters in such a “police state” as America).

    Probably, one sympathetic aspect (if the only so far attractive aspect), of a future Kanye/Kim Kardashian tandem presidency, is they seem to have interest in prison reform, etc.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    Why should there be prison reform in the US, those harsh sentences are needed to keep the criminal segments of the population in check.
    If there's any reform, it should be about the death penalty, it's bizarre that there are sometimes decades of delay between sentencing and execution. Executions must happen much faster for any deterrent effect.
    , @reiner Tor
    Releasing many prisoners will lead to a horrible crime wave and eventually another wave of tough anti-crime policies.
  66. @Vishnugupta
    You are making a virtue out of a necessity.

    It's not like Muslim's have not tried fighting modern mechanized wars it's just that the anti intellectual conditions of Muslim countries and many generations of inbreeding have lowered the IQ of the smart fraction of Muslim countries who ultimately are responsible for foreign policy and apex decision making including strategic military decisions by atleast 1 SD relative to their non Muslim neighbours with whom they fight wars.

    Take India Pakistan,Armenia and Azerbaijan,Albanians and Serbs in each of these cases the smart fraction of the otherwise genetically similar adversary is 1 SD above the respective Mohammaden country.

    This was paradoxically an advantage in per industrial times as low IQ is positively correlated with high birth rates,propensity to seriously believe in religious myths and willingness to die in large numbers which explains the Muslim world's military success in pre industrialization times.

    Unfortunately for Muslim's in industrialized times a proud brave fool is no match for a relatively intelligent but physically weaker opponent backed by a much more sophisticated industrial base and foreign policy.

    Cheers. :clink

    You are making a virtue out of a necessity.

    David is always seen as more virtuous than Goliath; Mr. Lind mentions this. Of course this is adaptation by necessity – Muslim countries go not have the best infrastructure nor the capability or countering air power by non-Muslim forces. Like most of the third world (Muslim or not), they buy equipment from

    It’s not like Muslim’s have not tried fighting modern mechanized wars

    They indeed have – not many though against non-Muslims. They have mostly been against themselves. They made a few good showings in a couple of theaters here and there, but usually get defeated in an offensive war but the question still stands – why is this necessary? You need mechanized divisions to invade someone. If you really only want to keep your territory intact, then the strategy is different. When the other side has complete air superiority massive amounts of mechanized divisions can be a liability.

    Unfortunately for Muslim’s in industrialized times a proud brave fool is no match for a relatively intelligent but physically weaker opponent backed by a much more sophisticated industrial base and foreign policy.

    I’ll agree here – this was already established during the days of European colonization – see the lop-sided casualties at the Battle of the Pyramids for example (so this is not news), but the US is going to eventually leave dirt-poor Afghanistan after having accomplished practically none of its stated goals so I still don’t see the point. Muslims took a bunch of casualties, had no real infrastructure to destroy anyway, killed a bunch of invaders and still hold their territory. So?

    Peace.

  67. Is Moscow the best major city in Europe? This Indian expat thinks yes.

    London is still the best “mega city” (I guess arbitrarily – city with a population over 5 million) in Europe.

    The wealthy areas of London are just a paradise (even if the poor areas of London, are a bit apocalyptic).

    However, Moscow very quickly improving of course.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    Since 2016, I have spent a few months in London, and approaching 2 years in Moscow. I can unreservedly state that Moscow is far better.

    To be sure London is better for boutique shopping and starred Michelin restaurants for people rich enough to care about that but what other advantages does it have?
  68. @Dmitry

    and now after Donald Trump’s meeting with Kanye West, we have talk of Trump doing something radical re American prisons, per his dialogue with Kanye
     
    Yes, this would be very good.

    While I think there are many sympathetic aspects about Trump's personality, however - he might unfortunately have too much "authoritarian sympathies", which seems perhaps unusual for a man of his social origin.

    In particular, this strange worship of police which you can hear in his speeches (although, from a cynical point of view, this is perhaps good politics for attracting lower middle voters in such a "police state" as America).

    Probably, one sympathetic aspect (if the only so far attractive aspect), of a future Kanye/Kim Kardashian tandem presidency, is they seem to have interest in prison reform, etc.

    Why should there be prison reform in the US, those harsh sentences are needed to keep the criminal segments of the population in check.
    If there’s any reform, it should be about the death penalty, it’s bizarre that there are sometimes decades of delay between sentencing and execution. Executions must happen much faster for any deterrent effect.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I have been to jail (not prison) for a felony in a major city.

    It was 36 hours before I could call someone, and another 12 before I could get bailed out. After getting bailed out it still took four hours before I could get out. They also did need give me my wallet back...or even my shoelaces. So I had to walk seven miles to get home in shoes without shoelaces through some fairly dangerous neighborhoods.

    The only food served was white bread, hard boiled eggs, and off-brand kool-aid packets.

    Throughout the entire process I was endlessly lied to by officials.

    These seems like something that could be reformed, though not in the sense liberals imagine (they simply don't think criminals should be punished).

    , @Yevardian
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=IpkX6aIrSQc

    Very, very tangentially related, but since this is an open thread I thought I'd share it with you lot, perhaps German_Reader could translate this gem?
  69. @Dmitry

    and now after Donald Trump’s meeting with Kanye West, we have talk of Trump doing something radical re American prisons, per his dialogue with Kanye
     
    Yes, this would be very good.

    While I think there are many sympathetic aspects about Trump's personality, however - he might unfortunately have too much "authoritarian sympathies", which seems perhaps unusual for a man of his social origin.

    In particular, this strange worship of police which you can hear in his speeches (although, from a cynical point of view, this is perhaps good politics for attracting lower middle voters in such a "police state" as America).

    Probably, one sympathetic aspect (if the only so far attractive aspect), of a future Kanye/Kim Kardashian tandem presidency, is they seem to have interest in prison reform, etc.

    Releasing many prisoners will lead to a horrible crime wave and eventually another wave of tough anti-crime policies.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    A lot of people are in prison, not for violent crimes. They are in prison. for all kinds of different things, even just many which would be legal in parts of the EU - like drugs.

    Greasy perhaps in prison right now by the IRS. Meanwhile, Thorfinnsson also talks about how he was in prison .

    I would like a graph comparing American rates, with the Soviet Union.


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fa/Incarceration_rates_worldwide.gif/350px-Incarceration_rates_worldwide.gif
  70. @German_reader

    $2bn in exports is more important than the lives of Yemenis.
     
    That's really cynical, one doesn't even need to have a positive view of Yemenis to think that aiding in their intentional starvation is deeply immoral.
    And there's not even a good reason for it...it's not like Saudi-Arabia is a genuine friend or ally.
    One way or another, this will backfire horribly on the Western countries involved with Saudi-Arabia imo.

    It will probably backfire on Western countries in the form of “refugees”.

    Which we have no obligation to accept (not like Saudi Arabia is accepting any).

    So trying to stop Saudi Arabia’s war to stop immigration is like what Steve Sailer likes to call a “triple bankshot”.

    There is no shortage of things we can criticize Saudi Arabia for, but unlike Israel they actually do pay us. Trump got a $400bn arms deal out of them.

    I suppose the other big risk is they bribe us into attacking Iran.

    • Replies: @German_reader

    Which we have no obligation to accept
     
    If Western countries have actively supported the destruction and starvation of Yemen, it becomes much harder to reject a moral argument for accepting refugees from there.
    Besides, I just object to such a policy in general, it's deeply immoral.

    There is no shortage of things we can criticize Saudi Arabia for, but unlike Israel they actually do pay us. Trump got a $400bn arms deal out of them.
     
    So what, not everything should be about money.
    Apart from moral considerations, I also have my doubts whether it's wise to sell all those arms to Saudi-Arabia, the present regime might eventually collapse, and who knows what those weapons will be used for then (yes, I know, Arab jihadis would probably be too dumb to utilize all those tanks and fighter jets effectively, but still, not worth the risk imo).
  71. * Greece wants $280 billion in gibsmedats WW2 reparations from Germany.

    Only if they accept German/Bavarian rule.

  72. @iffen
    Still fuming about my honest question a week later I see

    Not really, but you have got me thinking about whether I've always been a woman these 68 years. I was thinking about coming out, but the commenters here are so hurtful they might laugh at me.

    I’ve always been a woman these 68 years

    1950? A good vintage then.

  73. @Thorfinnsson
    It will probably backfire on Western countries in the form of "refugees".

    Which we have no obligation to accept (not like Saudi Arabia is accepting any).

    So trying to stop Saudi Arabia's war to stop immigration is like what Steve Sailer likes to call a "triple bankshot".

    There is no shortage of things we can criticize Saudi Arabia for, but unlike Israel they actually do pay us. Trump got a $400bn arms deal out of them.

    I suppose the other big risk is they bribe us into attacking Iran.

    Which we have no obligation to accept

    If Western countries have actively supported the destruction and starvation of Yemen, it becomes much harder to reject a moral argument for accepting refugees from there.
    Besides, I just object to such a policy in general, it’s deeply immoral.

    There is no shortage of things we can criticize Saudi Arabia for, but unlike Israel they actually do pay us. Trump got a $400bn arms deal out of them.

    So what, not everything should be about money.
    Apart from moral considerations, I also have my doubts whether it’s wise to sell all those arms to Saudi-Arabia, the present regime might eventually collapse, and who knows what those weapons will be used for then (yes, I know, Arab jihadis would probably be too dumb to utilize all those tanks and fighter jets effectively, but still, not worth the risk imo).

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Susceptibility to moral arguments is the problem.

    We should reject "refugees" because they are not in our self-interest. Pursuing your interests is after all what politics is all about...or should be.

    There's more to life than money, but any government should have as an objective increasing the wealth of its people. And unlike Germany the United States has a negative balance of trade, so lucrative arms exports are very welcome.

    You have a reasonable point about Saudi Arabia's likely future collapse. I see this as grabbing the money while we still can, but I won't pretend it's risk-free. Still, the harm caused by those weapons in a post-collapse scenario is likely to be mostly confined to the region.
    , @reiner Tor

    Arab jihadis would probably be too dumb to utilize all those tanks and fighter jets effectively
     
    They might be smart enough to sell some of them to Russia, China, Turkey and Pakistan for cold hard cash. And maybe some mercenaries to operate the rest.
    , @notanon

    I also have my doubts whether it’s wise to sell all those arms to Saudi-Arabia
     
    those arms sales are disguised bribes - it's why our corrupt political class let the Saudis get away with funding every jihadist group on the planet
  74. Who is going to stop the Russian horde?

    The West needs to close the ATV gap!

    • Replies: @inertial
    That's pretty impressive!
    , @Spisarevski
    Russian (incl. Soviet) ATVs are the best. The only thing that is comfier than exploring the end of the world with an apartment on wheels is exploring it on a nuclear icebreaker - and f0r that you also have to go to the Russians.

    From their new ATVs, besides the SHERP, the Shaman and the Burlak are also pretty cool.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfiqbpvOGbE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsPJ3JCElXA

    And from the Soviet ATVs, my favorite are the Harkovchanka:
    https://i.imgur.com/3hP466M.jpg

    and of course the ZIL-167
    https://i.imgur.com/4CGYStI.jpg
  75. @reiner Tor
    Releasing many prisoners will lead to a horrible crime wave and eventually another wave of tough anti-crime policies.

    A lot of people are in prison, not for violent crimes. They are in prison. for all kinds of different things, even just many which would be legal in parts of the EU – like drugs.

    Greasy perhaps in prison right now by the IRS. Meanwhile, Thorfinnsson also talks about how he was in prison .

    I would like a graph comparing American rates, with the Soviet Union.

    • Replies: @AP
    As someone else has pointed out, putting people away for seemingly minor crimes means that there is much less property crime in the USA. Mail is delivered to front porches and rarely gets stolen, fewer pickpockets, etc. etc.
    , @notanon
    the police use drug possession to lock up gangstas cos it doesn't require witnesses...

    cos witnesses won't testify against gangstas.

    it's not a good solution but it's the only option while the US media refuse to tell the truth about the inner-city gang problem.
  76. @German_reader
    Why should there be prison reform in the US, those harsh sentences are needed to keep the criminal segments of the population in check.
    If there's any reform, it should be about the death penalty, it's bizarre that there are sometimes decades of delay between sentencing and execution. Executions must happen much faster for any deterrent effect.

    I have been to jail (not prison) for a felony in a major city.

    It was 36 hours before I could call someone, and another 12 before I could get bailed out. After getting bailed out it still took four hours before I could get out. They also did need give me my wallet back…or even my shoelaces. So I had to walk seven miles to get home in shoes without shoelaces through some fairly dangerous neighborhoods.

    The only food served was white bread, hard boiled eggs, and off-brand kool-aid packets.

    Throughout the entire process I was endlessly lied to by officials.

    These seems like something that could be reformed, though not in the sense liberals imagine (they simply don’t think criminals should be punished).

    • Replies: @for-the-record
    I have been to jail (not prison) for a felony in a major city.

    Is this separate from your O'Hare Airport adventure?
  77. @German_reader

    Which we have no obligation to accept
     
    If Western countries have actively supported the destruction and starvation of Yemen, it becomes much harder to reject a moral argument for accepting refugees from there.
    Besides, I just object to such a policy in general, it's deeply immoral.

    There is no shortage of things we can criticize Saudi Arabia for, but unlike Israel they actually do pay us. Trump got a $400bn arms deal out of them.
     
    So what, not everything should be about money.
    Apart from moral considerations, I also have my doubts whether it's wise to sell all those arms to Saudi-Arabia, the present regime might eventually collapse, and who knows what those weapons will be used for then (yes, I know, Arab jihadis would probably be too dumb to utilize all those tanks and fighter jets effectively, but still, not worth the risk imo).

    Susceptibility to moral arguments is the problem.

    We should reject “refugees” because they are not in our self-interest. Pursuing your interests is after all what politics is all about…or should be.

    There’s more to life than money, but any government should have as an objective increasing the wealth of its people. And unlike Germany the United States has a negative balance of trade, so lucrative arms exports are very welcome.

    You have a reasonable point about Saudi Arabia’s likely future collapse. I see this as grabbing the money while we still can, but I won’t pretend it’s risk-free. Still, the harm caused by those weapons in a post-collapse scenario is likely to be mostly confined to the region.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    Susceptibility to moral arguments is the problem.
     
    It’s probably part of what makes European societies so nice and good.

    It’s also not something you can abolish by fiat. So the result of Hitler disregarding moral imperatives was that his name became synonymous with Satan. Now the name of President Thorfinnsson might become synonymous with Hitler.

    Even from a purely utilitarian point of view, you have to be mindful of the fact that the results of Hitler’s policies were the exact opposite of what he aimed for, and it was only partly the result of his having lost the war. The other problem was his extreme amorality, which made it impossible to revive his ideas or political movement, even in modified form.
  78. @Another German Reader
    Who is going to stop the Russian horde?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WrjjV6nGh0g
    The West needs to close the ATV gap!

    That’s pretty impressive!

  79. @German_reader

    Which we have no obligation to accept
     
    If Western countries have actively supported the destruction and starvation of Yemen, it becomes much harder to reject a moral argument for accepting refugees from there.
    Besides, I just object to such a policy in general, it's deeply immoral.

    There is no shortage of things we can criticize Saudi Arabia for, but unlike Israel they actually do pay us. Trump got a $400bn arms deal out of them.
     
    So what, not everything should be about money.
    Apart from moral considerations, I also have my doubts whether it's wise to sell all those arms to Saudi-Arabia, the present regime might eventually collapse, and who knows what those weapons will be used for then (yes, I know, Arab jihadis would probably be too dumb to utilize all those tanks and fighter jets effectively, but still, not worth the risk imo).

    Arab jihadis would probably be too dumb to utilize all those tanks and fighter jets effectively

    They might be smart enough to sell some of them to Russia, China, Turkey and Pakistan for cold hard cash. And maybe some mercenaries to operate the rest.

  80. @E. Harding
    The Bloomberg hacking story is taken as dubious by security experts due to it having lots of problems:

    https://blog.erratasec.com/2018/10/notes-on-bloomberg-supermicro-supply.html

    Black support for Affirmative Action seems pretty overwhelming in real life:

    https://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/state.php?fips=26&year=2006&f=0&off=51&elect=0

    Only an idiot or an American would believe anything told about China or Russia in the MSM.

  81. @Thorfinnsson
    Susceptibility to moral arguments is the problem.

    We should reject "refugees" because they are not in our self-interest. Pursuing your interests is after all what politics is all about...or should be.

    There's more to life than money, but any government should have as an objective increasing the wealth of its people. And unlike Germany the United States has a negative balance of trade, so lucrative arms exports are very welcome.

    You have a reasonable point about Saudi Arabia's likely future collapse. I see this as grabbing the money while we still can, but I won't pretend it's risk-free. Still, the harm caused by those weapons in a post-collapse scenario is likely to be mostly confined to the region.

    Susceptibility to moral arguments is the problem.

    It’s probably part of what makes European societies so nice and good.

    It’s also not something you can abolish by fiat. So the result of Hitler disregarding moral imperatives was that his name became synonymous with Satan. Now the name of President Thorfinnsson might become synonymous with Hitler.

    Even from a purely utilitarian point of view, you have to be mindful of the fact that the results of Hitler’s policies were the exact opposite of what he aimed for, and it was only partly the result of his having lost the war. The other problem was his extreme amorality, which made it impossible to revive his ideas or political movement, even in modified form.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    I agree. This "might is right, moral considerations are unimportant" line is self-defeating. The argument must be that mass immigration and forced multiculturalization is a grave injustice and well beyond anything that could be reasonably justified as a moral obligation.
    Not actively aiding the mass starvation of people who haven't harmed one is a pretty minimal demand and shouldn't be controversial imo.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    These are good points, but it invites the obvious question of how far do you go in the opposite direction?

    Note that Anglos routinely get accused of hypocrisy. Hasn't been a problem since Anglos have been winners for a few centuries now.

    Other than communists I think we all have limits as it is. If the Saudis were slaughtering Greeks or something I'd favor stopping them.
  82. @LondonBob
    Five Star's economic policies are nuts, hope Salvini keeps his distance and nullifies their crazy ideas.

    That’s impossible. At best he’ll be able blame them for collapse.

  83. @Another German Reader
    Who is going to stop the Russian horde?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WrjjV6nGh0g
    The West needs to close the ATV gap!

    Russian (incl. Soviet) ATVs are the best. The only thing that is comfier than exploring the end of the world with an apartment on wheels is exploring it on a nuclear icebreaker – and f0r that you also have to go to the Russians.

    From their new ATVs, besides the SHERP, the Shaman and the Burlak are also pretty cool.

    And from the Soviet ATVs, my favorite are the Harkovchanka:

    and of course the ZIL-167

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Let's not forget Sweden here:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/34/US_5055th_Range_Squadron_M973_SUSV.jpg
  84. @reiner Tor

    Susceptibility to moral arguments is the problem.
     
    It’s probably part of what makes European societies so nice and good.

    It’s also not something you can abolish by fiat. So the result of Hitler disregarding moral imperatives was that his name became synonymous with Satan. Now the name of President Thorfinnsson might become synonymous with Hitler.

    Even from a purely utilitarian point of view, you have to be mindful of the fact that the results of Hitler’s policies were the exact opposite of what he aimed for, and it was only partly the result of his having lost the war. The other problem was his extreme amorality, which made it impossible to revive his ideas or political movement, even in modified form.

    I agree. This “might is right, moral considerations are unimportant” line is self-defeating. The argument must be that mass immigration and forced multiculturalization is a grave injustice and well beyond anything that could be reasonably justified as a moral obligation.
    Not actively aiding the mass starvation of people who haven’t harmed one is a pretty minimal demand and shouldn’t be controversial imo.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I suppose you two are right as far as arguments go.

    I'm deeply offended by the idea that we should give up exports just to help Arabalonian Mohammedans.

    But publicly this is perhaps not a good line.
  85. @anon
    Something more into your "moral decay and degeneracy/LGBTQ appreciation" files:

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/institutionalizing-the-trans-revolution/

    TL;DR: Thomas Donelly, a senior national security analyst with the neoconservative American Enterprise Institute, announced his transition and is now Giselle Donelly, and there was much rejoicing all over Washington DC.

    Thomas

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Screen-Shot-2018-10-13-at-8.09.17-AM-e1539436311780.png

    Giselle

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Screen-Shot-2018-10-13-at-8.10.14-AM.png

    Behold the miracle, Ernst Stavro Blofeld turned into elderly cat lady ;-)

    “Look at what the cat dragged in.”

  86. @Toronto Russian

    and now c. 20 years later almost all the cultural creativity in the USA is concentrated in a few thousand alt-righters
     
    This stuff isn't original, lol. A sociopathic Harry Potter in Yudkowsky's fanfic (isn't he a leftist?) refers to other people as NPC.

    HPMOR is full of ideas I find incredibly suspect- the only character trait worth anything in the story (both implicitly and explicitly) is intelligence, and the primary use of intelligence within the story is manipulation. This leads to cloying levels of a sort of nerd elitism. Ron and Hagrid are basically dismissed out of hand in this story (Ron explicitly as being useless, Hagrid implicitly so) because they aren’t intelligent enough, and Hariezer explicitly draws implicit NPC vs real-people distinctions.

    The world itself is constructed to back up these assertions- nothing in the wizarding world makes much sense, and characters often behave in silly ways (”like NPCs”) to be a foil for Hariezer.
    https://danluu.com/su3su2u1/hpmor/
     

    Not to mention that their favorite metaphor comes from a mainstream (((Hollywood))) movie made by two transsexuals. Such creativity.

  87. @Vishnugupta
    You are making a virtue out of a necessity.

    It's not like Muslim's have not tried fighting modern mechanized wars it's just that the anti intellectual conditions of Muslim countries and many generations of inbreeding have lowered the IQ of the smart fraction of Muslim countries who ultimately are responsible for foreign policy and apex decision making including strategic military decisions by atleast 1 SD relative to their non Muslim neighbours with whom they fight wars.

    Take India Pakistan,Armenia and Azerbaijan,Albanians and Serbs in each of these cases the smart fraction of the otherwise genetically similar adversary is 1 SD above the respective Mohammaden country.

    This was paradoxically an advantage in per industrial times as low IQ is positively correlated with high birth rates,propensity to seriously believe in religious myths and willingness to die in large numbers which explains the Muslim world's military success in pre industrialization times.

    Unfortunately for Muslim's in industrialized times a proud brave fool is no match for a relatively intelligent but physically weaker opponent backed by a much more sophisticated industrial base and foreign policy.

    Cheers. :clink

    Muslims in the Indian sub-continent are largely converts from the bottom of the barrel Dalit Hindu castes. Therefore it is no surprise their IQ is lower than that of upper class Brahmins, when the same would have also been true of their unconverted ancestors. Their lack of human capital meant India’s Muslim rulers preferred imported Iranians and Central Asians for important roles as well as capable Hindus. Even Aurangzeb had plenty of Hindu ministers and generals rather than employing the descendants of local converrts.

    The Muslim world’s success in warfare was due to their expertise in steppe-style cavalry warfare and archery than a numbers advantage. That is why the Turkic Mahmud of Ghazni was able to raid northwest India 17 times and remain undefeated despite usually having much smaller armies than his opponents.

    • Replies: @Talha
    And why the Mamluks and other Turkic Muslim armies were able to hold the line against the Mongol juggernaut. The Mongol invasions were kept to the outer areas or were recovered by the various forms of the Delhi Sultanate and not allowed to go into the interior of India...otherwise you would have had something akin to what happened in China.

    Wa salaam.
    , @Vishnugupta
    While it is true most S Asian Muslim's are low caste converts the fact is the Muslim ruling class were Turkic in origin and had upper caste converts.

    I am not aware of any Arzal Muslim ie low caste convert founding any ruling dynasty.

    The IQ difference among Ashram/Ajlaf Muslim's and upper caste Hindus (excluding Brahmins as we are for various reasons of a different IQ profile and responsible for 95% + of S Asian intellectual achievements throughout history despite being at best 5% of Indian and 3% of South Asian population) is very real and apparent and can be attributed to decline in IQ via 20-50 generations of inbreeding and an anti intellectual culture Muslim India despite having 25% of world GDP at its peak has no scientific achievements comprehensively dwarfed by tiny Kerala with its school of mathematics at the same time and of course completely eclipsed by Hindu India that preceded it which had the world's largest higher education system Nalanda,vikramshila,..dozens more which were systematically destroyed by the followers of the proudly illiterate prophet.

    Even today Pakistan and Bangladesh have nothing remotely comparable to India's Iit system.

    This is not an isolated instance Armenia produced Artem mikoyan,Boris babian,countless chess headmasters etc. What did Muslim's of the Caucasus produce? Serbs produced Nikola Tesla and Mikhail milankuvitch what did Bosnian's and Albanians produce? The base genetics of the population pairs is the same just the religion is different..heck the middle east in per Islamic times was shockingly advanced despite lack of pre industrial inputs fresh water and arable land relative to population. Today despite having massive resources it achieves nothing.What happened? Long term and irreversible IQ retardation in the smart fraction due to inbreeding and a intellectually hostile culture is my best guess.
  88. @Talha
    I think Saudis can come up with anything they want and will face very little repercussions (any more than they did with having 15 out of 19 guys on 9/11 holding Saudi passports). Whether we like it or not, the Saudis are part of the global elite squad - they bought their way in.

    Bin Salman: "Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do...know-what-I'm-sayin'?"
    Putin: "You gotta...what else you gonna do?"

    https://img.maximummedia.ie/joe_ie/eyJkYXRhIjoie1widXJsXCI6XCJodHRwOlxcXC9cXFwvbWVkaWEtam9lLm1heGltdW1tZWRpYS5pZS5zMy5hbWF6b25hd3MuY29tXFxcL3dwLWNvbnRlbnRcXFwvdXBsb2Fkc1xcXC8yMDE4XFxcLzA2XFxcLzE0MjA0MTQwXFxcL1NjcmVlbi1TaG90LTIwMTgtMDYtMTQtYXQtMjAuNDAuMzcucG5nXCIsXCJ3aWR0aFwiOjc2NyxcImhlaWdodFwiOjQzMSxcImRlZmF1bHRcIjpcImh0dHBzOlxcXC9cXFwvd3d3LmpvZS5pZVxcXC9hc3NldHNcXFwvaW1hZ2VzXFxcL2pvZVxcXC9uby1pbWFnZS5wbmc_dj01XCJ9IiwiaGFzaCI6IjFiZWZkMmFjYTMxMzI0MGU1YTAxNWZiMzJkNjZkYjA0ZThlMjAzOTAifQ==/screen-shot-2018-06-14-at-20-40-37.png

    Peace.

    Putin: You know about the guy’s (head) they found in Istanbul?

    Bin Salman: Yeah, I heard about it.

    Putin: They’re making a big deal about it. Its in all the papers. I mean….this isn’t good. You got to tell them to “take care of things…a little better”.

    Bin Salman: I’ll tell them.

    • Replies: @Talha
    Another valid caption. You can do a lot with that photo.

    Peace.
  89. @reiner Tor

    Susceptibility to moral arguments is the problem.
     
    It’s probably part of what makes European societies so nice and good.

    It’s also not something you can abolish by fiat. So the result of Hitler disregarding moral imperatives was that his name became synonymous with Satan. Now the name of President Thorfinnsson might become synonymous with Hitler.

    Even from a purely utilitarian point of view, you have to be mindful of the fact that the results of Hitler’s policies were the exact opposite of what he aimed for, and it was only partly the result of his having lost the war. The other problem was his extreme amorality, which made it impossible to revive his ideas or political movement, even in modified form.

    These are good points, but it invites the obvious question of how far do you go in the opposite direction?

    Note that Anglos routinely get accused of hypocrisy. Hasn’t been a problem since Anglos have been winners for a few centuries now.

    Other than communists I think we all have limits as it is. If the Saudis were slaughtering Greeks or something I’d favor stopping them.

  90. @Spisarevski
    Russian (incl. Soviet) ATVs are the best. The only thing that is comfier than exploring the end of the world with an apartment on wheels is exploring it on a nuclear icebreaker - and f0r that you also have to go to the Russians.

    From their new ATVs, besides the SHERP, the Shaman and the Burlak are also pretty cool.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfiqbpvOGbE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsPJ3JCElXA

    And from the Soviet ATVs, my favorite are the Harkovchanka:
    https://i.imgur.com/3hP466M.jpg

    and of course the ZIL-167
    https://i.imgur.com/4CGYStI.jpg

    Let’s not forget Sweden here:

    • Replies: @AP
    SHERP, Russian company, but manufactured in Ukraine:

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/sherp-canada-demonstrations-yukon-nwt-1.4195574

    Can be bought in Canada for $140,000 CDN:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3j7n00Xx38o

    This would be fun in the Wisconsin wilderness...
    , @Spisarevski
    No offense, and I do respect Swedish tech in general (to the last I hoped that my government will choose Gripen's offer for our air force renovation) but this looks like a toy compared to something like a Vityaz. I don't think it's in the same league in terms of passability, ruggedness or load capacity.

    https://i.imgur.com/CSF26PZ.png
  91. @German_reader
    I agree. This "might is right, moral considerations are unimportant" line is self-defeating. The argument must be that mass immigration and forced multiculturalization is a grave injustice and well beyond anything that could be reasonably justified as a moral obligation.
    Not actively aiding the mass starvation of people who haven't harmed one is a pretty minimal demand and shouldn't be controversial imo.

    I suppose you two are right as far as arguments go.

    I’m deeply offended by the idea that we should give up exports just to help Arabalonian Mohammedans.

    But publicly this is perhaps not a good line.

    • Replies: @John Gruskos
    Weapons are different from all other exports, and should only be sold to truly friendly regimes - a category which does not include Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Israel or Antifa-friendly Kurds.

    The export profits lost by ending arms sales to unfriendly regimes would be more than counter-balanced by the profits gained by ending export-stifling sanctions against Russia, Iran, Syria, Cuba etc, thus increasing non-weapons exports, not to mention the tax money saved by ending counter-productive military involvement in the Middle East and foreign aid, especially aid to Israel.

    Saudi Arabia, Israel and Turkey increase the strength of their respective lobbies in the US by bribing the military-industrial complex via arms sales, and the disastrous consequences of the foreign policy undertaken at the behest of the Israeli/Saudi lobby far outweigh the profits from the arms sales to those two countries.
  92. @Ali Choudhury
    Muslims in the Indian sub-continent are largely converts from the bottom of the barrel Dalit Hindu castes. Therefore it is no surprise their IQ is lower than that of upper class Brahmins, when the same would have also been true of their unconverted ancestors. Their lack of human capital meant India's Muslim rulers preferred imported Iranians and Central Asians for important roles as well as capable Hindus. Even Aurangzeb had plenty of Hindu ministers and generals rather than employing the descendants of local converrts.

    The Muslim world's success in warfare was due to their expertise in steppe-style cavalry warfare and archery than a numbers advantage. That is why the Turkic Mahmud of Ghazni was able to raid northwest India 17 times and remain undefeated despite usually having much smaller armies than his opponents.

    And why the Mamluks and other Turkic Muslim armies were able to hold the line against the Mongol juggernaut. The Mongol invasions were kept to the outer areas or were recovered by the various forms of the Delhi Sultanate and not allowed to go into the interior of India…otherwise you would have had something akin to what happened in China.

    Wa salaam.

  93. @Dmitry
    A lot of people are in prison, not for violent crimes. They are in prison. for all kinds of different things, even just many which would be legal in parts of the EU - like drugs.

    Greasy perhaps in prison right now by the IRS. Meanwhile, Thorfinnsson also talks about how he was in prison .

    I would like a graph comparing American rates, with the Soviet Union.


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fa/Incarceration_rates_worldwide.gif/350px-Incarceration_rates_worldwide.gif

    As someone else has pointed out, putting people away for seemingly minor crimes means that there is much less property crime in the USA. Mail is delivered to front porches and rarely gets stolen, fewer pickpockets, etc. etc.

  94. @DFH
    Is there some sort of HBD underlying the martial races? Sikhs generally do seem larger than your average puny Indian.

    i think there’s probably truth in the idea of “martial” races but whether that was the actual reason for the British list i don’t know.

    i think hunter-gatherers develop killer genes (cos hunters)

    farming selects against those genes over time cos they’re not as useful any more so number of generations farming -> less killer genes

    with herders in between cos herders = raiding (usually) so those genes are more useful

    if correct then “martial” races would be from herder populations or farming populations who’d been farming for the least number of generations

    (although probably not as relevant in modern industrial warfare except special forces or other small scale violence like gangsters)

  95. @Abelard Lindsey
    Putin: You know about the guy's (head) they found in Istanbul?

    Bin Salman: Yeah, I heard about it.

    Putin: They're making a big deal about it. Its in all the papers. I mean....this isn't good. You got to tell them to "take care of things...a little better".

    Bin Salman: I'll tell them.

    Another valid caption. You can do a lot with that photo.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Abelard Lindsey
    My caption comes from a scene in "Casino" where Remo Gaggi asks Frankie Marino about "the head they found in the desert" and how it was in all of the papers. Remo finally tells Frankie to tell Nicky to "take care of things...a little better".

    You'll remember this scene if you watched and like Casino as much as I do (its my all time favorite movie).

    There is also a good scene in "Goodfellas" where Jimmy tells Henry about "you know that thing we took care of upstate?" (the whacking of Billy Batts) and how the land got sold and they had to "get it out of there" before it was discovered by construction crews.
  96. @Vishnugupta
    You are making a virtue out of a necessity.

    It's not like Muslim's have not tried fighting modern mechanized wars it's just that the anti intellectual conditions of Muslim countries and many generations of inbreeding have lowered the IQ of the smart fraction of Muslim countries who ultimately are responsible for foreign policy and apex decision making including strategic military decisions by atleast 1 SD relative to their non Muslim neighbours with whom they fight wars.

    Take India Pakistan,Armenia and Azerbaijan,Albanians and Serbs in each of these cases the smart fraction of the otherwise genetically similar adversary is 1 SD above the respective Mohammaden country.

    This was paradoxically an advantage in per industrial times as low IQ is positively correlated with high birth rates,propensity to seriously believe in religious myths and willingness to die in large numbers which explains the Muslim world's military success in pre industrialization times.

    Unfortunately for Muslim's in industrialized times a proud brave fool is no match for a relatively intelligent but physically weaker opponent backed by a much more sophisticated industrial base and foreign policy.

    Cheers. :clink

    the smart fraction of Muslim countries who ultimately are responsible for foreign policy and apex decision making

    It doesn’t help that a significant % of this fraction move to countries like the US. In spite of this, I give Talha credit for not abandoning his religion or his people.

    Unlike some people who not only leave their people but become lap and attack dogs for their enemies:

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/democrats-can-defeat-trump-base-only-if-they-ditch-chuck-ncna919841

    One hundred years of searching for magic negroes at the expense of working class whites is enough, Howell.

  97. @Dmitry
    A lot of people are in prison, not for violent crimes. They are in prison. for all kinds of different things, even just many which would be legal in parts of the EU - like drugs.

    Greasy perhaps in prison right now by the IRS. Meanwhile, Thorfinnsson also talks about how he was in prison .

    I would like a graph comparing American rates, with the Soviet Union.


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fa/Incarceration_rates_worldwide.gif/350px-Incarceration_rates_worldwide.gif

    the police use drug possession to lock up gangstas cos it doesn’t require witnesses…

    cos witnesses won’t testify against gangstas.

    it’s not a good solution but it’s the only option while the US media refuse to tell the truth about the inner-city gang problem.

  98. @German_reader

    Which we have no obligation to accept
     
    If Western countries have actively supported the destruction and starvation of Yemen, it becomes much harder to reject a moral argument for accepting refugees from there.
    Besides, I just object to such a policy in general, it's deeply immoral.

    There is no shortage of things we can criticize Saudi Arabia for, but unlike Israel they actually do pay us. Trump got a $400bn arms deal out of them.
     
    So what, not everything should be about money.
    Apart from moral considerations, I also have my doubts whether it's wise to sell all those arms to Saudi-Arabia, the present regime might eventually collapse, and who knows what those weapons will be used for then (yes, I know, Arab jihadis would probably be too dumb to utilize all those tanks and fighter jets effectively, but still, not worth the risk imo).

    I also have my doubts whether it’s wise to sell all those arms to Saudi-Arabia

    those arms sales are disguised bribes – it’s why our corrupt political class let the Saudis get away with funding every jihadist group on the planet

  99. @Talha
    Another valid caption. You can do a lot with that photo.

    Peace.

    My caption comes from a scene in “Casino” where Remo Gaggi asks Frankie Marino about “the head they found in the desert” and how it was in all of the papers. Remo finally tells Frankie to tell Nicky to “take care of things…a little better”.

    You’ll remember this scene if you watched and like Casino as much as I do (its my all time favorite movie).

    There is also a good scene in “Goodfellas” where Jimmy tells Henry about “you know that thing we took care of upstate?” (the whacking of Billy Batts) and how the land got sold and they had to “get it out of there” before it was discovered by construction crews.

    • Replies: @Talha
    Ah OK, yes...it’s been a long time since I watched those two movies.

    Peace.
  100. @Thorfinnsson
    I suppose you two are right as far as arguments go.

    I'm deeply offended by the idea that we should give up exports just to help Arabalonian Mohammedans.

    But publicly this is perhaps not a good line.

    Weapons are different from all other exports, and should only be sold to truly friendly regimes – a category which does not include Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Israel or Antifa-friendly Kurds.

    The export profits lost by ending arms sales to unfriendly regimes would be more than counter-balanced by the profits gained by ending export-stifling sanctions against Russia, Iran, Syria, Cuba etc, thus increasing non-weapons exports, not to mention the tax money saved by ending counter-productive military involvement in the Middle East and foreign aid, especially aid to Israel.

    Saudi Arabia, Israel and Turkey increase the strength of their respective lobbies in the US by bribing the military-industrial complex via arms sales, and the disastrous consequences of the foreign policy undertaken at the behest of the Israeli/Saudi lobby far outweigh the profits from the arms sales to those two countries.

  101. @Toronto Russian

    and now c. 20 years later almost all the cultural creativity in the USA is concentrated in a few thousand alt-righters
     
    This stuff isn't original, lol. A sociopathic Harry Potter in Yudkowsky's fanfic (isn't he a leftist?) refers to other people as NPC.

    HPMOR is full of ideas I find incredibly suspect- the only character trait worth anything in the story (both implicitly and explicitly) is intelligence, and the primary use of intelligence within the story is manipulation. This leads to cloying levels of a sort of nerd elitism. Ron and Hagrid are basically dismissed out of hand in this story (Ron explicitly as being useless, Hagrid implicitly so) because they aren’t intelligent enough, and Hariezer explicitly draws implicit NPC vs real-people distinctions.

    The world itself is constructed to back up these assertions- nothing in the wizarding world makes much sense, and characters often behave in silly ways (”like NPCs”) to be a foil for Hariezer.
    https://danluu.com/su3su2u1/hpmor/
     

    the NPC meme has an impressive triggering ratio

  102. @Ali Choudhury
    Muslims in the Indian sub-continent are largely converts from the bottom of the barrel Dalit Hindu castes. Therefore it is no surprise their IQ is lower than that of upper class Brahmins, when the same would have also been true of their unconverted ancestors. Their lack of human capital meant India's Muslim rulers preferred imported Iranians and Central Asians for important roles as well as capable Hindus. Even Aurangzeb had plenty of Hindu ministers and generals rather than employing the descendants of local converrts.

    The Muslim world's success in warfare was due to their expertise in steppe-style cavalry warfare and archery than a numbers advantage. That is why the Turkic Mahmud of Ghazni was able to raid northwest India 17 times and remain undefeated despite usually having much smaller armies than his opponents.

    While it is true most S Asian Muslim’s are low caste converts the fact is the Muslim ruling class were Turkic in origin and had upper caste converts.

    I am not aware of any Arzal Muslim ie low caste convert founding any ruling dynasty.

    The IQ difference among Ashram/Ajlaf Muslim’s and upper caste Hindus (excluding Brahmins as we are for various reasons of a different IQ profile and responsible for 95% + of S Asian intellectual achievements throughout history despite being at best 5% of Indian and 3% of South Asian population) is very real and apparent and can be attributed to decline in IQ via 20-50 generations of inbreeding and an anti intellectual culture Muslim India despite having 25% of world GDP at its peak has no scientific achievements comprehensively dwarfed by tiny Kerala with its school of mathematics at the same time and of course completely eclipsed by Hindu India that preceded it which had the world’s largest higher education system Nalanda,vikramshila,..dozens more which were systematically destroyed by the followers of the proudly illiterate prophet.

    Even today Pakistan and Bangladesh have nothing remotely comparable to India’s Iit system.

    This is not an isolated instance Armenia produced Artem mikoyan,Boris babian,countless chess headmasters etc. What did Muslim’s of the Caucasus produce? Serbs produced Nikola Tesla and Mikhail milankuvitch what did Bosnian’s and Albanians produce? The base genetics of the population pairs is the same just the religion is different..heck the middle east in per Islamic times was shockingly advanced despite lack of pre industrial inputs fresh water and arable land relative to population. Today despite having massive resources it achieves nothing.What happened? Long term and irreversible IQ retardation in the smart fraction due to inbreeding and a intellectually hostile culture is my best guess.

    • Replies: @Talha

    Long term and irreversible IQ retardation in the smart fraction due to inbreeding and a intellectually hostile culture is my best guess.
     
    I believe there is truth to this in our era, there is a current anti-intellectual culture in a good part of the Muslim world. On top of that, cousin marriage has very high rates in certain areas (though not in places like Bosnia or Chechnya)
    The anti-illectual culture is not without reason; I’m not sure it is a positive thing to have a hyper-or-high-intellectual culture based on the results Muslims are seeing in the West. Somehow a balance needs to be brought back.

    The issue with this as the explanation is that the Muslim world produced plenty of its own pioneers and punched above its weight in the past when it was arguably more traditional and religious than now. The medieval Islamicate world was both a center of intellectual and religious culture - one should read the intro to al-Khwarizmi’s book and how he starts it with a paragraph praising God and sending salutations on the Prophet (pbuh) and his family.

    Peace.
    , @Ali Choudhury
    Thank you for the quick response.

    Do you have any sources that document the decline in ashraf/aqhlaq IQ? It is not something I have heard of before.

    True, Muslim India did not have much of a record in scientific achievement but that is hardly surprising given the huge distance from northwestern Europe where all the advances were occurring. I don't think I would call the society the rulers created an anti-intellectual one. There was lots of patronage for the arts and culture in general especially poetry, history, literature, architecture, painting. Consider Akbar's Nauratan who would put the bulk of contemporary state cabinets to shame with their scholarly learning: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/who-were-the-nine-gems-navratnas-of-emperor-akbar-the-great-mughal-emperor.html

    Elite Indian Muslims would be trained in religious learning, grammar, rhetoric and philosophy which again would be atypical of anti-intellectuals. Going further back Mahmud of Ghazni used his raids to furnish his courts with luminaries like Al-Biruni, who calculated the radius of the Earth to within 1% accuracy.

    The Prophet being illiterate is a Muslim tradition that arose to defend him from charges that the parts of the Quran which showed awareness of Jewish tradition, the Bible and Greek thought were not divine revelation and just items he had read about. He was a successful merchant who led long distance expeditions and even in that era such merchants could read and write. Even if he was illiterate, he could not be described as being proudly illiterate. It was not something he ever boasted about. There are numerous sayings of the Prophet about the importance of seeking knowledge etc.

    I am not particularly familiar with the Balkans but a search on Wiki shows a number of notable Bosniaks and Albanians although the lists are rather biased to the arts and literature. The 1998 winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine is a Muslim Albanian, Ferid Murad and an Azeri (Kerim Kerimov) was noted as being a key figure in the Soviet space program.

    The IITs are great but I believe they illustrate the misplaced priorities that are in play in subcontinental educational policies. The focus is too much on catering to the elite rather than trying to improve the lot of the bulk of the population who are left to the devil. Even Indian Islam was not immune to this. Syed Ahmad Khan made it clear that lower caste Muslims were not welcome at Aligarh and it was meant for the ashraf and aqhlaq only.

    For that reason China with its huge population and average IQ of 100 will dominate Asia in the decades to come. There was a quote in one of the comment threads here (possibly by Lee Kuan Yew or Thorfinnson) that a thousand schools is better than one university which is quite sensible.
  103. @Vishnugupta
    While it is true most S Asian Muslim's are low caste converts the fact is the Muslim ruling class were Turkic in origin and had upper caste converts.

    I am not aware of any Arzal Muslim ie low caste convert founding any ruling dynasty.

    The IQ difference among Ashram/Ajlaf Muslim's and upper caste Hindus (excluding Brahmins as we are for various reasons of a different IQ profile and responsible for 95% + of S Asian intellectual achievements throughout history despite being at best 5% of Indian and 3% of South Asian population) is very real and apparent and can be attributed to decline in IQ via 20-50 generations of inbreeding and an anti intellectual culture Muslim India despite having 25% of world GDP at its peak has no scientific achievements comprehensively dwarfed by tiny Kerala with its school of mathematics at the same time and of course completely eclipsed by Hindu India that preceded it which had the world's largest higher education system Nalanda,vikramshila,..dozens more which were systematically destroyed by the followers of the proudly illiterate prophet.

    Even today Pakistan and Bangladesh have nothing remotely comparable to India's Iit system.

    This is not an isolated instance Armenia produced Artem mikoyan,Boris babian,countless chess headmasters etc. What did Muslim's of the Caucasus produce? Serbs produced Nikola Tesla and Mikhail milankuvitch what did Bosnian's and Albanians produce? The base genetics of the population pairs is the same just the religion is different..heck the middle east in per Islamic times was shockingly advanced despite lack of pre industrial inputs fresh water and arable land relative to population. Today despite having massive resources it achieves nothing.What happened? Long term and irreversible IQ retardation in the smart fraction due to inbreeding and a intellectually hostile culture is my best guess.

    Long term and irreversible IQ retardation in the smart fraction due to inbreeding and a intellectually hostile culture is my best guess.

    I believe there is truth to this in our era, there is a current anti-intellectual culture in a good part of the Muslim world. On top of that, cousin marriage has very high rates in certain areas (though not in places like Bosnia or Chechnya)
    The anti-illectual culture is not without reason; I’m not sure it is a positive thing to have a hyper-or-high-intellectual culture based on the results Muslims are seeing in the West. Somehow a balance needs to be brought back.

    The issue with this as the explanation is that the Muslim world produced plenty of its own pioneers and punched above its weight in the past when it was arguably more traditional and religious than now. The medieval Islamicate world was both a center of intellectual and religious culture – one should read the intro to al-Khwarizmi’s book and how he starts it with a paragraph praising God and sending salutations on the Prophet (pbuh) and his family.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Vishnugupta
    First of all as I stated the middle east has been an advanced part of the world from the bronze age till around 300 years post it's islamization.

    The Islamic golden age therefore is not an outlier but a continuation of various middle eastern civilizations particularly Persian.

    It is however under Islam that the middle east went from a leading pole of civilization to a non contender and more or less stayed that way.

    It could be that the slow and steady genetic destruction of middle eastern smart fractions took 400 years for it to fall beneath the critical mass required to sustain civilizational progress.

    That coupled with the political economy of Islam which is basically that of a grotesquely inefficient welfare state only sustainable by constant external plunder which began faltering when there were no more lands that could be brought under Islam and further plundered.

    Baghdad before the Mongols overran it had a divorce rate of 30% an absurd figure for a pee industrial society indicative of the comprehensive rot that had set in.
  104. @Thorfinnsson
    Let's not forget Sweden here:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/34/US_5055th_Range_Squadron_M973_SUSV.jpg

    SHERP, Russian company, but manufactured in Ukraine:

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/sherp-canada-demonstrations-yukon-nwt-1.4195574

    Can be bought in Canada for $140,000 CDN:

    This would be fun in the Wisconsin wilderness…

  105. @Thorfinnsson
    Let's not forget Sweden here:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/34/US_5055th_Range_Squadron_M973_SUSV.jpg

    No offense, and I do respect Swedish tech in general (to the last I hoped that my government will choose Gripen’s offer for our air force renovation) but this looks like a toy compared to something like a Vityaz. I don’t think it’s in the same league in terms of passability, ruggedness or load capacity.

  106. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    The secret sauce to the Dollar's success isn't world trade but rather American capital markets and assets.

    Its role in world trade will decline over time.

    World trade and American capital markets are one in the same. They are part of the same system. If world trade collapses and or the dollar is replaced in favor of something else, Americas economy will collapse.

    American capital markets bring no value to America in and of itself. Only in the context of being able to wage war on other countries and to suck value out of other economic systems.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    World trade and American capital markets are not one in the same, even if deeply interwoven. Most trade is conducted in Dollars simply because America has the world's largest and most liquid capital markets, and US capital markets offer the world's largest portfolio of high quality assets. This makes the Dollar a good choice for both buyer and seller.

    The flow of money in the world far exceeds the exchange of goods, which makes sense since transaction costs are much lower. You can purchase a billion dollars worth of shares on the New York Stock Exchange for five bucks. Purchasing a billion dollars worth of wheat, real estate, oil, etc. will have significantly higher transaction costs.

    The idea that the American economy will collapse because the Dollar will lose its leading role is ridiculous. Will corn stop growing in Iowa? Will oil stop flowing in Texas? Will films stop being made in Los Angeles? Will cars stop being made in Michigan?

    Don't be ridiculous.

    And American capital markets bring great value to Americans. My employees are very happy with their Vanguard 401(k) plans.
  107. @Talha

    Long term and irreversible IQ retardation in the smart fraction due to inbreeding and a intellectually hostile culture is my best guess.
     
    I believe there is truth to this in our era, there is a current anti-intellectual culture in a good part of the Muslim world. On top of that, cousin marriage has very high rates in certain areas (though not in places like Bosnia or Chechnya)
    The anti-illectual culture is not without reason; I’m not sure it is a positive thing to have a hyper-or-high-intellectual culture based on the results Muslims are seeing in the West. Somehow a balance needs to be brought back.

    The issue with this as the explanation is that the Muslim world produced plenty of its own pioneers and punched above its weight in the past when it was arguably more traditional and religious than now. The medieval Islamicate world was both a center of intellectual and religious culture - one should read the intro to al-Khwarizmi’s book and how he starts it with a paragraph praising God and sending salutations on the Prophet (pbuh) and his family.

    Peace.

    First of all as I stated the middle east has been an advanced part of the world from the bronze age till around 300 years post it’s islamization.

    The Islamic golden age therefore is not an outlier but a continuation of various middle eastern civilizations particularly Persian.

    It is however under Islam that the middle east went from a leading pole of civilization to a non contender and more or less stayed that way.

    It could be that the slow and steady genetic destruction of middle eastern smart fractions took 400 years for it to fall beneath the critical mass required to sustain civilizational progress.

    That coupled with the political economy of Islam which is basically that of a grotesquely inefficient welfare state only sustainable by constant external plunder which began faltering when there were no more lands that could be brought under Islam and further plundered.

    Baghdad before the Mongols overran it had a divorce rate of 30% an absurd figure for a pee industrial society indicative of the comprehensive rot that had set in.

    • Replies: @Talha

    The Islamic golden age therefore is not an outlier but a continuation of various middle eastern civilizations particularly Persian.
     
    This is correct, though Egyptian as well as Levantine deserve mention. The Iberian Peninsula could be considered a little different. As far as simply ending it at 300 years after Islam was introduced, then that is way too early. As Prof. George Saliba points out, scientific development (particularly in the field of astronomy and medicine) continued into the Ottoman era - as evidenced by the presence of men like Ali Qushji. Even a famous person like al-Tusi was around in the 12th century.

    to fall beneath the critical mass required to sustain civilizational progress.
     
    Possibly...or other civilizations simply pulled ahead.

    Islam which is basically that of a grotesquely inefficient welfare state only sustainable by constant external plunder
     
    This was absolutely the path of the Ummayyads which collapsed relatively quickly as outlined in this book:
    “Stretching from Morocco to China, the Umayyad caliphate based its expansion and success on the doctrine of jihad--armed struggle to claim the whole earth for God's rule, a struggle that had brought much material success for a century but suddenly ground to a halt followed by the collapse of the ruling Umayyad dynasty in 750 CE. The End of the Jihad State demonstrates for the first time that the cause of this collapse came not just from internal conflict, as has been claimed, but from a number of external and concurrent factors that exceeded the caliphate's capacity to respond.”
    http://www.sunypress.edu/p-1793-the-end-of-the-jihad-state.aspx

    As is also evidenced by the Abbasid Empire actually reaching out and establishing diplomatic relations even with China and Charlemagne. Now, once the steady influx and influence of Turkic and Mongol people into the Islamic world and religion became more prominent, the external-raiding states did become more pronounced because that’s basically what Mongol and Turkic people did irrespective of religion. Which is one of the reasons that the military historian, Prof. David Nicolle, lumped a Muslim like Tamerlane among the great Mongol conquers:
    https://www.amazon.com/Mongol-Warlords-Genghis-Tamerlane-warriors/dp/1853141046


    indicative of the comprehensive rot that had set in.
     
    Indeed, which is what sometimes happens in high-intellectual societies (which Baghdad May have become) as can be ascertained by divorce rates in the West and collapse of families for instance. Again, another reason to be careful about simply following headlong into that paradigm.

    Peace.

    , @Anon
    So what places like Egypt & Turkey had even higher.

    Divorce & remarriage were relatively normalized among sedentary Muslim elites.

    Men after all like young women
    , @Ali Choudhury
    I think you are rather overstating the effect of in-breeding on the vigour of Arab society. The Mongol invasion obliterated Baghdad, its ruling class and it's intellectuals with a death toll that ran into hundreds of thousands. That wiped Islam's largest center of learning and culture off the map and was far more devastating than the western Crusades. Thereafter the Arab world was dominated by the Mamluks in Egypt and Ottomans in Anatolia and power and wealth moved westwards to Cairo and Istanbul.
  108. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Vishnugupta
    Yes it is but not for the reasons you stated.

    The British East India Company army was overwhelmingly recruited from upper cast Hindus of North India.

    Post 1857 mutiny recruitment was from regions/groups that did not mutiny.

    The Sikhs,Punjabi's,Maratha's and Gurkha's..

    The stated goal of the 1857 mutiny was to restore Mughal rule which was anathema to these group who had spent the better part of 400 years fighting Muslim's.

    The martial race theory was politically convenient nonsense in the age of the gun and now assault rifle temperament and ability to follow complex instructions matter far more than brute strength which is why Muslim's have never won a modern mechanized war against non Muslim's not counting guerilla wars like Afghanistan and small skirmishes like Cyprus.

    India has followed this British era recruitment policy to effectively make India military coup proof. Warrior castes from the north west including Sikhs make up 80%+ of the Indian army though they represent 3% of the Indian population so do not ethnically identify caste/region wise with the whole Indian population..but yes the north west warrior castes have near European levels of grip strength and a non vegetarian diet so they are physically the strongest Indians available.

    Martial race theory still applies today. An Indian coder can follow directions and press buttons, but in a real war it is going to come down to blood and guts as it always has.

    There is real danger in having your military come from such a small population group or region. When times are bad people start to question why they are fighting and who are they fighting for. Seems really unstable to me.

    • Replies: @Vishnugupta
    You pick your poison.

    This is the only fool proof way of insulating against a military takeover in India.

    India is basically a United States of Europe type of political entity with 18 major linguistic groups with none having a majority or in a position to electorally dominate.

    On top of that you have unique civilizational features like the caste system and polytheistic religion which has been in continuous operation since the bronze age.

    This can only work in a semi federated democratic setup.

    A military coup will balkanize the country and any chief of the army the world's second largest will have that ambition if he is seen to be heading an army representative of the whole population.

    To insure against things getting really bad militarily we have a comprehensive nuclear arsenal..

    It's worked so far.
  109. @Anonymous
    Martial race theory still applies today. An Indian coder can follow directions and press buttons, but in a real war it is going to come down to blood and guts as it always has.

    There is real danger in having your military come from such a small population group or region. When times are bad people start to question why they are fighting and who are they fighting for. Seems really unstable to me.

    You pick your poison.

    This is the only fool proof way of insulating against a military takeover in India.

    India is basically a United States of Europe type of political entity with 18 major linguistic groups with none having a majority or in a position to electorally dominate.

    On top of that you have unique civilizational features like the caste system and polytheistic religion which has been in continuous operation since the bronze age.

    This can only work in a semi federated democratic setup.

    A military coup will balkanize the country and any chief of the army the world’s second largest will have that ambition if he is seen to be heading an army representative of the whole population.

    To insure against things getting really bad militarily we have a comprehensive nuclear arsenal..

    It’s worked so far.

    • Replies: @Anon
    I disagree.

    I think keeping the Royal Houses weak is how they prevent a coup.

    Regional elites outside the British Liberal ecosystem are the real threat.

    This is why the British & Islamic ecosystems have always cooperated in the region.
  110. @Vishnugupta
    First of all as I stated the middle east has been an advanced part of the world from the bronze age till around 300 years post it's islamization.

    The Islamic golden age therefore is not an outlier but a continuation of various middle eastern civilizations particularly Persian.

    It is however under Islam that the middle east went from a leading pole of civilization to a non contender and more or less stayed that way.

    It could be that the slow and steady genetic destruction of middle eastern smart fractions took 400 years for it to fall beneath the critical mass required to sustain civilizational progress.

    That coupled with the political economy of Islam which is basically that of a grotesquely inefficient welfare state only sustainable by constant external plunder which began faltering when there were no more lands that could be brought under Islam and further plundered.

    Baghdad before the Mongols overran it had a divorce rate of 30% an absurd figure for a pee industrial society indicative of the comprehensive rot that had set in.

    The Islamic golden age therefore is not an outlier but a continuation of various middle eastern civilizations particularly Persian.

    This is correct, though Egyptian as well as Levantine deserve mention. The Iberian Peninsula could be considered a little different. As far as simply ending it at 300 years after Islam was introduced, then that is way too early. As Prof. George Saliba points out, scientific development (particularly in the field of astronomy and medicine) continued into the Ottoman era – as evidenced by the presence of men like Ali Qushji. Even a famous person like al-Tusi was around in the 12th century.

    to fall beneath the critical mass required to sustain civilizational progress.

    Possibly…or other civilizations simply pulled ahead.

    Islam which is basically that of a grotesquely inefficient welfare state only sustainable by constant external plunder

    This was absolutely the path of the Ummayyads which collapsed relatively quickly as outlined in this book:
    “Stretching from Morocco to China, the Umayyad caliphate based its expansion and success on the doctrine of jihad–armed struggle to claim the whole earth for God’s rule, a struggle that had brought much material success for a century but suddenly ground to a halt followed by the collapse of the ruling Umayyad dynasty in 750 CE. The End of the Jihad State demonstrates for the first time that the cause of this collapse came not just from internal conflict, as has been claimed, but from a number of external and concurrent factors that exceeded the caliphate’s capacity to respond.”

    http://www.sunypress.edu/p-1793-the-end-of-the-jihad-state.aspx

    As is also evidenced by the Abbasid Empire actually reaching out and establishing diplomatic relations even with China and Charlemagne. Now, once the steady influx and influence of Turkic and Mongol people into the Islamic world and religion became more prominent, the external-raiding states did become more pronounced because that’s basically what Mongol and Turkic people did irrespective of religion. Which is one of the reasons that the military historian, Prof. David Nicolle, lumped a Muslim like Tamerlane among the great Mongol conquers:

    https://www.amazon.com/Mongol-Warlords-Genghis-Tamerlane-warriors/dp/1853141046

    indicative of the comprehensive rot that had set in.

    Indeed, which is what sometimes happens in high-intellectual societies (which Baghdad May have become) as can be ascertained by divorce rates in the West and collapse of families for instance. Again, another reason to be careful about simply following headlong into that paradigm.

    Peace.

  111. @Bliss

    It was not a failed war........it had no vision of a British free India
     
    Since the “mutiny was to restore Mughal rule” does that not mean that it was to end British rule?

    Mughal rule had been effectively destroyed more than a century before.

    Afghans & Persians were the Islamic enemies of the day before christcucks.

    • Replies: @Bliss
    The Indian mutineers, muslims allied with upper caste hindus, were seeking to revive muslim Mughal rule and installed a Mughal as their Emperor.

    Afghans & Persians were the Islamic enemies of the day before christcucks.
     
    The muslim dynasties that ruled India tended to be Afghan or Turkic. Not Persian (though both afghans and turks were persianized in culture). The Mughal Dynasty was mongol-turkic, tracing their lineage to Genghis Khan.
  112. @Dmitry

    Is Moscow the best major city in Europe? This Indian expat thinks yes.
     
    London is still the best "mega city" (I guess arbitrarily - city with a population over 5 million) in Europe.

    The wealthy areas of London are just a paradise (even if the poor areas of London, are a bit apocalyptic).

    However, Moscow very quickly improving of course.

    Since 2016, I have spent a few months in London, and approaching 2 years in Moscow. I can unreservedly state that Moscow is far better.

    To be sure London is better for boutique shopping and starred Michelin restaurants for people rich enough to care about that but what other advantages does it have?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    Walk around in Hampstead, Primrose Hill, etc. See the houses, and the urban design.

    Look at how bourgeois English people live there. English bourgeoisie have one of the most perfect quality of lives in the world. And live in areas which seem like their urban planning was designed by elves. And go to the best schools in the world. Afterwards, they have access to a high salary jobs without leaving their hometown.

    On the other hand, fall into the wrong bus, and the area where the poor, uneducated brown people live. Sure it's a apocalyptic. The thing is, even in these poor, brown areas I have walked through, it doesn't seem very dangerous, and there are sometimes hipsters mixed up there.

    Nightlife and atmosphere in London - there is multiplicity of nice areas (maybe as many as there are bad areas).

    Elite culture in London - similar level as Moscow (which is to say, one of the top centers).

  113. @Vishnugupta
    First of all as I stated the middle east has been an advanced part of the world from the bronze age till around 300 years post it's islamization.

    The Islamic golden age therefore is not an outlier but a continuation of various middle eastern civilizations particularly Persian.

    It is however under Islam that the middle east went from a leading pole of civilization to a non contender and more or less stayed that way.

    It could be that the slow and steady genetic destruction of middle eastern smart fractions took 400 years for it to fall beneath the critical mass required to sustain civilizational progress.

    That coupled with the political economy of Islam which is basically that of a grotesquely inefficient welfare state only sustainable by constant external plunder which began faltering when there were no more lands that could be brought under Islam and further plundered.

    Baghdad before the Mongols overran it had a divorce rate of 30% an absurd figure for a pee industrial society indicative of the comprehensive rot that had set in.

    So what places like Egypt & Turkey had even higher.

    Divorce & remarriage were relatively normalized among sedentary Muslim elites.

    Men after all like young women

  114. @Vishnugupta
    You pick your poison.

    This is the only fool proof way of insulating against a military takeover in India.

    India is basically a United States of Europe type of political entity with 18 major linguistic groups with none having a majority or in a position to electorally dominate.

    On top of that you have unique civilizational features like the caste system and polytheistic religion which has been in continuous operation since the bronze age.

    This can only work in a semi federated democratic setup.

    A military coup will balkanize the country and any chief of the army the world's second largest will have that ambition if he is seen to be heading an army representative of the whole population.

    To insure against things getting really bad militarily we have a comprehensive nuclear arsenal..

    It's worked so far.

    I disagree.

    I think keeping the Royal Houses weak is how they prevent a coup.

    Regional elites outside the British Liberal ecosystem are the real threat.

    This is why the British & Islamic ecosystems have always cooperated in the region.

  115. The people in England who some readers want to replace with the Thorfinsson Dynasty have celebrated a wedding of a minor princess.

    “But muh female hypergamy – even the plain ones only want a billionaire with the looks of Johnny Depp!”

    “But men are biologically wired to value youthful beauty above all, a guy with options won’t marry a horse faced 28-year-old no matter what her social status!”

    “But some of these little kids were born to their mom at withered and practically menopausal 30-something, so they shouldn’t really exist!”

    etc etc.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Speaking as a man with options I am growing less interested in looks and more interested in other matters (family background, work ethic, morality, etc.).

    28 isn't optimal but is acceptable. I used to think anything over 21 was awful but now have no problems with mid-20s.

    Shifting from R-selection to k-selection I suppose.

    When you marinate in Game for too long you forget about k-selection.

  116. It’s now a thing that the American Empire is facing some unexpected difficulties in some of its military procurement.

    https://gizmodo.com/employees-protest-microsoft-bid-for-huge-military-contr-1829740921

  117. Elections in Bavaria seem to have gone mostly as predicted, though CSU seems to be somewhat stronger than expected.
    AfD is somewhat under 11% right now…disappointing, but given the political situation I might not have voted for them myself, but rather for the Freie Wähler, who seem to have gotten above 11%.
    Social Democrats have suffered catastrophic losses; big winners (according to the mainstream media) are the Greens who have gotten around 18%.
    CSU would be foolish imo if they don’t enter into a coalition with the Freie Wähler.
    Anyway, probably not the worst possible result for Bavaria; but it’s depressing how much support there is for the Greens.

    • Replies: @iffen
    Can you explain what this means for Merkel?
    , @Joach
    The SPD lost more support than the CSU and the AfD beat the Greens (+10,2% vs +8,9%) in growth. The CSU may no longer control the state alone, but the right did better in this election than in the last one.

    Don't let they browbeat you that just because the CSU will need a coalition partner, the right lost. The result tells a different tale.
  118. @Anatoly Karlin
    Since 2016, I have spent a few months in London, and approaching 2 years in Moscow. I can unreservedly state that Moscow is far better.

    To be sure London is better for boutique shopping and starred Michelin restaurants for people rich enough to care about that but what other advantages does it have?

    Walk around in Hampstead, Primrose Hill, etc. See the houses, and the urban design.

    Look at how bourgeois English people live there. English bourgeoisie have one of the most perfect quality of lives in the world. And live in areas which seem like their urban planning was designed by elves. And go to the best schools in the world. Afterwards, they have access to a high salary jobs without leaving their hometown.

    On the other hand, fall into the wrong bus, and the area where the poor, uneducated brown people live. Sure it’s a apocalyptic. The thing is, even in these poor, brown areas I have walked through, it doesn’t seem very dangerous, and there are sometimes hipsters mixed up there.

    Nightlife and atmosphere in London – there is multiplicity of nice areas (maybe as many as there are bad areas).

    Elite culture in London – similar level as Moscow (which is to say, one of the top centers).

    • Replies: @German_reader

    And go to the best schools in the world.
     
    If they can afford private (public) schools. State school system in Britain is pretty rotten.
    You need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    There's nothing particularly good about English "public" schools other than the caliber of the students in them. It's just a brand name. And since the school places are for sale anyway not like you need to live in Britain if your status anxiety is so bad you think you need to pay some crooks $30,000 per year to brainwash your children to hate your ancestors.
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    Urban planning - the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas, interspersing the original planning with those ugly concrete slabs. Though I assume that the really rich areas have avoided this due to their political influence.

    Schools - what Thorfinnsson said. Though the Brits must be credited for their marketing of Hogwarts, which have captivated the imaginations of foreign SWPLs.

    High salary jobs - sure, the UK is still a lot richer than Russia, even adjusted for cost of living. But that's a feature of the country, not the city as such.

    Going into the brown areas is pretty safe, though the seas of niqabs are depressing to look at. Going into the black areas is dangerous.
  119. @Dmitry
    Walk around in Hampstead, Primrose Hill, etc. See the houses, and the urban design.

    Look at how bourgeois English people live there. English bourgeoisie have one of the most perfect quality of lives in the world. And live in areas which seem like their urban planning was designed by elves. And go to the best schools in the world. Afterwards, they have access to a high salary jobs without leaving their hometown.

    On the other hand, fall into the wrong bus, and the area where the poor, uneducated brown people live. Sure it's a apocalyptic. The thing is, even in these poor, brown areas I have walked through, it doesn't seem very dangerous, and there are sometimes hipsters mixed up there.

    Nightlife and atmosphere in London - there is multiplicity of nice areas (maybe as many as there are bad areas).

    Elite culture in London - similar level as Moscow (which is to say, one of the top centers).

    And go to the best schools in the world.

    If they can afford private (public) schools. State school system in Britain is pretty rotten.
    You need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.

    • Replies: @iffen
    You need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.


    I'm not sure that I would have expected to meet you on the barricades, GR.
    , @Dmitry

    need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.
     
    It's a different topic, from discussion of great cities.

    If you are cashier in a supermarket, then you can be living better in a small, boring town in a country with high overall living parameters, like Denmark or Sweden.

    What would be discussion of great cities, and their opera houses (or their Jay Z concerts, if that is your taste) - many advantages of great cities are (and always were) designed for "privileged".


    If they can afford private (public) schools. State school system in Britain is pretty rotten.

     

    We can infer from popularity of private schools in London, that state schools probably have a much lower level of teaching.

    But even the brown, uneducated people, living in slightly apocalyptic areas of London, and going to schools with low teaching levels, might not be so poor.

    For anecdote. Visiting my hometown, walking in the wrong area, with new Nikes - and once a guy was following me, talking about how expensive the shoes are, that only rich men would buy them, and asking for money.

    Meanwhile, in London, I'm looking at the Nike shop, and half of customers, buying boxes of the most expensive Nikes - it's the English black teenagers.

    , @Ali Choudhury
    State schools in London have improved significantly and quite a number are competitive with private schools.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5295621/Londons-East-End-Eton-sending-22-pupils-Oxbridge.html

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/secondaryeducation/12115739/Are-state-schools-actually-providing-a-better-education-than-private-schools.html

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-28003848
  120. @Thorfinnsson
    I have been to jail (not prison) for a felony in a major city.

    It was 36 hours before I could call someone, and another 12 before I could get bailed out. After getting bailed out it still took four hours before I could get out. They also did need give me my wallet back...or even my shoelaces. So I had to walk seven miles to get home in shoes without shoelaces through some fairly dangerous neighborhoods.

    The only food served was white bread, hard boiled eggs, and off-brand kool-aid packets.

    Throughout the entire process I was endlessly lied to by officials.

    These seems like something that could be reformed, though not in the sense liberals imagine (they simply don't think criminals should be punished).

    I have been to jail (not prison) for a felony in a major city.

    Is this separate from your O’Hare Airport adventure?

  121. @Vishnugupta
    While it is true most S Asian Muslim's are low caste converts the fact is the Muslim ruling class were Turkic in origin and had upper caste converts.

    I am not aware of any Arzal Muslim ie low caste convert founding any ruling dynasty.

    The IQ difference among Ashram/Ajlaf Muslim's and upper caste Hindus (excluding Brahmins as we are for various reasons of a different IQ profile and responsible for 95% + of S Asian intellectual achievements throughout history despite being at best 5% of Indian and 3% of South Asian population) is very real and apparent and can be attributed to decline in IQ via 20-50 generations of inbreeding and an anti intellectual culture Muslim India despite having 25% of world GDP at its peak has no scientific achievements comprehensively dwarfed by tiny Kerala with its school of mathematics at the same time and of course completely eclipsed by Hindu India that preceded it which had the world's largest higher education system Nalanda,vikramshila,..dozens more which were systematically destroyed by the followers of the proudly illiterate prophet.

    Even today Pakistan and Bangladesh have nothing remotely comparable to India's Iit system.

    This is not an isolated instance Armenia produced Artem mikoyan,Boris babian,countless chess headmasters etc. What did Muslim's of the Caucasus produce? Serbs produced Nikola Tesla and Mikhail milankuvitch what did Bosnian's and Albanians produce? The base genetics of the population pairs is the same just the religion is different..heck the middle east in per Islamic times was shockingly advanced despite lack of pre industrial inputs fresh water and arable land relative to population. Today despite having massive resources it achieves nothing.What happened? Long term and irreversible IQ retardation in the smart fraction due to inbreeding and a intellectually hostile culture is my best guess.

    Thank you for the quick response.

    Do you have any sources that document the decline in ashraf/aqhlaq IQ? It is not something I have heard of before.

    True, Muslim India did not have much of a record in scientific achievement but that is hardly surprising given the huge distance from northwestern Europe where all the advances were occurring. I don’t think I would call the society the rulers created an anti-intellectual one. There was lots of patronage for the arts and culture in general especially poetry, history, literature, architecture, painting. Consider Akbar’s Nauratan who would put the bulk of contemporary state cabinets to shame with their scholarly learning: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/who-were-the-nine-gems-navratnas-of-emperor-akbar-the-great-mughal-emperor.html

    Elite Indian Muslims would be trained in religious learning, grammar, rhetoric and philosophy which again would be atypical of anti-intellectuals. Going further back Mahmud of Ghazni used his raids to furnish his courts with luminaries like Al-Biruni, who calculated the radius of the Earth to within 1% accuracy.

    The Prophet being illiterate is a Muslim tradition that arose to defend him from charges that the parts of the Quran which showed awareness of Jewish tradition, the Bible and Greek thought were not divine revelation and just items he had read about. He was a successful merchant who led long distance expeditions and even in that era such merchants could read and write. Even if he was illiterate, he could not be described as being proudly illiterate. It was not something he ever boasted about. There are numerous sayings of the Prophet about the importance of seeking knowledge etc.

    I am not particularly familiar with the Balkans but a search on Wiki shows a number of notable Bosniaks and Albanians although the lists are rather biased to the arts and literature. The 1998 winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine is a Muslim Albanian, Ferid Murad and an Azeri (Kerim Kerimov) was noted as being a key figure in the Soviet space program.

    The IITs are great but I believe they illustrate the misplaced priorities that are in play in subcontinental educational policies. The focus is too much on catering to the elite rather than trying to improve the lot of the bulk of the population who are left to the devil. Even Indian Islam was not immune to this. Syed Ahmad Khan made it clear that lower caste Muslims were not welcome at Aligarh and it was meant for the ashraf and aqhlaq only.

    For that reason China with its huge population and average IQ of 100 will dominate Asia in the decades to come. There was a quote in one of the comment threads here (possibly by Lee Kuan Yew or Thorfinnson) that a thousand schools is better than one university which is quite sensible.

    • Replies: @Bliss

    The 1998 winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine is a Muslim Albanian, Ferid Murad
     
    Wrong. His mother was a Christian American and he was raised Christian.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferid_Murad

    an Azeri (Kerim Kerimov) was noted as being a key figure in the Soviet space program.
     
    As a communist, Kerim Kerimov must have been an atheist.
    , @Talha

    Even if he was illiterate, he could not be described as being proudly illiterate. It was not something he ever boasted about.
     
    Agreed - very solid. The vast majority of human beings that have ever walked the Earth were unlettered until quite recently. He was the bridge between those worlds as he was between the sedentary and nomadic people. There is nothing in Islamic doctrine that encourages illiteracy though it does not hold those in contempt.

    The rest of your points are also spot on. Even very sanguinary rulers like Tamerlane were known as patrons of the arts, poetry, etc. His famous grandson Ulugh Beg having founded the (still-standing) observatory in Samarkand:
    “While the achievements of his reign were many, he is probably best remembered for his scientific contributions. The madrasa became a major center of learning in the Islamic world, whose influence spread widely and lasted beyond Ulugh Beg's death, at which time some of the scholars he had supported left Samarkand for capitals such as Istanbul which promised more stability. The first director of his observatory was Qazizadeh Rumi, who had in fact come to Central Asia from Anatolia and was one of Ulugh Beg's teachers...The tradition of Islamic science upon which Ulugh Beg and his scholars drew had long been valued by the rulers of Inner Asia. For example, the famous Mongol Emperor Khubilai Khan, staffed his new observatory in Beijing (shown on the left) with Muslim scientists.”
    https://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/cities/uz/samarkand/obser.html

    Peace.

  122. @German_reader

    And go to the best schools in the world.
     
    If they can afford private (public) schools. State school system in Britain is pretty rotten.
    You need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.

    You need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.

    I’m not sure that I would have expected to meet you on the barricades, GR.

  123. @German_reader
    Elections in Bavaria seem to have gone mostly as predicted, though CSU seems to be somewhat stronger than expected.
    AfD is somewhat under 11% right now...disappointing, but given the political situation I might not have voted for them myself, but rather for the Freie Wähler, who seem to have gotten above 11%.
    Social Democrats have suffered catastrophic losses; big winners (according to the mainstream media) are the Greens who have gotten around 18%.
    CSU would be foolish imo if they don't enter into a coalition with the Freie Wähler.
    Anyway, probably not the worst possible result for Bavaria; but it's depressing how much support there is for the Greens.

    Can you explain what this means for Merkel?

    • Replies: @German_reader
    Really difficult to judge tbh. There are those who think Merkel's position might be strengthened by the CSU being weakened (which is of course pretty perverse if you think about it). On the other hand, the CSU seems to have done somewhat better than in the latest polls (currently it's about 37,4% compared to 33% in the last poll before election - that's bad by CSU standards, but still vastly better than anything Merkel's CDU can hope to achieve anywhere nowadays). It also looks most likely now that the CSU will enter into a coalition with the kind-of-conservative Freie Wähler, so probably not that much will change on the state level in Bavaria. If they entered into a coalition with the Greens (probably Merkel's preferred option, also strongly promoted by the mainstram media), it would really harm the CSU imo and reduce them to just another part of the CDU in anything but name.
    Anyway, Bavaria has always been somewhat of a special case. In 14 days there will be state elections in Hesse, and Merkel's CDU will probably suffer serious losses there. And unlike with the CSU in Bavaria it will be impossible to explain this with an alleged drift to the right, criticism of Merkel etc.
    It's possible Merkel's chancellorship might end in the next few months, though one shouldn't count on it (one should never underestimate how tenaciously she clings to power and how spineless her party is). Question is, what happens then. Personally I'd like to see the CDU implode, that party isn't worth salvaging imo.
  124. @German_reader

    And go to the best schools in the world.
     
    If they can afford private (public) schools. State school system in Britain is pretty rotten.
    You need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.

    need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.

    It’s a different topic, from discussion of great cities.

    If you are cashier in a supermarket, then you can be living better in a small, boring town in a country with high overall living parameters, like Denmark or Sweden.

    What would be discussion of great cities, and their opera houses (or their Jay Z concerts, if that is your taste) – many advantages of great cities are (and always were) designed for “privileged”.

    If they can afford private (public) schools. State school system in Britain is pretty rotten.

    We can infer from popularity of private schools in London, that state schools probably have a much lower level of teaching.

    But even the brown, uneducated people, living in slightly apocalyptic areas of London, and going to schools with low teaching levels, might not be so poor.

    For anecdote. Visiting my hometown, walking in the wrong area, with new Nikes – and once a guy was following me, talking about how expensive the shoes are, that only rich men would buy them, and asking for money.

    Meanwhile, in London, I’m looking at the Nike shop, and half of customers, buying boxes of the most expensive Nikes – it’s the English black teenagers.

    • Replies: @Mitleser

    Meanwhile, in London, I’m looking at the Nike shop, and half of customers, buying boxes of the most expensive Nikes – it’s the English black teenagers.
     
    Because they are Londoners. They are part of the Privileged of Britain.
    But London is not Britain.
  125. @Anonymous
    World trade and American capital markets are one in the same. They are part of the same system. If world trade collapses and or the dollar is replaced in favor of something else, Americas economy will collapse.

    American capital markets bring no value to America in and of itself. Only in the context of being able to wage war on other countries and to suck value out of other economic systems.

    World trade and American capital markets are not one in the same, even if deeply interwoven. Most trade is conducted in Dollars simply because America has the world’s largest and most liquid capital markets, and US capital markets offer the world’s largest portfolio of high quality assets. This makes the Dollar a good choice for both buyer and seller.

    The flow of money in the world far exceeds the exchange of goods, which makes sense since transaction costs are much lower. You can purchase a billion dollars worth of shares on the New York Stock Exchange for five bucks. Purchasing a billion dollars worth of wheat, real estate, oil, etc. will have significantly higher transaction costs.

    The idea that the American economy will collapse because the Dollar will lose its leading role is ridiculous. Will corn stop growing in Iowa? Will oil stop flowing in Texas? Will films stop being made in Los Angeles? Will cars stop being made in Michigan?

    Don’t be ridiculous.

    And American capital markets bring great value to Americans. My employees are very happy with their Vanguard 401(k) plans.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Countries trade in the dollar for lots of reasons. Liquidity, relatively stable value, history of rule of law, and momentum. But a lot of this is an aberration that will correct itself.

    If it were not for America forcibly making the dollar the world reserve currency through middle east oil and its military bases, the dollar would not have near the same liquidity, stability of value, or be as adopted universally as it is today. This process is reversing itself now as we speak.

    America has attractive assets, but the value is widely inflated and also subject to American dollar dominance which is ending.

    The same financial services that bring back so much value on the world stage, will do harm to America post collapse because they are not good at doing the basics like establishing value and allocating capitol.

    America will collapse, but I don't mean the economy will grind to a halt. It will still hum along because our economy has intrinsic value. It just won't get the benefit of dollar hedgemony.
  126. @German_reader

    And go to the best schools in the world.
     
    If they can afford private (public) schools. State school system in Britain is pretty rotten.
    You need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.
  127. @Dmitry
    Walk around in Hampstead, Primrose Hill, etc. See the houses, and the urban design.

    Look at how bourgeois English people live there. English bourgeoisie have one of the most perfect quality of lives in the world. And live in areas which seem like their urban planning was designed by elves. And go to the best schools in the world. Afterwards, they have access to a high salary jobs without leaving their hometown.

    On the other hand, fall into the wrong bus, and the area where the poor, uneducated brown people live. Sure it's a apocalyptic. The thing is, even in these poor, brown areas I have walked through, it doesn't seem very dangerous, and there are sometimes hipsters mixed up there.

    Nightlife and atmosphere in London - there is multiplicity of nice areas (maybe as many as there are bad areas).

    Elite culture in London - similar level as Moscow (which is to say, one of the top centers).

    There’s nothing particularly good about English “public” schools other than the caliber of the students in them. It’s just a brand name. And since the school places are for sale anyway not like you need to live in Britain if your status anxiety is so bad you think you need to pay some crooks $30,000 per year to brainwash your children to hate your ancestors.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    For Russian parents, it's not so important to send children just to the academically best schools in England. A lot are in academically mediocre schools. The dividing line of "status anxiety", is more for children to study abroad.

    But you can see schools with the highest academic results of the UK, and highest ratio to admission to Oxford and Cambridge University, are private schools in London. Academic standard will obviously be much higher, and they would pay higher salary to attract the best teachers.

    E.g. private schools in London

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_School

    Article shows over 99% achieving the highest academic scores:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_School,_London

  128. @iffen
    Can you explain what this means for Merkel?

    Really difficult to judge tbh. There are those who think Merkel’s position might be strengthened by the CSU being weakened (which is of course pretty perverse if you think about it). On the other hand, the CSU seems to have done somewhat better than in the latest polls (currently it’s about 37,4% compared to 33% in the last poll before election – that’s bad by CSU standards, but still vastly better than anything Merkel’s CDU can hope to achieve anywhere nowadays). It also looks most likely now that the CSU will enter into a coalition with the kind-of-conservative Freie Wähler, so probably not that much will change on the state level in Bavaria. If they entered into a coalition with the Greens (probably Merkel’s preferred option, also strongly promoted by the mainstram media), it would really harm the CSU imo and reduce them to just another part of the CDU in anything but name.
    Anyway, Bavaria has always been somewhat of a special case. In 14 days there will be state elections in Hesse, and Merkel’s CDU will probably suffer serious losses there. And unlike with the CSU in Bavaria it will be impossible to explain this with an alleged drift to the right, criticism of Merkel etc.
    It’s possible Merkel’s chancellorship might end in the next few months, though one shouldn’t count on it (one should never underestimate how tenaciously she clings to power and how spineless her party is). Question is, what happens then. Personally I’d like to see the CDU implode, that party isn’t worth salvaging imo.

  129. @Toronto Russian
    The people in England who some readers want to replace with the Thorfinsson Dynasty have celebrated a wedding of a minor princess.
    https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/comtesszia/62294190/139318/139318_900.jpg
    "But muh female hypergamy - even the plain ones only want a billionaire with the looks of Johnny Depp!"

    "But men are biologically wired to value youthful beauty above all, a guy with options won't marry a horse faced 28-year-old no matter what her social status!"

    "But some of these little kids were born to their mom at withered and practically menopausal 30-something, so they shouldn't really exist!"

    etc etc.

    Speaking as a man with options I am growing less interested in looks and more interested in other matters (family background, work ethic, morality, etc.).

    28 isn’t optimal but is acceptable. I used to think anything over 21 was awful but now have no problems with mid-20s.

    Shifting from R-selection to k-selection I suppose.

    When you marinate in Game for too long you forget about k-selection.

  130. How are Polish Perspective and Bliss doing on their Tesla long bets? :)

    Actually not convinced Bliss even has a brokerage account, so she might not be baggy after all.

  131. @Vishnugupta
    First of all as I stated the middle east has been an advanced part of the world from the bronze age till around 300 years post it's islamization.

    The Islamic golden age therefore is not an outlier but a continuation of various middle eastern civilizations particularly Persian.

    It is however under Islam that the middle east went from a leading pole of civilization to a non contender and more or less stayed that way.

    It could be that the slow and steady genetic destruction of middle eastern smart fractions took 400 years for it to fall beneath the critical mass required to sustain civilizational progress.

    That coupled with the political economy of Islam which is basically that of a grotesquely inefficient welfare state only sustainable by constant external plunder which began faltering when there were no more lands that could be brought under Islam and further plundered.

    Baghdad before the Mongols overran it had a divorce rate of 30% an absurd figure for a pee industrial society indicative of the comprehensive rot that had set in.

    I think you are rather overstating the effect of in-breeding on the vigour of Arab society. The Mongol invasion obliterated Baghdad, its ruling class and it’s intellectuals with a death toll that ran into hundreds of thousands. That wiped Islam’s largest center of learning and culture off the map and was far more devastating than the western Crusades. Thereafter the Arab world was dominated by the Mamluks in Egypt and Ottomans in Anatolia and power and wealth moved westwards to Cairo and Istanbul.

  132. @Dmitry
    Walk around in Hampstead, Primrose Hill, etc. See the houses, and the urban design.

    Look at how bourgeois English people live there. English bourgeoisie have one of the most perfect quality of lives in the world. And live in areas which seem like their urban planning was designed by elves. And go to the best schools in the world. Afterwards, they have access to a high salary jobs without leaving their hometown.

    On the other hand, fall into the wrong bus, and the area where the poor, uneducated brown people live. Sure it's a apocalyptic. The thing is, even in these poor, brown areas I have walked through, it doesn't seem very dangerous, and there are sometimes hipsters mixed up there.

    Nightlife and atmosphere in London - there is multiplicity of nice areas (maybe as many as there are bad areas).

    Elite culture in London - similar level as Moscow (which is to say, one of the top centers).

    Urban planning – the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas, interspersing the original planning with those ugly concrete slabs. Though I assume that the really rich areas have avoided this due to their political influence.

    Schools – what Thorfinnsson said. Though the Brits must be credited for their marketing of Hogwarts, which have captivated the imaginations of foreign SWPLs.

    High salary jobs – sure, the UK is still a lot richer than Russia, even adjusted for cost of living. But that’s a feature of the country, not the city as such.

    Going into the brown areas is pretty safe, though the seas of niqabs are depressing to look at. Going into the black areas is dangerous.

    • Replies: @iffen
    the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas,

    Works in America until you run out of whites. It really is whack-a-mole.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    Just to elaborate on the school thing, my brother attended a very prestigious Ivy League university. He said attending was the greatest mistake of his life (owing to the student debt he contracted). He was offered a full scholarship to the flagship state university of Illinois and wishes he had done that instead.

    I chose not to attend university at all and have no trouble mingling with business and social elites.

    For people who do not have a bourgeois background elite schools can be useful, as being rough around the edges and unsophisticated can be quite detrimental.

    And of course I won't deny that they're useful in gaining useful connections and employment offers, though personally I favor entrepreneurship and simply going to high end bars, clubs, etc. Expensive hobbies (automobile racing for instance) are also a great way to meet excellent people.
    , @Dmitry
    Native bourgeoisie of London, are living in areas like in video I'll place below.*

    I've been going to London for holidays, quite a lot of times, since I was a child. We usually wanted to stay near that area especially.

    Bourgeoisie can move very easily into center of the city from there. At the same time, live in a beautiful environment, which seems like it was built by a race of elves, or computer simulation team from Harry Potter series.

    English will send their children, to schools with the highest academic results, and highest ratio of admission to Oxford/Cambridge University.

    Finally, black people are not seen so much there, if I remember. Blacks there probably more likely to be family of African oligarchs, rather than the English blacks.

    Sure, in England (unlike Denmark, etc), there is some extreme divergence of lifestyle between social class, which disappoints naive tourists that dream of only English gentlemen everywhere. But bourgeois English, have a living standard which matches all their self-image and Harry Potter books.


    -
    *

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLhn99BWIFU
    , @g2k

    Urban planning – the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas, interspersing the original planning with those ugly concrete slabs. Though I assume that the really rich areas have avoided this due to their political influence.
     
    I don't think khan has had much to do with this. For a long time it's been national policy to pay private landlords to house welfare recipients rather than have the government house them directly in soviet style council estates. Mrs thatcher started off this process by letting sitting tenants buy at a discount, but the current conservative government has accellerated it somewhat by doing things like ending heritable tenure for the remaining purpose built council houses, charging market rents for them and selling them off to developers. They wanted to increase rease labor mobility, but the side effect of it has been to make all areas more mixed.
  133. @Thorfinnsson
    There's nothing particularly good about English "public" schools other than the caliber of the students in them. It's just a brand name. And since the school places are for sale anyway not like you need to live in Britain if your status anxiety is so bad you think you need to pay some crooks $30,000 per year to brainwash your children to hate your ancestors.

    For Russian parents, it’s not so important to send children just to the academically best schools in England. A lot are in academically mediocre schools. The dividing line of “status anxiety”, is more for children to study abroad.

    But you can see schools with the highest academic results of the UK, and highest ratio to admission to Oxford and Cambridge University, are private schools in London. Academic standard will obviously be much higher, and they would pay higher salary to attract the best teachers.

    E.g. private schools in London

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_School

    Article shows over 99% achieving the highest academic scores:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_School,_London

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Correlation does not prove causation.

    "Better" schools show better results simply because they have better students with higher IQs to begin with.

    Trust me when I say you do not want to get into a debate with an American about "good schools".

    , @DFH
    It is sweet that you think Westminster has many English people in it.

    Fun fact; it is where Rinat Akhmetov's son went to school.
  134. @Anatoly Karlin
    Urban planning - the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas, interspersing the original planning with those ugly concrete slabs. Though I assume that the really rich areas have avoided this due to their political influence.

    Schools - what Thorfinnsson said. Though the Brits must be credited for their marketing of Hogwarts, which have captivated the imaginations of foreign SWPLs.

    High salary jobs - sure, the UK is still a lot richer than Russia, even adjusted for cost of living. But that's a feature of the country, not the city as such.

    Going into the brown areas is pretty safe, though the seas of niqabs are depressing to look at. Going into the black areas is dangerous.

    the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas,

    Works in America until you run out of whites. It really is whack-a-mole.

  135. @Ali Choudhury
    Thank you for the quick response.

    Do you have any sources that document the decline in ashraf/aqhlaq IQ? It is not something I have heard of before.

    True, Muslim India did not have much of a record in scientific achievement but that is hardly surprising given the huge distance from northwestern Europe where all the advances were occurring. I don't think I would call the society the rulers created an anti-intellectual one. There was lots of patronage for the arts and culture in general especially poetry, history, literature, architecture, painting. Consider Akbar's Nauratan who would put the bulk of contemporary state cabinets to shame with their scholarly learning: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/who-were-the-nine-gems-navratnas-of-emperor-akbar-the-great-mughal-emperor.html

    Elite Indian Muslims would be trained in religious learning, grammar, rhetoric and philosophy which again would be atypical of anti-intellectuals. Going further back Mahmud of Ghazni used his raids to furnish his courts with luminaries like Al-Biruni, who calculated the radius of the Earth to within 1% accuracy.

    The Prophet being illiterate is a Muslim tradition that arose to defend him from charges that the parts of the Quran which showed awareness of Jewish tradition, the Bible and Greek thought were not divine revelation and just items he had read about. He was a successful merchant who led long distance expeditions and even in that era such merchants could read and write. Even if he was illiterate, he could not be described as being proudly illiterate. It was not something he ever boasted about. There are numerous sayings of the Prophet about the importance of seeking knowledge etc.

    I am not particularly familiar with the Balkans but a search on Wiki shows a number of notable Bosniaks and Albanians although the lists are rather biased to the arts and literature. The 1998 winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine is a Muslim Albanian, Ferid Murad and an Azeri (Kerim Kerimov) was noted as being a key figure in the Soviet space program.

    The IITs are great but I believe they illustrate the misplaced priorities that are in play in subcontinental educational policies. The focus is too much on catering to the elite rather than trying to improve the lot of the bulk of the population who are left to the devil. Even Indian Islam was not immune to this. Syed Ahmad Khan made it clear that lower caste Muslims were not welcome at Aligarh and it was meant for the ashraf and aqhlaq only.

    For that reason China with its huge population and average IQ of 100 will dominate Asia in the decades to come. There was a quote in one of the comment threads here (possibly by Lee Kuan Yew or Thorfinnson) that a thousand schools is better than one university which is quite sensible.

    The 1998 winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine is a Muslim Albanian, Ferid Murad

    Wrong. His mother was a Christian American and he was raised Christian.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferid_Murad

    an Azeri (Kerim Kerimov) was noted as being a key figure in the Soviet space program.

    As a communist, Kerim Kerimov must have been an atheist.

    • Replies: @Ali Choudhury
    Ferid Murad's father was an Albanian Muslim. His conversion to Christianity did not erase his ethnicity. Karim Kerimov's ancestry was also Muslim despite whatever his position was on atheism.
  136. @Anatoly Karlin
    Urban planning - the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas, interspersing the original planning with those ugly concrete slabs. Though I assume that the really rich areas have avoided this due to their political influence.

    Schools - what Thorfinnsson said. Though the Brits must be credited for their marketing of Hogwarts, which have captivated the imaginations of foreign SWPLs.

    High salary jobs - sure, the UK is still a lot richer than Russia, even adjusted for cost of living. But that's a feature of the country, not the city as such.

    Going into the brown areas is pretty safe, though the seas of niqabs are depressing to look at. Going into the black areas is dangerous.

    Just to elaborate on the school thing, my brother attended a very prestigious Ivy League university. He said attending was the greatest mistake of his life (owing to the student debt he contracted). He was offered a full scholarship to the flagship state university of Illinois and wishes he had done that instead.

    I chose not to attend university at all and have no trouble mingling with business and social elites.

    For people who do not have a bourgeois background elite schools can be useful, as being rough around the edges and unsophisticated can be quite detrimental.

    And of course I won’t deny that they’re useful in gaining useful connections and employment offers, though personally I favor entrepreneurship and simply going to high end bars, clubs, etc. Expensive hobbies (automobile racing for instance) are also a great way to meet excellent people.

    • Replies: @Dmitry

    For people who do not have a bourgeois background elite schools can be useful, as being rough around the edges and unsophisticated c
     
    Because you are born in America, where there are endless high salary jobs, and also probably with higher appetite for risk.

    But for people not from America, then opportunity for normal guy to have a reliable profession, usually requires formal studying.

    Personally, I was very mediocre and lazy for years at school, and no teacher thought I was clever. But my parents were angry, and pressed on me, and suddenly I studied a lot from when I was about 17 (until several years later, when I became lazy again).

    However, many teenagers will not have parents (or sibling examples) that press on them (shouting at them) at this age - or children themselves might not recognise it. In this case, you will need a whole educational or institutional framework. This is what parents can buy with academically elite schools.

    If I have children, then I would place them in the most academically elite school, because I know I am too mild to ever shout at them to study. Moreover, other kinds of jobs (which don't require academic study) are unreliable, and there is no guarantee a person will be successful.
    , @Mr. Hack
    I'm curious. You seem to have a good breadth of knowledge, especially in economics and history. Did you pick up this knowledge mostly by reading on your own? I know that you've passed the difficult 66 securities exam. Are there many of your age that have forsaken college education for self study? You might be a good poster boy for advanced intellectual dilettantism? :-)
  137. @Dmitry
    For Russian parents, it's not so important to send children just to the academically best schools in England. A lot are in academically mediocre schools. The dividing line of "status anxiety", is more for children to study abroad.

    But you can see schools with the highest academic results of the UK, and highest ratio to admission to Oxford and Cambridge University, are private schools in London. Academic standard will obviously be much higher, and they would pay higher salary to attract the best teachers.

    E.g. private schools in London

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_School

    Article shows over 99% achieving the highest academic scores:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_School,_London

    Correlation does not prove causation.

    “Better” schools show better results simply because they have better students with higher IQs to begin with.

    Trust me when I say you do not want to get into a debate with an American about “good schools”.

    • Replies: @DFH
    Dmitry is correct that they do also have extremely good teaching and are just generally very pleasant.
  138. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    World trade and American capital markets are not one in the same, even if deeply interwoven. Most trade is conducted in Dollars simply because America has the world's largest and most liquid capital markets, and US capital markets offer the world's largest portfolio of high quality assets. This makes the Dollar a good choice for both buyer and seller.

    The flow of money in the world far exceeds the exchange of goods, which makes sense since transaction costs are much lower. You can purchase a billion dollars worth of shares on the New York Stock Exchange for five bucks. Purchasing a billion dollars worth of wheat, real estate, oil, etc. will have significantly higher transaction costs.

    The idea that the American economy will collapse because the Dollar will lose its leading role is ridiculous. Will corn stop growing in Iowa? Will oil stop flowing in Texas? Will films stop being made in Los Angeles? Will cars stop being made in Michigan?

    Don't be ridiculous.

    And American capital markets bring great value to Americans. My employees are very happy with their Vanguard 401(k) plans.

    Countries trade in the dollar for lots of reasons. Liquidity, relatively stable value, history of rule of law, and momentum. But a lot of this is an aberration that will correct itself.

    If it were not for America forcibly making the dollar the world reserve currency through middle east oil and its military bases, the dollar would not have near the same liquidity, stability of value, or be as adopted universally as it is today. This process is reversing itself now as we speak.

    America has attractive assets, but the value is widely inflated and also subject to American dollar dominance which is ending.

    The same financial services that bring back so much value on the world stage, will do harm to America post collapse because they are not good at doing the basics like establishing value and allocating capitol.

    America will collapse, but I don’t mean the economy will grind to a halt. It will still hum along because our economy has intrinsic value. It just won’t get the benefit of dollar hedgemony.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Dollar hegemony was established in 1944, long before the petrodollar and America's empire of bases. I'm not sure it was forced except to the extent that America refused Keynes' proposal of the Bancor, and no one was interested in returning to the gold standard.

    A sudden elimination of Dollar hegemony (as opposed to gradual decline) would no doubt cause a deep recession and severely dent the market value of American assets.

    But the crisis would end as all crises do. It would also be good for American exporters (like me) and aspiring oligarchs (also me).

    It would be worst for the existing oligarchy and for ZOG.

    I do not consider Dollar hegemony to be a benefit to America, as the strength of a nation ultimately depends on the strength of its production. Being a reserve currency issuer undermines that.
  139. @Anatoly Karlin
    Urban planning - the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas, interspersing the original planning with those ugly concrete slabs. Though I assume that the really rich areas have avoided this due to their political influence.

    Schools - what Thorfinnsson said. Though the Brits must be credited for their marketing of Hogwarts, which have captivated the imaginations of foreign SWPLs.

    High salary jobs - sure, the UK is still a lot richer than Russia, even adjusted for cost of living. But that's a feature of the country, not the city as such.

    Going into the brown areas is pretty safe, though the seas of niqabs are depressing to look at. Going into the black areas is dangerous.

    Native bourgeoisie of London, are living in areas like in video I’ll place below.*

    I’ve been going to London for holidays, quite a lot of times, since I was a child. We usually wanted to stay near that area especially.

    Bourgeoisie can move very easily into center of the city from there. At the same time, live in a beautiful environment, which seems like it was built by a race of elves, or computer simulation team from Harry Potter series.

    English will send their children, to schools with the highest academic results, and highest ratio of admission to Oxford/Cambridge University.

    Finally, black people are not seen so much there, if I remember. Blacks there probably more likely to be family of African oligarchs, rather than the English blacks.

    Sure, in England (unlike Denmark, etc), there is some extreme divergence of lifestyle between social class, which disappoints naive tourists that dream of only English gentlemen everywhere. But bourgeois English, have a living standard which matches all their self-image and Harry Potter books.

    -
    *

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Nothing tops bourgeois American high WASPs.

    Go to hell pants. Boat shoes (no socks). 420cm two man sailboats. Gin and blow. "Summering" in seaside houses with no electronics of any kind. Lobster pants. Old Jeep Grand Wagoneers and BMW 2002s. Allen Edmonds and J Press.
    , @DFH
    I am the most knowledgeable on this area, and I think you overestimate how English the upper middle class of London is. Most are still probably white but from or at least mixed with other Europeans. Not that it is desperately important.

    Also most nice areas inside London (rather than commuter towns outside) are very close to not as nice areas and so not as segregated as you think.

    , @Bliss
    The red brick buildings remind me of Boston:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=boston+red+brick+buildings&client=safari&biw=1024&bih=627&hl=en-US&tbm=isch&prmd=insv&source=lnms&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiAh_yE9YbeAhWnjVQKHdnBBBcQ_AUIDigB
  140. @Anonymous
    Countries trade in the dollar for lots of reasons. Liquidity, relatively stable value, history of rule of law, and momentum. But a lot of this is an aberration that will correct itself.

    If it were not for America forcibly making the dollar the world reserve currency through middle east oil and its military bases, the dollar would not have near the same liquidity, stability of value, or be as adopted universally as it is today. This process is reversing itself now as we speak.

    America has attractive assets, but the value is widely inflated and also subject to American dollar dominance which is ending.

    The same financial services that bring back so much value on the world stage, will do harm to America post collapse because they are not good at doing the basics like establishing value and allocating capitol.

    America will collapse, but I don't mean the economy will grind to a halt. It will still hum along because our economy has intrinsic value. It just won't get the benefit of dollar hedgemony.

    Dollar hegemony was established in 1944, long before the petrodollar and America’s empire of bases. I’m not sure it was forced except to the extent that America refused Keynes’ proposal of the Bancor, and no one was interested in returning to the gold standard.

    A sudden elimination of Dollar hegemony (as opposed to gradual decline) would no doubt cause a deep recession and severely dent the market value of American assets.

    But the crisis would end as all crises do. It would also be good for American exporters (like me) and aspiring oligarchs (also me).

    It would be worst for the existing oligarchy and for ZOG.

    I do not consider Dollar hegemony to be a benefit to America, as the strength of a nation ultimately depends on the strength of its production. Being a reserve currency issuer undermines that.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    America did not decouple from gold until the 70s. Before then it was not dollar hedgemony since the dollar was based on a tangible asset and money creation was in check.

    Also, this was when the cold war was going on and the world was not unipolar as it is today. Even if the powers that be wanted dollar hedgemony back then a lot of things had to happen first.

    Remember, Japan threatened Western dominance in the 80s before they were brought into line and they had to wait until the Soviet Union collapsed.

    The Petro dollar had to be established as well as bringing China into the fold and establishing its ring of bases.

    You only saw significant monetary expansion in the 90's and the 00's when all of these things fell into place and this is also when our asset prices went crazy.

    The rest of what you say I totally agree with. I stand to gain when the current order comes to a close because I am productive.
    , @anonymous

    Being a reserve currency issuer undermines that.
     
    Could you go into more detail?

    Are the tariffs helping you?
  141. @Bliss

    The 1998 winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine is a Muslim Albanian, Ferid Murad
     
    Wrong. His mother was a Christian American and he was raised Christian.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferid_Murad

    an Azeri (Kerim Kerimov) was noted as being a key figure in the Soviet space program.
     
    As a communist, Kerim Kerimov must have been an atheist.

    Ferid Murad’s father was an Albanian Muslim. His conversion to Christianity did not erase his ethnicity. Karim Kerimov’s ancestry was also Muslim despite whatever his position was on atheism.

    • Replies: @Bliss
    Islam is a religion not an ethnicity.
  142. @Dmitry
    Native bourgeoisie of London, are living in areas like in video I'll place below.*

    I've been going to London for holidays, quite a lot of times, since I was a child. We usually wanted to stay near that area especially.

    Bourgeoisie can move very easily into center of the city from there. At the same time, live in a beautiful environment, which seems like it was built by a race of elves, or computer simulation team from Harry Potter series.

    English will send their children, to schools with the highest academic results, and highest ratio of admission to Oxford/Cambridge University.

    Finally, black people are not seen so much there, if I remember. Blacks there probably more likely to be family of African oligarchs, rather than the English blacks.

    Sure, in England (unlike Denmark, etc), there is some extreme divergence of lifestyle between social class, which disappoints naive tourists that dream of only English gentlemen everywhere. But bourgeois English, have a living standard which matches all their self-image and Harry Potter books.


    -
    *

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLhn99BWIFU

    Nothing tops bourgeois American high WASPs.

    Go to hell pants. Boat shoes (no socks). 420cm two man sailboats. Gin and blow. “Summering” in seaside houses with no electronics of any kind. Lobster pants. Old Jeep Grand Wagoneers and BMW 2002s. Allen Edmonds and J Press.

  143. @Anon
    Mughal rule had been effectively destroyed more than a century before.

    Afghans & Persians were the Islamic enemies of the day before christcucks.

    The Indian mutineers, muslims allied with upper caste hindus, were seeking to revive muslim Mughal rule and installed a Mughal as their Emperor.

    Afghans & Persians were the Islamic enemies of the day before christcucks.

    The muslim dynasties that ruled India tended to be Afghan or Turkic. Not Persian (though both afghans and turks were persianized in culture). The Mughal Dynasty was mongol-turkic, tracing their lineage to Genghis Khan.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Did you go long on Tesla or not girl?
    , @Anon
    I'm talking about Nadir Shah & Ahmed Shah u fkn autist.

    Stop thinking u can talk down to Brown Pagans & think that you know more about our country than us.

    I don't expect much more from abrahamics who blame any socio-political issue they don't undersatnd as SATAN.
  144. @Dmitry
    Native bourgeoisie of London, are living in areas like in video I'll place below.*

    I've been going to London for holidays, quite a lot of times, since I was a child. We usually wanted to stay near that area especially.

    Bourgeoisie can move very easily into center of the city from there. At the same time, live in a beautiful environment, which seems like it was built by a race of elves, or computer simulation team from Harry Potter series.

    English will send their children, to schools with the highest academic results, and highest ratio of admission to Oxford/Cambridge University.

    Finally, black people are not seen so much there, if I remember. Blacks there probably more likely to be family of African oligarchs, rather than the English blacks.

    Sure, in England (unlike Denmark, etc), there is some extreme divergence of lifestyle between social class, which disappoints naive tourists that dream of only English gentlemen everywhere. But bourgeois English, have a living standard which matches all their self-image and Harry Potter books.


    -
    *

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLhn99BWIFU

    I am the most knowledgeable on this area, and I think you overestimate how English the upper middle class of London is. Most are still probably white but from or at least mixed with other Europeans. Not that it is desperately important.

    Also most nice areas inside London (rather than commuter towns outside) are very close to not as nice areas and so not as segregated as you think.

    • Replies: @Dmitry

    re very close to not as nice areas and so not as segregated as you think.
     
    Do average native London bourgeoisie, even if they become oversensitive from their beautiful houses, care very much by some poor brown people in the next district? I assume (because this is my personal attitude whenever I am in London), that it is usually viewed more like some colorful scenery.

    Even when you go into the cinema in Hampstead, they only play intellectual films that will scare away any of neighbouring populations, and the price of organic green tea in the cafes is probably higher than the daily income of those people.

    But nothing in London is even close to scary to me.

    In our cities, walking to school every morning, navigating our road crossing- more dangerous than driveby shootings of Compton, Inglewood and Harlem combined.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjTaWRgYXIM

  145. @Bliss
    The Indian mutineers, muslims allied with upper caste hindus, were seeking to revive muslim Mughal rule and installed a Mughal as their Emperor.

    Afghans & Persians were the Islamic enemies of the day before christcucks.
     
    The muslim dynasties that ruled India tended to be Afghan or Turkic. Not Persian (though both afghans and turks were persianized in culture). The Mughal Dynasty was mongol-turkic, tracing their lineage to Genghis Khan.

    Did you go long on Tesla or not girl?

    • Replies: @Bliss
    You must really hate your mother.
  146. @Dmitry
    For Russian parents, it's not so important to send children just to the academically best schools in England. A lot are in academically mediocre schools. The dividing line of "status anxiety", is more for children to study abroad.

    But you can see schools with the highest academic results of the UK, and highest ratio to admission to Oxford and Cambridge University, are private schools in London. Academic standard will obviously be much higher, and they would pay higher salary to attract the best teachers.

    E.g. private schools in London

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_School

    Article shows over 99% achieving the highest academic scores:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_School,_London

    It is sweet that you think Westminster has many English people in it.

    Fun fact; it is where Rinat Akhmetov’s son went to school.

  147. @Thorfinnsson
    Correlation does not prove causation.

    "Better" schools show better results simply because they have better students with higher IQs to begin with.

    Trust me when I say you do not want to get into a debate with an American about "good schools".

    Dmitry is correct that they do also have extremely good teaching and are just generally very pleasant.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I'll defer to your first hand experience.

    I went to elite schools in America (state schools, but in a community where the median house value costs more than $1m), and it accords with what you say.

    As an example here is a photo of my high school:

    https://cdn20.patchcdn.com/users/22915293/20180912/081655/styles/T800x600/public/processed_images/lfhs-1526328121-3572-1536797668-9286.jpg

    None the less I remain deeply skeptical of education beyond basic literacy and numeracy except as a means of giving children good peers and social mores.

    And in fairness, I suppose that really is the point isn't it?

  148. @DFH
    Dmitry is correct that they do also have extremely good teaching and are just generally very pleasant.

    I’ll defer to your first hand experience.

    I went to elite schools in America (state schools, but in a community where the median house value costs more than $1m), and it accords with what you say.

    As an example here is a photo of my high school:

    None the less I remain deeply skeptical of education beyond basic literacy and numeracy except as a means of giving children good peers and social mores.

    And in fairness, I suppose that really is the point isn’t it?

    • Replies: @DFH

    good peers and social mores
     
    Even then

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3079588/Ex-public-schoolboy-19-dead-barrister-father-s-2million-London-home-injecting-lethal-cocktail-drugs.html

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2582327/Westminster-pupil-arrested-posted-sex-photos-girl-16-internet-argument.html

    A more sympathetic story

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2663088/PM-sworn-public-schoolboys-Pupils-32-000-year-Westminster-School-accused-hurling-abuse-Cameron-spoke.html
    , @Bliss

    As an example here is a photo of my high school:
     
    Sure it is. ;)

    That reminds me of that picture of a fancy mansion you once posted, claiming it was the house you grew up in. One poster recognized that house and neighborhood and asked you a question about it. That shut you up. Lol.

    , @Dmitry
    My school looked externally more like a horrible prison, and so was the attitude of some of the teachers and students was more like we were in prison. Still, nice days, and we eventually studied quite a lot before exams.
  149. @Thorfinnsson
    Did you go long on Tesla or not girl?

    You must really hate your mother.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    You gonna answer the question or what honey?

    Do you need me to hold your hand and show you how to open a brokerage account?
  150. @Thorfinnsson
    Just to elaborate on the school thing, my brother attended a very prestigious Ivy League university. He said attending was the greatest mistake of his life (owing to the student debt he contracted). He was offered a full scholarship to the flagship state university of Illinois and wishes he had done that instead.

    I chose not to attend university at all and have no trouble mingling with business and social elites.

    For people who do not have a bourgeois background elite schools can be useful, as being rough around the edges and unsophisticated can be quite detrimental.

    And of course I won't deny that they're useful in gaining useful connections and employment offers, though personally I favor entrepreneurship and simply going to high end bars, clubs, etc. Expensive hobbies (automobile racing for instance) are also a great way to meet excellent people.

    For people who do not have a bourgeois background elite schools can be useful, as being rough around the edges and unsophisticated c

    Because you are born in America, where there are endless high salary jobs, and also probably with higher appetite for risk.

    But for people not from America, then opportunity for normal guy to have a reliable profession, usually requires formal studying.

    Personally, I was very mediocre and lazy for years at school, and no teacher thought I was clever. But my parents were angry, and pressed on me, and suddenly I studied a lot from when I was about 17 (until several years later, when I became lazy again).

    However, many teenagers will not have parents (or sibling examples) that press on them (shouting at them) at this age – or children themselves might not recognise it. In this case, you will need a whole educational or institutional framework. This is what parents can buy with academically elite schools.

    If I have children, then I would place them in the most academically elite school, because I know I am too mild to ever shout at them to study. Moreover, other kinds of jobs (which don’t require academic study) are unreliable, and there is no guarantee a person will be successful.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    You still need to yell at your kids. Elite schools don't force you to study.

    Source: went to elite schools, did not study

    If your resources allow elite schools are probably worth it simply for the friends your children will make.
    , @Anatoly Karlin

    If I have children, then I would place them in the most academically elite school, because I know I am too mild to ever shout at them to study.
     
    More cost effective to be a breeder (according to Caplan, anyway - not that I'm one to talk).
    , @Philip Owen
    UK life in market towns and cathedral cities (think Salisbury) can be rather comfortable far from London. Think Salisbury. Few are rich but you will be not be anonymous. Keep your place in teh class system though. There is usually some former grammar school around which the bigger, older houses are clustered. Somewhere above 50,000 people modern culture breaks in. The presence of a "University" doesn't help.

    These days most British boarding schools limit their intake of foreigners to 50% to try and preserve their character. In the late '60's, I was the first state school pupil to join the 6th form in the boarding school I attended. I was an experiment. I still have the physical scars and PTSD to prove it. They were taught at a higher level in maths than I had been but I overtook most of them in the two years I was there. Antibullyiing policies are stricter and effective now. They have girls and the most violent Rugby fixture has been banned by the first headmistress. Twenty years ago, the match used to get televised, now its banned. It's is a small place surrounded by mountains. J K Rowling lived nearby when she started writing Harry Potter novels.

    I can compare Cardiff and Saratov both with similar metro areas and a sizable competitor within the province. (Swansea/Balakovo) etc etc. In say 1890, I suspect they were rather equal. Cardiff is now streets ahead in wealth. Saratov has held on to its excellent ballet company but Cardiff's Welsh National Opera Company now and again gets described as the world's best. that said, for high culture, they compare. The Welsh dimension in Cardiff means that it has a local TV industry which these days is the base for Dr. Who. Modern media struggles in Saratov. Both have world class research done at their universities but Cardiff is much further ahead. It didn't have to endure the 1990's in Russia. Both have long established Muslim communities that are well integrated. (Cardiff had the first mosque in the UK in the 1880's to serve Lascar sailors). Nowhere is off limits despite the more recent arrivals, such as Lebanese, being concentrated in the areas with the oldest housing.

    Living standards and the built environment are far better in Cardiff as is the preservation of heritage. Both as it happens support a Bosch factory making auto-components in diverse economies. I have no intention of moving to Saratov to live. The gap in life in Russia between the capitals and the rest is bigger than in the UK, which is not in itself known for equality between regions.

  151. @Thorfinnsson
    I'll defer to your first hand experience.

    I went to elite schools in America (state schools, but in a community where the median house value costs more than $1m), and it accords with what you say.

    As an example here is a photo of my high school:

    https://cdn20.patchcdn.com/users/22915293/20180912/081655/styles/T800x600/public/processed_images/lfhs-1526328121-3572-1536797668-9286.jpg

    None the less I remain deeply skeptical of education beyond basic literacy and numeracy except as a means of giving children good peers and social mores.

    And in fairness, I suppose that really is the point isn't it?

    • LOL: Dmitry
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    Probably I can post back here in 30 years, after I have children, sent them to them most elite British school, and they became strippers and drug dealers.
  152. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    Dollar hegemony was established in 1944, long before the petrodollar and America's empire of bases. I'm not sure it was forced except to the extent that America refused Keynes' proposal of the Bancor, and no one was interested in returning to the gold standard.

    A sudden elimination of Dollar hegemony (as opposed to gradual decline) would no doubt cause a deep recession and severely dent the market value of American assets.

    But the crisis would end as all crises do. It would also be good for American exporters (like me) and aspiring oligarchs (also me).

    It would be worst for the existing oligarchy and for ZOG.

    I do not consider Dollar hegemony to be a benefit to America, as the strength of a nation ultimately depends on the strength of its production. Being a reserve currency issuer undermines that.

    America did not decouple from gold until the 70s. Before then it was not dollar hedgemony since the dollar was based on a tangible asset and money creation was in check.

    Also, this was when the cold war was going on and the world was not unipolar as it is today. Even if the powers that be wanted dollar hedgemony back then a lot of things had to happen first.

    Remember, Japan threatened Western dominance in the 80s before they were brought into line and they had to wait until the Soviet Union collapsed.

    The Petro dollar had to be established as well as bringing China into the fold and establishing its ring of bases.

    You only saw significant monetary expansion in the 90′s and the 00′s when all of these things fell into place and this is also when our asset prices went crazy.

    The rest of what you say I totally agree with. I stand to gain when the current order comes to a close because I am productive.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    This was only the gold exchange standard (only foreign governments could redeem their Dollars for gold), and even under the classical gold standard banks lent money first and found gold second (though gold did act as a real constraint on credit expansion).

    As for money expansion...

    https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/MABMM301USA189S

    Unfortunately FRED doesn't show M3 prior to 1960, but as you can see it was expanding before Nixon closed the gold window in 1971.
  153. @Ali Choudhury
    Ferid Murad's father was an Albanian Muslim. His conversion to Christianity did not erase his ethnicity. Karim Kerimov's ancestry was also Muslim despite whatever his position was on atheism.

    Islam is a religion not an ethnicity.

    • Agree: Talha
  154. @Thorfinnsson
    I'll defer to your first hand experience.

    I went to elite schools in America (state schools, but in a community where the median house value costs more than $1m), and it accords with what you say.

    As an example here is a photo of my high school:

    https://cdn20.patchcdn.com/users/22915293/20180912/081655/styles/T800x600/public/processed_images/lfhs-1526328121-3572-1536797668-9286.jpg

    None the less I remain deeply skeptical of education beyond basic literacy and numeracy except as a means of giving children good peers and social mores.

    And in fairness, I suppose that really is the point isn't it?

    As an example here is a photo of my high school:

    Sure it is. ;)

    That reminds me of that picture of a fancy mansion you once posted, claiming it was the house you grew up in. One poster recognized that house and neighborhood and asked you a question about it. That shut you up. Lol.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I'd be happy to answer whatever the question was if you remember it.
  155. @utu
    Currency reserves in billions. Total value not all are held in US dollars.

    China $3,161.5
    Japan $1,198.9
    Switzerland $785.7
    Taiwan $456.7
    Hong Kong $437.5
    India $397.2
    Republic of Korea $385.3
    Brazil $359.1
    Russian Federation $356.5
    Singapore $279.8

    The United States had foreign currency reserves of $42.8 billion as of March 2018. The Euro Area had combined foreign currency reserves of $272.7 billion as of March 2018. The UK, which did not make the list, has $112.8 billion in foreign reserves as of March 2018.

    The trade figures are from SWIFT which has been tracking the rise of the Renimbi. I am not quite sure why the pound is still so comparatively strong s most former African colonies use US dollars. Russia actually traded with the UK in pounds up to the invasion of Georgia.

  156. @Bliss
    You must really hate your mother.

    You gonna answer the question or what honey?

    Do you need me to hold your hand and show you how to open a brokerage account?

  157. @Dmitry

    For people who do not have a bourgeois background elite schools can be useful, as being rough around the edges and unsophisticated c
     
    Because you are born in America, where there are endless high salary jobs, and also probably with higher appetite for risk.

    But for people not from America, then opportunity for normal guy to have a reliable profession, usually requires formal studying.

    Personally, I was very mediocre and lazy for years at school, and no teacher thought I was clever. But my parents were angry, and pressed on me, and suddenly I studied a lot from when I was about 17 (until several years later, when I became lazy again).

    However, many teenagers will not have parents (or sibling examples) that press on them (shouting at them) at this age - or children themselves might not recognise it. In this case, you will need a whole educational or institutional framework. This is what parents can buy with academically elite schools.

    If I have children, then I would place them in the most academically elite school, because I know I am too mild to ever shout at them to study. Moreover, other kinds of jobs (which don't require academic study) are unreliable, and there is no guarantee a person will be successful.

    You still need to yell at your kids. Elite schools don’t force you to study.

    Source: went to elite schools, did not study

    If your resources allow elite schools are probably worth it simply for the friends your children will make.

  158. @Anonymous
    America did not decouple from gold until the 70s. Before then it was not dollar hedgemony since the dollar was based on a tangible asset and money creation was in check.

    Also, this was when the cold war was going on and the world was not unipolar as it is today. Even if the powers that be wanted dollar hedgemony back then a lot of things had to happen first.

    Remember, Japan threatened Western dominance in the 80s before they were brought into line and they had to wait until the Soviet Union collapsed.

    The Petro dollar had to be established as well as bringing China into the fold and establishing its ring of bases.

    You only saw significant monetary expansion in the 90's and the 00's when all of these things fell into place and this is also when our asset prices went crazy.

    The rest of what you say I totally agree with. I stand to gain when the current order comes to a close because I am productive.

    This was only the gold exchange standard (only foreign governments could redeem their Dollars for gold), and even under the classical gold standard banks lent money first and found gold second (though gold did act as a real constraint on credit expansion).

    As for money expansion…

    https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/MABMM301USA189S

    Unfortunately FRED doesn’t show M3 prior to 1960, but as you can see it was expanding before Nixon closed the gold window in 1971.

  159. @Bliss

    As an example here is a photo of my high school:
     
    Sure it is. ;)

    That reminds me of that picture of a fancy mansion you once posted, claiming it was the house you grew up in. One poster recognized that house and neighborhood and asked you a question about it. That shut you up. Lol.

    I’d be happy to answer whatever the question was if you remember it.

    • Replies: @Bliss
    You should have answered the question by the guy who recognized the house you claimed to have grown up in. Why didn’t you?

    Post that picture again.
  160. @Ali Choudhury
    Thank you for the quick response.

    Do you have any sources that document the decline in ashraf/aqhlaq IQ? It is not something I have heard of before.

    True, Muslim India did not have much of a record in scientific achievement but that is hardly surprising given the huge distance from northwestern Europe where all the advances were occurring. I don't think I would call the society the rulers created an anti-intellectual one. There was lots of patronage for the arts and culture in general especially poetry, history, literature, architecture, painting. Consider Akbar's Nauratan who would put the bulk of contemporary state cabinets to shame with their scholarly learning: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/who-were-the-nine-gems-navratnas-of-emperor-akbar-the-great-mughal-emperor.html

    Elite Indian Muslims would be trained in religious learning, grammar, rhetoric and philosophy which again would be atypical of anti-intellectuals. Going further back Mahmud of Ghazni used his raids to furnish his courts with luminaries like Al-Biruni, who calculated the radius of the Earth to within 1% accuracy.

    The Prophet being illiterate is a Muslim tradition that arose to defend him from charges that the parts of the Quran which showed awareness of Jewish tradition, the Bible and Greek thought were not divine revelation and just items he had read about. He was a successful merchant who led long distance expeditions and even in that era such merchants could read and write. Even if he was illiterate, he could not be described as being proudly illiterate. It was not something he ever boasted about. There are numerous sayings of the Prophet about the importance of seeking knowledge etc.

    I am not particularly familiar with the Balkans but a search on Wiki shows a number of notable Bosniaks and Albanians although the lists are rather biased to the arts and literature. The 1998 winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine is a Muslim Albanian, Ferid Murad and an Azeri (Kerim Kerimov) was noted as being a key figure in the Soviet space program.

    The IITs are great but I believe they illustrate the misplaced priorities that are in play in subcontinental educational policies. The focus is too much on catering to the elite rather than trying to improve the lot of the bulk of the population who are left to the devil. Even Indian Islam was not immune to this. Syed Ahmad Khan made it clear that lower caste Muslims were not welcome at Aligarh and it was meant for the ashraf and aqhlaq only.

    For that reason China with its huge population and average IQ of 100 will dominate Asia in the decades to come. There was a quote in one of the comment threads here (possibly by Lee Kuan Yew or Thorfinnson) that a thousand schools is better than one university which is quite sensible.

    Even if he was illiterate, he could not be described as being proudly illiterate. It was not something he ever boasted about.

    Agreed – very solid. The vast majority of human beings that have ever walked the Earth were unlettered until quite recently. He was the bridge between those worlds as he was between the sedentary and nomadic people. There is nothing in Islamic doctrine that encourages illiteracy though it does not hold those in contempt.

    The rest of your points are also spot on. Even very sanguinary rulers like Tamerlane were known as patrons of the arts, poetry, etc. His famous grandson Ulugh Beg having founded the (still-standing) observatory in Samarkand:
    “While the achievements of his reign were many, he is probably best remembered for his scientific contributions. The madrasa became a major center of learning in the Islamic world, whose influence spread widely and lasted beyond Ulugh Beg’s death, at which time some of the scholars he had supported left Samarkand for capitals such as Istanbul which promised more stability. The first director of his observatory was Qazizadeh Rumi, who had in fact come to Central Asia from Anatolia and was one of Ulugh Beg’s teachers…The tradition of Islamic science upon which Ulugh Beg and his scholars drew had long been valued by the rulers of Inner Asia. For example, the famous Mongol Emperor Khubilai Khan, staffed his new observatory in Beijing (shown on the left) with Muslim scientists.”

    https://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/cities/uz/samarkand/obser.html

    Peace.

  161. @Dmitry
    Native bourgeoisie of London, are living in areas like in video I'll place below.*

    I've been going to London for holidays, quite a lot of times, since I was a child. We usually wanted to stay near that area especially.

    Bourgeoisie can move very easily into center of the city from there. At the same time, live in a beautiful environment, which seems like it was built by a race of elves, or computer simulation team from Harry Potter series.

    English will send their children, to schools with the highest academic results, and highest ratio of admission to Oxford/Cambridge University.

    Finally, black people are not seen so much there, if I remember. Blacks there probably more likely to be family of African oligarchs, rather than the English blacks.

    Sure, in England (unlike Denmark, etc), there is some extreme divergence of lifestyle between social class, which disappoints naive tourists that dream of only English gentlemen everywhere. But bourgeois English, have a living standard which matches all their self-image and Harry Potter books.


    -
    *

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLhn99BWIFU
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    You can visit Cambridge (like Hampstead another center of English bourgeoisie and intelligensia).

    British obviously outsourced urban planning of parts of the city, to race of enchanted gnomes.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-y_NmpxZPjM
  162. @Thorfinnsson
    I'd be happy to answer whatever the question was if you remember it.

    You should have answered the question by the guy who recognized the house you claimed to have grown up in. Why didn’t you?

    Post that picture again.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    I don't remember this episode either.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    Perhaps because I didn't see it and have no memory of this?

    Searching in Google Images now (using address and city) my childhood home does not come up.

    This house, however, does:

    https://ssl.cdn-redfin.com/photo/68/mbphoto/986/genMid.08758986_3.jpg

    This house was a few doors down from me.
  163. @Bliss
    The Indian mutineers, muslims allied with upper caste hindus, were seeking to revive muslim Mughal rule and installed a Mughal as their Emperor.

    Afghans & Persians were the Islamic enemies of the day before christcucks.
     
    The muslim dynasties that ruled India tended to be Afghan or Turkic. Not Persian (though both afghans and turks were persianized in culture). The Mughal Dynasty was mongol-turkic, tracing their lineage to Genghis Khan.

    I’m talking about Nadir Shah & Ahmed Shah u fkn autist.

    Stop thinking u can talk down to Brown Pagans & think that you know more about our country than us.

    I don’t expect much more from abrahamics who blame any socio-political issue they don’t undersatnd as SATAN.

    • Replies: @Seth Largo
    lol this has been the most amusing and most informative Unz thread in months.
    , @Bliss

    I’m talking about Nadir Shah & Ahmed Shah u fkn autist.
     
    What the hell do Nadir Shah and Ahmed Shah Abdali have to do with the events that took place in 1857? They belonged to the previous century. Neither of them had stayed in Delhi anyway. Talk about ignorance of history.

    The nominal Mughal Emperor was still in Delhi when the Mutiny took place and the Mughal Empire was formally ended by the British only after the defeat of the rebels. Educate yourself:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Rebellion_of_1857

    After the outbreak of the mutiny in Meerut, the rebels very quickly reached Delhi and declared its 81-year-old Mughal ruler, Bahadur Shah Zafar, as Emperor of Hindustan.

    Bahadur Shah Zafar was proclaimed the Emperor of the whole of India...... In spite of the significant loss of power that the Mughal dynasty had suffered in the preceding centuries, their name still carried great prestige across northern India.[102] Civilians, nobility and other dignitaries took an oath of allegiance. The emperor issued coins in his name, one of the oldest ways of asserting imperial status.

    Even though the rebellion had various causes, most of the rebel sepoys who were able to do so, made their way to Delhi to revive the old Mughal empire that signified national unity for even the Hindus amongst them

    The sepoys did not seek to revive small kingdoms in their regions, instead they repeatedly proclaimed a "country-wide rule" of the Mughals and vowed to drive out the British from "India", as they knew it then.
  164. @Dmitry

    For people who do not have a bourgeois background elite schools can be useful, as being rough around the edges and unsophisticated c
     
    Because you are born in America, where there are endless high salary jobs, and also probably with higher appetite for risk.

    But for people not from America, then opportunity for normal guy to have a reliable profession, usually requires formal studying.

    Personally, I was very mediocre and lazy for years at school, and no teacher thought I was clever. But my parents were angry, and pressed on me, and suddenly I studied a lot from when I was about 17 (until several years later, when I became lazy again).

    However, many teenagers will not have parents (or sibling examples) that press on them (shouting at them) at this age - or children themselves might not recognise it. In this case, you will need a whole educational or institutional framework. This is what parents can buy with academically elite schools.

    If I have children, then I would place them in the most academically elite school, because I know I am too mild to ever shout at them to study. Moreover, other kinds of jobs (which don't require academic study) are unreliable, and there is no guarantee a person will be successful.

    If I have children, then I would place them in the most academically elite school, because I know I am too mild to ever shout at them to study.

    More cost effective to be a breeder (according to Caplan, anyway – not that I’m one to talk).

  165. @Bliss
    You should have answered the question by the guy who recognized the house you claimed to have grown up in. Why didn’t you?

    Post that picture again.

    I don’t remember this episode either.

  166. @Bliss
    You should have answered the question by the guy who recognized the house you claimed to have grown up in. Why didn’t you?

    Post that picture again.

    Perhaps because I didn’t see it and have no memory of this?

    Searching in Google Images now (using address and city) my childhood home does not come up.

    This house, however, does:

    This house was a few doors down from me.

    • Replies: @Bliss
    That’s not the neighborhood you claimed to have grown up in. Far from it.

    Your claimed home was a huge mansion. I don’t exactly remember where the guy who recognized it located it. But I think it was an upscale neighborhood around some lake in the Chicago area. Not sure though.

    Btw, you have always claimed to be from a rich (aristocratic) family. The picture you posted above is enough to prove you are a liar.
    , @German_reader
    I guess Bliss referred to this:
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-43/#comment-2356030
    As we know, she's prone to "misremembering" previous comments.
  167. @DFH

    good peers and social mores
     
    Even then

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3079588/Ex-public-schoolboy-19-dead-barrister-father-s-2million-London-home-injecting-lethal-cocktail-drugs.html

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2582327/Westminster-pupil-arrested-posted-sex-photos-girl-16-internet-argument.html

    A more sympathetic story

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2663088/PM-sworn-public-schoolboys-Pupils-32-000-year-Westminster-School-accused-hurling-abuse-Cameron-spoke.html

    Probably I can post back here in 30 years, after I have children, sent them to them most elite British school, and they became strippers and drug dealers.

  168. @Thorfinnsson
    Perhaps because I didn't see it and have no memory of this?

    Searching in Google Images now (using address and city) my childhood home does not come up.

    This house, however, does:

    https://ssl.cdn-redfin.com/photo/68/mbphoto/986/genMid.08758986_3.jpg

    This house was a few doors down from me.

    That’s not the neighborhood you claimed to have grown up in. Far from it.

    Your claimed home was a huge mansion. I don’t exactly remember where the guy who recognized it located it. But I think it was an upscale neighborhood around some lake in the Chicago area. Not sure though.

    Btw, you have always claimed to be from a rich (aristocratic) family. The picture you posted above is enough to prove you are a liar.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    So are you going to repost the question or not?

    And are you going to tell us if you went long Tesla or not?

    No need to play games girl.

  169. @Bliss
    That’s not the neighborhood you claimed to have grown up in. Far from it.

    Your claimed home was a huge mansion. I don’t exactly remember where the guy who recognized it located it. But I think it was an upscale neighborhood around some lake in the Chicago area. Not sure though.

    Btw, you have always claimed to be from a rich (aristocratic) family. The picture you posted above is enough to prove you are a liar.

    So are you going to repost the question or not?

    And are you going to tell us if you went long Tesla or not?

    No need to play games girl.

  170. @Thorfinnsson
    Perhaps because I didn't see it and have no memory of this?

    Searching in Google Images now (using address and city) my childhood home does not come up.

    This house, however, does:

    https://ssl.cdn-redfin.com/photo/68/mbphoto/986/genMid.08758986_3.jpg

    This house was a few doors down from me.

    I guess Bliss referred to this:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-43/#comment-2356030

    As we know, she’s prone to “misremembering” previous comments.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    So there's my high school again and the city hall of the town where I grew up.

    I see two questions in response. One from AP (one of my favorite commenters), who asks if the place is on Lake Michigan. The answer is yes.

    And another commenter confuses these buildings for private homes, which I guess Bliss did too.

    The home I grew up in was nice, but not spectacular. A 4,000 square foot two story Dutch colonial home on a half acre of land.

    I own a lot more land today, but it's not in a high Dollar community and was thus affordable.

    Thank you German_reader.
    , @Bliss
    Bingo! That’s it.

    So it was AP who asked Thorfinsson about this house on Lake Michigan, and got no response ;):

    http://data2.finalsite.com/cf82/lakeforestschoolsorg/data/media/fullsize/1652.jpg?v=102516011440
  171. @German_reader
    I guess Bliss referred to this:
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-43/#comment-2356030
    As we know, she's prone to "misremembering" previous comments.

    So there’s my high school again and the city hall of the town where I grew up.

    I see two questions in response. One from AP (one of my favorite commenters), who asks if the place is on Lake Michigan. The answer is yes.

    And another commenter confuses these buildings for private homes, which I guess Bliss did too.

    The home I grew up in was nice, but not spectacular. A 4,000 square foot two story Dutch colonial home on a half acre of land.

    I own a lot more land today, but it’s not in a high Dollar community and was thus affordable.

    Thank you German_reader.

  172. @Bliss
    The red brick buildings remind me of Boston:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=boston+red+brick+buildings&client=safari&biw=1024&bih=627&hl=en-US&tbm=isch&prmd=insv&source=lnms&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiAh_yE9YbeAhWnjVQKHdnBBBcQ_AUIDigB

    You can visit Cambridge (like Hampstead another center of English bourgeoisie and intelligensia).

    British obviously outsourced urban planning of parts of the city, to race of enchanted gnomes.

  173. @Thorfinnsson
    I'll defer to your first hand experience.

    I went to elite schools in America (state schools, but in a community where the median house value costs more than $1m), and it accords with what you say.

    As an example here is a photo of my high school:

    https://cdn20.patchcdn.com/users/22915293/20180912/081655/styles/T800x600/public/processed_images/lfhs-1526328121-3572-1536797668-9286.jpg

    None the less I remain deeply skeptical of education beyond basic literacy and numeracy except as a means of giving children good peers and social mores.

    And in fairness, I suppose that really is the point isn't it?

    My school looked externally more like a horrible prison, and so was the attitude of some of the teachers and students was more like we were in prison. Still, nice days, and we eventually studied quite a lot before exams.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    You'll be happy to discover that most schools in America look like prisons, minus the walls. Which is appropriate given that school is a prison for children. I once had an employee (he got too slow and thus had to be let go, and now works at an auto body shop) who along with his brother every year celebrates the day school starts...because they don't have to go back. He is now 60 incidentally.

    I am not posting a photo as these comms aren't secure.
  174. @Dmitry
    My school looked externally more like a horrible prison, and so was the attitude of some of the teachers and students was more like we were in prison. Still, nice days, and we eventually studied quite a lot before exams.

    You’ll be happy to discover that most schools in America look like prisons, minus the walls. Which is appropriate given that school is a prison for children. I once had an employee (he got too slow and thus had to be let go, and now works at an auto body shop) who along with his brother every year celebrates the day school starts…because they don’t have to go back. He is now 60 incidentally.

    I am not posting a photo as these comms aren’t secure.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I am not posting a photo as these comms aren’t secure.
     
    What exactly do you mean here?
  175. @German_reader
    I guess Bliss referred to this:
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-43/#comment-2356030
    As we know, she's prone to "misremembering" previous comments.

    Bingo! That’s it.

    So it was AP who asked Thorfinsson about this house on Lake Michigan, and got no response ;):

    • Replies: @German_reader
    Thorfinnsson has already explained that it's his former high school...you can run a Google search, which will confirm it.
  176. @Bliss
    Bingo! That’s it.

    So it was AP who asked Thorfinsson about this house on Lake Michigan, and got no response ;):

    http://data2.finalsite.com/cf82/lakeforestschoolsorg/data/media/fullsize/1652.jpg?v=102516011440

    Thorfinnsson has already explained that it’s his former high school…you can run a Google search, which will confirm it.

    • Replies: @Dmitry

    …you can run a Google search, which will confirm it.

     

    I now type Forest Lake on YouTube and it teaches me that "High School Musical" and "Glee" that I was thought was fiction, is some kind of realistic documentary films :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLBEUo4MCiI

  177. @DFH
    I am the most knowledgeable on this area, and I think you overestimate how English the upper middle class of London is. Most are still probably white but from or at least mixed with other Europeans. Not that it is desperately important.

    Also most nice areas inside London (rather than commuter towns outside) are very close to not as nice areas and so not as segregated as you think.

    re very close to not as nice areas and so not as segregated as you think.

    Do average native London bourgeoisie, even if they become oversensitive from their beautiful houses, care very much by some poor brown people in the next district? I assume (because this is my personal attitude whenever I am in London), that it is usually viewed more like some colorful scenery.

    Even when you go into the cinema in Hampstead, they only play intellectual films that will scare away any of neighbouring populations, and the price of organic green tea in the cafes is probably higher than the daily income of those people.

    But nothing in London is even close to scary to me.

    In our cities, walking to school every morning, navigating our road crossing- more dangerous than driveby shootings of Compton, Inglewood and Harlem combined.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    Russian driving is MUCH better than it used to be.
    , @Dmitry

    and the price of organic green tea in the cafes is probably higher than the daily income of those people.
     
    This was a bit hyperbole.

    But let's say the price of single cinema ticket in central Hampstead, is $19.
  178. anon[163] • Disclaimer says:
    @Brabantian
    Interesting AK link above, to the Bloomberg article about Russian exile Sergei Kapchuk, fearing for his life in Britain where he had asylum, moving quietly around Europe in dazed uncertainty, and then getting terrified in Croatia where his UK travel documents were seized because the UK had apparently revoked them

    Calling Putin's man Boris Titov for help, Kapchuk was then rescued by the Russian embassy from arrest in Croatia, Kapchuk agreeing to go back into mother Russia's arms despite legal charges involving him there

    From the Bloomberg article, about Titov, a good vignette about Putin's Russia:

    Back in February, Putin’s business ombudsman, Boris Titov, flew into London with an unusual offer for Kapchuk and a few dozen other wealthy Russians accused of financial crimes. At Pushkin House, a cultural center on Bloomsbury Square, Titov vowed to use the power of his office and an army of lawyers to help the men clear their names through Russian courts. All they had to do was come home.
     
    This leads to an intriguing area of political analysis

    It is an under-appreciated aspect of Putin that he has in fact let huge numbers of people out of Russia's prisons early, with numbers said to be in the hundreds of thousands

    Whereas in the USA, e.g., heavy youthful pot smoker Barack Obama never thought of releasing the hundreds of thousands of weed tokers and sellers who languish in the USA's 2.3 million prisoner gulag (about 25% of all people in jail in the entire world)

    In surprisingly rough or even 'barbaric' countries, there is quite often an early release of jailed political figures or even extremist 'terrorists', sometimes by tinpot dictatorships who yet seek to get some good PR amidst their local rabble-rousers

    It takes a real Chad to let bygones be bygones ... and now after Donald Trump's meeting with Kanye West, we have talk of Trump doing something radical re American prisons, per his dialogue with Kanye

    Trump could go down in history like 'Abraham Lincoln ending slavery in the USA', if he let out of jail a couple of hundred thousand of the blacks and Mexicans in the slammer for non-violent offences ... that people that fake progressive black guy Obama left to languish behind bars ... would be a brilliant move to embarrass the hell out of the Antifa / SJW shriekers, it might even demolish them 4evah

    Federal Prisons are around 6% of the total prison population in the US. Obama took a shot at minorities, and spent a lot of time and effort to find 1,000 or so to pardon. He was looking for non violent offenders who could argue that they were over sentenced due to mandatory minimums, etc. He had to exclude potential Willie Hortons. You can look it up.

    So Trump can’t really do that much. Further, States have been under pressure to reduce populations and have released the ‘low hanging fruit’. There aren’t any casual marijuana smokers rotting in prison.

    Why are so many Americans incarcerated? Americans are free to be bad. Our underclass, for example, is armed to the teeth. Of course, everyone has their own ideas, but forget the idea that there are easy solutions.

    • Replies: @notanon

    but forget the idea that there are easy solutions.
     
    1) halt immigration to stop increasing the crime problem until it's fixed

    2) instead of letting gangstas get away with beating up the other kids for years while they're juveniles and having 2-4 of their own kids as a result before they eventually get locked up as an adult target gangstas as soon as they start doing it (around age 12-13 ish) and get them locked up early so they don't breed.

    the black crime rate would be down around the white level in a few generations.
  179. @Dmitry

    For people who do not have a bourgeois background elite schools can be useful, as being rough around the edges and unsophisticated c
     
    Because you are born in America, where there are endless high salary jobs, and also probably with higher appetite for risk.

    But for people not from America, then opportunity for normal guy to have a reliable profession, usually requires formal studying.

    Personally, I was very mediocre and lazy for years at school, and no teacher thought I was clever. But my parents were angry, and pressed on me, and suddenly I studied a lot from when I was about 17 (until several years later, when I became lazy again).

    However, many teenagers will not have parents (or sibling examples) that press on them (shouting at them) at this age - or children themselves might not recognise it. In this case, you will need a whole educational or institutional framework. This is what parents can buy with academically elite schools.

    If I have children, then I would place them in the most academically elite school, because I know I am too mild to ever shout at them to study. Moreover, other kinds of jobs (which don't require academic study) are unreliable, and there is no guarantee a person will be successful.

    UK life in market towns and cathedral cities (think Salisbury) can be rather comfortable far from London. Think Salisbury. Few are rich but you will be not be anonymous. Keep your place in teh class system though. There is usually some former grammar school around which the bigger, older houses are clustered. Somewhere above 50,000 people modern culture breaks in. The presence of a “University” doesn’t help.

    These days most British boarding schools limit their intake of foreigners to 50% to try and preserve their character. In the late ’60′s, I was the first state school pupil to join the 6th form in the boarding school I attended. I was an experiment. I still have the physical scars and PTSD to prove it. They were taught at a higher level in maths than I had been but I overtook most of them in the two years I was there. Antibullyiing policies are stricter and effective now. They have girls and the most violent Rugby fixture has been banned by the first headmistress. Twenty years ago, the match used to get televised, now its banned. It’s is a small place surrounded by mountains. J K Rowling lived nearby when she started writing Harry Potter novels.

    I can compare Cardiff and Saratov both with similar metro areas and a sizable competitor within the province. (Swansea/Balakovo) etc etc. In say 1890, I suspect they were rather equal. Cardiff is now streets ahead in wealth. Saratov has held on to its excellent ballet company but Cardiff’s Welsh National Opera Company now and again gets described as the world’s best. that said, for high culture, they compare. The Welsh dimension in Cardiff means that it has a local TV industry which these days is the base for Dr. Who. Modern media struggles in Saratov. Both have world class research done at their universities but Cardiff is much further ahead. It didn’t have to endure the 1990′s in Russia. Both have long established Muslim communities that are well integrated. (Cardiff had the first mosque in the UK in the 1880′s to serve Lascar sailors). Nowhere is off limits despite the more recent arrivals, such as Lebanese, being concentrated in the areas with the oldest housing.

    Living standards and the built environment are far better in Cardiff as is the preservation of heritage. Both as it happens support a Bosch factory making auto-components in diverse economies. I have no intention of moving to Saratov to live. The gap in life in Russia between the capitals and the rest is bigger than in the UK, which is not in itself known for equality between regions.

    • Replies: @Dmitry

    . Both as it happens support a Bosch factory making auto-components in diverse economies.
     
    Do you think Bosch washing dryer machines are made in Wales (UK)? I remember when my mother wanted to buy a washing dryer machine, she was worrying "Bosch are made in Turkey not in Germany", so saying it is better to buy Miele, which is actually made in Germany.
    , @anonymous coward

    The gap in life in Russia between the capitals and the rest is bigger than in the UK, which is not in itself known for equality between regions.
     
    Compare Saratov and Perm -- two cities of roughly equal population, a similar geography and logistics situation.

    One is a modern and clean city with urbanist pretensions, the other is a dump that seems to be transplanted from India. (Thankfully, the climate isn't conducive for feral cows in the streets.)

    The difference is strictly cultural. There is a lot of such difference when you compare Russian cities.

    P.S. I've visited lots of Russian cities, and Saratov is probably the biggest dump of them all.

  180. @Dmitry

    re very close to not as nice areas and so not as segregated as you think.
     
    Do average native London bourgeoisie, even if they become oversensitive from their beautiful houses, care very much by some poor brown people in the next district? I assume (because this is my personal attitude whenever I am in London), that it is usually viewed more like some colorful scenery.

    Even when you go into the cinema in Hampstead, they only play intellectual films that will scare away any of neighbouring populations, and the price of organic green tea in the cafes is probably higher than the daily income of those people.

    But nothing in London is even close to scary to me.

    In our cities, walking to school every morning, navigating our road crossing- more dangerous than driveby shootings of Compton, Inglewood and Harlem combined.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjTaWRgYXIM

    Russian driving is MUCH better than it used to be.

  181. @Dmitry

    re very close to not as nice areas and so not as segregated as you think.
     
    Do average native London bourgeoisie, even if they become oversensitive from their beautiful houses, care very much by some poor brown people in the next district? I assume (because this is my personal attitude whenever I am in London), that it is usually viewed more like some colorful scenery.

    Even when you go into the cinema in Hampstead, they only play intellectual films that will scare away any of neighbouring populations, and the price of organic green tea in the cafes is probably higher than the daily income of those people.

    But nothing in London is even close to scary to me.

    In our cities, walking to school every morning, navigating our road crossing- more dangerous than driveby shootings of Compton, Inglewood and Harlem combined.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjTaWRgYXIM

    and the price of organic green tea in the cafes is probably higher than the daily income of those people.

    This was a bit hyperbole.

    But let’s say the price of single cinema ticket in central Hampstead, is $19.

    • Replies: @g2k
    Prices for goods and services etc. are a bit more expensive in London. Companies generally dont distinguish between "nice" areas of london and "grotty" bits. The real differentiatior is London/non london. Look at the price of a pint of ale in wetherspoons for a uk-centric cost of living index. Ever since the end of wwii london was emptying out with heavy premiums going to housing in the home counties and only a select few london neighborhoods remaining prestigious. In the late 90s this process stopped abruptly and any place anywhere near london has become increasingly more expensive. Hampstead indeed gives a bucolic existence right in the middle of the city, but so does everywhere else inside the north circular, with the exception of bits of Tottenham, poplar, wood green, gospel oak etc. Even prts of london that the average boomer would be afraid to go anywhere near are now totally gentrified: brixton, all of hackney, most of tottenham, tower hamlets, clapton, Limehouse, peckham etc.
  182. @Philip Owen
    UK life in market towns and cathedral cities (think Salisbury) can be rather comfortable far from London. Think Salisbury. Few are rich but you will be not be anonymous. Keep your place in teh class system though. There is usually some former grammar school around which the bigger, older houses are clustered. Somewhere above 50,000 people modern culture breaks in. The presence of a "University" doesn't help.

    These days most British boarding schools limit their intake of foreigners to 50% to try and preserve their character. In the late '60's, I was the first state school pupil to join the 6th form in the boarding school I attended. I was an experiment. I still have the physical scars and PTSD to prove it. They were taught at a higher level in maths than I had been but I overtook most of them in the two years I was there. Antibullyiing policies are stricter and effective now. They have girls and the most violent Rugby fixture has been banned by the first headmistress. Twenty years ago, the match used to get televised, now its banned. It's is a small place surrounded by mountains. J K Rowling lived nearby when she started writing Harry Potter novels.

    I can compare Cardiff and Saratov both with similar metro areas and a sizable competitor within the province. (Swansea/Balakovo) etc etc. In say 1890, I suspect they were rather equal. Cardiff is now streets ahead in wealth. Saratov has held on to its excellent ballet company but Cardiff's Welsh National Opera Company now and again gets described as the world's best. that said, for high culture, they compare. The Welsh dimension in Cardiff means that it has a local TV industry which these days is the base for Dr. Who. Modern media struggles in Saratov. Both have world class research done at their universities but Cardiff is much further ahead. It didn't have to endure the 1990's in Russia. Both have long established Muslim communities that are well integrated. (Cardiff had the first mosque in the UK in the 1880's to serve Lascar sailors). Nowhere is off limits despite the more recent arrivals, such as Lebanese, being concentrated in the areas with the oldest housing.

    Living standards and the built environment are far better in Cardiff as is the preservation of heritage. Both as it happens support a Bosch factory making auto-components in diverse economies. I have no intention of moving to Saratov to live. The gap in life in Russia between the capitals and the rest is bigger than in the UK, which is not in itself known for equality between regions.

    . Both as it happens support a Bosch factory making auto-components in diverse economies.

    Do you think Bosch washing dryer machines are made in Wales (UK)? I remember when my mother wanted to buy a washing dryer machine, she was worrying “Bosch are made in Turkey not in Germany”, so saying it is better to buy Miele, which is actually made in Germany.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    No washing machines are made in Wales anymore. It was a centre for them but production has moved to Turkey. The televisions went to Slovakia. It is the Bosch automotive division.
  183. @DFH
    Is there some sort of HBD underlying the martial races? Sikhs generally do seem larger than your average puny Indian.

    Punjabis (including the vast majority of Sikhs) are on average (iirc) taller than your average Indian (I guess that would make them much taller than your average puny Indian?). Gurkhas, on the other hand are … not.

  184. @German_reader
    Thorfinnsson has already explained that it's his former high school...you can run a Google search, which will confirm it.

    …you can run a Google search, which will confirm it.

    I now type Forest Lake on YouTube and it teaches me that “High School Musical” and “Glee” that I was thought was fiction, is some kind of realistic documentary films :)

    • Replies: @AP
    The upper middle class town where I currently live has high school musicals that easily surpass Glee (which admittedly I haven't watched, only seen previews) in quality.

    Thorfinnson's childhood area is one of the nicest in the USA.
  185. @Philip Owen
    The British Indian Army confined its recruiting to certain Martial Races. The rest were rubbish. The Sikhs and the Nepalis were top of the list. Punjabis in general were OK as I recall. I thought this was still the case in the best regiments.

    The British Indian Army confined its recruiting to certain Martial Races. The rest were rubbish. The Sikhs and the Nepalis were top of the list. Punjabis in general were OK as I recall. I thought this was still the case in the best regiments.

    In other words…those who eat meat. Hindu’s mostly vegetarian and they cant seriously be expected to have a strong army, which is not to say that here aren’t plenty of vegetarian Indians who would make strong and great soldiers….just that it would be alot harder to get together

    Anyway, the British army recruited Africans and Indians ( in Africa) to serve in WW2 under false promises of land….such is the lying scum they can be

    Though the approach was vindicated from a strategic perspective…..it’s unheard of for a country in 4 years to refuse it’s army to fight a war in an area occupied by the enemy only 35km away(France) but fight it 1000 miles away in desert land, empire land, with civilians merely inquisitive spectators, as the British did in North Africa.

    With respect to the military, that is an enormous luxury to have. But overall in all fields the British actions in WW2 in science/Intelligence/Navy/Air force/timing must be judged to have been a big success

  186. @anon
    Federal Prisons are around 6% of the total prison population in the US. Obama took a shot at minorities, and spent a lot of time and effort to find 1,000 or so to pardon. He was looking for non violent offenders who could argue that they were over sentenced due to mandatory minimums, etc. He had to exclude potential Willie Hortons. You can look it up.

    So Trump can't really do that much. Further, States have been under pressure to reduce populations and have released the 'low hanging fruit'. There aren't any casual marijuana smokers rotting in prison.

    Why are so many Americans incarcerated? Americans are free to be bad. Our underclass, for example, is armed to the teeth. Of course, everyone has their own ideas, but forget the idea that there are easy solutions.

    but forget the idea that there are easy solutions.

    1) halt immigration to stop increasing the crime problem until it’s fixed

    2) instead of letting gangstas get away with beating up the other kids for years while they’re juveniles and having 2-4 of their own kids as a result before they eventually get locked up as an adult target gangstas as soon as they start doing it (around age 12-13 ish) and get them locked up early so they don’t breed.

    the black crime rate would be down around the white level in a few generations.

  187. @Thorfinnsson
    Just to elaborate on the school thing, my brother attended a very prestigious Ivy League university. He said attending was the greatest mistake of his life (owing to the student debt he contracted). He was offered a full scholarship to the flagship state university of Illinois and wishes he had done that instead.

    I chose not to attend university at all and have no trouble mingling with business and social elites.

    For people who do not have a bourgeois background elite schools can be useful, as being rough around the edges and unsophisticated can be quite detrimental.

    And of course I won't deny that they're useful in gaining useful connections and employment offers, though personally I favor entrepreneurship and simply going to high end bars, clubs, etc. Expensive hobbies (automobile racing for instance) are also a great way to meet excellent people.

    I’m curious. You seem to have a good breadth of knowledge, especially in economics and history. Did you pick up this knowledge mostly by reading on your own? I know that you’ve passed the difficult 66 securities exam. Are there many of your age that have forsaken college education for self study? You might be a good poster boy for advanced intellectual dilettantism? :-)

    • Replies: @for-the-record
    You might be a good poster boy for advanced intellectual dilettantism?

    Yes, Thor and Gore Vidal.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    Yes, I am self-taught.

    Bypassing college is not common in my generation (I was simply a poor student who hated school), but is growing more common in Generation Zyklon.

    This fellow is a good example: https://twitter.com/erikfinman

    He has some foolish ideas, but that's forgivable at age 19.
  188. @Thorfinnsson
    You'll be happy to discover that most schools in America look like prisons, minus the walls. Which is appropriate given that school is a prison for children. I once had an employee (he got too slow and thus had to be let go, and now works at an auto body shop) who along with his brother every year celebrates the day school starts...because they don't have to go back. He is now 60 incidentally.

    I am not posting a photo as these comms aren't secure.

    I am not posting a photo as these comms aren’t secure.

    What exactly do you mean here?

    • Replies: @Gerard2

    What exactly do you mean here?
     
    He means you are a creepy tramp who would probably try and sniff every pillow he has touched if given the opportunity....typical Banderite sadist loser cretin
    , @Thorfinnsson
    I don't need Bliss showing up at my house in the middle of the night begging for it.
  189. @Dmitry

    …you can run a Google search, which will confirm it.

     

    I now type Forest Lake on YouTube and it teaches me that "High School Musical" and "Glee" that I was thought was fiction, is some kind of realistic documentary films :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLBEUo4MCiI

    The upper middle class town where I currently live has high school musicals that easily surpass Glee (which admittedly I haven’t watched, only seen previews) in quality.

    Thorfinnson’s childhood area is one of the nicest in the USA.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    I guess, new generation in American highschools already changing rapidly since you were there.

    It's cool to have bio-diesel in your car, and "two-strap" your ruksak nowadays?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSa368X1Z2w
  190. @Abelard Lindsey
    My caption comes from a scene in "Casino" where Remo Gaggi asks Frankie Marino about "the head they found in the desert" and how it was in all of the papers. Remo finally tells Frankie to tell Nicky to "take care of things...a little better".

    You'll remember this scene if you watched and like Casino as much as I do (its my all time favorite movie).

    There is also a good scene in "Goodfellas" where Jimmy tells Henry about "you know that thing we took care of upstate?" (the whacking of Billy Batts) and how the land got sold and they had to "get it out of there" before it was discovered by construction crews.

    Ah OK, yes…it’s been a long time since I watched those two movies.

    Peace.

  191. @Anatoly Karlin
    Urban planning - the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas, interspersing the original planning with those ugly concrete slabs. Though I assume that the really rich areas have avoided this due to their political influence.

    Schools - what Thorfinnsson said. Though the Brits must be credited for their marketing of Hogwarts, which have captivated the imaginations of foreign SWPLs.

    High salary jobs - sure, the UK is still a lot richer than Russia, even adjusted for cost of living. But that's a feature of the country, not the city as such.

    Going into the brown areas is pretty safe, though the seas of niqabs are depressing to look at. Going into the black areas is dangerous.

    Urban planning – the trend under Khan is to spill the minorities over into those bourgeois areas, interspersing the original planning with those ugly concrete slabs. Though I assume that the really rich areas have avoided this due to their political influence.

    I don’t think khan has had much to do with this. For a long time it’s been national policy to pay private landlords to house welfare recipients rather than have the government house them directly in soviet style council estates. Mrs thatcher started off this process by letting sitting tenants buy at a discount, but the current conservative government has accellerated it somewhat by doing things like ending heritable tenure for the remaining purpose built council houses, charging market rents for them and selling them off to developers. They wanted to increase rease labor mobility, but the side effect of it has been to make all areas more mixed.

  192. @Philip Owen
    UK life in market towns and cathedral cities (think Salisbury) can be rather comfortable far from London. Think Salisbury. Few are rich but you will be not be anonymous. Keep your place in teh class system though. There is usually some former grammar school around which the bigger, older houses are clustered. Somewhere above 50,000 people modern culture breaks in. The presence of a "University" doesn't help.

    These days most British boarding schools limit their intake of foreigners to 50% to try and preserve their character. In the late '60's, I was the first state school pupil to join the 6th form in the boarding school I attended. I was an experiment. I still have the physical scars and PTSD to prove it. They were taught at a higher level in maths than I had been but I overtook most of them in the two years I was there. Antibullyiing policies are stricter and effective now. They have girls and the most violent Rugby fixture has been banned by the first headmistress. Twenty years ago, the match used to get televised, now its banned. It's is a small place surrounded by mountains. J K Rowling lived nearby when she started writing Harry Potter novels.

    I can compare Cardiff and Saratov both with similar metro areas and a sizable competitor within the province. (Swansea/Balakovo) etc etc. In say 1890, I suspect they were rather equal. Cardiff is now streets ahead in wealth. Saratov has held on to its excellent ballet company but Cardiff's Welsh National Opera Company now and again gets described as the world's best. that said, for high culture, they compare. The Welsh dimension in Cardiff means that it has a local TV industry which these days is the base for Dr. Who. Modern media struggles in Saratov. Both have world class research done at their universities but Cardiff is much further ahead. It didn't have to endure the 1990's in Russia. Both have long established Muslim communities that are well integrated. (Cardiff had the first mosque in the UK in the 1880's to serve Lascar sailors). Nowhere is off limits despite the more recent arrivals, such as Lebanese, being concentrated in the areas with the oldest housing.

    Living standards and the built environment are far better in Cardiff as is the preservation of heritage. Both as it happens support a Bosch factory making auto-components in diverse economies. I have no intention of moving to Saratov to live. The gap in life in Russia between the capitals and the rest is bigger than in the UK, which is not in itself known for equality between regions.

    The gap in life in Russia between the capitals and the rest is bigger than in the UK, which is not in itself known for equality between regions.

    Compare Saratov and Perm — two cities of roughly equal population, a similar geography and logistics situation.

    One is a modern and clean city with urbanist pretensions, the other is a dump that seems to be transplanted from India. (Thankfully, the climate isn’t conducive for feral cows in the streets.)

    The difference is strictly cultural. There is a lot of such difference when you compare Russian cities.

    P.S. I’ve visited lots of Russian cities, and Saratov is probably the biggest dump of them all.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    Saratov suffers from dust blowing in from the river banks. It makes it look worse than it is. That said, the first time I went there it felt like a different continent, as you say. I have also visited a lot of cities in European Russia and I agree that Saratov is at the bottom end.

    However, like Cardiff, in the run up to WW1, it was outstandingly successful on a world scale. Cardiff in coal and metals, Saratov with wheat. Hence the comparison. Saratov has had much more relative decline than Cardiff. modern Cardiff is in fact an island of modern life in a sea of almost post industrialism.
  193. @Dmitry

    . Both as it happens support a Bosch factory making auto-components in diverse economies.
     
    Do you think Bosch washing dryer machines are made in Wales (UK)? I remember when my mother wanted to buy a washing dryer machine, she was worrying "Bosch are made in Turkey not in Germany", so saying it is better to buy Miele, which is actually made in Germany.

    No washing machines are made in Wales anymore. It was a centre for them but production has moved to Turkey. The televisions went to Slovakia. It is the Bosch automotive division.

  194. @anonymous coward

    The gap in life in Russia between the capitals and the rest is bigger than in the UK, which is not in itself known for equality between regions.
     
    Compare Saratov and Perm -- two cities of roughly equal population, a similar geography and logistics situation.

    One is a modern and clean city with urbanist pretensions, the other is a dump that seems to be transplanted from India. (Thankfully, the climate isn't conducive for feral cows in the streets.)

    The difference is strictly cultural. There is a lot of such difference when you compare Russian cities.

    P.S. I've visited lots of Russian cities, and Saratov is probably the biggest dump of them all.

    Saratov suffers from dust blowing in from the river banks. It makes it look worse than it is. That said, the first time I went there it felt like a different continent, as you say. I have also visited a lot of cities in European Russia and I agree that Saratov is at the bottom end.

    However, like Cardiff, in the run up to WW1, it was outstandingly successful on a world scale. Cardiff in coal and metals, Saratov with wheat. Hence the comparison. Saratov has had much more relative decline than Cardiff. modern Cardiff is in fact an island of modern life in a sea of almost post industrialism.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward

    Saratov has had much more relative decline than Cardiff.
     
    Indeed. It was the number 3 city in Russia after Moscow and St. Petersburg sometime around the turn of the last century.
    , @Gerard2

    However, like Cardiff, in the run up to WW1, it was outstandingly successful on a world scale. Cardiff in coal and metals, Saratov with wheat. Hence the comparison. Saratov has had much more relative decline than Cardiff. modern Cardiff is in fact an island of modern life in a sea of almost post industrialism.
     
    Utter garbage, show photos of this about Cardiff...absolute drivel. Bristol, I know from friends and visits that is relatively near to Cardiff, but in England.....is significantly higher in standing and quality to the fairly average Cardiff
  195. @Mr. Hack
    I'm curious. You seem to have a good breadth of knowledge, especially in economics and history. Did you pick up this knowledge mostly by reading on your own? I know that you've passed the difficult 66 securities exam. Are there many of your age that have forsaken college education for self study? You might be a good poster boy for advanced intellectual dilettantism? :-)

    You might be a good poster boy for advanced intellectual dilettantism?

    Yes, Thor and Gore Vidal.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    Well, somebody has to pick up the torch now that old Gore is gone? With all of the anecdotal knowledge that Thor likes to sprinkle his comments with here for us plebes about life at the top of the mountain, you'd think that he'd be a cinch as the new F. Scott Fitzgerald? Besides, 'The Great Gatsby' story needs a face lift, a new modern adaptation, and who better than our guy, Thofinnsson?...
  196. @Philip Owen
    Saratov suffers from dust blowing in from the river banks. It makes it look worse than it is. That said, the first time I went there it felt like a different continent, as you say. I have also visited a lot of cities in European Russia and I agree that Saratov is at the bottom end.

    However, like Cardiff, in the run up to WW1, it was outstandingly successful on a world scale. Cardiff in coal and metals, Saratov with wheat. Hence the comparison. Saratov has had much more relative decline than Cardiff. modern Cardiff is in fact an island of modern life in a sea of almost post industrialism.

    Saratov has had much more relative decline than Cardiff.

    Indeed. It was the number 3 city in Russia after Moscow and St. Petersburg sometime around the turn of the last century.

  197. @Thorfinnsson
    I kind of like the idea of Ivanka as UN Ambassador as it gets her out of the White House, and the UN is a total joke (and founded on completely disgusting principles) anyway so why not nominate a joke candidate?

    I kind of like the idea of Ivanka as UN Ambassador as it gets her out of the White House

    Not far enough.

    Ivanka for ambassador to Australia!

    Get Saudi puppet Jared Kushner into a different time zone.

    • Replies: @notanon
    Moonbase Ivanka
  198. @for-the-record
    You might be a good poster boy for advanced intellectual dilettantism?

    Yes, Thor and Gore Vidal.

    Well, somebody has to pick up the torch now that old Gore is gone? With all of the anecdotal knowledge that Thor likes to sprinkle his comments with here for us plebes about life at the top of the mountain, you’d think that he’d be a cinch as the new F. Scott Fitzgerald? Besides, ‘The Great Gatsby’ story needs a face lift, a new modern adaptation, and who better than our guy, Thofinnsson?…

  199. Invoking open thread…

    Correspondence addressed to the new US embassy being built in Ankara should be sent to “Malcolm X” street:

    https://www.newsweek.com/turkey-malcolm-x-us-embassy-recep-tayyip-erdogan-street-ankara-racism-name-1168886

    Peace.

    • Replies: @songbird
    I'm afraid I don't really know much about the group he belonged to. Are the Nation of Islam really considered Muslims in the Muslim world? I know there are various splits, but, offhand, I'd guess they were analogous to Mormons, when Mormons were separatists, or maybe even Christian Scientists or Shakers. I mean, some of their theology seems really out there. UFOs. Jacub, the evil black scientist who created white people.
    , @utu
    Erdogan is not crazier than American officials. They showed the way.

    DC officially renames street in front of Russian embassy after slain Putin critic
    https://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/375814-dc-officially-renames-street-in-front-of-russian-embassy-after
     
    However I am not sure if Malcom X is the best choice if you want to irritate Americans.
  200. @Dmitry

    and the price of organic green tea in the cafes is probably higher than the daily income of those people.
     
    This was a bit hyperbole.

    But let's say the price of single cinema ticket in central Hampstead, is $19.

    Prices for goods and services etc. are a bit more expensive in London. Companies generally dont distinguish between “nice” areas of london and “grotty” bits. The real differentiatior is London/non london. Look at the price of a pint of ale in wetherspoons for a uk-centric cost of living index. Ever since the end of wwii london was emptying out with heavy premiums going to housing in the home counties and only a select few london neighborhoods remaining prestigious. In the late 90s this process stopped abruptly and any place anywhere near london has become increasingly more expensive. Hampstead indeed gives a bucolic existence right in the middle of the city, but so does everywhere else inside the north circular, with the exception of bits of Tottenham, poplar, wood green, gospel oak etc. Even prts of london that the average boomer would be afraid to go anywhere near are now totally gentrified: brixton, all of hackney, most of tottenham, tower hamlets, clapton, Limehouse, peckham etc.

    • Replies: @Dmitry

    select few london neighborhoods remaining prestigious
     
    I think it is quite a large proportion of the city, which became "prestigious". Although it's interesting even poor parts of London, have some very nice houses of the 19th century.

    Prestigious parts of London, pushed outwards more into the West of the city - I've read - because of prevailing wind was in the West to East direction. As a result, air pollution was spread over the East of the city during industrialization.

    I thought there was an irony, that the oligarch building a new copper mine (hated by locals for creating more air pollution) outside Chelyabinsk , is living in a part of West London which developed in the 19th century, partly as response to air pollution.
  201. Things I learned from this article

    https://triblive.com/local/westmoreland/14174937-74/indiana-county-native-last-living-member-of-the-venona-project-a-soviet

    1) The American government under FDR (or as I call him, the Great Satan, the killer of federalist America and creator of Evil Empire America) and Truman was filled with Stalin’s spies. Wait, already knew that.
    2) Winston Churchill’s NKVD nickname was “Boar.” Funny!
    3) The NKVD referred to San Francisco as “Babylon” and Washington DC as “Carthage.” Perfect!

    The article says the NKVD code name for Charles de Gaulle was “RAS”? That’s in the Latin alphabet Anyone know what that might mean in Russian?

    • Replies: @DFH
    You missed out WASP for Ruth Rosenberg. They obviously had a sense of humour.
    , @for-the-record
    The article says the NKVD code name for Charles de Gaulle was “RAS”? That’s in the Latin alphabet Anyone know what that might mean in Russian?

    My guess, given the time period and the evident sense of humor, is that RAS is the Ethiopian title (king or prince). In Italian it can be (or at least was) used jokingly for despotic local leader or local fascist.
  202. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Things I learned from this article

    https://triblive.com/local/westmoreland/14174937-74/indiana-county-native-last-living-member-of-the-venona-project-a-soviet

    1) The American government under FDR (or as I call him, the Great Satan, the killer of federalist America and creator of Evil Empire America) and Truman was filled with Stalin's spies. Wait, already knew that.
    2) Winston Churchill's NKVD nickname was "Boar." Funny!
    3) The NKVD referred to San Francisco as "Babylon" and Washington DC as "Carthage." Perfect!

    The article says the NKVD code name for Charles de Gaulle was "RAS"? That's in the Latin alphabet Anyone know what that might mean in Russian?

    You missed out WASP for Ruth Rosenberg. They obviously had a sense of humour.

  203. @Philip Owen
    Saratov suffers from dust blowing in from the river banks. It makes it look worse than it is. That said, the first time I went there it felt like a different continent, as you say. I have also visited a lot of cities in European Russia and I agree that Saratov is at the bottom end.

    However, like Cardiff, in the run up to WW1, it was outstandingly successful on a world scale. Cardiff in coal and metals, Saratov with wheat. Hence the comparison. Saratov has had much more relative decline than Cardiff. modern Cardiff is in fact an island of modern life in a sea of almost post industrialism.

    However, like Cardiff, in the run up to WW1, it was outstandingly successful on a world scale. Cardiff in coal and metals, Saratov with wheat. Hence the comparison. Saratov has had much more relative decline than Cardiff. modern Cardiff is in fact an island of modern life in a sea of almost post industrialism.

    Utter garbage, show photos of this about Cardiff…absolute drivel. Bristol, I know from friends and visits that is relatively near to Cardiff, but in England…..is significantly higher in standing and quality to the fairly average Cardiff

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    Nobody English rates anywhere in Wales. I have lived in Bristol. i now live near Cardiff. Bristol certainly has an older more historic city city even allowing for the bombing. Cardiff is a rather new city by British standards, post 1880. the centre is the best of pre WW1 cities. It is a lot better laid out than Bristol. It is one of the very few British cities where the inner city is more desired than the suburbs. Both are seaports with large coloured populations. Bristol had riots. Cardiff's happened before the First World War. More economic equality.

    https://goo.gl/images/JrTjmd

    The big copper coloured building is amongst other things an Opera House but is not called that to avoid charges of elitism. Cardiff also has a symphony orchestra. Bristol has neither. Both are growing very fast but Bristol is just Bristol. Cardiff has a large metro area comparable in population to Saratov.
  204. @John Gruskos

    I kind of like the idea of Ivanka as UN Ambassador as it gets her out of the White House
     
    Not far enough.

    Ivanka for ambassador to Australia!

    Get Saudi puppet Jared Kushner into a different time zone.

    Moonbase Ivanka

  205. @Mr. Hack

    I am not posting a photo as these comms aren’t secure.
     
    What exactly do you mean here?

    What exactly do you mean here?

    He means you are a creepy tramp who would probably try and sniff every pillow he has touched if given the opportunity….typical Banderite sadist loser cretin

    • Replies: @Gerard2
    Ok, I apologise to Karlin for this.......completely unnecessary from myself
    , @Mr. Hack
    You're a moron. No apologies to anyone.
  206. I listed countries who have contributed the most to humanity over the years, as a point of proving how much of a useless failure state Poland was and is. In the process I had Italy on top followed by Russia/Holland, then Britain , then Germany , then France…….but in doing my list I completely forgot to think about the great british eccentric explorers and adventurers over the centuries, such as this superb man:

    https://vk.com/grishawphillips?w=wall262707630_552618

    https://twitter.com/GrahamWP_UK/status/1051742963162861568

    Excellent work

    No doubt this will be yet another post pulled by Karlin- a kreakl lover is a Bandera lover

    • Replies: @DFH

    In the process I had Italy on top followed by Russia/Holland
     
    Obviously Russia (or Holland) has not accomplished more than Britain, Germany or France.
    , @DFH
    On an unrelated point, what is the deal with Graham Phillips (in general)?
    , @notanon
    i wonder how many people his cheka great-grandparents killed
  207. @Gerard2

    What exactly do you mean here?
     
    He means you are a creepy tramp who would probably try and sniff every pillow he has touched if given the opportunity....typical Banderite sadist loser cretin

    Ok, I apologise to Karlin for this…….completely unnecessary from myself

  208. @Brabantian
    Interesting AK link above, to the Bloomberg article about Russian exile Sergei Kapchuk, fearing for his life in Britain where he had asylum, moving quietly around Europe in dazed uncertainty, and then getting terrified in Croatia where his UK travel documents were seized because the UK had apparently revoked them

    Calling Putin's man Boris Titov for help, Kapchuk was then rescued by the Russian embassy from arrest in Croatia, Kapchuk agreeing to go back into mother Russia's arms despite legal charges involving him there

    From the Bloomberg article, about Titov, a good vignette about Putin's Russia:

    Back in February, Putin’s business ombudsman, Boris Titov, flew into London with an unusual offer for Kapchuk and a few dozen other wealthy Russians accused of financial crimes. At Pushkin House, a cultural center on Bloomsbury Square, Titov vowed to use the power of his office and an army of lawyers to help the men clear their names through Russian courts. All they had to do was come home.
     
    This leads to an intriguing area of political analysis

    It is an under-appreciated aspect of Putin that he has in fact let huge numbers of people out of Russia's prisons early, with numbers said to be in the hundreds of thousands

    Whereas in the USA, e.g., heavy youthful pot smoker Barack Obama never thought of releasing the hundreds of thousands of weed tokers and sellers who languish in the USA's 2.3 million prisoner gulag (about 25% of all people in jail in the entire world)

    In surprisingly rough or even 'barbaric' countries, there is quite often an early release of jailed political figures or even extremist 'terrorists', sometimes by tinpot dictatorships who yet seek to get some good PR amidst their local rabble-rousers

    It takes a real Chad to let bygones be bygones ... and now after Donald Trump's meeting with Kanye West, we have talk of Trump doing something radical re American prisons, per his dialogue with Kanye

    Trump could go down in history like 'Abraham Lincoln ending slavery in the USA', if he let out of jail a couple of hundred thousand of the blacks and Mexicans in the slammer for non-violent offences ... that people that fake progressive black guy Obama left to languish behind bars ... would be a brilliant move to embarrass the hell out of the Antifa / SJW shriekers, it might even demolish them 4evah

    Mass incarceration is the best approach to our criminal underclass that is available within the U.S. Overton window. The only other alternative within the Overton window, mass release, would be terrible. Our country has a weaker genetic stock than most other civilized places and needs a correspondingly harsh approach to law and order in order to keep us safe.

    People tend to conflate “nonviolent offender” with “drug offender” when they cite these stats. The guy who broke into and robbed my home was a “nonviolent offender”, but I’d fully advocate keeping him in prison for the remainder of his useful life. Actually, I’d advocate hanging him, if that were in the Overton window. Home invasion is a terrible crime, violent or not.

    Maybe the government could stand to soften up on prosecution of certain drug crimes, but I’m generally OK with where things stand. Worst case, you clean up the streets a bit. Best case, you take out a lot of thieves and assorted lowlifes who can’t be busted on any other charge.

    If Trump decided to go soft on law and order and engage in mass pardons, I’d consider it a betrayal of the highest order and would fully support the efforts of Democrats to impeach him. Trump would gain virtually no support for the move but most of his base would abandon him.

  209. @Talha
    Invoking open thread...

    Correspondence addressed to the new US embassy being built in Ankara should be sent to “Malcolm X” street:
    https://www.newsweek.com/turkey-malcolm-x-us-embassy-recep-tayyip-erdogan-street-ankara-racism-name-1168886

    Peace.

    I’m afraid I don’t really know much about the group he belonged to. Are the Nation of Islam really considered Muslims in the Muslim world? I know there are various splits, but, offhand, I’d guess they were analogous to Mormons, when Mormons were separatists, or maybe even Christian Scientists or Shakers. I mean, some of their theology seems really out there. UFOs. Jacub, the evil black scientist who created white people.

    • Replies: @DFH
    He became a 'normal' Muslim later on
    , @Ali Choudhury
    They don't really register, most of the American Muslims who are known to the wider Muslim world are more orthodox types like Hamza Yusuf - a white Californian convert - and Wallace Deen Muhammad, the son of Elijah Muhammad. He took the original Nation Of Islam and made it a regular Sunni organisation while Louis Farrakhan created his own splinter group using the NOI name which is the more widely known one.
    , @Talha

    Are the Nation of Islam really considered Muslims in the Muslim world?
     
    Nope. They are actually a made-in-America religion like...

    I’d guess they were analogous to Mormons
     
    Bingo!

    Jacub, the evil black scientist who created white people.
     
    Malcolm X (ra) left all that later in life (partly why he was killed) - went on Hajj, broke bread (literally) with White Muslims, sat with some serious ulema*, and ended up rejecting racism - however, it must be stated, he was still not keen on integration as he did not think that was in the best interests of his people. Perhaps his views would have changed today - who knows...

    He remains a hero of mine since my teenage years. Incidentally, my wife's first exposure to "Islam" was in Berkeley in her high school where there were some NOI kids apparently who told her she was the devil because she was White...dorks...

    Peace.

    *Malcolm was legit, yo!
    https://www.gettyimages.dk/detail/news-photo/black-muslim-leader-malcolm-x-meets-with-sheik-abdel-rahman-news-photo/514682588

    "In the afternoon on August 15, Malcolm met with Sheikh Akbar Hassan, the rector of al-Azhar University. Sheikh Hassan handed Malcolm a certificate granting him the authority to teach Islam."
    Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention
  210. @Gerard2
    I listed countries who have contributed the most to humanity over the years, as a point of proving how much of a useless failure state Poland was and is. In the process I had Italy on top followed by Russia/Holland, then Britain , then Germany , then France.......but in doing my list I completely forgot to think about the great british eccentric explorers and adventurers over the centuries, such as this superb man:

    https://vk.com/grishawphillips?w=wall262707630_552618

    https://twitter.com/GrahamWP_UK/status/1051742963162861568


    Excellent work

    No doubt this will be yet another post pulled by Karlin- a kreakl lover is a Bandera lover

    In the process I had Italy on top followed by Russia/Holland

    Obviously Russia (or Holland) has not accomplished more than Britain, Germany or France.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Gérard here

    It was more a type of " pound for pound" analysis as in Boxing, with Holland promoted because of its small size and Russia for it having a 1000 year disadvantage compared to France,Britain and so on.......with respect given to Italy for its contribution from ancient times,right through to now, but extra weight given to contributions from the Enlightenment and age of Industrialisation
  211. @songbird
    I'm afraid I don't really know much about the group he belonged to. Are the Nation of Islam really considered Muslims in the Muslim world? I know there are various splits, but, offhand, I'd guess they were analogous to Mormons, when Mormons were separatists, or maybe even Christian Scientists or Shakers. I mean, some of their theology seems really out there. UFOs. Jacub, the evil black scientist who created white people.

    He became a ‘normal’ Muslim later on

  212. @Gerard2
    I listed countries who have contributed the most to humanity over the years, as a point of proving how much of a useless failure state Poland was and is. In the process I had Italy on top followed by Russia/Holland, then Britain , then Germany , then France.......but in doing my list I completely forgot to think about the great british eccentric explorers and adventurers over the centuries, such as this superb man:

    https://vk.com/grishawphillips?w=wall262707630_552618

    https://twitter.com/GrahamWP_UK/status/1051742963162861568


    Excellent work

    No doubt this will be yet another post pulled by Karlin- a kreakl lover is a Bandera lover

    On an unrelated point, what is the deal with Graham Phillips (in general)?

  213. @Talha
    Invoking open thread...

    Correspondence addressed to the new US embassy being built in Ankara should be sent to “Malcolm X” street:
    https://www.newsweek.com/turkey-malcolm-x-us-embassy-recep-tayyip-erdogan-street-ankara-racism-name-1168886

    Peace.

    Erdogan is not crazier than American officials. They showed the way.

    DC officially renames street in front of Russian embassy after slain Putin critic

    https://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/375814-dc-officially-renames-street-in-front-of-russian-embassy-after

    However I am not sure if Malcom X is the best choice if you want to irritate Americans.

    • Replies: @Talha
    I guess everybody does it!

    However I am not sure if Malcom X is the best choice if you want to irritate Americans.
     
    Agreed. But if you read the article I linked to, it mentions that Erdogan met with the daughters of Malcolm X (ra) on his last visit to America so it may have less to do with irritating the US than a genuine desire to honor their father (or maybe both). The man is after all probably the best known Muslim (apart from Muhammad Ali) from America.

    Peace.

  214. @songbird
    I'm afraid I don't really know much about the group he belonged to. Are the Nation of Islam really considered Muslims in the Muslim world? I know there are various splits, but, offhand, I'd guess they were analogous to Mormons, when Mormons were separatists, or maybe even Christian Scientists or Shakers. I mean, some of their theology seems really out there. UFOs. Jacub, the evil black scientist who created white people.

    They don’t really register, most of the American Muslims who are known to the wider Muslim world are more orthodox types like Hamza Yusuf – a white Californian convert – and Wallace Deen Muhammad, the son of Elijah Muhammad. He took the original Nation Of Islam and made it a regular Sunni organisation while Louis Farrakhan created his own splinter group using the NOI name which is the more widely known one.

  215. @Gerard2

    What exactly do you mean here?
     
    He means you are a creepy tramp who would probably try and sniff every pillow he has touched if given the opportunity....typical Banderite sadist loser cretin

    You’re a moron. No apologies to anyone.

  216. @songbird
    I'm afraid I don't really know much about the group he belonged to. Are the Nation of Islam really considered Muslims in the Muslim world? I know there are various splits, but, offhand, I'd guess they were analogous to Mormons, when Mormons were separatists, or maybe even Christian Scientists or Shakers. I mean, some of their theology seems really out there. UFOs. Jacub, the evil black scientist who created white people.

    Are the Nation of Islam really considered Muslims in the Muslim world?

    Nope. They are actually a made-in-America religion like…

    I’d guess they were analogous to Mormons

    Bingo!

    Jacub, the evil black scientist who created white people.

    Malcolm X (ra) left all that later in life (partly why he was killed) – went on Hajj, broke bread (literally) with White Muslims, sat with some serious ulema*, and ended up rejecting racism – however, it must be stated, he was still not keen on integration as he did not think that was in the best interests of his people. Perhaps his views would have changed today – who knows…

    He remains a hero of mine since my teenage years. Incidentally, my wife’s first exposure to “Islam” was in Berkeley in her high school where there were some NOI kids apparently who told her she was the devil because she was White…dorks…

    Peace.

    *Malcolm was legit, yo!

    https://www.gettyimages.dk/detail/news-photo/black-muslim-leader-malcolm-x-meets-with-sheik-abdel-rahman-news-photo/514682588

    “In the afternoon on August 15, Malcolm met with Sheikh Akbar Hassan, the rector of al-Azhar University. Sheikh Hassan handed Malcolm a certificate granting him the authority to teach Islam.”
    Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention

  217. @utu
    Erdogan is not crazier than American officials. They showed the way.

    DC officially renames street in front of Russian embassy after slain Putin critic
    https://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/375814-dc-officially-renames-street-in-front-of-russian-embassy-after
     
    However I am not sure if Malcom X is the best choice if you want to irritate Americans.

    I guess everybody does it!

    However I am not sure if Malcom X is the best choice if you want to irritate Americans.

    Agreed. But if you read the article I linked to, it mentions that Erdogan met with the daughters of Malcolm X (ra) on his last visit to America so it may have less to do with irritating the US than a genuine desire to honor their father (or maybe both). The man is after all probably the best known Muslim (apart from Muhammad Ali) from America.

    Peace.

  218. @Gerard2
    I listed countries who have contributed the most to humanity over the years, as a point of proving how much of a useless failure state Poland was and is. In the process I had Italy on top followed by Russia/Holland, then Britain , then Germany , then France.......but in doing my list I completely forgot to think about the great british eccentric explorers and adventurers over the centuries, such as this superb man:

    https://vk.com/grishawphillips?w=wall262707630_552618

    https://twitter.com/GrahamWP_UK/status/1051742963162861568


    Excellent work

    No doubt this will be yet another post pulled by Karlin- a kreakl lover is a Bandera lover

    i wonder how many people his cheka great-grandparents killed

  219. @Mr. Hack
    I'm curious. You seem to have a good breadth of knowledge, especially in economics and history. Did you pick up this knowledge mostly by reading on your own? I know that you've passed the difficult 66 securities exam. Are there many of your age that have forsaken college education for self study? You might be a good poster boy for advanced intellectual dilettantism? :-)

    Yes, I am self-taught.

    Bypassing college is not common in my generation (I was simply a poor student who hated school), but is growing more common in Generation Zyklon.

    This fellow is a good example: https://twitter.com/erikfinman

    He has some foolish ideas, but that’s forgivable at age 19.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    I was only half kidding when I stated that somebody with your insight and cynicism might attempt to write an updated version of 'The Great Gatsby'. After all, Fitzgerald's great novel depicted the decadence of the rich of the 1920's. Almost 100 years has passed. It might be a lot of fun, and you might make out like a bandit too?...
  220. @Mr. Hack

    I am not posting a photo as these comms aren’t secure.
     
    What exactly do you mean here?

    I don’t need Bliss showing up at my house in the middle of the night begging for it.

  221. @Anon
    Re. Unz vs ADL, I think people like Karlin are the most screwed.

    It is unclear why Unz writes that crap, but even someone who accepts innate evilness of supremacist clans such as the Jews will have a hard time understanding a person who states "Jews pray to Satan daily". I mean, who the hell cares about their prayers? They could have worshipped Clefairy, if only they could refrain from taking our money through subterfuge.

    But now, anyone who reads about daily prayers to Satan will conclude Unz is unhinged, and his collaborators must be about the same level of insanity. GG, Jew.

    I didn’t think they had it in them, but in the very last paragraph, the ADL mentions that ‘Unz comes from a Jewish background’.

  222. @Thorfinnsson
    Yes, I am self-taught.

    Bypassing college is not common in my generation (I was simply a poor student who hated school), but is growing more common in Generation Zyklon.

    This fellow is a good example: https://twitter.com/erikfinman

    He has some foolish ideas, but that's forgivable at age 19.

    I was only half kidding when I stated that somebody with your insight and cynicism might attempt to write an updated version of ‘The Great Gatsby’. After all, Fitzgerald’s great novel depicted the decadence of the rich of the 1920′s. Almost 100 years has passed. It might be a lot of fun, and you might make out like a bandit too?…

  223. Fast Eddie Lampert’s three-card monty routine has come to an end. Sears Holdings has officially filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy on Monday in White Plains, New York. A sad end to the fabled Sears Roebuck & Company.

    Even President Trump remarked on this:

    Sears was the Amazon, Walmart, and Costco of its day combined. Launched as a nationwide catalog retailer in 1892, it quickly become the largest retailer in the world thanks in part to the introduction of Rural Free Delivery by the United States Postal Service in 1896.

    Based in Chicago (then, and still today, America’s largest logistics hub), the Sears main warehouse was by far the largest in the world. The old Chicago general post office in turn was the world’s largest post office. Anything could be ordered from the Sears catalog, even complete houses.

    After WW1 with the motorization of American society, Sears entered the department store business. It quickly became the largest brick & mortar retailer in the world as well, a position it would hold until being surpassed by Walmart in the early 1990s.

    Sears gave to America the credit card, the Craftsman tool brand, DieHard car batteries, Kenmore appliances, Allstate insurance, and the Discover card. Sears built what was then the tallest structure in the world in the 1970s, the Sears Tower (now renamed the Willis Tower). The terms and conditions of the Sears credit card were copied by Bank of America verbatim when Bank of America introduced the first general purpose credit card. The reason you pay no interest on your credit card if you pay your statement balance in full? Because that’s how Sears designed it in 1908.

    The decline of Sears mirrored the decline of middle class America. In 1973, when the Sears Tower was built, America’s middle class was at its peak and Sears straddled America like a colossus. Generations of Americans bought their home goods from Sears, and even took family portraits at Sears. That America, and the retailer that catered to it, is gone. Now the largest retailer in America is Walmart, which specializes in catering to America’s poor.

    Fast Eddie Lampert was hailed as an investing genius when he put together Sears and K-Mart, but unfortunately his shell game just kept Sears circling the drain for a decade. Capital investment was slashed to zero, treasured brands sold off (Craftsman is now owned by Stanley Black & Decker), and departments were made to fight eachother for resources. The stores came to reek of desperation, despair, and depression.

    A sad day.

    • Replies: @iffen
    A sad day.

    Yes, but think of all the money the short sellers made over the years.

    God, I do love America!
    , @Talha
    It is sad, I remember Sears fondly also.

    There is a spiritual lesson in the rise and fall of Sears. If you had asked someone in the 1970's if they thought Sears would go away in just 50 years, they'd have said you were crazy. Ask people about Apple now, they might say the same thing...

    "It is God's way that He lowers whatever raises itself in the world." - reported in Bukhari

    Peace.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    Good piece in the Journal about Sears:

    https://twitter.com/EddyElfenbein/status/1051906239830069249

    If you access it from Twitter you should be able to bypass the paywall.

    I also recommend following Eddy Elfenbein in general if you're interested in business and finance.
  224. @Thorfinnsson
    Fast Eddie Lampert's three-card monty routine has come to an end. Sears Holdings has officially filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy on Monday in White Plains, New York. A sad end to the fabled Sears Roebuck & Company.

    Even President Trump remarked on this:

    https://twitter.com/thehill/status/1051884831750180864

    Sears was the Amazon, Walmart, and Costco of its day combined. Launched as a nationwide catalog retailer in 1892, it quickly become the largest retailer in the world thanks in part to the introduction of Rural Free Delivery by the United States Postal Service in 1896.

    Based in Chicago (then, and still today, America's largest logistics hub), the Sears main warehouse was by far the largest in the world. The old Chicago general post office in turn was the world's largest post office. Anything could be ordered from the Sears catalog, even complete houses.

    After WW1 with the motorization of American society, Sears entered the department store business. It quickly became the largest brick & mortar retailer in the world as well, a position it would hold until being surpassed by Walmart in the early 1990s.

    Sears gave to America the credit card, the Craftsman tool brand, DieHard car batteries, Kenmore appliances, Allstate insurance, and the Discover card. Sears built what was then the tallest structure in the world in the 1970s, the Sears Tower (now renamed the Willis Tower). The terms and conditions of the Sears credit card were copied by Bank of America verbatim when Bank of America introduced the first general purpose credit card. The reason you pay no interest on your credit card if you pay your statement balance in full? Because that's how Sears designed it in 1908.

    The decline of Sears mirrored the decline of middle class America. In 1973, when the Sears Tower was built, America's middle class was at its peak and Sears straddled America like a colossus. Generations of Americans bought their home goods from Sears, and even took family portraits at Sears. That America, and the retailer that catered to it, is gone. Now the largest retailer in America is Walmart, which specializes in catering to America's poor.

    Fast Eddie Lampert was hailed as an investing genius when he put together Sears and K-Mart, but unfortunately his shell game just kept Sears circling the drain for a decade. Capital investment was slashed to zero, treasured brands sold off (Craftsman is now owned by Stanley Black & Decker), and departments were made to fight eachother for resources. The stores came to reek of desperation, despair, and depression.

    A sad day.

    A sad day.

    Yes, but think of all the money the short sellers made over the years.

    God, I do love America!

  225. @Thorfinnsson
    Fast Eddie Lampert's three-card monty routine has come to an end. Sears Holdings has officially filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy on Monday in White Plains, New York. A sad end to the fabled Sears Roebuck & Company.

    Even President Trump remarked on this:

    https://twitter.com/thehill/status/1051884831750180864

    Sears was the Amazon, Walmart, and Costco of its day combined. Launched as a nationwide catalog retailer in 1892, it quickly become the largest retailer in the world thanks in part to the introduction of Rural Free Delivery by the United States Postal Service in 1896.

    Based in Chicago (then, and still today, America's largest logistics hub), the Sears main warehouse was by far the largest in the world. The old Chicago general post office in turn was the world's largest post office. Anything could be ordered from the Sears catalog, even complete houses.

    After WW1 with the motorization of American society, Sears entered the department store business. It quickly became the largest brick & mortar retailer in the world as well, a position it would hold until being surpassed by Walmart in the early 1990s.

    Sears gave to America the credit card, the Craftsman tool brand, DieHard car batteries, Kenmore appliances, Allstate insurance, and the Discover card. Sears built what was then the tallest structure in the world in the 1970s, the Sears Tower (now renamed the Willis Tower). The terms and conditions of the Sears credit card were copied by Bank of America verbatim when Bank of America introduced the first general purpose credit card. The reason you pay no interest on your credit card if you pay your statement balance in full? Because that's how Sears designed it in 1908.

    The decline of Sears mirrored the decline of middle class America. In 1973, when the Sears Tower was built, America's middle class was at its peak and Sears straddled America like a colossus. Generations of Americans bought their home goods from Sears, and even took family portraits at Sears. That America, and the retailer that catered to it, is gone. Now the largest retailer in America is Walmart, which specializes in catering to America's poor.

    Fast Eddie Lampert was hailed as an investing genius when he put together Sears and K-Mart, but unfortunately his shell game just kept Sears circling the drain for a decade. Capital investment was slashed to zero, treasured brands sold off (Craftsman is now owned by Stanley Black & Decker), and departments were made to fight eachother for resources. The stores came to reek of desperation, despair, and depression.

    A sad day.

    It is sad, I remember Sears fondly also.

    There is a spiritual lesson in the rise and fall of Sears. If you had asked someone in the 1970′s if they thought Sears would go away in just 50 years, they’d have said you were crazy. Ask people about Apple now, they might say the same thing…

    “It is God’s way that He lowers whatever raises itself in the world.” – reported in Bukhari

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    I think that's missing the point to some extent. Sears may be gone, but the systems and attitudes that it has introduced remain with us to this day. Neither mass manufacturing, large department stores, or smartphones are going away now.
  226. Anonymous[213] • Disclaimer says:
    @DFH

    In the process I had Italy on top followed by Russia/Holland
     
    Obviously Russia (or Holland) has not accomplished more than Britain, Germany or France.

    Gérard here

    It was more a type of ” pound for pound” analysis as in Boxing, with Holland promoted because of its small size and Russia for it having a 1000 year disadvantage compared to France,Britain and so on…….with respect given to Italy for its contribution from ancient times,right through to now, but extra weight given to contributions from the Enlightenment and age of Industrialisation

  227. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Things I learned from this article

    https://triblive.com/local/westmoreland/14174937-74/indiana-county-native-last-living-member-of-the-venona-project-a-soviet

    1) The American government under FDR (or as I call him, the Great Satan, the killer of federalist America and creator of Evil Empire America) and Truman was filled with Stalin's spies. Wait, already knew that.
    2) Winston Churchill's NKVD nickname was "Boar." Funny!
    3) The NKVD referred to San Francisco as "Babylon" and Washington DC as "Carthage." Perfect!

    The article says the NKVD code name for Charles de Gaulle was "RAS"? That's in the Latin alphabet Anyone know what that might mean in Russian?

    The article says the NKVD code name for Charles de Gaulle was “RAS”? That’s in the Latin alphabet Anyone know what that might mean in Russian?

    My guess, given the time period and the evident sense of humor, is that RAS is the Ethiopian title (king or prince). In Italian it can be (or at least was) used jokingly for despotic local leader or local fascist.

  228. @Talha
    It is sad, I remember Sears fondly also.

    There is a spiritual lesson in the rise and fall of Sears. If you had asked someone in the 1970's if they thought Sears would go away in just 50 years, they'd have said you were crazy. Ask people about Apple now, they might say the same thing...

    "It is God's way that He lowers whatever raises itself in the world." - reported in Bukhari

    Peace.

    I think that’s missing the point to some extent. Sears may be gone, but the systems and attitudes that it has introduced remain with us to this day. Neither mass manufacturing, large department stores, or smartphones are going away now.

    • Replies: @Talha

    Sears may be gone, but the systems and attitudes that it has introduced remain with us to this day.
     
    Sure...as do political arrangements (and even architecture) that the Roman Republic helped to define...but Rome is gone.

    Sears did its part to add the the human story as did Rome during their time under the sun. But it set on them like it inevitably does on any enterprise. Thus is the way of the world.

    Peace.

  229. @Thorfinnsson
    Fast Eddie Lampert's three-card monty routine has come to an end. Sears Holdings has officially filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy on Monday in White Plains, New York. A sad end to the fabled Sears Roebuck & Company.

    Even President Trump remarked on this:

    https://twitter.com/thehill/status/1051884831750180864

    Sears was the Amazon, Walmart, and Costco of its day combined. Launched as a nationwide catalog retailer in 1892, it quickly become the largest retailer in the world thanks in part to the introduction of Rural Free Delivery by the United States Postal Service in 1896.

    Based in Chicago (then, and still today, America's largest logistics hub), the Sears main warehouse was by far the largest in the world. The old Chicago general post office in turn was the world's largest post office. Anything could be ordered from the Sears catalog, even complete houses.

    After WW1 with the motorization of American society, Sears entered the department store business. It quickly became the largest brick & mortar retailer in the world as well, a position it would hold until being surpassed by Walmart in the early 1990s.

    Sears gave to America the credit card, the Craftsman tool brand, DieHard car batteries, Kenmore appliances, Allstate insurance, and the Discover card. Sears built what was then the tallest structure in the world in the 1970s, the Sears Tower (now renamed the Willis Tower). The terms and conditions of the Sears credit card were copied by Bank of America verbatim when Bank of America introduced the first general purpose credit card. The reason you pay no interest on your credit card if you pay your statement balance in full? Because that's how Sears designed it in 1908.

    The decline of Sears mirrored the decline of middle class America. In 1973, when the Sears Tower was built, America's middle class was at its peak and Sears straddled America like a colossus. Generations of Americans bought their home goods from Sears, and even took family portraits at Sears. That America, and the retailer that catered to it, is gone. Now the largest retailer in America is Walmart, which specializes in catering to America's poor.

    Fast Eddie Lampert was hailed as an investing genius when he put together Sears and K-Mart, but unfortunately his shell game just kept Sears circling the drain for a decade. Capital investment was slashed to zero, treasured brands sold off (Craftsman is now owned by Stanley Black & Decker), and departments were made to fight eachother for resources. The stores came to reek of desperation, despair, and depression.

    A sad day.

    Good piece in the Journal about Sears:

    If you access it from Twitter you should be able to bypass the paywall.

    I also recommend following Eddy Elfenbein in general if you’re interested in business and finance.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    Listen folks, I didn't read the article, but as a Mom, I can tell you why Sears failed.

    First of all, here's why it didn't fail: lack of value. Sears carried excellent family essentials that everyone needs, with markably higher quality and barely higher prices than Walmart.

    But here's the problem: You can't buy groceries at Sears! I never experienced it, but I imagine the old Main Street model worked great for Moms. You could park the car, pick up new shoes for the kids, get groceries, and then get your hair done. Walmart has kind of recreated that.

    I've avoided buying clothes at Walmart for two reasons. First, being a SAHM, I have time for multiple errands. Second, with numerous children, quality matters more. A well-made winter coat will last through several children, but you don't care about that if you're only planning on having one or two or three kids.

    It's sad, but it was inevitable.
    , @Mitleser
    Paywall bypassed: http://archive.is/Hr05m
  230. @Daniel Chieh
    I think that's missing the point to some extent. Sears may be gone, but the systems and attitudes that it has introduced remain with us to this day. Neither mass manufacturing, large department stores, or smartphones are going away now.

    Sears may be gone, but the systems and attitudes that it has introduced remain with us to this day.

    Sure…as do political arrangements (and even architecture) that the Roman Republic helped to define…but Rome is gone.

    Sears did its part to add the the human story as did Rome during their time under the sun. But it set on them like it inevitably does on any enterprise. Thus is the way of the world.

    Peace.

  231. @Toronto Russian

    and now c. 20 years later almost all the cultural creativity in the USA is concentrated in a few thousand alt-righters
     
    This stuff isn't original, lol. A sociopathic Harry Potter in Yudkowsky's fanfic (isn't he a leftist?) refers to other people as NPC.

    HPMOR is full of ideas I find incredibly suspect- the only character trait worth anything in the story (both implicitly and explicitly) is intelligence, and the primary use of intelligence within the story is manipulation. This leads to cloying levels of a sort of nerd elitism. Ron and Hagrid are basically dismissed out of hand in this story (Ron explicitly as being useless, Hagrid implicitly so) because they aren’t intelligent enough, and Hariezer explicitly draws implicit NPC vs real-people distinctions.

    The world itself is constructed to back up these assertions- nothing in the wizarding world makes much sense, and characters often behave in silly ways (”like NPCs”) to be a foil for Hariezer.
    https://danluu.com/su3su2u1/hpmor/
     

    Lol, the fanfic could have been named “What if Harry Potter was a Jew”, as reviewed by Asian physicist. Worth a read.

  232. @notanon

    This new NPC meme is great.
     
    one of the odd things about "Fight Club" when it came out was how there were all these bright white dudes working low wage jobs

    and now c. 20 years later almost all the cultural creativity in the USA is concentrated in a few thousand alt-righters and i wouldn't be surprised if half of them were working jobs like that (like #skyking)

    Fight Club was prophecy.

    Worth elaborating – the NPC meme was partially inspired by studies that a number of humans lack inner speech. This often is assumed to be a general lack of thought, and therefore the idea of action/reaction without consideration:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/pristine-inner-experience/201110/not-everyone-conducts-inner-speech

    • Replies: @DFH
    It was fairly often used before that but only took off into normie consciousness with the study
    , @Seth Largo
    How terrifying. I can't imagine life without inner speech. It's like trying to imagine how a goldfish might experience existence.

    Aphantasia I can kind of understand. Not thinking in mental pictures. But not a lack of inner speech.
    , @notanon
    interesting - didn't know
  233. @Thorfinnsson
    Good piece in the Journal about Sears:

    https://twitter.com/EddyElfenbein/status/1051906239830069249

    If you access it from Twitter you should be able to bypass the paywall.

    I also recommend following Eddy Elfenbein in general if you're interested in business and finance.

    Listen folks, I didn’t read the article, but as a Mom, I can tell you why Sears failed.

    First of all, here’s why it didn’t fail: lack of value. Sears carried excellent family essentials that everyone needs, with markably higher quality and barely higher prices than Walmart.

    But here’s the problem: You can’t buy groceries at Sears! I never experienced it, but I imagine the old Main Street model worked great for Moms. You could park the car, pick up new shoes for the kids, get groceries, and then get your hair done. Walmart has kind of recreated that.

    I’ve avoided buying clothes at Walmart for two reasons. First, being a SAHM, I have time for multiple errands. Second, with numerous children, quality matters more. A well-made winter coat will last through several children, but you don’t care about that if you’re only planning on having one or two or three kids.

    It’s sad, but it was inevitable.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    No groceries.

    Stores too far from customers and anchored to (dying) malls.

    The value started to deteriorate as well. Craftsman started mucking around with its famous lifetime warranty policy for instance.

    Fast Eddie Lampert's decision to drastically slash capital spending also meant the stores started to literally fall apart. Sears was nice to go to when I was a kid, but in the past decade the stores have been pathetic.

    Then there's the problem that department stores are inherently more expensive to run than big box stores. Dept. stores operate on a 35% gross margin, big box stores more like 15% (Costco at 8%).

    Thus department stores hang onto their older customers, but don't gain new ones (other than Nordstrom). For instance this lady quoted in the article:

    Gloria Chavez of Berwyn, Ill., opened her Sears credit card in 1977 and bought everything there, from appliances to clothes for her three sons. The 66-year-old said she wouldn’t know where to go if Sears disappeared. “It’s been around forever,” she said.
     
    I can vouch for the quality of Sears clothing. I have a Sears brand blue wool cardigan which was made in the 1970s. It's excellent.

    And I sure hope you're not getting your hair done at Walmart Rosie...
    , @Rosie
    Another factor occurred to me after I posted this: the easy marketability of used consumer goods on eBay, Craigslist, consignment sales, etc. None of this was possible before the internets. New items like baby gear, furniture, clothes, sporting goods, etc are probably much more price elastic than they used to be because of that.
  234. @Rosie
    Listen folks, I didn't read the article, but as a Mom, I can tell you why Sears failed.

    First of all, here's why it didn't fail: lack of value. Sears carried excellent family essentials that everyone needs, with markably higher quality and barely higher prices than Walmart.

    But here's the problem: You can't buy groceries at Sears! I never experienced it, but I imagine the old Main Street model worked great for Moms. You could park the car, pick up new shoes for the kids, get groceries, and then get your hair done. Walmart has kind of recreated that.

    I've avoided buying clothes at Walmart for two reasons. First, being a SAHM, I have time for multiple errands. Second, with numerous children, quality matters more. A well-made winter coat will last through several children, but you don't care about that if you're only planning on having one or two or three kids.

    It's sad, but it was inevitable.

    No groceries.

    Stores too far from customers and anchored to (dying) malls.

    The value started to deteriorate as well. Craftsman started mucking around with its famous lifetime warranty policy for instance.

    Fast Eddie Lampert’s decision to drastically slash capital spending also meant the stores started to literally fall apart. Sears was nice to go to when I was a kid, but in the past decade the stores have been pathetic.

    Then there’s the problem that department stores are inherently more expensive to run than big box stores. Dept. stores operate on a 35% gross margin, big box stores more like 15% (Costco at 8%).

    Thus department stores hang onto their older customers, but don’t gain new ones (other than Nordstrom). For instance this lady quoted in the article:

    Gloria Chavez of Berwyn, Ill., opened her Sears credit card in 1977 and bought everything there, from appliances to clothes for her three sons. The 66-year-old said she wouldn’t know where to go if Sears disappeared. “It’s been around forever,” she said.

    I can vouch for the quality of Sears clothing. I have a Sears brand blue wool cardigan which was made in the 1970s. It’s excellent.

    And I sure hope you’re not getting your hair done at Walmart Rosie…

    • Replies: @Rosie

    And I sure hope you’re not getting your hair done at Walmart Rosie…
     
    LOL no but they do fine for the kids.
  235. @Thorfinnsson
    No groceries.

    Stores too far from customers and anchored to (dying) malls.

    The value started to deteriorate as well. Craftsman started mucking around with its famous lifetime warranty policy for instance.

    Fast Eddie Lampert's decision to drastically slash capital spending also meant the stores started to literally fall apart. Sears was nice to go to when I was a kid, but in the past decade the stores have been pathetic.

    Then there's the problem that department stores are inherently more expensive to run than big box stores. Dept. stores operate on a 35% gross margin, big box stores more like 15% (Costco at 8%).

    Thus department stores hang onto their older customers, but don't gain new ones (other than Nordstrom). For instance this lady quoted in the article:

    Gloria Chavez of Berwyn, Ill., opened her Sears credit card in 1977 and bought everything there, from appliances to clothes for her three sons. The 66-year-old said she wouldn’t know where to go if Sears disappeared. “It’s been around forever,” she said.
     
    I can vouch for the quality of Sears clothing. I have a Sears brand blue wool cardigan which was made in the 1970s. It's excellent.

    And I sure hope you're not getting your hair done at Walmart Rosie...

    And I sure hope you’re not getting your hair done at Walmart Rosie…

    LOL no but they do fine for the kids.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Life without good hair just isn't worth living.

    https://twitter.com/WSJ/status/1051857794469679104

    This article might be more up your alley. It has a human interest angle.


    Matthew Sylvia

    50, Eureka Calif.

    We are a Sears Family. I grew up in a super rural area of Northern California in a rather large family—eight siblings, my parents and grandmother under the same roof. My favorite memories are looking through the catalogs and seeing the toys, and all of the other things that Sears had in their stores. It was magical, and we used to call it the wish book. One of my sisters would actually cut out paper dolls from the older catalogs and play for hours. We ordered school clothes and supplies, and Sears was Christmas to us. Thank you, Sears, for being there when no one else was.
     
  236. @Rosie

    And I sure hope you’re not getting your hair done at Walmart Rosie…
     
    LOL no but they do fine for the kids.

    Life without good hair just isn’t worth living.

    This article might be more up your alley. It has a human interest angle.

    Matthew Sylvia

    50, Eureka Calif.

    We are a Sears Family. I grew up in a super rural area of Northern California in a rather large family—eight siblings, my parents and grandmother under the same roof. My favorite memories are looking through the catalogs and seeing the toys, and all of the other things that Sears had in their stores. It was magical, and we used to call it the wish book. One of my sisters would actually cut out paper dolls from the older catalogs and play for hours. We ordered school clothes and supplies, and Sears was Christmas to us. Thank you, Sears, for being there when no one else was.

  237. @Daniel Chieh
    Worth elaborating - the NPC meme was partially inspired by studies that a number of humans lack inner speech. This often is assumed to be a general lack of thought, and therefore the idea of action/reaction without consideration:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/pristine-inner-experience/201110/not-everyone-conducts-inner-speech

    It was fairly often used before that but only took off into normie consciousness with the study

  238. @Anon
    I'm talking about Nadir Shah & Ahmed Shah u fkn autist.

    Stop thinking u can talk down to Brown Pagans & think that you know more about our country than us.

    I don't expect much more from abrahamics who blame any socio-political issue they don't undersatnd as SATAN.

    lol this has been the most amusing and most informative Unz thread in months.

  239. @Daniel Chieh
    Worth elaborating - the NPC meme was partially inspired by studies that a number of humans lack inner speech. This often is assumed to be a general lack of thought, and therefore the idea of action/reaction without consideration:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/pristine-inner-experience/201110/not-everyone-conducts-inner-speech

    How terrifying. I can’t imagine life without inner speech. It’s like trying to imagine how a goldfish might experience existence.

    Aphantasia I can kind of understand. Not thinking in mental pictures. But not a lack of inner speech.

    • Replies: @Spisarevski

    How terrifying. I can’t imagine life without inner speech. It’s like trying to imagine how a goldfish might experience existence.
     
    I can't imagine talking to yourself like a literal retard, but hey.

    Lack of inner speech doesn't mean lack of inner thoughts, some people simply think without words, or at least not fully in words.

    Words are an interface so we can transmit thoughts to one another. I don't need an interface to understand my own thoughts.
  240. @Dmitry

    need to stop looking at everything from the point of view of the privileged.
     
    It's a different topic, from discussion of great cities.

    If you are cashier in a supermarket, then you can be living better in a small, boring town in a country with high overall living parameters, like Denmark or Sweden.

    What would be discussion of great cities, and their opera houses (or their Jay Z concerts, if that is your taste) - many advantages of great cities are (and always were) designed for "privileged".


    If they can afford private (public) schools. State school system in Britain is pretty rotten.

     

    We can infer from popularity of private schools in London, that state schools probably have a much lower level of teaching.

    But even the brown, uneducated people, living in slightly apocalyptic areas of London, and going to schools with low teaching levels, might not be so poor.

    For anecdote. Visiting my hometown, walking in the wrong area, with new Nikes - and once a guy was following me, talking about how expensive the shoes are, that only rich men would buy them, and asking for money.

    Meanwhile, in London, I'm looking at the Nike shop, and half of customers, buying boxes of the most expensive Nikes - it's the English black teenagers.

    Meanwhile, in London, I’m looking at the Nike shop, and half of customers, buying boxes of the most expensive Nikes – it’s the English black teenagers.

    Because they are Londoners. They are part of the Privileged of Britain.
    But London is not Britain.

  241. @Thorfinnsson
    Good piece in the Journal about Sears:

    https://twitter.com/EddyElfenbein/status/1051906239830069249

    If you access it from Twitter you should be able to bypass the paywall.

    I also recommend following Eddy Elfenbein in general if you're interested in business and finance.

    Paywall bypassed: http://archive.is/Hr05m

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Good idea. I torrent the Journal and use Twitter when I want to share articles with people. Every morning starts with reading their business section with a nice cup of coffee (dark roast, strong, immersion blended with a tablespoon of salted butter).

    And now for a classic country song that references Sears. Coal Miner's Daughter by the lovely Loretta Lynn.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9eHp7JJgq8

    Well, I was borned a coal miner's daughter
    In a cabin, on a hill in Butcher Holler
    We were poor but we had love
    That's the one thing that daddy made sure of
    He shoveled coal to make a poor man's dollar

    My daddy worked all night in the Van Lear coal mines
    All day long in the field a hoin' corn
    Mommy rocked the babies at night
    And read the Bible by the coal oil light
    And ever' thing would start all over come break of morn

    Daddy loved and raised eight kids on a miner's pay
    Mommy scrubbed our clothes on a washboard ever' day
    Why I've seen her fingers bleed
    To complain, there was no need
    She'd smile in mommy's understanding way

    In the summertime we didn't have shoes to wear
    But in the wintertime we'd all get a brand new pair
    From a mail order catalog
    Money made from selling a hog

    Daddy always managed to get the money somewhere
    Yeah, I'm proud to be a coal miner's daughter
    I remember well, the well where I drew water
    The work we done was hard
    At night we'd sleep 'cause we were tired
    I never thought of ever leaving Butcher Holler

    Well a lot of things have changed since a way back then
    And it's so good to be back home again
    Not much left but the floor, nothing lives here anymore
    Except the memory of a coal miner's daughter

     

    Loretta Lynn was born in 1932, so the setting for this song is Depression and Wartime Kentucky coal country.

    https://img0.etsystatic.com/000/0/5594150/il_fullxfull.263169810.jpg

    My father had a Craftsman toolbox like this when I was a boy. RIP Sears.

  242. @Mitleser
    Paywall bypassed: http://archive.is/Hr05m

    Good idea. I torrent the Journal and use Twitter when I want to share articles with people. Every morning starts with reading their business section with a nice cup of coffee (dark roast, strong, immersion blended with a tablespoon of salted butter).

    And now for a classic country song that references Sears. Coal Miner’s Daughter by the lovely Loretta Lynn.

    Well, I was borned a coal miner’s daughter
    In a cabin, on a hill in Butcher Holler
    We were poor but we had love
    That’s the one thing that daddy made sure of
    He shoveled coal to make a poor man’s dollar

    My daddy worked all night in the Van Lear coal mines
    All day long in the field a hoin’ corn
    Mommy rocked the babies at night
    And read the Bible by the coal oil light
    And ever’ thing would start all over come break of morn

    Daddy loved and raised eight kids on a miner’s pay
    Mommy scrubbed our clothes on a washboard ever’ day
    Why I’ve seen her fingers bleed
    To complain, there was no need
    She’d smile in mommy’s understanding way

    In the summertime we didn’t have shoes to wear
    But in the wintertime we’d all get a brand new pair
    From a mail order catalog
    Money made from selling a hog

    Daddy always managed to get the money somewhere
    Yeah, I’m proud to be a coal miner’s daughter
    I remember well, the well where I drew water
    The work we done was hard
    At night we’d sleep ’cause we were tired
    I never thought of ever leaving Butcher Holler

    Well a lot of things have changed since a way back then
    And it’s so good to be back home again
    Not much left but the floor, nothing lives here anymore
    Except the memory of a coal miner’s daughter

    Loretta Lynn was born in 1932, so the setting for this song is Depression and Wartime Kentucky coal country.

    My father had a Craftsman toolbox like this when I was a boy. RIP Sears.

  243. @Daniel Chieh
    Worth elaborating - the NPC meme was partially inspired by studies that a number of humans lack inner speech. This often is assumed to be a general lack of thought, and therefore the idea of action/reaction without consideration:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/pristine-inner-experience/201110/not-everyone-conducts-inner-speech

    interesting – didn’t know

  244. Tom Rogan Washington Examiner BS

    Re: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/russias-orthodox-church-puts-imperialist-politics-before-religious-faith

    Written by someone who doesn’t seem to know WTF he’s writing about. The Constantinople (Istanbul) based church doesn’t have the same centralizing powers as the Vatican. There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople. The majority of national Orthodox churches haven’t supported Constantinople’s decision to grant autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

    The established Ukrainian Orthodox Church, which is loosely affiliated with the Moscow Patriarchate didn’t ask for the Kiev regime and/or Constantinople to get involved with its matters. Note that the Washington Examiner appears otherwise prone to support the idea of a separation between church and state. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church that sought autocephaly approval from Constantinople is headed by someone who for decades supported the Moscow Patriarchate’s ties with the Orthodox churches of Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova. He changed course after not getting a promotion within the Moscow Patriarchate.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack

    There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople.
     
    There's even much better reason to believe that you're the top nutter for the Kremlin Stooge brigade, Mickey! Your flights of imagination have no bounds when it comes to trying to defend the imperialist dreams of Mother Russia! :-)
  245. @German_reader
    Elections in Bavaria seem to have gone mostly as predicted, though CSU seems to be somewhat stronger than expected.
    AfD is somewhat under 11% right now...disappointing, but given the political situation I might not have voted for them myself, but rather for the Freie Wähler, who seem to have gotten above 11%.
    Social Democrats have suffered catastrophic losses; big winners (according to the mainstream media) are the Greens who have gotten around 18%.
    CSU would be foolish imo if they don't enter into a coalition with the Freie Wähler.
    Anyway, probably not the worst possible result for Bavaria; but it's depressing how much support there is for the Greens.

    The SPD lost more support than the CSU and the AfD beat the Greens (+10,2% vs +8,9%) in growth. The CSU may no longer control the state alone, but the right did better in this election than in the last one.

    Don’t let they browbeat you that just because the CSU will need a coalition partner, the right lost. The result tells a different tale.

  246. @Mikhail
    Tom Rogan Washington Examiner BS

    Re: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/russias-orthodox-church-puts-imperialist-politics-before-religious-faith

    Written by someone who doesn't seem to know WTF he's writing about. The Constantinople (Istanbul) based church doesn't have the same centralizing powers as the Vatican. There's good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople. The majority of national Orthodox churches haven't supported Constantinople's decision to grant autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

    The established Ukrainian Orthodox Church, which is loosely affiliated with the Moscow Patriarchate didn't ask for the Kiev regime and/or Constantinople to get involved with its matters. Note that the Washington Examiner appears otherwise prone to support the idea of a separation between church and state. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church that sought autocephaly approval from Constantinople is headed by someone who for decades supported the Moscow Patriarchate's ties with the Orthodox churches of Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova. He changed course after not getting a promotion within the Moscow Patriarchate.

    There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople.

    There’s even much better reason to believe that you’re the top nutter for the Kremlin Stooge brigade, Mickey! Your flights of imagination have no bounds when it comes to trying to defend the imperialist dreams of Mother Russia! :-)

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Svido psychoanalysis:

    There’s even much better reason to believe that you’re the top nutter for the Kremlin Stooge brigade, Mickey! Your flights of imagination have no bounds when it comes to trying to defend the imperialist dreams of Mother Russia!
     
    I wasn't the first person to state that possibility as being within reason. The Kiev regime is corrupt and nationalist enough to pursue such an act. In turn, it otherwise makes no sense for the Constantinople Church to make such a move - seeing that most national Orthodox churches don't support it.

    As previously stated in full -

    Tom Rogan Washington Examiner BS

    Re: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/russias-orthodox-church-puts-imperialist-politics-before-religious-faith

    Written by someone who doesn’t seem to know WTF he’s writing about. The Constantinople (Istanbul) based church doesn’t have the same centralizing powers as the Vatican. There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople. The majority of national Orthodox churches haven’t supported Constantinople’s decision to grant autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

    The established Ukrainian Orthodox Church, which is loosely affiliated with the Moscow Patriarchate didn’t ask for the Kiev regime and/or Constantinople to get involved with its matters. Note that the Washington Examiner appears otherwise prone to support the idea of a separation between church and state. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church that sought autocephaly approval from Constantinople is headed by someone who for decades supported the Moscow Patriarchate’s ties with the Orthodox churches of Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova. He changed course after not getting a promotion within the Moscow Patriarchate.
    , @anonymous coward
    > someone posted something rational and informative to cut through your bullshit
    > red alert, quickly spew more shit upon vulgar shit and call him a shill!

    Nice retort, retard. (Not.)

    Anyways, back to the point.

    I'll make this quick (or not):

    a) Poroshenko (the Ukrainian so-called "president") wants to flex some muscle before he get ousted from power, in the Ukrainian tradition. His play is to try and get some official recognition for Denisenko, a defrocked fraudster and criminal and self-styled "Kiev patriarch". Poroshenko (rightly) believes that he can hold such a petty criminal by the balls even after he get booted by the next scheduled Ukrainian coup d'etat.

    b) The Constantinople Patriarch, the spiritual leader of a few thousand still-uncleansed ethnic Greeks in Istanbul, wants to muck about in the Ukrainian mess. Whether this is delusions of grandeur ("muh Byzantium") or a genuine desire to fix something in Ukraine (lol, good luck) is hard to say.

    c) The Constantinople Patriarch has declared formal independence for the Ukrainian church. Note that the Ukrainian church has been de-facto and de-jure independent for a long time already; nobody really wants that hot potato and Russia has been forced to be the formal titular head of the mess. No doubt the Russian Church would let them go completely if they had a way.

    d) The Constantinople Patriarch of course won't grant any sort of official title to a criminal and fraud like Denisenko. He wants to install his own Greek bishops to put the situation under some sort of semblance of order. (Won't ever happen, of course. Ukraine is too much of a mess for some fly-by-night Greeks to fix.)

    e) Poroshenko is a loser who will continue to drown his problems in the bottle after this harebrained plan of his fails. Sorry, lol.

    f) The other Churches will denounce the actions of the Constantinople Patriarch because they don't give a rat's ass about "muh Byzantium".

  247. anon[265] • Disclaimer says:

    Maybe OT ( but can there be something as OT in open thread?)

    I found on the net this translation of one Russian researcher’s memories of living in Soviet Union after war, in the 50′s. He claims that Stalin’s USSR had higher standard of living than United States, what all you Soviet and Russian experts think? The truth that TPTB do not want you to see, or delirious Sovok propaganda?

    https://www.russianvoices.org/2017/02/01/remembering-the-ussr-a-personal-account-of-stalins-economy-part-1-of-4/

    https://www.russianvoices.org/2017/02/18/remembering-the-ussr-a-personal-account-of-stalins-economy-part-2-of-4/

    https://www.russianvoices.org/2017/02/22/ussr-stalins-economy-a-personal-story-part-3-of-5/

    https://www.russianvoices.org/2017/03/13/ussr-stalins-economy-personal-story-part-4-5/

  248. @Thorfinnsson
    Dollar hegemony was established in 1944, long before the petrodollar and America's empire of bases. I'm not sure it was forced except to the extent that America refused Keynes' proposal of the Bancor, and no one was interested in returning to the gold standard.

    A sudden elimination of Dollar hegemony (as opposed to gradual decline) would no doubt cause a deep recession and severely dent the market value of American assets.

    But the crisis would end as all crises do. It would also be good for American exporters (like me) and aspiring oligarchs (also me).

    It would be worst for the existing oligarchy and for ZOG.

    I do not consider Dollar hegemony to be a benefit to America, as the strength of a nation ultimately depends on the strength of its production. Being a reserve currency issuer undermines that.

    Being a reserve currency issuer undermines that.

    Could you go into more detail?

    Are the tariffs helping you?

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    It's known as the "Triffen Dilemma" in economics. In order to meet the foreign demand for Dollars, the US has to run a chronic deficit on its current account.

    See this piece: https://qz.com/1266044/why-does-the-us-run-a-trade-deficit-to-maintain-the-dollars-privileged-position/

    The tariffs and trade negotiations, along with the corporate tax reform, will help in time. But for now the trade deficit is actually growing larger owing to strong economic growth and the emerging markets all tanking at the same time.

    Our current account deficit, while not good, isn't as bad as it appears because we earn more on our overseas investments than foreigners earn on their American investments. But it's still too high.

    It would be acceptable to run a current account deficit which is smaller than the typical year's growth in the national wealth. That way we stop losing our country to foreigners, but foreigners still get the Dollars they need.

    Ultimately the Dollar's role as a reserve currency should be eliminated. It's not good for America or for foreigners.
  249. Truth About Khashoggi

    Re: https://therealnews.com/stories/duplicitous-khashoggi-picked-the-wrong-prince

    A politically left of center Arab describes Jamal Khashoggi as a two faced charlatan, whose views in Arabic differed sharply from what he wrote in The WaPo. From a conservative Western slant, Mark Steyn commented similarly on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News show.

    Khashoggi’s WaPo persona is indicative of a US mass media propaganda tactic. Utilize foreign nationals (including Russians) who say things which conform to neolib to necon leaning views.

    At a recent NYC event, the Nikki Haleyesque Kori Schacke, piously highlighted Russia’s bombing of hospitals in Syria – in a classic example of using human rights as a propaganda tool. Schacke didn’t highlight the atrocities from the anti-Syrian government side and the matter of extensive collateral damage (civilian deaths), resulting from US military actions in Iraq and Syria.

    Khashoggi’s apparent death has received considerably more attention than the bloody Saudi war effort in Yemen, which has involved some US support for that Saudi effort.

  250. @Mr. Hack

    There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople.
     
    There's even much better reason to believe that you're the top nutter for the Kremlin Stooge brigade, Mickey! Your flights of imagination have no bounds when it comes to trying to defend the imperialist dreams of Mother Russia! :-)

    Svido psychoanalysis:

    There’s even much better reason to believe that you’re the top nutter for the Kremlin Stooge brigade, Mickey! Your flights of imagination have no bounds when it comes to trying to defend the imperialist dreams of Mother Russia!

    I wasn’t the first person to state that possibility as being within reason. The Kiev regime is corrupt and nationalist enough to pursue such an act. In turn, it otherwise makes no sense for the Constantinople Church to make such a move – seeing that most national Orthodox churches don’t support it.

    As previously stated in full -

    Tom Rogan Washington Examiner BS

    Re: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/russias-orthodox-church-puts-imperialist-politics-before-religious-faith

    Written by someone who doesn’t seem to know WTF he’s writing about. The Constantinople (Istanbul) based church doesn’t have the same centralizing powers as the Vatican. There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople. The majority of national Orthodox churches haven’t supported Constantinople’s decision to grant autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

    The established Ukrainian Orthodox Church, which is loosely affiliated with the Moscow Patriarchate didn’t ask for the Kiev regime and/or Constantinople to get involved with its matters. Note that the Washington Examiner appears otherwise prone to support the idea of a separation between church and state. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church that sought autocephaly approval from Constantinople is headed by someone who for decades supported the Moscow Patriarchate’s ties with the Orthodox churches of Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova. He changed course after not getting a promotion within the Moscow Patriarchate.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I wasn’t the first person to state that possibility as being within reason
     
    Of course you weren't, Mickey. Nobody has ever once hinted that you're a very creative person. All of your BS theories, like undoubtedly this one is, had to be hatched initially by somebody else. Your pleas for sympathy will only garner support from other Kremlin stooge nut jobs, like anonymous coward. A lot of butt hurt, I understand, but go slower on the unsubstantiated BS, Mickey - it's a sign of abject failure.

    ,

  251. @Mr. Hack

    There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople.
     
    There's even much better reason to believe that you're the top nutter for the Kremlin Stooge brigade, Mickey! Your flights of imagination have no bounds when it comes to trying to defend the imperialist dreams of Mother Russia! :-)

    > someone posted something rational and informative to cut through your bullshit
    > red alert, quickly spew more shit upon vulgar shit and call him a shill!

    Nice retort, retard. (Not.)

    Anyways, back to the point.

    I’ll make this quick (or not):

    a) Poroshenko (the Ukrainian so-called “president”) wants to flex some muscle before he get ousted from power, in the Ukrainian tradition. His play is to try and get some official recognition for Denisenko, a defrocked fraudster and criminal and self-styled “Kiev patriarch”. Poroshenko (rightly) believes that he can hold such a petty criminal by the balls even after he get booted by the next scheduled Ukrainian coup d’etat.

    b) The Constantinople Patriarch, the spiritual leader of a few thousand still-uncleansed ethnic Greeks in Istanbul, wants to muck about in the Ukrainian mess. Whether this is delusions of grandeur (“muh Byzantium”) or a genuine desire to fix something in Ukraine (lol, good luck) is hard to say.

    c) The Constantinople Patriarch has declared formal independence for the Ukrainian church. Note that the Ukrainian church has been de-facto and de-jure independent for a long time already; nobody really wants that hot potato and Russia has been forced to be the formal titular head of the mess. No doubt the Russian Church would let them go completely if they had a way.

    d) The Constantinople Patriarch of course won’t grant any sort of official title to a criminal and fraud like Denisenko. He wants to install his own Greek bishops to put the situation under some sort of semblance of order. (Won’t ever happen, of course. Ukraine is too much of a mess for some fly-by-night Greeks to fix.)

    e) Poroshenko is a loser who will continue to drown his problems in the bottle after this harebrained plan of his fails. Sorry, lol.

    f) The other Churches will denounce the actions of the Constantinople Patriarch because they don’t give a rat’s ass about “muh Byzantium”.

  252. @Anon
    I'm talking about Nadir Shah & Ahmed Shah u fkn autist.

    Stop thinking u can talk down to Brown Pagans & think that you know more about our country than us.

    I don't expect much more from abrahamics who blame any socio-political issue they don't undersatnd as SATAN.

    I’m talking about Nadir Shah & Ahmed Shah u fkn autist.

    What the hell do Nadir Shah and Ahmed Shah Abdali have to do with the events that took place in 1857? They belonged to the previous century. Neither of them had stayed in Delhi anyway. Talk about ignorance of history.

    The nominal Mughal Emperor was still in Delhi when the Mutiny took place and the Mughal Empire was formally ended by the British only after the defeat of the rebels. Educate yourself:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Rebellion_of_1857

    After the outbreak of the mutiny in Meerut, the rebels very quickly reached Delhi and declared its 81-year-old Mughal ruler, Bahadur Shah Zafar, as Emperor of Hindustan.

    Bahadur Shah Zafar was proclaimed the Emperor of the whole of India…… In spite of the significant loss of power that the Mughal dynasty had suffered in the preceding centuries, their name still carried great prestige across northern India.[102] Civilians, nobility and other dignitaries took an oath of allegiance. The emperor issued coins in his name, one of the oldest ways of asserting imperial status.

    Even though the rebellion had various causes, most of the rebel sepoys who were able to do so, made their way to Delhi to revive the old Mughal empire that signified national unity for even the Hindus amongst them

    The sepoys did not seek to revive small kingdoms in their regions, instead they repeatedly proclaimed a “country-wide rule” of the Mughals and vowed to drive out the British from “India”, as they knew it then.

  253. @Mikhail
    Svido psychoanalysis:

    There’s even much better reason to believe that you’re the top nutter for the Kremlin Stooge brigade, Mickey! Your flights of imagination have no bounds when it comes to trying to defend the imperialist dreams of Mother Russia!
     
    I wasn't the first person to state that possibility as being within reason. The Kiev regime is corrupt and nationalist enough to pursue such an act. In turn, it otherwise makes no sense for the Constantinople Church to make such a move - seeing that most national Orthodox churches don't support it.

    As previously stated in full -

    Tom Rogan Washington Examiner BS

    Re: https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/russias-orthodox-church-puts-imperialist-politics-before-religious-faith

    Written by someone who doesn’t seem to know WTF he’s writing about. The Constantinople (Istanbul) based church doesn’t have the same centralizing powers as the Vatican. There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople. The majority of national Orthodox churches haven’t supported Constantinople’s decision to grant autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

    The established Ukrainian Orthodox Church, which is loosely affiliated with the Moscow Patriarchate didn’t ask for the Kiev regime and/or Constantinople to get involved with its matters. Note that the Washington Examiner appears otherwise prone to support the idea of a separation between church and state. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church that sought autocephaly approval from Constantinople is headed by someone who for decades supported the Moscow Patriarchate’s ties with the Orthodox churches of Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova. He changed course after not getting a promotion within the Moscow Patriarchate.

    I wasn’t the first person to state that possibility as being within reason

    Of course you weren’t, Mickey. Nobody has ever once hinted that you’re a very creative person. All of your BS theories, like undoubtedly this one is, had to be hatched initially by somebody else. Your pleas for sympathy will only garner support from other Kremlin stooge nut jobs, like anonymous coward. A lot of butt hurt, I understand, but go slower on the unsubstantiated BS, Mickey – it’s a sign of abject failure.

    ,

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    Another content-free post from you. Way to go! Ukraine's reputation as the IQ black hole of Europe must be confirmed.

    Next step after """invalidating""" facts by claiming the facts are Kremlin shills: call upon Putler, your Dark God and mental overlord.
    , @Epigon
    To tell you the truth, the Ecumenical Patriarch commited a lot of blunders in doing it this specific way.

    First of all, Russian Orthodox Church recognizes Abkhazia and South Ossetia as dioceses of Georgian Orthodox Church.
    It also recognizes Donbass and Crimea as dioceses of Ukrainian Orthodox Church, the canonical one. I think it strictly discouraged any moves towards incorporation in Russian Orthodox Church/Moscow Patriarchate dioceses and takeover of Kiev/Kyiv Metropolity property.


    So, when Ecumenical Patriarch MEDDLES in diocese of Autocephalus, recognized canonical church, he tramples the basic principle of Orthodox canon.
    He will be opposed by Autocephalus Churches and Patriarchs.

    He also intends to open stavropegion in Kiev/Kyiv, of Ecumenical Orthodox Church. Bizarre.


    He will accept petitions of appeal of Filaret Denisenko, Makariy Maletych and their followers, in accordance with the canonical prerogatives of the Patriarch of Constantinople to receive such petitions by hierarchs and other clergy from all of the Autocephalous Churches. Thus, the above-mentioned have been canonically reinstated to their hierarchical or priestly rank, and their faithful have been restored to communion with the Church.

    This paragraph is problematic on several levels. In writing this, he basically forced the hand of Russian Orthodox Church AND other Autocephalus Churches.
    Denisenko was anatemised by ROC, so ROC by definition will break off all contacts. Even better, Russian Orthodox Church and its priests, believers will be banned from Athos, Meteora etc. Serb and other Orthodox Churches will be presented a choice between canon, tradition and biggest Orthodox Church with most power, and USA/NATO, Russian containment, geopolitical, Ecumenical Patriarch option.

    He goes even further. The Ecumenical Patriarch is REVOKING the Synodal Letter of the year 1686 and its LEGAL bindings. LOL. Retroactively. And proclaiming the Metropolitan of Kyiv a "canonical dependent of Constantinople"!

    Finally, in a bizarre ending, he appeals to all sides involved that "they avoid appropriation of Churches, Monasteries and other properties, as well as every other act of violence and retaliation, so that the peace and love of Christ may prevail."

    LOL
    As if historically built and staffed ROC properties, monasteries, churches and cathedrals have not already been invaded and occupied (these acts are what makes other Autocephalus churches unlikely to condone this maneuver) until now, and as if there can be "Christ's love" and "peace" after he proclaimed an anatemised former ROC priest a hierarch of a future Autocephalus Church.

    This whole episode will end badly for Ukraine. Hopefully, it will also end badly for vermin that Greeks and Greek Orthodox clergy have been since Byzantine times and especially during Ottoman period.

    , @Mikhail
    I stated fact based observations and presented a very reasonable observation, that included the basis for making such.

    As can be expected, you provided no substantive counter.

  254. @Mr. Hack

    I wasn’t the first person to state that possibility as being within reason
     
    Of course you weren't, Mickey. Nobody has ever once hinted that you're a very creative person. All of your BS theories, like undoubtedly this one is, had to be hatched initially by somebody else. Your pleas for sympathy will only garner support from other Kremlin stooge nut jobs, like anonymous coward. A lot of butt hurt, I understand, but go slower on the unsubstantiated BS, Mickey - it's a sign of abject failure.

    ,

    Another content-free post from you. Way to go! Ukraine’s reputation as the IQ black hole of Europe must be confirmed.

    Next step after “””invalidating””” facts by claiming the facts are Kremlin shills: call upon Putler, your Dark God and mental overlord.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    Because you yourself are guilty of what you accuse me of (Another content-free post from you), and don't really appear to have much in the department of reading comprehension, I'll help you out and show you that my last two comment to Mr, Averko have been solely inspired by content, and not empty blow back, like you've been able to post. I've been accusing Averko of posting unsubstantiated BS, in claiming that:

    There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople.
     
    Where's any proof of this? It's all monotonous sounding, empty phrased BS, and if you too want to jump on this train ride to nowhere, then I suggest that you offer some proof too, as I'm about to leave this ride at the next station...
  255. @Mr. Hack

    I wasn’t the first person to state that possibility as being within reason
     
    Of course you weren't, Mickey. Nobody has ever once hinted that you're a very creative person. All of your BS theories, like undoubtedly this one is, had to be hatched initially by somebody else. Your pleas for sympathy will only garner support from other Kremlin stooge nut jobs, like anonymous coward. A lot of butt hurt, I understand, but go slower on the unsubstantiated BS, Mickey - it's a sign of abject failure.

    ,

    To tell you the truth, the Ecumenical Patriarch commited a lot of blunders in doing it this specific way.

    First of all, Russian Orthodox Church recognizes Abkhazia and South Ossetia as dioceses of Georgian Orthodox Church.
    It also recognizes Donbass and Crimea as dioceses of Ukrainian Orthodox Church, the canonical one. I think it strictly discouraged any moves towards incorporation in Russian Orthodox Church/Moscow Patriarchate dioceses and takeover of Kiev/Kyiv Metropolity property.

    So, when Ecumenical Patriarch MEDDLES in diocese of Autocephalus, recognized canonical church, he tramples the basic principle of Orthodox canon.
    He will be opposed by Autocephalus Churches and Patriarchs.

    He also intends to open stavropegion in Kiev/Kyiv, of Ecumenical Orthodox Church. Bizarre.

    He will accept petitions of appeal of Filaret Denisenko, Makariy Maletych and their followers, in accordance with the canonical prerogatives of the Patriarch of Constantinople to receive such petitions by hierarchs and other clergy from all of the Autocephalous Churches. Thus, the above-mentioned have been canonically reinstated to their hierarchical or priestly rank, and their faithful have been restored to communion with the Church.

    This paragraph is problematic on several levels. In writing this, he basically forced the hand of Russian Orthodox Church AND other Autocephalus Churches.
    Denisenko was anatemised by ROC, so ROC by definition will break off all contacts. Even better, Russian Orthodox Church and its priests, believers will be banned from Athos, Meteora etc. Serb and other Orthodox Churches will be presented a choice between canon, tradition and biggest Orthodox Church with most power, and USA/NATO, Russian containment, geopolitical, Ecumenical Patriarch option.

    He goes even further. The Ecumenical Patriarch is REVOKING the Synodal Letter of the year 1686 and its LEGAL bindings. LOL. Retroactively. And proclaiming the Metropolitan of Kyiv a “canonical dependent of Constantinople”!

    Finally, in a bizarre ending, he appeals to all sides involved that “they avoid appropriation of Churches, Monasteries and other properties, as well as every other act of violence and retaliation, so that the peace and love of Christ may prevail.”

    LOL
    As if historically built and staffed ROC properties, monasteries, churches and cathedrals have not already been invaded and occupied (these acts are what makes other Autocephalus churches unlikely to condone this maneuver) until now, and as if there can be “Christ’s love” and “peace” after he proclaimed an anatemised former ROC priest a hierarch of a future Autocephalus Church.

    This whole episode will end badly for Ukraine. Hopefully, it will also end badly for vermin that Greeks and Greek Orthodox clergy have been since Byzantine times and especially during Ottoman period.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    The streets of Kyiv are filled with Orthodox faithful, very much pleased with the way things are progressing. You can't ignore the voice of millions of faithful. Ecumenical Patriarch will go down in history as a very wise man:

    https://youtu.be/bo_7FE9a-QQ

    , @AP
    Epigon, what do you think of these arguments?

    https://risu.org.ua/en/index/expert_thought/interview/72711/

    Since the lands of Galicia and Transcarpathia were still considered to be the canonical territory of the Ecumenical Patriarchate at the beginning of the 20th century, the Metropolitan of Kiev, Anthony (Khrapovitsky), a member of the Synod of the Russian Church, for the purpose of exercising care over the Orthodox flock in these Ukrainian lands, wrote requesting the permission and blessing of the Ecumenical Patriarchs, and even requested for this purpose to give him the title of Exarch of the Ecumenical Patriarch in Galicia and Transcarpathia. And with this title of the Exarch of the Ecumenical Patriarch in Galicia and Transcarpathia, this Russian hierarch was endowed with the Charter of Ecumenical Patriarch Ioakim III in 1910. Later, this title of the Exarch for him was confirmed by Ecumenical Patriarch Germanos V (1913 – 1918).

    Consequently, at the beginning of the 20th century the Russian Church itself requested the appointment of its bishop as the Exarch of the Ecumenical Patriarch in the Ukrainian lands, and then it did not consider it “an invasion of another’s canonical territory.” Therefore, it is not clear on what basis now the Synod of the Orthodox Church in Russia has changed its position and is trying to deny the Mother Church the right to appoint exarchs to the lands that historically and canonically have been the canonical territory of the Ecumenical Patriarchate?
     
    So Moscow itself admitted that western Ukraine was not its territory.

    It should be added here that the institution of exarchs (legates) of the Ecumenical Patriarch in Ukraine has long been a well-established tradition. When, in 1596, part of the episcopate, led by the Metropolitan of Kiev, fell into a split from the Church of Constantinople and became united with Rome, then two bishops, Gedeon of Lviv and Michael of Peremyshl, remained faithful to Orthodoxy and to the Ecumenical Throne. Consequently, Ecumenical Patriarch Meletios (Pegas) appointed Bishop Gedeon (Balaban) of Lviv as his Exarch in Ukraine and locum tenens of the Metropolis of Kiev. At the same time, Archdeacon Nikiphoros (Kantakouzenos) was also appointed as Exarch of the Ecumenical Patriarch and he presided at the anti-union Orthodox Council in Brest and contributed to the preservation of the Orthodox Church in Ukraine. For this he was accused by the unionist bishops and the Polish authorities of espionage in favour of Turkey, which was why he was imprisoned in the Malbork Castle, where he died in 1599. In 2001, the Synod of the UOC (MP) glorified this Exarch of the Ecumenical Patriarch as a holy martyr. Therefore, we have not only historical precedents for the appointment of the Exarchs of the Ecumenical Patriarch in Ukraine, but also have revered saints among them.
     
    Comment?

    Ecumenical Patriarchate. After Left-bank Ukraine joined the Moscow State in the middle of the 17th century, the Kievan Church was divided into parts between different rival countries (Russia, Poland and Turkey), which is was why they could not choose a single Metropolitan for a long time in Kiev. In this difficult situation, the Ecumenical Patriarch, in order not to leave the entire Ukrainian flock without archpastoral care, part of the Kievan Church in the territories subordinate to Russia were transferred to the Moscow Patriarchate in 1686 for temporary guardianship, in order to help him put a metropolitan in Kiev and bishops in the other dioceses of Left Bank Ukraine (Cossack Hetmanate). At the same time, the principle requirement was that the Metropolitans of Kiev continued to remain autonomous from Moscow as Exarchs of the Ecumenical Patriarch and that they would commemorate his name without exception at all divine services. That was in no way the transfer of the Metropolis of Kiev under the authority of the Moscow Patriarchs. For such a transmission would be anti-canonical, since in the letter of establishment of the Moscow Patriarchate the limits of canonical influences of the Moscow Patriarchs were recognized at the borders of the Moscow State in 1589. And these limits did not in any way include the Kievan Metropolis, which included, under the omophorion of the Ecumenical Patriarchate, Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania and Poland.

    It was similar to that, as in 66 years before, in 1620, with the blessing of Patriarch of Constantinople, Timothy II, the Patriarch Theophanes III of Jerusalem ordained an Orthodox Metropolitan and Bishops in Kyiv, namely, he restored the Orthodox hierarchy in Ukraine. But at the same time, we do not say that since that time the Metropolis of Kiev became dependent on the Patriarchate of Jerusalem. The same was the case in 1686. Because in Constantinople it was not possible to think that in the Moscow Church, the daughter would violate the agreements and try to force the abolition of the canonical jurisdiction of the Constantinople Mother of the Church in Ukraine. Because of this, after the collapse of the Russian Empire, the Ecumenical Patriarchate, with a separate tomos in order to provide autocephaly to the Church of Poland on 13 November 1924, was forced to declare the act of 1686 non-canonical and ineffective.
     
    Comment? Is he lying according to you?
  256. @anonymous coward
    Another content-free post from you. Way to go! Ukraine's reputation as the IQ black hole of Europe must be confirmed.

    Next step after """invalidating""" facts by claiming the facts are Kremlin shills: call upon Putler, your Dark God and mental overlord.

    Because you yourself are guilty of what you accuse me of (Another content-free post from you), and don’t really appear to have much in the department of reading comprehension, I’ll help you out and show you that my last two comment to Mr, Averko have been solely inspired by content, and not empty blow back, like you’ve been able to post. I’ve been accusing Averko of posting unsubstantiated BS, in claiming that:

    There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople.

    Where’s any proof of this? It’s all monotonous sounding, empty phrased BS, and if you too want to jump on this train ride to nowhere, then I suggest that you offer some proof too, as I’m about to leave this ride at the next station…

    • Replies: @anonymous coward

    Where’s any proof of this?
     
    This isn't a court of law, no "proofs" are possible here.

    That said, Bartholomew is a very suspect man:

    a) He was educated in Rome, has lots of ties to the Vatican and other creepy NGO's.
    b) His most important parishes are located in the USA and Canada, attended by descendants of post-WWII CIA-resettled "refugees". (Read: useful Nazis.)
    c) He has a long history of stirring up political shit, which is why the other Orthodox Churches don't like him.
    d) He is completely subjugated by the Turks, a Muslim and NATO country.

    "Some form of payola" is a good bet considering the circumstances, though emphasis should be on "some form", not "payola". Of course the man isn't motivated by money. He does what he can considering he's allowed to exist by the Turks with USA complicity after the Turks genocided his people.
  257. @Epigon
    To tell you the truth, the Ecumenical Patriarch commited a lot of blunders in doing it this specific way.

    First of all, Russian Orthodox Church recognizes Abkhazia and South Ossetia as dioceses of Georgian Orthodox Church.
    It also recognizes Donbass and Crimea as dioceses of Ukrainian Orthodox Church, the canonical one. I think it strictly discouraged any moves towards incorporation in Russian Orthodox Church/Moscow Patriarchate dioceses and takeover of Kiev/Kyiv Metropolity property.


    So, when Ecumenical Patriarch MEDDLES in diocese of Autocephalus, recognized canonical church, he tramples the basic principle of Orthodox canon.
    He will be opposed by Autocephalus Churches and Patriarchs.

    He also intends to open stavropegion in Kiev/Kyiv, of Ecumenical Orthodox Church. Bizarre.


    He will accept petitions of appeal of Filaret Denisenko, Makariy Maletych and their followers, in accordance with the canonical prerogatives of the Patriarch of Constantinople to receive such petitions by hierarchs and other clergy from all of the Autocephalous Churches. Thus, the above-mentioned have been canonically reinstated to their hierarchical or priestly rank, and their faithful have been restored to communion with the Church.

    This paragraph is problematic on several levels. In writing this, he basically forced the hand of Russian Orthodox Church AND other Autocephalus Churches.
    Denisenko was anatemised by ROC, so ROC by definition will break off all contacts. Even better, Russian Orthodox Church and its priests, believers will be banned from Athos, Meteora etc. Serb and other Orthodox Churches will be presented a choice between canon, tradition and biggest Orthodox Church with most power, and USA/NATO, Russian containment, geopolitical, Ecumenical Patriarch option.

    He goes even further. The Ecumenical Patriarch is REVOKING the Synodal Letter of the year 1686 and its LEGAL bindings. LOL. Retroactively. And proclaiming the Metropolitan of Kyiv a "canonical dependent of Constantinople"!

    Finally, in a bizarre ending, he appeals to all sides involved that "they avoid appropriation of Churches, Monasteries and other properties, as well as every other act of violence and retaliation, so that the peace and love of Christ may prevail."

    LOL
    As if historically built and staffed ROC properties, monasteries, churches and cathedrals have not already been invaded and occupied (these acts are what makes other Autocephalus churches unlikely to condone this maneuver) until now, and as if there can be "Christ's love" and "peace" after he proclaimed an anatemised former ROC priest a hierarch of a future Autocephalus Church.

    This whole episode will end badly for Ukraine. Hopefully, it will also end badly for vermin that Greeks and Greek Orthodox clergy have been since Byzantine times and especially during Ottoman period.

    The streets of Kyiv are filled with Orthodox faithful, very much pleased with the way things are progressing. You can’t ignore the voice of millions of faithful. Ecumenical Patriarch will go down in history as a very wise man:

  258. @Mr. Hack
    Because you yourself are guilty of what you accuse me of (Another content-free post from you), and don't really appear to have much in the department of reading comprehension, I'll help you out and show you that my last two comment to Mr, Averko have been solely inspired by content, and not empty blow back, like you've been able to post. I've been accusing Averko of posting unsubstantiated BS, in claiming that:

    There’s good reason to believe that some form of payola might be at play between the corrupt nationalist Kiev regime and Constantinople.
     
    Where's any proof of this? It's all monotonous sounding, empty phrased BS, and if you too want to jump on this train ride to nowhere, then I suggest that you offer some proof too, as I'm about to leave this ride at the next station...

    Where’s any proof of this?

    This isn’t a court of law, no “proofs” are possible here.

    That said, Bartholomew is a very suspect man:

    a) He was educated in Rome, has lots of ties to the Vatican and other creepy NGO’s.
    b) His most important parishes are located in the USA and Canada, attended by descendants of post-WWII CIA-resettled “refugees”. (Read: useful Nazis.)
    c) He has a long history of stirring up political shit, which is why the other Orthodox Churches don’t like him.
    d) He is completely subjugated by the Turks, a Muslim and NATO country.

    “Some form of payola” is a good bet considering the circumstances, though emphasis should be on “some form”, not “payola”. Of course the man isn’t motivated by money. He does what he can considering he’s allowed to exist by the Turks with USA complicity after the Turks genocided his people.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    So was it the Vatican, or the Turks or NATO or the CIA that forced the EP's hand to grant autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church? Or maybe all of them worked in tandem to force the Patriarch's hand, in your alternative universe conspiracy theory? His decision couldn't have possibly been inspired with the desire to bring some 30,000,ooo Orthodox Christians back into the canonical fold now could it? What a ridiculous notion eh, I'll put my money on your wacko conspiracy theory any day of the week! :-)
  259. @anonymous

    Being a reserve currency issuer undermines that.
     
    Could you go into more detail?

    Are the tariffs helping you?

    It’s known as the “Triffen Dilemma” in economics. In order to meet the foreign demand for Dollars, the US has to run a chronic deficit on its current account.

    See this piece: https://qz.com/1266044/why-does-the-us-run-a-trade-deficit-to-maintain-the-dollars-privileged-position/

    The tariffs and trade negotiations, along with the corporate tax reform, will help in time. But for now the trade deficit is actually growing larger owing to strong economic growth and the emerging markets all tanking at the same time.

    Our current account deficit, while not good, isn’t as bad as it appears because we earn more on our overseas investments than foreigners earn on their American investments. But it’s still too high.

    It would be acceptable to run a current account deficit which is smaller than the typical year’s growth in the national wealth. That way we stop losing our country to foreigners, but foreigners still get the Dollars they need.

    Ultimately the Dollar’s role as a reserve currency should be eliminated. It’s not good for America or for foreigners.

  260. @anonymous coward

    Where’s any proof of this?
     
    This isn't a court of law, no "proofs" are possible here.

    That said, Bartholomew is a very suspect man:

    a) He was educated in Rome, has lots of ties to the Vatican and other creepy NGO's.
    b) His most important parishes are located in the USA and Canada, attended by descendants of post-WWII CIA-resettled "refugees". (Read: useful Nazis.)
    c) He has a long history of stirring up political shit, which is why the other Orthodox Churches don't like him.
    d) He is completely subjugated by the Turks, a Muslim and NATO country.

    "Some form of payola" is a good bet considering the circumstances, though emphasis should be on "some form", not "payola". Of course the man isn't motivated by money. He does what he can considering he's allowed to exist by the Turks with USA complicity after the Turks genocided his people.