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My Romania post will hopefully be up in a few days.

In the meantime, I’ll share my impressions of the Sukhoi Superjet 100, which I flew for the first time on the way back from Bucharest.

Overall impressions: Meh. As densely packed as any Airbus, and way more vibrations and creaking sounds than the average flight (though I suppose I can’t extrapolate too much from n=1 flights). My favorite plane by far remains the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, which at least on Norwegian Airlines comes packed with individual monitors for entertainment and ordering food and drinks, and has free WiFi on many of its flights (and this was a couple of years ago). The Superjet 100 didn’t even have sockets to charge your cell phone or laptop with, which I consider to be a disgraceful omission in this day and age.

The next Kholmogorov translation from Fluctuarius Argenteus is going to be this one: Николай II становится для нас анти-Сталиным (“Nicholas II is becoming an anti-Stalin for us”).

***

Featured News

* Trump. Canada. Kim meeting. Etc. I gather nothing very interesting happened.

* Syria will probably start cleaning up Daraa in a matter of days. As I understand it, the Israelis are cool with it, so long as the Iranians aren’t involved.

* All football discussions go here.

* James Thompson: Who are the IQ experts?

iq-experts

I do wonder how the rankings would have changed since 2013 – probably not in my favor, since I have started writing much less about HBD/IQ stuff (in fairness, so has Sailer).

***

Russia

* Police search the apartment of a guy involved in the Dissernet project to detect plagiarism (of which at least 1/9 Duma deputies are guilty of). He might be charged under Article 282 (extremism).

This is great news, helping discredit that law even further.

* Ukraine comes dead last out of eight in Strong Europe Tank Challenge 2018 (an explanation from AP). Germany wins as usual.

* Another big corruption investigation [in Russian] from Navalny about Gazprom, based on the fired Sberbank analyst’s report.

***

World

* Sane nationalities/language policy:

***

Science & Culture

* Bernt Bratsberg & Ole Rogeberg (2018) – Flynn effect and its reversal are both environmentally caused (summary via James Thompson)

* Emil Kirkegaard & Bryan Pesta (2018) – An S Factor Analysis on the Provinces of Vietnam: Relationships with Cognitive Ability, Ethnicity, and Latitude

map-vietnam-iq

* Angela Nagle, who wrote Kill All Normies, is a plagiarist.

***

Powerful Takes

* /r/politics reaching levels of ROG that shouldn’t even be possible (via Greasy William):

levels-of-rog

* Einstein was waycist.

* Taleb goes full #frogtwitter:

* This entire thread, with me providing several of them: https://www.unz.com/akarlin/stalin-is-not-great/

***

 
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  1. I wonder what Taleb considers Med. I know he doesn’t like being called an Arab, and also, that there were a lot of Greek and Phoenician colonists in North Africa, but still any Übermenschen concept that includes the Levant and Southern Europe seems hard enough to justify without including North Africa.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Taleb incorporates North Africa into his definition. He wants them to stop identifying as "Arabs".
    , @Greasy William
    I think that there are a lot of Christian Lebanese who identify more with Greece and Cyprus than with the middle east. Taleb certainly is one.

    North Africa, save Egypt, was historically "med", but that changed after the rise of Islam. Similarly, Turkey and Syria used to be med but since have joined the middle east after Islam.
  2. I’ve dropped this link before, but putting it here again since this is an open thread: http://chris-intel-corner.blogspot.com/2012/07/wwii-myths-t-34-best-tank-of-war.html

    The T-34 wasn’t nearly as good as people believe. It was probably inferior to the Sherman in fact.

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    The T-34 was like a lot of Russian military tech, superior in some ways but inferior in others.

    The German anti tank guns couldn't penetrate T-34 armor. That is huge. The sloping armor was a great innovation. It was also easy to manufacture and maintain.

    But it was unreliable and lacked radios which had already become vital for armored warfare.

    This same pattern continues today. Look at the SU-57: it is vastly kinetically superior to anything that Europe has and probably even has a kinetic edge over the F-22. But it has poor reliability (relative to western aircraft) and its avionics and weapons are at least a decade behind western ones. It's "stealth" is a total joke.
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    I'm not particularly qualified to opine on the qualities of individual tanks, though the blog post you cite seems well-researched and convincing.

    That said, if one had to condense it down to one point, I suspect that lack of radio would still be the #1, #2, and #3 problem.

    French tanks certainly were superior to German ones in 1940 - the SOMUA S35 had a bigger cannon and was better armored than any contemporary German tank. But without the doctrine or the radio sets needed for tight coordination, it was all for naught. Almost all German tanks were equipped with two-way radios by 1940, an emphasis that was in turn an outgrowth of their tank doctrine.
  3. @songbird
    I wonder what Taleb considers Med. I know he doesn't like being called an Arab, and also, that there were a lot of Greek and Phoenician colonists in North Africa, but still any Übermenschen concept that includes the Levant and Southern Europe seems hard enough to justify without including North Africa.

    Taleb incorporates North Africa into his definition. He wants them to stop identifying as “Arabs”.

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    good luck with that
    , @AP
    Well, Iraqi Christians often don't identify as Arabs, but as Chaldeans. They claim to be descendants of the original Babylonians who were conquered and swamped by the dirty Arabs coming from the south.
  4. @songbird
    I wonder what Taleb considers Med. I know he doesn't like being called an Arab, and also, that there were a lot of Greek and Phoenician colonists in North Africa, but still any Übermenschen concept that includes the Levant and Southern Europe seems hard enough to justify without including North Africa.

    I think that there are a lot of Christian Lebanese who identify more with Greece and Cyprus than with the middle east. Taleb certainly is one.

    North Africa, save Egypt, was historically “med”, but that changed after the rise of Islam. Similarly, Turkey and Syria used to be med but since have joined the middle east after Islam.

    • Replies: @Duke of Qin
    He doesn't want to identify with smelly barbarian desert nomads with their head chopping religion but rather with the lost civilization of antiquity. I can't say I blame him.

    Everything to the West of Ctesiphon used to be part of the Hellenistic/Roman Pagan and later Christian World. From Alexander to Heraclius, it was a 900 year run all told. All of it forever obliterated by Islam and it's bloodthirsty semitic tribal brigands. Europe held the line at Austria and Spain and was even able to recover some lost territories for a time. They have however managed to bypass those national geographic barriers and now Britain, France, Germany, and Sweden are the beacheads of the latest rounds of Mohammedan pillage.
  5. Still haven’t flown on a 787. Going to India again in September and plan on getting there via 787.

  6. @Thorfinnsson
    I've dropped this link before, but putting it here again since this is an open thread: http://chris-intel-corner.blogspot.com/2012/07/wwii-myths-t-34-best-tank-of-war.html

    The T-34 wasn't nearly as good as people believe. It was probably inferior to the Sherman in fact.

    The T-34 was like a lot of Russian military tech, superior in some ways but inferior in others.

    The German anti tank guns couldn’t penetrate T-34 armor. That is huge. The sloping armor was a great innovation. It was also easy to manufacture and maintain.

    But it was unreliable and lacked radios which had already become vital for armored warfare.

    This same pattern continues today. Look at the SU-57: it is vastly kinetically superior to anything that Europe has and probably even has a kinetic edge over the F-22. But it has poor reliability (relative to western aircraft) and its avionics and weapons are at least a decade behind western ones. It’s “stealth” is a total joke.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    The 3.7 cm Pak 36 couldn't penetrate the T-34.

    The 5 cm Pak 38 could, though only at short range.

    In 1942 the 7.5 cm Pak 40 was introduced which could reliably penetrate the T-34 throughout the war. The same gun also equiped the PzKw IV (7.5 cm KwK 40) on the personal orders of the H-man.

    Sloping armor wasn't a new invention first applied to the T-34. The T-34 was simply the first tank with all-around sloped armor, which required some design tradeoffs (reduced interior space and bad ergonomics).

    The Su-57 is quite new so its reliability isn't something I'm prepared to judge. What's wrong with its avionics or weapons? Unlike the F-22 it has IRST, cheek radars, and a tail radar. Carlo Kopp thought highly of it when it first appeared, unfortunately he stopped updating his magnificent website (http://ausairpower.net) more than four years ago.

    The Russians clearly made a conscious design choice to focus on maximizing the Su-57's flight envelope over maximizing stealth. Probably Russia's technological lead in VHF radar informed their choice. America in a way made a similar choice with the F-22, which was selected for production over the YF-23 which had superior stealth.

    , @Pilgrim007
    "The German anti tank guns couldn’t penetrate T-34 armor"

    In '41 the Germans used the 37mm pak, that was indeed useless against the T34, but the pak 75/40 L46 could take a T34 from at least 1 km. It was introduced at the beginning of '42 and was still in use long after the war. The L48 version was also used on Pkw IV and other armored vehicles.
  7. @Thorfinnsson
    Taleb incorporates North Africa into his definition. He wants them to stop identifying as "Arabs".

    good luck with that

  8. @Greasy William
    The T-34 was like a lot of Russian military tech, superior in some ways but inferior in others.

    The German anti tank guns couldn't penetrate T-34 armor. That is huge. The sloping armor was a great innovation. It was also easy to manufacture and maintain.

    But it was unreliable and lacked radios which had already become vital for armored warfare.

    This same pattern continues today. Look at the SU-57: it is vastly kinetically superior to anything that Europe has and probably even has a kinetic edge over the F-22. But it has poor reliability (relative to western aircraft) and its avionics and weapons are at least a decade behind western ones. It's "stealth" is a total joke.

    The 3.7 cm Pak 36 couldn’t penetrate the T-34.

    The 5 cm Pak 38 could, though only at short range.

    In 1942 the 7.5 cm Pak 40 was introduced which could reliably penetrate the T-34 throughout the war. The same gun also equiped the PzKw IV (7.5 cm KwK 40) on the personal orders of the H-man.

    Sloping armor wasn’t a new invention first applied to the T-34. The T-34 was simply the first tank with all-around sloped armor, which required some design tradeoffs (reduced interior space and bad ergonomics).

    The Su-57 is quite new so its reliability isn’t something I’m prepared to judge. What’s wrong with its avionics or weapons? Unlike the F-22 it has IRST, cheek radars, and a tail radar. Carlo Kopp thought highly of it when it first appeared, unfortunately he stopped updating his magnificent website (http://ausairpower.net) more than four years ago.

    The Russians clearly made a conscious design choice to focus on maximizing the Su-57’s flight envelope over maximizing stealth. Probably Russia’s technological lead in VHF radar informed their choice. America in a way made a similar choice with the F-22, which was selected for production over the YF-23 which had superior stealth.

    • Replies: @Greasy William

    The Russians clearly made a conscious design choice to focus on maximizing the Su-57′s flight envelope over maximizing stealth.
     
    That's what they say but what is more likely is that Russian industry isn't capable of the precision needed to manufacture low RCS aircraft. That IRST bulging out of the front is a terrible sign. It means that the aircraft's RCS is so high that adding the IRST didn't materially increase the RCS.

    Look I like Russian aircraft. They show human ingenuity at it's best but the limits of Russian industry are really starting to catch up with them.
  9. @Greasy William
    I think that there are a lot of Christian Lebanese who identify more with Greece and Cyprus than with the middle east. Taleb certainly is one.

    North Africa, save Egypt, was historically "med", but that changed after the rise of Islam. Similarly, Turkey and Syria used to be med but since have joined the middle east after Islam.

    He doesn’t want to identify with smelly barbarian desert nomads with their head chopping religion but rather with the lost civilization of antiquity. I can’t say I blame him.

    Everything to the West of Ctesiphon used to be part of the Hellenistic/Roman Pagan and later Christian World. From Alexander to Heraclius, it was a 900 year run all told. All of it forever obliterated by Islam and it’s bloodthirsty semitic tribal brigands. Europe held the line at Austria and Spain and was even able to recover some lost territories for a time. They have however managed to bypass those national geographic barriers and now Britain, France, Germany, and Sweden are the beacheads of the latest rounds of Mohammedan pillage.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Why is everything east of Baghdad considered inferior when those areas are the only ones to not suck off abraham। ।
  10. @Thorfinnsson
    The 3.7 cm Pak 36 couldn't penetrate the T-34.

    The 5 cm Pak 38 could, though only at short range.

    In 1942 the 7.5 cm Pak 40 was introduced which could reliably penetrate the T-34 throughout the war. The same gun also equiped the PzKw IV (7.5 cm KwK 40) on the personal orders of the H-man.

    Sloping armor wasn't a new invention first applied to the T-34. The T-34 was simply the first tank with all-around sloped armor, which required some design tradeoffs (reduced interior space and bad ergonomics).

    The Su-57 is quite new so its reliability isn't something I'm prepared to judge. What's wrong with its avionics or weapons? Unlike the F-22 it has IRST, cheek radars, and a tail radar. Carlo Kopp thought highly of it when it first appeared, unfortunately he stopped updating his magnificent website (http://ausairpower.net) more than four years ago.

    The Russians clearly made a conscious design choice to focus on maximizing the Su-57's flight envelope over maximizing stealth. Probably Russia's technological lead in VHF radar informed their choice. America in a way made a similar choice with the F-22, which was selected for production over the YF-23 which had superior stealth.

    The Russians clearly made a conscious design choice to focus on maximizing the Su-57′s flight envelope over maximizing stealth.

    That’s what they say but what is more likely is that Russian industry isn’t capable of the precision needed to manufacture low RCS aircraft. That IRST bulging out of the front is a terrible sign. It means that the aircraft’s RCS is so high that adding the IRST didn’t materially increase the RCS.

    Look I like Russian aircraft. They show human ingenuity at it’s best but the limits of Russian industry are really starting to catch up with them.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    This is bullshit. Low RCS is simply a matter of applying Ufimtsev's equations, which can be done with any modern personal computer. Then there's the matter of materials, where the Russians in fact made progress. They (allegedly) developed a cheaper and better replacement for electromagnetic radiation absorbing ferritic paint, for instance.

    Obviously they prioritized maneuvering and sensors over the lowest possible RCS.

    Whether or not they made the correct choice we hopefully never find out.

  11. You realize that your complaints about Superjet have nothing to do with the plane itself? The cabin is furnished according to the airline’s specifications, so this is who you should blame for the lack of monitors and USB sockets. Even the creaking is most likely caused by the cheap-ass interior plastic.

  12. @Greasy William
    The T-34 was like a lot of Russian military tech, superior in some ways but inferior in others.

    The German anti tank guns couldn't penetrate T-34 armor. That is huge. The sloping armor was a great innovation. It was also easy to manufacture and maintain.

    But it was unreliable and lacked radios which had already become vital for armored warfare.

    This same pattern continues today. Look at the SU-57: it is vastly kinetically superior to anything that Europe has and probably even has a kinetic edge over the F-22. But it has poor reliability (relative to western aircraft) and its avionics and weapons are at least a decade behind western ones. It's "stealth" is a total joke.

    “The German anti tank guns couldn’t penetrate T-34 armor”

    In ’41 the Germans used the 37mm pak, that was indeed useless against the T34, but the pak 75/40 L46 could take a T34 from at least 1 km. It was introduced at the beginning of ’42 and was still in use long after the war. The L48 version was also used on Pkw IV and other armored vehicles.

    • Replies: @NTN
    You're all ignoring the Christie Suspension which allowed high overland travel speeds.

    The Red Army exploited any holes in the German lines by pouring all their reserves into any penetration. "Reinforcing Success"

    Yes the armor was great and they were easy to manufacture, but their overland travel speed combined with Soviet Doctrine is what won the war. It's not having the best tank, it's having the best combination of quality, quantity and doctrine. The Red Army clearly had that, in spite of Stalin's best efforts ...

    Arguably Mr. Christie is most influential Mechanical Engineer of 20th Century ...
    , @Anon
    War was already lost when Germany lost all but 8 of its combat divisions during Barbarossa

    https://youtu.be/A_3R-Rkn_98
  13. I’m honestly surprised to see Hui on that map in that location. I had no idea that they were so far into the heart of China. I guess maybe I shouldn’t be surprised because of Zheng He being an admiral, but, on another level, it seems so strange that Islam was able to make such inroads into China. I guess they were invited in – I am surprised.

    • Replies: @Polish Perspective
    I am far from an expert on China, as can be revealed by my name, but I did find this talk quite illuminating some years ago when I first stumbled upon it. It kindled my interest in China and made me deepen it by reading. I still don't understand much of China, which is why it is a fascinating place.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gte5UmAxyiE

    She has an interesting perspective. On the one hand she mocks the excessive obsession of 'eurocentrism' in many Western universities but at the same time, she criticises what she perceives as the stilted view of many Chinese historians who prefer a "continuous civilisation" narrative. She spends much of her talk vigorously questioning the latter Chinese narrative without trying to fall into a post-nationalist trap that about 'imagined communities' and similar tripe which is very much in fashion in Western humanities these days.

    The video is long, but I think you'd find it illuminating. The maps help drive her point home, but you could also just download the video and convert it and listen to it on your commute. It's a good primer, though obviously far from sufficient when it comes to China's identity and history and outgrowth as a nation.
    , @Duke of Qin
    Hui doesn't mean Chinese Muslim in this case. English use of pinyin doesn't usually include tone markers. Hui in this case an abbreviation of Huizhou which was a historic prefecture. There are zero Muslims there. There used to be significant Chinese Muslim presence in Shaanxi, Yunnan, and Gansu but they were burned out and their numbers there are a fraction of what they were in the 19th century.
    , @Anonymous
    Thats not Hui as in Hui Muslims, it's Hui as in the Huizhou variant of Chinese.
  14. @Thorfinnsson
    Taleb incorporates North Africa into his definition. He wants them to stop identifying as "Arabs".

    Well, Iraqi Christians often don’t identify as Arabs, but as Chaldeans. They claim to be descendants of the original Babylonians who were conquered and swamped by the dirty Arabs coming from the south.

    • Replies: @Jayce
    Ethnically they refer to themselves as Assyrians, same as their neighbors in northwestern Iran and northeastern Syria. Chaldean is just a term for those whose churches are in communion with Rome after splitting from the Church of the East (the so-called Nestorian church) back in the 16th century. I think the only MENA Christians that call themselves Arabs these days are the Palestinians; traditionally the Orthodox in Lebanon and Syria were associated with pan-Arabism, but lately with stuff like Operation Antioch they've been focusing more on their Hellenic roots.
    , @gate666
    what was their estimated iq.
    , @DFH
    And Romans and Medieval Britons believed they were descended from the Trojans
  15. @songbird
    I'm honestly surprised to see Hui on that map in that location. I had no idea that they were so far into the heart of China. I guess maybe I shouldn't be surprised because of Zheng He being an admiral, but, on another level, it seems so strange that Islam was able to make such inroads into China. I guess they were invited in - I am surprised.

    I am far from an expert on China, as can be revealed by my name, but I did find this talk quite illuminating some years ago when I first stumbled upon it. It kindled my interest in China and made me deepen it by reading. I still don’t understand much of China, which is why it is a fascinating place.

    She has an interesting perspective. On the one hand she mocks the excessive obsession of ‘eurocentrism’ in many Western universities but at the same time, she criticises what she perceives as the stilted view of many Chinese historians who prefer a “continuous civilisation” narrative. She spends much of her talk vigorously questioning the latter Chinese narrative without trying to fall into a post-nationalist trap that about ‘imagined communities’ and similar tripe which is very much in fashion in Western humanities these days.

    The video is long, but I think you’d find it illuminating. The maps help drive her point home, but you could also just download the video and convert it and listen to it on your commute. It’s a good primer, though obviously far from sufficient when it comes to China’s identity and history and outgrowth as a nation.

    • Replies: @Duke of Qin
    I only watched part of it, but much of it is nonsense. Keep in mind that the woman is a leftist quisling out to deconstruct Chinese historiography.

    The reason why Chinese historians prefer a continuous civilization narrative is that all previous Chinese historians had hewed the same line. The orthodox cannon 24 histories covers 2000 years of imperial state building. China has perhaps too much history and it's written legacy of statecraft is thick and overflowing with historical allusions to past dynastic rulers. Her argument that China was never unified using some retarded maximal Qing borders is akin to arguing the US didn't exist as a unified polity prior to the mid 20th century because Hawaii and Alaska weren't yet states.

    Political interregnums where multiple competing states existed simultaneously has been the undesired exception since the Qin defeated all the other ducal heirs of Zhou. Chinese states do not recognize the political legitimacy of other Chinese states, period. Like in Highlander, in the end there can be only one. This is the reason why Taiwan must be crushed and brought to heel.
  16. @AP
    Well, Iraqi Christians often don't identify as Arabs, but as Chaldeans. They claim to be descendants of the original Babylonians who were conquered and swamped by the dirty Arabs coming from the south.

    Ethnically they refer to themselves as Assyrians, same as their neighbors in northwestern Iran and northeastern Syria. Chaldean is just a term for those whose churches are in communion with Rome after splitting from the Church of the East (the so-called Nestorian church) back in the 16th century. I think the only MENA Christians that call themselves Arabs these days are the Palestinians; traditionally the Orthodox in Lebanon and Syria were associated with pan-Arabism, but lately with stuff like Operation Antioch they’ve been focusing more on their Hellenic roots.

    • Replies: @songbird
    Palestinian Christians probably call themselves Arabs out of a certain pragmatism, rather than a natural desire.
  17. @songbird
    I'm honestly surprised to see Hui on that map in that location. I had no idea that they were so far into the heart of China. I guess maybe I shouldn't be surprised because of Zheng He being an admiral, but, on another level, it seems so strange that Islam was able to make such inroads into China. I guess they were invited in - I am surprised.

    Hui doesn’t mean Chinese Muslim in this case. English use of pinyin doesn’t usually include tone markers. Hui in this case an abbreviation of Huizhou which was a historic prefecture. There are zero Muslims there. There used to be significant Chinese Muslim presence in Shaanxi, Yunnan, and Gansu but they were burned out and their numbers there are a fraction of what they were in the 19th century.

    • Replies: @songbird
    Thanks for that explanation.

    One reason I was a bit confused is wikipedia mentions Zhongyuan as being one Hui area. It is certainly far enough East, though not coincident with the language map. The Zhongyuan page does not mention the Hui though.
  18. Sukhoi Superjet is comparable to Embraer not Airbus A320/Boeing 737 which are bigger planes and would be comparable to the upcoming MC 21.

    The interiors are the choice of the airline so can’t blame Sukhoi for that.

    The vibration/creaking noise well as a thumb rule the larger the plane the less likely it will be tossed around while in flight due to inertia So 747 will be more comfortable than 737 which will be better than an Embraer.I think it is as quiet as the Embraer E series jets which is in the same class size wise.

    The one serious mistake Sukhoi made was going for French Engines SaM 146 instead of US/UK Ones.

    Jet engines is one area of manufacturing where the Anglos reign supreme(GE,PW,RR).

    Russia has not made the same mistake with the MC 21 whose international version will have Pratt and Whitney GTF engines.These is an indigenous engine option as well PD 14 but that will not be competitive internationally vis a vis fuel efficiency

    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    The one serious mistake Sukhoi made was going for French Engines SaM 146 instead of US/UK Ones.
     
    It’s probably better to avoid Anglo cooperation, due to the risk of sanctions.

    I think back then the reason was that there was already a history of cooperation with the French, and they were probably more willing to share the technology and license local production.
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    Also @inertial, @reiner Tor,

    Thanks for the explanation.

    You realize that your complaints about Superjet have nothing to do with the plane itself?
     
    Legitimate point.

    But one problem is that Aeroflot accounts for approximately half the Superjet's orders, so this would be reflective of experience of the plane as a whole.
    , @AP
    I flew to Moscow on Aeroflot in an Airbus and flew out in a Boeing. Difference is night and day. Airbus is cramped and terrible.
    , @Anonymous
    Why is it that only Anglos seem to be able to make good jet engines? I know there are other manufacturers based on joint ventures between Anglos and either France or (Japan and Germany).
  19. Anonymous[149] • Disclaimer says:
    @songbird
    I'm honestly surprised to see Hui on that map in that location. I had no idea that they were so far into the heart of China. I guess maybe I shouldn't be surprised because of Zheng He being an admiral, but, on another level, it seems so strange that Islam was able to make such inroads into China. I guess they were invited in - I am surprised.

    Thats not Hui as in Hui Muslims, it’s Hui as in the Huizhou variant of Chinese.

  20. The next Kholmogorov translation from Fluctuarius Argenteus is going to be this one: Николай II становится для нас анти-Сталиным (“Nicholas II is becoming an anti-Stalin for us”).

    Idiot Kholmogorov engaged in the glorification of Stalin. There is no better way to glorify Stalin than to oppose him Nicholas II.

    Probably Kholmogorov received a grant from the FSB to discredit the “Russian nationalism”. But why the fucking shame to re-translate into English – I do not understand

  21. The Superjet 100 didn’t even have sockets to charge your cell phone or laptop with

    As others have remarked, it’s the airlines’ choice. In my experience, short haul flights never have it.

    Probably you also never flew small planes, which are usually quite noisy, unlike bigger planes like the 777 or A380. The 787 has a further edge in that department due to its super low drag coefficient. The choice of interior materials is also important.

    So probably not that bad.

  22. @Vishnugupta
    Sukhoi Superjet is comparable to Embraer not Airbus A320/Boeing 737 which are bigger planes and would be comparable to the upcoming MC 21.

    The interiors are the choice of the airline so can't blame Sukhoi for that.

    The vibration/creaking noise well as a thumb rule the larger the plane the less likely it will be tossed around while in flight due to inertia So 747 will be more comfortable than 737 which will be better than an Embraer.I think it is as quiet as the Embraer E series jets which is in the same class size wise.

    The one serious mistake Sukhoi made was going for French Engines SaM 146 instead of US/UK Ones.

    Jet engines is one area of manufacturing where the Anglos reign supreme(GE,PW,RR).

    Russia has not made the same mistake with the MC 21 whose international version will have Pratt and Whitney GTF engines.These is an indigenous engine option as well PD 14 but that will not be competitive internationally vis a vis fuel efficiency

    The one serious mistake Sukhoi made was going for French Engines SaM 146 instead of US/UK Ones.

    It’s probably better to avoid Anglo cooperation, due to the risk of sanctions.

    I think back then the reason was that there was already a history of cooperation with the French, and they were probably more willing to share the technology and license local production.

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    The French are phenomenal about sharing tech. If you are looking to partner with a country on a large scale project, France should be your first choice.

    The problem is that Uncle Sam can be very "persuasive" when he wants you to partner with American companies instead. So France ends up working with countries like Egypt, Russia, India and Brazil while being shut out of more lucrative contracts. Too bad.
  23. As densely packed as any Airbus, and way more vibrations and creaking sounds than the average flight

    The interior depends on the airline, not the airliner frame.

  24. @reiner Tor

    The one serious mistake Sukhoi made was going for French Engines SaM 146 instead of US/UK Ones.
     
    It’s probably better to avoid Anglo cooperation, due to the risk of sanctions.

    I think back then the reason was that there was already a history of cooperation with the French, and they were probably more willing to share the technology and license local production.

    The French are phenomenal about sharing tech. If you are looking to partner with a country on a large scale project, France should be your first choice.

    The problem is that Uncle Sam can be very “persuasive” when he wants you to partner with American companies instead. So France ends up working with countries like Egypt, Russia, India and Brazil while being shut out of more lucrative contracts. Too bad.

    • Replies: @Vishnugupta
    How?

    What have the French transferred technology wise to any other country that can be considered State of the Art?

    India was sold obsolete Viking rocket engine tech by the French which are used in its PSLV space launch vehicles.

    In state of the art stuff like Ardiden helicopter engine produced in India as the Shakti(For HAL LCH Attack helicopter) they let India do screw driver assembly and charge a heavy fee for that.All critical components are flown in from France.

    Much the same for Scorpene class SSK submarine being built in India where the French are again dragging their feet vis a vis TOT though this time we are delaying TOT milestone linked payments so they should come around.

    Also lacking economies of scale French tech is almost always more expensive and less advanced than their american equivalents.

    In contrast Russia allows India to produce very competent Su 30 Mki aircraft more or less from raw materials and gave us blue prints and tech help to produce advanced cryogenic engines for our Space launch vehicles in the early 1990s.

    We also produce state of the art Yakhont cruise missiles(as the Brahmos) and will soon produce hypersonic missiles as well Brahmos 2 etc.

    They also helped us design sub components of our Delhi/Kolkata/Vishakapatnam class destroyers.

    Oh and they lease us their state of the art Akula II Nuclear Attack Submarine so that we gain operational expertise and build up crews before our indigenous attack SSNs become operational early next decade.This is not the first time they have leased us nuclear subs(Nations are forbidden to sell N subs to each other so this long term leasing business was a work around)

    Now that is what we call a partner.

    US transferred Japan/France its nuclear reactor tech in the 1960s.

    UK transferred ship building tech to S Korea etc.
  25. @Thorfinnsson
    I've dropped this link before, but putting it here again since this is an open thread: http://chris-intel-corner.blogspot.com/2012/07/wwii-myths-t-34-best-tank-of-war.html

    The T-34 wasn't nearly as good as people believe. It was probably inferior to the Sherman in fact.

    I’m not particularly qualified to opine on the qualities of individual tanks, though the blog post you cite seems well-researched and convincing.

    That said, if one had to condense it down to one point, I suspect that lack of radio would still be the #1, #2, and #3 problem.

    French tanks certainly were superior to German ones in 1940 – the SOMUA S35 had a bigger cannon and was better armored than any contemporary German tank. But without the doctrine or the radio sets needed for tight coordination, it was all for naught. Almost all German tanks were equipped with two-way radios by 1940, an emphasis that was in turn an outgrowth of their tank doctrine.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    lack of radio would still be the #1, #2, and #3 problem
     
    Perhaps, but being highly uncomfortable and having the commander also be the gunner were also big disadvantages.
  26. @Vishnugupta
    Sukhoi Superjet is comparable to Embraer not Airbus A320/Boeing 737 which are bigger planes and would be comparable to the upcoming MC 21.

    The interiors are the choice of the airline so can't blame Sukhoi for that.

    The vibration/creaking noise well as a thumb rule the larger the plane the less likely it will be tossed around while in flight due to inertia So 747 will be more comfortable than 737 which will be better than an Embraer.I think it is as quiet as the Embraer E series jets which is in the same class size wise.

    The one serious mistake Sukhoi made was going for French Engines SaM 146 instead of US/UK Ones.

    Jet engines is one area of manufacturing where the Anglos reign supreme(GE,PW,RR).

    Russia has not made the same mistake with the MC 21 whose international version will have Pratt and Whitney GTF engines.These is an indigenous engine option as well PD 14 but that will not be competitive internationally vis a vis fuel efficiency

    Also @inertial, @reiner Tor,

    Thanks for the explanation.

    You realize that your complaints about Superjet have nothing to do with the plane itself?

    Legitimate point.

    But one problem is that Aeroflot accounts for approximately half the Superjet’s orders, so this would be reflective of experience of the plane as a whole.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    this would be reflective of experience of the plane as a whole
     
    All small planes are like that, in my experience. I only like big and recently built planes like the 777, 787, and the A380.
  27. @Greasy William
    The French are phenomenal about sharing tech. If you are looking to partner with a country on a large scale project, France should be your first choice.

    The problem is that Uncle Sam can be very "persuasive" when he wants you to partner with American companies instead. So France ends up working with countries like Egypt, Russia, India and Brazil while being shut out of more lucrative contracts. Too bad.

    How?

    What have the French transferred technology wise to any other country that can be considered State of the Art?

    India was sold obsolete Viking rocket engine tech by the French which are used in its PSLV space launch vehicles.

    In state of the art stuff like Ardiden helicopter engine produced in India as the Shakti(For HAL LCH Attack helicopter) they let India do screw driver assembly and charge a heavy fee for that.All critical components are flown in from France.

    Much the same for Scorpene class SSK submarine being built in India where the French are again dragging their feet vis a vis TOT though this time we are delaying TOT milestone linked payments so they should come around.

    Also lacking economies of scale French tech is almost always more expensive and less advanced than their american equivalents.

    In contrast Russia allows India to produce very competent Su 30 Mki aircraft more or less from raw materials and gave us blue prints and tech help to produce advanced cryogenic engines for our Space launch vehicles in the early 1990s.

    We also produce state of the art Yakhont cruise missiles(as the Brahmos) and will soon produce hypersonic missiles as well Brahmos 2 etc.

    They also helped us design sub components of our Delhi/Kolkata/Vishakapatnam class destroyers.

    Oh and they lease us their state of the art Akula II Nuclear Attack Submarine so that we gain operational expertise and build up crews before our indigenous attack SSNs become operational early next decade.This is not the first time they have leased us nuclear subs(Nations are forbidden to sell N subs to each other so this long term leasing business was a work around)

    Now that is what we call a partner.

    US transferred Japan/France its nuclear reactor tech in the 1960s.

    UK transferred ship building tech to S Korea etc.

  28. @AP
    Well, Iraqi Christians often don't identify as Arabs, but as Chaldeans. They claim to be descendants of the original Babylonians who were conquered and swamped by the dirty Arabs coming from the south.

    what was their estimated iq.

    • Replies: @AP
    Probably a lot higher than those of Arabs. There are many in Detroit. They live in wealthier areas, tend to work as professionals. They are rather materialistic, one of my friends dated one - 20-something professional in finance or something, but still living at home so she can afford a new higher-end Mercedes, only wore designer clothes (Armani store is full of them). But superstitious, afraid of the "evil eye." Contemptuous of Arabs who live in poorer areas.
  29. @Anatoly Karlin
    I'm not particularly qualified to opine on the qualities of individual tanks, though the blog post you cite seems well-researched and convincing.

    That said, if one had to condense it down to one point, I suspect that lack of radio would still be the #1, #2, and #3 problem.

    French tanks certainly were superior to German ones in 1940 - the SOMUA S35 had a bigger cannon and was better armored than any contemporary German tank. But without the doctrine or the radio sets needed for tight coordination, it was all for naught. Almost all German tanks were equipped with two-way radios by 1940, an emphasis that was in turn an outgrowth of their tank doctrine.

    lack of radio would still be the #1, #2, and #3 problem

    Perhaps, but being highly uncomfortable and having the commander also be the gunner were also big disadvantages.

  30. @Anatoly Karlin
    Also @inertial, @reiner Tor,

    Thanks for the explanation.

    You realize that your complaints about Superjet have nothing to do with the plane itself?
     
    Legitimate point.

    But one problem is that Aeroflot accounts for approximately half the Superjet's orders, so this would be reflective of experience of the plane as a whole.

    this would be reflective of experience of the plane as a whole

    All small planes are like that, in my experience. I only like big and recently built planes like the 777, 787, and the A380.

  31. @AP
    Well, Iraqi Christians often don't identify as Arabs, but as Chaldeans. They claim to be descendants of the original Babylonians who were conquered and swamped by the dirty Arabs coming from the south.

    And Romans and Medieval Britons believed they were descended from the Trojans

    • Replies: @AP
    Chaldeans may be right, though. Their ancestors converted to Christianity under the Persians, not after the Arab invasion. Although it is likely that their Arab neighbors aren't all invaders but locals whose ancestors converted to Islam over the years.
  32. How?

    They resurrected your Kaveri engine program. Russia didn’t even offer even after you put down billions to co develop the SU-57.

    What have the French transferred technology wise to any other country that can be considered State of the Art?

    They let you build the entire Rafale.

    • Replies: @Vishnugupta
    Screwdriver assembly with all critical components(Engine,Radar,Avionics,even sections of the aero structure) flown in from France is not the same thing as letting us build the whole aircraft almost from raw materials in the country like India builds the Su 30 Mki.

    Russia is not continuing research in Kaveri class engines (Klimov RD 33 series is not being meaningfully upgraded and Klimov has been asked to focus on Helicopter engines now that it is part of UEC) they can only afford research in one class of fighter aircraft engines i.e. Type 30 for PAK FA .

    We build Su 30 Mki engine from raw materials in India btw including the all important hot section(HP turbine and Compressor).

    The 'help' on Kaveri is essentially an offer to license build M88 engine (Rafale) and rename it Kaveri 2 with all critical components flown in from France.Like the Ardiden helicopter engine we build as the Shakti. No thanks!

    We will build a non after burning version of it and fly our AURA UCAV on it.That's basically it for the Kaveri.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DRDO_AURA
  33. @Pilgrim007
    "The German anti tank guns couldn’t penetrate T-34 armor"

    In '41 the Germans used the 37mm pak, that was indeed useless against the T34, but the pak 75/40 L46 could take a T34 from at least 1 km. It was introduced at the beginning of '42 and was still in use long after the war. The L48 version was also used on Pkw IV and other armored vehicles.

    You’re all ignoring the Christie Suspension which allowed high overland travel speeds.

    The Red Army exploited any holes in the German lines by pouring all their reserves into any penetration. “Reinforcing Success”

    Yes the armor was great and they were easy to manufacture, but their overland travel speed combined with Soviet Doctrine is what won the war. It’s not having the best tank, it’s having the best combination of quality, quantity and doctrine. The Red Army clearly had that, in spite of Stalin’s best efforts …

    Arguably Mr. Christie is most influential Mechanical Engineer of 20th Century …

  34. AP says:
    @gate666
    what was their estimated iq.

    Probably a lot higher than those of Arabs. There are many in Detroit. They live in wealthier areas, tend to work as professionals. They are rather materialistic, one of my friends dated one – 20-something professional in finance or something, but still living at home so she can afford a new higher-end Mercedes, only wore designer clothes (Armani store is full of them). But superstitious, afraid of the “evil eye.” Contemptuous of Arabs who live in poorer areas.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    I'm curious, how you and your family have integrated into the Ukrainian community in Michigan? Are the malankas still as popular as back in the day when they were packing them into the Cultural Center? How about during the warmer months, is the Dibrova Oselia still a popular destination? Plenty of churches to visit (and join!)? Lot's of Ukies used to live in Warren, Fenton, Flint, Hamtraken,they're probably even further north now...
  35. @DFH
    And Romans and Medieval Britons believed they were descended from the Trojans

    Chaldeans may be right, though. Their ancestors converted to Christianity under the Persians, not after the Arab invasion. Although it is likely that their Arab neighbors aren’t all invaders but locals whose ancestors converted to Islam over the years.

  36. @Vishnugupta
    Sukhoi Superjet is comparable to Embraer not Airbus A320/Boeing 737 which are bigger planes and would be comparable to the upcoming MC 21.

    The interiors are the choice of the airline so can't blame Sukhoi for that.

    The vibration/creaking noise well as a thumb rule the larger the plane the less likely it will be tossed around while in flight due to inertia So 747 will be more comfortable than 737 which will be better than an Embraer.I think it is as quiet as the Embraer E series jets which is in the same class size wise.

    The one serious mistake Sukhoi made was going for French Engines SaM 146 instead of US/UK Ones.

    Jet engines is one area of manufacturing where the Anglos reign supreme(GE,PW,RR).

    Russia has not made the same mistake with the MC 21 whose international version will have Pratt and Whitney GTF engines.These is an indigenous engine option as well PD 14 but that will not be competitive internationally vis a vis fuel efficiency

    I flew to Moscow on Aeroflot in an Airbus and flew out in a Boeing. Difference is night and day. Airbus is cramped and terrible.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    What kind of Boeing and Airbus those were? What year they were produced?
  37. @Greasy William

    How?
     
    They resurrected your Kaveri engine program. Russia didn't even offer even after you put down billions to co develop the SU-57.

    What have the French transferred technology wise to any other country that can be considered State of the Art?
     
    They let you build the entire Rafale.

    Screwdriver assembly with all critical components(Engine,Radar,Avionics,even sections of the aero structure) flown in from France is not the same thing as letting us build the whole aircraft almost from raw materials in the country like India builds the Su 30 Mki.

    Russia is not continuing research in Kaveri class engines (Klimov RD 33 series is not being meaningfully upgraded and Klimov has been asked to focus on Helicopter engines now that it is part of UEC) they can only afford research in one class of fighter aircraft engines i.e. Type 30 for PAK FA .

    We build Su 30 Mki engine from raw materials in India btw including the all important hot section(HP turbine and Compressor).

    The ‘help’ on Kaveri is essentially an offer to license build M88 engine (Rafale) and rename it Kaveri 2 with all critical components flown in from France.Like the Ardiden helicopter engine we build as the Shakti. No thanks!

    We will build a non after burning version of it and fly our AURA UCAV on it.That’s basically it for the Kaveri.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DRDO_AURA

    • Replies: @Greasy William

    We build Su 30 Mki engine from raw materials in India btw including the all important hot section(HP turbine and Compressor).
     
    I was not aware of that. Very impressive. Congratulations.

    Not sure why it matters if the raw materials come from India, though.

    Screwdriver assembly with all critical components(Engine,Radar,Avionics,even sections of the aero structure) flown in from France is not the same thing as letting us build the whole aircraft almost from raw materials in the country like India builds the Su 30 Mki.
     
    Well then why did you buy it? Obviously your own government was happy with the level of tech transfer or they wouldn't have signed the contract.
  38. @Vishnugupta
    Screwdriver assembly with all critical components(Engine,Radar,Avionics,even sections of the aero structure) flown in from France is not the same thing as letting us build the whole aircraft almost from raw materials in the country like India builds the Su 30 Mki.

    Russia is not continuing research in Kaveri class engines (Klimov RD 33 series is not being meaningfully upgraded and Klimov has been asked to focus on Helicopter engines now that it is part of UEC) they can only afford research in one class of fighter aircraft engines i.e. Type 30 for PAK FA .

    We build Su 30 Mki engine from raw materials in India btw including the all important hot section(HP turbine and Compressor).

    The 'help' on Kaveri is essentially an offer to license build M88 engine (Rafale) and rename it Kaveri 2 with all critical components flown in from France.Like the Ardiden helicopter engine we build as the Shakti. No thanks!

    We will build a non after burning version of it and fly our AURA UCAV on it.That's basically it for the Kaveri.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DRDO_AURA

    We build Su 30 Mki engine from raw materials in India btw including the all important hot section(HP turbine and Compressor).

    I was not aware of that. Very impressive. Congratulations.

    Not sure why it matters if the raw materials come from India, though.

    Screwdriver assembly with all critical components(Engine,Radar,Avionics,even sections of the aero structure) flown in from France is not the same thing as letting us build the whole aircraft almost from raw materials in the country like India builds the Su 30 Mki.

    Well then why did you buy it? Obviously your own government was happy with the level of tech transfer or they wouldn’t have signed the contract.

    • Replies: @Anon
    India has had one party christian backed democracy for most of its post ww2 history similar to Japan.

    There's a significant lobby for imported arms, which just changes the requirement for indigenous tech midway.

    Drdos entire budget is a few billion usd across all programs subs, icbms, aircraft.

    The mirage didn't have working missiles for years while a nearly fully functional Tejas is rejected for reasons.

    Same with Arjun tank

    The Kaveri actually has close to 90kn thrust more than the m88 but the Tejas Mk2 naval needs more & refuses to fund further development.

    The only tech Russia withholds is the engine core of the Sukhoi & the gun barrel/turret of the t90.

    France is different since it rejoined Nato..
  39. @Duke of Qin
    Hui doesn't mean Chinese Muslim in this case. English use of pinyin doesn't usually include tone markers. Hui in this case an abbreviation of Huizhou which was a historic prefecture. There are zero Muslims there. There used to be significant Chinese Muslim presence in Shaanxi, Yunnan, and Gansu but they were burned out and their numbers there are a fraction of what they were in the 19th century.

    Thanks for that explanation.

    One reason I was a bit confused is wikipedia mentions Zhongyuan as being one Hui area. It is certainly far enough East, though not coincident with the language map. The Zhongyuan page does not mention the Hui though.

  40. @AP
    I flew to Moscow on Aeroflot in an Airbus and flew out in a Boeing. Difference is night and day. Airbus is cramped and terrible.

    What kind of Boeing and Airbus those were? What year they were produced?

    • Replies: @AP
    I think it was A330 Airbus and Boeing 777.

    Generally Aeroflot is very comfortable and spacious, for "cattle class" flights. I prefer Aeroflot to Lufthansa or Delta when flying to Moscow. The Airbus experience was shocking - my knees were jammed against the seat in front. Never happened on the old Soviet planes nor Boeing.
  41. @Jayce
    Ethnically they refer to themselves as Assyrians, same as their neighbors in northwestern Iran and northeastern Syria. Chaldean is just a term for those whose churches are in communion with Rome after splitting from the Church of the East (the so-called Nestorian church) back in the 16th century. I think the only MENA Christians that call themselves Arabs these days are the Palestinians; traditionally the Orthodox in Lebanon and Syria were associated with pan-Arabism, but lately with stuff like Operation Antioch they've been focusing more on their Hellenic roots.

    Palestinian Christians probably call themselves Arabs out of a certain pragmatism, rather than a natural desire.

  42. @Greasy William

    The Russians clearly made a conscious design choice to focus on maximizing the Su-57′s flight envelope over maximizing stealth.
     
    That's what they say but what is more likely is that Russian industry isn't capable of the precision needed to manufacture low RCS aircraft. That IRST bulging out of the front is a terrible sign. It means that the aircraft's RCS is so high that adding the IRST didn't materially increase the RCS.

    Look I like Russian aircraft. They show human ingenuity at it's best but the limits of Russian industry are really starting to catch up with them.

    This is bullshit. Low RCS is simply a matter of applying Ufimtsev’s equations, which can be done with any modern personal computer. Then there’s the matter of materials, where the Russians in fact made progress. They (allegedly) developed a cheaper and better replacement for electromagnetic radiation absorbing ferritic paint, for instance.

    Obviously they prioritized maneuvering and sensors over the lowest possible RCS.

    Whether or not they made the correct choice we hopefully never find out.

  43. AP says:
    @reiner Tor
    What kind of Boeing and Airbus those were? What year they were produced?

    I think it was A330 Airbus and Boeing 777.

    Generally Aeroflot is very comfortable and spacious, for “cattle class” flights. I prefer Aeroflot to Lufthansa or Delta when flying to Moscow. The Airbus experience was shocking – my knees were jammed against the seat in front. Never happened on the old Soviet planes nor Boeing.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    It will happen on Boeings and the CRAIC CR929 when it appears.

    Aircraft manufacturers are currently experimenting with staggered cabin layouts which will allow them to cram even more people in cattle class.

    Solution: get some money and fly business class.
  44. Here is an unusual and unsung hero: https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/julius-erasmus.html

    German WW2 veteran decided to personally provide a dignified burial for every soldier he could find, ultimately burying 1,569 soldiers.

  45. As densely packed as any Airbus, and way more vibrations and creaking sounds than the average flight (though I suppose I can’t extrapolate too much from n=1 flights).

    Maybe next time the Russian nationalist will have more luck and fly with a SSJ not named after a Soviet Bashkir poet.

  46. @AP
    I think it was A330 Airbus and Boeing 777.

    Generally Aeroflot is very comfortable and spacious, for "cattle class" flights. I prefer Aeroflot to Lufthansa or Delta when flying to Moscow. The Airbus experience was shocking - my knees were jammed against the seat in front. Never happened on the old Soviet planes nor Boeing.

    It will happen on Boeings and the CRAIC CR929 when it appears.

    Aircraft manufacturers are currently experimenting with staggered cabin layouts which will allow them to cram even more people in cattle class.

    Solution: get some money and fly business class.

    • Replies: @AP
    I'm willing to put up with a few hours of discomfort for the sake of $1500 roundtrip, the cost of an upgrade to business class. And then multiply it by three, the number of people travelling. That's almost 2 weeks of personal income - not worth it.

    But this Airbus was very annoying.
  47. AP says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    It will happen on Boeings and the CRAIC CR929 when it appears.

    Aircraft manufacturers are currently experimenting with staggered cabin layouts which will allow them to cram even more people in cattle class.

    Solution: get some money and fly business class.

    I’m willing to put up with a few hours of discomfort for the sake of $1500 roundtrip, the cost of an upgrade to business class. And then multiply it by three, the number of people travelling. That’s almost 2 weeks of personal income – not worth it.

    But this Airbus was very annoying.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Refer to: "get some money" :)
  48. @AP
    I'm willing to put up with a few hours of discomfort for the sake of $1500 roundtrip, the cost of an upgrade to business class. And then multiply it by three, the number of people travelling. That's almost 2 weeks of personal income - not worth it.

    But this Airbus was very annoying.

    Refer to: “get some money” 🙂

    • Replies: @AP
    Not everyone can, or wants to, run a factory.
  49. @AP
    Probably a lot higher than those of Arabs. There are many in Detroit. They live in wealthier areas, tend to work as professionals. They are rather materialistic, one of my friends dated one - 20-something professional in finance or something, but still living at home so she can afford a new higher-end Mercedes, only wore designer clothes (Armani store is full of them). But superstitious, afraid of the "evil eye." Contemptuous of Arabs who live in poorer areas.

    I’m curious, how you and your family have integrated into the Ukrainian community in Michigan? Are the malankas still as popular as back in the day when they were packing them into the Cultural Center? How about during the warmer months, is the Dibrova Oselia still a popular destination? Plenty of churches to visit (and join!)? Lot’s of Ukies used to live in Warren, Fenton, Flint, Hamtraken,they’re probably even further north now…

    • Replies: @AP
    I didn't grow up there, just spent some time while at the medical center for my internship/residency, so didn't integrate other than going to church and having shashliks at Dibrova.

    I left long ago, but Trump Jr. came to the Ukrainian cultural center in Warren and promised that his dad would be better for Ukraine than Obama was.

  50. Duterte plans hand out guns to trusted ‘community leaders’. This may or may not be a good idea but I really enjoy his style, truly /ourguy/.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/r-philippines-aims-to-arm-community-leaders-to-help-fight-crime-drugs-2018-6

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    President DAKKA DAKKA is my president.
  51. AP says:
    @Mr. Hack
    I'm curious, how you and your family have integrated into the Ukrainian community in Michigan? Are the malankas still as popular as back in the day when they were packing them into the Cultural Center? How about during the warmer months, is the Dibrova Oselia still a popular destination? Plenty of churches to visit (and join!)? Lot's of Ukies used to live in Warren, Fenton, Flint, Hamtraken,they're probably even further north now...

    I didn’t grow up there, just spent some time while at the medical center for my internship/residency, so didn’t integrate other than going to church and having shashliks at Dibrova.

    I left long ago, but Trump Jr. came to the Ukrainian cultural center in Warren and promised that his dad would be better for Ukraine than Obama was.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    For some reason, I thought that you still lived in the area?...Do you think that Trump Jr. was correct in his assessment?
  52. This earnest negress is convinced Trump will get a much larger share of the black vote in 2020: http://blackrepublican.blogspot.com/2018/06/yuge-5-reasons-trump-will-win-40-states.html

    Scott Adams tweeted out this link.

    I suspect she is correct and that Trump will get 15-20% of the black vote in 2020.

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    I reeeeeeeaaaaallllly don't think so. Blacks hate Trump far more than any other demo.

    I think in 2020 Trump will get 63% of the white vote, 43% of the Latino vote, 36% of the Asian vote, 21% of the faggot vote and 11% of the black vote. Final margin: Trump 52, Kamala Harris 46.
    , @gate666
    highly unlikely.
  53. @Thorfinnsson
    Refer to: "get some money" :)

    Not everyone can, or wants to, run a factory.

  54. @AP
    I didn't grow up there, just spent some time while at the medical center for my internship/residency, so didn't integrate other than going to church and having shashliks at Dibrova.

    I left long ago, but Trump Jr. came to the Ukrainian cultural center in Warren and promised that his dad would be better for Ukraine than Obama was.

    For some reason, I thought that you still lived in the area?…Do you think that Trump Jr. was correct in his assessment?

    • Replies: @AP
    I think he was.
  55. An entire Politico article of “powerful takes:”

    https://www.politico.eu/blogs/the-linesman/2018/06/world-cup-2018-russia-politics-a-to-z/

    P is for Putin, the presiding deity, malign and self-satisfied. He wanted the cup for Russia, and he made sure FIFA gave it to him. What better way to whitewash your reputation as an autocrat than by throwing your doors open to the world for a month of vodka and football. Russia, and Russians, will be on their best behavior. We have seen it reported that train and bus conductors in all the host cities are being taught how to smile.

    Clearly, tv shows instructing his minions(all Russians, apparently) on how to appear civilized to the Western world are being broadcast right now.

    • Replies: @DFH

    It calls itself Die Mannschaft (or “the Team”), with Turkish and African players alongside a solid Germanic core. Yet non-Germans remain unprepared to give them love.
     
    How is such racism allowed to be published?
  56. @Hyperborean
    Duterte plans hand out guns to trusted 'community leaders'. This may or may not be a good idea but I really enjoy his style, truly /ourguy/.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/r-philippines-aims-to-arm-community-leaders-to-help-fight-crime-drugs-2018-6

    President DAKKA DAKKA is my president.

  57. @Thorfinnsson
    This earnest negress is convinced Trump will get a much larger share of the black vote in 2020: http://blackrepublican.blogspot.com/2018/06/yuge-5-reasons-trump-will-win-40-states.html

    Scott Adams tweeted out this link.

    I suspect she is correct and that Trump will get 15-20% of the black vote in 2020.

    I reeeeeeeaaaaallllly don’t think so. Blacks hate Trump far more than any other demo.

    I think in 2020 Trump will get 63% of the white vote, 43% of the Latino vote, 36% of the Asian vote, 21% of the faggot vote and 11% of the black vote. Final margin: Trump 52, Kamala Harris 46.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Black women hate Trump. Black men don't.

    And something unexpected seems to be going on in the black community right now thanks to Kanye.

    Trump could improve his numbers with black women by carrying on an affair with a negress. Stacy Dash would be an obvious choice if she's not too old for his tastes (unlikely given that he screwed Kelly Anne Conway).

    , @Duke of Qin
    That's optimistic considering Trump actually lost the popular vote by 2% to Clinton of all people, the platonic essence of the shrill hectoring school marm no on likes. It was only thanks to the weird electoral College situation that Trump became president. Unfortunately that same system is going to come back and bite the Republicans in the ass once the Democrats flip Texas via demographic change and then you are looking forward to eternal lefty rule of the US executive branch.
  58. @Greasy William
    I reeeeeeeaaaaallllly don't think so. Blacks hate Trump far more than any other demo.

    I think in 2020 Trump will get 63% of the white vote, 43% of the Latino vote, 36% of the Asian vote, 21% of the faggot vote and 11% of the black vote. Final margin: Trump 52, Kamala Harris 46.

    Black women hate Trump. Black men don’t.

    And something unexpected seems to be going on in the black community right now thanks to Kanye.

    Trump could improve his numbers with black women by carrying on an affair with a negress. Stacy Dash would be an obvious choice if she’s not too old for his tastes (unlikely given that he screwed Kelly Anne Conway).

  59. @Greasy William
    I reeeeeeeaaaaallllly don't think so. Blacks hate Trump far more than any other demo.

    I think in 2020 Trump will get 63% of the white vote, 43% of the Latino vote, 36% of the Asian vote, 21% of the faggot vote and 11% of the black vote. Final margin: Trump 52, Kamala Harris 46.

    That’s optimistic considering Trump actually lost the popular vote by 2% to Clinton of all people, the platonic essence of the shrill hectoring school marm no on likes. It was only thanks to the weird electoral College situation that Trump became president. Unfortunately that same system is going to come back and bite the Republicans in the ass once the Democrats flip Texas via demographic change and then you are looking forward to eternal lefty rule of the US executive branch.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Provided the economy stays in good shape Trump will improve his results in 2020, as he has now been "normalized".

    We can stop the Democrats from getting a lock on the executive branch by increasing our share of the white vote and/or suppressing Democrat voting blocs.

    Time is of course running out.
    , @AP
    Democrats may run up the score in California thanks to the immigration policy, but that won't matter. Gettting more of the black vote will strengthen Trump in the Rust Belt. If the Democrats run Biden they have a chance, but if they go Kamala they don't.
  60. @Daniel Chieh
    An entire Politico article of "powerful takes:"

    https://www.politico.eu/blogs/the-linesman/2018/06/world-cup-2018-russia-politics-a-to-z/

    P is for Putin, the presiding deity, malign and self-satisfied. He wanted the cup for Russia, and he made sure FIFA gave it to him. What better way to whitewash your reputation as an autocrat than by throwing your doors open to the world for a month of vodka and football. Russia, and Russians, will be on their best behavior. We have seen it reported that train and bus conductors in all the host cities are being taught how to smile.
     
    Clearly, tv shows instructing his minions(all Russians, apparently) on how to appear civilized to the Western world are being broadcast right now.

    It calls itself Die Mannschaft (or “the Team”), with Turkish and African players alongside a solid Germanic core. Yet non-Germans remain unprepared to give them love.

    How is such racism allowed to be published?

  61. @Duke of Qin
    That's optimistic considering Trump actually lost the popular vote by 2% to Clinton of all people, the platonic essence of the shrill hectoring school marm no on likes. It was only thanks to the weird electoral College situation that Trump became president. Unfortunately that same system is going to come back and bite the Republicans in the ass once the Democrats flip Texas via demographic change and then you are looking forward to eternal lefty rule of the US executive branch.

    Provided the economy stays in good shape Trump will improve his results in 2020, as he has now been “normalized”.

    We can stop the Democrats from getting a lock on the executive branch by increasing our share of the white vote and/or suppressing Democrat voting blocs.

    Time is of course running out.

  62. @Mr. Hack
    For some reason, I thought that you still lived in the area?...Do you think that Trump Jr. was correct in his assessment?

    I think he was.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    I wonder, although I don't think that he was 'Putin's man' by any means, he still seems to exhibit an inordinate love affair with Russia, and seems willing to overlook a lot. Whatever his true relations with Russia were, they haven't seemed to help his cause to this point?...
  63. @Duke of Qin
    That's optimistic considering Trump actually lost the popular vote by 2% to Clinton of all people, the platonic essence of the shrill hectoring school marm no on likes. It was only thanks to the weird electoral College situation that Trump became president. Unfortunately that same system is going to come back and bite the Republicans in the ass once the Democrats flip Texas via demographic change and then you are looking forward to eternal lefty rule of the US executive branch.

    Democrats may run up the score in California thanks to the immigration policy, but that won’t matter. Gettting more of the black vote will strengthen Trump in the Rust Belt. If the Democrats run Biden they have a chance, but if they go Kamala they don’t.

    • Replies: @songbird
    I think the GOP may have exactly one more presidential election that is winnable. Beyond that... Though it is true they didn't do a lot of good in general when they won. Maybe there is hope for the Democrats to fracture into more than one party, but I wouldn't bet on it happening anytime soon.

    What is left? I don't know. I guess there is always hope of a technological revolution for freedom. But technology is kind of a double edged sword.
    , @LondonBob
    Trump will definitely flip Minnesota, and probably take NH in 2000. Suspect more blacks won't vote rather than actually voting for Trump.
  64. @AP
    Democrats may run up the score in California thanks to the immigration policy, but that won't matter. Gettting more of the black vote will strengthen Trump in the Rust Belt. If the Democrats run Biden they have a chance, but if they go Kamala they don't.

    I think the GOP may have exactly one more presidential election that is winnable. Beyond that… Though it is true they didn’t do a lot of good in general when they won. Maybe there is hope for the Democrats to fracture into more than one party, but I wouldn’t bet on it happening anytime soon.

    What is left? I don’t know. I guess there is always hope of a technological revolution for freedom. But technology is kind of a double edged sword.

  65. Tesla Update

    Polish Perspective is looking good now, as Tesla shares have climbed to $355. Not too far from its 52 week high of $389.

    My thesis remains unchanged, and I am now short. I have not suffered a margin call yet.

    Also credit due to Musk’s shill Ross Gerber, who agreed to appear on Quoth the Raven Research’s podcast.

    Meanwhile Exxon Mobil refuses to come unglued from its stubborn 80ish position despite a good oil price and surging production (company is about to hit 4 million barrels per day–that’s double Norway’s output).

    Many consumer staples are a great buy at the moment. Get long Coca Cola, Procter & Gamble, General Mills, Hormel, Kimberly Clark, Clorox, and Unilever. Take a pass on Pepsi and Colgate Palmolive.

    I am also coming to the point of view that traditional automakers may be systematically undervalued. The case for their low earnings multiples is that the auto business is cyclical. But I do not believe repeats of the last two recessions will occur. These were artifacts of deepening globalization and “neoliberalism”. The “system” is now complete and thus future recessions will be “normal”.

    Bank stocks are definitely undervalued for the same reason. They’re all cheap other than Deutsche Bank which you couldn’t pay me to own. Deutsche Bank is an absolute disgrace.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    Tell me more about Bank stocks and perhaps Financial Services ones too. I've been told this is a good place to invest right now, don't know for how long?...
    , @reiner Tor
    There's the news of the many Model 3 cancellations.

    But as I wrote in the other thread, an acquaintance in NYC just got his Model 3 delivered to him, and he's totally happy with it, posting it on FB (which he rarely does about anything else), etc.
  66. Russian MOD claims the US and Syrian militants are preparing for a false flag gas attack provocation to prepare for further military strikes on Syria.

    http://tass.com/defense/1009105

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    While the strikes are certainly aggressive, it doesn't seem like the previous ones have really affected the progress of the recapturing of land, so it appears to be more an expression of hostile intent.
  67. @Polish Perspective
    I am far from an expert on China, as can be revealed by my name, but I did find this talk quite illuminating some years ago when I first stumbled upon it. It kindled my interest in China and made me deepen it by reading. I still don't understand much of China, which is why it is a fascinating place.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gte5UmAxyiE

    She has an interesting perspective. On the one hand she mocks the excessive obsession of 'eurocentrism' in many Western universities but at the same time, she criticises what she perceives as the stilted view of many Chinese historians who prefer a "continuous civilisation" narrative. She spends much of her talk vigorously questioning the latter Chinese narrative without trying to fall into a post-nationalist trap that about 'imagined communities' and similar tripe which is very much in fashion in Western humanities these days.

    The video is long, but I think you'd find it illuminating. The maps help drive her point home, but you could also just download the video and convert it and listen to it on your commute. It's a good primer, though obviously far from sufficient when it comes to China's identity and history and outgrowth as a nation.

    I only watched part of it, but much of it is nonsense. Keep in mind that the woman is a leftist quisling out to deconstruct Chinese historiography.

    The reason why Chinese historians prefer a continuous civilization narrative is that all previous Chinese historians had hewed the same line. The orthodox cannon 24 histories covers 2000 years of imperial state building. China has perhaps too much history and it’s written legacy of statecraft is thick and overflowing with historical allusions to past dynastic rulers. Her argument that China was never unified using some retarded maximal Qing borders is akin to arguing the US didn’t exist as a unified polity prior to the mid 20th century because Hawaii and Alaska weren’t yet states.

    Political interregnums where multiple competing states existed simultaneously has been the undesired exception since the Qin defeated all the other ducal heirs of Zhou. Chinese states do not recognize the political legitimacy of other Chinese states, period. Like in Highlander, in the end there can be only one. This is the reason why Taiwan must be crushed and brought to heel.

    • Replies: @Anon
    You could've just said it's a woman, ignore video.
  68. Anonymous[620] • Disclaimer says:
    @Vishnugupta
    Sukhoi Superjet is comparable to Embraer not Airbus A320/Boeing 737 which are bigger planes and would be comparable to the upcoming MC 21.

    The interiors are the choice of the airline so can't blame Sukhoi for that.

    The vibration/creaking noise well as a thumb rule the larger the plane the less likely it will be tossed around while in flight due to inertia So 747 will be more comfortable than 737 which will be better than an Embraer.I think it is as quiet as the Embraer E series jets which is in the same class size wise.

    The one serious mistake Sukhoi made was going for French Engines SaM 146 instead of US/UK Ones.

    Jet engines is one area of manufacturing where the Anglos reign supreme(GE,PW,RR).

    Russia has not made the same mistake with the MC 21 whose international version will have Pratt and Whitney GTF engines.These is an indigenous engine option as well PD 14 but that will not be competitive internationally vis a vis fuel efficiency

    Why is it that only Anglos seem to be able to make good jet engines? I know there are other manufacturers based on joint ventures between Anglos and either France or (Japan and Germany).

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Because Germany lost the war, and Russia suffered under communism. Operation Paperclip then conveniently relocated most of Germany's jet engine engineers to the United States. Hans von Ohain went on to run the US Air Force Research Laboratory.

    Safran makes reasonably competitive military jet engines.

    German and French industry are also effectively integrated into the Anglo jet engine supply chains.
    Rolls-Royce Deutschland, CFM International, and International Aero Engines.

    Jet engine design and manufacturing industrial bases also exist in Sweden (Volvo Flygmotor, which planned a clean sheet design for the Gripen NG which was rejected for budgetary reasons) and Japan (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries).

    The Kawasaki P-1 maritime patrol bomber has indigenously developed and produced high bypass turbofan engines. I would not be surprised if these were developed with an eye to cracking the civilian market in the future. Perhaps in the next decade we'll see IHI engines on the Mitsubishi Regional Jet?

    IHI is also developing a low-bypass afterburning turbofan for the Mitsubishi X-2 Shinden stealth fighter.

    Japan's industrial strategy has been to merge its aerospace industry with Boeing (787 is as much a Japanese aircraft as an American one) and United Technologies, but I suppose they're hedging their bets.

    It seems like Russia and China are in the process of merging their aerospace industries, which means they'll no doubt develop competitive engines sooner or later.

    , @LondonBob
    Inteligence leading to engineering excellence. Watched a programme on Rolls Royce, impressive stuff, real value added manufacturing.

    EM FX hammered as the USD surges, Russia unaffected, Russian equities still so cheap. When gold cracks 1400 we should see fireworks, I wonder what will drive it?
  69. @Thorfinnsson
    Tesla Update

    Polish Perspective is looking good now, as Tesla shares have climbed to $355. Not too far from its 52 week high of $389.

    My thesis remains unchanged, and I am now short. I have not suffered a margin call yet.

    Also credit due to Musk's shill Ross Gerber, who agreed to appear on Quoth the Raven Research's podcast.

    Meanwhile Exxon Mobil refuses to come unglued from its stubborn 80ish position despite a good oil price and surging production (company is about to hit 4 million barrels per day--that's double Norway's output).

    Many consumer staples are a great buy at the moment. Get long Coca Cola, Procter & Gamble, General Mills, Hormel, Kimberly Clark, Clorox, and Unilever. Take a pass on Pepsi and Colgate Palmolive.

    I am also coming to the point of view that traditional automakers may be systematically undervalued. The case for their low earnings multiples is that the auto business is cyclical. But I do not believe repeats of the last two recessions will occur. These were artifacts of deepening globalization and "neoliberalism". The "system" is now complete and thus future recessions will be "normal".

    Bank stocks are definitely undervalued for the same reason. They're all cheap other than Deutsche Bank which you couldn't pay me to own. Deutsche Bank is an absolute disgrace.

    Tell me more about Bank stocks and perhaps Financial Services ones too. I’ve been told this is a good place to invest right now, don’t know for how long?…

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    We're late in the economic cycle right now, so the best sector is consumer staples as these are defensive stocks. People still need toilet paper and toothpaste during recessions.

    Best bank bar none is JP Morgan Chase. I feel comfortable owning that as long as Jamie Dimon remains captain of that ship. As a Chase credit card customer I am impressed with their technology. So does Warren Buffet, who owns over 50 million shares in his personal account. Berkshire Hathaway also owns shares in Wells Fargo (good bet once the government stops fucking with them), US Bancorp, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, and BNY Mellon.

    Banks are attractive businesses for the simple reason that they receive money upfront and only have to pay out later. The time to stay out of banks is when they're obviously lending money to extremely dubious enterprises as in the naughties.

    As for financial services, I like AFLAC and Berkshire Hathaway itself (a conglomerate, but one of the world's largest insurers). VISA and American Express are great companies, but their current stock prices are not attractive.

    AFLAC has increased dividends every year in a row for 35 years. It's also the only insurer that has a truly strong brand, thanks to their loveable duck. Interestingly AFLAC gets about three quarters of its business from Japan, and the AFLAC duck is a beloved mascot in Japan.

    The Japanese AFLAC duck however has a very polite voice, sometimes wears a cape, and hangs out with a white cat. Gilbert Gottfriend was the original voice of the American AFLAC duck. He Tweeted out some tasteless tsunami jokes in 2011, and as a result was immediately fired by AFLAC.

    Bank stocks aren't something you should consider a permanent part of your portfolio owing to the habit banks have of blowing themselves up once a generation. AFLAC and Berkshire Hathaway are the sort of stocks you can sit on for fifty years.

    Of course you don't need to actively invest either. Most people should simply automatically fund a target date retirement fund (Vanguard) or a robo-advisor account (Charles Schwab, Wealthfront, or Betterment).
    , @Daniel Chieh
    You should invest everything in Ukraine.
  70. @AP
    I think he was.

    I wonder, although I don’t think that he was ‘Putin’s man’ by any means, he still seems to exhibit an inordinate love affair with Russia, and seems willing to overlook a lot. Whatever his true relations with Russia were, they haven’t seemed to help his cause to this point?…

  71. @AP
    Democrats may run up the score in California thanks to the immigration policy, but that won't matter. Gettting more of the black vote will strengthen Trump in the Rust Belt. If the Democrats run Biden they have a chance, but if they go Kamala they don't.

    Trump will definitely flip Minnesota, and probably take NH in 2000. Suspect more blacks won’t vote rather than actually voting for Trump.

  72. @Anonymous
    Why is it that only Anglos seem to be able to make good jet engines? I know there are other manufacturers based on joint ventures between Anglos and either France or (Japan and Germany).

    Because Germany lost the war, and Russia suffered under communism. Operation Paperclip then conveniently relocated most of Germany’s jet engine engineers to the United States. Hans von Ohain went on to run the US Air Force Research Laboratory.

    Safran makes reasonably competitive military jet engines.

    German and French industry are also effectively integrated into the Anglo jet engine supply chains.
    Rolls-Royce Deutschland, CFM International, and International Aero Engines.

    Jet engine design and manufacturing industrial bases also exist in Sweden (Volvo Flygmotor, which planned a clean sheet design for the Gripen NG which was rejected for budgetary reasons) and Japan (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries).

    The Kawasaki P-1 maritime patrol bomber has indigenously developed and produced high bypass turbofan engines. I would not be surprised if these were developed with an eye to cracking the civilian market in the future. Perhaps in the next decade we’ll see IHI engines on the Mitsubishi Regional Jet?

    IHI is also developing a low-bypass afterburning turbofan for the Mitsubishi X-2 Shinden stealth fighter.

    Japan’s industrial strategy has been to merge its aerospace industry with Boeing (787 is as much a Japanese aircraft as an American one) and United Technologies, but I suppose they’re hedging their bets.

    It seems like Russia and China are in the process of merging their aerospace industries, which means they’ll no doubt develop competitive engines sooner or later.

    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
  73. @Anonymous
    Why is it that only Anglos seem to be able to make good jet engines? I know there are other manufacturers based on joint ventures between Anglos and either France or (Japan and Germany).

    Inteligence leading to engineering excellence. Watched a programme on Rolls Royce, impressive stuff, real value added manufacturing.

    EM FX hammered as the USD surges, Russia unaffected, Russian equities still so cheap. When gold cracks 1400 we should see fireworks, I wonder what will drive it?

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Russian equities are indeed dirt cheap, and the Rouble is also low. Double bargain.

    Downside is the RTS is dominated by dubious Kremlin-controlled enterprises operated mainly for the benefit of the corrupt apparatchiks surrounding Vladimir Putin, and actual entrepreneurial companies run by professional managers themselves become targets for acquisitive Kremlin-controlled enterprises.

    Great recent example being Magnit.

    Portuguese equities are also cheap. But I don't know anything about Portugal.
  74. @Mr. Hack
    Tell me more about Bank stocks and perhaps Financial Services ones too. I've been told this is a good place to invest right now, don't know for how long?...

    We’re late in the economic cycle right now, so the best sector is consumer staples as these are defensive stocks. People still need toilet paper and toothpaste during recessions.

    Best bank bar none is JP Morgan Chase. I feel comfortable owning that as long as Jamie Dimon remains captain of that ship. As a Chase credit card customer I am impressed with their technology. So does Warren Buffet, who owns over 50 million shares in his personal account. Berkshire Hathaway also owns shares in Wells Fargo (good bet once the government stops fucking with them), US Bancorp, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, and BNY Mellon.

    Banks are attractive businesses for the simple reason that they receive money upfront and only have to pay out later. The time to stay out of banks is when they’re obviously lending money to extremely dubious enterprises as in the naughties.

    As for financial services, I like AFLAC and Berkshire Hathaway itself (a conglomerate, but one of the world’s largest insurers). VISA and American Express are great companies, but their current stock prices are not attractive.

    AFLAC has increased dividends every year in a row for 35 years. It’s also the only insurer that has a truly strong brand, thanks to their loveable duck. Interestingly AFLAC gets about three quarters of its business from Japan, and the AFLAC duck is a beloved mascot in Japan.

    The Japanese AFLAC duck however has a very polite voice, sometimes wears a cape, and hangs out with a white cat. Gilbert Gottfriend was the original voice of the American AFLAC duck. He Tweeted out some tasteless tsunami jokes in 2011, and as a result was immediately fired by AFLAC.

    Bank stocks aren’t something you should consider a permanent part of your portfolio owing to the habit banks have of blowing themselves up once a generation. AFLAC and Berkshire Hathaway are the sort of stocks you can sit on for fifty years.

    Of course you don’t need to actively invest either. Most people should simply automatically fund a target date retirement fund (Vanguard) or a robo-advisor account (Charles Schwab, Wealthfront, or Betterment).

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    Thanks for the update. You seem like a smart 'money guy', I bet that you work in the industry?...I'm a 'marketing' guy within the industry, doing a lot of paper pushing. I'm seriously considering sitting for the Series 65, though...
    , @LondonBob
    Impressively large segments of the European banking system are still a mess. Exposure to Argentina, Brazil, Turkey etc. is something to watch out for.
  75. @LondonBob
    Inteligence leading to engineering excellence. Watched a programme on Rolls Royce, impressive stuff, real value added manufacturing.

    EM FX hammered as the USD surges, Russia unaffected, Russian equities still so cheap. When gold cracks 1400 we should see fireworks, I wonder what will drive it?

    Russian equities are indeed dirt cheap, and the Rouble is also low. Double bargain.

    Downside is the RTS is dominated by dubious Kremlin-controlled enterprises operated mainly for the benefit of the corrupt apparatchiks surrounding Vladimir Putin, and actual entrepreneurial companies run by professional managers themselves become targets for acquisitive Kremlin-controlled enterprises.

    Great recent example being Magnit.

    Portuguese equities are also cheap. But I don’t know anything about Portugal.

  76. @Mr. Hack
    Tell me more about Bank stocks and perhaps Financial Services ones too. I've been told this is a good place to invest right now, don't know for how long?...

    You should invest everything in Ukraine.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    If the Rada ever repeals the idiotic law banning Ukrainians from selling land (seriously, this is the law in the Ukraine) then Ukrainian farmland would be a good investment if you can tolerate the geopolitical risk. No need to be a farmer either, just lease it out.

    In fact I could see the Ukraine in general as having many investment opportunities simply owing to how underdeveloped the country is relative to its human capital.
    , @Mr. Hack
    What more than my soul can I invest?? :-)

    How about you, any shares in Peking Duck (one of my favorites!)?
  77. @Daniel Chieh
    You should invest everything in Ukraine.

    If the Rada ever repeals the idiotic law banning Ukrainians from selling land (seriously, this is the law in the Ukraine) then Ukrainian farmland would be a good investment if you can tolerate the geopolitical risk. No need to be a farmer either, just lease it out.

    In fact I could see the Ukraine in general as having many investment opportunities simply owing to how underdeveloped the country is relative to its human capital.

  78. @Thorfinnsson
    We're late in the economic cycle right now, so the best sector is consumer staples as these are defensive stocks. People still need toilet paper and toothpaste during recessions.

    Best bank bar none is JP Morgan Chase. I feel comfortable owning that as long as Jamie Dimon remains captain of that ship. As a Chase credit card customer I am impressed with their technology. So does Warren Buffet, who owns over 50 million shares in his personal account. Berkshire Hathaway also owns shares in Wells Fargo (good bet once the government stops fucking with them), US Bancorp, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, and BNY Mellon.

    Banks are attractive businesses for the simple reason that they receive money upfront and only have to pay out later. The time to stay out of banks is when they're obviously lending money to extremely dubious enterprises as in the naughties.

    As for financial services, I like AFLAC and Berkshire Hathaway itself (a conglomerate, but one of the world's largest insurers). VISA and American Express are great companies, but their current stock prices are not attractive.

    AFLAC has increased dividends every year in a row for 35 years. It's also the only insurer that has a truly strong brand, thanks to their loveable duck. Interestingly AFLAC gets about three quarters of its business from Japan, and the AFLAC duck is a beloved mascot in Japan.

    The Japanese AFLAC duck however has a very polite voice, sometimes wears a cape, and hangs out with a white cat. Gilbert Gottfriend was the original voice of the American AFLAC duck. He Tweeted out some tasteless tsunami jokes in 2011, and as a result was immediately fired by AFLAC.

    Bank stocks aren't something you should consider a permanent part of your portfolio owing to the habit banks have of blowing themselves up once a generation. AFLAC and Berkshire Hathaway are the sort of stocks you can sit on for fifty years.

    Of course you don't need to actively invest either. Most people should simply automatically fund a target date retirement fund (Vanguard) or a robo-advisor account (Charles Schwab, Wealthfront, or Betterment).

    Thanks for the update. You seem like a smart ‘money guy’, I bet that you work in the industry?…I’m a ‘marketing’ guy within the industry, doing a lot of paper pushing. I’m seriously considering sitting for the Series 65, though…

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I'm in manufacturing, but I've been very interested in finance for many years.

    I do have a Series 65, which I did to comply with the (now repealed) Fiduciary Rule for 401(k) plans without paying for a completely unnecessary investment advisor (20 basis points).

    It's somewhat useful in that it allows me to dispense financial advice to my employees as a fringe benefit. Since they're rural proles they are completely unable to get decent financial advice on their own, so this benefit helps retain talent. I was able to advise a girl on how to obtain a subsidized USDA Rural mortgage for instance so that she did not need to make a down payment.

    I have a talent retention strategy for proles I call the Web of Benefits. It consists of offering so many different benefits that the employee begins to see it as impossible to separate himself from the company, because doing so would result in the loss of so many benefits as to be unthinkable. I devised this strategy after learning, to my surprise, that proles care more about health insurance than wages (beyond a certain level) and are unable to calculate the financial value of benefits.

    Currently we offer silver health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, a 401(k) plan (4% match), and a 10% discount at a local sporting goods store.

    I intend to add life insurance, accident insurance, cancer insurance, hospital insurance, critical illness insurance, short-term disability insurance, broadband internet, and Verizon cellular service.

    Then if you quit, not only do you lose tons of insurance, but you also lose your internet and cellular service. No one will ever quit again. :)
  79. @Daniel Chieh
    You should invest everything in Ukraine.

    What more than my soul can I invest?? 🙂

    How about you, any shares in Peking Duck (one of my favorites!)?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Much of it is still stuck in crypto, to be honest, which I've been relatively fortunate for developing an early interest in. Still trying to make a call going forward, though.
  80. Congratulations on being rated a top IQ expert, AK!

    You should do a few more posts on IQ.

  81. @Mr. Hack
    What more than my soul can I invest?? :-)

    How about you, any shares in Peking Duck (one of my favorites!)?

    Much of it is still stuck in crypto, to be honest, which I’ve been relatively fortunate for developing an early interest in. Still trying to make a call going forward, though.

  82. @Mr. Hack
    Thanks for the update. You seem like a smart 'money guy', I bet that you work in the industry?...I'm a 'marketing' guy within the industry, doing a lot of paper pushing. I'm seriously considering sitting for the Series 65, though...

    I’m in manufacturing, but I’ve been very interested in finance for many years.

    I do have a Series 65, which I did to comply with the (now repealed) Fiduciary Rule for 401(k) plans without paying for a completely unnecessary investment advisor (20 basis points).

    It’s somewhat useful in that it allows me to dispense financial advice to my employees as a fringe benefit. Since they’re rural proles they are completely unable to get decent financial advice on their own, so this benefit helps retain talent. I was able to advise a girl on how to obtain a subsidized USDA Rural mortgage for instance so that she did not need to make a down payment.

    I have a talent retention strategy for proles I call the Web of Benefits. It consists of offering so many different benefits that the employee begins to see it as impossible to separate himself from the company, because doing so would result in the loss of so many benefits as to be unthinkable. I devised this strategy after learning, to my surprise, that proles care more about health insurance than wages (beyond a certain level) and are unable to calculate the financial value of benefits.

    Currently we offer silver health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, a 401(k) plan (4% match), and a 10% discount at a local sporting goods store.

    I intend to add life insurance, accident insurance, cancer insurance, hospital insurance, critical illness insurance, short-term disability insurance, broadband internet, and Verizon cellular service.

    Then if you quit, not only do you lose tons of insurance, but you also lose your internet and cellular service. No one will ever quit again. 🙂

    • Replies: @iffen
    No one will ever quit again.

    St Peter don't you call me I cause can't go:
    I owe my soul to the company store.

    Sixteen Tons – Frankie Lane

     

    , @Mr. Hack
    Wow, with such generous benefits I'm sure that you'll manage to keep them glued to their workstations with these 'golden handcuffs'. Obviously, you have a very unique and talented bunch of workers that you want to keep around, otherwise how can your company afford to pay these exorbitant benefits?
  83. @Thorfinnsson
    I'm in manufacturing, but I've been very interested in finance for many years.

    I do have a Series 65, which I did to comply with the (now repealed) Fiduciary Rule for 401(k) plans without paying for a completely unnecessary investment advisor (20 basis points).

    It's somewhat useful in that it allows me to dispense financial advice to my employees as a fringe benefit. Since they're rural proles they are completely unable to get decent financial advice on their own, so this benefit helps retain talent. I was able to advise a girl on how to obtain a subsidized USDA Rural mortgage for instance so that she did not need to make a down payment.

    I have a talent retention strategy for proles I call the Web of Benefits. It consists of offering so many different benefits that the employee begins to see it as impossible to separate himself from the company, because doing so would result in the loss of so many benefits as to be unthinkable. I devised this strategy after learning, to my surprise, that proles care more about health insurance than wages (beyond a certain level) and are unable to calculate the financial value of benefits.

    Currently we offer silver health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, a 401(k) plan (4% match), and a 10% discount at a local sporting goods store.

    I intend to add life insurance, accident insurance, cancer insurance, hospital insurance, critical illness insurance, short-term disability insurance, broadband internet, and Verizon cellular service.

    Then if you quit, not only do you lose tons of insurance, but you also lose your internet and cellular service. No one will ever quit again. :)

    No one will ever quit again.

    St Peter don’t you call me I cause can’t go:
    I owe my soul to the company store.

    Sixteen Tons – Frankie Lane

    • Replies: @Sparkon

    Sixteen Tons – Frankie Lane
     
    Eh?

    "Sixteen Tons" is a song written by Merle Travis...A 1955 version recorded by Tennessee Ernie Ford reached number one in the Billboard charts, while another version by Frankie Laine was released only in Western Europe, where it gave Ford's version competition.

    --Wiki
     

    I doubt anyone in the U.S. ever heard (of) Frankie Laine's version.
  84. This JRL promoted piece has the standard leftist BS about the Russian Revolution:

    https://www.jacobinmag.com/2018/06/richard-pipes-cold-war-russian-revolution

    Unlike some other matters, Pipes’ isn’t wrong in noting that the image of a foreign intervention on the side of the Russian Civil War era Whites is bloated from reality. The author of the above piece hypes White atrocities with inaccurate generalizations, while suggestively downplaying Red violence.

    • Replies: @DFH

    The author of the above piece hypes White atrocities with inaccurate generalizations
     
    But the Whites were 'vile anti-semites'!!!!!!!!
    , @Mr. Hack
    Look at the bright side, Mickey, at least he didn't take any pot shots at Skoropadsky! :-)
  85. @Thorfinnsson
    I'm in manufacturing, but I've been very interested in finance for many years.

    I do have a Series 65, which I did to comply with the (now repealed) Fiduciary Rule for 401(k) plans without paying for a completely unnecessary investment advisor (20 basis points).

    It's somewhat useful in that it allows me to dispense financial advice to my employees as a fringe benefit. Since they're rural proles they are completely unable to get decent financial advice on their own, so this benefit helps retain talent. I was able to advise a girl on how to obtain a subsidized USDA Rural mortgage for instance so that she did not need to make a down payment.

    I have a talent retention strategy for proles I call the Web of Benefits. It consists of offering so many different benefits that the employee begins to see it as impossible to separate himself from the company, because doing so would result in the loss of so many benefits as to be unthinkable. I devised this strategy after learning, to my surprise, that proles care more about health insurance than wages (beyond a certain level) and are unable to calculate the financial value of benefits.

    Currently we offer silver health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, a 401(k) plan (4% match), and a 10% discount at a local sporting goods store.

    I intend to add life insurance, accident insurance, cancer insurance, hospital insurance, critical illness insurance, short-term disability insurance, broadband internet, and Verizon cellular service.

    Then if you quit, not only do you lose tons of insurance, but you also lose your internet and cellular service. No one will ever quit again. :)

    Wow, with such generous benefits I’m sure that you’ll manage to keep them glued to their workstations with these ‘golden handcuffs’. Obviously, you have a very unique and talented bunch of workers that you want to keep around, otherwise how can your company afford to pay these exorbitant benefits?

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    The deal is that other than major medical insurance the benefits are not that expensive. That said we have margins around 20%, and I think I can get us to 25%. Yearly top line growth is around 20%, something I'd like to accelerate.

    Most workers, especially proles, irrationally overvalue their benefits.

    Or you could consider it rational given the labor involved in providing such things for yourself, and the fact that most Americans prefer not to save much money owing to well-developed credit systems in America. So benefits provide a safety net and frees them to spend their money on things they prefer like housing, entertainment, cars, and so forth.

    If we go with the rational thesis the Web of Benefits is a mutually beneficial arrangement in which their labor and loyalty are bartered for my brain and administrative talents.

    Some employees I'm not too pleased with, but yes many are excellent. We have one girl in particular who testified against her own sister (to be clear her sister was in the wrong) in an administrative law hearing regarding unemployment insurance. Despite having a terminally ill toddler she still gives us 50-60 hours a week.

    Beyond her ordinary wages and benefit I did her the favor of arranging a new, well-compensated job for her husband at a company my friend runs. I plan on developing her into an executive, which is kind of amusing to me since she's both prole and female. But whatever. Talent is talent.

    We have a strategy of offering the best blue collar wages and benefits in town so we have our pick of talent and little to no turnover.

    Professional talent is difficult for us to recruit since we're in the middle of nowhere, so I effectively have three or four jobs. Fortunately we did manage to recruit one of the best engineers in our field in the entire country, but he refuses to live here.

    I've also found that for positions which don't require creativity or strength that women are generally better employees since they love following orders and love drudgery, and they are much less likely to demand promotions or pay increases. Single moms are particularly good since they have no other options. That said one issue with female employees is they always need time off to deal with their families.
  86. @Mikhail
    This JRL promoted piece has the standard leftist BS about the Russian Revolution:

    https://www.jacobinmag.com/2018/06/richard-pipes-cold-war-russian-revolution

    Unlike some other matters, Pipes' isn't wrong in noting that the image of a foreign intervention on the side of the Russian Civil War era Whites is bloated from reality. The author of the above piece hypes White atrocities with inaccurate generalizations, while suggestively downplaying Red violence.

    The author of the above piece hypes White atrocities with inaccurate generalizations

    But the Whites were ‘vile anti-semites’!!!!!!!!

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Bullshit. In exile, many of them (not all) had the opportunity to exhibit such - but didn't.

    Like there weren't anti-Jews among the Reds, Poles and Ukrainian separatists of that time period.
  87. @Mr. Hack
    Wow, with such generous benefits I'm sure that you'll manage to keep them glued to their workstations with these 'golden handcuffs'. Obviously, you have a very unique and talented bunch of workers that you want to keep around, otherwise how can your company afford to pay these exorbitant benefits?

    The deal is that other than major medical insurance the benefits are not that expensive. That said we have margins around 20%, and I think I can get us to 25%. Yearly top line growth is around 20%, something I’d like to accelerate.

    Most workers, especially proles, irrationally overvalue their benefits.

    Or you could consider it rational given the labor involved in providing such things for yourself, and the fact that most Americans prefer not to save much money owing to well-developed credit systems in America. So benefits provide a safety net and frees them to spend their money on things they prefer like housing, entertainment, cars, and so forth.

    If we go with the rational thesis the Web of Benefits is a mutually beneficial arrangement in which their labor and loyalty are bartered for my brain and administrative talents.

    Some employees I’m not too pleased with, but yes many are excellent. We have one girl in particular who testified against her own sister (to be clear her sister was in the wrong) in an administrative law hearing regarding unemployment insurance. Despite having a terminally ill toddler she still gives us 50-60 hours a week.

    Beyond her ordinary wages and benefit I did her the favor of arranging a new, well-compensated job for her husband at a company my friend runs. I plan on developing her into an executive, which is kind of amusing to me since she’s both prole and female. But whatever. Talent is talent.

    We have a strategy of offering the best blue collar wages and benefits in town so we have our pick of talent and little to no turnover.

    Professional talent is difficult for us to recruit since we’re in the middle of nowhere, so I effectively have three or four jobs. Fortunately we did manage to recruit one of the best engineers in our field in the entire country, but he refuses to live here.

    I’ve also found that for positions which don’t require creativity or strength that women are generally better employees since they love following orders and love drudgery, and they are much less likely to demand promotions or pay increases. Single moms are particularly good since they have no other options. That said one issue with female employees is they always need time off to deal with their families.

    • Replies: @Guillaume Tell

    Despite having a terminally ill toddler she still gives us 50-60 hours a week.
     
    Why would a woman in her right mind do such a thing?

    Also I seem to remember that you wrote once that single mothers were a threat to civilization and should not be subsidized in any way. Why do you even have some in your staff then? This is a honest-to-God kind of question, no stealth criticism of yours implied — just asking.

    On a different note, I am wondering who AK is becoming so anti-anything-Russian, to the point of blaming Sukhoi for the absence of power outlets of which they are not responsible. It’s really strange.
    , @Anonymous
    Middle of nowhere upper midwest really doesn't sound like a fun place to live. Why not move operations to the south? How many employees do you have?
  88. @DFH

    The author of the above piece hypes White atrocities with inaccurate generalizations
     
    But the Whites were 'vile anti-semites'!!!!!!!!

    Bullshit. In exile, many of them (not all) had the opportunity to exhibit such – but didn’t.

    Like there weren’t anti-Jews among the Reds, Poles and Ukrainian separatists of that time period.

  89. @Mikhail
    This JRL promoted piece has the standard leftist BS about the Russian Revolution:

    https://www.jacobinmag.com/2018/06/richard-pipes-cold-war-russian-revolution

    Unlike some other matters, Pipes' isn't wrong in noting that the image of a foreign intervention on the side of the Russian Civil War era Whites is bloated from reality. The author of the above piece hypes White atrocities with inaccurate generalizations, while suggestively downplaying Red violence.

    Look at the bright side, Mickey, at least he didn’t take any pot shots at Skoropadsky! 🙂

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Skoro has a good record on that score.
  90. @Thorfinnsson
    The deal is that other than major medical insurance the benefits are not that expensive. That said we have margins around 20%, and I think I can get us to 25%. Yearly top line growth is around 20%, something I'd like to accelerate.

    Most workers, especially proles, irrationally overvalue their benefits.

    Or you could consider it rational given the labor involved in providing such things for yourself, and the fact that most Americans prefer not to save much money owing to well-developed credit systems in America. So benefits provide a safety net and frees them to spend their money on things they prefer like housing, entertainment, cars, and so forth.

    If we go with the rational thesis the Web of Benefits is a mutually beneficial arrangement in which their labor and loyalty are bartered for my brain and administrative talents.

    Some employees I'm not too pleased with, but yes many are excellent. We have one girl in particular who testified against her own sister (to be clear her sister was in the wrong) in an administrative law hearing regarding unemployment insurance. Despite having a terminally ill toddler she still gives us 50-60 hours a week.

    Beyond her ordinary wages and benefit I did her the favor of arranging a new, well-compensated job for her husband at a company my friend runs. I plan on developing her into an executive, which is kind of amusing to me since she's both prole and female. But whatever. Talent is talent.

    We have a strategy of offering the best blue collar wages and benefits in town so we have our pick of talent and little to no turnover.

    Professional talent is difficult for us to recruit since we're in the middle of nowhere, so I effectively have three or four jobs. Fortunately we did manage to recruit one of the best engineers in our field in the entire country, but he refuses to live here.

    I've also found that for positions which don't require creativity or strength that women are generally better employees since they love following orders and love drudgery, and they are much less likely to demand promotions or pay increases. Single moms are particularly good since they have no other options. That said one issue with female employees is they always need time off to deal with their families.

    Despite having a terminally ill toddler she still gives us 50-60 hours a week.

    Why would a woman in her right mind do such a thing?

    Also I seem to remember that you wrote once that single mothers were a threat to civilization and should not be subsidized in any way. Why do you even have some in your staff then? This is a honest-to-God kind of question, no stealth criticism of yours implied — just asking.

    On a different note, I am wondering who AK is becoming so anti-anything-Russian, to the point of blaming Sukhoi for the absence of power outlets of which they are not responsible. It’s really strange.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I can't speak to her personal motivations. I assume she likes working for me. She does also work hard to save her poor daughter.

    She is married and thus not a single mother, but in general I work within our system as it is and pursue my self interest. Isn't the whole point of government to reign that in?

    If she didn't already have kids, small tits, and brown eyes I would ask her to marry me.
  91. Every time I like a post on Twitter or follow somebody new, my account gets locked with the message that I have triggered some algorithm violating Twitter rules. Anybody know what that is all about?

  92. @Guillaume Tell

    Despite having a terminally ill toddler she still gives us 50-60 hours a week.
     
    Why would a woman in her right mind do such a thing?

    Also I seem to remember that you wrote once that single mothers were a threat to civilization and should not be subsidized in any way. Why do you even have some in your staff then? This is a honest-to-God kind of question, no stealth criticism of yours implied — just asking.

    On a different note, I am wondering who AK is becoming so anti-anything-Russian, to the point of blaming Sukhoi for the absence of power outlets of which they are not responsible. It’s really strange.

    I can’t speak to her personal motivations. I assume she likes working for me. She does also work hard to save her poor daughter.

    She is married and thus not a single mother, but in general I work within our system as it is and pursue my self interest. Isn’t the whole point of government to reign that in?

    If she didn’t already have kids, small tits, and brown eyes I would ask her to marry me.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    '

    'Anything over a handful is a waste'
     
    :-)
    , @for-the-record
    If she didn’t already have kids, small tits, and brown eyes I would ask her to marry me.

    Obviously the husband is no problem . . .
    , @Guillaume Tell

    If she didn’t already have kids, small tits, and brown eyes I would ask her to marry me.
     
    I hope that at least her BMI is not over 25. This seems to be a rarity nowadays in the United States.
  93. @Thorfinnsson
    I can't speak to her personal motivations. I assume she likes working for me. She does also work hard to save her poor daughter.

    She is married and thus not a single mother, but in general I work within our system as it is and pursue my self interest. Isn't the whole point of government to reign that in?

    If she didn't already have kids, small tits, and brown eyes I would ask her to marry me.

    ‘Anything over a handful is a waste’

    🙂

  94. Taleb:

    “We wuz fo’neeshunzzz…”

    Peace.

    • Agree: Greasy William
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    He's Greek Orthodox, likely to a large portion descended from the original Greeks. (They didn't convert many locals before the Islamic conquest, and it's not quite likely that they converted many afterwards.)

    But he says that Lebanese Arabs (especially the non-Muslims, and probably among Muslims the Shia) are mostly descendants of Phoenicians, i.e. they are Arabized Phoenicians. That's quite a bit more plausible than the African Beethoven and similar stories. Actually, there are genetic studies which seem to confirm that.
  95. @reiner Tor
    Russian MOD claims the US and Syrian militants are preparing for a false flag gas attack provocation to prepare for further military strikes on Syria.

    http://tass.com/defense/1009105

    While the strikes are certainly aggressive, it doesn’t seem like the previous ones have really affected the progress of the recapturing of land, so it appears to be more an expression of hostile intent.

  96. @Mr. Hack
    Look at the bright side, Mickey, at least he didn't take any pot shots at Skoropadsky! :-)

    Skoro has a good record on that score.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    'Skoros' is the man and you're the one to resurrect his star. The only problem is, is that his grandson is a major league svido and presents his grandfather's ideas almost totally diametrically than what you do. He thinks that Ukraine should not be joined to the hip to Russia like Siamese twins, and other such blasphemies. He would be an ideal candidate to get things moving again, unless, of course you have similar ambitions? Perhaps its time that you get off the barstool and put away the suds and fly out to Canada and meet the guy? Don't you think that somebody as important as you, Mickey, needs to make his mark in history beyond just being a negligible commenter to other people's websites? People might get the wrong impression and think of your as some sort of a 'hack' and not a real mover and shaker?

    Mickey, wake up and do something with your life, before it' too late!

    https://day.kyiv.ua/en/article/day-after-day/skoropadsky-successor-returns-ukraine
  97. Is Euro media talking about these camps for beaner children that Trump is building? It’s huge news in America.

  98. @Talha
    Taleb:

    “We wuz fo’neeshunzzz...”

    Peace.

    He’s Greek Orthodox, likely to a large portion descended from the original Greeks. (They didn’t convert many locals before the Islamic conquest, and it’s not quite likely that they converted many afterwards.)

    But he says that Lebanese Arabs (especially the non-Muslims, and probably among Muslims the Shia) are mostly descendants of Phoenicians, i.e. they are Arabized Phoenicians. That’s quite a bit more plausible than the African Beethoven and similar stories. Actually, there are genetic studies which seem to confirm that.

    • Replies: @Talha
    Yeah, I’ve seen the genetic studies that show a demarcation between Muslims and non-Muslims of the area. Makes sense, since intermarriage is highly discouraged and only goes one way (Muslim men can marry their females - People of the Book - and not vice versa).

    Melkites (a term that was used by some as a pejorative to connote “king’s men”) were seen as occupiers by many native non-Chalcedonian Christians. A fact that made the Muslim conquests that much easier...oh and (as Prof. Robert Hoyland points out) the fact that Muslims could offer them a reduction in taxes. Something quite easy to do if you are a semi-nomadic, spartan-like desert people establishing garrison cities instead of a bloated bureaucratic empire.

    Peace.

    , @The Big Red Scary

    They didn’t convert many locals before the Islamic conquest, and it’s not quite likely that they converted many afterwards.
     
    Really? It might be availability bias, but I thought the whole Mediterranean was thoroughly Christianized before the Islamic conquest. Julian tried to Make Paganism Great Again in the middle of the 4th century, but Justinian pretty much killed it in the middle of the 6th century, no?
  99. @Thorfinnsson
    Tesla Update

    Polish Perspective is looking good now, as Tesla shares have climbed to $355. Not too far from its 52 week high of $389.

    My thesis remains unchanged, and I am now short. I have not suffered a margin call yet.

    Also credit due to Musk's shill Ross Gerber, who agreed to appear on Quoth the Raven Research's podcast.

    Meanwhile Exxon Mobil refuses to come unglued from its stubborn 80ish position despite a good oil price and surging production (company is about to hit 4 million barrels per day--that's double Norway's output).

    Many consumer staples are a great buy at the moment. Get long Coca Cola, Procter & Gamble, General Mills, Hormel, Kimberly Clark, Clorox, and Unilever. Take a pass on Pepsi and Colgate Palmolive.

    I am also coming to the point of view that traditional automakers may be systematically undervalued. The case for their low earnings multiples is that the auto business is cyclical. But I do not believe repeats of the last two recessions will occur. These were artifacts of deepening globalization and "neoliberalism". The "system" is now complete and thus future recessions will be "normal".

    Bank stocks are definitely undervalued for the same reason. They're all cheap other than Deutsche Bank which you couldn't pay me to own. Deutsche Bank is an absolute disgrace.

    There’s the news of the many Model 3 cancellations.

    But as I wrote in the other thread, an acquaintance in NYC just got his Model 3 delivered to him, and he’s totally happy with it, posting it on FB (which he rarely does about anything else), etc.

  100. @Thorfinnsson
    This earnest negress is convinced Trump will get a much larger share of the black vote in 2020: http://blackrepublican.blogspot.com/2018/06/yuge-5-reasons-trump-will-win-40-states.html

    Scott Adams tweeted out this link.

    I suspect she is correct and that Trump will get 15-20% of the black vote in 2020.

    highly unlikely.

  101. @reiner Tor
    He's Greek Orthodox, likely to a large portion descended from the original Greeks. (They didn't convert many locals before the Islamic conquest, and it's not quite likely that they converted many afterwards.)

    But he says that Lebanese Arabs (especially the non-Muslims, and probably among Muslims the Shia) are mostly descendants of Phoenicians, i.e. they are Arabized Phoenicians. That's quite a bit more plausible than the African Beethoven and similar stories. Actually, there are genetic studies which seem to confirm that.

    Yeah, I’ve seen the genetic studies that show a demarcation between Muslims and non-Muslims of the area. Makes sense, since intermarriage is highly discouraged and only goes one way (Muslim men can marry their females – People of the Book – and not vice versa).

    Melkites (a term that was used by some as a pejorative to connote “king’s men”) were seen as occupiers by many native non-Chalcedonian Christians. A fact that made the Muslim conquests that much easier…oh and (as Prof. Robert Hoyland points out) the fact that Muslims could offer them a reduction in taxes. Something quite easy to do if you are a semi-nomadic, spartan-like desert people establishing garrison cities instead of a bloated bureaucratic empire.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    I didn't say Greeks conducted smart policies before the conquest, just that Taleb doesn't say that he personally was descended from Phoenicians (he's a proud descendant of the Greeks), and that his theories generally make more sense than the pyramids built by blacks or Beethoven being black.
  102. @Talha
    Yeah, I’ve seen the genetic studies that show a demarcation between Muslims and non-Muslims of the area. Makes sense, since intermarriage is highly discouraged and only goes one way (Muslim men can marry their females - People of the Book - and not vice versa).

    Melkites (a term that was used by some as a pejorative to connote “king’s men”) were seen as occupiers by many native non-Chalcedonian Christians. A fact that made the Muslim conquests that much easier...oh and (as Prof. Robert Hoyland points out) the fact that Muslims could offer them a reduction in taxes. Something quite easy to do if you are a semi-nomadic, spartan-like desert people establishing garrison cities instead of a bloated bureaucratic empire.

    Peace.

    I didn’t say Greeks conducted smart policies before the conquest, just that Taleb doesn’t say that he personally was descended from Phoenicians (he’s a proud descendant of the Greeks), and that his theories generally make more sense than the pyramids built by blacks or Beethoven being black.

    • Replies: @Talha
    Yeah, I respect a lot of what Taleb has to say; I’ve referenced him before.

    I guess I misunderstood, I thought he was claiming Phoenician heritage.

    Peace.

  103. @reiner Tor
    I didn't say Greeks conducted smart policies before the conquest, just that Taleb doesn't say that he personally was descended from Phoenicians (he's a proud descendant of the Greeks), and that his theories generally make more sense than the pyramids built by blacks or Beethoven being black.

    Yeah, I respect a lot of what Taleb has to say; I’ve referenced him before.

    I guess I misunderstood, I thought he was claiming Phoenician heritage.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    I thought he was claiming Phoenician heritage.
     
    You made me a little doubt myself. I'll read into his exact position when I'll have time later. But I firmly believed that he was talking about other Lebanese, and that he thought that both Greeks and Phoenicians were part of the Levant.

    Interestingly he's quite opposed to the Saudi Arabian version of Islam, but has respect for certain forms of Islam, like Shia Islam. I can imagine he'd approve of your brand of Islam, too.
  104. @Thorfinnsson
    We're late in the economic cycle right now, so the best sector is consumer staples as these are defensive stocks. People still need toilet paper and toothpaste during recessions.

    Best bank bar none is JP Morgan Chase. I feel comfortable owning that as long as Jamie Dimon remains captain of that ship. As a Chase credit card customer I am impressed with their technology. So does Warren Buffet, who owns over 50 million shares in his personal account. Berkshire Hathaway also owns shares in Wells Fargo (good bet once the government stops fucking with them), US Bancorp, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, and BNY Mellon.

    Banks are attractive businesses for the simple reason that they receive money upfront and only have to pay out later. The time to stay out of banks is when they're obviously lending money to extremely dubious enterprises as in the naughties.

    As for financial services, I like AFLAC and Berkshire Hathaway itself (a conglomerate, but one of the world's largest insurers). VISA and American Express are great companies, but their current stock prices are not attractive.

    AFLAC has increased dividends every year in a row for 35 years. It's also the only insurer that has a truly strong brand, thanks to their loveable duck. Interestingly AFLAC gets about three quarters of its business from Japan, and the AFLAC duck is a beloved mascot in Japan.

    The Japanese AFLAC duck however has a very polite voice, sometimes wears a cape, and hangs out with a white cat. Gilbert Gottfriend was the original voice of the American AFLAC duck. He Tweeted out some tasteless tsunami jokes in 2011, and as a result was immediately fired by AFLAC.

    Bank stocks aren't something you should consider a permanent part of your portfolio owing to the habit banks have of blowing themselves up once a generation. AFLAC and Berkshire Hathaway are the sort of stocks you can sit on for fifty years.

    Of course you don't need to actively invest either. Most people should simply automatically fund a target date retirement fund (Vanguard) or a robo-advisor account (Charles Schwab, Wealthfront, or Betterment).

    Impressively large segments of the European banking system are still a mess. Exposure to Argentina, Brazil, Turkey etc. is something to watch out for.

  105. @Talha
    Yeah, I respect a lot of what Taleb has to say; I’ve referenced him before.

    I guess I misunderstood, I thought he was claiming Phoenician heritage.

    Peace.

    I thought he was claiming Phoenician heritage.

    You made me a little doubt myself. I’ll read into his exact position when I’ll have time later. But I firmly believed that he was talking about other Lebanese, and that he thought that both Greeks and Phoenicians were part of the Levant.

    Interestingly he’s quite opposed to the Saudi Arabian version of Islam, but has respect for certain forms of Islam, like Shia Islam. I can imagine he’d approve of your brand of Islam, too.

    • Replies: @Talha
    From what I’ve seen, many Arab Christians are fairly cool with traditional (and especially Sufi-oriented) Islam - obviously they prefer secularism above all options. I’ve referenced plenty of these guys before; Profs. Najib Saliba, George Saliba, not sure if I referenced Robert Haddad, etc.

    But they generally hate the Salafi-Wahhabi with a passion - for very good reason - if I were them, I would too. There are exceptions; I’ve read Hamas is fairly good to local Christians.

    Peace.
  106. @Mikhail
    Skoro has a good record on that score.

    ‘Skoros’ is the man and you’re the one to resurrect his star. The only problem is, is that his grandson is a major league svido and presents his grandfather’s ideas almost totally diametrically than what you do. He thinks that Ukraine should not be joined to the hip to Russia like Siamese twins, and other such blasphemies. He would be an ideal candidate to get things moving again, unless, of course you have similar ambitions? Perhaps its time that you get off the barstool and put away the suds and fly out to Canada and meet the guy? Don’t you think that somebody as important as you, Mickey, needs to make his mark in history beyond just being a negligible commenter to other people’s websites? People might get the wrong impression and think of your as some sort of a ‘hack‘ and not a real mover and shaker?

    Mickey, wake up and do something with your life, before it’ too late!

    https://day.kyiv.ua/en/article/day-after-day/skoropadsky-successor-returns-ukraine

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    Mickey - If you read the article that I cited, you'll find several important and useful tidbits to help you in your quest to resurrect the Hetmanite movement in Ukraine (and throughout the world!):

    We know that a hetman organization created by Pavlo Skoropadsky functioned in the Ukrainian Diaspora, whose membership was topped only by the Communist Party. Its strongest and most effective organizations operated in the US, Canada, Germany, and Great Britain, where many Ukrainians live. The US government even gave Ukrainian-American hetman- affiliated war pilots aircraft with names like Kyiv, Odesa, and Lviv. The hetmanites had weapons, uniforms, and training camps. In time, however, the hetman movement began to decline, and fewer books were published about Skoropadsky whose name began to sink into oblivion.
     
    Imagine, Mickey, you and Boris resurrecting such a movement and toppling the current band of Nazis and Banderites in Ukraine? You and Boris - what a team (kind of like you and Leos, in the past)!
    , @Mikhail

    Don’t you think that somebody as important as you, Mickey, needs to make his mark in history beyond just being a negligible commenter to other people’s websites? People might get the wrong impression and think of your as some sort of a ‘hack‘ and not a real mover and shaker?
     
    You're incorrectly transferring your attributes to me.

    Skoro's edict for an All-Russian Federation including Russia and Ukraine is a matter of record:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/22052011-pavlo-skoropadsky-and-the-course-of-russian-ukrainian-relations-analysis/
  107. @reiner Tor

    I thought he was claiming Phoenician heritage.
     
    You made me a little doubt myself. I'll read into his exact position when I'll have time later. But I firmly believed that he was talking about other Lebanese, and that he thought that both Greeks and Phoenicians were part of the Levant.

    Interestingly he's quite opposed to the Saudi Arabian version of Islam, but has respect for certain forms of Islam, like Shia Islam. I can imagine he'd approve of your brand of Islam, too.

    From what I’ve seen, many Arab Christians are fairly cool with traditional (and especially Sufi-oriented) Islam – obviously they prefer secularism above all options. I’ve referenced plenty of these guys before; Profs. Najib Saliba, George Saliba, not sure if I referenced Robert Haddad, etc.

    But they generally hate the Salafi-Wahhabi with a passion – for very good reason – if I were them, I would too. There are exceptions; I’ve read Hamas is fairly good to local Christians.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Hyperborean

    I’ve read Hamas is fairly good to local Christians.
     
    There are Christians in Gaza?
    , @Sean
    https://mosaicmagazine.com/picks/2018/06/in-saudi-arabia-public-opinion-about-israel-is-shifting/

    Muted complaints about the Gaza deaths. The Crown Prince recently said Palestinians should take the best deal they can get now or shut up. Trump's son in law told them their cause is a declining stock. McMaster was sacked for opposing planning meetings with Israel over Iran because he said Israel would start a war against Iran and expect US to finish it. Israel will never attack Iran, it is going to have to be the US.

    Israel was allowed by Russia to fly into Syrian airspace for bombing. It is all pointing to an attack on Iran by the US. And then


    http://townhall.com/columnists/benshapiro/2003/08/27/transfer_is_not_a_dirty_word/page/full/

    The Jews don't realize that expelling a hostile population is a commonly used and generally effective way of preventing violent entanglements. There are no gas chambers here. It's not genocide; it's transfer. It's not Hitler; it's Churchill.

    After World War II, Poland was recreated by the Allied Powers. In doing so, the Allies sliced off a chunk of Germany and extended Poland west to the Oder-Neisse line. Anywhere from 3.5 million to 9 million Germans were forcibly expelled from the new Polish territory and relocated in Germany.

    British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was pleased with the result. In 1944, he had explained to the House of Commons that "expulsion is the method which, so far as we have been able to see, will be the most satisfactory and lasting. There will be no mixture of populations to cause endless trouble ... a clean sweep will be made. I am not alarmed by the prospect of the disentanglement of populations, nor even by these large transferences, which are more possible in modern conditions than they ever were before." Churchill was right. The Germans accepted the new border, and decades of conflict between Poles and Germans ended.

    Arab-Jewish conflict is exponentially more volatile than German-Polish conflict ever was. And the solution is far easier. If there was "room in Germany for the German populations of East Prussia and of the other territories," as Churchill stated, there is certainly room in the spacious Muslim states of the Middle East for 5 million Palestinians and Israeli Arabs. If Germans, who had a centuries-old connection to the newly created Polish territory, could be expelled, then surely Palestinians, whose claim to Judea, Samaria and Gaza is dubious at best, can be expelled.

    It's time to stop being squeamish. Jews are not Nazis. Transfer is not genocide. And anything else isn't a solution.
     

  108. @Talha
    From what I’ve seen, many Arab Christians are fairly cool with traditional (and especially Sufi-oriented) Islam - obviously they prefer secularism above all options. I’ve referenced plenty of these guys before; Profs. Najib Saliba, George Saliba, not sure if I referenced Robert Haddad, etc.

    But they generally hate the Salafi-Wahhabi with a passion - for very good reason - if I were them, I would too. There are exceptions; I’ve read Hamas is fairly good to local Christians.

    Peace.

    I’ve read Hamas is fairly good to local Christians.

    There are Christians in Gaza?

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    not for long
    , @Talha
    Less and less...
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2015/12/20/after-2000-years-christians-gaza-disappearing/77503936/

    Peace.
  109. @Mr. Hack
    'Skoros' is the man and you're the one to resurrect his star. The only problem is, is that his grandson is a major league svido and presents his grandfather's ideas almost totally diametrically than what you do. He thinks that Ukraine should not be joined to the hip to Russia like Siamese twins, and other such blasphemies. He would be an ideal candidate to get things moving again, unless, of course you have similar ambitions? Perhaps its time that you get off the barstool and put away the suds and fly out to Canada and meet the guy? Don't you think that somebody as important as you, Mickey, needs to make his mark in history beyond just being a negligible commenter to other people's websites? People might get the wrong impression and think of your as some sort of a 'hack' and not a real mover and shaker?

    Mickey, wake up and do something with your life, before it' too late!

    https://day.kyiv.ua/en/article/day-after-day/skoropadsky-successor-returns-ukraine

    Mickey – If you read the article that I cited, you’ll find several important and useful tidbits to help you in your quest to resurrect the Hetmanite movement in Ukraine (and throughout the world!):

    We know that a hetman organization created by Pavlo Skoropadsky functioned in the Ukrainian Diaspora, whose membership was topped only by the Communist Party. Its strongest and most effective organizations operated in the US, Canada, Germany, and Great Britain, where many Ukrainians live. The US government even gave Ukrainian-American hetman- affiliated war pilots aircraft with names like Kyiv, Odesa, and Lviv. The hetmanites had weapons, uniforms, and training camps. In time, however, the hetman movement began to decline, and fewer books were published about Skoropadsky whose name began to sink into oblivion.

    Imagine, Mickey, you and Boris resurrecting such a movement and toppling the current band of Nazis and Banderites in Ukraine? You and Boris – what a team (kind of like you and Leos, in the past)!

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Far superior to the dimwitted likes of yourself.
  110. @Hyperborean

    I’ve read Hamas is fairly good to local Christians.
     
    There are Christians in Gaza?

    not for long

  111. @Hyperborean

    I’ve read Hamas is fairly good to local Christians.
     
    There are Christians in Gaza?
  112. • Replies: @Hyperborean
    All hail the Ever-Spinning Basketball and His representative in America Saint Dennis of Trenton! All Hail!
  113. Follow-up to waaycist Einstein:

    https://qz.com/1305236/chinese-internet-users-are-surprisingly-sympathetic-to-einsteins-racist-remarks/

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jun/15/chinese-defend-einsteins-diaries-filthy-obtuse

    Predictably, most of the angry people are merely squawking liberasts.

    I like how they include the sentence ‘The theoretical physicist, who once said racism was “a disease of white people”’ without any kind of comment (Hello Fellow Hwhyte People!).

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    I think back then pretty much everybody would have considered Jews white, so I don't think Einstein really meant anything by it.

    I'm not into outrage culture but what Einstein said about the Chinese was pretty bad. It was a long time ago and it was only his private thoughts but I don't think that we are forbidden from criticizing outdated, racist speech. I'm sure that Einstein himself would be embarrassed by what he wrote if he were alive today.

    Good on the Chinese though for understanding the context of Einstein's words and not chimping out.
    , @AaronB
    The funny thing is, Bertrand Russell went to China about the same time and thought it was the most amazing country he'd been to. He had the exact opposite reaction - it made him hopeful for the fate of mankind, saying that if European civilization died there would be something quite as good to replace it.
  114. @Thorfinnsson
    https://twitter.com/dennisrodman/status/1007612450819239943

    All hail the Ever-Spinning Basketball and His representative in America Saint Dennis of Trenton! All Hail!

  115. @Hyperborean
    Follow-up to waaycist Einstein:

    https://qz.com/1305236/chinese-internet-users-are-surprisingly-sympathetic-to-einsteins-racist-remarks/

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jun/15/chinese-defend-einsteins-diaries-filthy-obtuse

    Predictably, most of the angry people are merely squawking liberasts.

    I like how they include the sentence 'The theoretical physicist, who once said racism was “a disease of white people”' without any kind of comment (Hello Fellow Hwhyte People!).

    I think back then pretty much everybody would have considered Jews white, so I don’t think Einstein really meant anything by it.

    I’m not into outrage culture but what Einstein said about the Chinese was pretty bad. It was a long time ago and it was only his private thoughts but I don’t think that we are forbidden from criticizing outdated, racist speech. I’m sure that Einstein himself would be embarrassed by what he wrote if he were alive today.

    Good on the Chinese though for understanding the context of Einstein’s words and not chimping out.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Kaiser Wilhelm II didn't consider them white.

    And I doubt he was alone.
    , @Hyperborean

    It was a long time ago and it was only his private thoughts but I don’t think that we are forbidden from criticizing outdated, racist speech.
     
    I wrote a long reply but I think my bloody Internet screwed it up and I don't feel like rewriting it.

    TL;DR Even if it is racist, it is not necessarily wrong (probably that sounds more offensive without context).

    And by the standards of how we talk about other nationalities and even our own people on this board it sounds rather mild.

  116. @Greasy William
    I think back then pretty much everybody would have considered Jews white, so I don't think Einstein really meant anything by it.

    I'm not into outrage culture but what Einstein said about the Chinese was pretty bad. It was a long time ago and it was only his private thoughts but I don't think that we are forbidden from criticizing outdated, racist speech. I'm sure that Einstein himself would be embarrassed by what he wrote if he were alive today.

    Good on the Chinese though for understanding the context of Einstein's words and not chimping out.

    Kaiser Wilhelm II didn’t consider them white.

    And I doubt he was alone.

  117. @Greasy William
    I think back then pretty much everybody would have considered Jews white, so I don't think Einstein really meant anything by it.

    I'm not into outrage culture but what Einstein said about the Chinese was pretty bad. It was a long time ago and it was only his private thoughts but I don't think that we are forbidden from criticizing outdated, racist speech. I'm sure that Einstein himself would be embarrassed by what he wrote if he were alive today.

    Good on the Chinese though for understanding the context of Einstein's words and not chimping out.

    It was a long time ago and it was only his private thoughts but I don’t think that we are forbidden from criticizing outdated, racist speech.

    I wrote a long reply but I think my bloody Internet screwed it up and I don’t feel like rewriting it.

    TL;DR Even if it is racist, it is not necessarily wrong (probably that sounds more offensive without context).

    And by the standards of how we talk about other nationalities and even our own people on this board it sounds rather mild.

  118. @Mr. Hack
    'Skoros' is the man and you're the one to resurrect his star. The only problem is, is that his grandson is a major league svido and presents his grandfather's ideas almost totally diametrically than what you do. He thinks that Ukraine should not be joined to the hip to Russia like Siamese twins, and other such blasphemies. He would be an ideal candidate to get things moving again, unless, of course you have similar ambitions? Perhaps its time that you get off the barstool and put away the suds and fly out to Canada and meet the guy? Don't you think that somebody as important as you, Mickey, needs to make his mark in history beyond just being a negligible commenter to other people's websites? People might get the wrong impression and think of your as some sort of a 'hack' and not a real mover and shaker?

    Mickey, wake up and do something with your life, before it' too late!

    https://day.kyiv.ua/en/article/day-after-day/skoropadsky-successor-returns-ukraine

    Don’t you think that somebody as important as you, Mickey, needs to make his mark in history beyond just being a negligible commenter to other people’s websites? People might get the wrong impression and think of your as some sort of a ‘hack‘ and not a real mover and shaker?

    You’re incorrectly transferring your attributes to me.

    Skoro’s edict for an All-Russian Federation including Russia and Ukraine is a matter of record:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/22052011-pavlo-skoropadsky-and-the-course-of-russian-ukrainian-relations-analysis/

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    It most certainly is, Mickey, therefore don't you think that it's incumbent to get the message out, loud and clear, like you've been doing? I think that it's time that you consider getting beyond the realm of the make believe world of Russian blogs, and become a viable historical force for change. Your talents are much too valuable to waste spending precious time commenting at blogs like this one, or even that lackluster 'Eurasian' rag, where you currently have your own blog. Skoro needs a new blast of fresh air to get his message heard, what better way than you and Boris uniting for the 'New Hetmanate'?
  119. @Mr. Hack
    Mickey - If you read the article that I cited, you'll find several important and useful tidbits to help you in your quest to resurrect the Hetmanite movement in Ukraine (and throughout the world!):

    We know that a hetman organization created by Pavlo Skoropadsky functioned in the Ukrainian Diaspora, whose membership was topped only by the Communist Party. Its strongest and most effective organizations operated in the US, Canada, Germany, and Great Britain, where many Ukrainians live. The US government even gave Ukrainian-American hetman- affiliated war pilots aircraft with names like Kyiv, Odesa, and Lviv. The hetmanites had weapons, uniforms, and training camps. In time, however, the hetman movement began to decline, and fewer books were published about Skoropadsky whose name began to sink into oblivion.
     
    Imagine, Mickey, you and Boris resurrecting such a movement and toppling the current band of Nazis and Banderites in Ukraine? You and Boris - what a team (kind of like you and Leos, in the past)!

    Far superior to the dimwitted likes of yourself.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    For sure. You shouldn't be wasting your time on the likes of me, Mickey, your destiny is many pay grades above mine. You need to set your sights on something much higher, to the likes of somebody like 'Borys (Tukhai Bei) Skoropadsky! You two are destined to rewrite the history books! You two and Skoropadsky's prophetic edict for an All-Russian Federation including Russia and Ukraine!
  120. @Mikhail

    Don’t you think that somebody as important as you, Mickey, needs to make his mark in history beyond just being a negligible commenter to other people’s websites? People might get the wrong impression and think of your as some sort of a ‘hack‘ and not a real mover and shaker?
     
    You're incorrectly transferring your attributes to me.

    Skoro's edict for an All-Russian Federation including Russia and Ukraine is a matter of record:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/22052011-pavlo-skoropadsky-and-the-course-of-russian-ukrainian-relations-analysis/

    It most certainly is, Mickey, therefore don’t you think that it’s incumbent to get the message out, loud and clear, like you’ve been doing? I think that it’s time that you consider getting beyond the realm of the make believe world of Russian blogs, and become a viable historical force for change. Your talents are much too valuable to waste spending precious time commenting at blogs like this one, or even that lackluster ‘Eurasian’ rag, where you currently have your own blog. Skoro needs a new blast of fresh air to get his message heard, what better way than you and Boris uniting for the ‘New Hetmanate’?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    But I have, you lying twit. You haven't done likewise.

    BTW, the rag you seem to be referring to features a diverse range of views.

  121. @Mikhail
    Far superior to the dimwitted likes of yourself.

    For sure. You shouldn’t be wasting your time on the likes of me, Mickey, your destiny is many pay grades above mine. You need to set your sights on something much higher, to the likes of somebody like ‘Borys (Tukhai Bei) Skoropadsky! You two are destined to rewrite the history books! You two and Skoropadsky’s prophetic edict for an All-Russian Federation including Russia and Ukraine!

  122. @Mr. Hack
    It most certainly is, Mickey, therefore don't you think that it's incumbent to get the message out, loud and clear, like you've been doing? I think that it's time that you consider getting beyond the realm of the make believe world of Russian blogs, and become a viable historical force for change. Your talents are much too valuable to waste spending precious time commenting at blogs like this one, or even that lackluster 'Eurasian' rag, where you currently have your own blog. Skoro needs a new blast of fresh air to get his message heard, what better way than you and Boris uniting for the 'New Hetmanate'?

    But I have, you lying twit. You haven’t done likewise.

    BTW, the rag you seem to be referring to features a diverse range of views.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    Of course you have, Mickey. You're the greatest Russian blogger of all time, a regular 'Independent Foreign Policy Analyst' you are! And what I love the most about you, Mickey, is that all of your stuff is either factual or based on factual materials. Yep, no BS when it comes to Mike Averko!
  123. @Mikhail
    But I have, you lying twit. You haven't done likewise.

    BTW, the rag you seem to be referring to features a diverse range of views.

    Of course you have, Mickey. You’re the greatest Russian blogger of all time, a regular ‘Independent Foreign Policy Analyst’ you are! And what I love the most about you, Mickey, is that all of your stuff is either factual or based on factual materials. Yep, no BS when it comes to Mike Averko!

  124. @Talha
    From what I’ve seen, many Arab Christians are fairly cool with traditional (and especially Sufi-oriented) Islam - obviously they prefer secularism above all options. I’ve referenced plenty of these guys before; Profs. Najib Saliba, George Saliba, not sure if I referenced Robert Haddad, etc.

    But they generally hate the Salafi-Wahhabi with a passion - for very good reason - if I were them, I would too. There are exceptions; I’ve read Hamas is fairly good to local Christians.

    Peace.

    https://mosaicmagazine.com/picks/2018/06/in-saudi-arabia-public-opinion-about-israel-is-shifting/

    Muted complaints about the Gaza deaths. The Crown Prince recently said Palestinians should take the best deal they can get now or shut up. Trump’s son in law told them their cause is a declining stock. McMaster was sacked for opposing planning meetings with Israel over Iran because he said Israel would start a war against Iran and expect US to finish it. Israel will never attack Iran, it is going to have to be the US.

    Israel was allowed by Russia to fly into Syrian airspace for bombing. It is all pointing to an attack on Iran by the US. And then

    http://townhall.com/columnists/benshapiro/2003/08/27/transfer_is_not_a_dirty_word/page/full/

    The Jews don’t realize that expelling a hostile population is a commonly used and generally effective way of preventing violent entanglements. There are no gas chambers here. It’s not genocide; it’s transfer. It’s not Hitler; it’s Churchill.

    After World War II, Poland was recreated by the Allied Powers. In doing so, the Allies sliced off a chunk of Germany and extended Poland west to the Oder-Neisse line. Anywhere from 3.5 million to 9 million Germans were forcibly expelled from the new Polish territory and relocated in Germany.

    British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was pleased with the result. In 1944, he had explained to the House of Commons that “expulsion is the method which, so far as we have been able to see, will be the most satisfactory and lasting. There will be no mixture of populations to cause endless trouble … a clean sweep will be made. I am not alarmed by the prospect of the disentanglement of populations, nor even by these large transferences, which are more possible in modern conditions than they ever were before.” Churchill was right. The Germans accepted the new border, and decades of conflict between Poles and Germans ended.

    Arab-Jewish conflict is exponentially more volatile than German-Polish conflict ever was. And the solution is far easier. If there was “room in Germany for the German populations of East Prussia and of the other territories,” as Churchill stated, there is certainly room in the spacious Muslim states of the Middle East for 5 million Palestinians and Israeli Arabs. If Germans, who had a centuries-old connection to the newly created Polish territory, could be expelled, then surely Palestinians, whose claim to Judea, Samaria and Gaza is dubious at best, can be expelled.

    It’s time to stop being squeamish. Jews are not Nazis. Transfer is not genocide. And anything else isn’t a solution.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The problem is that the Palestinians aren't Germans either.

    The Germans had been vilified and dehumanized by propaganda to such an extent that after the war prominent Jews in government like Morgenthau could make proposals like his eponymous plan which would kill off about half of Germany's population.

    The Palestinians aren't hated like the Germans were, and global opinion is on the side of the Palestinians. And at this point, no amount of propaganda will be able to change that. The Palestinian protests and confrontations with the IDF just make Israel look bad.

    Furthermore, the American right wing is no longer unified in being reflexively pro Israel following the rise of the alt-right. Ben Shapiro is especially detested by the alt-right for his hypocrisy regarding Israel and nationalism.

    Shapiro wrote that article in the wake of 9/11 and shortly after the start of the Iraq War. The sort of Final Solution you propose for the Palestinians may only be possible in the wake of another 9/11 type event. If your claim that Israel regards such a solution as an absolute necessity is true, then that suggests that there is a tremendous incentive for Israel to see another 9/11 type event, with all that entails, which would outweigh any risks for Israel in whatever it may or may not do in seeing such an event be carried out. That's a very disquieting prospect.
  125. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean
    https://mosaicmagazine.com/picks/2018/06/in-saudi-arabia-public-opinion-about-israel-is-shifting/

    Muted complaints about the Gaza deaths. The Crown Prince recently said Palestinians should take the best deal they can get now or shut up. Trump's son in law told them their cause is a declining stock. McMaster was sacked for opposing planning meetings with Israel over Iran because he said Israel would start a war against Iran and expect US to finish it. Israel will never attack Iran, it is going to have to be the US.

    Israel was allowed by Russia to fly into Syrian airspace for bombing. It is all pointing to an attack on Iran by the US. And then


    http://townhall.com/columnists/benshapiro/2003/08/27/transfer_is_not_a_dirty_word/page/full/

    The Jews don't realize that expelling a hostile population is a commonly used and generally effective way of preventing violent entanglements. There are no gas chambers here. It's not genocide; it's transfer. It's not Hitler; it's Churchill.

    After World War II, Poland was recreated by the Allied Powers. In doing so, the Allies sliced off a chunk of Germany and extended Poland west to the Oder-Neisse line. Anywhere from 3.5 million to 9 million Germans were forcibly expelled from the new Polish territory and relocated in Germany.

    British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was pleased with the result. In 1944, he had explained to the House of Commons that "expulsion is the method which, so far as we have been able to see, will be the most satisfactory and lasting. There will be no mixture of populations to cause endless trouble ... a clean sweep will be made. I am not alarmed by the prospect of the disentanglement of populations, nor even by these large transferences, which are more possible in modern conditions than they ever were before." Churchill was right. The Germans accepted the new border, and decades of conflict between Poles and Germans ended.

    Arab-Jewish conflict is exponentially more volatile than German-Polish conflict ever was. And the solution is far easier. If there was "room in Germany for the German populations of East Prussia and of the other territories," as Churchill stated, there is certainly room in the spacious Muslim states of the Middle East for 5 million Palestinians and Israeli Arabs. If Germans, who had a centuries-old connection to the newly created Polish territory, could be expelled, then surely Palestinians, whose claim to Judea, Samaria and Gaza is dubious at best, can be expelled.

    It's time to stop being squeamish. Jews are not Nazis. Transfer is not genocide. And anything else isn't a solution.
     

    The problem is that the Palestinians aren’t Germans either.

    The Germans had been vilified and dehumanized by propaganda to such an extent that after the war prominent Jews in government like Morgenthau could make proposals like his eponymous plan which would kill off about half of Germany’s population.

    The Palestinians aren’t hated like the Germans were, and global opinion is on the side of the Palestinians. And at this point, no amount of propaganda will be able to change that. The Palestinian protests and confrontations with the IDF just make Israel look bad.

    Furthermore, the American right wing is no longer unified in being reflexively pro Israel following the rise of the alt-right. Ben Shapiro is especially detested by the alt-right for his hypocrisy regarding Israel and nationalism.

    Shapiro wrote that article in the wake of 9/11 and shortly after the start of the Iraq War. The sort of Final Solution you propose for the Palestinians may only be possible in the wake of another 9/11 type event. If your claim that Israel regards such a solution as an absolute necessity is true, then that suggests that there is a tremendous incentive for Israel to see another 9/11 type event, with all that entails, which would outweigh any risks for Israel in whatever it may or may not do in seeing such an event be carried out. That’s a very disquieting prospect.

  126. @Hyperborean
    Follow-up to waaycist Einstein:

    https://qz.com/1305236/chinese-internet-users-are-surprisingly-sympathetic-to-einsteins-racist-remarks/

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jun/15/chinese-defend-einsteins-diaries-filthy-obtuse

    Predictably, most of the angry people are merely squawking liberasts.

    I like how they include the sentence 'The theoretical physicist, who once said racism was “a disease of white people”' without any kind of comment (Hello Fellow Hwhyte People!).

    The funny thing is, Bertrand Russell went to China about the same time and thought it was the most amazing country he’d been to. He had the exact opposite reaction – it made him hopeful for the fate of mankind, saying that if European civilization died there would be something quite as good to replace it.

  127. @iffen
    No one will ever quit again.

    St Peter don't you call me I cause can't go:
    I owe my soul to the company store.

    Sixteen Tons – Frankie Lane

     

    Sixteen Tons – Frankie Lane

    Eh?

    “Sixteen Tons” is a song written by Merle Travis…A 1955 version recorded by Tennessee Ernie Ford reached number one in the Billboard charts, while another version by Frankie Laine was released only in Western Europe, where it gave Ford’s version competition.

    –Wiki

    I doubt anyone in the U.S. ever heard (of) Frankie Laine’s version.

    • Replies: @iffen
    My carelessness, I am only familiar with the Tennessee Ernie Ford recording. When I looked it up I took Frankie Laine to be the song writer.
  128. @Sparkon

    Sixteen Tons – Frankie Lane
     
    Eh?

    "Sixteen Tons" is a song written by Merle Travis...A 1955 version recorded by Tennessee Ernie Ford reached number one in the Billboard charts, while another version by Frankie Laine was released only in Western Europe, where it gave Ford's version competition.

    --Wiki
     

    I doubt anyone in the U.S. ever heard (of) Frankie Laine's version.

    My carelessness, I am only familiar with the Tennessee Ernie Ford recording. When I looked it up I took Frankie Laine to be the song writer.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    One of my favorite songs incidentally. Thanks for bringing it up.

    Though for aesthetic reasons I really must focus on 80s music.

    http://k39.kn3.net/taringa/1/5/6/2/3/3/25/cruelangel94/B53.jpg?7534
  129. @reiner Tor
    He's Greek Orthodox, likely to a large portion descended from the original Greeks. (They didn't convert many locals before the Islamic conquest, and it's not quite likely that they converted many afterwards.)

    But he says that Lebanese Arabs (especially the non-Muslims, and probably among Muslims the Shia) are mostly descendants of Phoenicians, i.e. they are Arabized Phoenicians. That's quite a bit more plausible than the African Beethoven and similar stories. Actually, there are genetic studies which seem to confirm that.

    They didn’t convert many locals before the Islamic conquest, and it’s not quite likely that they converted many afterwards.

    Really? It might be availability bias, but I thought the whole Mediterranean was thoroughly Christianized before the Islamic conquest. Julian tried to Make Paganism Great Again in the middle of the 4th century, but Justinian pretty much killed it in the middle of the 6th century, no?

    • Replies: @German_reader
    There were religious divisions though (possibly related to ethno-linguistic ones), with all those Eastern churches of people who spoke Aramaic, Coptic etc. in conflict with the imperial (Melkite) church of Greek-speakers. I always forget the details since as a non-believer it baffles me people could get worked up over those obscure Christological issues.
    , @reiner Tor
    It was Christian, but not Orthodox. The question was whether the Greek Orthodox community Taleb descends from has anything to do with the Greeks of antiquity. What can be reasonably established at this point is that they are the continuation of the ethnically Greek Orthodox Christians of the late Roman Empire. They didn’t manage to convert non-Greeks to Orthodoxy then, and certainly not after the Islamic Conquest.

    So it’s quite plausible that Taleb is indeed descended from the Greeks of antiquity.

    Another point he makes is that the Lebanese are mostly descendants of the ancient Phoenicians. He also makes the point that the ancient Middle East was pretty similar to ancient Greece, genetically and to an extent culturally.

    I think he somewhat exaggerates the cultural similarity, but the genetic similarity was likely there. Hence his point about both Melkites (Greek Orthodox) and other Lebanese being different from other Arabs and more similar to Greeks.
  130. @iffen
    My carelessness, I am only familiar with the Tennessee Ernie Ford recording. When I looked it up I took Frankie Laine to be the song writer.

    One of my favorite songs incidentally. Thanks for bringing it up.

    Though for aesthetic reasons I really must focus on 80s music.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    David Bowie X

    Eurythmics X

    Blondie X

    Fleetwood Mac X
    ,
    Abba X

    Huey Lewis & the News ?

    Perhaps, I never gave them enough of a listen. I'm thinking that you were a fan of Hootie and the Blowfish too? But yeah, the 80's was a banner time for pop music (I can't stand most of the stuff coming out today, except for jazz and international).

    Hey Anatoly, if you're still out there, do you know anything of a great Russian 'New Age' group Vermicelli Orchetra? Nice stuff, if you can find it....

  131. @The Big Red Scary

    They didn’t convert many locals before the Islamic conquest, and it’s not quite likely that they converted many afterwards.
     
    Really? It might be availability bias, but I thought the whole Mediterranean was thoroughly Christianized before the Islamic conquest. Julian tried to Make Paganism Great Again in the middle of the 4th century, but Justinian pretty much killed it in the middle of the 6th century, no?

    There were religious divisions though (possibly related to ethno-linguistic ones), with all those Eastern churches of people who spoke Aramaic, Coptic etc. in conflict with the imperial (Melkite) church of Greek-speakers. I always forget the details since as a non-believer it baffles me people could get worked up over those obscure Christological issues.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    They might look at us in the same way. In the past couple of weeks we've debated (among other things):

    • The legitimacy and desirability of conquest
    • Characteristics of Russian weapons
    • Whether or not Ukrainians are a nation or a division of the Russian nation
    • The Russians of Ancient Egypt

    It's ordinary to have debates within a particular group that shares common values and aims. And abstract intellectual topics like religion and ideology tend to attract nerds and autists who will belabor points in great detail.

    We're all "nationalists" for instance, but the only thing we probably universally agree on 100% is Remove Kebab.

    , @AP
    Sure, but the bottom line is that they were all Christians before the Muslim conquest.
  132. @German_reader
    There were religious divisions though (possibly related to ethno-linguistic ones), with all those Eastern churches of people who spoke Aramaic, Coptic etc. in conflict with the imperial (Melkite) church of Greek-speakers. I always forget the details since as a non-believer it baffles me people could get worked up over those obscure Christological issues.

    They might look at us in the same way. In the past couple of weeks we’ve debated (among other things):

    • The legitimacy and desirability of conquest
    • Characteristics of Russian weapons
    • Whether or not Ukrainians are a nation or a division of the Russian nation
    • The Russians of Ancient Egypt

    It’s ordinary to have debates within a particular group that shares common values and aims. And abstract intellectual topics like religion and ideology tend to attract nerds and autists who will belabor points in great detail.

    We’re all “nationalists” for instance, but the only thing we probably universally agree on 100% is Remove Kebab.

    • Replies: @German_reader

    And abstract intellectual topics like religion and ideology tend to attract nerds and autists who will belabor points in great detail.
     
    Those great christological controversies in late antiquity seem to have been a big deal though for the masses as well, not just for a few unusual enthusiasts like the people on this blog.
    I've always wondered how that worked, did the average man on the street in Antiochia or Alexandria, or somewhere in the countryside in Syria really think in detail about those different conceptions of Christ, with their minute differences (at least they seem like that to me), and their theological implications? Or was it merely a vehicle for tribalism based on issues of class or ethnicity to assert itself, as many moderns would suspect?
    Regarding Remove Kebab: One doesn't even have to be especially right-wing or nationalistic for that. In a few years it might be just common sense.
  133. @Thorfinnsson
    They might look at us in the same way. In the past couple of weeks we've debated (among other things):

    • The legitimacy and desirability of conquest
    • Characteristics of Russian weapons
    • Whether or not Ukrainians are a nation or a division of the Russian nation
    • The Russians of Ancient Egypt

    It's ordinary to have debates within a particular group that shares common values and aims. And abstract intellectual topics like religion and ideology tend to attract nerds and autists who will belabor points in great detail.

    We're all "nationalists" for instance, but the only thing we probably universally agree on 100% is Remove Kebab.

    And abstract intellectual topics like religion and ideology tend to attract nerds and autists who will belabor points in great detail.

    Those great christological controversies in late antiquity seem to have been a big deal though for the masses as well, not just for a few unusual enthusiasts like the people on this blog.
    I’ve always wondered how that worked, did the average man on the street in Antiochia or Alexandria, or somewhere in the countryside in Syria really think in detail about those different conceptions of Christ, with their minute differences (at least they seem like that to me), and their theological implications? Or was it merely a vehicle for tribalism based on issues of class or ethnicity to assert itself, as many moderns would suspect?
    Regarding Remove Kebab: One doesn’t even have to be especially right-wing or nationalistic for that. In a few years it might be just common sense.

    • Replies: @AP

    I’ve always wondered how that worked, did the average man on the street in Antiochia or Alexandria, or somewhere in the countryside in Syria really think in detail about those different conceptions of Christ, with their minute differences (at least they seem like that to me), and their theological implications?
     
    Well,, in America there are passionate Democrats and Republicans who argue and sometimes even fight. To someone completely alien to this culture such as an Amazonian tribesman or ancient Egyptian it would also seem bizarre to argue over such (relative to oneself) slight and obscure differences.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    90% of people in Late Antiquity were likely illiterate, and in any case writing had to be manually copied in order to distribute it. On parchment. So it's not very likely that ordinary people had views on the nature of the Trinity at all.

    The "Christological" controversies of Late Antiquity had political consequences, which is why they were so serious. The Germanic barbarians overrunning the Western Roman Empire followed the Arian creed, while the Eastern Roman Empire was Nicene.

    That said I don't really know what the fuss was about, but that's because our records from the time are poor. And actually a lot of primary sources from that time, surprisingly, have never been translated to English because Latin scholars only care about classical Latin and don't bother with the language as it evolved.

    I assume the Arian creed offered some sort of political advantage to Germanic barbarians that we don't know about.

    You can compare it to the Protestant Reformation, which is better documented and more recent. Obviously the typical peasant in early modern Germany couldn't read and certainly couldn't read the Gospel of Matthew in Latin.

    Here the political consequences are easier to understand as the German princes seized upon Lutheranism as a convenient way to expropriate the Church and free themselves from Papal authority (to the point where Luther's lord decided to engage in bigamy LOL).

    As for Julian the Apostate, Christians were still a minority in the Empire during his reign. However they comprised majorities in a lot of important places like Rome, Antioch, Alexandria, Constantinople, and so forth.

    By the 7th century pretty much the entire former Roman Empire was fully Christian, though paganism persisted in parts of England...probably owing to being invaded by Angles, Saxons, Jutes, and vikings. There was apparently an upsurge in paganism during the disastrous reign of Aethelred the Unready as the endless disasters visited upon the English were seen as discrediting Christianity.

    Traditionally societies have always had an official religion and a priesthood, so religion is very serious business. Today that function is fulfilled by the universities (which after all were originally founded by priests) and the press, and they seek to punish heretics with the same zeal the church did in the past.

    Look at how whenever Ron Unz writes a "revisionist" essay, weird Jewish commenters appear to "warn" him about the "dark road" he's going down.
  134. @German_reader
    There were religious divisions though (possibly related to ethno-linguistic ones), with all those Eastern churches of people who spoke Aramaic, Coptic etc. in conflict with the imperial (Melkite) church of Greek-speakers. I always forget the details since as a non-believer it baffles me people could get worked up over those obscure Christological issues.

    Sure, but the bottom line is that they were all Christians before the Muslim conquest.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    Yes, but it was originally about Taleb, who as a Greek Orthodox (if that's what he is) would prsumably be descended from Greek-speaking city dwellers. I think that's what reiner tor meant.
  135. AP says:
    @German_reader

    And abstract intellectual topics like religion and ideology tend to attract nerds and autists who will belabor points in great detail.
     
    Those great christological controversies in late antiquity seem to have been a big deal though for the masses as well, not just for a few unusual enthusiasts like the people on this blog.
    I've always wondered how that worked, did the average man on the street in Antiochia or Alexandria, or somewhere in the countryside in Syria really think in detail about those different conceptions of Christ, with their minute differences (at least they seem like that to me), and their theological implications? Or was it merely a vehicle for tribalism based on issues of class or ethnicity to assert itself, as many moderns would suspect?
    Regarding Remove Kebab: One doesn't even have to be especially right-wing or nationalistic for that. In a few years it might be just common sense.

    I’ve always wondered how that worked, did the average man on the street in Antiochia or Alexandria, or somewhere in the countryside in Syria really think in detail about those different conceptions of Christ, with their minute differences (at least they seem like that to me), and their theological implications?

    Well,, in America there are passionate Democrats and Republicans who argue and sometimes even fight. To someone completely alien to this culture such as an Amazonian tribesman or ancient Egyptian it would also seem bizarre to argue over such (relative to oneself) slight and obscure differences.

  136. @German_reader

    And abstract intellectual topics like religion and ideology tend to attract nerds and autists who will belabor points in great detail.
     
    Those great christological controversies in late antiquity seem to have been a big deal though for the masses as well, not just for a few unusual enthusiasts like the people on this blog.
    I've always wondered how that worked, did the average man on the street in Antiochia or Alexandria, or somewhere in the countryside in Syria really think in detail about those different conceptions of Christ, with their minute differences (at least they seem like that to me), and their theological implications? Or was it merely a vehicle for tribalism based on issues of class or ethnicity to assert itself, as many moderns would suspect?
    Regarding Remove Kebab: One doesn't even have to be especially right-wing or nationalistic for that. In a few years it might be just common sense.

    90% of people in Late Antiquity were likely illiterate, and in any case writing had to be manually copied in order to distribute it. On parchment. So it’s not very likely that ordinary people had views on the nature of the Trinity at all.

    The “Christological” controversies of Late Antiquity had political consequences, which is why they were so serious. The Germanic barbarians overrunning the Western Roman Empire followed the Arian creed, while the Eastern Roman Empire was Nicene.

    That said I don’t really know what the fuss was about, but that’s because our records from the time are poor. And actually a lot of primary sources from that time, surprisingly, have never been translated to English because Latin scholars only care about classical Latin and don’t bother with the language as it evolved.

    I assume the Arian creed offered some sort of political advantage to Germanic barbarians that we don’t know about.

    You can compare it to the Protestant Reformation, which is better documented and more recent. Obviously the typical peasant in early modern Germany couldn’t read and certainly couldn’t read the Gospel of Matthew in Latin.

    Here the political consequences are easier to understand as the German princes seized upon Lutheranism as a convenient way to expropriate the Church and free themselves from Papal authority (to the point where Luther’s lord decided to engage in bigamy LOL).

    As for Julian the Apostate, Christians were still a minority in the Empire during his reign. However they comprised majorities in a lot of important places like Rome, Antioch, Alexandria, Constantinople, and so forth.

    By the 7th century pretty much the entire former Roman Empire was fully Christian, though paganism persisted in parts of England…probably owing to being invaded by Angles, Saxons, Jutes, and vikings. There was apparently an upsurge in paganism during the disastrous reign of Aethelred the Unready as the endless disasters visited upon the English were seen as discrediting Christianity.

    Traditionally societies have always had an official religion and a priesthood, so religion is very serious business. Today that function is fulfilled by the universities (which after all were originally founded by priests) and the press, and they seek to punish heretics with the same zeal the church did in the past.

    Look at how whenever Ron Unz writes a “revisionist” essay, weird Jewish commenters appear to “warn” him about the “dark road” he’s going down.

    • Replies: @German_reader

    90% of people in Late Antiquity were likely illiterate, and in any case writing had to be manually copied in order to distribute it. On parchment.
     
    Before the Islamic conquests people could use papyrus as a writing material which presumably was cheaper and could be used in greater numbers than parchment. And illiterate people could have things read to them. So maybe the audience for those controversies was greater than one would imagine at first.

    I assume the Arian creed offered some sort of political advantage to Germanic barbarians that we don’t know about.
     
    It may have worked as a marker of identity, keeping them separate from the Roman population and thereby increasing their cohesion. But in the end I'm not sure how satisfactory such explanations are that claim it was really all about something different than the genuinely religious questions. It might just be projecting our own criteria back into a past which had fundamentally different values.

    And actually a lot of primary sources from that time, surprisingly, have never been translated to English because Latin scholars only care about classical Latin and don’t bother with the language as it evolved.
     
    I don't think that's quite correct like that, there's a lot of literature about vulgar Latin, the shift to the Romance languages etc. What might be neglected, are sources in Near Eastern languages like Syriac (?) which only a few specialists know.
  137. @Thorfinnsson
    90% of people in Late Antiquity were likely illiterate, and in any case writing had to be manually copied in order to distribute it. On parchment. So it's not very likely that ordinary people had views on the nature of the Trinity at all.

    The "Christological" controversies of Late Antiquity had political consequences, which is why they were so serious. The Germanic barbarians overrunning the Western Roman Empire followed the Arian creed, while the Eastern Roman Empire was Nicene.

    That said I don't really know what the fuss was about, but that's because our records from the time are poor. And actually a lot of primary sources from that time, surprisingly, have never been translated to English because Latin scholars only care about classical Latin and don't bother with the language as it evolved.

    I assume the Arian creed offered some sort of political advantage to Germanic barbarians that we don't know about.

    You can compare it to the Protestant Reformation, which is better documented and more recent. Obviously the typical peasant in early modern Germany couldn't read and certainly couldn't read the Gospel of Matthew in Latin.

    Here the political consequences are easier to understand as the German princes seized upon Lutheranism as a convenient way to expropriate the Church and free themselves from Papal authority (to the point where Luther's lord decided to engage in bigamy LOL).

    As for Julian the Apostate, Christians were still a minority in the Empire during his reign. However they comprised majorities in a lot of important places like Rome, Antioch, Alexandria, Constantinople, and so forth.

    By the 7th century pretty much the entire former Roman Empire was fully Christian, though paganism persisted in parts of England...probably owing to being invaded by Angles, Saxons, Jutes, and vikings. There was apparently an upsurge in paganism during the disastrous reign of Aethelred the Unready as the endless disasters visited upon the English were seen as discrediting Christianity.

    Traditionally societies have always had an official religion and a priesthood, so religion is very serious business. Today that function is fulfilled by the universities (which after all were originally founded by priests) and the press, and they seek to punish heretics with the same zeal the church did in the past.

    Look at how whenever Ron Unz writes a "revisionist" essay, weird Jewish commenters appear to "warn" him about the "dark road" he's going down.

    90% of people in Late Antiquity were likely illiterate, and in any case writing had to be manually copied in order to distribute it. On parchment.

    Before the Islamic conquests people could use papyrus as a writing material which presumably was cheaper and could be used in greater numbers than parchment. And illiterate people could have things read to them. So maybe the audience for those controversies was greater than one would imagine at first.

    I assume the Arian creed offered some sort of political advantage to Germanic barbarians that we don’t know about.

    It may have worked as a marker of identity, keeping them separate from the Roman population and thereby increasing their cohesion. But in the end I’m not sure how satisfactory such explanations are that claim it was really all about something different than the genuinely religious questions. It might just be projecting our own criteria back into a past which had fundamentally different values.

    And actually a lot of primary sources from that time, surprisingly, have never been translated to English because Latin scholars only care about classical Latin and don’t bother with the language as it evolved.

    I don’t think that’s quite correct like that, there’s a lot of literature about vulgar Latin, the shift to the Romance languages etc. What might be neglected, are sources in Near Eastern languages like Syriac (?) which only a few specialists know.

  138. @AP
    Sure, but the bottom line is that they were all Christians before the Muslim conquest.

    Yes, but it was originally about Taleb, who as a Greek Orthodox (if that’s what he is) would prsumably be descended from Greek-speaking city dwellers. I think that’s what reiner tor meant.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
  139. @The Big Red Scary

    They didn’t convert many locals before the Islamic conquest, and it’s not quite likely that they converted many afterwards.
     
    Really? It might be availability bias, but I thought the whole Mediterranean was thoroughly Christianized before the Islamic conquest. Julian tried to Make Paganism Great Again in the middle of the 4th century, but Justinian pretty much killed it in the middle of the 6th century, no?

    It was Christian, but not Orthodox. The question was whether the Greek Orthodox community Taleb descends from has anything to do with the Greeks of antiquity. What can be reasonably established at this point is that they are the continuation of the ethnically Greek Orthodox Christians of the late Roman Empire. They didn’t manage to convert non-Greeks to Orthodoxy then, and certainly not after the Islamic Conquest.

    So it’s quite plausible that Taleb is indeed descended from the Greeks of antiquity.

    Another point he makes is that the Lebanese are mostly descendants of the ancient Phoenicians. He also makes the point that the ancient Middle East was pretty similar to ancient Greece, genetically and to an extent culturally.

    I think he somewhat exaggerates the cultural similarity, but the genetic similarity was likely there. Hence his point about both Melkites (Greek Orthodox) and other Lebanese being different from other Arabs and more similar to Greeks.

  140. @Duke of Qin
    He doesn't want to identify with smelly barbarian desert nomads with their head chopping religion but rather with the lost civilization of antiquity. I can't say I blame him.

    Everything to the West of Ctesiphon used to be part of the Hellenistic/Roman Pagan and later Christian World. From Alexander to Heraclius, it was a 900 year run all told. All of it forever obliterated by Islam and it's bloodthirsty semitic tribal brigands. Europe held the line at Austria and Spain and was even able to recover some lost territories for a time. They have however managed to bypass those national geographic barriers and now Britain, France, Germany, and Sweden are the beacheads of the latest rounds of Mohammedan pillage.

    Why is everything east of Baghdad considered inferior when those areas are the only ones to not suck off abraham। ।

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    are you ever going to explain to us what is with the "| |" that you put in all your posts?

    Also, posting as Anon is really annoying. Pick a handle or get lost.
    , @Duke of Qin
    Who made any claims to superiority / inferiority? I am merely pointing out that the the area was the border between the Greco-Roman and later Christians and Persian worlds. The geographic idea of what constitutes Western was much more expansive in antiquity than it is today. Rather than Western success, I see the West under assault having lost the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean coasts and despite a few centuries reprieve following the siege of Vienna again under threat by the Mohammedans.
  141. @Pilgrim007
    "The German anti tank guns couldn’t penetrate T-34 armor"

    In '41 the Germans used the 37mm pak, that was indeed useless against the T34, but the pak 75/40 L46 could take a T34 from at least 1 km. It was introduced at the beginning of '42 and was still in use long after the war. The L48 version was also used on Pkw IV and other armored vehicles.

    War was already lost when Germany lost all but 8 of its combat divisions during Barbarossa

  142. @Anon
    Why is everything east of Baghdad considered inferior when those areas are the only ones to not suck off abraham। ।

    are you ever going to explain to us what is with the “| |” that you put in all your posts?

    Also, posting as Anon is really annoying. Pick a handle or get lost.

  143. Anon[126] • Disclaimer says:
    @Greasy William

    We build Su 30 Mki engine from raw materials in India btw including the all important hot section(HP turbine and Compressor).
     
    I was not aware of that. Very impressive. Congratulations.

    Not sure why it matters if the raw materials come from India, though.

    Screwdriver assembly with all critical components(Engine,Radar,Avionics,even sections of the aero structure) flown in from France is not the same thing as letting us build the whole aircraft almost from raw materials in the country like India builds the Su 30 Mki.
     
    Well then why did you buy it? Obviously your own government was happy with the level of tech transfer or they wouldn't have signed the contract.

    India has had one party christian backed democracy for most of its post ww2 history similar to Japan.

    There’s a significant lobby for imported arms, which just changes the requirement for indigenous tech midway.

    Drdos entire budget is a few billion usd across all programs subs, icbms, aircraft.

    The mirage didn’t have working missiles for years while a nearly fully functional Tejas is rejected for reasons.

    Same with Arjun tank

    The Kaveri actually has close to 90kn thrust more than the m88 but the Tejas Mk2 naval needs more & refuses to fund further development.

    The only tech Russia withholds is the engine core of the Sukhoi & the gun barrel/turret of the t90.

    France is different since it rejoined Nato..

    • Replies: @Greasy William

    The Kaveri actually has close to 90kn thrust more than the m88
     
    Because it's a bigger engine. I think it's thrust to weight ratio is a little worse. The m88 is also fully mature.

    DRDO was saying that they need 2 billion USD minimum to develop the Kaveri; the Indian gov ended up giving them 600 million. Can't develop engines without money.
  144. @Duke of Qin
    I only watched part of it, but much of it is nonsense. Keep in mind that the woman is a leftist quisling out to deconstruct Chinese historiography.

    The reason why Chinese historians prefer a continuous civilization narrative is that all previous Chinese historians had hewed the same line. The orthodox cannon 24 histories covers 2000 years of imperial state building. China has perhaps too much history and it's written legacy of statecraft is thick and overflowing with historical allusions to past dynastic rulers. Her argument that China was never unified using some retarded maximal Qing borders is akin to arguing the US didn't exist as a unified polity prior to the mid 20th century because Hawaii and Alaska weren't yet states.

    Political interregnums where multiple competing states existed simultaneously has been the undesired exception since the Qin defeated all the other ducal heirs of Zhou. Chinese states do not recognize the political legitimacy of other Chinese states, period. Like in Highlander, in the end there can be only one. This is the reason why Taiwan must be crushed and brought to heel.

    You could’ve just said it’s a woman, ignore video.

    • Agree: Greasy William
  145. @Anon
    India has had one party christian backed democracy for most of its post ww2 history similar to Japan.

    There's a significant lobby for imported arms, which just changes the requirement for indigenous tech midway.

    Drdos entire budget is a few billion usd across all programs subs, icbms, aircraft.

    The mirage didn't have working missiles for years while a nearly fully functional Tejas is rejected for reasons.

    Same with Arjun tank

    The Kaveri actually has close to 90kn thrust more than the m88 but the Tejas Mk2 naval needs more & refuses to fund further development.

    The only tech Russia withholds is the engine core of the Sukhoi & the gun barrel/turret of the t90.

    France is different since it rejoined Nato..

    The Kaveri actually has close to 90kn thrust more than the m88

    Because it’s a bigger engine. I think it’s thrust to weight ratio is a little worse. The m88 is also fully mature.

    DRDO was saying that they need 2 billion USD minimum to develop the Kaveri; the Indian gov ended up giving them 600 million. Can’t develop engines without money.

  146. Japanese business is trying to ruin Japan.

    But businesses have long lobbied for looser rules, saying they struggle to find workers in a country where unemployment hovers around 2.5 percent and there are 159 job offers to every 100 job seekers.

    Hiroaki Nakanishi, head of the influential Keidanren business lobby, told reporters earlier this week that the policy was about more than addressing labor shortages.

    “Increasing diversity is inevitable for improving Japan’s industrial competitiveness and research and academic levels,” he said.

    http://archive.is/mYwd3#selection-925.0-937.128

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    They have samurai swords. The business leaders have necks. The former should be applied to the latter.
  147. @Mitleser
    Japanese business is trying to ruin Japan.

    But businesses have long lobbied for looser rules, saying they struggle to find workers in a country where unemployment hovers around 2.5 percent and there are 159 job offers to every 100 job seekers.

    Hiroaki Nakanishi, head of the influential Keidanren business lobby, told reporters earlier this week that the policy was about more than addressing labor shortages.

    "Increasing diversity is inevitable for improving Japan's industrial competitiveness and research and academic levels," he said.
     
    http://archive.is/mYwd3#selection-925.0-937.128

    They have samurai swords. The business leaders have necks. The former should be applied to the latter.

  148. @Anon
    Why is everything east of Baghdad considered inferior when those areas are the only ones to not suck off abraham। ।

    Who made any claims to superiority / inferiority? I am merely pointing out that the the area was the border between the Greco-Roman and later Christians and Persian worlds. The geographic idea of what constitutes Western was much more expansive in antiquity than it is today. Rather than Western success, I see the West under assault having lost the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean coasts and despite a few centuries reprieve following the siege of Vienna again under threat by the Mohammedans.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Arabs came from the South not the East.

    Your comment implies the Persian world was any less to this Western world you speak so highly of,

    Probably you have a pro christian agenda as this Western world of yours had Legions worshipping Great Mithras।।

    West or East was not so different back then more so a gradual transition & it's unfortunate that both Persian & Roman worship a kebab now।।

    We will definitely have to fix this.
  149. @Thorfinnsson
    I can't speak to her personal motivations. I assume she likes working for me. She does also work hard to save her poor daughter.

    She is married and thus not a single mother, but in general I work within our system as it is and pursue my self interest. Isn't the whole point of government to reign that in?

    If she didn't already have kids, small tits, and brown eyes I would ask her to marry me.

    If she didn’t already have kids, small tits, and brown eyes I would ask her to marry me.

    Obviously the husband is no problem . . .

    • LOL: Talha
  150. * Ukraine comes dead last out of eight in Strong Europe Tank Challenge 2018 (an explanation from AP). Germany wins as usual.

    I think this is a good example of how AP keep making excuses for the Ukraine, and is therefore full is shit.

    Ukrainian officer, who participated in the competition was more honest:

    Участник команды из 14-й волынской механизированной бригады ВСУ капитан Роман Багаев рассказал, почему украинские танкисты заняли последнее место в танковом соревновании Strong Europe Tank Challenge в Германии.

    В беседе с изданием «Новинарня» военный раскритиковал техническое состояние новейшего украинского танка Т-84 «Оплот», который ВСУ получили вместо Т-64.

    «А ничего не удалось сделать. Мы поехали на четырёх машинах. Во время «операции в наступлении» выстрелил только один танк. На остальных трёх снаряд или не до конца загрузился в пушку, либо не сработали датчики. Система показала, что танк не до конца зарядился, поэтому пушка с гидростопора не снялась, пришлось дозаряжать вручную», — сказал Багаев.

    Среди других причин поражения он назвал незнание натовской специфики, языковые проблемы и отставание в тактике.

    https://russian.rt.com/ussr/news/523662-ukraina-proval-tanki-germaniya

    If you don’t understand Russian, basically he says that 3 out of 4 Oplot tanks malfunctioned and failed to fire. The Ukraine built a tank, which doesn’t work.

    • Replies: @iffen
    a good example of how AP keep making excuses for the Ukraine


    AP probably expects Jesus to swoop down and heal the tanks.
    , @AP

    I think this is a good example of how AP keep making excuses for the Ukraine
     
    Already mentioned:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370507

    I posted that the tanks didn't shoot in the first section:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370547

    Those two problems were worth about 150 lost points, which would place Ukraine where it was last year – about the same as Poland (a little worse this year, while it actually beat Poland last year). Ukraine would have been ahead of the UK and the US.

    There’s a photo of results for the first 2 of 13 parts (the ones where Ukraine was affected by technical problems and too-deep dugout, respectively) here:

    https://aw.my.com/en/forum/showthread.php?199458-Strong-Europe-Tank-Challenge-2018

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370831

    "You are correct, it is indeed scandalous that the soldiers were given tanks that couldn’t shoot at at the beginning, costing a lot of points. The Ukrainian soldiers were really outraged by that. It doesn’t reflect badly on the troops, at least.

    But the bottom line, if not for those two problems it looks like Ukrainians would have outperformed the Brits and the Americans, and come close to the Poles whom they beat last year when they didn’t have that problem."

    ::::::::::::::

    Explanations aren't excuses.

    And you, of course, simply lie about Ukraine.
  151. Anon[126] • Disclaimer says:
    @Duke of Qin
    Who made any claims to superiority / inferiority? I am merely pointing out that the the area was the border between the Greco-Roman and later Christians and Persian worlds. The geographic idea of what constitutes Western was much more expansive in antiquity than it is today. Rather than Western success, I see the West under assault having lost the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean coasts and despite a few centuries reprieve following the siege of Vienna again under threat by the Mohammedans.

    Arabs came from the South not the East.

    Your comment implies the Persian world was any less to this Western world you speak so highly of,

    Probably you have a pro christian agenda as this Western world of yours had Legions worshipping Great Mithras।।

    West or East was not so different back then more so a gradual transition & it’s unfortunate that both Persian & Roman worship a kebab now।।

    We will definitely have to fix this.

  152. @Felix Keverich

    * Ukraine comes dead last out of eight in Strong Europe Tank Challenge 2018 (an explanation from AP). Germany wins as usual.
     
    I think this is a good example of how AP keep making excuses for the Ukraine, and is therefore full is shit.

    Ukrainian officer, who participated in the competition was more honest:

    Участник команды из 14-й волынской механизированной бригады ВСУ капитан Роман Багаев рассказал, почему украинские танкисты заняли последнее место в танковом соревновании Strong Europe Tank Challenge в Германии.

    В беседе с изданием «Новинарня» военный раскритиковал техническое состояние новейшего украинского танка Т-84 «Оплот», который ВСУ получили вместо Т-64.

    «А ничего не удалось сделать. Мы поехали на четырёх машинах. Во время «операции в наступлении» выстрелил только один танк. На остальных трёх снаряд или не до конца загрузился в пушку, либо не сработали датчики. Система показала, что танк не до конца зарядился, поэтому пушка с гидростопора не снялась, пришлось дозаряжать вручную», — сказал Багаев.

    Среди других причин поражения он назвал незнание натовской специфики, языковые проблемы и отставание в тактике.
     

    https://russian.rt.com/ussr/news/523662-ukraina-proval-tanki-germaniya

    If you don't understand Russian, basically he says that 3 out of 4 Oplot tanks malfunctioned and failed to fire. The Ukraine built a tank, which doesn't work.

    a good example of how AP keep making excuses for the Ukraine

    AP probably expects Jesus to swoop down and heal the tanks.

    • Replies: @AP
    Says the guy who rejects empirically demonstrated facts (Christians basically ended global slavery) because they don't conform to his irrational beliefs.
  153. @Thorfinnsson
    One of my favorite songs incidentally. Thanks for bringing it up.

    Though for aesthetic reasons I really must focus on 80s music.

    http://k39.kn3.net/taringa/1/5/6/2/3/3/25/cruelangel94/B53.jpg?7534

    David Bowie X

    Eurythmics X

    Blondie X

    Fleetwood Mac X
    ,
    Abba X

    Huey Lewis & the News ?

    Perhaps, I never gave them enough of a listen. I’m thinking that you were a fan of Hootie and the Blowfish too? But yeah, the 80’s was a banner time for pop music (I can’t stand most of the stuff coming out today, except for jazz and international).

    Hey Anatoly, if you’re still out there, do you know anything of a great Russian ‘New Age’ group Vermicelli Orchetra? Nice stuff, if you can find it….

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Fleetwood Mac and ABBA are good but are representative of the 70s.

    Hootie and the Blowfish is something I don't mind hearing on the radio but would never choose to play. Formed in '86, but I tie them to the '90s and '00s. I also consider them to be proletarian. Someone who thought the Chrysler PT Cruiser was a cool car and wears NFL jerseys on Sundays would no doubt love Hootie and the Blowfish.

    Blondie bridges the gap between the '70s and '80s. The long form song Call Me used as a soundtrack in the fascinating 1980 film Call Me gets very close to kicking of the 80s, but the color palette of the film isn't '80s. Richard Gere's wardrobe is all grays and earth tones. Additionally Miami is always a better '80s setting than Los Angeles.

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4DI71X6PeM

    The most '80s song ever recorded is the long-form 12" extended play track Blue Monday by New Order. #2 would have to be Don't You Want Me by The Human League.

    The Eurythmics is extremely '80s.

    Bowie is both '70s and '80s, but really the man was such a force of nature that he was just Bowie.
  154. I went to an airshow in the Chippewa Valley today.

    There was a newly restored B-29 available for inspection and interior tour. Remarkable how cramped the interior of the largest WW2 bomber was.

    The Blue Angels performed the final show of the day and needless to say brought the house down. Of course they completed their finale to the Top Gun theme song. 🙂

  155. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich

    * Ukraine comes dead last out of eight in Strong Europe Tank Challenge 2018 (an explanation from AP). Germany wins as usual.
     
    I think this is a good example of how AP keep making excuses for the Ukraine, and is therefore full is shit.

    Ukrainian officer, who participated in the competition was more honest:

    Участник команды из 14-й волынской механизированной бригады ВСУ капитан Роман Багаев рассказал, почему украинские танкисты заняли последнее место в танковом соревновании Strong Europe Tank Challenge в Германии.

    В беседе с изданием «Новинарня» военный раскритиковал техническое состояние новейшего украинского танка Т-84 «Оплот», который ВСУ получили вместо Т-64.

    «А ничего не удалось сделать. Мы поехали на четырёх машинах. Во время «операции в наступлении» выстрелил только один танк. На остальных трёх снаряд или не до конца загрузился в пушку, либо не сработали датчики. Система показала, что танк не до конца зарядился, поэтому пушка с гидростопора не снялась, пришлось дозаряжать вручную», — сказал Багаев.

    Среди других причин поражения он назвал незнание натовской специфики, языковые проблемы и отставание в тактике.
     

    https://russian.rt.com/ussr/news/523662-ukraina-proval-tanki-germaniya

    If you don't understand Russian, basically he says that 3 out of 4 Oplot tanks malfunctioned and failed to fire. The Ukraine built a tank, which doesn't work.

    I think this is a good example of how AP keep making excuses for the Ukraine

    Already mentioned:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370507

    I posted that the tanks didn’t shoot in the first section:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370547

    Those two problems were worth about 150 lost points, which would place Ukraine where it was last year – about the same as Poland (a little worse this year, while it actually beat Poland last year). Ukraine would have been ahead of the UK and the US.

    There’s a photo of results for the first 2 of 13 parts (the ones where Ukraine was affected by technical problems and too-deep dugout, respectively) here:

    https://aw.my.com/en/forum/showthread.php?199458-Strong-Europe-Tank-Challenge-2018

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370831

    “You are correct, it is indeed scandalous that the soldiers were given tanks that couldn’t shoot at at the beginning, costing a lot of points. The Ukrainian soldiers were really outraged by that. It doesn’t reflect badly on the troops, at least.

    But the bottom line, if not for those two problems it looks like Ukrainians would have outperformed the Brits and the Americans, and come close to the Poles whom they beat last year when they didn’t have that problem.”

    ::::::::::::::

    Explanations aren’t excuses.

    And you, of course, simply lie about Ukraine.

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    Karlin's post was linking to your original "explanation" of the Ukraine's failure, and it was full of bullshit excuses.

    I do not have time to keep up with your evolving excuses, and, since neither of us is an expert in tank warfare, technical details are not the point. What is instructive is your instinct to rush to the Ukraine's defence, writing silly crap such as this:

    Ukrainian tanks have lower height than Abrams, so in one important exercise (defense) they lost all points, because their tanks can’t be used as a height for observing surroundings
     
    LOL
  156. @AP

    I think this is a good example of how AP keep making excuses for the Ukraine
     
    Already mentioned:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370507

    I posted that the tanks didn't shoot in the first section:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370547

    Those two problems were worth about 150 lost points, which would place Ukraine where it was last year – about the same as Poland (a little worse this year, while it actually beat Poland last year). Ukraine would have been ahead of the UK and the US.

    There’s a photo of results for the first 2 of 13 parts (the ones where Ukraine was affected by technical problems and too-deep dugout, respectively) here:

    https://aw.my.com/en/forum/showthread.php?199458-Strong-Europe-Tank-Challenge-2018

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370831

    "You are correct, it is indeed scandalous that the soldiers were given tanks that couldn’t shoot at at the beginning, costing a lot of points. The Ukrainian soldiers were really outraged by that. It doesn’t reflect badly on the troops, at least.

    But the bottom line, if not for those two problems it looks like Ukrainians would have outperformed the Brits and the Americans, and come close to the Poles whom they beat last year when they didn’t have that problem."

    ::::::::::::::

    Explanations aren't excuses.

    And you, of course, simply lie about Ukraine.

    Karlin’s post was linking to your original “explanation” of the Ukraine’s failure, and it was full of bullshit excuses.

    I do not have time to keep up with your evolving excuses, and, since neither of us is an expert in tank warfare, technical details are not the point. What is instructive is your instinct to rush to the Ukraine’s defence, writing silly crap such as this:

    Ukrainian tanks have lower height than Abrams, so in one important exercise (defense) they lost all points, because their tanks can’t be used as a height for observing surroundings

    LOL

    • Replies: @AP
    "Bullshit" is making stuff up that isn't true.

    Like when you claimed Kharkiv-based Azov were western Ukrainians. Or Ukrainians in diaspora have been "mediocre" in income (they have among the highest family incomes of white ethnic groups). These claims of yours were simply false.

    As for:

    "Ukrainian tanks have lower height than Abrams, so in one important exercise (defense) they lost all points, because their tanks can’t be used as a height for observing surroundings"

    This wasn't my claim originally. I posted to the original claim. And this "excuse" is corroborated elsewhere.

    Another commenter, who is hardly pro-Ukrainian, provided:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370507

    http://www.tank-net.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=43305&page=2#entry1372477

    Poor performance of pro-Ukrainian team partly explained by T-84 fire control system failure during first day (“assault”). Defense day video – From about 2:00 tanker complain about dugouts too deep (as designed for Abrams) and T-84 was unable to see targets from it – so they were firing from open positions

    ::::::::::::

    So take your problems up with them, you proven liar.

  157. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich
    Karlin's post was linking to your original "explanation" of the Ukraine's failure, and it was full of bullshit excuses.

    I do not have time to keep up with your evolving excuses, and, since neither of us is an expert in tank warfare, technical details are not the point. What is instructive is your instinct to rush to the Ukraine's defence, writing silly crap such as this:

    Ukrainian tanks have lower height than Abrams, so in one important exercise (defense) they lost all points, because their tanks can’t be used as a height for observing surroundings
     
    LOL

    “Bullshit” is making stuff up that isn’t true.

    Like when you claimed Kharkiv-based Azov were western Ukrainians. Or Ukrainians in diaspora have been “mediocre” in income (they have among the highest family incomes of white ethnic groups). These claims of yours were simply false.

    As for:

    “Ukrainian tanks have lower height than Abrams, so in one important exercise (defense) they lost all points, because their tanks can’t be used as a height for observing surroundings”

    This wasn’t my claim originally. I posted to the original claim. And this “excuse” is corroborated elsewhere.

    Another commenter, who is hardly pro-Ukrainian, provided:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-45/#comment-2370507

    http://www.tank-net.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=43305&page=2#entry1372477

    Poor performance of pro-Ukrainian team partly explained by T-84 fire control system failure during first day (“assault”). Defense day video – From about 2:00 tanker complain about dugouts too deep (as designed for Abrams) and T-84 was unable to see targets from it – so they were firing from open positions

    ::::::::::::

    So take your problems up with them, you proven liar.

  158. @iffen
    a good example of how AP keep making excuses for the Ukraine


    AP probably expects Jesus to swoop down and heal the tanks.

    Says the guy who rejects empirically demonstrated facts (Christians basically ended global slavery) because they don’t conform to his irrational beliefs.

    • Replies: @Talha
    I don’t think so. If I read iffen correctly, he stated that Christians get lion’s share credit for ending slavery, but not Christianity itself.

    Iffen can correct me if I’m wrong.

    Peace.
    , @iffen
    Says the guy who rejects empirically demonstrated facts (Christians basically ended global slavery) because they don’t conform to his irrational beliefs.

    You don’t know what empirical means, you apparently don’t know what fact means and you certainly don’t know what irrational means.
  159. @Mr. Hack
    David Bowie X

    Eurythmics X

    Blondie X

    Fleetwood Mac X
    ,
    Abba X

    Huey Lewis & the News ?

    Perhaps, I never gave them enough of a listen. I'm thinking that you were a fan of Hootie and the Blowfish too? But yeah, the 80's was a banner time for pop music (I can't stand most of the stuff coming out today, except for jazz and international).

    Hey Anatoly, if you're still out there, do you know anything of a great Russian 'New Age' group Vermicelli Orchetra? Nice stuff, if you can find it....

    Fleetwood Mac and ABBA are good but are representative of the 70s.

    Hootie and the Blowfish is something I don’t mind hearing on the radio but would never choose to play. Formed in ’86, but I tie them to the ’90s and ’00s. I also consider them to be proletarian. Someone who thought the Chrysler PT Cruiser was a cool car and wears NFL jerseys on Sundays would no doubt love Hootie and the Blowfish.

    Blondie bridges the gap between the ’70s and ’80s. The long form song Call Me used as a soundtrack in the fascinating 1980 film Call Me gets very close to kicking of the 80s, but the color palette of the film isn’t ’80s. Richard Gere’s wardrobe is all grays and earth tones. Additionally Miami is always a better ’80s setting than Los Angeles.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4DI71X6PeM

    The most ’80s song ever recorded is the long-form 12″ extended play track Blue Monday by New Order. #2 would have to be Don’t You Want Me by The Human League.

    The Eurythmics is extremely ’80s.

    Bowie is both ’70s and ’80s, but really the man was such a force of nature that he was just Bowie.

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    "Voices Carry" by Til' Tuesday
    "Something There to Remind Me" by whoever did that song
    "Take on Me" by Ah-ha
    "Something" About You by Level 42
    "Hold Me Now" by the Thompson Twins
    "Poetry in Motion" (She Blinded Me with Science) by whoever
    "I Ran So Far Away" by whatstherename
    "Red Skies" by The Fixx
    "Tarzan Boy" by Baltimora
    "Rhythm of the Night" by DeBarge
    "Don't You" by Simple Minds
    "Just What I Need" by The Cars

    you get the idea.


    I would say that "Like Lovers Do" by the aforementioned Eurythmics is the most 80's song ever followed by "Blue Monday".

    "These Dreams" by Heart and "Summertime" by The Sundays are the most early 90's songs ever. "Come Undone" by Duran Duran is up there.

    ...

    What makes the 80s sound is a very specific type of melancholy sound. This melancholy will manifest itself in songs that aren't meant to be sad and even in songs that are outright upbeat like "Take on Me". "Welcome to the Jungle" by Guns and Roses was released in 1988 but is not "80s music" because it doesn't have the depressed 80s sound.

    ...

    When I hear 80s music and watch 80s teen movies like The Breakfast Club and Weird Science I can't help but believe that the 80s in America must have been the best time and place to come of age.

  160. @Thorfinnsson
    Fleetwood Mac and ABBA are good but are representative of the 70s.

    Hootie and the Blowfish is something I don't mind hearing on the radio but would never choose to play. Formed in '86, but I tie them to the '90s and '00s. I also consider them to be proletarian. Someone who thought the Chrysler PT Cruiser was a cool car and wears NFL jerseys on Sundays would no doubt love Hootie and the Blowfish.

    Blondie bridges the gap between the '70s and '80s. The long form song Call Me used as a soundtrack in the fascinating 1980 film Call Me gets very close to kicking of the 80s, but the color palette of the film isn't '80s. Richard Gere's wardrobe is all grays and earth tones. Additionally Miami is always a better '80s setting than Los Angeles.

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4DI71X6PeM

    The most '80s song ever recorded is the long-form 12" extended play track Blue Monday by New Order. #2 would have to be Don't You Want Me by The Human League.

    The Eurythmics is extremely '80s.

    Bowie is both '70s and '80s, but really the man was such a force of nature that he was just Bowie.

    “Voices Carry” by Til’ Tuesday
    “Something There to Remind Me” by whoever did that song
    “Take on Me” by Ah-ha
    “Something” About You by Level 42
    “Hold Me Now” by the Thompson Twins
    “Poetry in Motion” (She Blinded Me with Science) by whoever
    “I Ran So Far Away” by whatstherename
    “Red Skies” by The Fixx
    “Tarzan Boy” by Baltimora
    “Rhythm of the Night” by DeBarge
    “Don’t You” by Simple Minds
    “Just What I Need” by The Cars

    you get the idea.

    I would say that “Like Lovers Do” by the aforementioned Eurythmics is the most 80’s song ever followed by “Blue Monday”.

    “These Dreams” by Heart and “Summertime” by The Sundays are the most early 90’s songs ever. “Come Undone” by Duran Duran is up there.

    What makes the 80s sound is a very specific type of melancholy sound. This melancholy will manifest itself in songs that aren’t meant to be sad and even in songs that are outright upbeat like “Take on Me”. “Welcome to the Jungle” by Guns and Roses was released in 1988 but is not “80s music” because it doesn’t have the depressed 80s sound.

    When I hear 80s music and watch 80s teen movies like The Breakfast Club and Weird Science I can’t help but believe that the 80s in America must have been the best time and place to come of age.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    There's a separate '80s music in the form of power rock, glam metal, hair metal, etc. This was a straight forward lineal evolution of music from the '70s, rather than a radically new genre like New Wave.

    This music isn't '80s (despite chronologically being in the '80s), but it is also its own cultural episode. The rock musical Rock of Ages starring Tom Cruise as the fictional rock star "Stacy Jaxx" is a great depiction of this.

    Who knew in 1987 when Welcome to the Jungle was released that in only a few years the stadium-filling rock stars who had bestrode the world like gods since Elvis first appeared that rock music would end only a few years later with the suicide of Kurt Cobain?

    I don't know that the '80s were a better time to come of age than the postwar era as lots of rot had already set in. But it provides a suitable white aesthetic which is recognizably modern and technological while still inducing nostalgia (including those of us like me who were born too late for it).

    A lot of this also comes through in the industrial design of the period.

    Hence why there are lots of alt-right Millennial and Generation Zyklon artists producing brand new synthwave music today.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    There's a separate '80s music in the form of power rock, glam metal, hair metal, etc. This was a straight forward lineal evolution of music from the '70s, rather than a radically new genre like New Wave.

    This music isn't '80s (despite chronologically being in the '80s), but it is also its own cultural episode. The rock musical Rock of Ages starring Tom Cruise as the fictional rock star "Stacy Jaxx" is a great depiction of this.

    Who knew in 1987 when Welcome to the Jungle was released that in only a few years the stadium-filling rock stars who had bestrode the world like gods since Elvis first appeared that rock music would end only a few years later with the suicide of Kurt Cobain?

    I don't know that the '80s were a better time to come of age than the postwar era as lots of rot had already set in. But it provides a suitable white aesthetic which is recognizably modern and technological while still inducing nostalgia (including those of us like me who were born too late for it).

    A lot of this also comes through in the industrial design of the period.

    Hence why there are lots of alt-right Millennial and Generation Zyklon artists producing brand new synthwave music today.
    , @Mr. Hack
    Simply Red?
  161. @Greasy William
    "Voices Carry" by Til' Tuesday
    "Something There to Remind Me" by whoever did that song
    "Take on Me" by Ah-ha
    "Something" About You by Level 42
    "Hold Me Now" by the Thompson Twins
    "Poetry in Motion" (She Blinded Me with Science) by whoever
    "I Ran So Far Away" by whatstherename
    "Red Skies" by The Fixx
    "Tarzan Boy" by Baltimora
    "Rhythm of the Night" by DeBarge
    "Don't You" by Simple Minds
    "Just What I Need" by The Cars

    you get the idea.


    I would say that "Like Lovers Do" by the aforementioned Eurythmics is the most 80's song ever followed by "Blue Monday".

    "These Dreams" by Heart and "Summertime" by The Sundays are the most early 90's songs ever. "Come Undone" by Duran Duran is up there.

    ...

    What makes the 80s sound is a very specific type of melancholy sound. This melancholy will manifest itself in songs that aren't meant to be sad and even in songs that are outright upbeat like "Take on Me". "Welcome to the Jungle" by Guns and Roses was released in 1988 but is not "80s music" because it doesn't have the depressed 80s sound.

    ...

    When I hear 80s music and watch 80s teen movies like The Breakfast Club and Weird Science I can't help but believe that the 80s in America must have been the best time and place to come of age.

    There’s a separate ’80s music in the form of power rock, glam metal, hair metal, etc. This was a straight forward lineal evolution of music from the ’70s, rather than a radically new genre like New Wave.

    This music isn’t ’80s (despite chronologically being in the ’80s), but it is also its own cultural episode. The rock musical Rock of Ages starring Tom Cruise as the fictional rock star “Stacy Jaxx” is a great depiction of this.

    Who knew in 1987 when Welcome to the Jungle was released that in only a few years the stadium-filling rock stars who had bestrode the world like gods since Elvis first appeared that rock music would end only a few years later with the suicide of Kurt Cobain?

    I don’t know that the ’80s were a better time to come of age than the postwar era as lots of rot had already set in. But it provides a suitable white aesthetic which is recognizably modern and technological while still inducing nostalgia (including those of us like me who were born too late for it).

    A lot of this also comes through in the industrial design of the period.

    Hence why there are lots of alt-right Millennial and Generation Zyklon artists producing brand new synthwave music today.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    The 1980s saw the development of extreme metal, which was quite different from earlier forms of heavy metal. Thrash metal broke into the mainstream with Metallica, which to this day is probably the biggest remaining rock band.

    Hip hop music was basically also a 1980s development, though it had its roots earlier. It had its roots in reggae. (In pop music, nothing is completely new.) Gangsta hip hop originated in the 1980s, though its popularity wasn’t recognized until the 1990s. With the SoundScan era after 1991 it turned out that the biggest gangsta hip hop performers (as well as Metallica) were already in superstar status. But regular hip hop was already fully mainstream in the 1980s.

    It’s not very important. I think other than supporting the availability and composition of classical music (the latter is tricky because a lot of the new compositions are useless, and they all have to compete against the very greatest of the last several centuries), music should be left to the proles to choose. Nazi Germany even promoted some very American sounding music which they usually denounced as degenerate, because that was popular. Hitler wanted to force the proles to listen to classical music, but that’s impossible due to IQ issues. IQ aside, for example during workouts some form of pop music (in the broadest possible meaning, including everything, like hip hop and metal) is better than classical.

    People are passionate about their favorite music (even if it’s shitty and ephemeral by any objective standard), so the government telling people what to listen to will only result in the government losing popularity. It can probably be influenced to an extent, but stupid trends from abroad will always exist and it’s futile to resist them.
  162. @Greasy William
    "Voices Carry" by Til' Tuesday
    "Something There to Remind Me" by whoever did that song
    "Take on Me" by Ah-ha
    "Something" About You by Level 42
    "Hold Me Now" by the Thompson Twins
    "Poetry in Motion" (She Blinded Me with Science) by whoever
    "I Ran So Far Away" by whatstherename
    "Red Skies" by The Fixx
    "Tarzan Boy" by Baltimora
    "Rhythm of the Night" by DeBarge
    "Don't You" by Simple Minds
    "Just What I Need" by The Cars

    you get the idea.


    I would say that "Like Lovers Do" by the aforementioned Eurythmics is the most 80's song ever followed by "Blue Monday".

    "These Dreams" by Heart and "Summertime" by The Sundays are the most early 90's songs ever. "Come Undone" by Duran Duran is up there.

    ...

    What makes the 80s sound is a very specific type of melancholy sound. This melancholy will manifest itself in songs that aren't meant to be sad and even in songs that are outright upbeat like "Take on Me". "Welcome to the Jungle" by Guns and Roses was released in 1988 but is not "80s music" because it doesn't have the depressed 80s sound.

    ...

    When I hear 80s music and watch 80s teen movies like The Breakfast Club and Weird Science I can't help but believe that the 80s in America must have been the best time and place to come of age.

    There’s a separate ’80s music in the form of power rock, glam metal, hair metal, etc. This was a straight forward lineal evolution of music from the ’70s, rather than a radically new genre like New Wave.

    This music isn’t ’80s (despite chronologically being in the ’80s), but it is also its own cultural episode. The rock musical Rock of Ages starring Tom Cruise as the fictional rock star “Stacy Jaxx” is a great depiction of this.

    Who knew in 1987 when Welcome to the Jungle was released that in only a few years the stadium-filling rock stars who had bestrode the world like gods since Elvis first appeared that rock music would end only a few years later with the suicide of Kurt Cobain?

    I don’t know that the ’80s were a better time to come of age than the postwar era as lots of rot had already set in. But it provides a suitable white aesthetic which is recognizably modern and technological while still inducing nostalgia (including those of us like me who were born too late for it).

    A lot of this also comes through in the industrial design of the period.

    Hence why there are lots of alt-right Millennial and Generation Zyklon artists producing brand new synthwave music today.

    • Replies: @Guillaume Tell
    How about Wang Chung (the memorable « everybody has fun tonight », I would agree with you, despite being apparently upbeat, has melancholic overtones)?

    And how about ABC? Poison Arrow comes to mind when it comes to extreme 1980s aesthetics.
  163. Anonymous[308] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    The deal is that other than major medical insurance the benefits are not that expensive. That said we have margins around 20%, and I think I can get us to 25%. Yearly top line growth is around 20%, something I'd like to accelerate.

    Most workers, especially proles, irrationally overvalue their benefits.

    Or you could consider it rational given the labor involved in providing such things for yourself, and the fact that most Americans prefer not to save much money owing to well-developed credit systems in America. So benefits provide a safety net and frees them to spend their money on things they prefer like housing, entertainment, cars, and so forth.

    If we go with the rational thesis the Web of Benefits is a mutually beneficial arrangement in which their labor and loyalty are bartered for my brain and administrative talents.

    Some employees I'm not too pleased with, but yes many are excellent. We have one girl in particular who testified against her own sister (to be clear her sister was in the wrong) in an administrative law hearing regarding unemployment insurance. Despite having a terminally ill toddler she still gives us 50-60 hours a week.

    Beyond her ordinary wages and benefit I did her the favor of arranging a new, well-compensated job for her husband at a company my friend runs. I plan on developing her into an executive, which is kind of amusing to me since she's both prole and female. But whatever. Talent is talent.

    We have a strategy of offering the best blue collar wages and benefits in town so we have our pick of talent and little to no turnover.

    Professional talent is difficult for us to recruit since we're in the middle of nowhere, so I effectively have three or four jobs. Fortunately we did manage to recruit one of the best engineers in our field in the entire country, but he refuses to live here.

    I've also found that for positions which don't require creativity or strength that women are generally better employees since they love following orders and love drudgery, and they are much less likely to demand promotions or pay increases. Single moms are particularly good since they have no other options. That said one issue with female employees is they always need time off to deal with their families.

    Middle of nowhere upper midwest really doesn’t sound like a fun place to live. Why not move operations to the south? How many employees do you have?

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    18.

    I'll be able to relocate somewhere civilized within a few years (while keeping operations here).
  164. @Anonymous
    Middle of nowhere upper midwest really doesn't sound like a fun place to live. Why not move operations to the south? How many employees do you have?

    18.

    I’ll be able to relocate somewhere civilized within a few years (while keeping operations here).

  165. @AP
    Says the guy who rejects empirically demonstrated facts (Christians basically ended global slavery) because they don't conform to his irrational beliefs.

    I don’t think so. If I read iffen correctly, he stated that Christians get lion’s share credit for ending slavery, but not Christianity itself.

    Iffen can correct me if I’m wrong.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @iffen
    he stated that Christians get lion’s share credit

    No, I did not.

    People who were Christians (abolitionists) agitated for ending slavery. Establishment Christianity, not.

  166. These are the headlines I’ve been seeing in Western media lately:

    Russia propose raising retirement age above life expectancy
    https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-44495136

    The very definition of fake news. Coming from a state-owned media outlet no less.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    The very people making fun of this would be praising it as some bold reform if someone like Yeltsin was implementing it.

    They also don’t mention that these reforms take a decade to implement due to grandfathering of those already retired or just about to retire. You cannot just tell a 59-year-old that he won’t be retiring next year, only in 2024, so a five year increase takes at least ten years. In ten years the life expectancy could increase.

    In Hungary male life expectancy was 69 years (and roughly unchanged since 1960!) when a similar increase of 60 to 65 was announced around 1960, and people were criticizing that there will be only a few years left to enjoy. But it’s a fallacy, because most who don’t survive to 65 die before 60 either, while those who reach 65 have a longer remaining life expectancy.

    Anyway, it’s interesting that the Hungarian reform was praised by the same people who are now condemning the Russian one. Similarly, I bet you these very same people would love to cut social security spending in the US or raising the retirement age in any western country. Like they were praising Macron.
  167. @AP
    Says the guy who rejects empirically demonstrated facts (Christians basically ended global slavery) because they don't conform to his irrational beliefs.

    Says the guy who rejects empirically demonstrated facts (Christians basically ended global slavery) because they don’t conform to his irrational beliefs.

    You don’t know what empirical means, you apparently don’t know what fact means and you certainly don’t know what irrational means.

    • Replies: @Anon

    You don’t know what empirical means, you apparently don’t know what fact means and you certainly don’t know what irrational means.
     
    Beware of drunken fights, they don't end well for anybody.
    , @AP
    You can't observe objectively, you deny or at best are ignorant of facts, and you are irrational.

    Better?
  168. @Talha
    I don’t think so. If I read iffen correctly, he stated that Christians get lion’s share credit for ending slavery, but not Christianity itself.

    Iffen can correct me if I’m wrong.

    Peace.

    he stated that Christians get lion’s share credit

    No, I did not.

    People who were Christians (abolitionists) agitated for ending slavery. Establishment Christianity, not.

    • Replies: @Talha
    Excellent distinction - I agree, but with the below caveat...

    Though establishment Christianity did end slavery among Christians on the Old Continent - there is little doubt of this. It was always heathens and Muslims (redundant ?) on the periphery that were fair game. In fact establishment Christianity often tried to stop Christians from selling heathens to Muslims; one major concern was that these same people were often found as slave soldiers in battle against Christian armies. So in this sense Christianity should be credited with ending most slavery in Europe itself.

    Islam did the same thing between Muslim peoples, but raiding non-Muslim territories (that did not have treaties in place) on the borders was considered OK.

    Peace.

  169. @iffen
    he stated that Christians get lion’s share credit

    No, I did not.

    People who were Christians (abolitionists) agitated for ending slavery. Establishment Christianity, not.

    Excellent distinction – I agree, but with the below caveat…

    Though establishment Christianity did end slavery among Christians on the Old Continent – there is little doubt of this. It was always heathens and Muslims (redundant ?) on the periphery that were fair game. In fact establishment Christianity often tried to stop Christians from selling heathens to Muslims; one major concern was that these same people were often found as slave soldiers in battle against Christian armies. So in this sense Christianity should be credited with ending most slavery in Europe itself.

    Islam did the same thing between Muslim peoples, but raiding non-Muslim territories (that did not have treaties in place) on the borders was considered OK.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @for-the-record
    raiding non-Muslim territories (that did not have treaties in place) on the borders

    Rather expansive definition of "border", it seems to me.

    They often made raids, called Razzias, on European coastal towns to capture Christian slaves to sell at slave markets in places such as Turkey, Egypt, Iran, Algeria and Morocco. According to Robert Davis, from the 16th to 19th century, pirates captured 1 million to 1.25 million Europeans as slaves. These slaves were captured mainly from seaside villages in Italy, Spain and Portugal, and from farther places like France, England, Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Russia, Scandinavia and even Iceland, India, Southeast Asia and North America.

    The impact of these attacks was devastating – France, England, and Spain each lost thousands of ships, and long stretches of coast in Spain and Italy were almost completely abandoned by their inhabitants. Pirate raids discouraged settlement along the coast until the 19th century.

    Concise History of Islam
    By Muzaffar Husain Syed, Syed Saud Akhtar, B D Usmani
     
  170. @iffen
    Says the guy who rejects empirically demonstrated facts (Christians basically ended global slavery) because they don’t conform to his irrational beliefs.

    You don’t know what empirical means, you apparently don’t know what fact means and you certainly don’t know what irrational means.

    You don’t know what empirical means, you apparently don’t know what fact means and you certainly don’t know what irrational means.

    Beware of drunken fights, they don’t end well for anybody.

  171. An interesting chart I found, showing government spending in Russia on various items as a share of GDP

    One can see how spending on pensions has steadily risen since 2011, necessitating a reform. At almost 9% of GDP, share of pensions is greater than OECD average.

    • Replies: @Jon0815
    It's estimated that this raising of the retirement age will increase Russian GDP growth by 0.3-0.5% per year over the next 15 years.
  172. @iffen
    Says the guy who rejects empirically demonstrated facts (Christians basically ended global slavery) because they don’t conform to his irrational beliefs.

    You don’t know what empirical means, you apparently don’t know what fact means and you certainly don’t know what irrational means.

    You can’t observe objectively, you deny or at best are ignorant of facts, and you are irrational.

    Better?

  173. @Greasy William
    "Voices Carry" by Til' Tuesday
    "Something There to Remind Me" by whoever did that song
    "Take on Me" by Ah-ha
    "Something" About You by Level 42
    "Hold Me Now" by the Thompson Twins
    "Poetry in Motion" (She Blinded Me with Science) by whoever
    "I Ran So Far Away" by whatstherename
    "Red Skies" by The Fixx
    "Tarzan Boy" by Baltimora
    "Rhythm of the Night" by DeBarge
    "Don't You" by Simple Minds
    "Just What I Need" by The Cars

    you get the idea.


    I would say that "Like Lovers Do" by the aforementioned Eurythmics is the most 80's song ever followed by "Blue Monday".

    "These Dreams" by Heart and "Summertime" by The Sundays are the most early 90's songs ever. "Come Undone" by Duran Duran is up there.

    ...

    What makes the 80s sound is a very specific type of melancholy sound. This melancholy will manifest itself in songs that aren't meant to be sad and even in songs that are outright upbeat like "Take on Me". "Welcome to the Jungle" by Guns and Roses was released in 1988 but is not "80s music" because it doesn't have the depressed 80s sound.

    ...

    When I hear 80s music and watch 80s teen movies like The Breakfast Club and Weird Science I can't help but believe that the 80s in America must have been the best time and place to come of age.

    Simply Red?

  174. @Felix Keverich
    These are the headlines I've been seeing in Western media lately:

    Russia propose raising retirement age above life expectancy
    https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-44495136

    The very definition of fake news. Coming from a state-owned media outlet no less.

    The very people making fun of this would be praising it as some bold reform if someone like Yeltsin was implementing it.

    They also don’t mention that these reforms take a decade to implement due to grandfathering of those already retired or just about to retire. You cannot just tell a 59-year-old that he won’t be retiring next year, only in 2024, so a five year increase takes at least ten years. In ten years the life expectancy could increase.

    In Hungary male life expectancy was 69 years (and roughly unchanged since 1960!) when a similar increase of 60 to 65 was announced around 1960, and people were criticizing that there will be only a few years left to enjoy. But it’s a fallacy, because most who don’t survive to 65 die before 60 either, while those who reach 65 have a longer remaining life expectancy.

    Anyway, it’s interesting that the Hungarian reform was praised by the same people who are now condemning the Russian one. Similarly, I bet you these very same people would love to cut social security spending in the US or raising the retirement age in any western country. Like they were praising Macron.

    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    Their hypocrisy is not the worst part for me here. The worst part is that they deliberately lie to make the reform appear more drastic, than it actually is. The current life expectancy in Russia is 73 years. It's lower for men, but even so as of today 57% of men in Russia are expected to live past the age of 65. It's simply not true to say that Russians will not be living to retirement, and yet this is what many Western headlines say.

    http://www.newsweek.com/russia-proposes-raising-retirement-age-above-life-expectancy-980448
    Newsweek is a neocon publication, that's big on warning US public about the dangers of Russian "fake news". So, naturally, they are doing the very thing that they accuse Russians of doing.

    , @Dmitry
    Reinor this week it's huge numbers of people in Russia complaining about this proposal. The complaining is not from the West (who don't have any interest in retirement ages).

    At the same time, most analysts understand that it is a good and necessary policy to raise the retirement age.

    It's a hallmark example of 'bitter medicine' (you don't like the taste, but it's good for you).

    -

    However, raising the VAT to 20% is not supported by analysts.

    On the VAT issue, the government already has access to inconceivably vast amounts of money. The direction should not be to transfer more money from citizens (and all citizens have to pay VAT) to the government. The direction should be the opposite: for the government to be more efficient in managing its spending.

    This is a debate occurring and interesting in many countries. I remember seeing a discussion during the American Presidential election debates in 2012 (Romney vs Obama) - Romney was arguing government "should return money to citizens" - as the way of describing a policy of not taxing so much.

  175. @Thorfinnsson
    There's a separate '80s music in the form of power rock, glam metal, hair metal, etc. This was a straight forward lineal evolution of music from the '70s, rather than a radically new genre like New Wave.

    This music isn't '80s (despite chronologically being in the '80s), but it is also its own cultural episode. The rock musical Rock of Ages starring Tom Cruise as the fictional rock star "Stacy Jaxx" is a great depiction of this.

    Who knew in 1987 when Welcome to the Jungle was released that in only a few years the stadium-filling rock stars who had bestrode the world like gods since Elvis first appeared that rock music would end only a few years later with the suicide of Kurt Cobain?

    I don't know that the '80s were a better time to come of age than the postwar era as lots of rot had already set in. But it provides a suitable white aesthetic which is recognizably modern and technological while still inducing nostalgia (including those of us like me who were born too late for it).

    A lot of this also comes through in the industrial design of the period.

    Hence why there are lots of alt-right Millennial and Generation Zyklon artists producing brand new synthwave music today.

    The 1980s saw the development of extreme metal, which was quite different from earlier forms of heavy metal. Thrash metal broke into the mainstream with Metallica, which to this day is probably the biggest remaining rock band.

    Hip hop music was basically also a 1980s development, though it had its roots earlier. It had its roots in reggae. (In pop music, nothing is completely new.) Gangsta hip hop originated in the 1980s, though its popularity wasn’t recognized until the 1990s. With the SoundScan era after 1991 it turned out that the biggest gangsta hip hop performers (as well as Metallica) were already in superstar status. But regular hip hop was already fully mainstream in the 1980s.

    It’s not very important. I think other than supporting the availability and composition of classical music (the latter is tricky because a lot of the new compositions are useless, and they all have to compete against the very greatest of the last several centuries), music should be left to the proles to choose. Nazi Germany even promoted some very American sounding music which they usually denounced as degenerate, because that was popular. Hitler wanted to force the proles to listen to classical music, but that’s impossible due to IQ issues. IQ aside, for example during workouts some form of pop music (in the broadest possible meaning, including everything, like hip hop and metal) is better than classical.

    People are passionate about their favorite music (even if it’s shitty and ephemeral by any objective standard), so the government telling people what to listen to will only result in the government losing popularity. It can probably be influenced to an extent, but stupid trends from abroad will always exist and it’s futile to resist them.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Music is of lower importance than immigration, but not irrelevant. We're fighting for truth and beauty.

    I agree that directly controlling music Soviet-style is a bad idea, but one can subtly guide what people listen to simply by setting one's thumb on the scales.
  176. I just read that Zimbardo’s famous Stanford prison experiment was fake. That’s interesting.

  177. So I just noticed the American concentration camps for children in the Hungarian news.

    Also apparently Melania just missed a great opportunity to keep her mouth shut.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Have you or your loved ones have been affected by border separations? Tell CNN.


    Have you or someone you know been affected by family separations at the US border? CNN's reporters want to hear about it.

    You can reach us by sending a text, WhatsApp message or iMessage to CNN at +1 347-322-0415.
     
    Someone troll this line.
  178. @reiner Tor
    The very people making fun of this would be praising it as some bold reform if someone like Yeltsin was implementing it.

    They also don’t mention that these reforms take a decade to implement due to grandfathering of those already retired or just about to retire. You cannot just tell a 59-year-old that he won’t be retiring next year, only in 2024, so a five year increase takes at least ten years. In ten years the life expectancy could increase.

    In Hungary male life expectancy was 69 years (and roughly unchanged since 1960!) when a similar increase of 60 to 65 was announced around 1960, and people were criticizing that there will be only a few years left to enjoy. But it’s a fallacy, because most who don’t survive to 65 die before 60 either, while those who reach 65 have a longer remaining life expectancy.

    Anyway, it’s interesting that the Hungarian reform was praised by the same people who are now condemning the Russian one. Similarly, I bet you these very same people would love to cut social security spending in the US or raising the retirement age in any western country. Like they were praising Macron.

    Their hypocrisy is not the worst part for me here. The worst part is that they deliberately lie to make the reform appear more drastic, than it actually is. The current life expectancy in Russia is 73 years. It’s lower for men, but even so as of today 57% of men in Russia are expected to live past the age of 65. It’s simply not true to say that Russians will not be living to retirement, and yet this is what many Western headlines say.

    http://www.newsweek.com/russia-proposes-raising-retirement-age-above-life-expectancy-980448
    Newsweek is a neocon publication, that’s big on warning US public about the dangers of Russian “fake news”. So, naturally, they are doing the very thing that they accuse Russians of doing.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    To be fair, the life expectancy of Russian men does seem to be below 65, I’ve seen 63 and 64 (close to 65) mentioned, and they do write that two fifth of men may not live to see it. These are factually correct claims.
  179. @Felix Keverich
    Their hypocrisy is not the worst part for me here. The worst part is that they deliberately lie to make the reform appear more drastic, than it actually is. The current life expectancy in Russia is 73 years. It's lower for men, but even so as of today 57% of men in Russia are expected to live past the age of 65. It's simply not true to say that Russians will not be living to retirement, and yet this is what many Western headlines say.

    http://www.newsweek.com/russia-proposes-raising-retirement-age-above-life-expectancy-980448
    Newsweek is a neocon publication, that's big on warning US public about the dangers of Russian "fake news". So, naturally, they are doing the very thing that they accuse Russians of doing.

    To be fair, the life expectancy of Russian men does seem to be below 65, I’ve seen 63 and 64 (close to 65) mentioned, and they do write that two fifth of men may not live to see it. These are factually correct claims.

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    You may have seen various numbers, but if you are writing an article on the subject, it shouldn't hard to find the latest official number - it's 67,5 years for men in 2017
    http://www.gks.ru/free_doc/new_site/population/demo/demo26.xlsx

    Besides, most people won't even read past the headline, and the headlines look like this:


    "Retire Never? Russia Sets Age of Retirement After Death"
    "Russia propose raising retirement age above life expectancy"
     
    Those are intentionally misleading and factually wrong.
    , @Dmitry

    To be fair, the life expectancy of Russian men does seem to be below 65, I’ve seen 63 and 64 (close to 65) mentioned, and they do write that two fifth of men may not live to see it. These are factually correct claims.

     

    It's not the relevant datapoint, since it is the life expectancy from birth.

    For the retirement argument, you need to look at the life-expectancy for a person about to retire (after they have survived to this age). Such a life expectancy level will be far higher, than the life-expectancy from birth figures.

    The life-expectancy at 60 in Russian Federation is 17 years (i.e. a person at 60 years old, has a life-expectancy of living to 77 years old).

    http://www.helpage.org/global-agewatch/population-ageing-data/life-expectancy-at-60/
    , @for-the-record
    To be fair, the life expectancy of Russian men does seem to be below 65

    When Social Security was enacted in the US in 1935, with 65 as a retirement age, life expectancy was 62 (60 for men, 64 for women). So in that sense this all seems simply to be much ado about nothing, or more accurately simply standard Russia-bashing.
  180. @reiner Tor
    To be fair, the life expectancy of Russian men does seem to be below 65, I’ve seen 63 and 64 (close to 65) mentioned, and they do write that two fifth of men may not live to see it. These are factually correct claims.

    You may have seen various numbers, but if you are writing an article on the subject, it shouldn’t hard to find the latest official number – it’s 67,5 years for men in 2017
    http://www.gks.ru/free_doc/new_site/population/demo/demo26.xlsx

    Besides, most people won’t even read past the headline, and the headlines look like this:

    “Retire Never? Russia Sets Age of Retirement After Death”
    “Russia propose raising retirement age above life expectancy”

    Those are intentionally misleading and factually wrong.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    Correct: https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russian-demographics-in-2018/

    Life expectancy has been surging in recent years:

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/russia-life-expectancy-1959-2017.png
    , @reiner Tor
    I usually assume that any bad news about Russia is just bullshit. It’s a much safer bet than the opposite.
  181. @Felix Keverich
    You may have seen various numbers, but if you are writing an article on the subject, it shouldn't hard to find the latest official number - it's 67,5 years for men in 2017
    http://www.gks.ru/free_doc/new_site/population/demo/demo26.xlsx

    Besides, most people won't even read past the headline, and the headlines look like this:


    "Retire Never? Russia Sets Age of Retirement After Death"
    "Russia propose raising retirement age above life expectancy"
     
    Those are intentionally misleading and factually wrong.

    Correct: https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russian-demographics-in-2018/

    Life expectancy has been surging in recent years:

    • Replies: @Gerard2
    Higher than Ukraines, for the first time. When you consider the regions of extreme cold, short days, ethnic issues.........that is incredible, and shows the depravity of the scumbag Ukrainian state
  182. @Anatoly Karlin
    Correct: https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russian-demographics-in-2018/

    Life expectancy has been surging in recent years:

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/russia-life-expectancy-1959-2017.png

    Higher than Ukraines, for the first time. When you consider the regions of extreme cold, short days, ethnic issues………that is incredible, and shows the depravity of the scumbag Ukrainian state

    • Replies: @AP

    Higher than Ukraines, for the first time.
     
    With or without Donbas?

    You are once again gloating at the expense of the more pro-Russian people within Ukraine.

    Moreover, what is the source? This one states 72.11 (increase .21%) for Ukraine in 2017 and 71.2 (increase .19%) for Russia:

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Ukraine/topics/Demographics/Age/Life-expectancy-at-birth

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Russian-Federation/topics/Demographics/Population-forecast/Life-expectancy

    According to WHO in 2017 Ukraine's life expectancy in 2017 was 71.3 and Russia's was 70.5:

    http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/russia-life-expectancy

    When you consider the regions of extreme cold, short days,
     
    Another stupid argument. Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world's highest life expectancy. Canada is #12.

    ethnic issues
     
    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016. Tatars also live longer than Slavs. Good job undermining yourself.
  183. The US seems to be complaining that it’s losing the ability to replace its ammunition stockpile. I think it’s probably a bit of an exaggeration.

    https://www.defensenews.com/pentagon/2018/05/22/the-us-is-running-out-of-bombs-and-it-may-soon-struggle-to-make-more/

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    It seems as though they dumped half of their ammunition stockpile on the city of Raqqa last year. US might need to change its approach to warfare in the future.

    https://news.vice.com/en_us/article/yweknx/the-us-destroyed-raqqa-to-defeat-isis-locals-dont-know-if-theyll-ever-rebuild-it
  184. Israel is criminalizing the filming of its soldiers if the resulting video shows them in a bad light.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/ministers-expected-to-back-bill-criminalizing-filming-soldiers/

  185. @Felix Keverich
    You may have seen various numbers, but if you are writing an article on the subject, it shouldn't hard to find the latest official number - it's 67,5 years for men in 2017
    http://www.gks.ru/free_doc/new_site/population/demo/demo26.xlsx

    Besides, most people won't even read past the headline, and the headlines look like this:


    "Retire Never? Russia Sets Age of Retirement After Death"
    "Russia propose raising retirement age above life expectancy"
     
    Those are intentionally misleading and factually wrong.

    I usually assume that any bad news about Russia is just bullshit. It’s a much safer bet than the opposite.

  186. @Felix Keverich
    An interesting chart I found, showing government spending in Russia on various items as a share of GDP

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DWuSIfnXUAIMh0l.jpg

    One can see how spending on pensions has steadily risen since 2011, necessitating a reform. At almost 9% of GDP, share of pensions is greater than OECD average.

    It’s estimated that this raising of the retirement age will increase Russian GDP growth by 0.3-0.5% per year over the next 15 years.

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    It will be a very gradual raising of retirement age, so the effect will be minimal at first, but will grow more pronounced over time.

    https://cdn.vdmsti.ru/image/2018/4m/ekqn/default-ix.png

    Upper graph shows the number of pensioners. Lower graph is the impact on economic growth in percentage of GDP.

  187. In the US, the chimpout over the border continues and is actually intensifying.

    It is difficult to tell if the Dems are being forced into it by their increasingly unhinged base or whether they really do think this is good politics for them.

    Right now there is no end in sight. Trump is not going to halt this policy and the Dems aren’t going to stop chimping out. If this lasts until the midterms, great.

    • Replies: @iffen
    Media created and orchestrated spectacles like this are bad optics and upset the mushy middle.

    Ordinary Americans who are arrested are separated from their children every day, but illegals are special. :)

  188. AP says:
    @Gerard2
    Higher than Ukraines, for the first time. When you consider the regions of extreme cold, short days, ethnic issues.........that is incredible, and shows the depravity of the scumbag Ukrainian state

    Higher than Ukraines, for the first time.

    With or without Donbas?

    You are once again gloating at the expense of the more pro-Russian people within Ukraine.

    Moreover, what is the source? This one states 72.11 (increase .21%) for Ukraine in 2017 and 71.2 (increase .19%) for Russia:

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Ukraine/topics/Demographics/Age/Life-expectancy-at-birth

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Russian-Federation/topics/Demographics/Population-forecast/Life-expectancy

    According to WHO in 2017 Ukraine’s life expectancy in 2017 was 71.3 and Russia’s was 70.5:

    http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/russia-life-expectancy

    When you consider the regions of extreme cold, short days,

    Another stupid argument. Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world’s highest life expectancy. Canada is #12.

    ethnic issues

    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016. Tatars also live longer than Slavs. Good job undermining yourself.

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    Dude, I know statistics (or integrity) is not your strong suit, but you read this blog. Why don't you use accurate data?

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russian-demographics-in-2018/

    Your desire to make excuses for the Ukraine is overwhelming.
    , @Mikhail

    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016. Tatars also live longer than Slavs.
     
    Good counter to Paul Goble's ongoing BS, suggesting that the Russians suppress non-Russians, when the later are increasing in population, in addition to the above quoted.

    Wonder how the American Indians are doing as a comparison?
    , @Gerard2

    With or without Donbas?

    You are once again gloating at the expense of the more pro-Russian people within Ukraine.

    Moreover, what is the source? This one states 72.11 (increase .21%) for Ukraine in 2017 and 71.2 (increase .19%) for Russia:
     
    LOL...this pitiful garbage is hilarious, to put it mildly. Typical of a moronic loser.
    Russia's life expectancy is 72.5 you retarded prick . Ukraine's is less than 72 ( obviously those are figures that don't count the DNR/LNR ,as with everything of Ukraine's doped-up statistics you thick POS.)

    72.5 vs less than 72 is an amazing and inexplicable turnaround you cretin.
    Your stats are about has relevant and as accurate as my toilet brush.

    What's more , my source is pure common sense....and Veronika Skvortsova ...a very successful woman full of integrity and purpose. Ukraine's "Health Department" is headed, naturally, by a crazed Canadian Banderatard Nazi bitch currently involved in bringing "exciting things" to Ukraine, like massive increases in TB rates, numerous other diseases, malnourishment level explosion....and even more failings in hospitals

    Another stupid argument. Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world’s highest life expectancy. Canada is #12.
     
    errrrmmm...the winters in Reykjavik (70% of Iceland population)and areas in which 95%+ of the population of Sweden live ,Stockholm and Malmo , (the only 2 cities in Sweden I have visited) alone are 3 out of the 10 million Swedish population,) are not anywhere near the extreme cold of areas as Murmansk,Omsk, Irkutsk, Yakutia .....or even Saint Petersburg and numerous others you thick prick POS! Kiev wouldn't survive in nearly 3 months of total darkness like Norilsk. Your dipshit talk is even more stupid when we consider that they and Canada don't have the huge operational heavy industries, big cities with sizeable populations, in areas of extreme cold&daylight issues..... as Russia does. Norilsk has 2-3 more times the population than the entire northern area of Canada you useless POS! Stockholm's winters are closer to France's or Britain's than the areas in Russia I refer to you cretinous prick.

    Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world’s highest life expectancy. Canada is #12
     
    errrmmm......Nobody disputes that Ukraine is a failed , artificial country run by scumbag prostitutes of the US. Nobody disputes that Sweden and Iceland are normal, prosperous nations.
    Typical of your time-wasting attentionwhoring nonsense to suddenly try and insiduously deflect the issue ( incorrectly and stupidly) onto other western countries.

    The simple facts are that if Ukraine had Russia's cold/daylight/ethnic issues then it's life expectancy would be immeasurably worse than it is now

    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016.

     

    LOl........you are shamelessly copying the point that you only know because I INFORMED YOU precisely of this a few days ago, when making the point of how western Ukraine/Galicia is effectively Ukraine's equivalent of the North Caucasus.....except alot worse. It's typical of your spamtard moron algorithm to fuck up with yet more stupidity. Who the fuck said or even hinted I was refering to the Caucasus you idiot? Siberian regions is what I more had in mind you freak. Overall with the cold/daylight/ethnic republic issues we are talking about areas that encompass 30% + of Russia's population.....yet still Russia survives and thrives, whilst Kiev sinks into the cesspit.

    But anytime you sink into your period ( again) , you can just watch this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_G82mQeFKak

    Also easy to note that Moscow and Saint Petersburg have life expectancies hugely superior to Lvov's. Numerous other megopolis's in Russia like Kazan too you dumb troll POS
  189. @Greasy William
    In the US, the chimpout over the border continues and is actually intensifying.

    It is difficult to tell if the Dems are being forced into it by their increasingly unhinged base or whether they really do think this is good politics for them.

    Right now there is no end in sight. Trump is not going to halt this policy and the Dems aren't going to stop chimping out. If this lasts until the midterms, great.

    Media created and orchestrated spectacles like this are bad optics and upset the mushy middle.

    Ordinary Americans who are arrested are separated from their children every day, but illegals are special. 🙂

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Children are sent to concentration camps against their will and away from their families five days a week for forty weeks a year. If they resist they're drugged or even imprisoned.
    , @Hyperborean

    Media created and orchestrated spectacles like this are bad optics and upset the mushy middle.
     
    Is it really? I checked some of the sob stories that the liberal American media are running and if I didn't already have a strong ideological opposition to mass migration and negative real life experience with subaltern proles I think I would be quite convinced by their propaganda.

    Ordinary Americans who are arrested are separated from their children every day, but illegals are special.
     
    But how many Americans who read this will receive or think about the context?

    As far as the media is concerned the migrants haven't committed any crimes and this is simply more of Trump's senseless cruelty, and given how people have been exposed for years to comments about Trump's vulgar and cruel nature by the media what is to say it won't fall on fertile ground?
  190. @reiner Tor
    The 1980s saw the development of extreme metal, which was quite different from earlier forms of heavy metal. Thrash metal broke into the mainstream with Metallica, which to this day is probably the biggest remaining rock band.

    Hip hop music was basically also a 1980s development, though it had its roots earlier. It had its roots in reggae. (In pop music, nothing is completely new.) Gangsta hip hop originated in the 1980s, though its popularity wasn’t recognized until the 1990s. With the SoundScan era after 1991 it turned out that the biggest gangsta hip hop performers (as well as Metallica) were already in superstar status. But regular hip hop was already fully mainstream in the 1980s.

    It’s not very important. I think other than supporting the availability and composition of classical music (the latter is tricky because a lot of the new compositions are useless, and they all have to compete against the very greatest of the last several centuries), music should be left to the proles to choose. Nazi Germany even promoted some very American sounding music which they usually denounced as degenerate, because that was popular. Hitler wanted to force the proles to listen to classical music, but that’s impossible due to IQ issues. IQ aside, for example during workouts some form of pop music (in the broadest possible meaning, including everything, like hip hop and metal) is better than classical.

    People are passionate about their favorite music (even if it’s shitty and ephemeral by any objective standard), so the government telling people what to listen to will only result in the government losing popularity. It can probably be influenced to an extent, but stupid trends from abroad will always exist and it’s futile to resist them.

    Music is of lower importance than immigration, but not irrelevant. We’re fighting for truth and beauty.

    I agree that directly controlling music Soviet-style is a bad idea, but one can subtly guide what people listen to simply by setting one’s thumb on the scales.

  191. @iffen
    Media created and orchestrated spectacles like this are bad optics and upset the mushy middle.

    Ordinary Americans who are arrested are separated from their children every day, but illegals are special. :)

    Children are sent to concentration camps against their will and away from their families five days a week for forty weeks a year. If they resist they’re drugged or even imprisoned.

  192. Trump has tweeted about the situation in Germany:

    I have mixed feelings about this, I don’t like foreign governments commenting on German internal affairs, and it’s probably counter-productive. Still, on some level it makes me like Trump somewhat again.
    The things going on in Germany the past few days are just unbelievable. Seehofer (an untrustworthy cuck imo) wants to scale back Merkel’s open borders policy somewhat. It’s mostly cosmetic stuff, like rejecting “refugees” at the borders who have already applied for asylum in other EU countries, or rejecting people who have already been deported from Germany and are trying to come back again (yes, this isn’t possible right now!). But even that’s too much for Merkel. She’s appeared with some leftie journalist Ferda Ataman (what kind of kebab name is that? Iranian?) at some summit about “integration”…Ataman is involved with numerous migrant lobbies, Annetta Kahane’s “antiracism” foundation and has just recently called Seehofer more or less a Nazi. I guess that should be read as meaning that Merkel has openly adopted a completely far left programme and doesn’t even hide her intention to destroy Germany anymore.
    If the CSU leaves the coalition, the Greens have already offered to replace them.
    I will never understand how an irresponsible political-medial caste can intentionally destroy a country that worked reasonably well like that. If there ever is serious civil strife in Germany (and I hope it will come to that eventually), they should have to pay for what they’ve done.

    • Replies: @utu
    It is very interesting. Even if it is just cosmetic at this point it may break the spell and the taboo. And yes, 'they should have to pay for what they’ve done.'

    Clearly there are glimmers of hope. So far small things but in this insane reality they are huge: Italy refusing to take the ship and Austria liquidating some mosques and government in Germany may fall apart because of it.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    The US government has been meddling in the internal affairs of European countries since at least the late 1930s, so this is nothing new. Trump is at least being open about it and doing it for the actual benefit of Germans for once.

    I generally tend to agree we shouldn't openly meddle in other countries' affairs, but Trump threw out the rulebook a long time ago and gets results that no one else does.

    This could be to our benefit in the ongoing USA-EU trade negotiations as well.

    Lastly, this Tweet isn't necessarily about foreign policy. Pointing out the disastrous consequences in Germany helps highlight our own ongoing problem with illegal immigration and "refugees".
  193. @iffen
    Media created and orchestrated spectacles like this are bad optics and upset the mushy middle.

    Ordinary Americans who are arrested are separated from their children every day, but illegals are special. :)

    Media created and orchestrated spectacles like this are bad optics and upset the mushy middle.

    Is it really? I checked some of the sob stories that the liberal American media are running and if I didn’t already have a strong ideological opposition to mass migration and negative real life experience with subaltern proles I think I would be quite convinced by their propaganda.

    Ordinary Americans who are arrested are separated from their children every day, but illegals are special.

    But how many Americans who read this will receive or think about the context?

    As far as the media is concerned the migrants haven’t committed any crimes and this is simply more of Trump’s senseless cruelty, and given how people have been exposed for years to comments about Trump’s vulgar and cruel nature by the media what is to say it won’t fall on fertile ground?

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson

    But how many Americans who read this will receive or think about the context?
     
    Based on the reactions of most Americans when I attack the school system, not many. Americans have Stockholm Syndrome.
  194. utu says:
    @German_reader
    Trump has tweeted about the situation in Germany:
    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1008696508697513985

    I have mixed feelings about this, I don't like foreign governments commenting on German internal affairs, and it's probably counter-productive. Still, on some level it makes me like Trump somewhat again.
    The things going on in Germany the past few days are just unbelievable. Seehofer (an untrustworthy cuck imo) wants to scale back Merkel's open borders policy somewhat. It's mostly cosmetic stuff, like rejecting "refugees" at the borders who have already applied for asylum in other EU countries, or rejecting people who have already been deported from Germany and are trying to come back again (yes, this isn't possible right now!). But even that's too much for Merkel. She's appeared with some leftie journalist Ferda Ataman (what kind of kebab name is that? Iranian?) at some summit about "integration"...Ataman is involved with numerous migrant lobbies, Annetta Kahane's "antiracism" foundation and has just recently called Seehofer more or less a Nazi. I guess that should be read as meaning that Merkel has openly adopted a completely far left programme and doesn't even hide her intention to destroy Germany anymore.
    If the CSU leaves the coalition, the Greens have already offered to replace them.
    I will never understand how an irresponsible political-medial caste can intentionally destroy a country that worked reasonably well like that. If there ever is serious civil strife in Germany (and I hope it will come to that eventually), they should have to pay for what they've done.

    It is very interesting. Even if it is just cosmetic at this point it may break the spell and the taboo. And yes, ‘they should have to pay for what they’ve done.’

    Clearly there are glimmers of hope. So far small things but in this insane reality they are huge: Italy refusing to take the ship and Austria liquidating some mosques and government in Germany may fall apart because of it.

    • Replies: @German_reader

    Clearly there are glimmers of hope
     
    Not in Germany. The establishment seems absolutely set on its course, they're fanatics who really want permanent mass immigration from Africa and the Islamic world. There is no other interpretation, it's intentional, and unfortunately far too many Germans are unable to overcome their brainwashing and react accordingly.
    I don't trust Seehofer and the CSU either, imo they just want to preserve their Bavarian fief and its patronage network. Their actions are probably mostly for show because of the state elections in fall, and it might even be possible that the current conflict has secretly been coordinated with Merkel, with the intention of presenting the CSU as an alternative for disaffected conservatives and marginalizing the "fascist" AfD.
    Admittedly, the developments in Italy are encouraging, I hope Salvini will remain firm.
  195. @utu
    It is very interesting. Even if it is just cosmetic at this point it may break the spell and the taboo. And yes, 'they should have to pay for what they’ve done.'

    Clearly there are glimmers of hope. So far small things but in this insane reality they are huge: Italy refusing to take the ship and Austria liquidating some mosques and government in Germany may fall apart because of it.

    Clearly there are glimmers of hope

    Not in Germany. The establishment seems absolutely set on its course, they’re fanatics who really want permanent mass immigration from Africa and the Islamic world. There is no other interpretation, it’s intentional, and unfortunately far too many Germans are unable to overcome their brainwashing and react accordingly.
    I don’t trust Seehofer and the CSU either, imo they just want to preserve their Bavarian fief and its patronage network. Their actions are probably mostly for show because of the state elections in fall, and it might even be possible that the current conflict has secretly been coordinated with Merkel, with the intention of presenting the CSU as an alternative for disaffected conservatives and marginalizing the “fascist” AfD.
    Admittedly, the developments in Italy are encouraging, I hope Salvini will remain firm.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Gotta start somewhere.

    Seehofer has been attacking immigration since long before 2015 which is an encouraging sign.

    It's also encouraging that he is a family man and an adulterer who embraces R-selection.

    That said if Seehofer were serious about it he would've broken the alliance with the CDU in 2015. Though I suppose perhaps his game all along was to bring down and replace Merkel via internal party mechanics.

    Il Capitano has balls and won't back down.
    , @Mitleser

    Admittedly, the developments in Italy are encouraging, I hope Salvini will remain firm.
     
    I am impressed that he is getting away with it.

    https://twitter.com/antoguerrera/status/1008726533832429568
  196. @German_reader
    Trump has tweeted about the situation in Germany:
    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1008696508697513985

    I have mixed feelings about this, I don't like foreign governments commenting on German internal affairs, and it's probably counter-productive. Still, on some level it makes me like Trump somewhat again.
    The things going on in Germany the past few days are just unbelievable. Seehofer (an untrustworthy cuck imo) wants to scale back Merkel's open borders policy somewhat. It's mostly cosmetic stuff, like rejecting "refugees" at the borders who have already applied for asylum in other EU countries, or rejecting people who have already been deported from Germany and are trying to come back again (yes, this isn't possible right now!). But even that's too much for Merkel. She's appeared with some leftie journalist Ferda Ataman (what kind of kebab name is that? Iranian?) at some summit about "integration"...Ataman is involved with numerous migrant lobbies, Annetta Kahane's "antiracism" foundation and has just recently called Seehofer more or less a Nazi. I guess that should be read as meaning that Merkel has openly adopted a completely far left programme and doesn't even hide her intention to destroy Germany anymore.
    If the CSU leaves the coalition, the Greens have already offered to replace them.
    I will never understand how an irresponsible political-medial caste can intentionally destroy a country that worked reasonably well like that. If there ever is serious civil strife in Germany (and I hope it will come to that eventually), they should have to pay for what they've done.

    The US government has been meddling in the internal affairs of European countries since at least the late 1930s, so this is nothing new. Trump is at least being open about it and doing it for the actual benefit of Germans for once.

    I generally tend to agree we shouldn’t openly meddle in other countries’ affairs, but Trump threw out the rulebook a long time ago and gets results that no one else does.

    This could be to our benefit in the ongoing USA-EU trade negotiations as well.

    Lastly, this Tweet isn’t necessarily about foreign policy. Pointing out the disastrous consequences in Germany helps highlight our own ongoing problem with illegal immigration and “refugees”.

  197. @German_reader

    Clearly there are glimmers of hope
     
    Not in Germany. The establishment seems absolutely set on its course, they're fanatics who really want permanent mass immigration from Africa and the Islamic world. There is no other interpretation, it's intentional, and unfortunately far too many Germans are unable to overcome their brainwashing and react accordingly.
    I don't trust Seehofer and the CSU either, imo they just want to preserve their Bavarian fief and its patronage network. Their actions are probably mostly for show because of the state elections in fall, and it might even be possible that the current conflict has secretly been coordinated with Merkel, with the intention of presenting the CSU as an alternative for disaffected conservatives and marginalizing the "fascist" AfD.
    Admittedly, the developments in Italy are encouraging, I hope Salvini will remain firm.

    Gotta start somewhere.

    Seehofer has been attacking immigration since long before 2015 which is an encouraging sign.

    It’s also encouraging that he is a family man and an adulterer who embraces R-selection.

    That said if Seehofer were serious about it he would’ve broken the alliance with the CDU in 2015. Though I suppose perhaps his game all along was to bring down and replace Merkel via internal party mechanics.

    Il Capitano has balls and won’t back down.

  198. @Hyperborean

    Media created and orchestrated spectacles like this are bad optics and upset the mushy middle.
     
    Is it really? I checked some of the sob stories that the liberal American media are running and if I didn't already have a strong ideological opposition to mass migration and negative real life experience with subaltern proles I think I would be quite convinced by their propaganda.

    Ordinary Americans who are arrested are separated from their children every day, but illegals are special.
     
    But how many Americans who read this will receive or think about the context?

    As far as the media is concerned the migrants haven't committed any crimes and this is simply more of Trump's senseless cruelty, and given how people have been exposed for years to comments about Trump's vulgar and cruel nature by the media what is to say it won't fall on fertile ground?

    But how many Americans who read this will receive or think about the context?

    Based on the reactions of most Americans when I attack the school system, not many. Americans have Stockholm Syndrome.

  199. @Jon0815
    It's estimated that this raising of the retirement age will increase Russian GDP growth by 0.3-0.5% per year over the next 15 years.

    It will be a very gradual raising of retirement age, so the effect will be minimal at first, but will grow more pronounced over time.

    Upper graph shows the number of pensioners. Lower graph is the impact on economic growth in percentage of GDP.

  200. @AP

    Higher than Ukraines, for the first time.
     
    With or without Donbas?

    You are once again gloating at the expense of the more pro-Russian people within Ukraine.

    Moreover, what is the source? This one states 72.11 (increase .21%) for Ukraine in 2017 and 71.2 (increase .19%) for Russia:

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Ukraine/topics/Demographics/Age/Life-expectancy-at-birth

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Russian-Federation/topics/Demographics/Population-forecast/Life-expectancy

    According to WHO in 2017 Ukraine's life expectancy in 2017 was 71.3 and Russia's was 70.5:

    http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/russia-life-expectancy

    When you consider the regions of extreme cold, short days,
     
    Another stupid argument. Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world's highest life expectancy. Canada is #12.

    ethnic issues
     
    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016. Tatars also live longer than Slavs. Good job undermining yourself.

    Dude, I know statistics (or integrity) is not your strong suit, but you read this blog. Why don’t you use accurate data?

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russian-demographics-in-2018/

    Your desire to make excuses for the Ukraine is overwhelming.

    • Replies: @AP

    Dude, I know statistics (or integrity) is not your strong suit
     
    Says the proven liar. Integrity?

    Here is your integrity:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/military-spending-in-2017/?highlight=azov#comment-2316166


    "Ukrainian Neo-Nazi paramilitaries such as the so-called Donbass and Azov “batallions” are indeed Ukrainian, but they are not native to Donbass. They originate from Western parts of the Ukraine. You know, the same way Panzer Army Afrika was not actually African. lol"

    Reality:

    The Azov Battalion has its roots in a group of Ultras of FC Metalist Kharkiv named “Sect 82″ (1982 is the year of the founding of the group).[18] “Sect 82″ was (at least until September 2013) allied with FC Spartak Moscow Ultras.[18] Late February 2014, during the 2014 Ukrainian crisis when a separatist movement was active in Kharkiv, “Sect 82″ occupied the Kharkiv Oblast regional administration building in Kharkiv and served as a local “self-defense”-force.[18] Soon, on the basis of “Sect 82″ there was formed a volunteer militia called “Eastern Corps”

    So much for your integrity.

    As for statistics, you were claiming Ukrainians were mediocre in income in the USA, remember? When in fact they are of higher income than most white ethnic groups.

    So much for your grasp of statistics.

    I am always happy to rub your nose in your own b.s. Felix.

    Why don’t you use accurate data?
     
    I posted data from two sources, including the World Health Organization, that provided figures for both Ukraine and Russia. Both sources indicated Russia's life expectancy was lower than Ukraine's.

    Karlin's link only provides a number for Russia.

    Moreover, Caucasians live longer than Slavs, and Finnic and Tatar peoples live longer than Russians. Russia is only about 80% Slavic. Even if Russia's life expectancy has crept above Ukraine's it's not because its Russians are living longer but because it has a lot of long-lived Dagestanis, Ingush, Chechens, Armenians, Tatars, etc.
  201. @reiner Tor
    The US seems to be complaining that it’s losing the ability to replace its ammunition stockpile. I think it’s probably a bit of an exaggeration.

    https://www.defensenews.com/pentagon/2018/05/22/the-us-is-running-out-of-bombs-and-it-may-soon-struggle-to-make-more/

    It seems as though they dumped half of their ammunition stockpile on the city of Raqqa last year. US might need to change its approach to warfare in the future.

    https://news.vice.com/en_us/article/yweknx/the-us-destroyed-raqqa-to-defeat-isis-locals-dont-know-if-theyll-ever-rebuild-it

  202. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich
    Dude, I know statistics (or integrity) is not your strong suit, but you read this blog. Why don't you use accurate data?

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russian-demographics-in-2018/

    Your desire to make excuses for the Ukraine is overwhelming.

    Dude, I know statistics (or integrity) is not your strong suit

    Says the proven liar. Integrity?

    Here is your integrity:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/military-spending-in-2017/?highlight=azov#comment-2316166

    “Ukrainian Neo-Nazi paramilitaries such as the so-called Donbass and Azov “batallions” are indeed Ukrainian, but they are not native to Donbass. They originate from Western parts of the Ukraine. You know, the same way Panzer Army Afrika was not actually African. lol”

    Reality:

    The Azov Battalion has its roots in a group of Ultras of FC Metalist Kharkiv named “Sect 82″ (1982 is the year of the founding of the group).[18] “Sect 82″ was (at least until September 2013) allied with FC Spartak Moscow Ultras.[18] Late February 2014, during the 2014 Ukrainian crisis when a separatist movement was active in Kharkiv, “Sect 82″ occupied the Kharkiv Oblast regional administration building in Kharkiv and served as a local “self-defense”-force.[18] Soon, on the basis of “Sect 82″ there was formed a volunteer militia called “Eastern Corps”

    So much for your integrity.

    As for statistics, you were claiming Ukrainians were mediocre in income in the USA, remember? When in fact they are of higher income than most white ethnic groups.

    So much for your grasp of statistics.

    I am always happy to rub your nose in your own b.s. Felix.

    Why don’t you use accurate data?

    I posted data from two sources, including the World Health Organization, that provided figures for both Ukraine and Russia. Both sources indicated Russia’s life expectancy was lower than Ukraine’s.

    Karlin’s link only provides a number for Russia.

    Moreover, Caucasians live longer than Slavs, and Finnic and Tatar peoples live longer than Russians. Russia is only about 80% Slavic. Even if Russia’s life expectancy has crept above Ukraine’s it’s not because its Russians are living longer but because it has a lot of long-lived Dagestanis, Ingush, Chechens, Armenians, Tatars, etc.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Then again, you've posted your share of BS.
    , @Felix Keverich
    Your tendency to deflect and obfuscate is annoying. We were talking about demographics, how the fuck do you pivot from this to Azov batallion? How does this make sense to you? lol

    The fact is the Ukraine slipped below Russia in average life expectancy. It happened in 2015 and since then Russia built a small gap. This is what Ukrainian statistics service says:
    http://ukrstat.gov.ua/operativ/operativ2007/ds/nas_rik/nas_e/nas_rik_e.html

    The figures you see on various English-language websites contain outdtated data from almost a decade ago.

  203. @AP

    Higher than Ukraines, for the first time.
     
    With or without Donbas?

    You are once again gloating at the expense of the more pro-Russian people within Ukraine.

    Moreover, what is the source? This one states 72.11 (increase .21%) for Ukraine in 2017 and 71.2 (increase .19%) for Russia:

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Ukraine/topics/Demographics/Age/Life-expectancy-at-birth

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Russian-Federation/topics/Demographics/Population-forecast/Life-expectancy

    According to WHO in 2017 Ukraine's life expectancy in 2017 was 71.3 and Russia's was 70.5:

    http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/russia-life-expectancy

    When you consider the regions of extreme cold, short days,
     
    Another stupid argument. Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world's highest life expectancy. Canada is #12.

    ethnic issues
     
    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016. Tatars also live longer than Slavs. Good job undermining yourself.

    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016. Tatars also live longer than Slavs.

    Good counter to Paul Goble’s ongoing BS, suggesting that the Russians suppress non-Russians, when the later are increasing in population, in addition to the above quoted.

    Wonder how the American Indians are doing as a comparison?

  204. @AP

    Dude, I know statistics (or integrity) is not your strong suit
     
    Says the proven liar. Integrity?

    Here is your integrity:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/military-spending-in-2017/?highlight=azov#comment-2316166


    "Ukrainian Neo-Nazi paramilitaries such as the so-called Donbass and Azov “batallions” are indeed Ukrainian, but they are not native to Donbass. They originate from Western parts of the Ukraine. You know, the same way Panzer Army Afrika was not actually African. lol"

    Reality:

    The Azov Battalion has its roots in a group of Ultras of FC Metalist Kharkiv named “Sect 82″ (1982 is the year of the founding of the group).[18] “Sect 82″ was (at least until September 2013) allied with FC Spartak Moscow Ultras.[18] Late February 2014, during the 2014 Ukrainian crisis when a separatist movement was active in Kharkiv, “Sect 82″ occupied the Kharkiv Oblast regional administration building in Kharkiv and served as a local “self-defense”-force.[18] Soon, on the basis of “Sect 82″ there was formed a volunteer militia called “Eastern Corps”

    So much for your integrity.

    As for statistics, you were claiming Ukrainians were mediocre in income in the USA, remember? When in fact they are of higher income than most white ethnic groups.

    So much for your grasp of statistics.

    I am always happy to rub your nose in your own b.s. Felix.

    Why don’t you use accurate data?
     
    I posted data from two sources, including the World Health Organization, that provided figures for both Ukraine and Russia. Both sources indicated Russia's life expectancy was lower than Ukraine's.

    Karlin's link only provides a number for Russia.

    Moreover, Caucasians live longer than Slavs, and Finnic and Tatar peoples live longer than Russians. Russia is only about 80% Slavic. Even if Russia's life expectancy has crept above Ukraine's it's not because its Russians are living longer but because it has a lot of long-lived Dagestanis, Ingush, Chechens, Armenians, Tatars, etc.

    Then again, you’ve posted your share of BS.

  205. @AP

    Dude, I know statistics (or integrity) is not your strong suit
     
    Says the proven liar. Integrity?

    Here is your integrity:

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/military-spending-in-2017/?highlight=azov#comment-2316166


    "Ukrainian Neo-Nazi paramilitaries such as the so-called Donbass and Azov “batallions” are indeed Ukrainian, but they are not native to Donbass. They originate from Western parts of the Ukraine. You know, the same way Panzer Army Afrika was not actually African. lol"

    Reality:

    The Azov Battalion has its roots in a group of Ultras of FC Metalist Kharkiv named “Sect 82″ (1982 is the year of the founding of the group).[18] “Sect 82″ was (at least until September 2013) allied with FC Spartak Moscow Ultras.[18] Late February 2014, during the 2014 Ukrainian crisis when a separatist movement was active in Kharkiv, “Sect 82″ occupied the Kharkiv Oblast regional administration building in Kharkiv and served as a local “self-defense”-force.[18] Soon, on the basis of “Sect 82″ there was formed a volunteer militia called “Eastern Corps”

    So much for your integrity.

    As for statistics, you were claiming Ukrainians were mediocre in income in the USA, remember? When in fact they are of higher income than most white ethnic groups.

    So much for your grasp of statistics.

    I am always happy to rub your nose in your own b.s. Felix.

    Why don’t you use accurate data?
     
    I posted data from two sources, including the World Health Organization, that provided figures for both Ukraine and Russia. Both sources indicated Russia's life expectancy was lower than Ukraine's.

    Karlin's link only provides a number for Russia.

    Moreover, Caucasians live longer than Slavs, and Finnic and Tatar peoples live longer than Russians. Russia is only about 80% Slavic. Even if Russia's life expectancy has crept above Ukraine's it's not because its Russians are living longer but because it has a lot of long-lived Dagestanis, Ingush, Chechens, Armenians, Tatars, etc.

    Your tendency to deflect and obfuscate is annoying. We were talking about demographics, how the fuck do you pivot from this to Azov batallion? How does this make sense to you? lol

    The fact is the Ukraine slipped below Russia in average life expectancy. It happened in 2015 and since then Russia built a small gap. This is what Ukrainian statistics service says:
    http://ukrstat.gov.ua/operativ/operativ2007/ds/nas_rik/nas_e/nas_rik_e.html

    The figures you see on various English-language websites contain outdtated data from almost a decade ago.

    • Replies: @AP

    Your tendency to deflect and obfuscate is annoying. We were talking about demographics, how the fuck do you pivot from this to Azov batallion?
     
    You were talking about integrity, and I demonstrated your lack of it. It was the first sentence of your post, that I replied to.

    If you start telling the truth I'll stop annoying you. But I know it's hard for you to do, when it comes to Ukraine.

    The fact is the Ukraine slipped below Russia in average life expectancy. It happened in 2015 and since then Russia built a small gap. This is what Ukrainian statistics service says:

    http://ukrstat.gov.ua/operativ/operativ2007/ds/nas_rik/nas_e/nas_rik_e.html

    The figures you see on various English-language websites contain outdtated data from almost a decade ago.

     

    This source has different numbers:

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Ukraine/topics/Demographics/Age/Life-expectancy-at-birth

    72.11 for Ukraine in 2017, vs. 71.2 for Russia.

    Ukraine stats never had 72.2, so as usual your claim of "outdtated data from almost a decade ago" is bullshit.

    WHO figure provided for Ukraine was 71.3. Ukraine stats had 71.37 in 2014. Not almost a decade ago.

    You really can't help yourself but lie in every post, when it comes to Ukraine, can you Felix?

    ::::::::::::::::::::

    As for Ukraine stats in the link you provided, they don't even have a number for 2017, which we had been discussing. In 2016 it was 71.68 (highest since 1990), an increase from 71.38 in 2015. Russia's state stats were 71.39 in 2015 (virtually no difference, 1/100th of a year) and 71.87 in 2016 (also very slight differences, less than 1/5 of a year). Number of Caucasians and Tatars can account for this difference.
  206. Your tendency to deflect and obfuscate is annoying.

    And your tendency to be a combative douche is annoying. So it all kinda evens out, doesn’t it?



    German_reader: From a Left wing board I visit, one American poster responds to a German poster thus:

    Please advocate for your country to militarize in order to defend liberal democracy against Russia and the US. Russia needs to be made to fear the might of Germany and Western Europe. They’ve gone too far and the world needs Germany to wake up and fight.

    p.s.: this German military response to Russia is merited by the American border crisis. Not sure what that has to do with Russia, but that’s the Left for you.

    • Replies: @Talha
    Coming to a female regiment near YOU!

    combative douche
     
    Because when you're out there in the trenches, regular douche won't do!

    Peace.
  207. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich
    Your tendency to deflect and obfuscate is annoying. We were talking about demographics, how the fuck do you pivot from this to Azov batallion? How does this make sense to you? lol

    The fact is the Ukraine slipped below Russia in average life expectancy. It happened in 2015 and since then Russia built a small gap. This is what Ukrainian statistics service says:
    http://ukrstat.gov.ua/operativ/operativ2007/ds/nas_rik/nas_e/nas_rik_e.html

    The figures you see on various English-language websites contain outdtated data from almost a decade ago.

    Your tendency to deflect and obfuscate is annoying. We were talking about demographics, how the fuck do you pivot from this to Azov batallion?

    You were talking about integrity, and I demonstrated your lack of it. It was the first sentence of your post, that I replied to.

    If you start telling the truth I’ll stop annoying you. But I know it’s hard for you to do, when it comes to Ukraine.

    The fact is the Ukraine slipped below Russia in average life expectancy. It happened in 2015 and since then Russia built a small gap. This is what Ukrainian statistics service says:

    http://ukrstat.gov.ua/operativ/operativ2007/ds/nas_rik/nas_e/nas_rik_e.html

    The figures you see on various English-language websites contain outdtated data from almost a decade ago.

    This source has different numbers:

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Ukraine/topics/Demographics/Age/Life-expectancy-at-birth

    72.11 for Ukraine in 2017, vs. 71.2 for Russia.

    Ukraine stats never had 72.2, so as usual your claim of “outdtated data from almost a decade ago” is bullshit.

    WHO figure provided for Ukraine was 71.3. Ukraine stats had 71.37 in 2014. Not almost a decade ago.

    You really can’t help yourself but lie in every post, when it comes to Ukraine, can you Felix?

    ::::::::::::::::::::

    As for Ukraine stats in the link you provided, they don’t even have a number for 2017, which we had been discussing. In 2016 it was 71.68 (highest since 1990), an increase from 71.38 in 2015. Russia’s state stats were 71.39 in 2015 (virtually no difference, 1/100th of a year) and 71.87 in 2016 (also very slight differences, less than 1/5 of a year). Number of Caucasians and Tatars can account for this difference.

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    The link I prodived comes from the official source. International institutions rely on data from national statistic agencies, but they process it with delay. Ukrstat is the source you should rely on, and it shows the Ukraine lagging behind Russia since 2015.

    Russia’s state stats were 71.39 in 2015 (virtually no difference, 1/100th of a year) and 71.87 in 2016 (also very slight differences, less than 1/5 of a year).
     
    This shows Russia moving ahead of the Ukraine and with much stronger momentum. Between 2004 and 2016 life expectancy in Russia gained 6,5 years, in the Ukraine - only 3,5 years. The Ukraine had led Russia every year before that until 2015. What has transpired in 2015 is a fundamental shift: the Ukraine will lag behind Russia from now on.
  208. @Greasy William

    Your tendency to deflect and obfuscate is annoying.
     
    And your tendency to be a combative douche is annoying. So it all kinda evens out, doesn't it?

    ...
    ...
    ...

    German_reader: From a Left wing board I visit, one American poster responds to a German poster thus:


    Please advocate for your country to militarize in order to defend liberal democracy against Russia and the US. Russia needs to be made to fear the might of Germany and Western Europe. They've gone too far and the world needs Germany to wake up and fight.
     
    p.s.: this German military response to Russia is merited by the American border crisis. Not sure what that has to do with Russia, but that's the Left for you.

    Coming to a female regiment near YOU!

    combative douche

    Because when you’re out there in the trenches, regular douche won’t do!

    Peace.

  209. @AP

    Your tendency to deflect and obfuscate is annoying. We were talking about demographics, how the fuck do you pivot from this to Azov batallion?
     
    You were talking about integrity, and I demonstrated your lack of it. It was the first sentence of your post, that I replied to.

    If you start telling the truth I'll stop annoying you. But I know it's hard for you to do, when it comes to Ukraine.

    The fact is the Ukraine slipped below Russia in average life expectancy. It happened in 2015 and since then Russia built a small gap. This is what Ukrainian statistics service says:

    http://ukrstat.gov.ua/operativ/operativ2007/ds/nas_rik/nas_e/nas_rik_e.html

    The figures you see on various English-language websites contain outdtated data from almost a decade ago.

     

    This source has different numbers:

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Ukraine/topics/Demographics/Age/Life-expectancy-at-birth

    72.11 for Ukraine in 2017, vs. 71.2 for Russia.

    Ukraine stats never had 72.2, so as usual your claim of "outdtated data from almost a decade ago" is bullshit.

    WHO figure provided for Ukraine was 71.3. Ukraine stats had 71.37 in 2014. Not almost a decade ago.

    You really can't help yourself but lie in every post, when it comes to Ukraine, can you Felix?

    ::::::::::::::::::::

    As for Ukraine stats in the link you provided, they don't even have a number for 2017, which we had been discussing. In 2016 it was 71.68 (highest since 1990), an increase from 71.38 in 2015. Russia's state stats were 71.39 in 2015 (virtually no difference, 1/100th of a year) and 71.87 in 2016 (also very slight differences, less than 1/5 of a year). Number of Caucasians and Tatars can account for this difference.

    The link I prodived comes from the official source. International institutions rely on data from national statistic agencies, but they process it with delay. Ukrstat is the source you should rely on, and it shows the Ukraine lagging behind Russia since 2015.

    Russia’s state stats were 71.39 in 2015 (virtually no difference, 1/100th of a year) and 71.87 in 2016 (also very slight differences, less than 1/5 of a year).

    This shows Russia moving ahead of the Ukraine and with much stronger momentum. Between 2004 and 2016 life expectancy in Russia gained 6,5 years, in the Ukraine – only 3,5 years. The Ukraine had led Russia every year before that until 2015. What has transpired in 2015 is a fundamental shift: the Ukraine will lag behind Russia from now on.

    • Replies: @AP

    The Ukraine had led Russia every year before that until 2015. What has transpired in 2015 is a fundamental shift
     
    1. Ukraine is having a low-grade civil war.

    2. Ukraine is about 99% Slavic, Russia is only about 80% Slavic. Caucasians such as Chechens, Dagestanis and Ingush live longer than do Slavs. Their proportion of the population grows.

    So, because Russia keeps alive a civil war in Ukraine, and because it hosts a lot of Caucasians, it's life expectancy has slipped ahead of Ukraine's slightly. 1/100 of a year in 2015 and 1/5 of a year in 2016.
    , @Anon 2
    Interestingly, Poland (98% Slavic)'s life expectancy in 2017 was 77.5 years,
    and is continuing to increase. This shows that there is nothing inherently low about
    the Slavs' life expectancy. Poland is expected to exceed the American life expectancy
    soon. The latter has, of course, dropped recently - something that typically only
    happens in times of war, famine, pestilence, and economic depression (opioid-related
    deaths probably contributed)
  210. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich
    The link I prodived comes from the official source. International institutions rely on data from national statistic agencies, but they process it with delay. Ukrstat is the source you should rely on, and it shows the Ukraine lagging behind Russia since 2015.

    Russia’s state stats were 71.39 in 2015 (virtually no difference, 1/100th of a year) and 71.87 in 2016 (also very slight differences, less than 1/5 of a year).
     
    This shows Russia moving ahead of the Ukraine and with much stronger momentum. Between 2004 and 2016 life expectancy in Russia gained 6,5 years, in the Ukraine - only 3,5 years. The Ukraine had led Russia every year before that until 2015. What has transpired in 2015 is a fundamental shift: the Ukraine will lag behind Russia from now on.

    The Ukraine had led Russia every year before that until 2015. What has transpired in 2015 is a fundamental shift

    1. Ukraine is having a low-grade civil war.

    2. Ukraine is about 99% Slavic, Russia is only about 80% Slavic. Caucasians such as Chechens, Dagestanis and Ingush live longer than do Slavs. Their proportion of the population grows.

    So, because Russia keeps alive a civil war in Ukraine, and because it hosts a lot of Caucasians, it’s life expectancy has slipped ahead of Ukraine’s slightly. 1/100 of a year in 2015 and 1/5 of a year in 2016.

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich

    Ukraine is having a low-grade civil war.
     
    Oh, it's a civil war now? Didn't you tell me that the Ukraine is "doing well" right now? You just cannot help, but make excuses for the Ukraine. :)

    Russia always had a fair amount of non-slavic minorities, but their share in the population has been been rather stable. Caucasians in Russia already live to 80 years, so whatever room for improvement Russia has, it will likely come from ethnic Russian men first and foremost.
  211. I’m sick of hand-washing kitchen knives like some filthy peasant woman. What’s the point of having two dishwashers in your kitchen if you still have to clean things by hand?

    I ordered Victorinox Fibrox and Wustof Pro (consistently the highest rated cheap kitchen knives) stamped-steel plastic handle kitchen knives which are dishwasher safe and dirt cheap.

    These knives are effectively disposable (in fact many professional chefs do just that), but I have a Worksharp Ken Onion edition knife sharpening machine for whenever they lose their edge.

    One of the knives I ordered is a 12″ (Euros: 30cm) chef’s knife, which I’ve never used before. Looking forward to it.

    My fancy Japanese knives will now be display items other than when I am entertaining.

  212. @AP

    The Ukraine had led Russia every year before that until 2015. What has transpired in 2015 is a fundamental shift
     
    1. Ukraine is having a low-grade civil war.

    2. Ukraine is about 99% Slavic, Russia is only about 80% Slavic. Caucasians such as Chechens, Dagestanis and Ingush live longer than do Slavs. Their proportion of the population grows.

    So, because Russia keeps alive a civil war in Ukraine, and because it hosts a lot of Caucasians, it's life expectancy has slipped ahead of Ukraine's slightly. 1/100 of a year in 2015 and 1/5 of a year in 2016.

    Ukraine is having a low-grade civil war.

    Oh, it’s a civil war now? Didn’t you tell me that the Ukraine is “doing well” right now? You just cannot help, but make excuses for the Ukraine. 🙂

    Russia always had a fair amount of non-slavic minorities, but their share in the population has been been rather stable. Caucasians in Russia already live to 80 years, so whatever room for improvement Russia has, it will likely come from ethnic Russian men first and foremost.

    • Replies: @AP

    Oh, it’s a civil war now? Didn’t you tell me that the Ukraine is “doing well” right now?
     
    I wrote low-grade.

    Yes, it's doing well despite the low-grade civil war. But a low-grade civil war will impact the average life expectancy somewhat.

    You seem to be unable to tell the difference between an explanation and an excuse.

    Of course, you are also dishonest, so this may explain your problem.

    Russia always had a fair amount of non-slavic minorities, but their share in the population has been been rather stable. Caucasians in Russia already live to 80 years
     
    Which means that when it comes to the Slavic population, Russia was even further behind Ukraine before, and still hasn't caught up yet, despite the low-grade civil war Russia keeps going in Ukraine. So your original comment was much ado about nothing, although it provided me with an opportunity to share some or your past lies :-)
  213. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich

    Ukraine is having a low-grade civil war.
     
    Oh, it's a civil war now? Didn't you tell me that the Ukraine is "doing well" right now? You just cannot help, but make excuses for the Ukraine. :)

    Russia always had a fair amount of non-slavic minorities, but their share in the population has been been rather stable. Caucasians in Russia already live to 80 years, so whatever room for improvement Russia has, it will likely come from ethnic Russian men first and foremost.

    Oh, it’s a civil war now? Didn’t you tell me that the Ukraine is “doing well” right now?

    I wrote low-grade.

    Yes, it’s doing well despite the low-grade civil war. But a low-grade civil war will impact the average life expectancy somewhat.

    You seem to be unable to tell the difference between an explanation and an excuse.

    Of course, you are also dishonest, so this may explain your problem.

    Russia always had a fair amount of non-slavic minorities, but their share in the population has been been rather stable. Caucasians in Russia already live to 80 years

    Which means that when it comes to the Slavic population, Russia was even further behind Ukraine before, and still hasn’t caught up yet, despite the low-grade civil war Russia keeps going in Ukraine. So your original comment was much ado about nothing, although it provided me with an opportunity to share some or your past lies 🙂

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    As usual, you are both somewhat correct.

    1. The Ukraine was usually ahead of Russia by around 2 years even during the USSR, now they have leveled. Felix wins.

    2. Russia is not meaningfully ahead of the Ukraine. AP wins.

    3. Caucasians only constitute ~5% of the population. It is also worth noting that the LE figures (and demographic figures in general) from Chechnya and especially Ingushetia are not reliable - they inflate their populations, meaning that mortality rates are higher and LE is lower than on paper. OTOH, adjusting for this would probably make Russia essentially equal to the Ukraine. Felix wins.

    4. The civil war in the Ukraine is not killing a statistically significant number of people. Felix wins. Possibly it is staving off improvements in healthcare and/or anti-alcohol regulations, though OTOH, they have always been low priority so far as I know. Unclear who wins.

    5. Apart from Caucasians, Russia also has Buryats, Tuvans, Yakuts, and other native peoples who due to their alcohol problems have lower LE than Russians. This likely balances things out anyway. Felix wins. Though this does also invalidate Mikhail's whataboutist point about Native Americans having lower LE than White Americans (their real point of comparison in Russia would be with Tuvans, etc).
  214. @Thorfinnsson
    There's a separate '80s music in the form of power rock, glam metal, hair metal, etc. This was a straight forward lineal evolution of music from the '70s, rather than a radically new genre like New Wave.

    This music isn't '80s (despite chronologically being in the '80s), but it is also its own cultural episode. The rock musical Rock of Ages starring Tom Cruise as the fictional rock star "Stacy Jaxx" is a great depiction of this.

    Who knew in 1987 when Welcome to the Jungle was released that in only a few years the stadium-filling rock stars who had bestrode the world like gods since Elvis first appeared that rock music would end only a few years later with the suicide of Kurt Cobain?

    I don't know that the '80s were a better time to come of age than the postwar era as lots of rot had already set in. But it provides a suitable white aesthetic which is recognizably modern and technological while still inducing nostalgia (including those of us like me who were born too late for it).

    A lot of this also comes through in the industrial design of the period.

    Hence why there are lots of alt-right Millennial and Generation Zyklon artists producing brand new synthwave music today.

    How about Wang Chung (the memorable « everybody has fun tonight », I would agree with you, despite being apparently upbeat, has melancholic overtones)?

    And how about ABC? Poison Arrow comes to mind when it comes to extreme 1980s aesthetics.

  215. @Thorfinnsson
    I can't speak to her personal motivations. I assume she likes working for me. She does also work hard to save her poor daughter.

    She is married and thus not a single mother, but in general I work within our system as it is and pursue my self interest. Isn't the whole point of government to reign that in?

    If she didn't already have kids, small tits, and brown eyes I would ask her to marry me.

    If she didn’t already have kids, small tits, and brown eyes I would ask her to marry me.

    I hope that at least her BMI is not over 25. This seems to be a rarity nowadays in the United States.

  216. @reiner Tor
    The very people making fun of this would be praising it as some bold reform if someone like Yeltsin was implementing it.

    They also don’t mention that these reforms take a decade to implement due to grandfathering of those already retired or just about to retire. You cannot just tell a 59-year-old that he won’t be retiring next year, only in 2024, so a five year increase takes at least ten years. In ten years the life expectancy could increase.

    In Hungary male life expectancy was 69 years (and roughly unchanged since 1960!) when a similar increase of 60 to 65 was announced around 1960, and people were criticizing that there will be only a few years left to enjoy. But it’s a fallacy, because most who don’t survive to 65 die before 60 either, while those who reach 65 have a longer remaining life expectancy.

    Anyway, it’s interesting that the Hungarian reform was praised by the same people who are now condemning the Russian one. Similarly, I bet you these very same people would love to cut social security spending in the US or raising the retirement age in any western country. Like they were praising Macron.

    Reinor this week it’s huge numbers of people in Russia complaining about this proposal. The complaining is not from the West (who don’t have any interest in retirement ages).

    At the same time, most analysts understand that it is a good and necessary policy to raise the retirement age.

    It’s a hallmark example of ‘bitter medicine’ (you don’t like the taste, but it’s good for you).

    However, raising the VAT to 20% is not supported by analysts.

    On the VAT issue, the government already has access to inconceivably vast amounts of money. The direction should not be to transfer more money from citizens (and all citizens have to pay VAT) to the government. The direction should be the opposite: for the government to be more efficient in managing its spending.

    This is a debate occurring and interesting in many countries. I remember seeing a discussion during the American Presidential election debates in 2012 (Romney vs Obama) – Romney was arguing government “should return money to citizens” – as the way of describing a policy of not taxing so much.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    In Germany there's already talk of raising the retirement age to 69 (ok, life expectancy is quite a bit higher than in Russia, so not totally comparable). I guess at least that would make it difficult to bash Russia over this.
    , @Felix Keverich

    Reinor this week it’s huge numbers of people in Russia complaining about this proposal. The complaining is not from the West (who don’t have any interest in retirement ages).
     
    The West has every interest in destabilising Russia's political situation though. For example, check out this headline:

    Russian men will now DIE before they retire in 'OUTRAGEOUS' new policy announcement
    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/975707/russian-men-die-before-retire-new-policy-dmitry-medvedev-world-cup-2018-latest
     
    A lot of news websites in Russia operate by copying and translating content from major Western media outlets. It's therefore likely that these fakes will make their way onto the Russian internet, and feed anti-government sentiment. Perhaps, that was the intention?

    However, raising the VAT to 20% is not supported by analysts.

    On the VAT issue, the government already has access to inconceivably vast amounts of money. The direction should not be to transfer more money from citizens (and all citizens have to pay VAT) to the government. The direction should be the opposite: for the government to be more efficient in managing its spending.
     

    Personally, I think the government in Russia isn't taxing people enough. They should certainly raise the income tax. It's very low in Russia at 13%, and flat, and doesn't serve the function of reducing inequality. In every developed country, income tax provides a lion share of budget revenue. But Russian government refuses to make full use of it, as they are worried, they wouldn't be able to handle evaders. So we're left relying on oil revenues instead, which makes Russia look like a banana republic.
  217. Although unlikely, this border stuff could spark the 2nd American Civil War. The Democrats aren’t going to back down over this like they did over the shutdown and this time they are putting people in the street. This could get really ugly and I have no idea where it will end.

    • Replies: @Talha

    his border stuff could spark the 2nd American Civil War.
     
    Everyone knows that would happen if the US and Mexico both made it to the World Cup finals.

    Guaranteed prediction: tacos will continue to be eaten.

    Peace.

  218. @Dmitry
    Reinor this week it's huge numbers of people in Russia complaining about this proposal. The complaining is not from the West (who don't have any interest in retirement ages).

    At the same time, most analysts understand that it is a good and necessary policy to raise the retirement age.

    It's a hallmark example of 'bitter medicine' (you don't like the taste, but it's good for you).

    -

    However, raising the VAT to 20% is not supported by analysts.

    On the VAT issue, the government already has access to inconceivably vast amounts of money. The direction should not be to transfer more money from citizens (and all citizens have to pay VAT) to the government. The direction should be the opposite: for the government to be more efficient in managing its spending.

    This is a debate occurring and interesting in many countries. I remember seeing a discussion during the American Presidential election debates in 2012 (Romney vs Obama) - Romney was arguing government "should return money to citizens" - as the way of describing a policy of not taxing so much.

    In Germany there’s already talk of raising the retirement age to 69 (ok, life expectancy is quite a bit higher than in Russia, so not totally comparable). I guess at least that would make it difficult to bash Russia over this.

    • Replies: @Dmitry

    In Germany there’s already talk of raising the retirement age to 69 (ok, life expectancy is quite a bit higher than in Russia, so not totally comparable). I guess at least that would make it difficult to bash Russia over this.

     

    It's ordinary citizens who are going crazy and angry over this issue (I don't think it is a EU or US relevant issue for foreigners).

    The unpopularity of the proposal resulted in some funny politics. Putin is trying to create distance between himself and this proposal, and says he has no relation to the proposal - was literally saying on Saturday Peskov: "Putin has no relation to the proposal".

    Putin promised in 2005 that he would never raise the retirement age, for any time he is president. So now Putin is not raising the retirement age - but Medvedev is raising it.

    , @Dmitry

    In Germany there’s already talk of raising the retirement age to 69 (ok, life expectancy is quite a bit higher than in Russia, so not totally comparable).
     
    The life expectancy at 60 in Germany is 24 years.

    So a 60 year old German, has a life expectancy of 84 years.

    http://www.helpage.org/global-agewatch/population-ageing-data/life-expectancy-at-60/

    If retirement is raised to 69 years - there will still be quite a good retirement length for the average citizen (it's still not pleasant, but it's not as bad when you look at the life-expectancy at 60 data).

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    There's a cultural expectation in Russia that the government is out to rip off people - give them an inch, they take a mile.

    This explains the 2005 protests over the monetization of benefits - benefits are real, set things, while additional subsidies can be inflated away.

    Ergo with the retirement age. The government can promise to raise pensions to compensate, but will they really? This is why people are very unhappy with raising the retirement age from 60/55, which are set in stone and can't be quietly done away with.
  219. @German_reader

    Clearly there are glimmers of hope
     
    Not in Germany. The establishment seems absolutely set on its course, they're fanatics who really want permanent mass immigration from Africa and the Islamic world. There is no other interpretation, it's intentional, and unfortunately far too many Germans are unable to overcome their brainwashing and react accordingly.
    I don't trust Seehofer and the CSU either, imo they just want to preserve their Bavarian fief and its patronage network. Their actions are probably mostly for show because of the state elections in fall, and it might even be possible that the current conflict has secretly been coordinated with Merkel, with the intention of presenting the CSU as an alternative for disaffected conservatives and marginalizing the "fascist" AfD.
    Admittedly, the developments in Italy are encouraging, I hope Salvini will remain firm.

    Admittedly, the developments in Italy are encouraging, I hope Salvini will remain firm.

    I am impressed that he is getting away with it.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    Hmm, not sure if that's a smart move, saying it's unfortunate one can't get rid of gypsies with citizenship is bound to be controversial, as is anything that sounds like ethnic discrimination against certain citizens.
    He should focus on the Africans (and their stupid German do-gooder friends), they're the greater threat anyway and must be removed.
    But in any case, hard not to be impressed by the Italians when one is sitting in this stupid lemming country where Merkel gets away with everything and the entire establishment is out to crush any dissent.
  220. @Greasy William
    Although unlikely, this border stuff could spark the 2nd American Civil War. The Democrats aren't going to back down over this like they did over the shutdown and this time they are putting people in the street. This could get really ugly and I have no idea where it will end.

    his border stuff could spark the 2nd American Civil War.

    Everyone knows that would happen if the US and Mexico both made it to the World Cup finals.

    Guaranteed prediction: tacos will continue to be eaten.

    Peace.

  221. @reiner Tor
    To be fair, the life expectancy of Russian men does seem to be below 65, I’ve seen 63 and 64 (close to 65) mentioned, and they do write that two fifth of men may not live to see it. These are factually correct claims.

    To be fair, the life expectancy of Russian men does seem to be below 65, I’ve seen 63 and 64 (close to 65) mentioned, and they do write that two fifth of men may not live to see it. These are factually correct claims.

    It’s not the relevant datapoint, since it is the life expectancy from birth.

    For the retirement argument, you need to look at the life-expectancy for a person about to retire (after they have survived to this age). Such a life expectancy level will be far higher, than the life-expectancy from birth figures.

    The life-expectancy at 60 in Russian Federation is 17 years (i.e. a person at 60 years old, has a life-expectancy of living to 77 years old).

    http://www.helpage.org/global-agewatch/population-ageing-data/life-expectancy-at-60/

  222. @Mitleser

    Admittedly, the developments in Italy are encouraging, I hope Salvini will remain firm.
     
    I am impressed that he is getting away with it.

    https://twitter.com/antoguerrera/status/1008726533832429568

    Hmm, not sure if that’s a smart move, saying it’s unfortunate one can’t get rid of gypsies with citizenship is bound to be controversial, as is anything that sounds like ethnic discrimination against certain citizens.
    He should focus on the Africans (and their stupid German do-gooder friends), they’re the greater threat anyway and must be removed.
    But in any case, hard not to be impressed by the Italians when one is sitting in this stupid lemming country where Merkel gets away with everything and the entire establishment is out to crush any dissent.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Gypsies are one of the lowest-quality races in the entire world and should absolutely be a priority for removal.

    That it's "controversial" is the point. We must (re)normalize ethnic discrimination, and urgently.

    Time's running out.
  223. @German_reader
    In Germany there's already talk of raising the retirement age to 69 (ok, life expectancy is quite a bit higher than in Russia, so not totally comparable). I guess at least that would make it difficult to bash Russia over this.

    In Germany there’s already talk of raising the retirement age to 69 (ok, life expectancy is quite a bit higher than in Russia, so not totally comparable). I guess at least that would make it difficult to bash Russia over this.

    It’s ordinary citizens who are going crazy and angry over this issue (I don’t think it is a EU or US relevant issue for foreigners).

    The unpopularity of the proposal resulted in some funny politics. Putin is trying to create distance between himself and this proposal, and says he has no relation to the proposal – was literally saying on Saturday Peskov: “Putin has no relation to the proposal”.

    Putin promised in 2005 that he would never raise the retirement age, for any time he is president. So now Putin is not raising the retirement age – but Medvedev is raising it.

  224. @German_reader
    Hmm, not sure if that's a smart move, saying it's unfortunate one can't get rid of gypsies with citizenship is bound to be controversial, as is anything that sounds like ethnic discrimination against certain citizens.
    He should focus on the Africans (and their stupid German do-gooder friends), they're the greater threat anyway and must be removed.
    But in any case, hard not to be impressed by the Italians when one is sitting in this stupid lemming country where Merkel gets away with everything and the entire establishment is out to crush any dissent.

    Gypsies are one of the lowest-quality races in the entire world and should absolutely be a priority for removal.

    That it’s “controversial” is the point. We must (re)normalize ethnic discrimination, and urgently.

    Time’s running out.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    I can see your point about pushing boundaries and changing the discourse. It would be more important though imo to break the taboo about Africans and openly state that no, they don't have any right to come to Europe, and no, they aren't victims, they're invaders and parasites.
    Gypsies are very unpopular anyway, whereas Africans get a lot of sympathy for mysterious reasons.
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    I was talking with a white American in Romania, one of those BLM-supporting boomer types. I was amused to see that when the conversation drifted from American fascist police shooting innocent Negroes to the Gypsy Question he abruptly transformed from a liberal cuck into a hardcore Nazi.
  225. @Dmitry
    Reinor this week it's huge numbers of people in Russia complaining about this proposal. The complaining is not from the West (who don't have any interest in retirement ages).

    At the same time, most analysts understand that it is a good and necessary policy to raise the retirement age.

    It's a hallmark example of 'bitter medicine' (you don't like the taste, but it's good for you).

    -

    However, raising the VAT to 20% is not supported by analysts.

    On the VAT issue, the government already has access to inconceivably vast amounts of money. The direction should not be to transfer more money from citizens (and all citizens have to pay VAT) to the government. The direction should be the opposite: for the government to be more efficient in managing its spending.

    This is a debate occurring and interesting in many countries. I remember seeing a discussion during the American Presidential election debates in 2012 (Romney vs Obama) - Romney was arguing government "should return money to citizens" - as the way of describing a policy of not taxing so much.

    Reinor this week it’s huge numbers of people in Russia complaining about this proposal. The complaining is not from the West (who don’t have any interest in retirement ages).

    The West has every interest in destabilising Russia’s political situation though. For example, check out this headline:

    Russian men will now DIE before they retire in ‘OUTRAGEOUS’ new policy announcement
    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/975707/russian-men-die-before-retire-new-policy-dmitry-medvedev-world-cup-2018-latest

    A lot of news websites in Russia operate by copying and translating content from major Western media outlets. It’s therefore likely that these fakes will make their way onto the Russian internet, and feed anti-government sentiment. Perhaps, that was the intention?

    However, raising the VAT to 20% is not supported by analysts.

    On the VAT issue, the government already has access to inconceivably vast amounts of money. The direction should not be to transfer more money from citizens (and all citizens have to pay VAT) to the government. The direction should be the opposite: for the government to be more efficient in managing its spending.

    Personally, I think the government in Russia isn’t taxing people enough. They should certainly raise the income tax. It’s very low in Russia at 13%, and flat, and doesn’t serve the function of reducing inequality. In every developed country, income tax provides a lion share of budget revenue. But Russian government refuses to make full use of it, as they are worried, they wouldn’t be able to handle evaders. So we’re left relying on oil revenues instead, which makes Russia look like a banana republic.

    • Replies: @Dmitry

    Personally, I think the government in Russia isn’t taxing people enough. They should certainly raise the income tax. It’s very low in Russia at 13%, and flat, and doesn’t serve the function of reducing inequality. In every developed country, income tax provides a lion share of budget revenue. But Russian government refuses to make full use of it, as they are worried, they wouldn’t be able to handle evaders. So we’re left relying on oil revenues instead, which makes Russia look like a banana republic.
     
    It is an interesting post.

    The flat tax scale is quite popular though even with average people, and administratively (from the government perspective) much more simple.

    I think there is an issue of "low state capacity" on both sides of this coin.

    The side of the coin (which attracts my attention), - that flooding the government with even more money than it already has, will not necessarily improve government services to citizens - or almost certainly not to an extent which matches the increase in government budget.

    On the other hand, citizens themselves will spend this money in a way which contributes more to their happiness, than would happen indirectly by taking more money from them, then giving it to the government to spend on the same citizens.

  226. @German_reader
    In Germany there's already talk of raising the retirement age to 69 (ok, life expectancy is quite a bit higher than in Russia, so not totally comparable). I guess at least that would make it difficult to bash Russia over this.

    In Germany there’s already talk of raising the retirement age to 69 (ok, life expectancy is quite a bit higher than in Russia, so not totally comparable).

    The life expectancy at 60 in Germany is 24 years.

    So a 60 year old German, has a life expectancy of 84 years.

    http://www.helpage.org/global-agewatch/population-ageing-data/life-expectancy-at-60/

    If retirement is raised to 69 years – there will still be quite a good retirement length for the average citizen (it’s still not pleasant, but it’s not as bad when you look at the life-expectancy at 60 data).

  227. @Thorfinnsson
    Gypsies are one of the lowest-quality races in the entire world and should absolutely be a priority for removal.

    That it's "controversial" is the point. We must (re)normalize ethnic discrimination, and urgently.

    Time's running out.

    I can see your point about pushing boundaries and changing the discourse. It would be more important though imo to break the taboo about Africans and openly state that no, they don’t have any right to come to Europe, and no, they aren’t victims, they’re invaders and parasites.
    Gypsies are very unpopular anyway, whereas Africans get a lot of sympathy for mysterious reasons.

  228. When Bismark came up with the idea of Social Security it was brilliant. Since the average person was dead by 65 it was cheap and the idiot masses loved it.

    If we are going to have some form of social security in the west, we should raise the age to like 85 or something. Medicare just needs to go completely.

  229. @Felix Keverich

    Reinor this week it’s huge numbers of people in Russia complaining about this proposal. The complaining is not from the West (who don’t have any interest in retirement ages).
     
    The West has every interest in destabilising Russia's political situation though. For example, check out this headline:

    Russian men will now DIE before they retire in 'OUTRAGEOUS' new policy announcement
    https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/975707/russian-men-die-before-retire-new-policy-dmitry-medvedev-world-cup-2018-latest
     
    A lot of news websites in Russia operate by copying and translating content from major Western media outlets. It's therefore likely that these fakes will make their way onto the Russian internet, and feed anti-government sentiment. Perhaps, that was the intention?

    However, raising the VAT to 20% is not supported by analysts.

    On the VAT issue, the government already has access to inconceivably vast amounts of money. The direction should not be to transfer more money from citizens (and all citizens have to pay VAT) to the government. The direction should be the opposite: for the government to be more efficient in managing its spending.
     

    Personally, I think the government in Russia isn't taxing people enough. They should certainly raise the income tax. It's very low in Russia at 13%, and flat, and doesn't serve the function of reducing inequality. In every developed country, income tax provides a lion share of budget revenue. But Russian government refuses to make full use of it, as they are worried, they wouldn't be able to handle evaders. So we're left relying on oil revenues instead, which makes Russia look like a banana republic.

    Personally, I think the government in Russia isn’t taxing people enough. They should certainly raise the income tax. It’s very low in Russia at 13%, and flat, and doesn’t serve the function of reducing inequality. In every developed country, income tax provides a lion share of budget revenue. But Russian government refuses to make full use of it, as they are worried, they wouldn’t be able to handle evaders. So we’re left relying on oil revenues instead, which makes Russia look like a banana republic.

    It is an interesting post.

    The flat tax scale is quite popular though even with average people, and administratively (from the government perspective) much more simple.

    I think there is an issue of “low state capacity” on both sides of this coin.

    The side of the coin (which attracts my attention), – that flooding the government with even more money than it already has, will not necessarily improve government services to citizens – or almost certainly not to an extent which matches the increase in government budget.

    On the other hand, citizens themselves will spend this money in a way which contributes more to their happiness, than would happen indirectly by taking more money from them, then giving it to the government to spend on the same citizens.

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich

    On the other hand, citizens themselves will spend this money in a way which contributes more to their happiness, than would happen indirectly by giving more money to the government to spend on the same citizens.
     
    The beauty of the taxation system and income tax in particular is that it enables the government to redistribute money from those who have too much of it, to those who need it more. The upper and middle classes in Russia are not savers: they spend their salary on tourism and imported goods. The Russian economy won't lose much if they have a smaller disposable income to spend.

    On the other hand, the government could use that additional revenue to lower VAT, stimulating business activity and improving living conditions for the poor (VAT is a tax that disproportionally affects the poor). It could enable the government to establish a system of food stamps, generous subsidies for young families with children etc. There are all sorts of nice things the government could do using revenue from income tax.

    Russian budget would then be less dependent on taxes paid by energy industry. This money could be stored in a soveregn wealth fund, and used to finance infraustructure projects.
  230. OT:

    German_Reader talked about Let’s Plays and although I have not yet gotten around to Civilization 6: Russophobia Edition, it seems to be a good enough time to ramble about one of my proudest moments of manipulation and coordination in a political/strategy game called Pardus.

    A little bit of background on the game. Its basically a web game back when such were a lot more popular, and had a surprisingly large population for it, almost 10k players or so. The most relevant factions to the story were the Empire, which had around a thousand active players, and the Federation, which had three thousand. For reasons, I was invited to the Empire by two friends(who have since become close IRL friends) and knowing the vast material and manpower deficiency, wanted to see if I could singlehandedly change the outcome and defeat the Federation.

    Warning: Long, boring and geeky.

    [MORE]

    I should add too, the Empire basically ran as a feudalism so its economic model was even worse on top of everything else. It is an interesting thing, though, considering the cues of the game and how it impacted people: for all practical purposes, there was no reason for the Empire to run as a feudalism and indeed, it wasn’t even necessarily supported by the story. Sometimes I just blame the color red and wonder if it had deeper effects on the psyche of the players.

    At any rate, it meant that the economies were always dysfunctional but there was a mixed blessing – everyone was always fighting. Each of the corporations or sub-alliances of the Empire had basically shed the blood of each other, which meant that even more resources were wasted in such internal fights, but on the upside, it meant that there was a vast and comfortable level of skill in Imperial pilots. In previous wars with the Federation, this was already noted on. It had its limits: this was usually tactical skill. The Federation generally was better at bulk and felt like an unstoppable juggernaught.

    A fair fight against the Federation was utterly impossible, the Federation would win simply through blatant attrition and the fact that they were inferior at tactical combat did not mean that they were incompetent. In order to make up for the lack of pilots, force multiplication was needed and I took on the role of an intelligence agency to assist the Empire. This is a long story, but eventually I was able to get an agent into the Federal Navy’s logistic section and worked on my most nefarious plan: get the Federation to promote a woman into their highest ranks right before the Third War.

    This is a bit trollish, so its worth clarification.

    The Third War was incited by Imperial aggression…um…liberation of a neighboring star system of Aya, which was justified in our view as the Imperial system of Nari was essentially in a weak position otherwise from Federation blockades. Politically, this also gave us a “buffer zone” to keep Nari safe. Militarily, by launching a surprise attack, it allowed us to make the most of our reduced forces and attempt to capture enemy resources and delay using Imperial resources for as a long as possible. Since the Federation was going to eventually go to war anyway with us, we had to strike first.

    The now occupied Aya system was a cause for the Federation to strike back, and I was able to observe a political strand in this. An economic leader by the name of Kaela Angeles was not so subtly expressing interest in retaking Aya from the Empire, “in conjunction” with the Federal Navy but with significant independence given that she had an vast business bloc behind her. She was a highly capable person….but she had no military experience.

    I had to do two things, then:

    1) Convince her to pursue a plan to occupy Aya
    2) Convince the Federation Navy to allow her to run the operation

    The first was basically Inception. How do you plant an idea in someone else’s head? Well, you don’t. She already had that idea, but now I needed to force her to “declare” it in a way that she could not back down on. So I had my agent run a marketing campaign for her, giving her the portrait of “Angel of Aya” and then helping her campaign on the idea of “liberating” Aya from the evil Imperial masters. She was flattered and foolish enough by the former to actually put the Angel of Aya as her portrait, and became increasingly fascinated with the idea of herself as a heroine. Her math was right – with the huge bulk of resources she had, why couldn’t she just become the Mistress of Aya? Why concede it to the Federal Navy and just be a taxpayer?

    Now the second part was harder. The Federal Navy had fought two wars with the Empire and far less rosy in their outlook. While they realistically knew that they had an enormous advantage, fighting the Empire has always been tough and victory was always bloody. They had few illusions, but now with Kaela basically declaring her ambitions openly, to denounce her would cause substantial chaos…especially because they needed her companies to keep them supplied.

    Naturally, the next step was to play the diversity card on them. I had my agent comment on how the Empire had no female leaders and was really a reactionary organization: a democracy such as the Federation should demonstrate how different they are, and allow Kaela an outsized role. They could marginalize her later, after all. The Navy’s leaders were dubious, but conceded, since they had two major attacks planned anyway and figured that whatever she did was immaterial. They also, mistakenly, assumed that she would listen to them more.

    I had achieved both of my goals.

    It was beautiful. I had successfully used their democracy against them. Such a thing could never happen in the Empire; the closest equivalent to a merchant alliance demanding involvement in the war effort would be answered by militant noble challenging the merchant leader to a duel. Such foolishness would stop right there.

    Skip forward a bit of time. Both Navy attacks had stalled, I had a role in stalling one of them. With the Navy deadlocked but fighting for attrition, things were still not going well for the Imperials. But we had the Angel of Aya to save us.

    Kaela thought to show up the Navy by launching her general third attack on the Aya system. In doing so, she used up nearly a third of the entire resource base of the Federation. The Navy could no longer convince her not to do so. To be honest, after seeing the sheer, virtually unbelievable bulk of her force, I began to wonder if I had made a horrible mistake.

    In a rare moment of convergence, Imperial High Command ordered my two close friends to stop her force. They were surprisingly confident, and in the ensuring two days, her total lack of experience would show:

    1) She engaged Imperial forces to “win”, often distracting her march to Aya. As such, the Imperials would use understrength flotillas to distract her and give her victories. Each victory cost her, and she gained nothing for it beyond ego.

    2) She did not understand, nor appropriately respect the Navy’s fear of Imperial skill. In something that even I didn’t know until recently, the Imperial High Command had perfect wargames of what was needed to lose Aya. So they knew exactly how much they needed to weaken her invasion force by.

    When she finally reached Aya, it was with a force that was understrength yet oversized, dependent on supply lines that were cut, and ultimately defeated in a massive battle above Aya in total. She didn’t seem too dismayed, defeat had to be someone else’s fault, and she reasoned that it wouldn’t be seen as a Fed Navy defeat anyway. Technically, it was just hers, and her corporations. She took of the Angel of Aya from her title. She went back to running her corporations.

    Of course, that wasn’t how the average Federation member saw it. The resulting collapse in morale…from having a “won war” get deadlocked and a third attack smashed…was near total for the Federation. Still in shock of what happened, the Federation Navy was caught off guard by immediate Imperial counterattacks and force to withdraw and abandon their allies. I had my agents spread rumors of Federal perfidy and cowardice, naturally. This did not net any turncoats as I had hoped, but it did destroy any faith in the Federal Navy.

    In the end, the Third War ended with the Empire in control of all major Federal sectors and perhaps the most complete defeat of the Federation ever. Around then, I chose to exit the game; in the long run, there was no way to defeat the Federal advantage in numbers. And the Imperial High Command, high off victory, was beginning to splinter and probably was able to fight each other over their new territories.

    I could sense the “victory disease” coming, and I didn’t want to stay to see the result. It was still a great story, and I like to think, that in many ways, I significantly impacted a battle between thousands but with enough placed whispers.

  231. @Dmitry

    Personally, I think the government in Russia isn’t taxing people enough. They should certainly raise the income tax. It’s very low in Russia at 13%, and flat, and doesn’t serve the function of reducing inequality. In every developed country, income tax provides a lion share of budget revenue. But Russian government refuses to make full use of it, as they are worried, they wouldn’t be able to handle evaders. So we’re left relying on oil revenues instead, which makes Russia look like a banana republic.
     
    It is an interesting post.

    The flat tax scale is quite popular though even with average people, and administratively (from the government perspective) much more simple.

    I think there is an issue of "low state capacity" on both sides of this coin.

    The side of the coin (which attracts my attention), - that flooding the government with even more money than it already has, will not necessarily improve government services to citizens - or almost certainly not to an extent which matches the increase in government budget.

    On the other hand, citizens themselves will spend this money in a way which contributes more to their happiness, than would happen indirectly by taking more money from them, then giving it to the government to spend on the same citizens.

    On the other hand, citizens themselves will spend this money in a way which contributes more to their happiness, than would happen indirectly by giving more money to the government to spend on the same citizens.

    The beauty of the taxation system and income tax in particular is that it enables the government to redistribute money from those who have too much of it, to those who need it more. The upper and middle classes in Russia are not savers: they spend their salary on tourism and imported goods. The Russian economy won’t lose much if they have a smaller disposable income to spend.

    On the other hand, the government could use that additional revenue to lower VAT, stimulating business activity and improving living conditions for the poor (VAT is a tax that disproportionally affects the poor). It could enable the government to establish a system of food stamps, generous subsidies for young families with children etc. There are all sorts of nice things the government could do using revenue from income tax.

    Russian budget would then be less dependent on taxes paid by energy industry. This money could be stored in a soveregn wealth fund, and used to finance infraustructure projects.

  232. @AP

    Oh, it’s a civil war now? Didn’t you tell me that the Ukraine is “doing well” right now?
     
    I wrote low-grade.

    Yes, it's doing well despite the low-grade civil war. But a low-grade civil war will impact the average life expectancy somewhat.

    You seem to be unable to tell the difference between an explanation and an excuse.

    Of course, you are also dishonest, so this may explain your problem.

    Russia always had a fair amount of non-slavic minorities, but their share in the population has been been rather stable. Caucasians in Russia already live to 80 years
     
    Which means that when it comes to the Slavic population, Russia was even further behind Ukraine before, and still hasn't caught up yet, despite the low-grade civil war Russia keeps going in Ukraine. So your original comment was much ado about nothing, although it provided me with an opportunity to share some or your past lies :-)

    As usual, you are both somewhat correct.

    1. The Ukraine was usually ahead of Russia by around 2 years even during the USSR, now they have leveled. Felix wins.

    2. Russia is not meaningfully ahead of the Ukraine. AP wins.

    3. Caucasians only constitute ~5% of the population. It is also worth noting that the LE figures (and demographic figures in general) from Chechnya and especially Ingushetia are not reliable – they inflate their populations, meaning that mortality rates are higher and LE is lower than on paper. OTOH, adjusting for this would probably make Russia essentially equal to the Ukraine. Felix wins.

    4. The civil war in the Ukraine is not killing a statistically significant number of people. Felix wins. Possibly it is staving off improvements in healthcare and/or anti-alcohol regulations, though OTOH, they have always been low priority so far as I know. Unclear who wins.

    5. Apart from Caucasians, Russia also has Buryats, Tuvans, Yakuts, and other native peoples who due to their alcohol problems have lower LE than Russians. This likely balances things out anyway. Felix wins. Though this does also invalidate Mikhail’s whataboutist point about Native Americans having lower LE than White Americans (their real point of comparison in Russia would be with Tuvans, etc).

    • Replies: @AP

    Caucasians only constitute ~5% of the population.
     
    Correct. But their life expectancy is a lot higher (Ingushetia is 82.6!) So their impact is probably not trivial, if small. And their population is growing relative to that of Slavs.

    How do they inflate population figures? Do they count those who have moved to Moscow as locals?

    The civil war in the Ukraine is not killing a statistically significant number of people.
     
    There is also suicide and alcoholism among veterans, and probably a lot of bad infrastructure in the Donbas oblasts still under Kiev control. We are talking about small overall differences, but small effects would create those.

    Apart from Caucasians, Russia also has Buryats, Tuvans, Yakuts, and other native peoples who due to their alcohol problems have lower LE than Russians
     
    These peoples have small populations. OTOH Tatars live longer than ethnic Russians on average. As do the Finnic peoples. So Caucasians plus Tatars plus Finnic peoples well outnumbers Tuvans and Yakuts. Overall the non-Russian minorities outlive the Slavs and boost Russia's LE stats.
    , @Felix Keverich
    You forgot another point I made: current momentum favors Russia over the Ukraine. Give it 15 years, and Russia will have meaningful lead over the Ukraine.
  233. @German_reader
    In Germany there's already talk of raising the retirement age to 69 (ok, life expectancy is quite a bit higher than in Russia, so not totally comparable). I guess at least that would make it difficult to bash Russia over this.

    There’s a cultural expectation in Russia that the government is out to rip off people – give them an inch, they take a mile.

    This explains the 2005 protests over the monetization of benefits – benefits are real, set things, while additional subsidies can be inflated away.

    Ergo with the retirement age. The government can promise to raise pensions to compensate, but will they really? This is why people are very unhappy with raising the retirement age from 60/55, which are set in stone and can’t be quietly done away with.

    • Replies: @Gerard2

    Ergo with the retirement age. The government can promise to raise pensions to compensate, but will they really? This is why people are very unhappy with raising the retirement age from 60/55, which are set in stone and can’t be quietly done away with.
     
    In no country are people ever hapy with the retirement age being increased. The most important thing here is that a key stetegic goal of Putin in his Federal Assembly address is to raise the life expectancy to 83 by 2028 ( when the male pension age reaches 65)...with the great success of Russia this is a wholly acheivable goal. A life expectancy at this level ( which would probably bring Moscow and Saint Petersburg close to 90 in life expectancy) makes moaning about retirement age lifting , pretty much irrelevant.

    The extreme North is protected and the often sympathised teachers get a massively beneficial deal that can allow early retirement on full pension after 30 years of service
  234. @Thorfinnsson
    Gypsies are one of the lowest-quality races in the entire world and should absolutely be a priority for removal.

    That it's "controversial" is the point. We must (re)normalize ethnic discrimination, and urgently.

    Time's running out.

    I was talking with a white American in Romania, one of those BLM-supporting boomer types. I was amused to see that when the conversation drifted from American fascist police shooting innocent Negroes to the Gypsy Question he abruptly transformed from a liberal cuck into a hardcore Nazi.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Perhaps it's wise then to start with the gypsies.

    Pick the low-hanging fruit first, as it is a major battle dismantle the Holy Negro sacrament.

    Fortunately the negroes in America are aiding this battle greatly with their Black Lives Matter (fact check: false) rubbish.
  235. @Anatoly Karlin
    I was talking with a white American in Romania, one of those BLM-supporting boomer types. I was amused to see that when the conversation drifted from American fascist police shooting innocent Negroes to the Gypsy Question he abruptly transformed from a liberal cuck into a hardcore Nazi.

    Perhaps it’s wise then to start with the gypsies.

    Pick the low-hanging fruit first, as it is a major battle dismantle the Holy Negro sacrament.

    Fortunately the negroes in America are aiding this battle greatly with their Black Lives Matter (fact check: false) rubbish.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    People in Europe who consume only mainstream media (that is the vast majority) get a very filtered view of race relations in the US and many probably regard something like BLM as a legitimate civil rights movement.
    Maybe people will wake up when there's more misbehaviour by blacks in Europe.
  236. @Thorfinnsson
    Perhaps it's wise then to start with the gypsies.

    Pick the low-hanging fruit first, as it is a major battle dismantle the Holy Negro sacrament.

    Fortunately the negroes in America are aiding this battle greatly with their Black Lives Matter (fact check: false) rubbish.

    People in Europe who consume only mainstream media (that is the vast majority) get a very filtered view of race relations in the US and many probably regard something like BLM as a legitimate civil rights movement.
    Maybe people will wake up when there’s more misbehaviour by blacks in Europe.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Generally speaking people have a more accurate view of their own country than foreign countries, as with respect to foreign countries the vast majority of people are totally dependent on the media.

    Witness the extreme unpopularity of American Republican Presidents in Europe for instance. In Canada things have gotten so unhinged that people in Trudeau's inner circle are calling for Magnitsky-style sanctions against Trump and his family.

    I browsed through Spiegel the other day and the tone of the magazine was nothing short of apocalyptic.

    Endless fretting about the "postwar liberal international order" about to end. The horror of Germany becoming...independent.

    In fact after Trump won the election Spiegel had an amusing cover of an asteroid in the form of Trump's head hurtling into planet Earth.

  237. @German_reader
    People in Europe who consume only mainstream media (that is the vast majority) get a very filtered view of race relations in the US and many probably regard something like BLM as a legitimate civil rights movement.
    Maybe people will wake up when there's more misbehaviour by blacks in Europe.

    Generally speaking people have a more accurate view of their own country than foreign countries, as with respect to foreign countries the vast majority of people are totally dependent on the media.

    Witness the extreme unpopularity of American Republican Presidents in Europe for instance. In Canada things have gotten so unhinged that people in Trudeau’s inner circle are calling for Magnitsky-style sanctions against Trump and his family.

    I browsed through Spiegel the other day and the tone of the magazine was nothing short of apocalyptic.

    Endless fretting about the “postwar liberal international order” about to end. The horror of Germany becoming…independent.

    In fact after Trump won the election Spiegel had an amusing cover of an asteroid in the form of Trump’s head hurtling into planet Earth.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    There's an entire collection of really unhinged SPIEGEL covers about Trump:

    Trump as ISIS butcherer, killing the statue of liberty:

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmeedia.de%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F02%2FBildschirmfoto-2017-02-04-um-00.38.22.png&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmeedia.de%2F2017%2F02%2F04%2Ftrump-titel-so-spaltet-das-kontroverse-spiegel-cover-das-netz%2F&docid=Y3rznzKhOCebYM&tbnid=oBwIXuN-18Od_M%3A&vet=10ahUKEwjxpszSut7bAhVMWxQKHXtGA8kQMwg8KAAwAA..i&w=3236&h=1900&client=firefox-b&bih=786&biw=1600&q=trump%20spiegel%20isis&ved=0ahUKEwjxpszSut7bAhVMWxQKHXtGA8kQMwg8KAAwAA&iact=mrc&uact=8

    Trump as klansman:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=trump+spiegel+isis&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj3ufDQut7bAhUTlxQKHaGLAssQ_AUICygC&biw=1600&bih=786#imgrc=K0aLmR26sqEOxM:

    And feeding into the paranoia about Trump being a Russian candidate:

    https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b&biw=1600&bih=786&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=bE0oW5SnJsreU9mMjKAG&q=trump+spiegel+cover+doppelregent&oq=trump+spiegel+cover+doppelregent&gs_l=img.3...16455.18562.0.18767.13.13.0.0.0.0.81.925.13.13.0....0...1c.1.64.img..0.2.160...0i30k1j0i8i30k1.0.z82q0wmzRjk#imgrc=7lwFA0SVqDUG_M:

    Even if one has misgivings and concerns about some of Trump's policies (as I do), this is obviously crazy stuff.
    German media over the last few years has really done everything they could to show that they're indeed the Lügenpresse.

  238. @Thorfinnsson
    Generally speaking people have a more accurate view of their own country than foreign countries, as with respect to foreign countries the vast majority of people are totally dependent on the media.

    Witness the extreme unpopularity of American Republican Presidents in Europe for instance. In Canada things have gotten so unhinged that people in Trudeau's inner circle are calling for Magnitsky-style sanctions against Trump and his family.

    I browsed through Spiegel the other day and the tone of the magazine was nothing short of apocalyptic.

    Endless fretting about the "postwar liberal international order" about to end. The horror of Germany becoming...independent.

    In fact after Trump won the election Spiegel had an amusing cover of an asteroid in the form of Trump's head hurtling into planet Earth.

    There’s an entire collection of really unhinged SPIEGEL covers about Trump:

    Trump as ISIS butcherer, killing the statue of liberty:

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmeedia.de%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F02%2FBildschirmfoto-2017-02-04-um-00.38.22.png&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmeedia.de%2F2017%2F02%2F04%2Ftrump-titel-so-spaltet-das-kontroverse-spiegel-cover-das-netz%2F&docid=Y3rznzKhOCebYM&tbnid=oBwIXuN-18Od_M%3A&vet=10ahUKEwjxpszSut7bAhVMWxQKHXtGA8kQMwg8KAAwAA..i&w=3236&h=1900&client=firefox-b&bih=786&biw=1600&q=trump%20spiegel%20isis&ved=0ahUKEwjxpszSut7bAhVMWxQKHXtGA8kQMwg8KAAwAA&iact=mrc&uact=8

    Trump as klansman:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=trump+spiegel+isis&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj3ufDQut7bAhUTlxQKHaGLAssQ_AUICygC&biw=1600&bih=786#imgrc=K0aLmR26sqEOxM:

    And feeding into the paranoia about Trump being a Russian candidate:

    https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b&biw=1600&bih=786&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=bE0oW5SnJsreU9mMjKAG&q=trump+spiegel+cover+doppelregent&oq=trump+spiegel+cover+doppelregent&gs_l=img.3…16455.18562.0.18767.13.13.0.0.0.0.81.925.13.13.0….0…1c.1.64.img..0.2.160…0i30k1j0i8i30k1.0.z82q0wmzRjk#imgrc=7lwFA0SVqDUG_M:

    Even if one has misgivings and concerns about some of Trump’s policies (as I do), this is obviously crazy stuff.
    German media over the last few years has really done everything they could to show that they’re indeed the Lügenpresse.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Trump's trade policy is obviously negative for Germany, though any objective German can understand why we take issue with the trade situation.

    His Iran policy might be negative (we don't know yet, but so far nothing negative for Europe). Trump seems to be starting to view himself as a "peacemaker", so I hope that becomes part of his self-conception and causes him to alter his views on Iran. That said withdrawing from the Iran Deal didn't create war.

    But other than that considering him some sort of lethal threat is absurd. Which of course you already knew.

    And if anything Trump cares more about Germans than Obama did, as evidenced by his views on the rapefugee crisis.

    Those Spiegel covers are amazing by the way LOL.
    , @Anon
    Great stuff, but we don't really need all the random stuff about your internet habits (I use Firefox too.) You can post just the picture (example: https://i.pinimg.com/236x/fb/b8/24/fbb824e6a8b052fee8b9a740fbd62969.jpg) or use a hyperlink (< a href ="[link]" > [text] < /a >)*

    example

    *let's see if this scans

  239. To Americans: https://shop.californiaoliveranch.com/Rich-and-Robust-Extra-Virgin-Olive-Oil/p/COR-100230&[email protected]

    Highly recommend this olive oil. Rich, robust, spicy, buttery flavor. Reasonably priced. Made in America. Not adulterated.

    For you Euros just avoid anything “packed in Italy” since it’s almost certainly adulterated by the mafia with soybean or canola oil. Skip Spain as well since it’s nearly all arbequina olives.

    Greek olive oil is generally a good bet.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    Is that the one that used to be McEvoy Ranch EVOO? If so, I agree, it's one of the very best, though unfortunately on the pricey side.

    For you Euros just avoid anything “packed in Italy” since it’s almost certainly adulterated by the mafia with soybean or canola oil.
     
    How frequently does this happen? I know there were a few scandals about this, but I don't know if this is systemic or not - e.g., if the standard bottle of Italian EVOO will be contaminated this way. Also would the Greeks not be prone to this as well, given they're no less corrupt than the Italians? Anyhow, I suppose this is a moot question for me, since almost all the EVOO sold in Russia is Italian, I think.
    , @Guillaume Tell
    IMHO, the absolute best is not to be found in Greece but there:
    https://boutique.barroux.org/1326-huile-d-olive

    I don't know about the USA, but I know for a fact that they ship the 3L oil "fountains" to CH (and therefore certainly at least anywhere into the EU).
  240. @Anatoly Karlin
    There's a cultural expectation in Russia that the government is out to rip off people - give them an inch, they take a mile.

    This explains the 2005 protests over the monetization of benefits - benefits are real, set things, while additional subsidies can be inflated away.

    Ergo with the retirement age. The government can promise to raise pensions to compensate, but will they really? This is why people are very unhappy with raising the retirement age from 60/55, which are set in stone and can't be quietly done away with.

    Ergo with the retirement age. The government can promise to raise pensions to compensate, but will they really? This is why people are very unhappy with raising the retirement age from 60/55, which are set in stone and can’t be quietly done away with.

    In no country are people ever hapy with the retirement age being increased. The most important thing here is that a key stetegic goal of Putin in his Federal Assembly address is to raise the life expectancy to 83 by 2028 ( when the male pension age reaches 65)…with the great success of Russia this is a wholly acheivable goal. A life expectancy at this level ( which would probably bring Moscow and Saint Petersburg close to 90 in life expectancy) makes moaning about retirement age lifting , pretty much irrelevant.

    The extreme North is protected and the often sympathised teachers get a massively beneficial deal that can allow early retirement on full pension after 30 years of service

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Retirement is for losers and should be abolished.

    The fuck do you do all day?
    , @Dmitry

    The most important thing here is that a key stetegic goal of Putin in his Federal Assembly address is to raise the life expectancy to 83
     
    The correct datapoint to look at is not life-expectancy from birth, but life expectancy from age of retirement (which is a lot higher).

    Life expectancy at 60 is 17 years (i.e. 77 years old).

    So raising retirement age looks more rational when you realize average retiring people will have 17 years retirement already currently.

    But - whether or not it is reasonable, and I think it is reasonable - it is also undeniable people are extremely angry about the proposal of raising pension age. Whether this anger fades or not who knows.

    People in general are seeming unusually angry at the government this year.

  241. AP says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    As usual, you are both somewhat correct.

    1. The Ukraine was usually ahead of Russia by around 2 years even during the USSR, now they have leveled. Felix wins.

    2. Russia is not meaningfully ahead of the Ukraine. AP wins.

    3. Caucasians only constitute ~5% of the population. It is also worth noting that the LE figures (and demographic figures in general) from Chechnya and especially Ingushetia are not reliable - they inflate their populations, meaning that mortality rates are higher and LE is lower than on paper. OTOH, adjusting for this would probably make Russia essentially equal to the Ukraine. Felix wins.

    4. The civil war in the Ukraine is not killing a statistically significant number of people. Felix wins. Possibly it is staving off improvements in healthcare and/or anti-alcohol regulations, though OTOH, they have always been low priority so far as I know. Unclear who wins.

    5. Apart from Caucasians, Russia also has Buryats, Tuvans, Yakuts, and other native peoples who due to their alcohol problems have lower LE than Russians. This likely balances things out anyway. Felix wins. Though this does also invalidate Mikhail's whataboutist point about Native Americans having lower LE than White Americans (their real point of comparison in Russia would be with Tuvans, etc).

    Caucasians only constitute ~5% of the population.

    Correct. But their life expectancy is a lot higher (Ingushetia is 82.6!) So their impact is probably not trivial, if small. And their population is growing relative to that of Slavs.

    How do they inflate population figures? Do they count those who have moved to Moscow as locals?

    The civil war in the Ukraine is not killing a statistically significant number of people.

    There is also suicide and alcoholism among veterans, and probably a lot of bad infrastructure in the Donbas oblasts still under Kiev control. We are talking about small overall differences, but small effects would create those.

    Apart from Caucasians, Russia also has Buryats, Tuvans, Yakuts, and other native peoples who due to their alcohol problems have lower LE than Russians

    These peoples have small populations. OTOH Tatars live longer than ethnic Russians on average. As do the Finnic peoples. So Caucasians plus Tatars plus Finnic peoples well outnumbers Tuvans and Yakuts. Overall the non-Russian minorities outlive the Slavs and boost Russia’s LE stats.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

    How do they inflate population figures? Do they count those who have moved to Moscow as locals?
     
    More details on this:

    1. https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russia-demographic-data-for-2016-released/#comment-1805422

    2. https://sputnikipogrom.com/politics/52925/dead-souls/

    These peoples have small populations. OTOH Tatars live longer than ethnic Russians on average. As do the Finnic peoples. So Caucasians plus Tatars plus Finnic peoples well outnumbers Tuvans and Yakuts. Overall the non-Russian minorities outlive the Slavs and boost Russia’s LE stats.
     
    But the effect if any will be small, because:

    1. The peoples with the biggest advantage, the relatively teetotalling DICh, have exaggerated LE's and there aren't many of them.

    2. LE advantage of Tatars, Bashkirs, and Chuvash is smaller: Approximately one year.

    3. Some Finnic peoples, esp. the ones more prone to alcoholism, live less than Russians (this applies to Udmurts, and especially the Mari).
    And of course the Tuvans, Yakuts, etc. live considerably less (LE in 90% Tuvan, Tuva, is more than 7 years below Russian average).
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russia-demographic-data-for-2016-released/
  242. @German_reader
    There's an entire collection of really unhinged SPIEGEL covers about Trump:

    Trump as ISIS butcherer, killing the statue of liberty:

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmeedia.de%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F02%2FBildschirmfoto-2017-02-04-um-00.38.22.png&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmeedia.de%2F2017%2F02%2F04%2Ftrump-titel-so-spaltet-das-kontroverse-spiegel-cover-das-netz%2F&docid=Y3rznzKhOCebYM&tbnid=oBwIXuN-18Od_M%3A&vet=10ahUKEwjxpszSut7bAhVMWxQKHXtGA8kQMwg8KAAwAA..i&w=3236&h=1900&client=firefox-b&bih=786&biw=1600&q=trump%20spiegel%20isis&ved=0ahUKEwjxpszSut7bAhVMWxQKHXtGA8kQMwg8KAAwAA&iact=mrc&uact=8

    Trump as klansman:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=trump+spiegel+isis&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj3ufDQut7bAhUTlxQKHaGLAssQ_AUICygC&biw=1600&bih=786#imgrc=K0aLmR26sqEOxM:

    And feeding into the paranoia about Trump being a Russian candidate:

    https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b&biw=1600&bih=786&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=bE0oW5SnJsreU9mMjKAG&q=trump+spiegel+cover+doppelregent&oq=trump+spiegel+cover+doppelregent&gs_l=img.3...16455.18562.0.18767.13.13.0.0.0.0.81.925.13.13.0....0...1c.1.64.img..0.2.160...0i30k1j0i8i30k1.0.z82q0wmzRjk#imgrc=7lwFA0SVqDUG_M:

    Even if one has misgivings and concerns about some of Trump's policies (as I do), this is obviously crazy stuff.
    German media over the last few years has really done everything they could to show that they're indeed the Lügenpresse.

    Trump’s trade policy is obviously negative for Germany, though any objective German can understand why we take issue with the trade situation.

    His Iran policy might be negative (we don’t know yet, but so far nothing negative for Europe). Trump seems to be starting to view himself as a “peacemaker”, so I hope that becomes part of his self-conception and causes him to alter his views on Iran. That said withdrawing from the Iran Deal didn’t create war.

    But other than that considering him some sort of lethal threat is absurd. Which of course you already knew.

    And if anything Trump cares more about Germans than Obama did, as evidenced by his views on the rapefugee crisis.

    Those Spiegel covers are amazing by the way LOL.

    • Replies: @German_reader

    That said withdrawing from the Iran Deal didn’t create war.
     
    It made it more likely though, imo a very flawed policy. Trump's unconditional support for Israel and Saudi-Arabia could well end disastrously.
    Problem just is that Trump rarely gets criticized for policies where it's actually justified, instead his hysterical leftie and centrist enemies with their politically correct pieties do their best to remind one why he was elected and why he still might be better than some alternatives.

    Those Spiegel covers are amazing by the way LOL.
     
    Some of them were drawn by a Cuban-American:
    https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-meet-artist-der-spiegels-viral-trump-covers
  243. @Gerard2

    Ergo with the retirement age. The government can promise to raise pensions to compensate, but will they really? This is why people are very unhappy with raising the retirement age from 60/55, which are set in stone and can’t be quietly done away with.
     
    In no country are people ever hapy with the retirement age being increased. The most important thing here is that a key stetegic goal of Putin in his Federal Assembly address is to raise the life expectancy to 83 by 2028 ( when the male pension age reaches 65)...with the great success of Russia this is a wholly acheivable goal. A life expectancy at this level ( which would probably bring Moscow and Saint Petersburg close to 90 in life expectancy) makes moaning about retirement age lifting , pretty much irrelevant.

    The extreme North is protected and the often sympathised teachers get a massively beneficial deal that can allow early retirement on full pension after 30 years of service

    Retirement is for losers and should be abolished.

    The fuck do you do all day?

    • Replies: @Gerard2

    Retirement is for losers and should be abolished.

    The fuck do you do all day?

     

    I would guess look after the grandkids....receiving none of the pay or benefits that a hired professional would get for the same thing. Watch all the World Cup games?

    But I would partially agree with you on this
  244. @Thorfinnsson
    Trump's trade policy is obviously negative for Germany, though any objective German can understand why we take issue with the trade situation.

    His Iran policy might be negative (we don't know yet, but so far nothing negative for Europe). Trump seems to be starting to view himself as a "peacemaker", so I hope that becomes part of his self-conception and causes him to alter his views on Iran. That said withdrawing from the Iran Deal didn't create war.

    But other than that considering him some sort of lethal threat is absurd. Which of course you already knew.

    And if anything Trump cares more about Germans than Obama did, as evidenced by his views on the rapefugee crisis.

    Those Spiegel covers are amazing by the way LOL.

    That said withdrawing from the Iran Deal didn’t create war.

    It made it more likely though, imo a very flawed policy. Trump’s unconditional support for Israel and Saudi-Arabia could well end disastrously.
    Problem just is that Trump rarely gets criticized for policies where it’s actually justified, instead his hysterical leftie and centrist enemies with their politically correct pieties do their best to remind one why he was elected and why he still might be better than some alternatives.

    Those Spiegel covers are amazing by the way LOL.

    Some of them were drawn by a Cuban-American:
    https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-meet-artist-der-spiegels-viral-trump-covers

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    To be clear I don't support Trump's Iran policy.

    That said no disaster so far.

    And who knows, perhaps he'll go to Tehran in his second term and make peace.
  245. @Anatoly Karlin
    As usual, you are both somewhat correct.

    1. The Ukraine was usually ahead of Russia by around 2 years even during the USSR, now they have leveled. Felix wins.

    2. Russia is not meaningfully ahead of the Ukraine. AP wins.

    3. Caucasians only constitute ~5% of the population. It is also worth noting that the LE figures (and demographic figures in general) from Chechnya and especially Ingushetia are not reliable - they inflate their populations, meaning that mortality rates are higher and LE is lower than on paper. OTOH, adjusting for this would probably make Russia essentially equal to the Ukraine. Felix wins.

    4. The civil war in the Ukraine is not killing a statistically significant number of people. Felix wins. Possibly it is staving off improvements in healthcare and/or anti-alcohol regulations, though OTOH, they have always been low priority so far as I know. Unclear who wins.

    5. Apart from Caucasians, Russia also has Buryats, Tuvans, Yakuts, and other native peoples who due to their alcohol problems have lower LE than Russians. This likely balances things out anyway. Felix wins. Though this does also invalidate Mikhail's whataboutist point about Native Americans having lower LE than White Americans (their real point of comparison in Russia would be with Tuvans, etc).

    You forgot another point I made: current momentum favors Russia over the Ukraine. Give it 15 years, and Russia will have meaningful lead over the Ukraine.

  246. @AP

    Higher than Ukraines, for the first time.
     
    With or without Donbas?

    You are once again gloating at the expense of the more pro-Russian people within Ukraine.

    Moreover, what is the source? This one states 72.11 (increase .21%) for Ukraine in 2017 and 71.2 (increase .19%) for Russia:

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Ukraine/topics/Demographics/Age/Life-expectancy-at-birth

    https://knoema.com/atlas/Russian-Federation/topics/Demographics/Population-forecast/Life-expectancy

    According to WHO in 2017 Ukraine's life expectancy in 2017 was 71.3 and Russia's was 70.5:

    http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/russia-life-expectancy

    When you consider the regions of extreme cold, short days,
     
    Another stupid argument. Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world's highest life expectancy. Canada is #12.

    ethnic issues
     
    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016. Tatars also live longer than Slavs. Good job undermining yourself.

    [MORE]

    With or without Donbas?

    You are once again gloating at the expense of the more pro-Russian people within Ukraine.

    Moreover, what is the source? This one states 72.11 (increase .21%) for Ukraine in 2017 and 71.2 (increase .19%) for Russia:

    LOL…this pitiful garbage is hilarious, to put it mildly. Typical of a moronic loser.
    Russia’s life expectancy is 72.5 you retarded prick . Ukraine’s is less than 72 ( obviously those are figures that don’t count the DNR/LNR ,as with everything of Ukraine’s doped-up statistics you thick POS.)

    72.5 vs less than 72 is an amazing and inexplicable turnaround you cretin.
    Your stats are about has relevant and as accurate as my toilet brush.

    What’s more , my source is pure common sense….and Veronika Skvortsova …a very successful woman full of integrity and purpose. Ukraine’s “Health Department” is headed, naturally, by a crazed Canadian Banderatard Nazi bitch currently involved in bringing “exciting things” to Ukraine, like massive increases in TB rates, numerous other diseases, malnourishment level explosion….and even more failings in hospitals

    Another stupid argument. Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world’s highest life expectancy. Canada is #12.

    errrrmmm…the winters in Reykjavik (70% of Iceland population)and areas in which 95%+ of the population of Sweden live ,Stockholm and Malmo , (the only 2 cities in Sweden I have visited) alone are 3 out of the 10 million Swedish population,) are not anywhere near the extreme cold of areas as Murmansk,Omsk, Irkutsk, Yakutia …..or even Saint Petersburg and numerous others you thick prick POS! Kiev wouldn’t survive in nearly 3 months of total darkness like Norilsk. Your dipshit talk is even more stupid when we consider that they and Canada don’t have the huge operational heavy industries, big cities with sizeable populations, in areas of extreme cold&daylight issues….. as Russia does. Norilsk has 2-3 more times the population than the entire northern area of Canada you useless POS! Stockholm’s winters are closer to France’s or Britain’s than the areas in Russia I refer to you cretinous prick.

    Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world’s highest life expectancy. Canada is #12

    errrmmm……Nobody disputes that Ukraine is a failed , artificial country run by scumbag prostitutes of the US. Nobody disputes that Sweden and Iceland are normal, prosperous nations.
    Typical of your time-wasting attentionwhoring nonsense to suddenly try and insiduously deflect the issue ( incorrectly and stupidly) onto other western countries.

    The simple facts are that if Ukraine had Russia’s cold/daylight/ethnic issues then it’s life expectancy would be immeasurably worse than it is now

    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016.

    LOl……..you are shamelessly copying the point that you only know because I INFORMED YOU precisely of this a few days ago, when making the point of how western Ukraine/Galicia is effectively Ukraine’s equivalent of the North Caucasus…..except alot worse. It’s typical of your spamtard moron algorithm to fuck up with yet more stupidity. Who the fuck said or even hinted I was refering to the Caucasus you idiot? Siberian regions is what I more had in mind you freak. Overall with the cold/daylight/ethnic republic issues we are talking about areas that encompass 30% + of Russia’s population…..yet still Russia survives and thrives, whilst Kiev sinks into the cesspit.

    But anytime you sink into your period ( again) , you can just watch this:

    Also easy to note that Moscow and Saint Petersburg have life expectancies hugely superior to Lvov’s. Numerous other megopolis’s in Russia like Kazan too you dumb troll POS

    • Replies: @AP
    Poor gerard2 failed and is now very angry :-)

    Your vulgarity won't cover your failures.


    Russia’s life expectancy is 72.5... Ukraine’s is less than 72
     
    It increased from 71.38 in 2015 to 71.68 in 2016. At that rate it (or even a lower one) would be over 72 in 2018.

    Ukraine’s is less than 72 ( obviously those are figures that don’t count the DNR/LNR
     
    No, but they include Donbas territory under Kiev's control.

    the winters in Reykjavik (70% of Iceland population)and areas in which 95%+ of the population of Sweden live ,Stockholm and Malmo , (the only 2 cities in Sweden I have visited) alone are 3 out of the 10 million Swedish population,) are not anywhere near the extreme cold of areas as Murmansk,Omsk, Irkutsk, Yakutia
     
    You mentioned extreme cold and short days. Days in winter are shorter in Stockholm and Reykjavik than in Moscow, Omsk, Irkutsk, etc. St. Petersburg is about the same as Stockholm. Only Murmansk is an exception.

    So your comment about "short days" was nonsense.

    As for temperature - note that Canada is as cold as Russia. It's life expectancy is #12 in the world. Montreal, Ottawa, Edmonton, and Winnipeg are a lot colder than St. Petersburg in winter. They are even colder than Moscow or Nizhni.


    Norilsk has 2-3 more times the population than the entire northern area of Canada
     
    Norilsk has a higher life expectancy than Slavic Pskov, Novgorod and Tver oblasts, purely Slavic areas which are a lot warmer than most Canadian cities.

    Krasnoyarsk krai (Norilsk's province) is only 2% of Russia's population.


    if Ukraine had Russia’s cold/daylight/ethnic issues then it’s life expectancy would be immeasurably worse than it is no
     
    If Ukraine was as loaded with Caucasians, Tatars and other non-Slavs as Russia is, its life expectancy would be higher.

    you are shamelessly copying the point that you only know because I INFORMED YOU
     
    Don't overestimate the extent to which I pay attention to your silly posts.

    Also easy to note that Moscow and Saint Petersburg have life expediencies hugely superior to Lvov’s
     
    Moscow perhaps, St. Petersburg no.

    In 2018 Moscow has a life expectancy of 77.9 and St. Petersburg of 75.5. For Moscow oblast it was 73.4 and for Leningrad oblast it was 72.5.

    I don't have data for Lviv city but for Lviv oblast it was 73.2 in 2012::

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/77/UkrLifeExpectancy.PNG

    And Ukraine's life expectancy has grown since 2012.

    So if in 2012 Lviv oblast's life expectancy was higher than Leningrad oblast's 2018 life expectancy, most likely Lviv city's life expectancy is higher than that of St. Petersburg.

    Your claim of "Moscow and Saint Petersburg have life expediencies hugely superior to Lvov’s" is as stupid as your other claims.

    The Galician oblasts are the longest-living pure East Slavic place in the world.


    Galicia is effectively Ukraine’s equivalent of the North Caucasus
     
    Another stupid claim. They have in common high life expectancy. In that case, Iceland is Europe's equivalent of the North Caucuses, lol.

    ::::::::::

    LOL that you are posting to a link in which everyone speaks Ukrainian but you keep trying to tell people they are speaking Russian.

    Maybe next you will try top prove again that Polish, Russian and Ukrainian are the same language by using the Yushchenko interview like you did before? That was especially funny.

  247. @Thorfinnsson
    Retirement is for losers and should be abolished.

    The fuck do you do all day?

    Retirement is for losers and should be abolished.

    The fuck do you do all day?

    I would guess look after the grandkids….receiving none of the pay or benefits that a hired professional would get for the same thing. Watch all the World Cup games?

    But I would partially agree with you on this

  248. @German_reader

    That said withdrawing from the Iran Deal didn’t create war.
     
    It made it more likely though, imo a very flawed policy. Trump's unconditional support for Israel and Saudi-Arabia could well end disastrously.
    Problem just is that Trump rarely gets criticized for policies where it's actually justified, instead his hysterical leftie and centrist enemies with their politically correct pieties do their best to remind one why he was elected and why he still might be better than some alternatives.

    Those Spiegel covers are amazing by the way LOL.
     
    Some of them were drawn by a Cuban-American:
    https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-meet-artist-der-spiegels-viral-trump-covers

    To be clear I don’t support Trump’s Iran policy.

    That said no disaster so far.

    And who knows, perhaps he’ll go to Tehran in his second term and make peace.

  249. @Gerard2

    Ergo with the retirement age. The government can promise to raise pensions to compensate, but will they really? This is why people are very unhappy with raising the retirement age from 60/55, which are set in stone and can’t be quietly done away with.
     
    In no country are people ever hapy with the retirement age being increased. The most important thing here is that a key stetegic goal of Putin in his Federal Assembly address is to raise the life expectancy to 83 by 2028 ( when the male pension age reaches 65)...with the great success of Russia this is a wholly acheivable goal. A life expectancy at this level ( which would probably bring Moscow and Saint Petersburg close to 90 in life expectancy) makes moaning about retirement age lifting , pretty much irrelevant.

    The extreme North is protected and the often sympathised teachers get a massively beneficial deal that can allow early retirement on full pension after 30 years of service

    The most important thing here is that a key stetegic goal of Putin in his Federal Assembly address is to raise the life expectancy to 83

    The correct datapoint to look at is not life-expectancy from birth, but life expectancy from age of retirement (which is a lot higher).

    Life expectancy at 60 is 17 years (i.e. 77 years old).

    So raising retirement age looks more rational when you realize average retiring people will have 17 years retirement already currently.

    But – whether or not it is reasonable, and I think it is reasonable – it is also undeniable people are extremely angry about the proposal of raising pension age. Whether this anger fades or not who knows.

    People in general are seeming unusually angry at the government this year.

  250. AP says:
    @Gerard2

    With or without Donbas?

    You are once again gloating at the expense of the more pro-Russian people within Ukraine.

    Moreover, what is the source? This one states 72.11 (increase .21%) for Ukraine in 2017 and 71.2 (increase .19%) for Russia:
     
    LOL...this pitiful garbage is hilarious, to put it mildly. Typical of a moronic loser.
    Russia's life expectancy is 72.5 you retarded prick . Ukraine's is less than 72 ( obviously those are figures that don't count the DNR/LNR ,as with everything of Ukraine's doped-up statistics you thick POS.)

    72.5 vs less than 72 is an amazing and inexplicable turnaround you cretin.
    Your stats are about has relevant and as accurate as my toilet brush.

    What's more , my source is pure common sense....and Veronika Skvortsova ...a very successful woman full of integrity and purpose. Ukraine's "Health Department" is headed, naturally, by a crazed Canadian Banderatard Nazi bitch currently involved in bringing "exciting things" to Ukraine, like massive increases in TB rates, numerous other diseases, malnourishment level explosion....and even more failings in hospitals

    Another stupid argument. Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world’s highest life expectancy. Canada is #12.
     
    errrrmmm...the winters in Reykjavik (70% of Iceland population)and areas in which 95%+ of the population of Sweden live ,Stockholm and Malmo , (the only 2 cities in Sweden I have visited) alone are 3 out of the 10 million Swedish population,) are not anywhere near the extreme cold of areas as Murmansk,Omsk, Irkutsk, Yakutia .....or even Saint Petersburg and numerous others you thick prick POS! Kiev wouldn't survive in nearly 3 months of total darkness like Norilsk. Your dipshit talk is even more stupid when we consider that they and Canada don't have the huge operational heavy industries, big cities with sizeable populations, in areas of extreme cold&daylight issues..... as Russia does. Norilsk has 2-3 more times the population than the entire northern area of Canada you useless POS! Stockholm's winters are closer to France's or Britain's than the areas in Russia I refer to you cretinous prick.

    Iceland and Sweden are in the top 10 in world’s highest life expectancy. Canada is #12
     
    errrmmm......Nobody disputes that Ukraine is a failed , artificial country run by scumbag prostitutes of the US. Nobody disputes that Sweden and Iceland are normal, prosperous nations.
    Typical of your time-wasting attentionwhoring nonsense to suddenly try and insiduously deflect the issue ( incorrectly and stupidly) onto other western countries.

    The simple facts are that if Ukraine had Russia's cold/daylight/ethnic issues then it's life expectancy would be immeasurably worse than it is now

    Another dumb argument from you. Caucasians live a lot longer than Russians. Ingushetia has the highest life expectancy within Russia , 81.6 in 2016.

     

    LOl........you are shamelessly copying the point that you only know because I INFORMED YOU precisely of this a few days ago, when making the point of how western Ukraine/Galicia is effectively Ukraine's equivalent of the North Caucasus.....except alot worse. It's typical of your spamtard moron algorithm to fuck up with yet more stupidity. Who the fuck said or even hinted I was refering to the Caucasus you idiot? Siberian regions is what I more had in mind you freak. Overall with the cold/daylight/ethnic republic issues we are talking about areas that encompass 30% + of Russia's population.....yet still Russia survives and thrives, whilst Kiev sinks into the cesspit.

    But anytime you sink into your period ( again) , you can just watch this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_G82mQeFKak

    Also easy to note that Moscow and Saint Petersburg have life expectancies hugely superior to Lvov's. Numerous other megopolis's in Russia like Kazan too you dumb troll POS

    Poor gerard2 failed and is now very angry 🙂

    Your vulgarity won’t cover your failures.

    Russia’s life expectancy is 72.5… Ukraine’s is less than 72

    It increased from 71.38 in 2015 to 71.68 in 2016. At that rate it (or even a lower one) would be over 72 in 2018.

    Ukraine’s is less than 72 ( obviously those are figures that don’t count the DNR/LNR

    No, but they include Donbas territory under Kiev’s control.

    the winters in Reykjavik (70% of Iceland population)and areas in which 95%+ of the population of Sweden live ,Stockholm and Malmo , (the only 2 cities in Sweden I have visited) alone are 3 out of the 10 million Swedish population,) are not anywhere near the extreme cold of areas as Murmansk,Omsk, Irkutsk, Yakutia

    You mentioned extreme cold and short days. Days in winter are shorter in Stockholm and Reykjavik than in Moscow, Omsk, Irkutsk, etc. St. Petersburg is about the same as Stockholm. Only Murmansk is an exception.

    So your comment about “short days” was nonsense.

    As for temperature – note that Canada is as cold as Russia. It’s life expectancy is #12 in the world. Montreal, Ottawa, Edmonton, and Winnipeg are a lot colder than St. Petersburg in winter. They are even colder than Moscow or Nizhni.

    Norilsk has 2-3 more times the population than the entire northern area of Canada

    Norilsk has a higher life expectancy than Slavic Pskov, Novgorod and Tver oblasts, purely Slavic areas which are a lot warmer than most Canadian cities.

    Krasnoyarsk krai (Norilsk’s province) is only 2% of Russia’s population.

    if Ukraine had Russia’s cold/daylight/ethnic issues then it’s life expectancy would be immeasurably worse than it is no

    If Ukraine was as loaded with Caucasians, Tatars and other non-Slavs as Russia is, its life expectancy would be higher.

    you are shamelessly copying the point that you only know because I INFORMED YOU

    Don’t overestimate the extent to which I pay attention to your silly posts.

    Also easy to note that Moscow and Saint Petersburg have life expediencies hugely superior to Lvov’s

    Moscow perhaps, St. Petersburg no.

    In 2018 Moscow has a life expectancy of 77.9 and St. Petersburg of 75.5. For Moscow oblast it was 73.4 and for Leningrad oblast it was 72.5.

    I don’t have data for Lviv city but for Lviv oblast it was 73.2 in 2012::

    And Ukraine’s life expectancy has grown since 2012.

    So if in 2012 Lviv oblast’s life expectancy was higher than Leningrad oblast’s 2018 life expectancy, most likely Lviv city’s life expectancy is higher than that of St. Petersburg.

    Your claim of “Moscow and Saint Petersburg have life expediencies hugely superior to Lvov’s” is as stupid as your other claims.

    The Galician oblasts are the longest-living pure East Slavic place in the world.

    Galicia is effectively Ukraine’s equivalent of the North Caucasus

    Another stupid claim. They have in common high life expectancy. In that case, Iceland is Europe’s equivalent of the North Caucuses, lol.

    ::::::::::

    LOL that you are posting to a link in which everyone speaks Ukrainian but you keep trying to tell people they are speaking Russian.

    Maybe next you will try top prove again that Polish, Russian and Ukrainian are the same language by using the Yushchenko interview like you did before? That was especially funny.

    • Replies: @Gerard2

    It increased from 71.38 in 2015 to 71.68 in 2016. At that rate it (or even a lower one) would be over 72 in 2018.

    Ukraine’s is less than 72 ( obviously those are figures that don’t count the DNR/LNR

     

    FFS. One final time you useless prick. Russian life expectancy 72.5, Ukrainian life expectancy less than 72. A ridiculous turnaround

    You mentioned extreme cold and short days. Days in winter are shorter in Stockholm and Reykjavik than in Moscow, Omsk, Irkutsk, etc. St. Petersburg is about the same as Stockholm. Only Murmansk is an exception.

    So your comment about “short days” was nonsense.
     
    hahah! FFS, again you cretin. 'Extreme cold AND short days" you idiot....coupled with the fact of these being highly populated and industrialised areas you POS ( because Russians can make miracles in impossible situations). No place in Sweden with over 25000 people that gets 3 months of permanent darkness like Norilsk (200000+)you thick cretin.
    Imbecilic, beyond plausibility to compare Stockholm or Rejkjevik to the infinitely colder areas of Murmansk,Omsy,Irkutsk,Yakutia ..and so do many others in Russia

    If Ukraine was as loaded with Caucasians, Tatars and other non-Slavs as Russia is, its life expectancy would be higher.

     

    Tatarstan, which you've obviously never been to , is the most non-ethnic Republic, ethnic republic around. Huge intermarriage, the way the police, chinovniki, academics , driving, everything act is one not similar to an ethnic republic as Chechnya you imbecile retard. A united russian culture, not Tatar culture is the dominant one. Even with the amount of criticism the Russian Central Bank is getting , being a Tatar is not brought out against her in the way it would be if from Dagestan.
    So with intermarriage and the way they act it is beyond stupid to include them

    30 million non-slavs. 11 from the Caucasus/Tatars. Ethnic republic regions with life expectancies below that of Kazan,Moscow and Saint Petersburg are the majority of the ethnic minority in Russia you idiot


    the rest is more bollocks that I can't be bothered to time-waste with now. What a POS cretin
  251. @AP

    Caucasians only constitute ~5% of the population.
     
    Correct. But their life expectancy is a lot higher (Ingushetia is 82.6!) So their impact is probably not trivial, if small. And their population is growing relative to that of Slavs.

    How do they inflate population figures? Do they count those who have moved to Moscow as locals?

    The civil war in the Ukraine is not killing a statistically significant number of people.
     
    There is also suicide and alcoholism among veterans, and probably a lot of bad infrastructure in the Donbas oblasts still under Kiev control. We are talking about small overall differences, but small effects would create those.

    Apart from Caucasians, Russia also has Buryats, Tuvans, Yakuts, and other native peoples who due to their alcohol problems have lower LE than Russians
     
    These peoples have small populations. OTOH Tatars live longer than ethnic Russians on average. As do the Finnic peoples. So Caucasians plus Tatars plus Finnic peoples well outnumbers Tuvans and Yakuts. Overall the non-Russian minorities outlive the Slavs and boost Russia's LE stats.

    How do they inflate population figures? Do they count those who have moved to Moscow as locals?

    More details on this:

    1. https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russia-demographic-data-for-2016-released/#comment-1805422

    2. https://sputnikipogrom.com/politics/52925/dead-souls/

    These peoples have small populations. OTOH Tatars live longer than ethnic Russians on average. As do the Finnic peoples. So Caucasians plus Tatars plus Finnic peoples well outnumbers Tuvans and Yakuts. Overall the non-Russian minorities outlive the Slavs and boost Russia’s LE stats.

    But the effect if any will be small, because:

    1. The peoples with the biggest advantage, the relatively teetotalling DICh, have exaggerated LE’s and there aren’t many of them.

    2. LE advantage of Tatars, Bashkirs, and Chuvash is smaller: Approximately one year.

    3. Some Finnic peoples, esp. the ones more prone to alcoholism, live less than Russians (this applies to Udmurts, and especially the Mari).
    And of course the Tuvans, Yakuts, etc. live considerably less (LE in 90% Tuvan, Tuva, is more than 7 years below Russian average).
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/russia-demographic-data-for-2016-released/

  252. @Thorfinnsson
    To Americans: https://shop.californiaoliveranch.com/Rich-and-Robust-Extra-Virgin-Olive-Oil/p/COR-100230&[email protected]

    Highly recommend this olive oil. Rich, robust, spicy, buttery flavor. Reasonably priced. Made in America. Not adulterated.

    For you Euros just avoid anything "packed in Italy" since it's almost certainly adulterated by the mafia with soybean or canola oil. Skip Spain as well since it's nearly all arbequina olives.

    Greek olive oil is generally a good bet.

    Is that the one that used to be McEvoy Ranch EVOO? If so, I agree, it’s one of the very best, though unfortunately on the pricey side.

    For you Euros just avoid anything “packed in Italy” since it’s almost certainly adulterated by the mafia with soybean or canola oil.

    How frequently does this happen? I know there were a few scandals about this, but I don’t know if this is systemic or not – e.g., if the standard bottle of Italian EVOO will be contaminated this way. Also would the Greeks not be prone to this as well, given they’re no less corrupt than the Italians? Anyhow, I suppose this is a moot question for me, since almost all the EVOO sold in Russia is Italian, I think.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    McEvoy is a different and much more expensive brand.

    Olive oil adulteration is systemic. I can't speak to Russia, but in America two-thirds of all olive oil sold is adulterated. It mainly happens in Italy and is literally done by the camorra and mafia.

    See this Jew York Crimes infographic from 2014: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/01/24/opinion/food-chains-extra-virgin-suicide.html

    Greeks are corrupt but lack organized criminal syndicates. Costco switched the sourcing of their Kirkland Signature EVOO (aside from their "Tuscan" label marketed to Italian-American Baby Boomers) from Italy to Greece.

    Perhaps there is Syrian EVOO available in Russia for the patriotic consumer.
  253. Elon Musk: https://www.cnbc.com/amp/2018/06/18/elon-musk-email-employee-conducted-extensive-and-damaging-sabotage.html

    From: Elon Musk
    To: Everybody
    Subject: Some concerning news
    June 17, 2018
    11:57 p.m.

    I was dismayed to learn this weekend about a Tesla employee who had conducted quite extensive and damaging sabotage to our operations. This included making direct code changes to the Tesla Manufacturing Operating System under false usernames and exporting large amounts of highly sensitive Tesla data to unknown third parties.

    The full extent of his actions are not yet clear, but what he has admitted to so far is pretty bad. His stated motivation is that he wanted a promotion that he did not receive. In light of these actions, not promoting him was definitely the right move.

    However, there may be considerably more to this situation than meets the eye, so the investigation will continue in depth this week. We need to figure out if he was acting alone or with others at Tesla and if he was working with any outside organizations.

    As you know, there are a long list of organizations that want Tesla to die. These include Wall Street short-sellers, who have already lost billions of dollars and stand to lose a lot more. Then there are the oil & gas companies, the wealthiest industry in the world — they don’t love the idea of Tesla advancing the progress of solar power & electric cars. Don’t want to blow your mind, but rumor has it that those companies are sometimes not super nice. Then there are the multitude of big gas/diesel car company competitors. If they’re willing to cheat so much about emissions, maybe they’re willing to cheat in other ways?

    Most of the time, when there is theft of goods, leaking of confidential information, dereliction of duty or outright sabotage, the reason really is something simple like wanting to get back at someone within the company or at the company as a whole. Occasionally, it is much more serious.

    Please be extremely vigilant, particularly over the next few weeks as we ramp up the production rate to 5k/week. This is when outside forces have the strongest motivation to stop us.

    If you know of, see or suspect anything suspicious, please send a note to [email address removed for privacy] with as much info as possible. This can be done in your name, which will be kept confidential, or completely anonymously.

    Looking forward to having a great week with you as we charge up the super exciting ramp to 5000 Model 3 cars per week!

    Will follow this up with emails every few days describing the progress and challenges of the Model 3 ramp.

    Thanks for working so hard to make Tesla successful,
    Elon

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    The beginnings of the Tyrell Corporation.

    Quite cyberpunk.
  254. @Anatoly Karlin
    Elon Musk: https://www.cnbc.com/amp/2018/06/18/elon-musk-email-employee-conducted-extensive-and-damaging-sabotage.html

    From: Elon Musk
    To: Everybody
    Subject: Some concerning news
    June 17, 2018
    11:57 p.m.

    I was dismayed to learn this weekend about a Tesla employee who had conducted quite extensive and damaging sabotage to our operations. This included making direct code changes to the Tesla Manufacturing Operating System under false usernames and exporting large amounts of highly sensitive Tesla data to unknown third parties.

    The full extent of his actions are not yet clear, but what he has admitted to so far is pretty bad. His stated motivation is that he wanted a promotion that he did not receive. In light of these actions, not promoting him was definitely the right move.

    However, there may be considerably more to this situation than meets the eye, so the investigation will continue in depth this week. We need to figure out if he was acting alone or with others at Tesla and if he was working with any outside organizations.

    As you know, there are a long list of organizations that want Tesla to die. These include Wall Street short-sellers, who have already lost billions of dollars and stand to lose a lot more. Then there are the oil & gas companies, the wealthiest industry in the world — they don't love the idea of Tesla advancing the progress of solar power & electric cars. Don't want to blow your mind, but rumor has it that those companies are sometimes not super nice. Then there are the multitude of big gas/diesel car company competitors. If they're willing to cheat so much about emissions, maybe they're willing to cheat in other ways?

    Most of the time, when there is theft of goods, leaking of confidential information, dereliction of duty or outright sabotage, the reason really is something simple like wanting to get back at someone within the company or at the company as a whole. Occasionally, it is much more serious.

    Please be extremely vigilant, particularly over the next few weeks as we ramp up the production rate to 5k/week. This is when outside forces have the strongest motivation to stop us.

    If you know of, see or suspect anything suspicious, please send a note to [email address removed for privacy] with as much info as possible. This can be done in your name, which will be kept confidential, or completely anonymously.

    Looking forward to having a great week with you as we charge up the super exciting ramp to 5000 Model 3 cars per week!

    Will follow this up with emails every few days describing the progress and challenges of the Model 3 ramp.

    Thanks for working so hard to make Tesla successful,
    Elon
     

    The beginnings of the Tyrell Corporation.

    Quite cyberpunk.

    • Replies: @bb.
    nah....just preparing for the 5k/week M3 production no-show i suspect. Not that production rates are relevant by themselves, the opex are, but that's their chosen battlefield goal for stock momentum.

    oooh....you mean like the Tyrell corp. went bankrupt by 2049....nice burn ;)
  255. Anon[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @German_reader
    There's an entire collection of really unhinged SPIEGEL covers about Trump:

    Trump as ISIS butcherer, killing the statue of liberty:

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmeedia.de%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F02%2FBildschirmfoto-2017-02-04-um-00.38.22.png&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmeedia.de%2F2017%2F02%2F04%2Ftrump-titel-so-spaltet-das-kontroverse-spiegel-cover-das-netz%2F&docid=Y3rznzKhOCebYM&tbnid=oBwIXuN-18Od_M%3A&vet=10ahUKEwjxpszSut7bAhVMWxQKHXtGA8kQMwg8KAAwAA..i&w=3236&h=1900&client=firefox-b&bih=786&biw=1600&q=trump%20spiegel%20isis&ved=0ahUKEwjxpszSut7bAhVMWxQKHXtGA8kQMwg8KAAwAA&iact=mrc&uact=8

    Trump as klansman:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=trump+spiegel+isis&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj3ufDQut7bAhUTlxQKHaGLAssQ_AUICygC&biw=1600&bih=786#imgrc=K0aLmR26sqEOxM:

    And feeding into the paranoia about Trump being a Russian candidate:

    https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b&biw=1600&bih=786&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=bE0oW5SnJsreU9mMjKAG&q=trump+spiegel+cover+doppelregent&oq=trump+spiegel+cover+doppelregent&gs_l=img.3...16455.18562.0.18767.13.13.0.0.0.0.81.925.13.13.0....0...1c.1.64.img..0.2.160...0i30k1j0i8i30k1.0.z82q0wmzRjk#imgrc=7lwFA0SVqDUG_M:

    Even if one has misgivings and concerns about some of Trump's policies (as I do), this is obviously crazy stuff.
    German media over the last few years has really done everything they could to show that they're indeed the Lügenpresse.

    Great stuff, but we don’t really need all the random stuff about your internet habits (I use Firefox too.) You can post just the picture (example: https://i.pinimg.com/236x/fb/b8/24/fbb824e6a8b052fee8b9a740fbd62969.jpg) or use a hyperlink (< a href =”[link]” > [text] < /a >)*

    example

    *let’s see if this scans

    • Replies: @German_reader
    Thanks, that's helpful, I knew it's hardly ideal just to post an entire link, but was too tired to look for a solution. How does one get pictures to show in the comment?
    , @Talha
    That is a really cool cover, stylistically. Looks like something Frank Miller would have done. Even the font they used is right on.

    Bravo!

    Peace.

    Note: I don’t care if it’s about Trump or Putin or Erdogan or...I’m just giving credit for an awesome minimalist design.

  256. @Anon
    Great stuff, but we don't really need all the random stuff about your internet habits (I use Firefox too.) You can post just the picture (example: https://i.pinimg.com/236x/fb/b8/24/fbb824e6a8b052fee8b9a740fbd62969.jpg) or use a hyperlink (< a href ="[link]" > [text] < /a >)*

    example

    *let's see if this scans

    Thanks, that’s helpful, I knew it’s hardly ideal just to post an entire link, but was too tired to look for a solution. How does one get pictures to show in the comment?

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    LOL, looks like Trump is living rent free in Spiegel editors' heads. Just like Putin has been doing at The Economist for the past 15 years.

    https://twitter.com/akarlin88/status/1009059919692169217
  257. @German_reader
    Thanks, that's helpful, I knew it's hardly ideal just to post an entire link, but was too tired to look for a solution. How does one get pictures to show in the comment?

    LOL, looks like Trump is living rent free in Spiegel editors’ heads. Just like Putin has been doing at The Economist for the past 15 years.

  258. @AP
    Poor gerard2 failed and is now very angry :-)

    Your vulgarity won't cover your failures.


    Russia’s life expectancy is 72.5... Ukraine’s is less than 72
     
    It increased from 71.38 in 2015 to 71.68 in 2016. At that rate it (or even a lower one) would be over 72 in 2018.

    Ukraine’s is less than 72 ( obviously those are figures that don’t count the DNR/LNR
     
    No, but they include Donbas territory under Kiev's control.

    the winters in Reykjavik (70% of Iceland population)and areas in which 95%+ of the population of Sweden live ,Stockholm and Malmo , (the only 2 cities in Sweden I have visited) alone are 3 out of the 10 million Swedish population,) are not anywhere near the extreme cold of areas as Murmansk,Omsk, Irkutsk, Yakutia
     
    You mentioned extreme cold and short days. Days in winter are shorter in Stockholm and Reykjavik than in Moscow, Omsk, Irkutsk, etc. St. Petersburg is about the same as Stockholm. Only Murmansk is an exception.

    So your comment about "short days" was nonsense.

    As for temperature - note that Canada is as cold as Russia. It's life expectancy is #12 in the world. Montreal, Ottawa, Edmonton, and Winnipeg are a lot colder than St. Petersburg in winter. They are even colder than Moscow or Nizhni.


    Norilsk has 2-3 more times the population than the entire northern area of Canada
     
    Norilsk has a higher life expectancy than Slavic Pskov, Novgorod and Tver oblasts, purely Slavic areas which are a lot warmer than most Canadian cities.

    Krasnoyarsk krai (Norilsk's province) is only 2% of Russia's population.


    if Ukraine had Russia’s cold/daylight/ethnic issues then it’s life expectancy would be immeasurably worse than it is no
     
    If Ukraine was as loaded with Caucasians, Tatars and other non-Slavs as Russia is, its life expectancy would be higher.

    you are shamelessly copying the point that you only know because I INFORMED YOU
     
    Don't overestimate the extent to which I pay attention to your silly posts.

    Also easy to note that Moscow and Saint Petersburg have life expediencies hugely superior to Lvov’s
     
    Moscow perhaps, St. Petersburg no.

    In 2018 Moscow has a life expectancy of 77.9 and St. Petersburg of 75.5. For Moscow oblast it was 73.4 and for Leningrad oblast it was 72.5.

    I don't have data for Lviv city but for Lviv oblast it was 73.2 in 2012::

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/77/UkrLifeExpectancy.PNG

    And Ukraine's life expectancy has grown since 2012.

    So if in 2012 Lviv oblast's life expectancy was higher than Leningrad oblast's 2018 life expectancy, most likely Lviv city's life expectancy is higher than that of St. Petersburg.

    Your claim of "Moscow and Saint Petersburg have life expediencies hugely superior to Lvov’s" is as stupid as your other claims.

    The Galician oblasts are the longest-living pure East Slavic place in the world.


    Galicia is effectively Ukraine’s equivalent of the North Caucasus
     
    Another stupid claim. They have in common high life expectancy. In that case, Iceland is Europe's equivalent of the North Caucuses, lol.

    ::::::::::

    LOL that you are posting to a link in which everyone speaks Ukrainian but you keep trying to tell people they are speaking Russian.

    Maybe next you will try top prove again that Polish, Russian and Ukrainian are the same language by using the Yushchenko interview like you did before? That was especially funny.

    [MORE]

    It increased from 71.38 in 2015 to 71.68 in 2016. At that rate it (or even a lower one) would be over 72 in 2018.

    Ukraine’s is less than 72 ( obviously those are figures that don’t count the DNR/LNR

    FFS. One final time you useless prick. Russian life expectancy 72.5, Ukrainian life expectancy less than 72. A ridiculous turnaround

    You mentioned extreme cold and short days. Days in winter are shorter in Stockholm and Reykjavik than in Moscow, Omsk, Irkutsk, etc. St. Petersburg is about the same as Stockholm. Only Murmansk is an exception.

    So your comment about “short days” was nonsense.

    hahah! FFS, again you cretin. ‘Extreme cold AND short days” you idiot….coupled with the fact of these being highly populated and industrialised areas you POS ( because Russians can make miracles in impossible situations). No place in Sweden with over 25000 people that gets 3 months of permanent darkness like Norilsk (200000+)you thick cretin.
    Imbecilic, beyond plausibility to compare Stockholm or Rejkjevik to the infinitely colder areas of Murmansk,Omsy,Irkutsk,Yakutia ..and so do many others in Russia

    If Ukraine was as loaded with Caucasians, Tatars and other non-Slavs as Russia is, its life expectancy would be higher.

    Tatarstan, which you’ve obviously never been to , is the most non-ethnic Republic, ethnic republic around. Huge intermarriage, the way the police, chinovniki, academics , driving, everything act is one not similar to an ethnic republic as Chechnya you imbecile retard. A united russian culture, not Tatar culture is the dominant one. Even with the amount of criticism the Russian Central Bank is getting , being a Tatar is not brought out against her in the way it would be if from Dagestan.
    So with intermarriage and the way they act it is beyond stupid to include them

    30 million non-slavs. 11 from the Caucasus/Tatars. Ethnic republic regions with life expectancies below that of Kazan,Moscow and Saint Petersburg are the majority of the ethnic minority in Russia you idiot

    the rest is more bollocks that I can’t be bothered to time-waste with now. What a POS cretin

  259. @Anon
    Great stuff, but we don't really need all the random stuff about your internet habits (I use Firefox too.) You can post just the picture (example: https://i.pinimg.com/236x/fb/b8/24/fbb824e6a8b052fee8b9a740fbd62969.jpg) or use a hyperlink (< a href ="[link]" > [text] < /a >)*

    example

    *let's see if this scans

    That is a really cool cover, stylistically. Looks like something Frank Miller would have done. Even the font they used is right on.

    Bravo!

    Peace.

    Note: I don’t care if it’s about Trump or Putin or Erdogan or…I’m just giving credit for an awesome minimalist design.

  260. @Daniel Chieh
    The beginnings of the Tyrell Corporation.

    Quite cyberpunk.

    nah….just preparing for the 5k/week M3 production no-show i suspect. Not that production rates are relevant by themselves, the opex are, but that’s their chosen battlefield goal for stock momentum.

    oooh….you mean like the Tyrell corp. went bankrupt by 2049….nice burn 😉

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Well, I was playing around with their claims of being attacked by a hostile corporation.

    Everything about this is strange. Of course, disgruntled employees sometimes act out in malicious ways. Occasionally, I've known even as far back as 2008 that competitors actually will engage in acts of malice against others. But all of this sounds more like, as you said, justification for upcoming failure. Things to note:

    1) When acts of malice occur, they are usually suppressed by the company. You do not want to advertise that internal chaos happened. This is considered reputational risk. Then again, Musk breaks a lot of rules of protocol.

    2) "Acts of malice" by corporations against each other usually is targeted hiring, by picking away a key member of a project. This is legal, and does not need some sort of arcane and highly illegal destruction of company property.

    One thing he is oddly correct about, though, is that my experience is indeed that it is the oil companies that are most willing to engage in such ops(but again, its usually targeted hiring). You'd think it'd be the SV companies, but they play surprisingly nice to each other with employee noncompete agreements and avoidance of targeted hiring to my experience.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    I should add - I bet this does nothing to help with the already cultish atmosphere that is probably in Telsa. Now you get to accuse your work rival of dark aims against the fatherland company! Just write to this anonymous email box.
  261. @bb.
    nah....just preparing for the 5k/week M3 production no-show i suspect. Not that production rates are relevant by themselves, the opex are, but that's their chosen battlefield goal for stock momentum.

    oooh....you mean like the Tyrell corp. went bankrupt by 2049....nice burn ;)

    Well, I was playing around with their claims of being attacked by a hostile corporation.

    Everything about this is strange. Of course, disgruntled employees sometimes act out in malicious ways. Occasionally, I’ve known even as far back as 2008 that competitors actually will engage in acts of malice against others. But all of this sounds more like, as you said, justification for upcoming failure. Things to note:

    1) When acts of malice occur, they are usually suppressed by the company. You do not want to advertise that internal chaos happened. This is considered reputational risk. Then again, Musk breaks a lot of rules of protocol.

    2) “Acts of malice” by corporations against each other usually is targeted hiring, by picking away a key member of a project. This is legal, and does not need some sort of arcane and highly illegal destruction of company property.

    One thing he is oddly correct about, though, is that my experience is indeed that it is the oil companies that are most willing to engage in such ops(but again, its usually targeted hiring). You’d think it’d be the SV companies, but they play surprisingly nice to each other with employee noncompete agreements and avoidance of targeted hiring to my experience.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    Musk possibly has narcissistic personality disorder (especially this dream the whole world is somehow trying to sabotage him - even though it is more the opposite way round, and a huge amount of people are directly financially invested in his company succeeding).

    There's something very similar to Trump for his behaviour (obviously Musk is far more intelligent in the academic level - his "saving the human race" megalomania is higher megalomania than anything Trump shows).

    , @bb.
    UuuuI think that industrial espionage is relatively common, or firms would not invest substantially into security, though mostly it's probably just information gathering.
    my favourite example of an act of malice is the hacking of a steel mill in germany which shut it down and damaged it in the process(https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-30575104). Do you know of any other interesting cases, maybe in the oil industry?
    As you note, usually the company would try to hide such incidents to not look weak and foolish. There might be deminishing marginal returns on breaking protocol, just sayin..:)
    On side note, there was a fire at a Ford factory recently which shut down the production of their prime product, the F150(https://amp.ft.com/content/abdd6bbe-53cd-11e8-b3ee-41e0209208ec). I don't think it was sabotage but imagine Ford went around 'implying' malice. On the other hand, the rules might be changing-globalization brings in players from cultures who don't mess around and you just have to adapt.
  262. @bb.
    nah....just preparing for the 5k/week M3 production no-show i suspect. Not that production rates are relevant by themselves, the opex are, but that's their chosen battlefield goal for stock momentum.

    oooh....you mean like the Tyrell corp. went bankrupt by 2049....nice burn ;)

    I should add – I bet this does nothing to help with the already cultish atmosphere that is probably in Telsa. Now you get to accuse your work rival of dark aims against the fatherland company! Just write to this anonymous email box.

  263. Turkish F-35 gets blocked by Congress?

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/06/senate-approves-bill-block-f35-transfer-turkey-180619085252727.html

    It might be good for the Su-57 project that both India and Turkey could be blocked from acquiring the F-36 and so might turn to Russia, if for nothing else then to spite the Americans.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=115&session=2&vote=00128

    The 85 Senators who voted for this are TRAITORS who are directly contributing to America's ongoing current account deficit.
  264. @Anatoly Karlin
    Is that the one that used to be McEvoy Ranch EVOO? If so, I agree, it's one of the very best, though unfortunately on the pricey side.

    For you Euros just avoid anything “packed in Italy” since it’s almost certainly adulterated by the mafia with soybean or canola oil.
     
    How frequently does this happen? I know there were a few scandals about this, but I don't know if this is systemic or not - e.g., if the standard bottle of Italian EVOO will be contaminated this way. Also would the Greeks not be prone to this as well, given they're no less corrupt than the Italians? Anyhow, I suppose this is a moot question for me, since almost all the EVOO sold in Russia is Italian, I think.

    McEvoy is a different and much more expensive brand.

    Olive oil adulteration is systemic. I can’t speak to Russia, but in America two-thirds of all olive oil sold is adulterated. It mainly happens in Italy and is literally done by the camorra and mafia.

    See this Jew York Crimes infographic from 2014: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/01/24/opinion/food-chains-extra-virgin-suicide.html

    Greeks are corrupt but lack organized criminal syndicates. Costco switched the sourcing of their Kirkland Signature EVOO (aside from their “Tuscan” label marketed to Italian-American Baby Boomers) from Italy to Greece.

    Perhaps there is Syrian EVOO available in Russia for the patriotic consumer.

    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
  265. @reiner Tor
    Turkish F-35 gets blocked by Congress?

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/06/senate-approves-bill-block-f35-transfer-turkey-180619085252727.html

    It might be good for the Su-57 project that both India and Turkey could be blocked from acquiring the F-36 and so might turn to Russia, if for nothing else then to spite the Americans.

    https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=115&session=2&vote=00128

    The 85 Senators who voted for this are TRAITORS who are directly contributing to America’s ongoing current account deficit.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Text of the bill is here: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/5515/text

    The bill also attacks Turkey for buying the S-400 and calls for the President to impose sanctions in response.

    Ridiculous.

    Maybe America should produce a competitive SAM system if we don't want others buying the S-400?
  266. @Thorfinnsson
    https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=115&session=2&vote=00128

    The 85 Senators who voted for this are TRAITORS who are directly contributing to America's ongoing current account deficit.

    Text of the bill is here: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/5515/text

    The bill also attacks Turkey for buying the S-400 and calls for the President to impose sanctions in response.

    Ridiculous.

    Maybe America should produce a competitive SAM system if we don’t want others buying the S-400?

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    The explanation I've seen in American media is that US military is worried that Russia could somehow use S400, sold to Turkey, to plug into F35 systems and learn everything about how US plane operates. Let's not forget that F35 was developed at the cost of over $1 trillion to combat ONE adversary. It may be worth it to sacrifice Turkey sales, if this is what it takes to keep crucial information out of Russia's hands.
  267. @Thorfinnsson
    Text of the bill is here: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/5515/text

    The bill also attacks Turkey for buying the S-400 and calls for the President to impose sanctions in response.

    Ridiculous.

    Maybe America should produce a competitive SAM system if we don't want others buying the S-400?

    The explanation I’ve seen in American media is that US military is worried that Russia could somehow use S400, sold to Turkey, to plug into F35 systems and learn everything about how US plane operates. Let’s not forget that F35 was developed at the cost of over $1 trillion to combat ONE adversary. It may be worth it to sacrifice Turkey sales, if this is what it takes to keep crucial information out of Russia’s hands.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    This would only be to our benefit since the F-35 is a piece of shit, and would thus force us to develop a replacement.

    I don't buy this angle because there was no hysteria when Greece purchased the TOR M1.

    It's just reflective of the current Russophobic hysteria that developed in Washington after Russia conquered the Crimea.
  268. @Felix Keverich
    The explanation I've seen in American media is that US military is worried that Russia could somehow use S400, sold to Turkey, to plug into F35 systems and learn everything about how US plane operates. Let's not forget that F35 was developed at the cost of over $1 trillion to combat ONE adversary. It may be worth it to sacrifice Turkey sales, if this is what it takes to keep crucial information out of Russia's hands.

    This would only be to our benefit since the F-35 is a piece of shit, and would thus force us to develop a replacement.

    I don’t buy this angle because there was no hysteria when Greece purchased the TOR M1.

    It’s just reflective of the current Russophobic hysteria that developed in Washington after Russia conquered the Crimea.

  269. @Talha
    Excellent distinction - I agree, but with the below caveat...

    Though establishment Christianity did end slavery among Christians on the Old Continent - there is little doubt of this. It was always heathens and Muslims (redundant ?) on the periphery that were fair game. In fact establishment Christianity often tried to stop Christians from selling heathens to Muslims; one major concern was that these same people were often found as slave soldiers in battle against Christian armies. So in this sense Christianity should be credited with ending most slavery in Europe itself.

    Islam did the same thing between Muslim peoples, but raiding non-Muslim territories (that did not have treaties in place) on the borders was considered OK.

    Peace.

    raiding non-Muslim territories (that did not have treaties in place) on the borders

    Rather expansive definition of “border”, it seems to me.

    They often made raids, called Razzias, on European coastal towns to capture Christian slaves to sell at slave markets in places such as Turkey, Egypt, Iran, Algeria and Morocco. According to Robert Davis, from the 16th to 19th century, pirates captured 1 million to 1.25 million Europeans as slaves. These slaves were captured mainly from seaside villages in Italy, Spain and Portugal, and from farther places like France, England, Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Russia, Scandinavia and even Iceland, India, Southeast Asia and North America.

    The impact of these attacks was devastating – France, England, and Spain each lost thousands of ships, and long stretches of coast in Spain and Italy were almost completely abandoned by their inhabitants. Pirate raids discouraged settlement along the coast until the 19th century.

    Concise History of Islam
    By Muzaffar Husain Syed, Syed Saud Akhtar, B D Usmani

    • Replies: @Talha
    Sure, it's a border if you don't count the water. ;)

    Pirates tend to do that sort of thing - I mean, they are pirates after all. Likewise, Europeans (when they became more capable) also raided far away for slaves:
    “We [therefore] weighing all and singular the premises with due meditation, and noting that since we had formerly by other letters of ours granted among other things free and ample faculty to the aforesaid King Alfonso—to invade, search out, capture, vanquish, and subdue all Saracens and pagans whatsoever, and other enemies of Christ wheresoever placed, and the kingdoms, dukedoms, principalities, dominions, possessions, and all movable and immovable goods whatsoever held and possessed by them and to reduce their persons to perpetual slavery.”

    http://ldhi.library.cofc.edu/exhibits/show/african_laborers_for_a_new_emp/pope_nicolas_v_and_the_portugu

    Of course, if you're going to do slave raiding, please come prepared (from above source)...
    "Portuguese mariners soon learned that inhabitants along the Upper Guinea coast were more than capable of defending themselves from such incursions. Not long after his 1441 voyage, Tristão and most of his crew were killed off the coast of present-day Senegal.”
    https://www.technologizer.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/doh.jpg

    Peace.
  270. @reiner Tor
    So I just noticed the American concentration camps for children in the Hungarian news.

    Also apparently Melania just missed a great opportunity to keep her mouth shut.

    Have you or your loved ones have been affected by border separations? Tell CNN.

    Have you or someone you know been affected by family separations at the US border? CNN’s reporters want to hear about it.

    You can reach us by sending a text, WhatsApp message or iMessage to CNN at +1 347-322-0415.

    Someone troll this line.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I'm on it.

    When I was 4 I was separated from my parents when reentering the United States with a Swedish passport. We were later reunited.
  271. Is the Russian language/history exam that useful?

    https://inosmi.ru/politic/20180618/242503946.html

    • Replies: @DFH
    Japan is pretty difficult, so if it were a hard enough exam (especially with a written component) it could probably function as an IQ filter
  272. @Daniel Chieh
    Have you or your loved ones have been affected by border separations? Tell CNN.


    Have you or someone you know been affected by family separations at the US border? CNN's reporters want to hear about it.

    You can reach us by sending a text, WhatsApp message or iMessage to CNN at +1 347-322-0415.
     
    Someone troll this line.

    I’m on it.

    When I was 4 I was separated from my parents when reentering the United States with a Swedish passport. We were later reunited.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    I am telling them a tragic story of how my wife was separated at the border from her loved one prior to coming into the US from Canada, and how her family member was subjected to all manners of indignity in a cage and inspection without any choice on his part.

    She was later reunited with her cat.
    , @for-the-record
    We were later reunited.

    But you're still suffering the after effects
  273. I don’t buy this angle because there was no hysteria when Greece purchased the TOR M1.

    Incidentally, Greece has not participated in the “international procurement program” and is unlikely to ever get F35.

  274. @Mitleser
    Is the Russian language/history exam that useful?

    https://twitter.com/JamesDJBrown/status/1008545185674887169

    https://inosmi.ru/politic/20180618/242503946.html

    Japan is pretty difficult, so if it were a hard enough exam (especially with a written component) it could probably function as an IQ filter

  275. @reiner Tor
    To be fair, the life expectancy of Russian men does seem to be below 65, I’ve seen 63 and 64 (close to 65) mentioned, and they do write that two fifth of men may not live to see it. These are factually correct claims.

    To be fair, the life expectancy of Russian men does seem to be below 65

    When Social Security was enacted in the US in 1935, with 65 as a retirement age, life expectancy was 62 (60 for men, 64 for women). So in that sense this all seems simply to be much ado about nothing, or more accurately simply standard Russia-bashing.

  276. @Thorfinnsson
    I'm on it.

    When I was 4 I was separated from my parents when reentering the United States with a Swedish passport. We were later reunited.

    I am telling them a tragic story of how my wife was separated at the border from her loved one prior to coming into the US from Canada, and how her family member was subjected to all manners of indignity in a cage and inspection without any choice on his part.

    She was later reunited with her cat.

  277. Personally, I cannot think of anything Russia could impose a tariff on. Russia imports a lot of high quality drilling equipment from the US. But placing tariffs on that will mainly hurt Rosneft’s bottomline.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    What about American aircrafts?
  278. Greater Africa will begin at the Rhein.

    So, the country of middle aged teenagers has worsening demographics:

    Births: 391,930 (-4.5%)
    Deaths: 423,643 (+3.2%)
    Balance: -31,713

    TFR: 1.31 (-0.02) of which 1.25 for Spaniards and 1.70 for immigrants

    And on this day, the socialist Spanish administration removed co-payments for pensioners and is planning to remove motorway payments despite a report blaming Spain (yet again) for throwing money out of the window on useless roads and AVE lines. Spain is literally doing nothing to improve its demographics, while setting the stage to make the effects of ageing ever worse by catering to pensioners and to its long-term infrastructuratis disease.

    https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=149582803&postcount=6399

  279. @Thorfinnsson
    I'm on it.

    When I was 4 I was separated from my parents when reentering the United States with a Swedish passport. We were later reunited.

    We were later reunited.

    But you’re still suffering the after effects

  280. @Felix Keverich
    https://twitter.com/Reuters/status/1009103711665344512

    Personally, I cannot think of anything Russia could impose a tariff on. Russia imports a lot of high quality drilling equipment from the US. But placing tariffs on that will mainly hurt Rosneft's bottomline.

    What about American aircrafts?

  281. @Daniel Chieh
    Well, I was playing around with their claims of being attacked by a hostile corporation.

    Everything about this is strange. Of course, disgruntled employees sometimes act out in malicious ways. Occasionally, I've known even as far back as 2008 that competitors actually will engage in acts of malice against others. But all of this sounds more like, as you said, justification for upcoming failure. Things to note:

    1) When acts of malice occur, they are usually suppressed by the company. You do not want to advertise that internal chaos happened. This is considered reputational risk. Then again, Musk breaks a lot of rules of protocol.

    2) "Acts of malice" by corporations against each other usually is targeted hiring, by picking away a key member of a project. This is legal, and does not need some sort of arcane and highly illegal destruction of company property.

    One thing he is oddly correct about, though, is that my experience is indeed that it is the oil companies that are most willing to engage in such ops(but again, its usually targeted hiring). You'd think it'd be the SV companies, but they play surprisingly nice to each other with employee noncompete agreements and avoidance of targeted hiring to my experience.

    Musk possibly has narcissistic personality disorder (especially this dream the whole world is somehow trying to sabotage him – even though it is more the opposite way round, and a huge amount of people are directly financially invested in his company succeeding).

    There’s something very similar to Trump for his behaviour (obviously Musk is far more intelligent in the academic level – his “saving the human race” megalomania is higher megalomania than anything Trump shows).

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    I think Musk and Trump are sometimes quite positive figures in ways, though.

    It shows how people with narcissistic personality disorder can sometimes succeed where people with normal psychology are failing, and that it is not always justifiable to use the word "disorder". (But these people from a distance - it is not pleasant if those personalities are your boss at work).

  282. Spanish students forced out of their houses to make room for Aquarius migrants

    Several students from the local student residence are now being forced from their lodgings despite having paid their accommodation fees so the migrants, arriving from Libya, can be housed, according to the online daily Actualidad Valdepeñas.

    A young German language student in Alicante named Rubén, who is planning to live and work in Germany in his future, paid €750 a month for his room, has now been forced to leave along with the other students housed there.

    His mother has stated that her son has had to leave the residence to make room for the Aquarius migrants: “They have told us that they cannot be there because they come with many illnesses, so this is a health issue”.

    “It’s like we are solving one problem by causing others, and this is a big problem because right now there is nowhere in Alicante for my son to live and continue with his studies. We are going to go there to see if we can find something, but it will be very difficult since everything is already booked for the Summer months,” she explains.

    Rubén’s mother does not believe that it can be due to a “health issue” otherwise the local authorities surely wouldn’t be housing hundreds of sick migrants in the centre of a busy tourist city like Alicante.

    Authorities announced on Saturday 16 June that Rubén and his colleagues only had 24 hours in which to collect their belongings and vacate the residence.

    https://voiceofeurope.com/2018/06/spanish-students-forced-out-of-their-houses-to-make-room-for-aquarius-migrants/#.WygaIpDpRSE.twitter

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh


    A young German language student in Alicante named Rubén, who is planning to live and work in Germany in his future, paid €750 a month for his room, has now been forced to leave along with the other students housed there.
     
    Complain to Merkel.
    , @DFH
    At least it's better than suddenly finding the building you live in filled with Africans.
  283. @for-the-record
    raiding non-Muslim territories (that did not have treaties in place) on the borders

    Rather expansive definition of "border", it seems to me.

    They often made raids, called Razzias, on European coastal towns to capture Christian slaves to sell at slave markets in places such as Turkey, Egypt, Iran, Algeria and Morocco. According to Robert Davis, from the 16th to 19th century, pirates captured 1 million to 1.25 million Europeans as slaves. These slaves were captured mainly from seaside villages in Italy, Spain and Portugal, and from farther places like France, England, Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Russia, Scandinavia and even Iceland, India, Southeast Asia and North America.

    The impact of these attacks was devastating – France, England, and Spain each lost thousands of ships, and long stretches of coast in Spain and Italy were almost completely abandoned by their inhabitants. Pirate raids discouraged settlement along the coast until the 19th century.

    Concise History of Islam
    By Muzaffar Husain Syed, Syed Saud Akhtar, B D Usmani
     

    Sure, it’s a border if you don’t count the water. 😉

    Pirates tend to do that sort of thing – I mean, they are pirates after all. Likewise, Europeans (when they became more capable) also raided far away for slaves:
    “We [therefore] weighing all and singular the premises with due meditation, and noting that since we had formerly by other letters of ours granted among other things free and ample faculty to the aforesaid King Alfonso—to invade, search out, capture, vanquish, and subdue all Saracens and pagans whatsoever, and other enemies of Christ wheresoever placed, and the kingdoms, dukedoms, principalities, dominions, possessions, and all movable and immovable goods whatsoever held and possessed by them and to reduce their persons to perpetual slavery.”

    http://ldhi.library.cofc.edu/exhibits/show/african_laborers_for_a_new_emp/pope_nicolas_v_and_the_portugu

    Of course, if you’re going to do slave raiding, please come prepared (from above source)…
    “Portuguese mariners soon learned that inhabitants along the Upper Guinea coast were more than capable of defending themselves from such incursions. Not long after his 1441 voyage, Tristão and most of his crew were killed off the coast of present-day Senegal.”

    Peace.

  284. @Dmitry
    Musk possibly has narcissistic personality disorder (especially this dream the whole world is somehow trying to sabotage him - even though it is more the opposite way round, and a huge amount of people are directly financially invested in his company succeeding).

    There's something very similar to Trump for his behaviour (obviously Musk is far more intelligent in the academic level - his "saving the human race" megalomania is higher megalomania than anything Trump shows).

    I think Musk and Trump are sometimes quite positive figures in ways, though.

    It shows how people with narcissistic personality disorder can sometimes succeed where people with normal psychology are failing, and that it is not always justifiable to use the word “disorder”. (But these people from a distance – it is not pleasant if those personalities are your boss at work).

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Psychologists are a frauds.

    http://bigthink.com/articles/is-racism-a-form-of-mental-illness

    While it isn’t in the DSM V—the manual containing all anointed psychiatric conditions, some experts believe that extreme racism should be. Oxford psychiatrists for instance did include “pathological bias” in their own version, the Oxford Handbook of Personality Disorders, last revised in 2012.
     

    "Disorders" is just the new form of heresy so then the state can "cure the insane."

    How can xenophobia be reduced and altruism strengthened? Researchers have shown in a new study that the bonding hormone oxytocin together with social norms significantly increases the willingness to donate money to refugees in need, even in people who tend to have a skeptical attitude towards migrants.


    What conclusions can be drawn from these results? It appears that pairing oxytocin with a social norm can help counter the effects of xenophobia by enhancing altruistic behavior toward refugees. "The combined enhancement of oxytocin and peer influence could diminish selfish motives," says Hurlemann.
     
    , @AaronB
    People with motivation succeed.

    Now that science has killed ideals only exceptionally selfish people remain motivated.

    But there used to be other personality types who were just as motivated, although for different reasons.
    , @Gerard2

    It shows how people with narcissistic personality disorder can sometimes succeed where people with normal psychology are failing,
     
    Is it just me, but isn't Trump quite self-deprecating and not the narcissist he's claimed to be?
    He send's up jokes about his hair ( as in he knows how ridiculous it ), loves criticism because he is practical enought to know all of it is good PR for his business or his Presidency

    and for a guy he pretends to be your average dumb,boorish, typical, "Go America" American idiot..........there must be something in the fact that two of his wives are Slavic.
  285. @Mitleser
    Spanish students forced out of their houses to make room for Aquarius migrants

    Several students from the local student residence are now being forced from their lodgings despite having paid their accommodation fees so the migrants, arriving from Libya, can be housed, according to the online daily Actualidad Valdepeñas.

    A young German language student in Alicante named Rubén, who is planning to live and work in Germany in his future, paid €750 a month for his room, has now been forced to leave along with the other students housed there.

    His mother has stated that her son has had to leave the residence to make room for the Aquarius migrants: “They have told us that they cannot be there because they come with many illnesses, so this is a health issue”.

    “It’s like we are solving one problem by causing others, and this is a big problem because right now there is nowhere in Alicante for my son to live and continue with his studies. We are going to go there to see if we can find something, but it will be very difficult since everything is already booked for the Summer months,” she explains.

    Rubén’s mother does not believe that it can be due to a “health issue” otherwise the local authorities surely wouldn’t be housing hundreds of sick migrants in the centre of a busy tourist city like Alicante.

    Authorities announced on Saturday 16 June that Rubén and his colleagues only had 24 hours in which to collect their belongings and vacate the residence.
     
    https://voiceofeurope.com/2018/06/spanish-students-forced-out-of-their-houses-to-make-room-for-aquarius-migrants/#.WygaIpDpRSE.twitter

    A young German language student in Alicante named Rubén, who is planning to live and work in Germany in his future, paid €750 a month for his room, has now been forced to leave along with the other students housed there.

    Complain to Merkel.

  286. @Dmitry
    I think Musk and Trump are sometimes quite positive figures in ways, though.

    It shows how people with narcissistic personality disorder can sometimes succeed where people with normal psychology are failing, and that it is not always justifiable to use the word "disorder". (But these people from a distance - it is not pleasant if those personalities are your boss at work).

    Psychologists are a frauds.

    http://bigthink.com/articles/is-racism-a-form-of-mental-illness

    While it isn’t in the DSM V—the manual containing all anointed psychiatric conditions, some experts believe that extreme racism should be. Oxford psychiatrists for instance did include “pathological bias” in their own version, the Oxford Handbook of Personality Disorders, last revised in 2012.

    “Disorders” is just the new form of heresy so then the state can “cure the insane.”

    How can xenophobia be reduced and altruism strengthened? Researchers have shown in a new study that the bonding hormone oxytocin together with social norms significantly increases the willingness to donate money to refugees in need, even in people who tend to have a skeptical attitude towards migrants.

    What conclusions can be drawn from these results? It appears that pairing oxytocin with a social norm can help counter the effects of xenophobia by enhancing altruistic behavior toward refugees. “The combined enhancement of oxytocin and peer influence could diminish selfish motives,” says Hurlemann.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    I don't think that because of one negative story of a potential politicization in the profession, that it implies that these clusters of symptoms (personality disorders) do not exist (in explanatory useful way).

    Where is the connection in the argument? That because of a single news story, then a move to claiming fraudulence of the profession and also all its past work.

    It seems that the concept of personality disorders (clusters of symptoms) such as narcissistic personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, etc - are obviously useful for understanding behaviour, and that wider public could learn practical benefits from dissemination of knowledge from this field (of what symptoms are often counter-intuitively clustering together - e.g. that ).

  287. @Daniel Chieh
    Psychologists are a frauds.

    http://bigthink.com/articles/is-racism-a-form-of-mental-illness

    While it isn’t in the DSM V—the manual containing all anointed psychiatric conditions, some experts believe that extreme racism should be. Oxford psychiatrists for instance did include “pathological bias” in their own version, the Oxford Handbook of Personality Disorders, last revised in 2012.
     

    "Disorders" is just the new form of heresy so then the state can "cure the insane."

    How can xenophobia be reduced and altruism strengthened? Researchers have shown in a new study that the bonding hormone oxytocin together with social norms significantly increases the willingness to donate money to refugees in need, even in people who tend to have a skeptical attitude towards migrants.


    What conclusions can be drawn from these results? It appears that pairing oxytocin with a social norm can help counter the effects of xenophobia by enhancing altruistic behavior toward refugees. "The combined enhancement of oxytocin and peer influence could diminish selfish motives," says Hurlemann.
     

    I don’t think that because of one negative story of a potential politicization in the profession, that it implies that these clusters of symptoms (personality disorders) do not exist (in explanatory useful way).

    Where is the connection in the argument? That because of a single news story, then a move to claiming fraudulence of the profession and also all its past work.

    It seems that the concept of personality disorders (clusters of symptoms) such as narcissistic personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, etc – are obviously useful for understanding behaviour, and that wider public could learn practical benefits from dissemination of knowledge from this field (of what symptoms are often counter-intuitively clustering together – e.g. that ).

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    Of course, it is a field (psychiatry) open for political abuses, so it could be quite scary this story you posted.

    -

    On another topic.


    In Poland Senegal match

    Local fans were cheering for Senegal next to polite Poland fans.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmaC991Xm58


    But Polish fans were reported very positively and are now seeming in love with Russia.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqVyfzxBI1U

  288. @Mitleser
    Spanish students forced out of their houses to make room for Aquarius migrants

    Several students from the local student residence are now being forced from their lodgings despite having paid their accommodation fees so the migrants, arriving from Libya, can be housed, according to the online daily Actualidad Valdepeñas.

    A young German language student in Alicante named Rubén, who is planning to live and work in Germany in his future, paid €750 a month for his room, has now been forced to leave along with the other students housed there.

    His mother has stated that her son has had to leave the residence to make room for the Aquarius migrants: “They have told us that they cannot be there because they come with many illnesses, so this is a health issue”.

    “It’s like we are solving one problem by causing others, and this is a big problem because right now there is nowhere in Alicante for my son to live and continue with his studies. We are going to go there to see if we can find something, but it will be very difficult since everything is already booked for the Summer months,” she explains.

    Rubén’s mother does not believe that it can be due to a “health issue” otherwise the local authorities surely wouldn’t be housing hundreds of sick migrants in the centre of a busy tourist city like Alicante.

    Authorities announced on Saturday 16 June that Rubén and his colleagues only had 24 hours in which to collect their belongings and vacate the residence.
     
    https://voiceofeurope.com/2018/06/spanish-students-forced-out-of-their-houses-to-make-room-for-aquarius-migrants/#.WygaIpDpRSE.twitter

    At least it’s better than suddenly finding the building you live in filled with Africans.

  289. @Dmitry
    I don't think that because of one negative story of a potential politicization in the profession, that it implies that these clusters of symptoms (personality disorders) do not exist (in explanatory useful way).

    Where is the connection in the argument? That because of a single news story, then a move to claiming fraudulence of the profession and also all its past work.

    It seems that the concept of personality disorders (clusters of symptoms) such as narcissistic personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, etc - are obviously useful for understanding behaviour, and that wider public could learn practical benefits from dissemination of knowledge from this field (of what symptoms are often counter-intuitively clustering together - e.g. that ).

    Of course, it is a field (psychiatry) open for political abuses, so it could be quite scary this story you posted.

    On another topic.

    In Poland Senegal match

    Local fans were cheering for Senegal next to polite Poland fans.

    But Polish fans were reported very positively and are now seeming in love with Russia.

  290. bb. says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Well, I was playing around with their claims of being attacked by a hostile corporation.

    Everything about this is strange. Of course, disgruntled employees sometimes act out in malicious ways. Occasionally, I've known even as far back as 2008 that competitors actually will engage in acts of malice against others. But all of this sounds more like, as you said, justification for upcoming failure. Things to note:

    1) When acts of malice occur, they are usually suppressed by the company. You do not want to advertise that internal chaos happened. This is considered reputational risk. Then again, Musk breaks a lot of rules of protocol.

    2) "Acts of malice" by corporations against each other usually is targeted hiring, by picking away a key member of a project. This is legal, and does not need some sort of arcane and highly illegal destruction of company property.

    One thing he is oddly correct about, though, is that my experience is indeed that it is the oil companies that are most willing to engage in such ops(but again, its usually targeted hiring). You'd think it'd be the SV companies, but they play surprisingly nice to each other with employee noncompete agreements and avoidance of targeted hiring to my experience.

    UuuuI think that industrial espionage is relatively common, or firms would not invest substantially into security, though mostly it’s probably just information gathering.
    my favourite example of an act of malice is the hacking of a steel mill in germany which shut it down and damaged it in the process(https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-30575104). Do you know of any other interesting cases, maybe in the oil industry?
    As you note, usually the company would try to hide such incidents to not look weak and foolish. There might be deminishing marginal returns on breaking protocol, just sayin..:)
    On side note, there was a fire at a Ford factory recently which shut down the production of their prime product, the F150(https://amp.ft.com/content/abdd6bbe-53cd-11e8-b3ee-41e0209208ec). I don’t think it was sabotage but imagine Ford went around ‘implying’ malice. On the other hand, the rules might be changing-globalization brings in players from cultures who don’t mess around and you just have to adapt.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    The only ones I know for certain was some oil companies contracted to this woman who would pretend to be an old friend, or a family member and try to slip by "gatekeepers" in order to get in contact with C-level employees in order to then contact them and hire them away. She would sometimes pretend to be sick or have an urgent case that needed to let her talk to someone. This was before LinkedIn, I don't think you need such silly games now. I'm suspect that she did other cases of corporate espionage, but I don't know for certain.

    The oil company I worked with in Africa engaged in all sorts of things, but I don't really think they had a choice otherwise: bribery, mercenaries, and violent politics is day to day life. I partly suspect that the more aggressive attitude that mineral companies have comes as a side-effect of having to deal with such situations.

    There was a rumor when I worked in SV also that some companies would have their security teams have a "black" section which would launch anonymous, generalized attacks on their competitor's websites. All I know is that when I was analyzing incoming logs once to stop an attack, it was during US hours but origin information claimed "Republic of Iran." Who knows?

    And of course, the most obvious and completely legal form of corporate malice is the standard "sue smaller competitor to oblivion", basically what would often count as malicious misuse of legal proceedings. Large companies have powerful ligating teams and huge warchests, allowing them to involve small competitors in endless lawsuits which small companies cannot scale up with.
    , @Daniel Chieh


    It said attackers used booby-trapped emails to steal logins that gave them access to the mill's control systems.
     
    lol.

    They do make dumb phishing sound so sexy and high-tech, don't they? Its probably still one of the most effective attacks out there, I've seen a C-level employee fall for it and because he also insisted on having digital access to everything(why? No idea), it proceeded to essentially explode our entire environment. The joys of ransomware.

    Fortunately, we had backups, but lost 48 hours of work.
  291. @Dmitry
    I think Musk and Trump are sometimes quite positive figures in ways, though.

    It shows how people with narcissistic personality disorder can sometimes succeed where people with normal psychology are failing, and that it is not always justifiable to use the word "disorder". (But these people from a distance - it is not pleasant if those personalities are your boss at work).

    People with motivation succeed.

    Now that science has killed ideals only exceptionally selfish people remain motivated.

    But there used to be other personality types who were just as motivated, although for different reasons.

  292. @bb.
    UuuuI think that industrial espionage is relatively common, or firms would not invest substantially into security, though mostly it's probably just information gathering.
    my favourite example of an act of malice is the hacking of a steel mill in germany which shut it down and damaged it in the process(https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-30575104). Do you know of any other interesting cases, maybe in the oil industry?
    As you note, usually the company would try to hide such incidents to not look weak and foolish. There might be deminishing marginal returns on breaking protocol, just sayin..:)
    On side note, there was a fire at a Ford factory recently which shut down the production of their prime product, the F150(https://amp.ft.com/content/abdd6bbe-53cd-11e8-b3ee-41e0209208ec). I don't think it was sabotage but imagine Ford went around 'implying' malice. On the other hand, the rules might be changing-globalization brings in players from cultures who don't mess around and you just have to adapt.

    The only ones I know for certain was some oil companies contracted to this woman who would pretend to be an old friend, or a family member and try to slip by “gatekeepers” in order to get in contact with C-level employees in order to then contact them and hire them away. She would sometimes pretend to be sick or have an urgent case that needed to let her talk to someone. This was before LinkedIn, I don’t think you need such silly games now. I’m suspect that she did other cases of corporate espionage, but I don’t know for certain.

    The oil company I worked with in Africa engaged in all sorts of things, but I don’t really think they had a choice otherwise: bribery, mercenaries, and violent politics is day to day life. I partly suspect that the more aggressive attitude that mineral companies have comes as a side-effect of having to deal with such situations.

    There was a rumor when I worked in SV also that some companies would have their security teams have a “black” section which would launch anonymous, generalized attacks on their competitor’s websites. All I know is that when I was analyzing incoming logs once to stop an attack, it was during US hours but origin information claimed “Republic of Iran.” Who knows?

    And of course, the most obvious and completely legal form of corporate malice is the standard “sue smaller competitor to oblivion”, basically what would often count as malicious misuse of legal proceedings. Large companies have powerful ligating teams and huge warchests, allowing them to involve small competitors in endless lawsuits which small companies cannot scale up with.

  293. @bb.
    UuuuI think that industrial espionage is relatively common, or firms would not invest substantially into security, though mostly it's probably just information gathering.
    my favourite example of an act of malice is the hacking of a steel mill in germany which shut it down and damaged it in the process(https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-30575104). Do you know of any other interesting cases, maybe in the oil industry?
    As you note, usually the company would try to hide such incidents to not look weak and foolish. There might be deminishing marginal returns on breaking protocol, just sayin..:)
    On side note, there was a fire at a Ford factory recently which shut down the production of their prime product, the F150(https://amp.ft.com/content/abdd6bbe-53cd-11e8-b3ee-41e0209208ec). I don't think it was sabotage but imagine Ford went around 'implying' malice. On the other hand, the rules might be changing-globalization brings in players from cultures who don't mess around and you just have to adapt.

    It said attackers used booby-trapped emails to steal logins that gave them access to the mill’s control systems.

    lol.

    They do make dumb phishing sound so sexy and high-tech, don’t they? Its probably still one of the most effective attacks out there, I’ve seen a C-level employee fall for it and because he also insisted on having digital access to everything(why? No idea), it proceeded to essentially explode our entire environment. The joys of ransomware.

    Fortunately, we had backups, but lost 48 hours of work.

  294. I was reading Panorama (the official journal of the Porsche Club of America) during lunch at the diner today.

    It reports that Porsche is installing 800V high power charging stations at every Porsche dealership in the USA. The chargers will be able to recharge the upcoming Mission E to 80% capacity within twenty minutes, good for 250 miles (Euros: 400km) range.

    Volkswagen is also partnering with Wal-Mart to install high power chargers at 100 Wal-Marts in America.

    $TSLAQ

    In other automotive news the CEO of Audi was arrested over Dieselgate, and BMW is now being investigated by German officials as well. The ecoterrorist persecution of German diesel makers is absurd, and it’s bizarre that the German government is going after the beating heart of the German export machine.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    Blame Trump, says der Spiegel

    Whereas American banks remain the undisputed leaders not only in the U.S., but also well beyond, the balance of power in the global automotive industry is markedly different. Here, German manufacturers from VW to Daimler to BMW dominate. That's why the U.S. government has been ratcheting up pressure on German carmakers since Trump took office.

    Their preferred target has been Volkswagen. The Wolfsburg-based company reached a settlement with the Justice Department at the beginning of 2017. In total, the fines the company had to pay along with the compensation to American owners of its diesel vehicles amounted to more than $20 billion. There is no question that the company deserved the punishment. It's growth in the U.S. market had been based on the myth of clean diesel, a lie the company perpetuated by installing cheat devices in its diesel vehicles allowing VW to claim far lower emissions than was actually the case.

    But the longer the scandal drags on, the more critically industry insiders are asking what is happening with other manufacturers with deeper roots in the U.S. -- car companies that are also believed to have manipulated emissions readings. In May 2017, for example, the Justice Department accused Fiat-Chrysler of deploying cheat software in close to 104,000 of its diesel vehicles. But the proceedings have been slow and a decision over a possible penalty still hasn't been made.

    Increasing Pressure on Daimler

    Instead, the U.S. authorities appear to be increasing pressure on Daimler. Representatives of the Stuttgart company were recently summoned to appear before the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It's already a foregone conclusion that Daimler is going to have to pay a considerable sum, and at this point negotiations are focusing on how high the settlement will be, say sources within the U.S. justice system. Officials at Daimler say they won't comment on speculation over ongoing legal proceedings.

    For VW, too, the scandal in the U.S. isn't over yet. At the beginning of May, the U.S. District Court in Detroit confirmed charges against former VW CEO Martin Winterkorn on the very day that new VW head Herbert Diess called for a cultural shift at the company during its annual shareholder meeting.
     
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/donald-trump-making-life-tough-for-german-companies-a-1212271.html

    America and China 2025 might break German global economic power.
    , @Dmitry

    In other automotive news the CEO of Audi was arrested over Dieselgate, and BMW is now being investigated by German officials as well. The ecoterrorist persecution of German diesel makers is absurd, and it’s bizarre that the German government is going after the beating heart of the German export machine.

     

    Diesel cars are horrible for lungs, because of the NOx and also higher release of (carcinogenic) particulate emissions (and reliability of the filters they use to reduce particulate emissions seem variable if they are not regularly maintained).

    Even though air pollution is horrible in a lot of Russian cities for various reasons, it is one small area things are possibly advanced of Western Europe: a lot lower market penetration of diesel engine cars (although not of trucks).

    -

    In London it's something very strong already (partly because of very high market penetration of diesel vehicles in UK).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlKGDGENI-4

  295. @Thorfinnsson
    I was reading Panorama (the official journal of the Porsche Club of America) during lunch at the diner today.

    It reports that Porsche is installing 800V high power charging stations at every Porsche dealership in the USA. The chargers will be able to recharge the upcoming Mission E to 80% capacity within twenty minutes, good for 250 miles (Euros: 400km) range.

    Volkswagen is also partnering with Wal-Mart to install high power chargers at 100 Wal-Marts in America.

    $TSLAQ

    In other automotive news the CEO of Audi was arrested over Dieselgate, and BMW is now being investigated by German officials as well. The ecoterrorist persecution of German diesel makers is absurd, and it's bizarre that the German government is going after the beating heart of the German export machine.

    Blame Trump, says der Spiegel

    Whereas American banks remain the undisputed leaders not only in the U.S., but also well beyond, the balance of power in the global automotive industry is markedly different. Here, German manufacturers from VW to Daimler to BMW dominate. That’s why the U.S. government has been ratcheting up pressure on German carmakers since Trump took office.

    Their preferred target has been Volkswagen. The Wolfsburg-based company reached a settlement with the Justice Department at the beginning of 2017. In total, the fines the company had to pay along with the compensation to American owners of its diesel vehicles amounted to more than $20 billion. There is no question that the company deserved the punishment. It’s growth in the U.S. market had been based on the myth of clean diesel, a lie the company perpetuated by installing cheat devices in its diesel vehicles allowing VW to claim far lower emissions than was actually the case.

    But the longer the scandal drags on, the more critically industry insiders are asking what is happening with other manufacturers with deeper roots in the U.S. — car companies that are also believed to have manipulated emissions readings. In May 2017, for example, the Justice Department accused Fiat-Chrysler of deploying cheat software in close to 104,000 of its diesel vehicles. But the proceedings have been slow and a decision over a possible penalty still hasn’t been made.

    Increasing Pressure on Daimler

    Instead, the U.S. authorities appear to be increasing pressure on Daimler. Representatives of the Stuttgart company were recently summoned to appear before the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It’s already a foregone conclusion that Daimler is going to have to pay a considerable sum, and at this point negotiations are focusing on how high the settlement will be, say sources within the U.S. justice system. Officials at Daimler say they won’t comment on speculation over ongoing legal proceedings.

    For VW, too, the scandal in the U.S. isn’t over yet. At the beginning of May, the U.S. District Court in Detroit confirmed charges against former VW CEO Martin Winterkorn on the very day that new VW head Herbert Diess called for a cultural shift at the company during its annual shareholder meeting.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/donald-trump-making-life-tough-for-german-companies-a-1212271.html

    America and China 2025 might break German global economic power.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    The USA targeting German automakers is logical.

    The German government itself doing so is not.
  296. @Mitleser
    Blame Trump, says der Spiegel

    Whereas American banks remain the undisputed leaders not only in the U.S., but also well beyond, the balance of power in the global automotive industry is markedly different. Here, German manufacturers from VW to Daimler to BMW dominate. That's why the U.S. government has been ratcheting up pressure on German carmakers since Trump took office.

    Their preferred target has been Volkswagen. The Wolfsburg-based company reached a settlement with the Justice Department at the beginning of 2017. In total, the fines the company had to pay along with the compensation to American owners of its diesel vehicles amounted to more than $20 billion. There is no question that the company deserved the punishment. It's growth in the U.S. market had been based on the myth of clean diesel, a lie the company perpetuated by installing cheat devices in its diesel vehicles allowing VW to claim far lower emissions than was actually the case.

    But the longer the scandal drags on, the more critically industry insiders are asking what is happening with other manufacturers with deeper roots in the U.S. -- car companies that are also believed to have manipulated emissions readings. In May 2017, for example, the Justice Department accused Fiat-Chrysler of deploying cheat software in close to 104,000 of its diesel vehicles. But the proceedings have been slow and a decision over a possible penalty still hasn't been made.

    Increasing Pressure on Daimler

    Instead, the U.S. authorities appear to be increasing pressure on Daimler. Representatives of the Stuttgart company were recently summoned to appear before the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It's already a foregone conclusion that Daimler is going to have to pay a considerable sum, and at this point negotiations are focusing on how high the settlement will be, say sources within the U.S. justice system. Officials at Daimler say they won't comment on speculation over ongoing legal proceedings.

    For VW, too, the scandal in the U.S. isn't over yet. At the beginning of May, the U.S. District Court in Detroit confirmed charges against former VW CEO Martin Winterkorn on the very day that new VW head Herbert Diess called for a cultural shift at the company during its annual shareholder meeting.
     
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/donald-trump-making-life-tough-for-german-companies-a-1212271.html

    America and China 2025 might break German global economic power.

    The USA targeting German automakers is logical.

    The German government itself doing so is not.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    German Zeitgeist is Green.
    Cars, German or not are not that Green.
  297. @Thorfinnsson
    The USA targeting German automakers is logical.

    The German government itself doing so is not.

    German Zeitgeist is Green.
    Cars, German or not are not that Green.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    "Green"

    There is certainly nothing green about atomophobia. Germany's hysterical, irrational fear of atomic power has led to major increases in coal-fired power generation.

    Including the use of lignite.

    The "Green" faction Germany is also in favor of a introducing nationwide speed limit on the Autobahn. Disgusting swine.

    If the NSDAP ever returns to power an immediate priority must be rounding up these political arsonists and confining them to concentration camps. These camps must have on-site nuclear reactors for heat, and the inmates should daily be reminded of it.
  298. @Mitleser
    German Zeitgeist is Green.
    Cars, German or not are not that Green.

    “Green”

    There is certainly nothing green about atomophobia. Germany’s hysterical, irrational fear of atomic power has led to major increases in coal-fired power generation.

    Including the use of lignite.

    The “Green” faction Germany is also in favor of a introducing nationwide speed limit on the Autobahn. Disgusting swine.

    If the NSDAP ever returns to power an immediate priority must be rounding up these political arsonists and confining them to concentration camps. These camps must have on-site nuclear reactors for heat, and the inmates should daily be reminded of it.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    It's a misconception to think that the Greens are primarily about ecology. Many of their prominent politicians from the founding era onwards had a background in weird Maoist sects and other far left groups; e.g. there was one guy, Joscha Schmierer - who got a nice job at the foreign ministry under Fischer - who had been head of the Kommunistischer Bund Westdeutschland (Communist League West Germany) in the 1970s and had made a friendly visit to the Pol Pot regime. Fischer himself of course had a violent background on the fringes of terrorist activism. That generation has now mostly receded into the background (though there's still Jürgen Trittin, also a former member of some weird Maoist group), but behind the bourgeois facade the Greens are still basically a far left party imo. Not on economic matters, but certainly in their antinational zeal. If it harms Germany, they're in favour of it.
    Personally I think concentration camps would be too good for them.
  299. @Thorfinnsson
    "Green"

    There is certainly nothing green about atomophobia. Germany's hysterical, irrational fear of atomic power has led to major increases in coal-fired power generation.

    Including the use of lignite.

    The "Green" faction Germany is also in favor of a introducing nationwide speed limit on the Autobahn. Disgusting swine.

    If the NSDAP ever returns to power an immediate priority must be rounding up these political arsonists and confining them to concentration camps. These camps must have on-site nuclear reactors for heat, and the inmates should daily be reminded of it.

    It’s a misconception to think that the Greens are primarily about ecology. Many of their prominent politicians from the founding era onwards had a background in weird Maoist sects and other far left groups; e.g. there was one guy, Joscha Schmierer – who got a nice job at the foreign ministry under Fischer – who had been head of the Kommunistischer Bund Westdeutschland (Communist League West Germany) in the 1970s and had made a friendly visit to the Pol Pot regime. Fischer himself of course had a violent background on the fringes of terrorist activism. That generation has now mostly receded into the background (though there’s still Jürgen Trittin, also a former member of some weird Maoist group), but behind the bourgeois facade the Greens are still basically a far left party imo. Not on economic matters, but certainly in their antinational zeal. If it harms Germany, they’re in favour of it.
    Personally I think concentration camps would be too good for them.

    • Replies: @Mitleser

    If it harms Germany, they’re in favour of it.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjnI_WtgJGw
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Its amazing that they actually exist as a political party, given that they seem to be antifa loons.
  300. @Thorfinnsson
    I was reading Panorama (the official journal of the Porsche Club of America) during lunch at the diner today.

    It reports that Porsche is installing 800V high power charging stations at every Porsche dealership in the USA. The chargers will be able to recharge the upcoming Mission E to 80% capacity within twenty minutes, good for 250 miles (Euros: 400km) range.

    Volkswagen is also partnering with Wal-Mart to install high power chargers at 100 Wal-Marts in America.

    $TSLAQ

    In other automotive news the CEO of Audi was arrested over Dieselgate, and BMW is now being investigated by German officials as well. The ecoterrorist persecution of German diesel makers is absurd, and it's bizarre that the German government is going after the beating heart of the German export machine.

    In other automotive news the CEO of Audi was arrested over Dieselgate, and BMW is now being investigated by German officials as well. The ecoterrorist persecution of German diesel makers is absurd, and it’s bizarre that the German government is going after the beating heart of the German export machine.

    Diesel cars are horrible for lungs, because of the NOx and also higher release of (carcinogenic) particulate emissions (and reliability of the filters they use to reduce particulate emissions seem variable if they are not regularly maintained).

    Even though air pollution is horrible in a lot of Russian cities for various reasons, it is one small area things are possibly advanced of Western Europe: a lot lower market penetration of diesel engine cars (although not of trucks).

    In London it’s something very strong already (partly because of very high market penetration of diesel vehicles in UK).

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Modern diesel cars are very clean.

    Don't confuse diesel passenger cars with trucks and buses.

    American regulators set an excessively low emissions standard because regulators always feel the need to "improve" upon existing regulations, even when there is no need.

    Volkswagen's clever defeat device allowed for their cars to have more horsepower and better fuel economy than would've been possible if they'd complied with the gay regulations. In effect Volkswagen is being persecuted for building superior cars.

    The only way Volkswagen could've met the emissions standards without compromising powertrain performance would've been to install a cat piss tank in the car, which the Golf is too small to accommodate unless the independent rear suspension is removed (resulting in bad handling characteristics).

    Dieselgate should've been a wakeup call about unreasonable regulations. Instead it seems that diesel passenger cars will simply disappear from the American market, which is a real shame as diesel cars have many excellent characteristics.

    The morons at CAFE even raised the future mileage standard to an absurd 54 miles per gallon by 2025 (only two cars even available in America today meet this standard), which would ensure that all cars sold are homo-sexual. Fortunately Trump rescinded this diktat, so our cars are saved...for now.

    Eric Peters has good libertarian takes on the car industry: https://www.ericpetersautos.com/2018/06/18/oj-is-free-but-audi-executive-is-in-a-cage/

  301. @German_reader
    It's a misconception to think that the Greens are primarily about ecology. Many of their prominent politicians from the founding era onwards had a background in weird Maoist sects and other far left groups; e.g. there was one guy, Joscha Schmierer - who got a nice job at the foreign ministry under Fischer - who had been head of the Kommunistischer Bund Westdeutschland (Communist League West Germany) in the 1970s and had made a friendly visit to the Pol Pot regime. Fischer himself of course had a violent background on the fringes of terrorist activism. That generation has now mostly receded into the background (though there's still Jürgen Trittin, also a former member of some weird Maoist group), but behind the bourgeois facade the Greens are still basically a far left party imo. Not on economic matters, but certainly in their antinational zeal. If it harms Germany, they're in favour of it.
    Personally I think concentration camps would be too good for them.

    If it harms Germany, they’re in favour of it.

  302. @German_reader
    It's a misconception to think that the Greens are primarily about ecology. Many of their prominent politicians from the founding era onwards had a background in weird Maoist sects and other far left groups; e.g. there was one guy, Joscha Schmierer - who got a nice job at the foreign ministry under Fischer - who had been head of the Kommunistischer Bund Westdeutschland (Communist League West Germany) in the 1970s and had made a friendly visit to the Pol Pot regime. Fischer himself of course had a violent background on the fringes of terrorist activism. That generation has now mostly receded into the background (though there's still Jürgen Trittin, also a former member of some weird Maoist group), but behind the bourgeois facade the Greens are still basically a far left party imo. Not on economic matters, but certainly in their antinational zeal. If it harms Germany, they're in favour of it.
    Personally I think concentration camps would be too good for them.

    Its amazing that they actually exist as a political party, given that they seem to be antifa loons.

  303. @Dmitry

    In other automotive news the CEO of Audi was arrested over Dieselgate, and BMW is now being investigated by German officials as well. The ecoterrorist persecution of German diesel makers is absurd, and it’s bizarre that the German government is going after the beating heart of the German export machine.

     

    Diesel cars are horrible for lungs, because of the NOx and also higher release of (carcinogenic) particulate emissions (and reliability of the filters they use to reduce particulate emissions seem variable if they are not regularly maintained).

    Even though air pollution is horrible in a lot of Russian cities for various reasons, it is one small area things are possibly advanced of Western Europe: a lot lower market penetration of diesel engine cars (although not of trucks).

    -

    In London it's something very strong already (partly because of very high market penetration of diesel vehicles in UK).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlKGDGENI-4

    Modern diesel cars are very clean.

    Don’t confuse diesel passenger cars with trucks and buses.

    American regulators set an excessively low emissions standard because regulators always feel the need to “improve” upon existing regulations, even when there is no need.

    Volkswagen’s clever defeat device allowed for their cars to have more horsepower and better fuel economy than would’ve been possible if they’d complied with the gay regulations. In effect Volkswagen is being persecuted for building superior cars.

    The only way Volkswagen could’ve met the emissions standards without compromising powertrain performance would’ve been to install a cat piss tank in the car, which the Golf is too small to accommodate unless the independent rear suspension is removed (resulting in bad handling characteristics).

    Dieselgate should’ve been a wakeup call about unreasonable regulations. Instead it seems that diesel passenger cars will simply disappear from the American market, which is a real shame as diesel cars have many excellent characteristics.

    The morons at CAFE even raised the future mileage standard to an absurd 54 miles per gallon by 2025 (only two cars even available in America today meet this standard), which would ensure that all cars sold are homo-sexual. Fortunately Trump rescinded this diktat, so our cars are saved…for now.

    Eric Peters has good libertarian takes on the car industry: https://www.ericpetersautos.com/2018/06/18/oj-is-free-but-audi-executive-is-in-a-cage/

    • Replies: @Dmitry

    Modern diesel cars are very clean.
     
    Not in terms of NOx, and potentially not in terms of particulates (yes only if the diesel particulate filter [which exists in diesel cars built newly in recent years] is functioning correctly - but in reality diesel particulate filters are very often not functioning correctly).
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    I drove a diesel-powered Dacia SUV in Romania. Its fuel economy was amazing.

    Ploiesti Brasov there and back (220km), plus three days of driving (maybe another 100km); it was still three quarters full at the end.
  304. @Thorfinnsson
    Modern diesel cars are very clean.

    Don't confuse diesel passenger cars with trucks and buses.

    American regulators set an excessively low emissions standard because regulators always feel the need to "improve" upon existing regulations, even when there is no need.

    Volkswagen's clever defeat device allowed for their cars to have more horsepower and better fuel economy than would've been possible if they'd complied with the gay regulations. In effect Volkswagen is being persecuted for building superior cars.

    The only way Volkswagen could've met the emissions standards without compromising powertrain performance would've been to install a cat piss tank in the car, which the Golf is too small to accommodate unless the independent rear suspension is removed (resulting in bad handling characteristics).

    Dieselgate should've been a wakeup call about unreasonable regulations. Instead it seems that diesel passenger cars will simply disappear from the American market, which is a real shame as diesel cars have many excellent characteristics.

    The morons at CAFE even raised the future mileage standard to an absurd 54 miles per gallon by 2025 (only two cars even available in America today meet this standard), which would ensure that all cars sold are homo-sexual. Fortunately Trump rescinded this diktat, so our cars are saved...for now.

    Eric Peters has good libertarian takes on the car industry: https://www.ericpetersautos.com/2018/06/18/oj-is-free-but-audi-executive-is-in-a-cage/

    Modern diesel cars are very clean.

    Not in terms of NOx, and potentially not in terms of particulates (yes only if the diesel particulate filter [which exists in diesel cars built newly in recent years] is functioning correctly – but in reality diesel particulate filters are very often not functioning correctly).

  305. @Thorfinnsson
    Modern diesel cars are very clean.

    Don't confuse diesel passenger cars with trucks and buses.

    American regulators set an excessively low emissions standard because regulators always feel the need to "improve" upon existing regulations, even when there is no need.

    Volkswagen's clever defeat device allowed for their cars to have more horsepower and better fuel economy than would've been possible if they'd complied with the gay regulations. In effect Volkswagen is being persecuted for building superior cars.

    The only way Volkswagen could've met the emissions standards without compromising powertrain performance would've been to install a cat piss tank in the car, which the Golf is too small to accommodate unless the independent rear suspension is removed (resulting in bad handling characteristics).

    Dieselgate should've been a wakeup call about unreasonable regulations. Instead it seems that diesel passenger cars will simply disappear from the American market, which is a real shame as diesel cars have many excellent characteristics.

    The morons at CAFE even raised the future mileage standard to an absurd 54 miles per gallon by 2025 (only two cars even available in America today meet this standard), which would ensure that all cars sold are homo-sexual. Fortunately Trump rescinded this diktat, so our cars are saved...for now.

    Eric Peters has good libertarian takes on the car industry: https://www.ericpetersautos.com/2018/06/18/oj-is-free-but-audi-executive-is-in-a-cage/

    I drove a diesel-powered Dacia SUV in Romania. Its fuel economy was amazing.

    Ploiesti Brasov there and back (220km), plus three days of driving (maybe another 100km); it was still three quarters full at the end.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    In addition to their excellent fuel efficiency they can be run on a variety of fuels such as kerosene and even vegetable oil. The owner of the local Culver's franchise runs his 3/4-ton pickup truck off of his used deep fryer grease.

    The multi-fuel capability is in fact what ol' Rudy Diesel invented his engine for in the first place.

    Diesel engines also have excellent low-end torque and thus offer better off-the-line acceleration for typical motorists (i.e. people who don't know how to launch a car).

    Diesel engines also last longer than gasoline engines. There are still lots of W116 and W126 diesel S-classes on the roads. Can't kill a Mercedes Benz diesel. An excellent vehicle to acquire if you wish to look like an 80s villain (e.g. Victor Maitland from Beverly Hills Cop) for the next 30 years.

    Downside is they cost more and diesel fuel stinks.
    , @Dmitry
    Diesel has a higher energy density by volume (although not by weight), than petrol. (Petrol may have actually slightly higher energy density by weight).

    And of course, fuel is sold (and also measured by the driver psychologically - in the tank) by volume, not by weight. So there is both economic and psychological reasons that people believe that diesel has a higher energy density (although if we customarily weighed fuel, it would not be).

    Aside from diesel having higher energy density by volume, there may be a difference in the fuel efficiency of CI engine (I am not sure why though).

  306. @Anatoly Karlin
    I drove a diesel-powered Dacia SUV in Romania. Its fuel economy was amazing.

    Ploiesti Brasov there and back (220km), plus three days of driving (maybe another 100km); it was still three quarters full at the end.

    In addition to their excellent fuel efficiency they can be run on a variety of fuels such as kerosene and even vegetable oil. The owner of the local Culver’s franchise runs his 3/4-ton pickup truck off of his used deep fryer grease.

    The multi-fuel capability is in fact what ol’ Rudy Diesel invented his engine for in the first place.

    Diesel engines also have excellent low-end torque and thus offer better off-the-line acceleration for typical motorists (i.e. people who don’t know how to launch a car).

    Diesel engines also last longer than gasoline engines. There are still lots of W116 and W126 diesel S-classes on the roads. Can’t kill a Mercedes Benz diesel. An excellent vehicle to acquire if you wish to look like an 80s villain (e.g. Victor Maitland from Beverly Hills Cop) for the next 30 years.

    Downside is they cost more and diesel fuel stinks.

  307. @Thorfinnsson
    To Americans: https://shop.californiaoliveranch.com/Rich-and-Robust-Extra-Virgin-Olive-Oil/p/COR-100230&[email protected]

    Highly recommend this olive oil. Rich, robust, spicy, buttery flavor. Reasonably priced. Made in America. Not adulterated.

    For you Euros just avoid anything "packed in Italy" since it's almost certainly adulterated by the mafia with soybean or canola oil. Skip Spain as well since it's nearly all arbequina olives.

    Greek olive oil is generally a good bet.

    IMHO, the absolute best is not to be found in Greece but there:
    https://boutique.barroux.org/1326-huile-d-olive

    I don’t know about the USA, but I know for a fact that they ship the 3L oil “fountains” to CH (and therefore certainly at least anywhere into the EU).

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Thank you, I will recommend this to my father since he lives in France.

    I won't order it as I don't need the best EVOO, but simply a very good EVOO which I can be sure is EVOO. And for patriotic reasons I prefer to purchase American where possible.

    There is an old saying among unionized American manufacturing workers: Buy American, Be American

    On the topic of Buy American, my Allen Edmonds order arrived today.

    The Sarasota woven penny loafers are stunning.

    https://www.allenedmonds.com/shoes/mens-shoes/loafers-slip-ons/sarasota-weave-slip-on-penny-loafer/SF1070.html?dwvar_SF1070_color=1070#start=2

    Made with pride in Port Washington, Wisconsin.
  308. @Anatoly Karlin
    I drove a diesel-powered Dacia SUV in Romania. Its fuel economy was amazing.

    Ploiesti Brasov there and back (220km), plus three days of driving (maybe another 100km); it was still three quarters full at the end.

    Diesel has a higher energy density by volume (although not by weight), than petrol. (Petrol may have actually slightly higher energy density by weight).

    And of course, fuel is sold (and also measured by the driver psychologically – in the tank) by volume, not by weight. So there is both economic and psychological reasons that people believe that diesel has a higher energy density (although if we customarily weighed fuel, it would not be).

    Aside from diesel having higher energy density by volume, there may be a difference in the fuel efficiency of CI engine (I am not sure why though).

  309. @Guillaume Tell
    IMHO, the absolute best is not to be found in Greece but there:
    https://boutique.barroux.org/1326-huile-d-olive

    I don't know about the USA, but I know for a fact that they ship the 3L oil "fountains" to CH (and therefore certainly at least anywhere into the EU).

    Thank you, I will recommend this to my father since he lives in France.

    I won’t order it as I don’t need the best EVOO, but simply a very good EVOO which I can be sure is EVOO. And for patriotic reasons I prefer to purchase American where possible.

    There is an old saying among unionized American manufacturing workers: Buy American, Be American

    On the topic of Buy American, my Allen Edmonds order arrived today.

    The Sarasota woven penny loafers are stunning.

    https://www.allenedmonds.com/shoes/mens-shoes/loafers-slip-ons/sarasota-weave-slip-on-penny-loafer/SF1070.html?dwvar_SF1070_color=1070#start=2

    Made with pride in Port Washington, Wisconsin.

    • Replies: @Guillaume Tell

    There is an old saying among unionized American manufacturing workers: Buy American, Be American
     
    Totally fair. I also try to buy from White countries for the most part. But for some things (electronics for instance) it's impossible. I order things from the US too. But the sad part is that it's most certainly Jews that own those companies I order from anyway.

    Thank you, I will recommend this to my father since he lives in France.
     
    What a strange thing to do. May I ask what he likes so much about living there?
  310. @Felix Keverich
    The link I prodived comes from the official source. International institutions rely on data from national statistic agencies, but they process it with delay. Ukrstat is the source you should rely on, and it shows the Ukraine lagging behind Russia since 2015.

    Russia’s state stats were 71.39 in 2015 (virtually no difference, 1/100th of a year) and 71.87 in 2016 (also very slight differences, less than 1/5 of a year).
     
    This shows Russia moving ahead of the Ukraine and with much stronger momentum. Between 2004 and 2016 life expectancy in Russia gained 6,5 years, in the Ukraine - only 3,5 years. The Ukraine had led Russia every year before that until 2015. What has transpired in 2015 is a fundamental shift: the Ukraine will lag behind Russia from now on.

    Interestingly, Poland (98% Slavic)’s life expectancy in 2017 was 77.5 years,
    and is continuing to increase. This shows that there is nothing inherently low about
    the Slavs’ life expectancy. Poland is expected to exceed the American life expectancy
    soon. The latter has, of course, dropped recently – something that typically only
    happens in times of war, famine, pestilence, and economic depression (opioid-related
    deaths probably contributed)

    • Replies: @Gerard2

    Interestingly, Poland (98% Slavic)’s life expectancy in 2017 was 77.5 years,
     
    Poland exports millions of people and criminals, for a supposedly "Catholic" country it has very small size families ...and nice environment that is is....is was near American levels of life expectancy for nearly decades after 1945.
    The main difference is this aspect between Poland and say Belarus, is that a higher % of men in Belarus are employed in heavy industry jobs in comparison to Poland, this makes most of the difference because the female levels of life expectancy are roughly the same

    Moscow ,Kazan and Saint Petersburg have considerably higher life expectancies than Poland's average. It is a miracle that Russia's is where it is considering the issues of extreme cold, daylight in places in ethnic issues.....it is though a joke that it has an even higher average than Ukraine, and this has transpired after the Euromaidan freakshow
  311. Things are looking really grim for Yemen. Any readers/posters here who like Yemenites would be advised to enjoy their remaining time with them, because the Anglo-Zionist steamroller is probably going to vaporize them within the next few months. Let’s hear it for Saudi Arabia! Nice work, boys!

    On on related note, is Iran seeking to set the record in failed military interventions? Can’t they like at least win just one to make things more interesting?

    • Replies: @DFH

    Can’t they like at least win just one to make things more interesting?
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_Lebanon_War
    , @German_reader

    Nice work, boys!
     
    If there's indeed mass death in Yemen, this will come to haunt the Western powers involved and eventually be seen as a horrible mistake, as something to feel guilty about (and it will of course be used as an argument for mass immigration - "We helped destroy their country, we must take them in"); pretty appalling imo that French special forces are supposedly directly aiding the Gulf Arabs in their assault on Hodeidah.
    It's dubious enough to kill foreigners in far away places for one's own interests...but for the benefit of that awful Saudi scum? Just stupid.
    , @Talha
    This is what is called an exchange of hats. Yemen has never been a land where it is unified under some kind of central authority. Mostly, some team captures a few major cities and ports (the choke points in the Red Sea out to the Indian Ocean) and the rest of the country says; "yeah, ok, whatever dude" as long as they are left mostly alone.

    If the port is kept open to allow humanitarian aid (this is my major concern and I keep up with Muslim humanitarian orgs about this situation since I try to send money there), then who controls the port cities is not of huge significance - at least to the local population. It obviously means a lot to oil companies and international shipping through those routes.

    Yemen produces only two things historically for export: 1) really high quality coffee beans (https://www.portofmokha.com/) and 2) religion (mostly of the traditional Sufi variety - pound for pound they are probably most responsible for spreading Islam around the world). There is likely no reason why Saudi will interfere with either of those.

    Prediction: the Houthis will retreat from the coastal and major cities into interior of Yemen where the Saudi coalition will leave them alone - seeing how they have been this difficult to handle even though only one side has complete air superiority and modern tanks.

    Peace.
  312. Norks do it right!

    Fertility in North Korea at 1.91 children per woman

    As probably expected from a country like North Korea, fertility is pretty uniform in a regional sense. The capital Pyongyang has 1.8 children per woman, and the most fertile province is South Hwanghae with 2.1, located between Pyongyang and the inner-Korean border.

    University educated women have 1.7 children while upper-secondary educated women have 2.0 children.

    The poorest 20% have 2.1, the richest 40% 1.9 and those inbetween also 1.9.

    https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=149610263&postcount=39181

  313. @Greasy William
    Things are looking really grim for Yemen. Any readers/posters here who like Yemenites would be advised to enjoy their remaining time with them, because the Anglo-Zionist steamroller is probably going to vaporize them within the next few months. Let's hear it for Saudi Arabia! Nice work, boys!

    On on related note, is Iran seeking to set the record in failed military interventions? Can't they like at least win just one to make things more interesting?

    Can’t they like at least win just one to make things more interesting?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_Lebanon_War

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    The war that devastated Lebanon so badly that Nasrallah had to publicly apologize to the Lebanese people for starting it? The war that traumatized Lebanon so badly that Hezbollah has refused to lift a finger to help Hamas in Gaza despite the IDF carrying out 4 large scale slaughters there over the past decade? The war that cost Lebanon 2 billion to rebuild from, mostly coming from the Gulf states who will certainly not be providing the ungrateful Lebs with a single dime next time? That war?

    When Israel has expanded from the Nile to the Euphrates, the Temple is rebuilt, the Palestinians have been expelled and Lebanon, Syria, Yemen, Turkey and Iran have been erased, you will still be talking about 2006. It's all you have left.
  314. @DFH

    Can’t they like at least win just one to make things more interesting?
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_Lebanon_War

    The war that devastated Lebanon so badly that Nasrallah had to publicly apologize to the Lebanese people for starting it? The war that traumatized Lebanon so badly that Hezbollah has refused to lift a finger to help Hamas in Gaza despite the IDF carrying out 4 large scale slaughters there over the past decade? The war that cost Lebanon 2 billion to rebuild from, mostly coming from the Gulf states who will certainly not be providing the ungrateful Lebs with a single dime next time? That war?

    When Israel has expanded from the Nile to the Euphrates, the Temple is rebuilt, the Palestinians have been expelled and Lebanon, Syria, Yemen, Turkey and Iran have been erased, you will still be talking about 2006. It’s all you have left.

  315. @Thorfinnsson
    Thank you, I will recommend this to my father since he lives in France.

    I won't order it as I don't need the best EVOO, but simply a very good EVOO which I can be sure is EVOO. And for patriotic reasons I prefer to purchase American where possible.

    There is an old saying among unionized American manufacturing workers: Buy American, Be American

    On the topic of Buy American, my Allen Edmonds order arrived today.

    The Sarasota woven penny loafers are stunning.

    https://www.allenedmonds.com/shoes/mens-shoes/loafers-slip-ons/sarasota-weave-slip-on-penny-loafer/SF1070.html?dwvar_SF1070_color=1070#start=2

    Made with pride in Port Washington, Wisconsin.

    There is an old saying among unionized American manufacturing workers: Buy American, Be American

    Totally fair. I also try to buy from White countries for the most part. But for some things (electronics for instance) it’s impossible. I order things from the US too. But the sad part is that it’s most certainly Jews that own those companies I order from anyway.

    Thank you, I will recommend this to my father since he lives in France.

    What a strange thing to do. May I ask what he likes so much about living there?

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I am considering Chinese knockoff Gucci loafers since the actual product is unreasonably priced. Charging a thousand dollars for leather loafers is completely unreasonable. You can buy American-made shell cordovan brogues for less! Unfortunately no one else executes such wild designs.

    As Weihan Zhang might say, "no spend expensive italian pimp clothes buy aliexpress save much"

    The Jews aren't as economically dominant in America as many believe. There is a significant presence, but actual Americans are also formidable businessmen.

    I think his wife is the main reason (not French, but has a typical aristocratic obsession with the "South of France"), but he is a gourmand and oenophile which helps. Additionally he's an Anglophobe which no doubt aids in bonding with the French.

    That said probably he would've enjoyed Germany more.
  316. https://www.politico.com/story/2018/06/20/pope-francis-trump-family-separations-655496

    Pope Francis on Sunday chastised the Trump administration’s practice of separating migrant children from their parents at the border, saying “populism is not the solution.”

    In an interview with Reuters published Wednesday, Pope Francis said he supports U.S. Catholic bishops who had called separating families at the border “immoral” and contrary to Catholic values.

    “Let it be clear that in these things, I respect (the position of) the bishops conference,” he said.

    More broadly, the pope criticized populists for “creating psychosis” on immigration issues in Europe when some countries in the continent need more immigrants to offset an aging population.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Who installed this globohomo faggot anti-pope? I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.

    We know that the CIA helped install Carol Wotilja, so why not Soros for the installation of Bergoglio?

    I suppose I should be grateful for anything that discredits romish papism however.
  317. @Guillaume Tell

    There is an old saying among unionized American manufacturing workers: Buy American, Be American
     
    Totally fair. I also try to buy from White countries for the most part. But for some things (electronics for instance) it's impossible. I order things from the US too. But the sad part is that it's most certainly Jews that own those companies I order from anyway.

    Thank you, I will recommend this to my father since he lives in France.
     
    What a strange thing to do. May I ask what he likes so much about living there?

    I am considering Chinese knockoff Gucci loafers since the actual product is unreasonably priced. Charging a thousand dollars for leather loafers is completely unreasonable. You can buy American-made shell cordovan brogues for less! Unfortunately no one else executes such wild designs.

    As Weihan Zhang might say, “no spend expensive italian pimp clothes buy aliexpress save much”

    The Jews aren’t as economically dominant in America as many believe. There is a significant presence, but actual Americans are also formidable businessmen.

    I think his wife is the main reason (not French, but has a typical aristocratic obsession with the “South of France”), but he is a gourmand and oenophile which helps. Additionally he’s an Anglophobe which no doubt aids in bonding with the French.

    That said probably he would’ve enjoyed Germany more.

  318. @Daniel Chieh
    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/06/20/pope-francis-trump-family-separations-655496

    Pope Francis on Sunday chastised the Trump administration’s practice of separating migrant children from their parents at the border, saying “populism is not the solution.”

    In an interview with Reuters published Wednesday, Pope Francis said he supports U.S. Catholic bishops who had called separating families at the border “immoral” and contrary to Catholic values.

    “Let it be clear that in these things, I respect (the position of) the bishops conference,” he said.

    More broadly, the pope criticized populists for “creating psychosis” on immigration issues in Europe when some countries in the continent need more immigrants to offset an aging population.
     

    Who installed this globohomo faggot anti-pope? I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.

    We know that the CIA helped install Carol Wotilja, so why not Soros for the installation of Bergoglio?

    I suppose I should be grateful for anything that discredits romish papism however.

    • Replies: @Talha

    LIEVER TVRCX DAN PAVS
     
    https://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/history-and-heritage/additional-resources/dutch-treats/geuzenpenning/

    Peace.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Its been quite a mystery to me how he got to Pope. This entire virtue signaling is particularly strange too - assuming that he did indeed believe in this crap, then he should be preaching to a Catholic country such as Poland where his position might actually hold value(although I hear sedevacantism is increasing there, rightfully).

    Rambling about Trump, who is not a Catholic, in regards to America, which is not a Catholic country, is completely nonsensical.

    That said, I am happy at least that Wikipedia has offered succor in this regard:

    List of people burned as heretics


    This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.
     
    , @German_reader

    I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.
     
    Its German members certainly would be, the Catholic church has been one of the main supporters of Merkel's open borders policy (which is good business for them, the social organizations of the churches like Caritas are profiting massively from the "refugee" influx), in fact it seems to be not enough for them.
    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe's problems are just dreaming imo.
    , @Guillaume Tell

    his wife is the main reason (not French, but has a typical aristocratic obsession with the “South of France”), but he is a gourmand and oenophile which helps. Additionally he’s an Anglophobe which no doubt aids in bonding with the French.
     
    Very certainly. He will get a lot of mileage over there for that reason alone.

    So if I understand well (sorry I’m new here), your dad moved the family from Sweden to the USA about 30 years ago, but then moved himself to France and left behind a now uprooted Swedish-American son? I don’t mean to sound harsh on your dad, but if it’s that, well then it’s not cool in my book.


    Who installed this globohomo faggot anti-pope? I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.
     
    Homosexualism has arguably taken the upper hand at the highest levels of the Latin Church. The SSPX types (for whom I have a lot of respect although I thunk their position is inconsistent for reasons that we may discuss in the future here) put all the blame on the Vatican II general council of 1962-1965 (iirc). They certainly have a point in that those things have started to manifest themselves massively after said council and the ensuing chaos and collapse of clerical as well as lay discipline that followed. But I believe that the causes are deeper and can be found in the very beginning of the East/West schism.

    By the way Protestantism (which like Athena from her father’s leg, sprung forth all endowed and equipped from
    Catholicism) exhibits the same maladies as the Latin Church — just worse.


    We know that the CIA helped install Carol Wotilja,
     
    Interesting. If you have some references I’ll be happy to read these.

    I suppose I should be grateful for anything that discredits romish papism however.
     
    May I ask if you’re a Christian of a particular “denomination”, and if so, which one? In the interest of full disclosure, I was baptized and raised Catholic (ie Latin Church) but became an Orthodox Christian as an adult.
  319. @Thorfinnsson
    Who installed this globohomo faggot anti-pope? I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.

    We know that the CIA helped install Carol Wotilja, so why not Soros for the installation of Bergoglio?

    I suppose I should be grateful for anything that discredits romish papism however.
    • Replies: @Anon

    TVRCX
     
    An early form of "Latinx", most valuable to etymologists.
  320. AP says:

    Tank competition, in which the Ukraine team came in last.

    Ukraine apparently had two problems: team was given tanks with defect, and course was laid out to Ukraine’s disadvantage (low dugout).

    Details, with video, about the first problem:

    http://defence-blog.com/army/ukraine-trying-hide-info-t-84-tanks-problems.html

    On 15 June, Captain Roman Bagaev, whose platoon is regularly declared to be the best tank platoon in Ukraine, told in an interview with a newspaper the Novynarniaabout serious problems with the upgraded Ukrainian T-84 main battle tanks.

    Ukraine’s tankmen with T-84s taken part in Strong Europe Tank Challenge 2018 annual training event designed to give participating nations a dynamic, productive and fun environment in which to foster military partnerships, form Soldier-level relationships, and share tactics, techniques and procedures. But in this year the Ukrainian team took the last place despite the use of the newest T-84 tanks.

    Captain Roman Bagaev said that the cause of losing in Strong Europe Tank Challenge 2018 competitions lie in serious problems with T-84 combat vehicles, modernized and overhauled at the SE “Kharkiv Morozov Machine-Building Design Bureau” in Kharkiv.

    The T-84 main battle tank has seen a number of problems. The big issue has been breakdowns that leave the tank without a weapon stabilization system.

    The Novynarniahas released videos showing serious problems with T-84’s automatic loader for its 125-mm gun, fire control system and also problems related to insulated wiring.

    Ukrainian tanks were unable to hit targets at a distance of more than 1 km due to problems with stabilization of the main armament.

    “Each tank was given ten rounds, for all four tanks – forty. We were able to fire only 16 shells out of 40,” said Roman Bagaev.

    Also, he noted that at other stages of the competition, Ukrainian team scored a lot of points, but the firing gave up, and that was the most important thing.

    For its part, representatives of the plant accused the crew of the tanks in poor preparation. They at first did not even believe in problems with tanks and refused to accept comments about critical defects.

    According to the Malyshev Tank Factory, the T-84 is a modern vehicle, developed by the SE “Kharkiv Morozov Machine-Building Design Bureau”. The T-84 has the latest gunner’s sight, detecting the target “tank” up to 3500 meters, and “infantryman” type target – up to 2,200 meters. Taking into account the 125-mm gun with a loader that allows firing at a rate of 8 rounds per minute, it ensures effective destruction of targets in a minimum amount of time.

    The main battle tank T-84 is more advanced, compared with the T-64BV, used by Ukrainian crew during international competitions in 2017.

    Needs to be noted that last year, the Ukrainian tankmen in ageing T-64BV tanks took 4th place out of five teams, placing ahead of the Polish team in their Leopard 2A5 vehicles.

    :::::::::::::::::::::::

    I guess it is good news that Ukraine still mostly uses upgraded T-64BV and T-64 BM tanks which perform better despite being older (T-64 originated in 1960s but T-64BV was from 1985 and T-64BM from 2005).

    According to wiki, Ukraine has about 700 T-64BVs, 100 T-64 BMs, 200 T-72s, 20 T-80s and only 10 T-84s in service.

    Because T-84s are expensive, Ukraine prioritized fixing and modernizing its T-64 BVs over building new T-84s for its military. Given the T-84s problems this may have been a good thing.

    As a comparison, Poland has about 700 tanks in service, a mix of Leopard 2A4 and 2A5, PT-91, and T-72s. Given that Ukraine’s T-64BVs outperformed Poland’s Leopard in 2017, it’s probably fair to say that Ukraine has an edge over Poland with respect to its tank force.

    Hungary, meanwhile, has 34 tanks in service!

    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    Hungary, meanwhile, has 34 tanks in service!
     
    I think I have already complained about how we have no army to speak of. Our air force is also weak, but some of our neighbors have even less.
  321. @Thorfinnsson
    Who installed this globohomo faggot anti-pope? I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.

    We know that the CIA helped install Carol Wotilja, so why not Soros for the installation of Bergoglio?

    I suppose I should be grateful for anything that discredits romish papism however.

    Its been quite a mystery to me how he got to Pope. This entire virtue signaling is particularly strange too – assuming that he did indeed believe in this crap, then he should be preaching to a Catholic country such as Poland where his position might actually hold value(although I hear sedevacantism is increasing there, rightfully).

    Rambling about Trump, who is not a Catholic, in regards to America, which is not a Catholic country, is completely nonsensical.

    That said, I am happy at least that Wikipedia has offered succor in this regard:

    List of people burned as heretics

    This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.

  322. @Greasy William
    Things are looking really grim for Yemen. Any readers/posters here who like Yemenites would be advised to enjoy their remaining time with them, because the Anglo-Zionist steamroller is probably going to vaporize them within the next few months. Let's hear it for Saudi Arabia! Nice work, boys!

    On on related note, is Iran seeking to set the record in failed military interventions? Can't they like at least win just one to make things more interesting?

    Nice work, boys!

    If there’s indeed mass death in Yemen, this will come to haunt the Western powers involved and eventually be seen as a horrible mistake, as something to feel guilty about (and it will of course be used as an argument for mass immigration – “We helped destroy their country, we must take them in”); pretty appalling imo that French special forces are supposedly directly aiding the Gulf Arabs in their assault on Hodeidah.
    It’s dubious enough to kill foreigners in far away places for one’s own interests…but for the benefit of that awful Saudi scum? Just stupid.

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    Well Europe is already taking in everybody regardless and the US is on the brink with the border crisis. Really everybody in the world right now should be focused first and foremost on the US border because of how big this has the potential to be.

    agree that the Saudis are scum though.
  323. @Talha

    LIEVER TVRCX DAN PAVS
     
    https://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/history-and-heritage/additional-resources/dutch-treats/geuzenpenning/

    Peace.

    TVRCX

    An early form of “Latinx”, most valuable to etymologists.

  324. @Thorfinnsson
    Who installed this globohomo faggot anti-pope? I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.

    We know that the CIA helped install Carol Wotilja, so why not Soros for the installation of Bergoglio?

    I suppose I should be grateful for anything that discredits romish papism however.

    I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.

    Its German members certainly would be, the Catholic church has been one of the main supporters of Merkel’s open borders policy (which is good business for them, the social organizations of the churches like Caritas are profiting massively from the “refugee” influx), in fact it seems to be not enough for them.
    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe’s problems are just dreaming imo.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Traditionalist Christians generally argue that the major denominations have been captured by SJWs and are better described as "Churchianity".

    You can read about this perspective from Dalrock and Vox Day.

    Italians are dominant in the conclave, and as I recall the Panzer Cardinal was fairly conservative as Pope.

    American bishops have been consistently awful on immigration as well. We need to conclude a concordat with the Vatican strictly prohibiting papist interference in our political affairs.

    If the so-called bishop of Rome refuses, we should threaten to expropriate without compensation papist assets and to back schismatic church factions such as a "Church of Saint Patrick" for Irish-Americans.

    That said this isn't just an issue with the romish papists. The leadership of America's major protestant denominations have all been captured by SJWs, which the members are beginning to rebel against. The head of the once reactionary Southern Baptist Convention is for instance a total globalist faggot.

    It's generally effective to tell professing Christians who express leftist sentiments that they worship globalism/liberalism, and thus Satan, rather than Jesus Christ.
    , @AP

    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe’s problems are just dreaming imo
     
    Says someone who has no children and states he probably never will (sorry, I think you aren't a bad guy, but this is IMO a valid criticism). People like you are the problem, not traditional Catholics.

    1. A re-Christianized Europe would have a positive population growth, rendering a potential influx of non-Christians less troublesome and less of an existential threat. Moreover, better population growth = more young people. More young people = more push-back against migrant crimes, because youth are inherently more hot-headed. So minorities would not only be outnumbered, but would be better behaved. And if there wasn't room for them because the native population was stable or growing, they probably wouldn't come in the first place. Prior to the 20th century nobody would have cared about possible migration - on the contrary, the European Christians were expanding and colonizing other places. Christian Spain of the 16th-17th centuries is probably the only nation to ever completely de-Islamify a place. It Europeanized large parts of the globe, wiping out temples devoted to human sacrifice to demons and building baroque cathedrals out of the ruins. I don't think those Christian Spaniards were whining about migration or transformation - they were the ones transforming others. It is precisely the abandonment of Christianity and a Christian lifestyle that led Europe to its current position.

    2. All post-Christian attempts have ended in failure. Mid 20th century nationalism was just mass slaughter of Europeans. Communism was just mass slaughter, plus ugliness, plus collapse in fertility. Secular hedonistic humanism, the dominant one currently, is ugliness, plus fertility collapse, plus self-hatred. No mass slaughter, at least. You think some other experiment will turn out better? Christianity is proven to have worked in the past and still works where it is applied.

    Why do you blame the Church if your people have collectively chosen to abandon its principles and therefore to die out? The Church wanted your embrace, you have deliberately rejected it and chosen some form of self-worship instead, which as we see leads to death either slowly or quickly. The Church is universal, it will move on with those parts of humanity who have not chosen self-extinction. And leave you secularists, Right or Left, in the dust.
  325. @German_reader

    I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.
     
    Its German members certainly would be, the Catholic church has been one of the main supporters of Merkel's open borders policy (which is good business for them, the social organizations of the churches like Caritas are profiting massively from the "refugee" influx), in fact it seems to be not enough for them.
    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe's problems are just dreaming imo.

    Traditionalist Christians generally argue that the major denominations have been captured by SJWs and are better described as “Churchianity”.

    You can read about this perspective from Dalrock and Vox Day.

    Italians are dominant in the conclave, and as I recall the Panzer Cardinal was fairly conservative as Pope.

    American bishops have been consistently awful on immigration as well. We need to conclude a concordat with the Vatican strictly prohibiting papist interference in our political affairs.

    If the so-called bishop of Rome refuses, we should threaten to expropriate without compensation papist assets and to back schismatic church factions such as a “Church of Saint Patrick” for Irish-Americans.

    That said this isn’t just an issue with the romish papists. The leadership of America’s major protestant denominations have all been captured by SJWs, which the members are beginning to rebel against. The head of the once reactionary Southern Baptist Convention is for instance a total globalist faggot.

    It’s generally effective to tell professing Christians who express leftist sentiments that they worship globalism/liberalism, and thus Satan, rather than Jesus Christ.

    • Replies: @Anon
    German bishops are probably the worst in the world; they're even much worse than ours in the US.

    American bishops have been consistently awful on immigration as well. We need to conclude a concordat with the Vatican strictly prohibiting papist interference in our political affairs.
     
    With American bishops it's at least rational (they want more congregants). Everyone knows this and nobody pays any attention. Also, the crazy generation is starting to die off.
    , @German_reader

    and as I recall the Panzer Cardinal was fairly conservative as Pope
     
    At least Benedict kept his mouth mostly shut about immigration issues (or I just didn't notice it) and was mildly critical of Islam. But Catholic conservatism or traditionalism is mostly idiotic imo, I don't care about their stupid issues about liturgy or about their obsessions with homos and other sex stuff. On the issues that really matter, like stopping African mass immigration to Europe, they'll eventually cuck anyway.
    In the US there's real separation of church and state at least, even if the churches are still very involved in the "refugee" business. In Germany they're really privileged to an absurd degree...not only is the state collecting church tax from their members for them (something which doesn't exist like that in any other country as far as I know), they also get hundreds of millions (no joke, it really is that much, about 500 million Euros just in 2015) of taxpayers' money as compensation for the secularisation of church property in 1803. Obviously I would be in favour of taking all those privileges away from them, one should help the church and its prelates in attaining the ideal of apostolic poverty.
  326. Anon[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    Traditionalist Christians generally argue that the major denominations have been captured by SJWs and are better described as "Churchianity".

    You can read about this perspective from Dalrock and Vox Day.

    Italians are dominant in the conclave, and as I recall the Panzer Cardinal was fairly conservative as Pope.

    American bishops have been consistently awful on immigration as well. We need to conclude a concordat with the Vatican strictly prohibiting papist interference in our political affairs.

    If the so-called bishop of Rome refuses, we should threaten to expropriate without compensation papist assets and to back schismatic church factions such as a "Church of Saint Patrick" for Irish-Americans.

    That said this isn't just an issue with the romish papists. The leadership of America's major protestant denominations have all been captured by SJWs, which the members are beginning to rebel against. The head of the once reactionary Southern Baptist Convention is for instance a total globalist faggot.

    It's generally effective to tell professing Christians who express leftist sentiments that they worship globalism/liberalism, and thus Satan, rather than Jesus Christ.

    German bishops are probably the worst in the world; they’re even much worse than ours in the US.

    American bishops have been consistently awful on immigration as well. We need to conclude a concordat with the Vatican strictly prohibiting papist interference in our political affairs.

    With American bishops it’s at least rational (they want more congregants). Everyone knows this and nobody pays any attention. Also, the crazy generation is starting to die off.

  327. @Thorfinnsson
    Traditionalist Christians generally argue that the major denominations have been captured by SJWs and are better described as "Churchianity".

    You can read about this perspective from Dalrock and Vox Day.

    Italians are dominant in the conclave, and as I recall the Panzer Cardinal was fairly conservative as Pope.

    American bishops have been consistently awful on immigration as well. We need to conclude a concordat with the Vatican strictly prohibiting papist interference in our political affairs.

    If the so-called bishop of Rome refuses, we should threaten to expropriate without compensation papist assets and to back schismatic church factions such as a "Church of Saint Patrick" for Irish-Americans.

    That said this isn't just an issue with the romish papists. The leadership of America's major protestant denominations have all been captured by SJWs, which the members are beginning to rebel against. The head of the once reactionary Southern Baptist Convention is for instance a total globalist faggot.

    It's generally effective to tell professing Christians who express leftist sentiments that they worship globalism/liberalism, and thus Satan, rather than Jesus Christ.

    and as I recall the Panzer Cardinal was fairly conservative as Pope

    At least Benedict kept his mouth mostly shut about immigration issues (or I just didn’t notice it) and was mildly critical of Islam. But Catholic conservatism or traditionalism is mostly idiotic imo, I don’t care about their stupid issues about liturgy or about their obsessions with homos and other sex stuff. On the issues that really matter, like stopping African mass immigration to Europe, they’ll eventually cuck anyway.
    In the US there’s real separation of church and state at least, even if the churches are still very involved in the “refugee” business. In Germany they’re really privileged to an absurd degree…not only is the state collecting church tax from their members for them (something which doesn’t exist like that in any other country as far as I know), they also get hundreds of millions (no joke, it really is that much, about 500 million Euros just in 2015) of taxpayers’ money as compensation for the secularisation of church property in 1803. Obviously I would be in favour of taking all those privileges away from them, one should help the church and its prelates in attaining the ideal of apostolic poverty.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    You should care about homos and sex stuff.

    Homo-sexuals are disgusting degenerates who spread disease (GRIDS rate exceeds 10% among sodomites) and prey on boys. They also define themselves by their sexual identity rather than a proper identity and thus nearly always side with The Enemy.

    The sexual revolution has been a disaster which destroyed the family and collapsed birth rates, and now the rate of venereal disease infection is skyrocketing. There is also a new breed of antibiotic resistant strains of bacterial VDs.

    The idea that we can ignore sex matters to gain cooperation on other issues is largely a fantasy. People committed to evil are rarely evil in just one area. Evildoers hate themselves and want to destroy everyone and everything around them.

    Given the uselessness (actually outright harmfulness) the church in Germany certainly it no longer makes sense to transfer taxpayer money to them, but I don't see anything wrong with compensation for the assets that were expropriated from them as a matter of principle.

    It's worth noting there are a few useful romish papist factions like Opus Dei and the Society of Saint Pius XII. In a America judges with a romish papist background tend to be fairly reliable conservatives as well. Pat Buchanan is a romish papist and has been very harsh on Bergoglio.
    , @DFH

    I don’t care about their stupid issues about liturgy or about their obsessions with homos and other sex stuff
     
    Nothing wrong with not wanting little children to be given hormones so they can be prey for homos.

    they also get hundreds of millions (no joke, it really is that much, about 500 million Euros just in 2015) of taxpayers’ money as compensation for the secularisation of church property in 1803
     
    That would be cool if the Church wasn't so pozzed. The Queen should compensate the Church for the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
    , @Mitleser

    not only is the state collecting church tax from their members for them (something which doesn’t exist like that in any other country as far as I know)
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_tax
  328. @Greasy William
    Things are looking really grim for Yemen. Any readers/posters here who like Yemenites would be advised to enjoy their remaining time with them, because the Anglo-Zionist steamroller is probably going to vaporize them within the next few months. Let's hear it for Saudi Arabia! Nice work, boys!

    On on related note, is Iran seeking to set the record in failed military interventions? Can't they like at least win just one to make things more interesting?

    This is what is called an exchange of hats. Yemen has never been a land where it is unified under some kind of central authority. Mostly, some team captures a few major cities and ports (the choke points in the Red Sea out to the Indian Ocean) and the rest of the country says; “yeah, ok, whatever dude” as long as they are left mostly alone.

    If the port is kept open to allow humanitarian aid (this is my major concern and I keep up with Muslim humanitarian orgs about this situation since I try to send money there), then who controls the port cities is not of huge significance – at least to the local population. It obviously means a lot to oil companies and international shipping through those routes.

    Yemen produces only two things historically for export: 1) really high quality coffee beans (https://www.portofmokha.com/) and 2) religion (mostly of the traditional Sufi variety – pound for pound they are probably most responsible for spreading Islam around the world). There is likely no reason why Saudi will interfere with either of those.

    Prediction: the Houthis will retreat from the coastal and major cities into interior of Yemen where the Saudi coalition will leave them alone – seeing how they have been this difficult to handle even though only one side has complete air superiority and modern tanks.

    Peace.

  329. @German_reader

    and as I recall the Panzer Cardinal was fairly conservative as Pope
     
    At least Benedict kept his mouth mostly shut about immigration issues (or I just didn't notice it) and was mildly critical of Islam. But Catholic conservatism or traditionalism is mostly idiotic imo, I don't care about their stupid issues about liturgy or about their obsessions with homos and other sex stuff. On the issues that really matter, like stopping African mass immigration to Europe, they'll eventually cuck anyway.
    In the US there's real separation of church and state at least, even if the churches are still very involved in the "refugee" business. In Germany they're really privileged to an absurd degree...not only is the state collecting church tax from their members for them (something which doesn't exist like that in any other country as far as I know), they also get hundreds of millions (no joke, it really is that much, about 500 million Euros just in 2015) of taxpayers' money as compensation for the secularisation of church property in 1803. Obviously I would be in favour of taking all those privileges away from them, one should help the church and its prelates in attaining the ideal of apostolic poverty.

    You should care about homos and sex stuff.

    Homo-sexuals are disgusting degenerates who spread disease (GRIDS rate exceeds 10% among sodomites) and prey on boys. They also define themselves by their sexual identity rather than a proper identity and thus nearly always side with The Enemy.

    The sexual revolution has been a disaster which destroyed the family and collapsed birth rates, and now the rate of venereal disease infection is skyrocketing. There is also a new breed of antibiotic resistant strains of bacterial VDs.

    The idea that we can ignore sex matters to gain cooperation on other issues is largely a fantasy. People committed to evil are rarely evil in just one area. Evildoers hate themselves and want to destroy everyone and everything around them.

    Given the uselessness (actually outright harmfulness) the church in Germany certainly it no longer makes sense to transfer taxpayer money to them, but I don’t see anything wrong with compensation for the assets that were expropriated from them as a matter of principle.

    It’s worth noting there are a few useful romish papist factions like Opus Dei and the Society of Saint Pius XII. In a America judges with a romish papist background tend to be fairly reliable conservatives as well. Pat Buchanan is a romish papist and has been very harsh on Bergoglio.

    • Agree: Greasy William
    • Replies: @for-the-record
    The sexual revolution has been a disaster

    So can we safely assume that, consistent with your views, you are an exemplar of chastity?
  330. @German_reader

    and as I recall the Panzer Cardinal was fairly conservative as Pope
     
    At least Benedict kept his mouth mostly shut about immigration issues (or I just didn't notice it) and was mildly critical of Islam. But Catholic conservatism or traditionalism is mostly idiotic imo, I don't care about their stupid issues about liturgy or about their obsessions with homos and other sex stuff. On the issues that really matter, like stopping African mass immigration to Europe, they'll eventually cuck anyway.
    In the US there's real separation of church and state at least, even if the churches are still very involved in the "refugee" business. In Germany they're really privileged to an absurd degree...not only is the state collecting church tax from their members for them (something which doesn't exist like that in any other country as far as I know), they also get hundreds of millions (no joke, it really is that much, about 500 million Euros just in 2015) of taxpayers' money as compensation for the secularisation of church property in 1803. Obviously I would be in favour of taking all those privileges away from them, one should help the church and its prelates in attaining the ideal of apostolic poverty.

    I don’t care about their stupid issues about liturgy or about their obsessions with homos and other sex stuff

    Nothing wrong with not wanting little children to be given hormones so they can be prey for homos.

    they also get hundreds of millions (no joke, it really is that much, about 500 million Euros just in 2015) of taxpayers’ money as compensation for the secularisation of church property in 1803

    That would be cool if the Church wasn’t so pozzed. The Queen should compensate the Church for the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

    • Replies: @Guillaume Tell

    That would be cool if the Church wasn’t so pozzed. The Queen should compensate the Church for the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
     
    Agreed.

    According to E. M. Jones, and he is arguing this case very well in “the Jewish Revolutionary Spirit”,this proceeds of this grand-scale loot provided the real original capital at the root of the England’s economic take-off (and earlier industrial revolution that on the Continent where such massive looting of the monastics did not occur until much later).

  331. @German_reader

    and as I recall the Panzer Cardinal was fairly conservative as Pope
     
    At least Benedict kept his mouth mostly shut about immigration issues (or I just didn't notice it) and was mildly critical of Islam. But Catholic conservatism or traditionalism is mostly idiotic imo, I don't care about their stupid issues about liturgy or about their obsessions with homos and other sex stuff. On the issues that really matter, like stopping African mass immigration to Europe, they'll eventually cuck anyway.
    In the US there's real separation of church and state at least, even if the churches are still very involved in the "refugee" business. In Germany they're really privileged to an absurd degree...not only is the state collecting church tax from their members for them (something which doesn't exist like that in any other country as far as I know), they also get hundreds of millions (no joke, it really is that much, about 500 million Euros just in 2015) of taxpayers' money as compensation for the secularisation of church property in 1803. Obviously I would be in favour of taking all those privileges away from them, one should help the church and its prelates in attaining the ideal of apostolic poverty.

    not only is the state collecting church tax from their members for them (something which doesn’t exist like that in any other country as far as I know)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_tax

  332. AP says:
    @German_reader

    I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.
     
    Its German members certainly would be, the Catholic church has been one of the main supporters of Merkel's open borders policy (which is good business for them, the social organizations of the churches like Caritas are profiting massively from the "refugee" influx), in fact it seems to be not enough for them.
    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe's problems are just dreaming imo.

    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe’s problems are just dreaming imo

    Says someone who has no children and states he probably never will (sorry, I think you aren’t a bad guy, but this is IMO a valid criticism). People like you are the problem, not traditional Catholics.

    1. A re-Christianized Europe would have a positive population growth, rendering a potential influx of non-Christians less troublesome and less of an existential threat. Moreover, better population growth = more young people. More young people = more push-back against migrant crimes, because youth are inherently more hot-headed. So minorities would not only be outnumbered, but would be better behaved. And if there wasn’t room for them because the native population was stable or growing, they probably wouldn’t come in the first place. Prior to the 20th century nobody would have cared about possible migration – on the contrary, the European Christians were expanding and colonizing other places. Christian Spain of the 16th-17th centuries is probably the only nation to ever completely de-Islamify a place. It Europeanized large parts of the globe, wiping out temples devoted to human sacrifice to demons and building baroque cathedrals out of the ruins. I don’t think those Christian Spaniards were whining about migration or transformation – they were the ones transforming others. It is precisely the abandonment of Christianity and a Christian lifestyle that led Europe to its current position.

    2. All post-Christian attempts have ended in failure. Mid 20th century nationalism was just mass slaughter of Europeans. Communism was just mass slaughter, plus ugliness, plus collapse in fertility. Secular hedonistic humanism, the dominant one currently, is ugliness, plus fertility collapse, plus self-hatred. No mass slaughter, at least. You think some other experiment will turn out better? Christianity is proven to have worked in the past and still works where it is applied.

    Why do you blame the Church if your people have collectively chosen to abandon its principles and therefore to die out? The Church wanted your embrace, you have deliberately rejected it and chosen some form of self-worship instead, which as we see leads to death either slowly or quickly. The Church is universal, it will move on with those parts of humanity who have not chosen self-extinction. And leave you secularists, Right or Left, in the dust.

    • Replies: @Anon

    And leave you secularists, Right or Left, in the dust.
     
    I don't know about that, Christ was pretty categorical about the "narrow gate", and "shall he find, think you, faith on earth?"
    , @Daniel Chieh
    FWIW, I think that German_Reader has agreed that there is a crisis of belief but that doesn't mean that he(or anyone) can simply just pick up a form of pre-modern thinking and accept it given the secular rationality of general thinking.

    Its a fair point, though with modern liberalism being as popular as a "religion" as it is, I suppose that it shows that indoctrination and propaganda do work. I don't see him agreeing with that either way though.
    , @Talha

    Why do you blame the Church if your people have collectively chosen to abandon its principles and therefore to die out?
     
    "How many were the gardens and the watersprings that they left behind, and fields of grain, and noble dwellings, and wealth (and conveniences of life), wherein they had taken such delight? Even so (it was), and We made it an inheritance for other folk; And the heaven and the earth wept not for them, nor were they allowed respite." (44:25-29)

    It is rather an interesting phenomenon to observe from a semi-outsider's perspective. I have no idea what the future holds within my lifetime, but there seems to be a massive setup in the works.

    My teenage son and I were driving back from taraweeh prayers a couple of weeks ago, well past midnight - we were both pretty exhausted from the daily Ramdan routine - and he said to me; you know, we seem to be the only ones that take religion seriously and devote a lot of time to worship.

    So I asked him whether it was a good or bad thing in his eyes and he said it was a good thing and that he didn't see any of his non-Muslim friends taking their religion seriously at all - actually three of them challenged themselves to try to fast along with the group of Muslims.

    The reason I bring this up is because, this is a script that is found (at least in the Qur'an) and to a degree in the Bible as well. God blesses a people more and more - and the more He does, the further they turn their backs on Him; generally being ungrateful and claiming all of their blessings to be a result of their own deeds and attributes. You know, kind of like this:
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/strength/#comment-2380634

    And this pattern continues until they have come to a point where they are a clear evidence against themselves. At this point He yanks the leash back that He has allowed to be slackened - very hard. The same story occurs again and again, just with different players and details - but the same results; people are replaced by others.

    In fact, we were given due notice too - that we don't get a free pass:
    " O you who believe, whoever of you should revert from his faith – Allah will bring forth [in place of them] a people He will love and who will love Him..." (5:54)

    If this narrative is all hogwash, well and good - no problems. If it's true - time seems to be running out. Maybe Orthodox Christianity will finally make major inroads into the West.

    Either way, it's quite interesting to observe...and learn from.

    Peace.

    , @German_reader

    Why do you blame the Church
     
    Because the church is actively promoting the destruction of my nation. Not merely not caring about it (which could be justified as not caring about transient, earthly matters), but actively doing everything in its power to push for policies whose end result will be the destruction of Germany and any other European nation unfortunate enough to follow the "recommendations" of those demented prelates.

    on the contrary, the European Christians were expanding and colonizing other places. Christian Spain of the 16th-17th centuries
     
    Your enthusiasm for Spanish imperialism reminds me a lot of Muslims, and not in a positive way.

    The Church is universal, it will move on with those parts of humanity who have not chosen self-extinction
     
    Good luck with your Nigerians and Congolese then, I'm sure they'll bring Catholic civilization to unprecedented heights.
    , @iffen
    The Church is universal, it will move on … And leave you secularists, Right or Left, in the dust.

    Don't let the door hit you in the ...
  333. @German_reader

    Nice work, boys!
     
    If there's indeed mass death in Yemen, this will come to haunt the Western powers involved and eventually be seen as a horrible mistake, as something to feel guilty about (and it will of course be used as an argument for mass immigration - "We helped destroy their country, we must take them in"); pretty appalling imo that French special forces are supposedly directly aiding the Gulf Arabs in their assault on Hodeidah.
    It's dubious enough to kill foreigners in far away places for one's own interests...but for the benefit of that awful Saudi scum? Just stupid.

    Well Europe is already taking in everybody regardless and the US is on the brink with the border crisis. Really everybody in the world right now should be focused first and foremost on the US border because of how big this has the potential to be.

    agree that the Saudis are scum though.

  334. @Thorfinnsson
    Who installed this globohomo faggot anti-pope? I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.

    We know that the CIA helped install Carol Wotilja, so why not Soros for the installation of Bergoglio?

    I suppose I should be grateful for anything that discredits romish papism however.

    his wife is the main reason (not French, but has a typical aristocratic obsession with the “South of France”), but he is a gourmand and oenophile which helps. Additionally he’s an Anglophobe which no doubt aids in bonding with the French.

    Very certainly. He will get a lot of mileage over there for that reason alone.

    So if I understand well (sorry I’m new here), your dad moved the family from Sweden to the USA about 30 years ago, but then moved himself to France and left behind a now uprooted Swedish-American son? I don’t mean to sound harsh on your dad, but if it’s that, well then it’s not cool in my book.

    Who installed this globohomo faggot anti-pope? I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.

    Homosexualism has arguably taken the upper hand at the highest levels of the Latin Church. The SSPX types (for whom I have a lot of respect although I thunk their position is inconsistent for reasons that we may discuss in the future here) put all the blame on the Vatican II general council of 1962-1965 (iirc). They certainly have a point in that those things have started to manifest themselves massively after said council and the ensuing chaos and collapse of clerical as well as lay discipline that followed. But I believe that the causes are deeper and can be found in the very beginning of the East/West schism.

    By the way Protestantism (which like Athena from her father’s leg, sprung forth all endowed and equipped from
    Catholicism) exhibits the same maladies as the Latin Church — just worse.

    We know that the CIA helped install Carol Wotilja,

    Interesting. If you have some references I’ll be happy to read these.

    I suppose I should be grateful for anything that discredits romish papism however.

    May I ask if you’re a Christian of a particular “denomination”, and if so, which one? In the interest of full disclosure, I was baptized and raised Catholic (ie Latin Church) but became an Orthodox Christian as an adult.

    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    40 years ago (initially to Canada), but yes.

    I'm an adult and can plant my own roots. He is now an old man and while in good health choosing to work less.

    But yes, my own background is one reason I'm so firmly against immigration. My German cousins (my aunt married a German) feel similarly, and in their case their German identity is a lot weaker than my American identity as their aunt failed to properly Germanize (speaks German with a Swedish accent, whereas my father's English is flawless).

    I'm a Lutheran but to me it's simply an ethnic marker. I never go to church other than weddings and funerals. I bash Catholics because that's just what American Protestants do.

    Older American Protestants refer to romish papists as "mackerel snappers" because of the previous interdiction against eating fish on Fridays. This is also the reason the McDonald's Filet o' Fish was invented.

    I've heard whispers of a pink mafia at the conclave for a long time.

    The Protestant churches are nearly all in a very bad state. The mainline denominations embraced leftism in the mid-20th century (partly because of Rockefeller money which controlled the World Council of Churches), and the Evangelicals are doing so now other than on the matter of abortion and homo-sexualism. It has become a status symbol among Evangelicals to adopt blacks, which is disgraceful.

    The denominations which resist the poz tend to be full of double digit IQ dullards unforutantely. The Missour Synod Lutherans are one such example. They still faithfully follow Luther's catechism and the Book of Concord.

    There's also the Pentecostals who are so dumb they practice snake handling. Sarah Palin is a Pentecostal. They might be bad on immigration however owing to surging Pentecostalism south of the Rio Grande. Pentecostals in Brazil might hand the country over to Jair Bolsonaro, the Brazilian Trump.

  335. @AP

    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe’s problems are just dreaming imo
     
    Says someone who has no children and states he probably never will (sorry, I think you aren't a bad guy, but this is IMO a valid criticism). People like you are the problem, not traditional Catholics.

    1. A re-Christianized Europe would have a positive population growth, rendering a potential influx of non-Christians less troublesome and less of an existential threat. Moreover, better population growth = more young people. More young people = more push-back against migrant crimes, because youth are inherently more hot-headed. So minorities would not only be outnumbered, but would be better behaved. And if there wasn't room for them because the native population was stable or growing, they probably wouldn't come in the first place. Prior to the 20th century nobody would have cared about possible migration - on the contrary, the European Christians were expanding and colonizing other places. Christian Spain of the 16th-17th centuries is probably the only nation to ever completely de-Islamify a place. It Europeanized large parts of the globe, wiping out temples devoted to human sacrifice to demons and building baroque cathedrals out of the ruins. I don't think those Christian Spaniards were whining about migration or transformation - they were the ones transforming others. It is precisely the abandonment of Christianity and a Christian lifestyle that led Europe to its current position.

    2. All post-Christian attempts have ended in failure. Mid 20th century nationalism was just mass slaughter of Europeans. Communism was just mass slaughter, plus ugliness, plus collapse in fertility. Secular hedonistic humanism, the dominant one currently, is ugliness, plus fertility collapse, plus self-hatred. No mass slaughter, at least. You think some other experiment will turn out better? Christianity is proven to have worked in the past and still works where it is applied.

    Why do you blame the Church if your people have collectively chosen to abandon its principles and therefore to die out? The Church wanted your embrace, you have deliberately rejected it and chosen some form of self-worship instead, which as we see leads to death either slowly or quickly. The Church is universal, it will move on with those parts of humanity who have not chosen self-extinction. And leave you secularists, Right or Left, in the dust.

    And leave you secularists, Right or Left, in the dust.

    I don’t know about that, Christ was pretty categorical about the “narrow gate”, and “shall he find, think you, faith on earth?”

  336. @DFH

    I don’t care about their stupid issues about liturgy or about their obsessions with homos and other sex stuff
     
    Nothing wrong with not wanting little children to be given hormones so they can be prey for homos.

    they also get hundreds of millions (no joke, it really is that much, about 500 million Euros just in 2015) of taxpayers’ money as compensation for the secularisation of church property in 1803
     
    That would be cool if the Church wasn't so pozzed. The Queen should compensate the Church for the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

    That would be cool if the Church wasn’t so pozzed. The Queen should compensate the Church for the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

    Agreed.

    According to E. M. Jones, and he is arguing this case very well in “the Jewish Revolutionary Spirit”,this proceeds of this grand-scale loot provided the real original capital at the root of the England’s economic take-off (and earlier industrial revolution that on the Continent where such massive looting of the monastics did not occur until much later).

    • Replies: @DFH

    According to E. M. Jones, and he is arguing this case very well in “the Jewish Revolutionary Spirit”,this proceeds of this grand-scale loot provided the real original capital at the root of the England’s economic take-off (and earlier industrial revolution that on the Continent where such massive looting of the monastics did not occur until much later).
     
    Unfortunately this is simply incorrect, like most of what EMJ says about Protestants/England.
    Firstly, the Reformation under Henry VIII had nothing to do with the Jewish (or any other) Revolutionary Spirit; Henry VIII was a very conservative man on every issue but the relationship between church and state and burnt Anabaptists. It's quite possible that the split with Rome would have occurred even without the Reformation.

    Secondly, the Dissolution of the Monasteries didn't provide the capital for the Industrial Revolution. I don't even know why anyone would think this. The Crown raised £150,000, which was in the grand scheme of things fairly trivial and eaten up in a couple of campaigns. The capital for the Industrial Revolution came from international trade, which didn't really get going until at least a century later, and doesn't have any obvious connection to the Dissolution. Something similar happened in Scandinavia, without the Industrial Revolution happening there (in fact the second country to industrialise was very Catholic Belgium).
  337. @AP

    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe’s problems are just dreaming imo
     
    Says someone who has no children and states he probably never will (sorry, I think you aren't a bad guy, but this is IMO a valid criticism). People like you are the problem, not traditional Catholics.

    1. A re-Christianized Europe would have a positive population growth, rendering a potential influx of non-Christians less troublesome and less of an existential threat. Moreover, better population growth = more young people. More young people = more push-back against migrant crimes, because youth are inherently more hot-headed. So minorities would not only be outnumbered, but would be better behaved. And if there wasn't room for them because the native population was stable or growing, they probably wouldn't come in the first place. Prior to the 20th century nobody would have cared about possible migration - on the contrary, the European Christians were expanding and colonizing other places. Christian Spain of the 16th-17th centuries is probably the only nation to ever completely de-Islamify a place. It Europeanized large parts of the globe, wiping out temples devoted to human sacrifice to demons and building baroque cathedrals out of the ruins. I don't think those Christian Spaniards were whining about migration or transformation - they were the ones transforming others. It is precisely the abandonment of Christianity and a Christian lifestyle that led Europe to its current position.

    2. All post-Christian attempts have ended in failure. Mid 20th century nationalism was just mass slaughter of Europeans. Communism was just mass slaughter, plus ugliness, plus collapse in fertility. Secular hedonistic humanism, the dominant one currently, is ugliness, plus fertility collapse, plus self-hatred. No mass slaughter, at least. You think some other experiment will turn out better? Christianity is proven to have worked in the past and still works where it is applied.

    Why do you blame the Church if your people have collectively chosen to abandon its principles and therefore to die out? The Church wanted your embrace, you have deliberately rejected it and chosen some form of self-worship instead, which as we see leads to death either slowly or quickly. The Church is universal, it will move on with those parts of humanity who have not chosen self-extinction. And leave you secularists, Right or Left, in the dust.

    FWIW, I think that German_Reader has agreed that there is a crisis of belief but that doesn’t mean that he(or anyone) can simply just pick up a form of pre-modern thinking and accept it given the secular rationality of general thinking.

    Its a fair point, though with modern liberalism being as popular as a “religion” as it is, I suppose that it shows that indoctrination and propaganda do work. I don’t see him agreeing with that either way though.

  338. @Dmitry
    I think Musk and Trump are sometimes quite positive figures in ways, though.

    It shows how people with narcissistic personality disorder can sometimes succeed where people with normal psychology are failing, and that it is not always justifiable to use the word "disorder". (But these people from a distance - it is not pleasant if those personalities are your boss at work).

    It shows how people with narcissistic personality disorder can sometimes succeed where people with normal psychology are failing,

    Is it just me, but isn’t Trump quite self-deprecating and not the narcissist he’s claimed to be?
    He send’s up jokes about his hair ( as in he knows how ridiculous it ), loves criticism because he is practical enought to know all of it is good PR for his business or his Presidency

    and for a guy he pretends to be your average dumb,boorish, typical, “Go America” American idiot……….there must be something in the fact that two of his wives are Slavic.

    • Agree: Dmitry
    • Replies: @Dmitry

    and for a guy he pretends to be your average dumb,boorish, typical, “Go America” American idiot……….there must be something in the fact that two of his wives are Slavic.

     

    It is true, he is anti-racist and obviously the opposite of a stereotype of an American redneck. (Equally, everything in his personal life seems very narcissistic.)

    I think I know a lot about Trump and American politics (I was following addictively the election).

    Trump might even be too far-liberal (if he was writing on here, he write more liberal ideas than all of us).

    E.g. His old girlfriends, not only Slavic, but also even a (half) black woman - who was supporting him.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rXDcXZbo2c

  339. @Anon 2
    Interestingly, Poland (98% Slavic)'s life expectancy in 2017 was 77.5 years,
    and is continuing to increase. This shows that there is nothing inherently low about
    the Slavs' life expectancy. Poland is expected to exceed the American life expectancy
    soon. The latter has, of course, dropped recently - something that typically only
    happens in times of war, famine, pestilence, and economic depression (opioid-related
    deaths probably contributed)

    Interestingly, Poland (98% Slavic)’s life expectancy in 2017 was 77.5 years,

    Poland exports millions of people and criminals, for a supposedly “Catholic” country it has very small size families …and nice environment that is is….is was near American levels of life expectancy for nearly decades after 1945.
    The main difference is this aspect between Poland and say Belarus, is that a higher % of men in Belarus are employed in heavy industry jobs in comparison to Poland, this makes most of the difference because the female levels of life expectancy are roughly the same

    Moscow ,Kazan and Saint Petersburg have considerably higher life expectancies than Poland’s average. It is a miracle that Russia’s is where it is considering the issues of extreme cold, daylight in places in ethnic issues…..it is though a joke that it has an even higher average than Ukraine, and this has transpired after the Euromaidan freakshow

  340. @AP

    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe’s problems are just dreaming imo
     
    Says someone who has no children and states he probably never will (sorry, I think you aren't a bad guy, but this is IMO a valid criticism). People like you are the problem, not traditional Catholics.

    1. A re-Christianized Europe would have a positive population growth, rendering a potential influx of non-Christians less troublesome and less of an existential threat. Moreover, better population growth = more young people. More young people = more push-back against migrant crimes, because youth are inherently more hot-headed. So minorities would not only be outnumbered, but would be better behaved. And if there wasn't room for them because the native population was stable or growing, they probably wouldn't come in the first place. Prior to the 20th century nobody would have cared about possible migration - on the contrary, the European Christians were expanding and colonizing other places. Christian Spain of the 16th-17th centuries is probably the only nation to ever completely de-Islamify a place. It Europeanized large parts of the globe, wiping out temples devoted to human sacrifice to demons and building baroque cathedrals out of the ruins. I don't think those Christian Spaniards were whining about migration or transformation - they were the ones transforming others. It is precisely the abandonment of Christianity and a Christian lifestyle that led Europe to its current position.

    2. All post-Christian attempts have ended in failure. Mid 20th century nationalism was just mass slaughter of Europeans. Communism was just mass slaughter, plus ugliness, plus collapse in fertility. Secular hedonistic humanism, the dominant one currently, is ugliness, plus fertility collapse, plus self-hatred. No mass slaughter, at least. You think some other experiment will turn out better? Christianity is proven to have worked in the past and still works where it is applied.

    Why do you blame the Church if your people have collectively chosen to abandon its principles and therefore to die out? The Church wanted your embrace, you have deliberately rejected it and chosen some form of self-worship instead, which as we see leads to death either slowly or quickly. The Church is universal, it will move on with those parts of humanity who have not chosen self-extinction. And leave you secularists, Right or Left, in the dust.

    Why do you blame the Church if your people have collectively chosen to abandon its principles and therefore to die out?

    “How many were the gardens and the watersprings that they left behind, and fields of grain, and noble dwellings, and wealth (and conveniences of life), wherein they had taken such delight? Even so (it was), and We made it an inheritance for other folk; And the heaven and the earth wept not for them, nor were they allowed respite.” (44:25-29)

    It is rather an interesting phenomenon to observe from a semi-outsider’s perspective. I have no idea what the future holds within my lifetime, but there seems to be a massive setup in the works.

    My teenage son and I were driving back from taraweeh prayers a couple of weeks ago, well past midnight – we were both pretty exhausted from the daily Ramdan routine – and he said to me; you know, we seem to be the only ones that take religion seriously and devote a lot of time to worship.

    So I asked him whether it was a good or bad thing in his eyes and he said it was a good thing and that he didn’t see any of his non-Muslim friends taking their religion seriously at all – actually three of them challenged themselves to try to fast along with the group of Muslims.

    The reason I bring this up is because, this is a script that is found (at least in the Qur’an) and to a degree in the Bible as well. God blesses a people more and more – and the more He does, the further they turn their backs on Him; generally being ungrateful and claiming all of their blessings to be a result of their own deeds and attributes. You know, kind of like this:
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/strength/#comment-2380634

    And this pattern continues until they have come to a point where they are a clear evidence against themselves. At this point He yanks the leash back that He has allowed to be slackened – very hard. The same story occurs again and again, just with different players and details – but the same results; people are replaced by others.

    In fact, we were given due notice too – that we don’t get a free pass:
    ” O you who believe, whoever of you should revert from his faith – Allah will bring forth [in place of them] a people He will love and who will love Him…” (5:54)

    If this narrative is all hogwash, well and good – no problems. If it’s true – time seems to be running out. Maybe Orthodox Christianity will finally make major inroads into the West.

    Either way, it’s quite interesting to observe…and learn from.

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    So I asked him whether it was a good or bad thing in his eyes and he said it was a good thing and that he didn’t see any of his non-Muslim friends taking their religion seriously at all
     
    Such enthusiasm for the Cult of the Machine God could be much more positive than the Cult of the Demented Virgin Seekers.
  341. @AP

    Right-wingers who think some form of Christian-based national conservatism is the answer to Europe’s problems are just dreaming imo
     
    Says someone who has no children and states he probably never will (sorry, I think you aren't a bad guy, but this is IMO a valid criticism). People like you are the problem, not traditional Catholics.

    1. A re-Christianized Europe would have a positive population growth, rendering a potential influx of non-Christians less troublesome and less of an existential threat. Moreover, better population growth = more young people. More young people = more push-back against migrant crimes, because youth are inherently more hot-headed. So minorities would not only be outnumbered, but would be better behaved. And if there wasn't room for them because the native population was stable or growing, they probably wouldn't come in the first place. Prior to the 20th century nobody would have cared about possible migration - on the contrary, the European Christians were expanding and colonizing other places. Christian Spain of the 16th-17th centuries is probably the only nation to ever completely de-Islamify a place. It Europeanized large parts of the globe, wiping out temples devoted to human sacrifice to demons and building baroque cathedrals out of the ruins. I don't think those Christian Spaniards were whining about migration or transformation - they were the ones transforming others. It is precisely the abandonment of Christianity and a Christian lifestyle that led Europe to its current position.

    2. All post-Christian attempts have ended in failure. Mid 20th century nationalism was just mass slaughter of Europeans. Communism was just mass slaughter, plus ugliness, plus collapse in fertility. Secular hedonistic humanism, the dominant one currently, is ugliness, plus fertility collapse, plus self-hatred. No mass slaughter, at least. You think some other experiment will turn out better? Christianity is proven to have worked in the past and still works where it is applied.

    Why do you blame the Church if your people have collectively chosen to abandon its principles and therefore to die out? The Church wanted your embrace, you have deliberately rejected it and chosen some form of self-worship instead, which as we see leads to death either slowly or quickly. The Church is universal, it will move on with those parts of humanity who have not chosen self-extinction. And leave you secularists, Right or Left, in the dust.

    Why do you blame the Church

    Because the church is actively promoting the destruction of my nation. Not merely not caring about it (which could be justified as not caring about transient, earthly matters), but actively doing everything in its power to push for policies whose end result will be the destruction of Germany and any other European nation unfortunate enough to follow the “recommendations” of those demented prelates.

    on the contrary, the European Christians were expanding and colonizing other places. Christian Spain of the 16th-17th centuries

    Your enthusiasm for Spanish imperialism reminds me a lot of Muslims, and not in a positive way.

    The Church is universal, it will move on with those parts of humanity who have not chosen self-extinction

    Good luck with your Nigerians and Congolese then, I’m sure they’ll bring Catholic civilization to unprecedented heights.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    AP's argument was that Christianity should be encouraged because it will raise birth-rates, which will push out migrants.

    It's an interesting view - but obviously seems kind of blasphemy from a god-fearing perspective.

    Basically a secular viewpoint on why religion is useful.

    But from the non-secular viewpoint, you are supposed to believe in religion because it saves your soul. (a god would unlikely be happy if you are supporting it for other motives).


    -


    As for AP's theory itself. It is interesting and I didn't see anyone write it like that before. Of course, it is not a necessary condition for having a rational immigration policy (Japan has low birthrates, highly secular, and they don't have any problem with immigration levels to a low level).

    , @AP

    Your enthusiasm for Spanish imperialism reminds me a lot of Muslims, and not in a positive way.
     
    Muslims ruined and destroyed better civilizations. Spaniards uplifted inferior ones. If you don't see the difference your anti-Christian bigotry is strong, indeed. The ones who indoctrinated you have done a great job.

    In the New World the Spaniards replaced temples devoted to human sacrifice with beautiful baroque cathedrals, like this one, using the same bricks:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/72/Taxco_Santa_Prisca.jpg

    Utu posted beautiful baroque music made by Indians in Paraguay, under Jesuit teachers.

  342. @Guillaume Tell

    his wife is the main reason (not French, but has a typical aristocratic obsession with the “South of France”), but he is a gourmand and oenophile which helps. Additionally he’s an Anglophobe which no doubt aids in bonding with the French.
     
    Very certainly. He will get a lot of mileage over there for that reason alone.

    So if I understand well (sorry I’m new here), your dad moved the family from Sweden to the USA about 30 years ago, but then moved himself to France and left behind a now uprooted Swedish-American son? I don’t mean to sound harsh on your dad, but if it’s that, well then it’s not cool in my book.


    Who installed this globohomo faggot anti-pope? I doubt the gerontocratic College of the Cardinals is naturally inclined to this level of poz.
     
    Homosexualism has arguably taken the upper hand at the highest levels of the Latin Church. The SSPX types (for whom I have a lot of respect although I thunk their position is inconsistent for reasons that we may discuss in the future here) put all the blame on the Vatican II general council of 1962-1965 (iirc). They certainly have a point in that those things have started to manifest themselves massively after said council and the ensuing chaos and collapse of clerical as well as lay discipline that followed. But I believe that the causes are deeper and can be found in the very beginning of the East/West schism.

    By the way Protestantism (which like Athena from her father’s leg, sprung forth all endowed and equipped from
    Catholicism) exhibits the same maladies as the Latin Church — just worse.


    We know that the CIA helped install Carol Wotilja,
     
    Interesting. If you have some references I’ll be happy to read these.

    I suppose I should be grateful for anything that discredits romish papism however.
     
    May I ask if you’re a Christian of a particular “denomination”, and if so, which one? In the interest of full disclosure, I was baptized and raised Catholic (ie Latin Church) but became an Orthodox Christian as an adult.

    40 years ago (initially to Canada), but yes.

    I’m an adult and can plant my own roots. He is now an old man and while in good health choosing to work less.

    But yes, my own background is one reason I’m so firmly against immigration. My German cousins (my aunt married a German) feel similarly, and in their case their German identity is a lot weaker than my American identity as their aunt failed to properly Germanize (speaks German with a Swedish accent, whereas my father’s English is flawless).

    I’m a Lutheran but to me it’s simply an ethnic marker. I never go to church other than weddings and funerals. I bash Catholics because that’s just what American Protestants do.

    Older American Protestants refer to romish papists as “mackerel snappers” because of the previous interdiction against eating fish on Fridays. This is also the reason the McDonald’s Filet o’ Fish was invented.

    I’ve heard whispers of a pink mafia at the conclave for a long time.

    The Protestant churches are nearly all in a very bad state. The mainline denominations embraced leftism in the mid-20th century (partly because of Rockefeller money which controlled the World Council of Churches), and the Evangelicals are doing so now other than on the matter of abortion and homo-sexualism. It has become a status symbol among Evangelicals to adopt blacks, which is disgraceful.

    The denominations which resist the poz tend to be full of double digit IQ dullards unforutantely. The Missour Synod Lutherans are one such example. They still faithfully follow Luther’s catechism and the Book of Concord.

    There’s also the Pentecostals who are so dumb they practice snake handling. Sarah Palin is a Pentecostal. They might be bad on immigration however owing to surging Pentecostalism south of the Rio Grande. Pentecostals in Brazil might hand the country over to Jair Bolsonaro, the Brazilian Trump.

    • Replies: @Guillaume Tell

    40 years ago (initially to Canada), but yes.

     

    We must be about the same age.

    I’m an adult and can plant my own roots. He is now an old man and while in good health choosing to work less. But yes, my own background is one reason I’m so firmly against immigration.
     
    Another common point

    I’m a Lutheran but to me it’s simply an ethnic marker. I never go to church other than weddings and funerals. I bash Catholics because that’s just what American Protestants do.
     
    I was born a (Roman) Catholic and I am appalled by what the Roman Church has become. It's not even a mockery. I bash the pope and his homo friends on a routine basis.

    Older American Protestants refer to romish papists as “mackerel snappers” because of the previous interdiction against eating fish on Fridays. This is also the reason the McDonald’s Filet o’ Fish was invented.
     
    Indeed. And one can legitimately claim that this is a nice legacy. Too bad the modernist catholic bishops cave in to the 1960s Zeitgeist and abolished the strict fasting rules -- fasting, which, incidentally, one of the reasons why I became an Orthodox. Fasting makes me a better man (or rather a much less crappy one) every single day I do it.

    I’ve heard whispers of a pink mafia at the conclave for a long time.
     
    You would certainly appreciate Dr Randy Engel's "The Rite of [email protected]@my". And she's a devout Roman Catholic.

    The denominations which resist the poz tend to be full of double digit IQ dullards unforutantely.
     
    Tell you what: this is one of the manifold reasons why I think the IQ debate is vacuous in many respects: high IQ, at least for Whites, appears to correlate with low survival instincts. Which undoubtedly is not good in terms of evolution competition; but on the other hand we are to believe that high intelligence gives an edge in said competition. Something must give.

    Funny how we live half a world away, of different nationalities and backgrounds, but could be friends as it seems. It must be the fact that we're White (I am not even of a Northern European ethnos).
  343. https://www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/10%20Critical%20years%20english%20version.pdf
    Anatoly what is your opinion on this PDF? Is this paper a good or plausible blueprint for demographic improvement in Russia?

    Also is this paper applicable to other Eastern European states like Ukraine and Belarus?

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    From what I quickly scanned of it: Yes, and yes.
  344. @Talha

    Why do you blame the Church if your people have collectively chosen to abandon its principles and therefore to die out?
     
    "How many were the gardens and the watersprings that they left behind, and fields of grain, and noble dwellings, and wealth (and conveniences of life), wherein they had taken such delight? Even so (it was), and We made it an inheritance for other folk; And the heaven and the earth wept not for them, nor were they allowed respite." (44:25-29)

    It is rather an interesting phenomenon to observe from a semi-outsider's perspective. I have no idea what the future holds within my lifetime, but there seems to be a massive setup in the works.

    My teenage son and I were driving back from taraweeh prayers a couple of weeks ago, well past midnight - we were both pretty exhausted from the daily Ramdan routine - and he said to me; you know, we seem to be the only ones that take religion seriously and devote a lot of time to worship.

    So I asked him whether it was a good or bad thing in his eyes and he said it was a good thing and that he didn't see any of his non-Muslim friends taking their religion seriously at all - actually three of them challenged themselves to try to fast along with the group of Muslims.

    The reason I bring this up is because, this is a script that is found (at least in the Qur'an) and to a degree in the Bible as well. God blesses a people more and more - and the more He does, the further they turn their backs on Him; generally being ungrateful and claiming all of their blessings to be a result of their own deeds and attributes. You know, kind of like this:
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/strength/#comment-2380634

    And this pattern continues until they have come to a point where they are a clear evidence against themselves. At this point He yanks the leash back that He has allowed to be slackened - very hard. The same story occurs again and again, just with different players and details - but the same results; people are replaced by others.

    In fact, we were given due notice too - that we don't get a free pass:
    " O you who believe, whoever of you should revert from his faith – Allah will bring forth [in place of them] a people He will love and who will love Him..." (5:54)

    If this narrative is all hogwash, well and good - no problems. If it's true - time seems to be running out. Maybe Orthodox Christianity will finally make major inroads into the West.

    Either way, it's quite interesting to observe...and learn from.

    Peace.

    So I asked him whether it was a good or bad thing in his eyes and he said it was a good thing and that he didn’t see any of his non-Muslim friends taking their religion seriously at all

    Such enthusiasm for the Cult of the Machine God could be much more positive than the Cult of the Demented Virgin Seekers.

    • Replies: @Talha

    Such enthusiasm for the Cult of the Machine God
     
    Yes indeed - I'd love to see if the machine-borg-singularity-god (MBSG) has followers ready to give up food and drink for it and serenade it in the middle of the night:
    "Their limbs forsake their beds of sleep, to cry unto their Lord in fear and hope: and they spend (in charity) out of the sustenance which We have bestowed on them." (32:16)

    "Men whom neither merchandise nor selling diverts from the remembrance of God and the keeping up of prayer and the giving of alms; they fear a day in which the hearts and eyes shall convulse." (24:37)

    If the MBSG can manage to win their hearts and devotion then its victory is reassured...and men like this will be a relic of the barbaric past:
    http://www.deenislam.co.uk/gallery/shaykhs/ahmad_alawi.jpg


    Cult of the Demented Virgin Seekers
     
    Don't worry - mop up operations against Daesh proceed as I type.

    My son is taking intro class into robotics right now.

    Peace.

  345. DFH says:
    @Guillaume Tell

    That would be cool if the Church wasn’t so pozzed. The Queen should compensate the Church for the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
     
    Agreed.

    According to E. M. Jones, and he is arguing this case very well in “the Jewish Revolutionary Spirit”,this proceeds of this grand-scale loot provided the real original capital at the root of the England’s economic take-off (and earlier industrial revolution that on the Continent where such massive looting of the monastics did not occur until much later).

    According to E. M. Jones, and he is arguing this case very well in “the Jewish Revolutionary Spirit”,this proceeds of this grand-scale loot provided the real original capital at the root of the England’s economic take-off (and earlier industrial revolution that on the Continent where such massive looting of the monastics did not occur until much later).

    Unfortunately this is simply incorrect, like most of what EMJ says about Protestants/England.
    Firstly, the Reformation under Henry VIII had nothing to do with the Jewish (or any other) Revolutionary Spirit; Henry VIII was a very conservative man on every issue but the relationship between church and state and burnt Anabaptists. It’s quite possible that the split with Rome would have occurred even without the Reformation.

    Secondly, the Dissolution of the Monasteries didn’t provide the capital for the Industrial Revolution. I don’t even know why anyone would think this. The Crown raised £150,000, which was in the grand scheme of things fairly trivial and eaten up in a couple of campaigns. The capital for the Industrial Revolution came from international trade, which didn’t really get going until at least a century later, and doesn’t have any obvious connection to the Dissolution. Something similar happened in Scandinavia, without the Industrial Revolution happening there (in fact the second country to industrialise was very Catholic Belgium).

    • Replies: @German_reader

    The capital for the Industrial Revolution came from international trade
     
    That sounds dangerously close to those arguments about industrialization being based on profits from the triangular trade which had Caribbean sugar plantations worked with slave labour as a main component.
    Is there actually consensus about that issue now? Obviously it would be politically preferable if those claims about slavery's importance for early industrialization weren't true.
    , @Dmitry

    Secondly, the Dissolution of the Monasteries didn’t provide the capital for the Industrial Revolution. I don’t even know why anyone would think this. The Crown raised £150,000, which was in the grand scheme of things fairly trivial and eaten up in a couple of campaigns
     
    Have you visited Cambridge University?

    I'm not an expert, but it was explained to me how in Trinity College in Cambridge University (later home of Isaac Newton) - the money confiscated from the Monasteries and Church was used to finance the college.
    , @Guillaume Tell

    Unfortunately this is simply incorrect, like most of what EMJ says about Protestants/England.
     
    You may be right, but your answer is a bit short and unsubstantiated.

    That said I appreciate what I have read of your comments since my arrival here, and am thus considering your comment. In addition, EMJ appears to be an Opus Dei hack as I have recently found out -- and to me this is an absolute deal breaker. Or rather the Opus Judaei as one of my rad-trad SSPX type friends calls Escriva's cult.

    BTW I am not English but I gather you are an English nationalist. Although I think it is best for everyone on the Continent to keep the English at arms' length, I do sympathize with your cause and I hope you may succeed in removing kebab from the Isle of the Saints.

  346. @Gerard2

    It shows how people with narcissistic personality disorder can sometimes succeed where people with normal psychology are failing,
     
    Is it just me, but isn't Trump quite self-deprecating and not the narcissist he's claimed to be?
    He send's up jokes about his hair ( as in he knows how ridiculous it ), loves criticism because he is practical enought to know all of it is good PR for his business or his Presidency

    and for a guy he pretends to be your average dumb,boorish, typical, "Go America" American idiot..........there must be something in the fact that two of his wives are Slavic.

    and for a guy he pretends to be your average dumb,boorish, typical, “Go America” American idiot……….there must be something in the fact that two of his wives are Slavic.

    It is true, he is anti-racist and obviously the opposite of a stereotype of an American redneck. (Equally, everything in his personal life seems very narcissistic.)

    I think I know a lot about Trump and American politics (I was following addictively the election).

    Trump might even be too far-liberal (if he was writing on here, he write more liberal ideas than all of us).

    E.g. His old girlfriends, not only Slavic, but also even a (half) black woman – who was supporting him.

  347. @DFH

    According to E. M. Jones, and he is arguing this case very well in “the Jewish Revolutionary Spirit”,this proceeds of this grand-scale loot provided the real original capital at the root of the England’s economic take-off (and earlier industrial revolution that on the Continent where such massive looting of the monastics did not occur until much later).
     
    Unfortunately this is simply incorrect, like most of what EMJ says about Protestants/England.
    Firstly, the Reformation under Henry VIII had nothing to do with the Jewish (or any other) Revolutionary Spirit; Henry VIII was a very conservative man on every issue but the relationship between church and state and burnt Anabaptists. It's quite possible that the split with Rome would have occurred even without the Reformation.

    Secondly, the Dissolution of the Monasteries didn't provide the capital for the Industrial Revolution. I don't even know why anyone would think this. The Crown raised £150,000, which was in the grand scheme of things fairly trivial and eaten up in a couple of campaigns. The capital for the Industrial Revolution came from international trade, which didn't really get going until at least a century later, and doesn't have any obvious connection to the Dissolution. Something similar happened in Scandinavia, without the Industrial Revolution happening there (in fact the second country to industrialise was very Catholic Belgium).

    The capital for the Industrial Revolution came from international trade

    That sounds dangerously close to those arguments about industrialization being based on profits from the triangular trade which had Caribbean sugar plantations worked with slave labour as a main component.
    Is there actually consensus about that issue now? Obviously it would be politically preferable if those claims about slavery’s importance for early industrialization weren’t true.

    • Replies: @DFH

    Is there actually consensus about that issue now?
     
    I have looked into this question before (although only briefly) and have been able to find very little about it, so I assume working out who financed what is quite difficult. It wouldn't surprise me if a decent amount of the money came from the slave trade or related industries, especially given the proximity of Liverpool to the industrial heartland. Still, I don't think there is any reason to suppose that the Industrial Revolution wouldn't have happened without slavery. Sugar made up about a quarter of colonial imports, but even without it, Britain would still have been the most financially advanced trading nation.
  348. The US border: Even a lot of Americans don’t understand what is going on, including the normally well informed American Left. I will explain all.

    Okay, 2 months ago the US started a 0 tolerance policy for illegal entry into the United States. This means that anybody apprehended crossing into the country illegally gets charged with a misdemeanor.

    A lot of these illegal crossers, however, are crossing with children, not always necessarily their own. US immigration law based on the court ruling of the Flores case makes it illegal to hold children in detention with their parents. So what the US is doing is putting the parents in jail and putting the children in holding facilities until the children are able to be put with relatives or into foster care.

    But this isn’t playing well. The media is saying “Trump is separating parents from their kids!” Now people like me say, “that’s awesome!” but few Americans hate immigrants as much as I do. So due to the backlash, Trump is signing an executive order, probably later this afternoon, that will keep parents and children together while the parents are awaiting prosecution.

    The problem with this is that it is flagrantly illegal. It brazenly violates Flores. The Left will file a suit within a day and I expect an emergency stay on the EO by the end of the week. So the possibilities are:

    1. Trump just ignores the stay. This has the possibility to create a Constitutional crisis which would probably lead to a civil war.

    2. Trump honors the stay in the short term but seeks and gets an immediate Supreme Court hearing of the case. The Supreme Court would almost certainly rule in Trump’s favor.

    3. Trump honors the stay but the SC refuses to here the case on an expedited basis. At this point Trump simply returns to separating the parents except now he has more credibility to say: “The law leaves me no choice.”

    Really interesting stuff.

  349. @DFH

    According to E. M. Jones, and he is arguing this case very well in “the Jewish Revolutionary Spirit”,this proceeds of this grand-scale loot provided the real original capital at the root of the England’s economic take-off (and earlier industrial revolution that on the Continent where such massive looting of the monastics did not occur until much later).
     
    Unfortunately this is simply incorrect, like most of what EMJ says about Protestants/England.
    Firstly, the Reformation under Henry VIII had nothing to do with the Jewish (or any other) Revolutionary Spirit; Henry VIII was a very conservative man on every issue but the relationship between church and state and burnt Anabaptists. It's quite possible that the split with Rome would have occurred even without the Reformation.

    Secondly, the Dissolution of the Monasteries didn't provide the capital for the Industrial Revolution. I don't even know why anyone would think this. The Crown raised £150,000, which was in the grand scheme of things fairly trivial and eaten up in a couple of campaigns. The capital for the Industrial Revolution came from international trade, which didn't really get going until at least a century later, and doesn't have any obvious connection to the Dissolution. Something similar happened in Scandinavia, without the Industrial Revolution happening there (in fact the second country to industrialise was very Catholic Belgium).

    Secondly, the Dissolution of the Monasteries didn’t provide the capital for the Industrial Revolution. I don’t even know why anyone would think this. The Crown raised £150,000, which was in the grand scheme of things fairly trivial and eaten up in a couple of campaigns

    Have you visited Cambridge University?

    I’m not an expert, but it was explained to me how in Trinity College in Cambridge University (later home of Isaac Newton) – the money confiscated from the Monasteries and Church was used to finance the college.

    • Replies: @DFH

    I’m not an expert, but it was explained to me how in Trinity College in Cambridge University (later home of Isaac Newton) – the money confiscated from the Monasteries and Church was used to finance the college.
     
    That was actually quite common even before the Dissolution. For instance both St. John's, Cambridge and Corpus, Oxford were founded (by very pious men) from nunneries that were dissolved due to poor behaviour.
    In any case, there were plenty of Oxbridge colleges apart from the Dissolution, and the money that was invested into educational foundations probably didn't make up for taking away the schools the monasteries were providing (although this is a very controversial topic and I haven't read too much about it).
  350. @German_reader

    Why do you blame the Church
     
    Because the church is actively promoting the destruction of my nation. Not merely not caring about it (which could be justified as not caring about transient, earthly matters), but actively doing everything in its power to push for policies whose end result will be the destruction of Germany and any other European nation unfortunate enough to follow the "recommendations" of those demented prelates.

    on the contrary, the European Christians were expanding and colonizing other places. Christian Spain of the 16th-17th centuries
     
    Your enthusiasm for Spanish imperialism reminds me a lot of Muslims, and not in a positive way.

    The Church is universal, it will move on with those parts of humanity who have not chosen self-extinction
     
    Good luck with your Nigerians and Congolese then, I'm sure they'll bring Catholic civilization to unprecedented heights.

    AP’s argument was that Christianity should be encouraged because it will raise birth-rates, which will push out migrants.

    It’s an interesting view – but obviously seems kind of blasphemy from a god-fearing perspective.

    Basically a secular viewpoint on why religion is useful.

    But from the non-secular viewpoint, you are supposed to believe in religion because it saves your soul. (a god would unlikely be happy if you are supporting it for other motives).

    As for AP’s theory itself. It is interesting and I didn’t see anyone write it like that before. Of course, it is not a necessary condition for having a rational immigration policy (Japan has low birthrates, highly secular, and they don’t have any problem with immigration levels to a low level).

    • Replies: @German_reader

    AP’s argument was that Christianity should be encouraged because it will raise birth-rates,
     
    It's a retarded argument imo. There's no point to calling for a breeding contest when one has open borders and mass immigration (which probably have the effect of depressing birth rates among the native population), the solution has to be to close the borders and end mass immigration - and that's exactly what the Catholic church regards as uncharitable and wants to prevent.
    I also don't even understand this natalist fetish among Catholics, as far as I can tell it doesn't have any basis in the New Testament (where marriage was a concession to those too weak for a completely celibate life).

    It’s an interesting view – but obviously seems kind of blasphemy from a god-fearing perspective.
     
    I agree, but a lot of religious people argue like that. I take it as an implicit admission that they know the core doctrines of their faith aren't terribly convincing on their own merit.
    , @AP

    It’s an interesting view – but obviously seems kind of blasphemy from a god-fearing perspective.

    Basically a secular viewpoint on why religion is useful.
     
    I am communicating with secular people so what other viewpoint should I use in that context?

    Look at what Europeans did, how they viewed themselves and how they treated others when they were actually deeply Christians? What have they done to themselves as post-Christians?
  351. DFH says:
    @Dmitry

    Secondly, the Dissolution of the Monasteries didn’t provide the capital for the Industrial Revolution. I don’t even know why anyone would think this. The Crown raised £150,000, which was in the grand scheme of things fairly trivial and eaten up in a couple of campaigns
     
    Have you visited Cambridge University?

    I'm not an expert, but it was explained to me how in Trinity College in Cambridge University (later home of Isaac Newton) - the money confiscated from the Monasteries and Church was used to finance the college.

    I’m not an expert, but it was explained to me how in Trinity College in Cambridge University (later home of Isaac Newton) – the money confiscated from the Monasteries and Church was used to finance the college.

    That was actually quite common even before the Dissolution. For instance both St. John’s, Cambridge and Corpus, Oxford were founded (by very pious men) from nunneries that were dissolved due to poor behaviour.
    In any case, there were plenty of Oxbridge colleges apart from the Dissolution, and the money that was invested into educational foundations probably didn’t make up for taking away the schools the monasteries were providing (although this is a very controversial topic and I haven’t read too much about it).

  352. DFH says:
    @German_reader

    The capital for the Industrial Revolution came from international trade
     
    That sounds dangerously close to those arguments about industrialization being based on profits from the triangular trade which had Caribbean sugar plantations worked with slave labour as a main component.
    Is there actually consensus about that issue now? Obviously it would be politically preferable if those claims about slavery's importance for early industrialization weren't true.

    Is there actually consensus about that issue now?

    I have looked into this question before (although only briefly) and have been able to find very little about it, so I assume working out who financed what is quite difficult. It wouldn’t surprise me if a decent amount of the money came from the slave trade or related industries, especially given the proximity of Liverpool to the industrial heartland. Still, I don’t think there is any reason to suppose that the Industrial Revolution wouldn’t have happened without slavery. Sugar made up about a quarter of colonial imports, but even without it, Britain would still have been the most financially advanced trading nation.

    • Replies: @German_reader

    Still, I don’t think there is any reason to suppose that the Industrial Revolution wouldn’t have happened without slavery
     
    There's a line of argument that claims just that though, if I understand correctly this was the argument advanced by Eric Williams in his influential Capitalism and slavery already back in 1944, and it's of course popular with black grievance-mongers ("No space ship without slave ship").
    I've never looked into the issue in detail, but from my limited reading (e.g. the relevant chapters in the Oxford History of the British empire from the late 1990s) I got the impression it was still a somewhat controversial issue.
  353. @Dmitry
    AP's argument was that Christianity should be encouraged because it will raise birth-rates, which will push out migrants.

    It's an interesting view - but obviously seems kind of blasphemy from a god-fearing perspective.

    Basically a secular viewpoint on why religion is useful.

    But from the non-secular viewpoint, you are supposed to believe in religion because it saves your soul. (a god would unlikely be happy if you are supporting it for other motives).


    -


    As for AP's theory itself. It is interesting and I didn't see anyone write it like that before. Of course, it is not a necessary condition for having a rational immigration policy (Japan has low birthrates, highly secular, and they don't have any problem with immigration levels to a low level).

    AP’s argument was that Christianity should be encouraged because it will raise birth-rates,

    It’s a retarded argument imo. There’s no point to calling for a breeding contest when one has open borders and mass immigration (which p