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Open Thread 190: Russia/Ukraine
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I’ve been told that the previous Open Thread has become very sluggish, so here’s a new one.

—Ron Unz

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Open Thread, Russia, Ukraine 
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  1. Wokechoke says:

    The two dipshit Britons captured by Russia in Mariupol and tried in Donbas have been sentenced to death.

    Perhaps Johnson ought to do his actual job and get them out of custody.

    Seems a bit harsh, and I think Putin ought to consider, leaning on the locals, it sensible to send them home alive, if a little shaken and much wiser.

    A good will off ramp for the public in the UK, showing that these Russians are not Flesh Eating Orcs.

  2. A little bit of statistics from the US Department of Defense.

    According to the Pentagon, five main stages of the Russian-Ukrainian war can be distinguished:

    1 – February 24-27 (4 days) – blitzkrieg;
    2 – February 28 – March 24 (25 days) – offensive on the entire front;
    3 – March 25 – April 18 (25 days) – operational pause;
    4 – April 19 – May 16 (28 days) – the first phase of the offensive in the Donbas;
    5 – May 17 – June 7 (21 days) – the second phase of the offensive in the Donbas.

    Daily losses of the Russian Armed Forces in Ukraine.

    Unfortunately the statistics of aircraft losses wasn’t available.

  3. A123 says: • Website

    There will be no quick fix for opening Black Sea ports. (1)

    Statements from the Ukrainian and Russian governments, as well as in international reports, indicate there are literally multiple thousands of mines up and down Ukraine’s coast. For this reason, Ukrainian government officials have estimated that if it started demining efforts now, it would take a whopping six months to clear the coast of Ukrainian and Russian mines

    Freight and insurance costs spiked after several merchant ships were hit in the early days of Russia’s invasion, and some shipping companies are still avoiding the Black Sea,” Bloomberg details of a still dangerous situation for Black Sea shipping. “Three mines were detected free-floating in March, two off the coast of Turkey and one near Romania. In the northwest of the Black Sea near Ukraine, commercial ships have stopped operating,” the report adds.

    It is unclear how much grain can be moved through Poland.

        • How much grain storage is there in Ukraine?
        • And, what % is already full?

    -A- YetAnotherAnon, pointed out that the border rail crossings between Ukraine and Poland appear to be single track.

    -B- Ukraine has USSR “wide” gauge rail, while Poland is Europe “standard” gauge. Are Ukrainian wheat exports transferred from one train to another as part its journey?

    The U.S. has experience trying to substitute trains for other transport systems. Leftoid pols keep delaying pipelines. Oil trains run daily in America to create “rolling pipelines”. Not only is this unnecessarily costly, it also has a much higher spill risk. Unrefined, crude oil is flammable and toxic. At least a “grain train” will not catch fire after an incident.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/even-if-ukraines-ports-open-tomorrow-it-will-take-months-demine-them-un

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  4. Beckow says:

    Ukraine is slowly losing the war. A sluggish defeat unusual in our agile millennium. The length won’t matter other than more losses. The current idea that the feet stomping fire-eaters I recently observed at a conference are taken by is that more losses for Kiev also mean more losses for Russia – and of course, Russia delenda est! is what keeps the assorted Laxas, Trusses and the nation of Poland in the game.

    Another idea floating around is that the painful suffering of the Ukie soldiers – thousands unnecessarily dying in an uneven fight – will allow Kiev to negotiate a better deal. I doubt it, the final settlement will be based on who controls what. The mythical Ukie counter-offensive is impossible for an outgunned army – attacks require superiority. Partisan war? The east and south are open flat lands with either pro-Russian or neutral population. It would be more destruction with no chance to succeed.

    It looks like they will be disappointed. What happens to a pathological hatred when it is faced with an inevitable loss? They will escape into minutia: ‘there is no Parmesan cheese in Moscow!‘, Chinese and Korean cars suck! India got an oil discount – paying way more than prices last year, but whatever, anything but to admit that the whole Ukraine-in-Nato enterprise was a bad idea from the start.

    The odds of a Russian-language high school in Kherson (forbidden by Kiev now) are a lot better than the odds of rump-Ukraine in Nato, or even in EU. If they keep on denying reality there will be also be Russian schools one in Kharkiv. Zelko will be fine, he has skills like playing piano with his d..ck…priceless.

    • Replies: @Callsign Pidor
    , @Wielgus
    , @Sean
  5. Beckow says:
    @Wokechoke

    We live in an ugly harsh world and BoJo has no influence. Russia stopped talking to UK completely, unlike with Macron and Sholz. There is also an element of discouraging other foreigners and the public opinion in Donbas – they want revenge for the civilians killed by the Ukie army.

    I saw the interview w Aiden, he claimed that he ‘wanted out, but couldn’t‘. He also implausibly claimed that he never shot at anything. What would happen to a Russian joining IRA during the height of troubles? Would UK treat him with kid gloves? In the end, they will serve a few years and be exchanged. But how about the poor Moroccan, who will save him?

    • Replies: @Matra
    , @AP
    , @Wielgus
  6. @Beckow

    Another idea floating around is that the painful suffering of the Ukie soldiers – thousands unnecessarily dying in an uneven fight

    The Slovak national mindset revealed (although perhaps unintentionally) in a nutshell.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  7. How Elon Musk’s space satellites changed the war on the ground

    Every time Oleksiy and his fellow artillerymen hit a Russian target, they have one person to thank: Elon Musk, the world’s richest man.

    Embedded in a frontline hot zone just south of the strategic town of Izyum in Ukraine’s war-ravaged east, Oleksiy — who declined to give his last name for security reasons — is now a power-user of Starlink, a satellite communication system owned by Musk’s SpaceX.

    When planning a counterattack or artillery barrage, he dials up his superiors for last-minute orders via a rectangular white-and-gray Starlink satellite receiver concealed in a shallow pit in the garden of an abandoned cottage.

    Alexander Kots, a pro-Russian war reporter embedded in the Donbass, who has talked to many Russian field commanders in recent weeks, has noted that Ukrainian artillery is generally very accurate according to their assessments, even if outnumbered.

    I don’t think this technological support will help turn the tide, but it certainly has contributed in slowing Russia’s advance. Russia has the capability to shoot down satellites, but I suspect they view it as too much of an escalation.

    • Replies: @Miro23
    , @songbird
  8. @Here Be Dragon

    Seems reasonable, given the size of the conflict. I still think wait and see is the best reaction, but sentimentally I support Russia, and I will likely feel the same way even if they lose badly. I live far away from what is happening, and I think it’s opportunistic that many governments and the media blame Russia or the war for the economic situation.

    • Agree: Here Be Dragon
  9. Mikel says:

    It’s not just that freedom of opinion and censorship are worsening in the West, it’s that they’re literally making us read Pravda these days (more precisely Ukrayinska Pravda, which is now a trusted source in the Yahoo news feed):

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/lviv-paratroopers-kill-half-hundred-114506771.html

    Title: Lviv paratroopers kill half a hundred Pskov “blue berets” in 14-hour battle

    Some excerpts:

    Our soldiers showed courage and heroism during a fierce battle that lasted almost 14 hours.

    … that day the Russian unit, which is part of the 104th Assault Regiment of the 76th Assault Division (Pskov), lost several armoured vehicles and up to 50 personnel as a result of the “welcome” of the Lviv paratroopers.

    I have been a Yahoo user for decades now and I don’t remember them ever feeding me propaganda from the press services of our allied governments in Iraq or Afghanistan, which was possibly not so over-the-top as these Ukrainian pieces.

    Is it not possible to support Ukraine, even militarily, without having to pretend that they are a fully democratic country with reliable media? I don’t get it.

  10. @Mr. Hack

    guerilla attack at the Phoenix zoo

    A gorilla attack would be little more expected…but a guerilla attack, now you have our attention. Was it some sort of militant PETA assault platoon? A mistaken feint by a hopelessly lost Che Guevara?

    Please elucidate. Expiring minds need to know!

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  11. Wielgus says:
    @Beckow

    Most of Ukraine saw little partisan activity in WW2, whether pro- or anti-Soviet. A lack of cover for the most part, evident from films and photos of the time. Whereas much of Belarus and some parts of northern Russia are heavily wooded and partisans could shelter there. The Pripet Marshes, on the Belarus/Ukraine border, were also a partisan hiding place although malarial and unpleasant to live and fight in. Postwar the Ukrainian Insurgent Army mostly operated in the Carpathian Mountains in the far west.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  12. @Mikel

    I’ve noticed it too on Yahoo, and find it irritating since it comes across as blatant propagandizing. There is too much emotionally charged BS out there to sift through so I still avoid engaging it.

    On an interesting side note, I came across a book that contains the daily editions of both the New York Times and the Charleston Mercury during the Civil War. It’s interesting reading. The vast amount of factual data on battles, even small skirmishes and individual charges in larger battles, troop movements, etc. is really incredible. All delivered with a far more informational and less emotive style.

    It gives the impression of general accuracy since unsuccessful movements and charges are reported upon unashamedly. It would be interesting to cross reference the reporting by the historical record. As a whole I have the impression that the average media consumer would have been far more factually informed from reading one newspaper than we can be from scouring half the internet.

    I suppose that the unvarnished nature of the reporting was partly possible thanks to slower communication making it impossible for enemies to gain much useful intel from newspaper accounts. Whatever the case, it is marked how much emotive propagandistic reporting has become so ubiquitous.

    • Replies: @Mikel
  13. Miro23 says:
    @Thulean Friend

    One aspect is that the Russian military is getting invaluable experience in dealing with modern Western warfare – Western guided munitions, armed drones, Starlink etc.

    Theory is necessary, but actual battle reveals a multitude of hidden flaws/potential improvements in equipment/tactics.

    • Agree: Here Be Dragon
    • Replies: @A123
    , @TG
  14. A123 says: • Website
    @Miro23

    Theory is necessary, but actual battle reveals a multitude of hidden flaws/potential improvements in equipment/tactics.

    This is one of the huge benefits of U.S.-Israeli cooperation. Upgrades to the F-16I have rendered the Russian made S-300 useless. That solution has travelled back to the U.S. and our fighters have largely been upgraded to beat the S-300.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  15. Matra says:
    @Beckow

    What would happen to a Russian joining IRA during the height of troubles? Would UK treat him with kid gloves?

    Given that the UK government did treat the IRA with kid gloves often actively thwarting those who wanted to take them on seriously – sometimes due to US pressure – I’d have to say yes. But the UK sees N Ireland as merely an inherited nuisance to be managed until they can get rid of it, not a geopolitical imperative like Ukraine is to Russia.

    Anyway, is this story even accurate? I thought Russia got rid of the death penalty in all circumstances. Even if war is an exception, this one has not actually been declared as war so I’m sceptical about the veracity of these reports.

    • Replies: @Matra
    , @Beckow
    , @FitsMan
  16. Matra says:
    @Matra

    OK, it is the no doubt totally independent Donetsk Peoples Republic, not Russia.

  17. Beckow says:
    @Wielgus

    Insurgent Army mostly operated in the Carpathian Mountains in the far west.

    The Bandera insurgents attempted in 1945-47 to fight their way thru Czecho-Slovakia to the west. They burned villages and killed civilians – literally for no reason, just because they could. It was in some ways worse than Germans who worked from a plan and killed for a reason. The Czechoslovak army fought them and given their well known lack of activity during WWII, this was the biggest fight they had.

    Most Bandera bands didn’t make it. In general the POWs were turned over to Poland, you can look up their harsh fate there. How the Bandera Nazi allies are viewed in our region somehow escapes the nationalist Ukrainians – a big mistake.

  18. songbird says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Russia has the capability to shoot down satellites, but I suspect they view it as too much of an escalation.

    IMO, depends what they can do with energy weapons, but I suspect that they couldn’t manage it, otherwise.

    There are over 2400 starlink satellites in orbit now. (not all in position). That’s about 19% of the satellites ever launched – just the starlinks in orbit now, not the deorbited ones. About 50% of all functional satellites currently in orbit.

    [MORE]

    They are mass-produced, have a flat design for stacking, and are often launched 60 at a time.

    They take like 3-4 months to get into position – using ion thrusters. Anything that could catch up to them quickly would need to be a lot more energy intensive. I don’t say it is impossible, with missiles – but I suspect that it is beyond the current capacities of Russians (or probably anyone) to manage that, at scale, or in a cost effective way.

    Even if a number of them could be shot down, the US gov would probably flood money into SpaceX to begin putting them back up, pretty quickly. They’ve typically been deploying 60, at a time. And though there are only a small number of starlink launches planned this year, the launch cadence of the Falcon 9 is pretty impressive, so far. By yearend, Musk is hoping for 60 launches. They’ve done 27 so far, so it seems plausible. (31, in total, last year). Probably could manage more, with the right incentives.

    I suspect in a war with the US, SpaceX’s infrastructure would be flattened, in the first few minutes. But short of flattening it, or other very escalatory moves, I don’t know, if there is much they can do. If they have ground-based space laser weapons, they probably couldn’t even handle the workload before all frying themselves. Or, at least that is the way I imagine it.

    • Thanks: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  19. Mr. Hack says:
    @Barbarossa

    Good catch! For “expiring minds” including songbird, here’s what happened:

    Somehow, I was one of the first visitors to the Phoenix zoo, one fine morning. Having seen the gorilla exhibit beofore, I had it earmarked as my first stop. It’s one of those modern zoo exhibits that tries to capture more of a natural environmental feel. The part of the exhibit where the visitor can get a close up of the gorillas can be seen indoors, made of rock and housed (fortunately for me) within a thick and tough plexiglass shield. Well, I walked through this portion of the exhibit and didn’t see a single creature astir yet. I thought that they were all still asleep outside, not having cleaned up and had their breakfast yet. Just as I turned around to make my exit to the entrance door, I heard this HUGE THUD! And I do mean a HUGE THUD, directed right at me. A huge, fully grown gorilla attacked me from the other side of the plexi glass and extended its arm and closed fist towards me and strongly thumped the glass. This was all done in the matter of a couple of seconds, and he soon disappeared outdoors. It was his “greeting” to me, as if he was angered that I had the gall to intrude on his own very private residence. Scared the bejesus out of me! 🙂

  20. Beckow says:
    @Matra

    A foreign volunteer to IRA during the height of Ulster troubles would be treated harshly: prison or worse. Same in many other conflicts – it is better for foreigners to stay out.

    We are observing gradual unravelling of the March-April Western enthusiasm, this is a small part of it. Today if the West could give in – basically sacrifice post-Maidan Ukraine – without losing face, they would do it. The eventual deal will be along those lines: Russia gets what it wants as long as West doesn’t look publicly like a loser.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  21. songbird says:

    I worry that neocons are getting the wrong ideas from this conflict – that the US is invincible or something.

    But, in reality, if the gloves were off, it would be very, very easy to target the energy grid in the US, or the supply chain, or probably just to stir up racial conflict. Possibly, even to the point of causing a systems crash.

  22. songbird says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Scared the bejesus out of me!

    Wouldn’t be surprised if he did it for fun.

    I think my closest encounter with a powerful animal at the zoo was with a sea lion. For some reason, it seemed to think I was its handler and was going to throw it a fish. I didn’t sneak inside its enclosure or anything, but it leaped up on the side of its pool, and I was still close enough to be enveloped in the fog of its breath.

    BTW, have you ever seen Mighty Joe Young? (I mean the original). I watched it a few years ago, and thought it was a fun film. I also like the original King Kong.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  23. @Wokechoke

    We have currently have Congress convening a televised kangaroo court and imprisoning conservatives for protesting blatant election fraud, many of whom have been in prison for over a year! They would execute them publically if they could! So you cry for leniency for British Terrorists, but are silent on American citizens being railroaded illegally on trumped-up charges without access to bail? While Antifa and BLM looters, arsonists and murderers get to skate? You propose letting them go only to pop up again somewhere for more murder-for-hire? No way, Jose! They have been legally tried and convicted of crimes against the state- not protesting mind, you, but actual murder and mayhem. In the US, they would be sent to gitmo with no trial, so they are already getting off easy by having a trial! And let’s not forget their own motto: ‘Kill Them All, Let God Sort Them Out’! Let them die by their own creed. So let the executions begin, and continue until the last war criminal employed by Ukraine gets his final dirt nap!

  24. @Mikel

    When the lockdown began, I was making comments daily on yahoo. I noticed that they have an army of minions posting counter comments that were all liberal talking points, sort of like what I had imagined Soviet Russia or Modern Communist China was like. Then after those paid shills were found to be unable to stop the surging tide of anti-government sentiment, well, yahoo stepped in and discontinued all comments. Recently, after almost 2 years, they began cautiously allowing selected comments, and I found that I was on some type of list where not one comment I made was allowed to appear online. So they have a list. Yahoo is the very tip of the censorship spear, and not one news article they print is not chock full of libtard propaganda, exactly like the daily spewings of Gin pSucki! Everything must contain a heavy anti-patriot and basically anti-american, slant. pResident Joe Biden heartily approves of this situation.

  25. TG says:
    @Miro23

    I think the ancient Romans had a saying about not fighting the same enemy too many times, they learn from you.

    When the Russians blitzed Crimea, that was pretty impressive, and I guarantee that the the other side spent the last eight years thinking long and hard about that. Now the Russians tried essentially the same thing and – oopsie! Didn’t go nearly as well, did it? I mean sure, the figureheads the western elites employ are retarded, but the western elites themselves are not stupid, and even if the west is long-term doomed, there are still a lot of smart people in the middle ranks paying attention…

    Putin should have tried this about six years ago, he probably would have pulled it off. But eight years was too long to give the other side to prepare.

    And now it is the turn of the Russians to think long and hard about what they need to fix for next time…

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
    , @LondonBob
    , @gT
  26. Mikel says:
    @Barbarossa

    Interesting. You would actually think that the media would be more partisan in a civil war than during a foreign conflict. Although a bit later on the US media, controlled then like now by magnates like the Hearsts, riled the American public to support the war in Cuba on largely trumped-up grounds.

    In any case, I am not as pessimistic as some frequent commenters here (although in the long term I do think that we’ll eventually use WMDs) but freedom of thought is another thing where we’re leaving a worse world for our children, along with the already discussed problems of less physical and mental resilience, a massive debt and worse quality music.

  27. AP says:
    @Beckow

    You are frequently dishonest but rarely stupid. This is stupid:

    What would happen to a Russian joining IRA during the height of troubles

    An analogous situation would be a British fighter in Chechnya, not a British fighter in Ukraine fighting in the Ukrainian army.

    A relevant question would be, what would happen to a Russian fighter in the military of Vietnam or Iraq or Yugoslavia?

    • Replies: @Beckow
  28. @Dave Wightman

    While Antifa and BLM looters, arsonists and murderers get to skate?

    Government officials kow towed to them and ceremoniously washed their feet.

  29. songbird says:

    Is this the frequency-based order of flags in Germany?

    1.) gay flag (’70s)
    2.) gay flag (new variant)
    3.) Turkish flag
    4.) Ukrainian flag
    5.) EU flag
    6.) BLM flag
    7.) Bavarian flag
    8.) American flag
    9.) British flag
    10.) Polish flag
    11.) Pan Arab flag
    12.) German flag

    Am joking a bit with those last few, but I do genuinely wonder if the German flag would even attain slot #4, today. It’s really disturbing to hear normie Germans speak about flags (“We already know we are in Germany, but we need to show our support for gays and Ukraine.”) Not sure there is a solution for it other than to go back to local coats of arms, or something bigger, like pan-Nordicism or pan-Europeanism.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  30. Are the Russians out of missiles yet?

  31. songbird says:

    All these websites that try to get you to agree to cookies should be forcefully removed to a new domain: .spyware.

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
  32. Beckow says:
    @AP

    The guys are from UK, so I was looking for the closest analogy, I agree it is not a very good one. But the point is that UK took IRA seriously – almost nobody else did – and would treat harshly any Russians joining IRA.

    It is essential to treat Country A as we treat Country B: what is good for the goose is good for the gander. All else doesn’t work and will not resolve this. The “what-aboutism” defense by the West is completely bogus and an admission that they have no argument.

    I said before that without the Nato attack on Serbia there would be no Crimea and no war today. That is an essential and decisive point – as with the poor British mercenaries one has to treat it objectively and consider what it would be like in reverse. The West is currently incapable of doing it and that is as scary as the war itself – it is something new: mental collapse and inability to think. Something relatively new in the West.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  33. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mikel

    Like the NY Post showing the Ukrainian flag at the top right of every page one print edition.

  34. Mikhail says: • Website

    Bach Told Off

    Along with Wayne Gretzky, Travis Tygart, Sebastian Coe and Sally Jenkins, the SOB had it coming to him.

    https://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1124257/lasitskene-bach-athletics-russia

  35. @TG

    Why are you insisting on this? Haven’t you been told many times that your assessment is wrong? Are you a troll?

    Crimea is a Russian land populated by the Russians and most of them are somehow related to the Sevastopol naval base personnel.

    Now the Russians tried essentially the same thing and – oopsie! Didn’t go nearly as well, did it?

    They didn’t try anything like that. You keep repeating this every time you post a comment. Every time.

    You keep saying they wanted to capture Kiev. You have been shown that they didn’t. Why do you continue to insist on that?

    Look – Kiev. A small part of Kiev. Kiev is a big city. 800 square kilometers.

    And this is Notre Dame stadium. Full – 75 thousand people. Russia had a half of that around Kiev.

    So please stop talking about how the Russians failed to take Kiev.

    • Agree: Mikhail, Miro23
    • Disagree: Philip Owen
  36. @Wokechoke

    No doubt there would have been no trials if Ukraine had not tried and convicted that Russian soldier of “war crimes “.
    No doubt, the various numpties convicted by either side will be exchanged at some future date.
    So don’t get your panties in a twist, people.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  37. Bashibuzuk says:

    Hi everyone !

    All I want to say is that this whole situation in Ukraine is a terrible thing. A disaster of monumental proportions for both Russian and Ukrainian people. Many don’t understand it today, but it is a trap for the Western middle class too. And of course it is outright awful for those who will soon be dying of hunger in the developing world. It fits perfectly with the Great Reset agenda and the dépopulation plans. Putin has played his role in this sinister game alongside the scumbags on the Ukrainian side of the border. They served their masters well…

    May those who suffer find solace and may we all find one day peace and brotherhood in this World despite the sociopaths who try to goad us all in the opposite direction towards the path of hate and destruction.

    Being human can be difficult at times, but it is worth it if we work to lift our spirits up from the hatred and ignorance that unfortunately often blind us.

    Be well everyone !

  38. Wokechoke says:
    @Beckow

    in the Irish war of independence the British tended to execute Irish ethnics who held British citizenship. Americans like De Valera were spared to avoid angering the USGov and a Polish cuntess who was a high up in the IRA was spared as she was a Plucky Little Polish Schlachter.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  39. German_reader says:
    @songbird

    You forgot the Israeli flag.
    I’d say the homo/tranny flag, the EU flag and the Ukrainian flag are the top three, because they’re flown by public buildings (Turkish flag is flown by…Turks, and pretty much nobody else).
    I suppose it’s mitigated though by the fact that for hardcore German nationalists the current flag isn’t the real one anyway 🙂

    • LOL: songbird
  40. Wokechoke says:
    @Dave Wightman

    The trials of the Jan6 people are complete bullshit of course. topic here is the Ukraine War.

    • Replies: @Dave Wightman
    , @A123
    , @A123
  41. German_reader says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    I don’t agree about Schwab, but noble sentiments, thanks. I don’t think we interacted much (if at all), but other commenters have missed you and expressed a wish for you to return.

    • Agree: Yevardian
  42. Wokechoke says:
    @Beckow

    De Valera and the Polish Countess survived the reprisals after the Dublin Post Office Caper as a result of being non British and non Irish.

  43. @Wokechoke

    Shut the ‘f’ up, Pokechoke! He is complaining about a trial which he imagines is unjust, I say it _is_ just, but in fact we have a real example of injustice with the jan 6 trials. So you moron, a direct comparison between trials is ‘on topic’. And further, when the Confederate soldiers surrendered, they wwere asked to lay down their weapons, then they were lined up and shot! This happened more than once. The officials of the US government, with no trial, executed the Confederate soldiers who surrendered under white flag of truce. Now that is another _direct comparison_ between historical fact of the US government who ‘whines about the mercenaries who got an actual trial’ for their crimes. The Confederate soldiers got no trial, only sudden death from betrayal and Yankee treachery. So chew on that libtard whiner.

    • LOL: Barbarossa
  44. @Mikel

    Hi Mikel, I realize that I was bad about getting back to you on some of our discussions last thread. I got really busy last week.

    such as preventing big life traumas, nor do we get very clear guidance. It’s not even clear that too much protection from trauma and the stress of life does any good.

    I would say that big life traumas are bad but consistent challenges and responsibility are very important to building up psychological strength. It’s good to push kids out of their comfort zone and give them real responsibility while making sure they can avail themselves to help when they actually need it.

    I think that much of the problem come from kids being too insulated by overprotective and over bearing parents from having to deal with life in an independent way. This seems to lead to an inability to cope and mental fragility.

    Micromanaging parents are the same as heath paranoiac parents who spray everything down with Lysol. We know that over-disinfecting things will lead to your child having a stunted immune system since the body did meet the challenges it needed to encounter to build a robust constitution.

    I think it’s a similar dynamic mentally. If one’s mental resiliency doesn’t develop during youth from normal and self directed challenges and victories and also adversities and defeats, then one can end up being unable to handle adversity as an adult. If adults try to intervene to much to make their child successful and “safe” then they may just hobble them emotionally.

    We live in a world which makes individuals feel powerless in many ways. As S points out, it is of the utmost importance that children have a secure and safe home environment as a jumping off point. That security has to be a starting point for independent and confident decision making for it really come to fruition though.

    This seems to be one of the main problems that I see with people in their 20’s or so; they feel powerless and lacking agency. I think it’s partly a consequence of too much over-protection growing up and too much attention paid to the 24 hour national news cycle and problems. I guess paying too much attention to what is fundamentally unsolvable on your level is somewhat neurotic.

    • Replies: @Mikel
  45. @Mikel

    https://ebookee.com/PDF-Words-of-War-The-Civil-War-Battle-Reportage-of-the-New-York-Times-and-the-Charleston-Mercury-and-What-the-Historians-Say-really-Happened_3336893.html

    Hey, someone already did my work for me. It looks like an interesting start especially since it’s downloadable.

    But to heck with that. I just ordered a used copy off eBay for \$7. The book I was originally referencing wasn’t mine so I didn’t have a chance to compare the accounts in depth. I was struck by the tone though and how much less emotive it seemed. It seems like an interesting topic to get a bit deeper into, so I’ll likely give more detailed impressions once I get into it further.

    On pessimism, I don’t get too worked up. I figure if things ever go nuclear there is precious little I can do anyway. I try to stay prepared for what I reasonably can and enjoy my family and life as much as I can. Even though things are crazy in much of clownworld it’s possible to build a different paradigm within your own family and community. I feel like that it’s the best way of “taking the power back”.

    • Agree: Mikel
  46. Wokechoke says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    would a total famine in Africa be so bad for the world though?

  47. Wokechoke says:

    Yes, the topic at hand is clearly Appomatox Court House and Andersonville.

    Either way the two dipshits who went to go fight someone else’s war have created a headache for Whitehall the Kremlin and an opportunity for Kiev.

  48. Wokechoke says:
    @Verymuchalive

    The press will go bananas. Zelenskyy will rub his little moichant hands figuring out the angle.

  49. songbird says:

    Japanese sample return mission from asteroid Ryugu found amino acids.

    https://news.yahoo.com/ryugu-asteroid-mission-suggests-space-150007177.html

    Probably not really big news, as telescope spectronomy already suggested their presence in space decades ago. Still cool, though. Some people think that life started in space, in low-gravity bodies with water that was kept liquid from the heat of radioactive elements. (perhaps, useful to play up this idea to the Greens?)

  50. AP says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    Wish you would stay!

    • Agree: Barbarossa, Coconuts
  51. Mr. Hack says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    It’s good to hear from you. How are you, why the long stay away? You can’t just leave us here with a couple of nice platitudes and then disappear again for another long period?

    What do you really think about the reasoning/reality (if any) of this Russia/Ukraine war? One thing that is perfectly clear, is that Putin started this war. Why so hard on Zelensky? Would you expect any real leader of a country to just roll over and surrender at the first signs of an invasion, just to save lives? Doesn’t Ukraine have every right in the world to defend itself from this invasion?

    We shared so many interesting conversations here. Did you manage to stay in touch with your Buddhist friend, AltanBakshi?

  52. songbird says:

    Should Erdoğan be sanctioned for his vicious attempt to steal the joy of young, Anglophone school kids everywhere learning for the first time that there is a country called “Turkey?”

    IMO, he should be given an ultimatum: 48 hrs to make gobly noising while saluting his new flag borrowed from American Thanksgiving, or we drop the bomb on Ankara.

  53. Wielgus says:
    @Wokechoke

    At that time they all had British citizenship though, at least until the Irish Free State was proclaimed.

    A closer parallel might be those mercenaries in Africa. Recall how a number were captured in Angola and some were executed by the MPLA authorities, including “Colonel” Callan, former British Parachute Regiment soldier and a Greek Cypriot by origin. Others were imprisoned and released some years later. I read in one source that some of the Brits at least had far right affiliations.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
  54. @Bashibuzuk

    I add my voice to those who wish you would stay, as your posts were often of a high quality with a strong element of humanism.

    I also hope that AaronB graces us with his return.

  55. @songbird

    I thought they changed their name in English to the cringe-inducing Türkiye recently? Apparently Turks have been bullied by meanies for having a silly name in English for too long and thus couldn’t bear the humiliation anymore.

    FWIW, I suspect very few people in the US will switch to new name and instead merely continue making more Thanksgiving-related jokes – as they should.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    , @songbird
  56. @songbird

    IMO, he should be given an ultimatum: 48 hrs to make gobly noising

    Göbliye göbliye.

    • LOL: songbird
  57. @songbird

    I don’t say it is impossible, with missiles – but I suspect that it is beyond the current capacities of Russians (or probably anyone) to manage that, at scale, or in a cost effective way.

    As you rightly point out, this is fundamentally a question of efficiency rather than capability. If it costs more to bring these satellites down than for the US/SpaceX to launch them, then obviously it’s a losing game unless you try to fry everything above Ukraine in one go, but that would probably bring down the electricity grid writ large. Not to mention Russia’s own satellites.

    From what I’ve read, a lot of effort is directed into EW capabilities. Russia has been become very effective in nullifying UA drones in recent weeks thanks to EW, thereby exposing Bayraktar as fairly useless against a sophisticated army. The hope would be to scale those efforts up to the stratosphere, but that is likely some time off. The goal ought to be to move away from expensive one-off missiles into a system that can be used multiple times, thereby massively reducing the cost of disruption. It may be that destruction of satellites is too expensive and merely distorting their signal would be sufficient, if the approach was to be sustainable financially.

  58. @Thulean Friend

    but that would probably bring down the electricity grid writ large

    What if this becomes a strategic war goal analogous to a nuclear first strike, on North America & Western Europe, not to mention Russia & China? Eventually someone will pull a Strangelove and drop it.

    • Replies: @Miro23
  59. @Thulean Friend

    It’s starting to look like that Czechia (Česko)/Czech Republic (Česká republika) thing, but that time both native forms are being Anglicized.

    A123 will want to take it out of context and unleash a diatribe on Erdogan’s personal Islamist rule anyway.

  60. Coconuts says:

    Reply to Yevardian’s post 908 on the other thread…

    I don’t hate or even dislike Dostoevsky, but I do think a lot of Western enthusiasm for him comes out of similar orientalist views of Russia that make people take Dugin seriously or consider Solzhenitsyn a great writer.

    Idk, when I was reading Dostoevsky novels in the 90s he was one of a few Russian Empire authors recognised as being among the ‘great classics you should read’, Tolstoy, Chekov, Gogol were some of the others. These weren’t seen as more exotic than say, Don Quixote or Goethe. Reading these authors was thought to bring understanding of European civilisation and the human condition.

    My parents had some Solzhenitsyn paperbacks from the 70s, but by the 90s he was de facto in the ‘topical writing’ category, i.e. he had been a big thing because he was a phenomena of the post-1968/ Prague spring era, when the New Left was displacing the Socialists of the previous generations and broke with the Soviet Union.

    Now this seems like an archaic Eurocentric provincial culture, before the influence of these guys like Edward Said and Foucault had started to filter out from universities into wider culture. You might have felt vaguely guilty about reading so many bourgeois writers of the past, who were in some way elitist, out of touch with contemporary social issues and the present day struggles of the poor, but not because they were all white European males.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
    , @Yevardian
    , @Dmitry
  61. Coconuts says:
    @Wielgus

    Maybe there is a parallel with the way Pakistani, Turkish, Saudi etc. Islamists who entered the UK to engage in Jihadi activities were treated by the British government when the wars in the Middle East were still underway.

  62. @Yellowface Anon

    Czechia was an improvement over “Czech Republic” since it’s faster and therefore more convenient.

    By contrast, Türkiye isn’t more convenient for an English speaker and is solely driven by an aggravated sense of victimhood and frankly not being able to take a joke or two without losing their marbles.

    You’d think Turkey would focus on their collapsing currency or other important matters rather than the optics of being bantered about Thanksgiving once in a while.

  63. Mikhail says: • Website

    https://nonzero.substack.com/p/propaganda-american-style?s=w

    Excerpt –

    Here’s a joke I recently heard a Russian tell:

    A Russian is on an airliner heading to the US, and the American in the seat next to him asks, “So what brings you to the US?” The Russian replies, “I’m studying the American approach to propaganda.” The American says, “What propaganda?” The Russian says, “That’s what I mean.

    • LOL: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    , @A123
  64. LondonBob says:
    @TG

    I think the Russians really underestimated the hate and craziness of the neolibs and neocons, and overestimated the rationality of the Western elites. I have Jewish friends and I know how wild they are for Russian blood. They are burning down their own economies in a war they know is lost anyway, the Russians went in soft thinking they were dealing with rational opponents.

    • Agree: Miro23
  65. @Mr. Hack

    Mr Hack, we may have had our differences, but you have excellent taste in music. The Bonzos always have been top dogs. May the spirit of Viv Stanshall be with you.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  66. Daniel H says:
    @Wokechoke

    Seems a bit harsh, and I think Putin ought to consider, leaning on the locals, it sensible to send them home alive, if a little shaken and much wiser.

    A good will off ramp for the public in the UK, showing that these Russians are not Flesh Eating Orcs.

    Nah, shoot ’em.

    Maybe it’s better for the world that we see the Russians as flesh-eating Orcs.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Beckow
  67. Mr. Hack says:
    @songbird

    I think that I’ve seen all of the “King Kong” movies (at least all of the “main” ones). They each have their own merits. My roommate had the newest one on recently, from 2017, “Kong: Skull Island”, which on retrospect was probably far from being the worst exemplar of this series.

    My own live encounter was the most terrifying sequel of all!. Real adrenaline and all. 🙂

  68. Daniel H says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    A little bit of statistics from the US Department of Defense.

    US Department of Defense? The same people that brought us the “body count” fraud of Vietnam?

    When probing journalists questioned the DOD during the Vietnam war about the “body count”, that the actually counted dead Vietnamese bodies in the after-action reports of US commanders on the battlefield did not match the “body count” published by the DOD, the DOD asserted a by-golly truthful estimate, because it was well know that in the heat of the battle, the Viet-Cong and North Vietnamese army took great and scrupulous care to retrieve and spirit away their dead, all the time under hellacious attack. Body count. A fraud equal to the assertion that “we never lost a battle in Vietnam..”

  69. Daniel H says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    A little bit of statistics from the US Department of Defense.

    US Department of Defense? The same people that brought us the “body count” fraud of Vietnam?

    When probing journalists questioned the DOD during the Vietnam war about the “body count”, that the actually counted dead Vietnamese bodies in the after-action reports of US commanders on the battlefield did not match the “body count” published by the DOD, the DOD asserted a a by-golly truthful estimate, because it was well know that in the heat of the battle, the Viet-Cong and North Vietnamese army took great and scrupulous care to retrieve and spirit away their dead, all the time under hellacious attack. Body count. A fraud equal to the assertion that “we never lost a battle in Vietnam..”

  70. Mr. Hack says:
    @Verymuchalive

    Thanks for the compliment (must be Mr. Hack appreciation month, but I know that wont last too long). I try not to come off as being an old crudgy sort. But yes, the “Bonzo Dog Doodah Band” were a creative lot, sort of a Monty Python for the ears. I liked all of their albums, with special mention going to “Tadpoles”, but my favorite, I think, was “The Urban Spaceman”. Crazy good stuff! 🙂

    • Agree: Philip Owen
    • Thanks: Verymuchalive
    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  71. @Thulean Friend

    The goal ought to be to move away from expensive one-off missiles into a system that can be used multiple times, thereby massively reducing the cost of disruption.

    Flying saucer, rayguns.

    I saw an interview with Diane Pasulka. Her sources say we got them and she does not disbelieve them.

    My god she is an idiot.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  72. @Mikhail

    I believe humor is being reclassified as aiding and abetting terrorism by the homeland security disinformation control bureau.

    In 1840 you weren’t allowed to raise the specter of slavery in congress. It was kind of like Israel and Palestine is today (it was a lot like Israel and Palestine is today). Back then it took a war which destroyed a third of the United States to change it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gag_rule_(United_States)

  73. @Emil Nikola Richard

    My wife has a cousin who works in higher Army intel and who was actually working at Area 51 a few years ago. She wouldn’t tell us exactly what was there, but did say that she could barely believe it when she she saw it.

    She’s been in the Army for over 20 years, with most of that in intel, with multiple tours in Afghanistan and Iraq, so she’s seen and been privy to a lot. The fact that she was so floored was impressive. Too bad she wouldn’t spill the classified beans, but whatever it is it’s some mind bending stuff.

  74. Coconuts says:
    @Coconuts

    Though about Dugin specifically I have seen a few arguments that he represents a form of orientalism (maybe he embraces this) and part of his orientalism is supposed to come from the large influence that thinkers like Evola had on him.

    There was a line of argument on the French right in the 1920s and 30s that following WW1 the German and Russian intelligentsias had been overwhelmed by Asian influences and were channeling Asiatic thought into the rest of Europe, including France, where it might threaten Greco-Latin civilisation. Various German writers were put forward as evidence (i.e. Spengler), you find some unusual commentary on Nazism from this point of view, that it was like Germany falling into the grip of an Oriental religion. Anyway, it is interesting that Dugin’s work seems to have been translated and become known in the West via people who are also interested in Spengler, Evola and thinking related to the mid-century German regime.

  75. @Yellowface Anon

    Ukraine managed to offend both Japan and China simultaneously. It was totally inappropriate to compare Hirohito to Hitler from a historian’s perspective.

    During wartime decision-making Hirohito was mostly reticent. After Hiroshima, Soviet entry, and Nagasaki, Hirohito intervened to end the war. In 1978 he received state visit from Deng Xiaoping in Tokyo, where he “expressed regret” over “the events of the past”.

    It was neither here nor there to compare him to Hitler. So of course the Japanese are offended.

    Many Chinese are offended that Ukraine’s apology to Japan, because the Japanese are allegedly worse than Nazis, this claims follows in part from the Nazi John Rabe who was appalled by Japanese atrocities in Nanjing.

    But John Rabe, who was actually in Nanjing, holds that the death count from the Massacre is 50 to 60,000

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Rabe#Nanking_Massacre

    Whereas the CCP, who was nowhere near Nanjing (they were holed up in remote Northwest Yan’an faraway from the main battles), holds that the number is 300,000. In addition there’s clear evidence some of the atrocities was committed by ill-disciplined warlord Chinese troops.

    In Feng Xiaogang’s Back to 1942 about the Henan Famines, it was depicted that KMT army was requistioning grains from starving peasants, KMT officials also withheld grains and sold it for profit on black market. Whereas the Japanese general 岡村 寧次 Okamura Yasuji distributed grain reserves to Chinese peasants in territories he controlled.

  76. A123 says: • Website
    @Wokechoke

    The trials of the Jan6 people are complete bullshit of course. topic here is the Ukraine War.

    This is an Open Thread, so J6 is a legitimate topic. However everyone here, if they have an opinion, concurs that the trials are bogus. There is injustice everywhere. Jury selection for the Sussman trial was so corrupt that it contained individuals with ties to Hillary Clinton.

    The Rule of Law is broken and MAGA will deliver payback actions available under precedent

    Anyone accused of “insurrection” can be tossed in the J6 facility and held in J6 conditions. I look forward to the day when actual insurrectionists, corrupt DoJ prosecutors and FBI collaborators, are detained there without the hope of bail. Two wrongs may not make a right, however it can produce justice.

    It will even clean the place up a bit. Cockroaches and rats have minimal standards. They will leave rather than associate with scum like Nazi-crats.

    PEACE 😇

  77. songbird says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I thought they changed their name in English to the cringe-inducing Türkiye recently?

    Yes, it’s still funny, but I prefer the original, and it is difficult to say where it will stop.

    Turkey has been an especially forceful demander of us accepting their names. I don’t think they deliver a letter if it says “Constantinople”, and then there are those other Greek cities that they changed the name of.

    If we don’t hold the line, then the Hungarians might insist we start calling their country Magyarország.

  78. A123 says: • Website
    @Mikhail

    I know I must sound like a broken record, but the phrase Winning The Peace is critical to understanding Russia’s victory. In locations that are on “their side of the line” they are:

    — Doing what they can to limit civilians casualties.
    — Rebuilding infrastructure quickly
    — Respecting the rights of minorities, such as Greek Orthodox

    The Fake Steam Media and Ukie Maximalists push total bunk that Mariupol was destroyed. They cherry pick photos that are zoomed in on the few structures that were flattened. Fooling Democrats is pretty easy. Low-IQ #NeverTrump followers been trained to mindlessly accept what they are told.

    However, fiction cannot last for the long term. As people sucessfully rebuild on the Russian side of the line, that will eventually get out. Backing for Ukie Azovites will diminish. The death knell of Ukie Maximalist fantasies will be when the Fake Stream Media moves on to other propaganda in efforts to bump up their collapsing ratings.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  79. gT says:
    @TG

    It was the Spartans who fought the same enemy too often and so the enemy was able to learn from the Spartans and defeat them.

    After the coup in 2014/15 the Ukrainians could possibly have lost like 50’000 men in Donetsk, so forcing them to sign the Minsk agreements. This time round they learnt their lesson and dug defensive lines every few kilometers or so. That just makes it harder for the artillery to get them, but get them the artillery will, it just takes longer and more rounds.

    But Russia has got all the time in the world, NATO doesn’t want to send their troops in to face that kind of artillery barrage. The Ukrainians are going to have several hundred thousand dead when this skirmish finally ends.

  80. A123 says: • Website
    @Wokechoke

    This is among the best possible reactions to J6 foolery.

    PEACE 😇

     

  81. @Barbarossa

    Counterintelligence on this topic area certainly is mind bending.

    This is close to Pasulka’s exact words:

    Bob Lazar shouldn’t have said it. We aren’t ready for it.

    When the source is classified top secret just ignore. Anybody who imparts it upon your or my reality is up to no good. The least bad that can be said for them by far is they are showing off and the most bad is things like dead Kennedy(s) or dead Kennedies or however you wish to spell it.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  82. Mr. Hack says:
    @A123

    I go easy on you for a few days, and this is the best that you can come up with?

    The Fake Steam Media and Ukie Maximalists push total bunk that Mariupol was destroyed. They cherry pick photos that are zoomed in on the few structures that were flattened. Fooling Democrats is pretty easy. Low-IQ #NeverTrump followers been trained to mindlessly accept what they are told

    Lucky thing nobody is following you here and not mindlessly accepting your brand of pro-Kremlin BS. Check out this very concise media cherry picked film clip, taken by drones above Mariupol’s skyline. You’re a lying sack of excrement if you try and spread nonsense that only a “few structures” were destroyed in Mariupol.


    Liar kremlinstoogeA123 peddling his pro-Putin fairy tales about only a “few structures that were flattened”. He’s obviously depressed when a real American patriot like Michael Pence is shown providing hard core footage during the trial showing what criminal activities expresidentTrump was up to on Jan 6.

  83. @A123

    Upgrades to the F-16I have rendered the Russian made S-300 useless. That solution has travelled back to the U.S. and our fighters have largely been upgraded to beat the S-300.

    Right on time.

    The S-300 was discontinued ten years ago. The Russians too made upgrades. They are using S-400 and S-500 now.

    Hello.

    • Replies: @A123
  84. @Mr. Hack

    He’s right.

    About 60 percent of the buildings were damaged about 30 percent seriously damaged Approximately 40 percent weren’t damaged. The footage shows the steel plant and surrounding neighborhood.

    • Replies: @A123
    , @Mr. Hack
  85. A123 says: • Website
    @Here Be Dragon

    Hello…. Right back at you… Plus the #EpicFailOMG award.

    Have you noticed that the Russians are still selling S-300? And, the S-400 is closely related.

    China has already called out Russia for the ineffectiveness of their systems.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    Note: The audio is a machine auto-translation and is thus a bit wonky.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  86. A123 says: • Website
    @Here Be Dragon

    About 60 percent of the buildings [in Mariupol] were damaged about 30 percent seriously damaged Approximately 40 percent weren’t damaged.

    Even these numbers seem quite high. Are they for the official city limits? Or, the larger metropolitan area?

    Losing glass means covering the opening with plywood until it can be replaced. As this has a cost, it is included in “damaged”. However it is readily repairable.

    The industrial area where the Azovites chose to fight structure by structure is pretty much 100% loss. This and other neo-Nazi hard points comprise most of the seriously damaged 30%. Unfortunate, but the Russian forces had little choice.

    For those who are not cherry picking, the bulk if the city remained viable. Livability is already rapidly improving. Water, Sewer, and Electricity have already been restored across almost all Mariupol’s residential areas.

    PEACE 😇

  87. @Coconuts

    Probably not Evola.

    Evola’s political preferences are pretty famously for Holy Roman Empire c. 1240 A. D. and everything after that is puke.

    It is a pity nobody actually reads Julius Evola. He has great stuff. Aside from his preposterous politics. Nobody is going back to 1250! This ought to be pretty obvious.

    Claims of a connection of Evola politics and Dugin politics seem far fetched. As in fetched from beyond Pluto which ain’t even a planet any more.

  88. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    “few structures” were destroyed in Mariupol.

    Western literati refer to it as ‘collateral damage‘ or ‘even creative destruction‘ by free enterprise. Check out Detroit, Buffalo, even Newcastle. And, of course, Phoenix – sans Scottsdale and the zoo – I drove through and visited. You won’t fool anyone, it is a dry sh..thole looking like it has been partially bombed. And the people, omg, how does anyone get that fat with so much sunshine?

    The functional cement-housing dominates large parts of Europe, east and west, removing 30% is not a bad idea. Mariupol is an opportunity: a beautiful garden city by the see, revived industry, new port, cheap real estate – that is what smart people do. But you instead bellyache over spilled milk. This is a golden opportunity: material resources, location, climate and demographics. In the long run I would bet on Mariupol over Phoenix.

    And you are a Michael Pence fan? Wow, I knew there had to be one out there somewhere. Must be lonely.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  89. Beckow says:
    @Daniel H

    …Maybe it’s better for the world that we see the Russians as flesh-eating Orcs.

    Fear works. Russia has tried everything else from reason and compromise, to harshness and defeating the West thoroughly in a war, WWII. Plus adopting a Western ideology and the ‘we-are-all-brothers‘ Gorbachevian fake peace.

    None of it changed the essential Western hostility – or primeval hatred among many. Maybe creating an irrational fear would work. It is very ugly, Moroccan was a student in Kiev who stupidly volunteered. A real savvy move would be to let him go, but not the Brits. But my guess is they will be exchanged. The point of the sentence has been achieved: there will be fewer mercenaries rushing to Ukraine to fight the “Orcs”.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
  90. @A123

    Of course Russia is selling the S-300 – the old outdated systems that are being replaced. They are not producing them anymore.

    The video is a propaganda bullshit.

    The S-400 is a completely different system with new radars and new missiles, it’s moronic to mention the two in a sentence as if they are somehow comparable.

    Furthermore the S-400 in Syria are not meant to protect Damascus. As a matter of fact Russia has not used the S-400 in Syria at all. Several attacks on the Russian Air Base were defeated by the Pantsir systems.

    It’s really amazing how people often bring up this argument, like “but Russia could have used the S-400 to take down the F-35 but they didn’t because they probably couldn’t”. Very funny.

    You want the S-400? Buy it – for \$600 million. Use it as you wish. Russia is not Santa Claus, and doesn’t owe anything to anybody.

    And of course “China criticizes S-400” is a complete bullshit as well.

  91. Things Russia has brought back to Europe:

    1. Inter-state aggression for territorial expansion. Last seen 1945.

    2. Flattened cities being called “victory.” Last seen Spanish Civil War.

    3. Mass rapes as weapon of war. Last seen former Yugoslavia.

    4. Constant and open nuclear threats. Last seen never.

    5. Executing prisoners of war via formal proceedings without crime alleged. Last seen Mongol Horde.

    6. Attritional warfare with only kilometres movement. Last seen 1918.

    7. Ethnic cleansing of Ukrainians. Last seen Holodomor.

    8. T62 tank. Last seen crushing of Prague Spring.

    Russia is a great place. Truly I have no idea why no one wants to play with Russians at sports, compete with them at athletics, trade with them, host them in our countries, be friends with them, or really do anything but spit on them on the street. They are the best thing for Europe. Truly. It is just cancel culture. Because misgendering someone and unleashing the horrors of war on an independent nation, combined with mass rapes, mass murders and Mongolian savagery, are obviously the same!

    Imagine the hypocrisy of not hating someone for using the wrong pronouns, but actually hating them for industrial-scale war crimes!

    But, to be fair, the West did tolerate Russia and therefore perhaps we really are at fault. We could destroy their entire military in Ukraine in a day.

    And if not doing so, has let Russia take Europe to this point, perhaps now is the time to try an alternative method of stopping escalation. To meet Russian force with overwhelming force and use our combined air and missile power to obliterate them in the field.

    Is it really more risky than allowing Russia to double down and get away with this stuff for another 100 days?

    If we don’t act, what else will Russia re-introduce to Europe? They already seem to be kidknapping children and putting them into education camps. And their shills were already making constant nuclear threats whenever their position is imperilled.

    They want to conquer the vast majority of Ukraine, but they have no ability, so the nukes will come out as a threat again, so why wait?

    Just put Russia out of its suffering by annihilating their military in the field and then say “what next?” If failing in their mission means they might use nukes, we might as well skip a few steps and get that confrontation over with.

    I used to really like Russia and Russians. Now I just feel repelled by anything related. That’s in a few months. You shills can argue all of your nonsense all you want, but the truth is that you make me feel viscerally sick. I still pity you, but now I also just want to never be reminded that you exist. Sorry, but that’s the truth. You can’t argue your way out of it. Just accept that loathing is now the most ordinary response to you, and that this is a direct result of your actions. So-called “intellectual arguments” against this, are pointless, and as they are just deflective excuses, they only magnify the loathing which anyone with a sense of their heart will feel whenever they are unlucky enough to be reminded of you. I’d be lying if I said any otherwise.

    You might look forward to when Western newspapers drop their interest in this conflict, but you misunderstand why they will do this. They will do it when the populace’s loathing becomes so solid and deep that newspapers no longer sell when they mention Russia, because no one wants to hear about Russia, just like most people avoid torture porn. It disgusts them.

    You might continue in Ukraine and grind out a few more towns etc. but all you’ll be left with is an empire of ashes, depression and lies. And the loathing and disgust of your fellow Europeans, the contempt of the Chinese and only what you’ll pay for from some warlords in Africa. Places like Brazil are already full of Ukrainian flags, but no Russian.

    Also, I thought it was funny to note that Putin’s claim that the collapse of the USSR was the greatest disaster etc.

    Why? Because it was for Russians, and those who Russia still dominated or tried to dominate, but it was also the greatest win and moment of the 20th Century for East Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia etc.

    Notice, basically those who could escape Russia and the Russians won out of the collapse of the Soviet Union, and those who became more concentrated as Russia and Russians lost. In other words, the more Russian a place is, the more miserable and incapable. That’s an obvious fact. And just wait until it clarifies in everyone’s heads, as it will. Russia is a dead project and a dead identity. What else can be said?

    Is this nice? No. But it is true. If you’re white then the niceness of your country, pretty much forever, has been determined by how physically or mentally far you can get away from Russia and Russianess was. Inarguably true. Lol.

  92. @Beckow

    “Fear works”. Fine. Then time for NATO to obliterate the Russian military in the field. Certainly a full air and missile strike on every single Russian position in Ukraine would teach Russia to fear invading and raping a sovreign European country. And, as you said, “fear works.”

    This is like Lord of the Rings, but the Eagles carry more fire and fury than Mount Doom and the Orcs can only operate outside of Mordor because the men of the West tolerate them and hope they will eventually see sense. But such tolerance is ebbing fast.

  93. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    You won’t fool anyone, it is a dry sh..thole looking like it has been partially bombed.

    “Partially bombed” Here’s part of my everyday drive to work from Phoenix into Scottsdale via Lincoln Drive. The part that veers to the right on Invergordon is even nicer. But I don’t have much time to waste on your tomfoolery to search for more video.

    kremlinstoogeA123:

    the bulk if the city remained viable. Livability is already rapidly improving. Water, Sewer, and Electricity have already been restored across almost all Mariupol’s residential areas.

    And you:

    Mariupol is an opportunity: a beautiful garden city by the see, revived industry, new port, cheap real estate – that is what smart people do. But you instead bellyache over spilled milk. This is a golden opportunity: material resources, location, climate and demographics. In the long run I would bet on Mariupol over Phoenix.

    The both of you sound like you’ve been smoking some meth. When you’re ready to substantiate your ludicrous claims and provide me with a video clip advertising some new housing and condos in this new “garden city by the sea” I’ll keep laughing…and laughing…ha, ha , ha – you’re both totally nuts!


    Real estate agents kremlinstoogeA123 and unrepentantsovokBeckow are pimping the new “Garden City by the Sea”. Unfortunately, returning citizens of Mariupol aren’t so impressed with the remodeling job done to their once lovely city.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  94. German_reader says:

    Putin supposedly called Lavrov “asshole” and “faggot”, because talks with the Chinese about support for Russia weren’t as successful as hoped. Also negative comments about president Xi:
    https://newsbeezer.com/switzerlandeng/asshole-russian-elite-attack-each-other/
    Might of course be totally made up, hard to evaluate.

  95. Mikel says:
    @Barbarossa

    I realize that I was bad about getting back to you on some of our discussions last thread.

    No worries about that. I couldn’t complain anyway because I am myself very bad at getting back to people who write to me, both on forums and in real life. I am always busy myself. Having online conversations should probably be a form of relax, where you can disengage any time, rather than another chore.

    I have been arguing that people in the past were possibly as bananas as ourselves but I do concede that children nowadays are more overprotected than ever and that is very likely an important factor in the kind of neuroses that are so prevalent these days.

    One time I asked a doctor why so many people are taking opioids and abusing prescription meds and he told me that they do it just to be able to cope with life. As simple as that. That suggests a widespread lack of ability to deal with frustration and adversity.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
  96. Mikel says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    Welcome back, old friend.

    If my memory doesn’t fail, your wife was not happy with your spending too much time debating on the internet, and she was probably right, as is mine. But it shouldn’t cause any harm if you leave us your thoughts from time to time.

  97. FitsMan says:
    @Matra

    I take issue with your fatuous statement that the UK treated the IRA with “kid gloves”. Even were it true, the UK certainly treated the ordinary indiginous citizens of Northern Ireland abominably. Since the Unionist community considers itself British, certainly everyone all around should be delighted if they were to decamp to the actual confines of Britain. As for the Brit mercenaries, clearly they found Russians equiped with firearms to be far more formidable than Irish wielding rocks.

  98. @Triteleia Laxa

    Perhaps you haven’t heard but the person who is responsible for the spreading of that “Russian atrocities” propaganda – Lyudmyla Denisova, this old lesbian on the photo below – has been fired by the Ukrainian Parliament, for causing damage to the image of Ukraine by making claims without any evidence behind them, not even having any witnesses – a complete fabrication.

    She has said in an interview that she did that in order to persuade the western countries that they must help Ukraine. All these stories are made up.

    According to the online Ukrinform news platform, one member of the Ukrainian parliament, Pavlo Frolov, provided a number of reasons why Denisova was removed, including “the numerous details of ‘unnatural sexual offenses’ and child sexual abuses in the occupied territories, which were unsupported by evidence and only harmed Ukraine.”

    Ukraine Official Fired Over Handling of Russian Sexual Assault Claims
    https://www.newsweek.com/lyudmila-denisova-ukraine-commissioner-human-rights-removed-russian-sexual-assault-claims-1711680

    A Ukrainian government official frequently cited as a source by western news media for her allegations of atrocities committed by Russian troops has been fired by the Ukrainian parliament, in part because of the unevidenced nature of those claims.

    Ukrainian official behind Western media reports of Russian atrocities fired by Ukrainian parliament
    https://www.pressenza.com/2022/06/ukrainian-official-behind-western-media-reports-of-russian-atrocities-fired-by-ukrainian-parliament/

    Your 800-word diatribe is a little bit outdated.

  99. Wokechoke says:
    @Triteleia Laxa

    And Ukraine is next to Moscow. So they should have sought terms once the Russians steamed in.

  100. Daniel H says:
    @Barbarossa

    My wife has a cousin who works in higher Army intel and who was actually working at Area 51 a few years ago. She wouldn’t tell us exactly what was there, but did say that she could barely believe it when she she saw it.

    She’s been in the Army for over 20 years, with most of that in intel, with multiple tours in Afghanistan and Iraq, so she’s seen and been privy to a lot. The fact that she was so floored was impressive.

    Oh stop it. Any military that puts women into “sensitive” responsibilities, allows them to witness and experience horrific matters is no military at all. I confidently assert that your wife’s cousin doesn’t know WTF she is talking about. Your wife’s cousin is a bullshitter and you and your wife fall for it. Next you will be retelling breathless accounts from some tranny friend in the brass. US military is a paper tiger.

    • LOL: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    , @songbird
  101. @Mikel

    Some facts for “trads” to consider before they get carried away:

    Demographic research suggests that at the beginning of the 19th century no country in the world had a life expectancy longer than 40 years. India were ~25, while Belgium was around 40. For Europe as a whole, it was ~33 years.

    Typical estimates of per-capita intakes of alcohol for 16th-century Central Europe cluster around 1 to 1.5 litres per day

    One out of 10,000 was murdered each year in Elizabethan England; that number has declined dramatically.

    The homicide crisis that gripped England in the late sixteenth and much of the seventeeth century did not make England the most homicidal nation in Europe. Indeed, it may have been the least homicidal.

    At one point in the 17th C, the urban homicide rate on Sweden was far in excess of what it is even in Detroit today.

    The past was radically different, or rather, the various pasts were different. If you live until 35, spend most of your time drunk, among a Swedish urban murder rate that outdid Detroit, and suffered under a tremendous disease burden that stunted you and could kill you, or anyone you know, or everyone you know, at any time, then it is pointless comparing things.

    Having said that, meaning is created from many places and tradition has an important role in that, but people should remember that, ultimately, whether they think they’re following tradition, or not, they have been creating their own meaning all along.

    And that doesn’t make it meaningless, but, as they are part of creation, and inseparable from it, that proves it had to be that way and is good that way.

    Your ancestors’ lives echo through yours, even though it is only in transcendental moments that you can connect. The gap between your realities is so wide that only the divine can cross it. But then, those moments when you do cross it, they’re not just following tradition, they’re truly harmonious. A touch of heaven, but without the ease, and therefore so much more worth it.

    • Replies: @Adept
  102. Beckow says:
    @Triteleia Laxa

    …time for NATO to obliterate the Russian military in the field. Certainly a full air and missile strike on every single Russian position in Ukraine

    Are you suggesting a nuclear war? If no, you are just blowing hot air. If yes, you are nuts.

    You are facing a dilemma: to have a chance to defeat Russia will require an active Nato involvement, leaving it to the Ukies is not working. Are they going to do it? What would be the odds of an escalation to a nuclear exchange?

    If you are still rational you have to address it. If you are not, well, enjoy the fireworks in your mind.

  103. @Yellowface Anon

    See Yellowface Anon, you earned a “Troll” from A123. He’s probably irritated that you got the terminology all wrong.

    It’s not “Islamist” rule, it’s “SJW-Islamohomofascist” rule. Haven’t you been listening at all?

    • Replies: @A123
  104. I won’t be surprised when Belarusian troops and those stationed in Kaliningrad overrun Lithuania, and then the Finns gestured by NATO to make a move onto St. Petersburg. Speeding towards WWIII…

  105. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    ….provide me with a video clip advertising some new housing and condos in this new “garden city by the sea”

    You seem not to understand the element of time. In real estate, rebuilding takes time. In the case of Mariupol it will happen. You are missing an opportunity, others will jump in.

    Regarding you stubborn local patriotism about Phoenix: I specifically excluded Scottsdale that I enjoyed. But the bulk of Phoenix is a dreary, ugly oversized hellh,.le, with badly designed freeways and paper-mache housing. In the middle of desert.

    It is populated mostly by endless cholo mestizos and some elderly whites (the whites concentrate around Scottsdale). They all seem to be incredibly fat and that must not be healthy in that heat. Phoenix itself has no charm, no city center, no walkable areas. It is very short of water as the drought spreads. There is no long-term future there. I would bet that \$500k invested in the Phoenix real estate is a much worse investment than \$100k put in Mariupol. And that, my friend, is all that matters. Enjoy the monkeys, Phoenix seems overrun by them. And stay cool, the summer is coming.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  106. @Emil Nikola Richard

    @Daniel H as well.

    She isn’t the kind of person who talks about what she does, and since she’s done multiple tours in Afghanistan and Iraq I know she’s seen some heavy action. So, she’s no fool or braggart, that much I’ll vouch for.

    That being said, she wouldn’t give any details about what she saw other than that it shook her. I don’t make any particular inferences about it other than the government has stuff they don’t tell us about (big shock). I’m certainly not saying that their are little green men floating in vats or ray guns, I’m just saying that there is some sort of interesting stuff there.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  107. @Daniel H

    US military is a paper tiger.

    Highly overrated, yes. Paper tiger is hyperbole.

    Since I know my wife’s cousin and you don’t I’ll stick with my own assessment of her character.

  108. songbird says:
    @Daniel H

    Here’s an idea: what if World War T is just a camouflage for alien invasion and subversion?

    These aliens can dress up in human skin, take positions of authority in the regime (which they control), only they can’t manage to seem normal, despite their best efforts. They are still hideous – even their voices are deeply disturbing, sight unseen. So, they invented this trannyism as a figleaf to hide their essential alienness. It is all a charade, and there really are no trannies, only aliens pretending to be trannies, to mask that they are aliens.

    BTW, I thought this tweet was amusing:

    [MORE]

    • LOL: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  109. @songbird

    The suicide rate of trannies is surely consistent with the rate the aliens crash their flying saucers in New Mexico.

    But no. I think it highly probable that is pure coincidence.

  110. A123 says: • Website
    @Barbarossa

    It’s not “Islamist” rule, it’s “SJW-Islamohomofascist” rule. Haven’t you been listening at all?

    The term you are looking for is “IslamoGloboHomo”. Actually, I have not had reason to deploy that one for some time. It is used to helpfully direct those agitated by “GloboHomo” towards the actual culprits.

    The reason I Troll marked Yellowface is that he engaged in a “drive-by” without no obvious connection to anything I have recently posted.

    PEACE 😇

  111. @Wokechoke

    They knew what they were doing. If they didn’t then Darwin’s processes should take place.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  112. @A123

    Grain is inflammable. Not so much as oil but it produces inflammable dust and in storage areas exposed to oxygen can catch fire. Grain silos are designed to keep oxygen levels low. Insurance required.

    • Replies: @A123
  113. @Barbarossa

    I’m just saying that there is some sort of interesting stuff there.

    We don’t know. And we won’t. We have far better sources just looking up at the sky than listening to any government reports, leaks, disclosures, &c. If I were you I would forget anything anything anybody ever said about what’s inside Area 51.

    Except John Lear. What he said was entertaining as hell. I just heard a couple days ago he is now deceased. : (

    One thing he said was Area 51 hasn’t had any interesting action since the late 1980’s when they built a new one completely underground in east NV. He said almost none of the Janet Air transports go to Groom Lake any more and haven’t for a long time. The day Area 51 hit the local news in Las Vegas it was already defunct.

    Like when Saturday Night Fever made it into the movie theaters the New York disco scene was already over with. Or in ’67 when all the kids were hitchhiking to San Francisco the Grateful Dead had already split for Marin.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  114. conatus says:
    @Mr. Hack

    The DC Zoo has high wires for the orangutan to clamber around and the wire crosses over the human traffic area, I was there with my daughter on a beautiful day when a female orangutan with her young was above us, a crowd formed and she proceeded to crap from above.
    The zookeepers were aware of what was coming and had presciently shooed most everyone from the target area.
    It has got to happen pretty regularly.

  115. A123 says: • Website
    @Philip Owen

    You are correct. Dust in grain silos is a know hazardous condition. However, I have never heard of an explosion or fire occurring from grain dust in a rail car. Do you have any documentation of such events?

    My suspicion is that rail cars are almost always 100% full or totally empty. This limits the formation of an explosive dust-air mix. Also, each hopper car is usually divided into 3 or 4 isolated bins.

    PEACE 😇

    • Agree: Philip Owen
    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  116. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    I’ve already provided you with several video clips indicating the building of large new factories and business concerns sprouting about all over the Valley. Phoenix is definitely within the top 5 (probably top 1-2) magnets for attracting buisneeses in the US from other high tax states, including California, but that was yesterday’s lesson and I don’t have the time (nor desire) to review this information for the slow or mentally retarded. I’ve also included video before, showing you at least one of many city parks with incredible hiking opportunities. Here’s a couple more:

    Encanto Park. about 260 acres of Phoenix delight, located right in the center of town. Take a bikeride first around the park (also includes a golf course), around some old, middle clas neighborhoods. Thulean Friend, you’ve told me that you appreciate this sort of thing, what do you think? Livable? My stepfather had a beautiful old home in this neighborhood.

    Now, if you’re interested in checking out some of the swankier neighborhoods of old Phoenix, the Biltmore area is hard to beat. By all means visit the Biltmore Hotel too, one of my favorite spots to go for a cool tropical drink with friends:

    • Replies: @Beckow
  117. The attached link concerns a multiple of subjects that have arisen in this blog over time.

    -The level of education in the UK
    -Attention given to Russian history
    -The development of Novorossiya
    -Multilingualism/cultural appropriation
    -Statue removal

    The topic of study is the foundation of the Donbas(s).

    The link guides you to further links to teaching notes for a history module for 11-13 years olds studying in Welsh schools. At this age children don’t specialise so they all study this module. One set of notes is in Welsh. The other is in English. This demonstrates that bilingual education systems are possible. You will need to download/view the PDF to see the content. Are the questions being asked of the children leading in one direction? This is 1922 material. Does it take a side?

    The Welsh speaking governess mentioned did teach the Hughes grandchildren Welsh and also taught school for emigres and local children. She wrote an essay on here experiences which I might post later. Her son, Gareth Jones, a speaker of fluent native standard English, Welsh, Russian and German, famously revealed the 1933 famine to the world although he only reached Kharkiv, the NKVD blocking his route to Hughesovka/Stalino/Donetsk.

    https://www.peoplescollection.wales/learn/hughesovka

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
  118. @A123

    Explosion/fire risk is why car (wagon in British) capacity is divided. I do know a higher insurance premium is needed.

  119. Adept says:
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Demographic research suggests that at the beginning of the 19th century no country in the world had a life expectancy longer than 40 years. India were ~25, while Belgium was around 40. For Europe as a whole, it was ~33 years.

    This is somewhat disingenuous. Life expectancy was low because child mortality was high. If you are born to a family of European burghers or American farmers at the dawn of the 19th century, and if you live to age 5, you stand a very good chance of living to age 60.

    See, for instance: https://mappinghistory.uoregon.edu/english/US/US39-01.html

    Adult European noblemen typically died between the ages of 55 and 60 in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    Some estimates suggest that adult life expectancy in late 19th century America was ~67 years.

    It really wasn’t all that bad. Read old books.

    • Agree: Coconuts, sher singh, S, Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    , @Aether
  120. @Philip Owen

    Since ever the routine for dealing with people LARPing as war participants is execution. See the Crabb massacre.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crabb_massacre

    Henry Crabb organized a thousand man army to invade Mexico on his own. 85 guys crossed the Rio Grande. The Mexicans captured 53 of them and executed every one. The American government did not say boo.

    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  121. @Philip Owen

    Would there be a way for Russia to settle down and be as economically comfortable as it can, like Iran?

    How would China fare in case the US goes on with a hard decoupling plan and forces SK & Japan to blockade China?

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  122. Wokechoke says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Good propaganda for the Moscow folks. If they release the two on parole.

  123. @Callsign Pidor

    painful suffering of the Ukie soldiers – thousands unnecessarily dying in an uneven fight

    The Slovak national mindset revealed (although perhaps unintentionally) in a nutshell.

    As opposed to civilized Western European mindset: “who cares how many aborigines die?”

  124. Coconuts says:
    @Triteleia Laxa

    But it is true. If you’re white then the niceness of your country, pretty much forever, has been determined by how physically or mentally far you can get away from Russia and Russianess was. Inarguably true. Lol.

    If those demographic projections are correct by the closing decades of the century Britain will be mainly populated by blacks and Muslim people from South Asia, and will be lucky if it is ruled by Indians and mixed race people, lolz obviously. Is it certain that the USSR was a harmful country to white people?

  125. tyrone says:

    Why did the US have 46 biolabs in Ukraine……hey Russia ,watch out for weird diseases.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  126. @Yellowface Anon

    I am going to do a blog post on this on my business site. I’ll link when I’ve done it. Iran had home grown industries from washing powder to glue. In fact Iranian products may yet be Russia’s salvation. Russia has Import Substitution projects ordered from the top down, mostly in food and pharma. These are gleaming palaces with huge outputs but they depend on critical foreign inputs, typically genetic. For example, almost all the world’s sugar beet seeds come from Northern Italy and Southern France. Sure, given 10 years, Russia can build the capacity to produce the necessary volumes, in good years, around Sochi but it will take even longer than that to selct varieties. Meanwhile the processing plants stand idle or are sub optimal. Same for 3 day old chicks, bull semen (milk production), breeding sows, salad crops, sunflower seeds. Some key ingredient for ice cream is short, I forget what. As Unilever has withdrawn, prices are rising particularly fast in an industry that looked overinvested last year. The 30% of production from smaller farms is not affected so severely (processing systems are more tolerant of variation) but is not so quickly ramped up and not all crops are available.

    Then there is the question of spare parts. Russia’s truck fleet is 21 years old. Mostly 2nd hand German and Scandinavian gear. Without parts it will degrade rapidly. The same for planes. The same for manufacturing equipment in general.

    China is showing no great enthusiasm to become a smuggling channel. Kazhakstan was less than impressed by Russia’s offer of friendship earlier this year. Uzbekistan was denied entry into the EaEU so will exact a price and is easily monitored. Georgia appears to be the main smuggling route just now but a crackdownis being prepared. It is not as if Georgian society is unanimously pro Russian.

    • Thanks: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @Sean
  127. @tyrone

    They didn’t. The number wasn’t zero either but RU propaganda was counting commercial labs of which there are many. UA is full of poor white people who are willing to act as pharmaceutical guinea pigs for very low pay. The labs are there to support this.

  128. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    …building of large new factories and business concerns sprouting about all over the Valley

    That has no relation to actual livability or charm of a place. Usually the opposite. I am sure Mariupol industry will soon restart and grow too. Some of the worst places I have been to are also “industrial powerhouses”. Don’t mix it up.

    Your cherry-picking of a few local islands of sanity, almost all of them private enclaves, changes nothing about how Phoenix comes across to an outsider: super dry, ugly, bad freeways, poor quality of housing, and people somewhere between fat mestizo natives and elderly escaping high taxes. Not much – I am just telling you what it looks like. You enjoy living there because you crafted for yourself a little escape with very specific geography. But that’s not Phoenix in general.

    I am sure an enterprising Mariupolite could produce video clips of nice building still standing, parks, beaches, etc…Would that be an accurate picture? No. Why do you think your boosterim of selected vistas in Phoenix is any different?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @Mr. Hack
    , @AP
  129. @Mr. Hack

    Roger Ruskin Spear had a solo act as well. I saw them or him three times, not altogether by design. They were just playing. I seem to remember mr Apollo was vaguely tuneful. It was about Joe Bugner the blond Cornish heavyweight boxer I think.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
  130. Miro23 says:
    @Yellowface Anon

    Once you get into taking out satellites it’s a strategic conflict and escalation leads to nuclear war.

    Elon Musk is a central player here. I hope that he realizes what he’s doing and pulls back. At the moment he’s stupidly celebrating Starlink’s capabilities.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
  131. @AnonFromTN

    Are you seriously going to pretend that western countries haven’t moved heaven and earth in a bid to make up for past wrongs? In Australia, it’s impossible to give any kind of official speech without first “acknowledging” some craptacular abo tribe who are “the rightful owners of this land” or commencing any major sporting event without first boring the crowd to tears with a twenty-minute ooger booger monkey dance. Of course, these are just the “insult” added to the “injury” of the innumerable set-asides they enjoy. Russia, I’m afraid, has a loooong way to go before it reaches this level of cuck faggotry.

    • Replies: @Callsign Pidor
  132. Miro23 says:
    @AnonFromTN

    As opposed to civilized Western European mindset: “who cares how many aborigines die?”

    The US reaction to having 1 million+ Iraqi’s killed as a result of the fake WMD story (that George Bush and the White House press corps are now laughing about) – was basically ZERO so they deserve everything they get.

  133. eah says:

    Interesting video from 2016 featuring Lindsey Graham and John McCain:

    Twitter/AZ OSINT

    THE WEST NEVER WANTED A PEACE IN UKRAINE.

    THIS IS A VIDEO FROM 2016,YOU MAY KNOW THIS VIDEO,BUT WE WANT TO POINT ON 1 VERY IMPORTANT DETAIL

    BUT,THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS JOHN MCCAIN SAYING ON 1:50 OF THE VIDEO THEY KNOW IF THEY LOSE WAR IN UKRANE THE WEST IS DONE

    • Replies: @Sean
  134. Sean says:
    @Philip Owen

    America once had great leverage over the USSR because of their need for wheat. Those days are long gone. There are villages in Russia that are like something out of the 19th century, a quarter of the men die by 55, beer is regarded as a soft drink. The ability of Russians to put up with conditions others would regard as intolerable is as great in those villages as it is on the battlefield.

    China is showing no great enthusiasm to become a smuggling channel

    China is doing just that for North Korea*, which made astoundingly rapid progress in strategic thermonuclear ICBMs and was bellicose about what it intended to do with them the instant Trump became President; Pakistan got missile parts from China.

    The reason Russian has so many battlefield thermonuclear missiles is to deter China. But Russia can announce it is getting rid of 90% of them and still have equal numbers of them as America; China would be getting something of inestimable value. America fears that above all else. Powerful forces in America are invested Chinese growth and integration into global supply chains. It is not at all obvious whether the deleterious effect might be for American economic preeminence of a long lasting total sanctions regieme on Russia but it that it would make Russia far less worried about China seems a fair bet. If there was a full nuclear exchange between Russia and America, then China would get hit by the US , even if it China was was completely innocent.

    *The de facto partition of Korea without formal peace is the most likely analogy for how Ukraine’s current conflict will end. Because no country is going to put their troops in Ukraine, it will require a huge lavishly equipped standing army plus conscription for the foreseeable future. Ukraine can afford that, but the economic development will be stymied. Ukraine sees Poland as a model but its not gong to happen because investment will require an end to the war. Not everyone wants to serve in the army when they could be earning and there is no actual hostilities, so I expect the emigration of young men will increase.

  135. Miro23 says:
    @Thulean Friend

    The goal ought to be to move away from expensive one-off missiles into a system that can be used multiple times, thereby massively reducing the cost of disruption. It may be that destruction of satellites is too expensive and merely distorting their signal would be sufficient, if the approach was to be sustainable financially.

    The evidence points to cheap mini-drones with optical links and small explosive charges visiting the artillery command sites.

    • Replies: @Sean
  136. Mikhail says: • Website

    Amusing takeoff from stated Nigerian origin (leaving out the name of the person stated) –

    My name is Capt. . I’m a Russian Army, I am serving in
    the military of the 1st Armored Division In Ukraine

    We hijacked a suspected black Van between the border of Ukraine. We
    discovered other currencies including US dollars of about \$ 16 million
    loaded inside the Black Van, which intelligence suggests are foreign
    drug traffickers since there are no Ukrainian citizens among them.
    The funds are raised through the drug trade. Our team performed a
    covet operation using information from the captured group, fast roping
    upon several drug laboratories which is controlled by Mexican citizens
    and drug cartels

    We want to move this money out of this place to you, before they are
    confiscated by corrupt government officials. This place is a war zone.
    This is not the kind of war we are trained to do. We can’t continue to
    kill innocent people for national interest. You will keep our share
    pending my ability to abandon this useless war and change to another
    country to start a new life with my family.

    We will take 70%. You take 30%. No strings attached, just help us move
    it out of Ukraine, Ukraine is a war zone. We plan to use a secured
    logistics courier to ship the money out in a large box.

    If you can help to receive the funds for us, I will send you the full
    details. Kindly send me an e-mail signifying your interest including
    your most confidential telephone/fax numbers for quick communication.
    I will give you my phone number for further communication.

    Respectfully,

  137. Sean says:
    @eah

    http://cup.columbia.edu/book/no-place-for-russia/9780231704588

    In No Place for Russia, William H. Hill traces the development of the post–Cold War European security order to explain today’s tensions, showing how attempts to integrate Russia into a unified Euro-Atlantic security order were gradually overshadowed by the domination of NATO and the EU—at Russia’s expense.

    Hill argues that the redivision of Europe has been largely unintended and not the result of any single decision or action. Instead, the current situation is the cumulative result of many decisions—reasonably made at the time—that gradually produced the current security architecture and led to mutual mistrust. Hill analyzes the United States’ decision to remain in Europe after the Cold War, the emergence of Germany as a major power on the continent, and the transformation of Russia into a nation-state, placing major weight on NATO’s evolution from an alliance dedicated primarily to static collective territorial defense into a security organization with global ambitions and capabilities.

    In his speech at the 2007 Munich security conference, Putin said Russia would never submit under the threat of a siege . The Americans in the audience were smirking at this. Soon after came the recognition of Kosovo, instantly followed by the Russian recognition of South Ossetia.

    • Replies: @eah
  138. A123 says: • Website

    Erdogan is doing his best to alienate everyone.

    You have no doubt heard about his incursions into Northern Syria. However, that is far from the only issue: (1)

    Turkey continues threatening Greek islands in the Aegean Sea — islands that belong to Greece according to several international treaties. On June 7, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu once again called on Greece to withdraw any military forces stationed on the Greek islands. Cavusoglu warned that Turkey will challenge the status of the islands if Greece fails to demilitarize them.

    In addition, Turkey has turned the Tymbou (“Ercan”) Airport, located in the Turkish-occupied northern part of the Republic of Cyprus, into a Turkish domestic airport. Erdogan’s regime has also made a new financial assistance deal with the illegal regime occupying northern part of Cyprus. 36% of the Republic of Cyprus — a European Union member state — has been illegally occupied by Turkey since it invaded the island in 1974. These recent moves by Turkey appear to be further steps toward annexing the occupied north. The Republic of Cyprus announced they will lodge a complaint with the United Nations.

    The Turkish Lira continues to fall in value on global markets.

    Is Erdogan trying to start ‘foreign wars’ to distract from domestic issues? This does not seem to work as an explanation. Is there a large swing constituency that will look on simultaneous adventurism in Syria, Greece, and Cyprus favourably?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/18599/turkey-targeting-iraq-syria-cyprus-greece

  139. Yevardian says:
    @Coconuts

    Idk, when I was reading Dostoevsky novels in the 90s he was one of a few Russian Empire authors recognised as being among the ‘great classics you should read’, Tolstoy, Chekov, Gogol were some of the others. These weren’t seen as more exotic than say, Don Quixote or Goethe. Reading these authors was thought to bring understanding of European civilisation and the human condition.

    Oh, don’t get me wrong, he’s a great writer and someone everyone should have read a least a little of, but I meant ‘exoticism’ more by the invariably grim-dark and hysterical nature of Dostoevsky’s bizzaro-world, where nearly every major character behaves in melodramatic and irrational ways, when they aren’t outright insane. Then, since he long been by far the most popular Russian writer abroad (Tolstoy does not seem so popular nowdays), and Western opinion being predisposed by later Cold-War propaganda (now resumed with a vengeance), people take Dostoevsky’s often 2-dimensional characterisation, mysticism and gothic atmosphere to be an actual accurate picture of Russian people and society. It would be as if people took Kafka’s writings as a documentary source for the mentality of Czechs, or everyday life in early 20th century central Europe (which there are elements, but obviously very far from the full story). I guess you can see in an even more extreme form with Gogol (a real writer of genius, btw), foreigners actually took his totally insane fantasy world as real descriptions of Russian life, lol.

    So I suspect one reason Dostoevsky remains the most popular Russian writer, other than being a talented writer of psychological thrillers and crime-fiction, is he does a sterling job of confirming all the worst foreign stereotypes of Russians, a ‘cruel and sentimental people’. Chekhov, a deeply humanistic and sensitive writer who described very real personalities, is far less popular in the West than Russia, and I think Turgenev (every post-Soviet highschool student is still forced to read ‘Mumu’ or ‘Fathers and Sons’) is practically unknown these days.

    The other sidepoint, and what put me on the tangent, was someone invoking Dostoevsky as a moral example or parable or something. But in the context it’s just bizzare, as Dostoevsky became a totally rabid Russian nationalist (technically, a ‘PanSlavist’, but in practice no difference), it would be as if an Indian quoted Kipling to argue the British should give the subcontinent independence.

    Edward Said isn’t that bad. Granted, ‘Orientalism’ mostly amounts to a huge monument to resentment of European success, but he wasn’t a post-modernist solely interesting in taking down his literary predecessors, nor did he just write verbose rubbish like Foucalt (a true and ongoing cancer on the humanities that guy, along with a dozen other Frenchmen from his time). Said actually really knew his subject and could write. Like other older leftists, I’m not sure he’d approve of the shitshow his department has become, Greer certainly doesn’t (who’s also written good books, whether you agree with her first principles or not).

    German_Reader is probably right though, it’s a waste of time and looks pretentious to be writing paragraphs about this stuff here. My excuse is I hardly know a single person in a real life I can talk about this subject to, I rather not look pretentious in real life, but I can live with nasty twerps like PajeetPerspective or TR jeering online. Anyway, my circle is either STEM graduates who look down if not ridicule the arts, history academia (who generally have limited interests outside of a deep but narrow knowledge of the confines of their specialty) or practical people who never did University, but I can enjoy with the sort of stuff Mikel or AaronB does. I guess finally, people who actually studied literature in Australia/NZ, where I grew up, just have to signal their ‘correct’ political views constantly, with total intolerance for anyone with a different opinion.
    So this increasingly toxic forum (well fairly, it’s just 2-3 posters) just became an outlet for that.

    @gt

    It was the Spartans who fought the same enemy too often and so the enemy was able to learn from the Spartans and defeat them.

    I’m not really sure that’s true. Though that period is definitely outside my area, I don’t recall any sources every describing Sparta as using any innovative tactics, or fighting at all differently from other Greek states. A lot of their power seems to have been based on what one critic called ‘the Spartan mirage’, i.e they projected an image of invincibility, aided by fellow Greek fascination with their barracks-hall lifestyle.
    Also, the first state to resoundingly defeat the Spartans (on equal terms) was Thebes, and I think they had hardly ever fought each other before, though they were distant allies in the past. Sparta got crushed a little later by Makedon under Antipatros too, another new enemy for them. Sparta’s decline mostly seems to have been because of internal factors, rather than military.
    But you know, Ron Unz actually published a couple of papers on Classical Sparta and the Pentekontaitia period, if his memory isn’t too rusty, he might have something informative to say if he sees this.

    • Thanks: German_reader
  140. AP says:
    @Yevardian

    But in the context it’s just bizzare, as Dostoevsky became a totally rabid Russian nationalist

    I’m not sure that he would approve of Putin’s slaughter of Ukrainians; his father was from Ukraine and he attended Taras Shevchenko’s funeral, right?

    (technically, a ‘PanSlavist’, but in practice no difference)

    There is a difference. Bashibuzuk (sic/) is a pan-Slavist. A Russian nationalist would approve of the destruction of other Slavs for the sake of Russian power. A pan-Slavist would view this killing of Slavs by Slavs (Russia is doing to Ukraine what the USSR had done to Germany) as a tragedy and would disapprove, they would hope for a peaceful integration. Attitudes towards Germans, Jews, etc. would be about the same though.

    Of course often Russian nationalists pretend to be pan-Slavists.

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @Here Be Dragon
    , @Dmitry
  141. Heh:

  142. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    Hey, if you’ve managed to convince yourself that the Phoenix Valley is such a bad place to live, then stay away. Nobody here needs your kind anyway, certainly not me.

  143. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    I am sure an enterprising Mariupolite could produce video clips of nice building still standing, parks, beaches, etc…Would that be an accurate picture? No.

    You and kremlinstoogeA123 are trying to sell me on the idea that at the very least life is returning to normal there and that it’s a great opportunity to buy real estate right now. Why not produce some relevant video clips to help you make your point. Oh, I know that neither you nor kremlinstoogeA123 will ever produce such film on your own, I’m talking about Russian Potemkin village propaganda experts? Nothing there? Of course not!

    • Replies: @Seraphim
  144. Wielgus says:
    @Beckow

    The Soviet bloc had rather close ties to the Official IRA but this declared a cease-fire in 1972, although it was sporadically involved in violence after that. Eastern Bloc weaponry and explosives sometimes found their way to the Provisionals and others, with certain Arab countries tending to serve as conduits. British propaganda sometimes played up alleged Eastern Bloc links to Irish Republicans, with the particularly unsubtle newspaper cartoonist Cummings depicting Soviet tanks being driven off a ship onto shore by IRA members in 1971, with the procession headed by “Father O’Brezhnev”.

  145. Sean says:
    @AP

    A Russian nationalist would approve of the destruction of other Slavs for the sake of Russian power.

    Yeltsin asked if Russia could join Nato. So did Putin.

    Russia is doing to Ukraine what the USSR had done to Germany

    The United States of America remained in Europe after the Cold War ended and after Germany emerged as a major power on the continent

    • Replies: @AP
  146. AP says:
    @Beckow

    how Phoenix comes across to an outsider: super dry, ugly, bad freeways, poor quality of housing,

    I have never been to Phoenix, but have been to Vegas which I am told is Phoenix plus casinos.

    So other than casinos: boring (not ugly, though the sameness achieves an ugly effect) sprawl where houses look the same, and are mostly in gated communities behind stone walls. Who cares about the urban cityscape though, because the nature is magnificent. All around one sees mountains that change color from red to purple as the sun sets. Twenty minutes drive from some of those bland suburbs, one can be hiking among red rocks and Joshua trees. An hour away, the mountains have snow in winter and one can ski. Nicer neighborhoods integrate desert with subdivision, with bike and hiking trails weaving through the cul de sacs. What kind of empty-souled animal ignores the garden of natural beauty all around and just complains about some boring walls people built within the wonderland?

    Here is a nice bike trail through some subdivision in Vegas:

    And hiking right outside town. I’m sure Phoenix has similar:

  147. AP says:
    @Sean

    What do your statements have to do with mine?

    If Russia had gotten into NATO it would have been able to cause trouble for its NATO neighbors with less chance of repercussions, like Turkey’s conflicts with Greece but with the Baltics, Poland, Finland, etc.

    • Replies: @Sean
  148. Sean says:
    @Miro23

    The evidence points to cheap mini-drones with optical links and small explosive charges visiting the artillery command sites

    The Ukrainians already have Brimstone missiles,, close to fire and forget that can be launched into an area to seek and destroy. Those are a lot more expensive than 50 year old tanks.

  149. Mikhail says: • Website

    https://awfulavalanche.wordpress.com/2022/06/06/ukraine-war-day-103-severodonetsk-update-plus-cossacks/

    Excerpt –

    Zaporozhian Cossacks To Discuss Integration With Russia

    For this story, the reporter is Evgeny Romanov. Ataman Sergei Yurchenko, of the Zaporozhie Oblast Cossacks, announced that his guys are conducting negotiations to join the All-Russian Society of Cossacks.

    Yurchenko: “The Cossacks of the Zaporozhie Oblast have entered into this initiative. We are currently discussing this issue in every city, in every region; the issue is whether we should join the All-Russian Cossack Society. We are conducting negotiations with Ataman Nikolai Doluda of the All-Russian Cossack Society. We are also consulting with State Duma Deputy Viktor Vodolatsky. In the very near future we will be convening a session of the Great Cossack Circle (Казачий Большой круг). We always used to take part in Cossack events on the Don, in the Kuban [peninsula], as well as in Moscow and other territories of the Cossack troops. […] And of course we are currently striving to become a part of the broader friendly family of Russian Cossacks.” Yurchenko also noted that Cossack culture is very much developed in Zaporozhie. Every city and region contains sophisticated Cossack organizations. From the very start of the Russian Special Operation, the Zaporozhian Cossacks have been actively helping the public cope, maintaining law and order, and assisting with humanitarian and social tasks.

    Yurchenko again: “We Cossacks, we are not just a social organization. We are also people who [traditionally] come to the defense of the government; who help to keep public order; who work with the youth, just the way it is done in Russia. And the Cossacks of the Zaporozhie Oblast, also support this kind of work. […] We are trying to form Cadet classes in the Zaporozhie Oblast, military cadet classes of the Cossack corpus. We want to re-educate youth who have been brainwashed by Western values, by pseudo-patriotic slogans, we want to help bring them out of that false consciousness, and show them what true patriotism consists of. This is much needed right now.”

  150. @Triteleia Laxa

    “Fear works”. Fine. Then time for NATO to obliterate the Russian military in the field. Certainly a full air and missile strike on every single Russian position in Ukraine would teach Russia to fear invading and raping a sovreign European country.

    I wish that the West were a little less appeasement-minded, but that’s not reality. A bloc that is going slow on merely providing Ukraine with less than replacement quantities for its worn out equipment and depleted ammo stocks will absolutely not strike Russian positions in Ukraine.

    Ukrainian artillery is outnumbered 10 to 1 by its Russian counterpart. As much as Biden attempts to cover for his deliberate slow-walking of scraps from the US military inventory by talking up the equipment’s non-existent superiority, this reality is why Ukraine is suffering up to 200 KIA per day.

    https://www.foxnews.com/world/ukraine-ammunition-running-out-intelligence-official

    Ukraine is quickly running out of ammunition as they continue to pushback against the Russian invasion.

    Ukrainian Deputy Head of Military Intelligence Vadym Skibitsky said in an interview that the violent conflict has exhausted the majority of Ukrainian artillery.

    Skibitsky said that overseas contributions were supplying the battle on the front line, but that Ukraine was still severely under prepared compared to their enemies.

    “Everything now depends on what [the west] gives us,” Skibitsky said in an interview with the Guardian. “Ukraine has one artillery piece to 10 to 15 Russian artillery pieces. Our western partners have given us about 10% of what they have.”

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-61742736

    A senior Ukrainian presidential aide has told the BBC that between 100 and 200 Ukrainian troops are being killed on the front line every day.

    As I’ve pointed out earlier, Burisma = Putin. Putin doesn’t quite own Biden. Putin rented Biden through 2 intermediaries – Zlochevsky (Burisma’s owner, who fled Ukraine along with Yanukovich after Yanukovich was impeached by the Rada) and Hunter Biden. Thanks to these cutouts, just as Putin can claim he did not bribe Biden, Biden can claim he wasn’t bribed by Putin.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mykola_Zlochevsky

    So how is Biden earning his keep vis-a-vis Putin? By supplying just enough equipment to Ukraine for the Ukrainians to lose while claiming credit for generosity.

    And the real kicker? The Dems have always been in Russia’s pocket, whatever their rhetoric of the moment. Trump fought Nordstream 2 tooth and nail, piercing the shell company veil to get at the European megacorps tasked with getting it off the ground, whereas Biden rubber-stamped the project. Biden’s genius was in getting Russian money while pointing the finger at Trump. Biden is a terrible president for the American public. But he is a first class schemer, and a genius at advancing his personal interests, much like his tyrannical counterparts elsewhere.

    Biden’s problem? For now, he can’t actually kill off his political opponents, unlike Putin. While I support Ukraine’s sovereignty, one silver lining, if Ukraine does fall is that Biden ends up looking weak on foreign policy again. That means a big uphill re-election battle in 2024.

    • LOL: German_reader
    • Replies: @German_reader
    , @Anne Lid
  151. LondonBob says:

    Feels like the financial markets broke on Friday.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  152. German_reader says:
    @Johann Ricke

    whereas Biden rubber-stamped the project.

    He did nothing of the sort, in early February he made it crystal clear that Nordstream 2 would be killed off if Russia invaded Ukraine. I’ve seen media reports claiming that behind the scenes this was actually coordinated with Scholz (who left matters vague), but it at least appeared that the US would find ways to stop the project, no matter the German position.
    Really funny that both Dem retards and Rep retards accuse each other of being in Russia’s pockets, takes the paranoid strain in US politics to a new level, lol.

  153. German_reader says:
    @Yevardian

    history academia (who generally have limited interests outside of a deep but narrow knowledge of the confines of their specialty)

    Interesting that you write this, it lines up with my own impressions of my former colleagues, many of them struck me as what’s called Fachidioten in German.

    Sparta’s decline mostly seems to have been because of internal factors, rather than military.

    Drastic decline of the numbers of full citizens is generally adduced as a major reason. Internal decay and defeat by foreign powers were linked though, if Spartiate manpower had been greater, presumably they would have had a better choice to prevent Thebes from freeing the Messenian helots in the 360s, which permanently eroded the economic basis of Sparta’s power.

  154. He did nothing of the sort, in early February he made it crystal clear that Nordstream 2 would be killed off if Russia invaded Ukraine. I’ve seen media reports claiming that behind the scenes this was actually coordinated with Scholz (who left matters vague), but it at least appeared that the US would find ways to stop the project, no matter the German position.

    Trump stopped the project because his position was that Russia had already invaded Ukraine. Whether the Russians, under Putin or Navalny, went further in Ukraine, NATO’s very existence was aimed at preventing Russia from expanding its territory. Subsidizing its war machine by purchasing its products was always, whether through Nordstream or NS2, bad policy.

    Speaking of retards, wasn’t it Germany that decided to exterminate its patriotic Jewish population by starving them to death in slave labor camps? Wasn’t it Germany that decided to take on every major power simultaneously rather than defeating them in detail? The Japanese weren’t much wiser, but they were smart enough to avoid taking on the Soviets only to be steamrolled by Germany if the Soviets collapsed. Finally, it was the brilliant German policy of feeding the Russian war machine that led to this current invasion.

    If it weren’t for the German lobby stateside, we might have set upon a post-WWII peace that handed Germany over to Russia on condition that the German population were made to walk to Siberia. Alas, it was the road not taken.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  155. German_reader says:
    @Johann Ricke

    If it weren’t for the German lobby stateside, we might have set upon a post-WWII peace that handed Germany over to Russia on condition that the German population were made to walk to Siberia. Alas, it was the road not taken.

    Yes, I remember that on Sailer’s blog you mused about how Israel should nuke Germany and other former Axis powers (and how everybody would be fine with that anyway) if its existence were ever threatened, and how the allies were really too soft in WW2 and should just have exterminated all Germans and Japanese.
    You’re chauvinistic scum, only value in your comments is that it’a a nice reminder how deeply sick in the head many Ameritards with their collective sadistic fantasies are (one sometimes forgets, since cretins like you mostly keep to Sailer’s boomer blog). Go fuck yourself.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  156. Really funny that both Dem retards and Rep retards accuse each other of being in Russia’s pockets, takes the paranoid strain in US politics to a new level, lol.

    Let me guess – you’re an Ossi.

    • LOL: German_reader
  157. Yes, I remember that on Sailer’s blog you mused about how Israel should nuke Germany and other former Axis powers (and how everybody would be fine with that anyway) if its existence were ever threatened, and how the allies were really too soft in WW2 and should just have exterminated all Germans and Japanese.

    What Israel does is up to Israel. As Americans, we have no beef with Germany or Japan beyond accounts we settled.

    I was making the point that Germans and Japanese who complained about us burning their cities to the ground need to understand that if we merely killed one German or Japanese for every Allied dead in the war they started, Germany and Japan would have lost half their populations. They did get off easy. Neither Hitler nor Tojo were as merciful in the territories they overran.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  158. German_reader says:
    @Johann Ricke

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/operation-finale-my-movie-review-in-takis-magazine/#comment-2501625

    It would be fitting if, in the future, as Israel is about to be overwhelmed by the invading Arab hordes on its borders, it lobbed a few dozen nukes at Germany’s largest cities as repayment for the German atrocities that caused them to have to return to the land of their ancestors, only to succumb to, in practical terms, the end phase of Germany’s Final Solution.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/operation-finale-my-movie-review-in-takis-magazine/#comment-2505772

    Actually, the white inhabitants of Europe would probably rise as one to congratulate every identifiably Jewish person they ran into, while commiserating over the destruction of Israel. The grievances of WWII run deep, and Germans are not particularly popular.

    I’m pretty sure you wrote similar comments several times, but I’m not going to spend more time looking for them, or replying to your idiotic comments, not worth the trouble.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  159. Anne Lid says:
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Why am I not surprised? Thinking in black and white, thirsting for Russian blood. That poor country, Ukraine, has not been sovereign since 2014, and hasn’t even been _a_ country for long. Your proclaimed love for Russia must have been awfully shallow. It is very well possible that we shall see another world war, and even though none of us is anywhere near the power to decide, I will still blame you – for believing and amplifying lies that lead up to the slaughter.

    I can’t recall where you are, but not in Europe. My country has been through 2 world wars and we have no appetite for another. Because of our location it will be impossible to just stay out of it.

    The solution would have been not obliterating the Russian military (they are people, too), but staying out of the conflict, not giving a bullet to Ukraine, only humanitarian help, and let them sort out their differences quickly. Sadly, nefarious powers want to obliterate Russian progress and use the unlucky Ukrainians as expendable proxies. If they beat the Russians, we are next in line.

    I am not into end of the world sects, but there is definitely something satanic in the air.

    • Agree: LondonBob
    • Replies: @S
  160. German_reader says:
    @German_reader

    Here’s another Johann Ricke gem, I had remembered correctly, it wasn’t a one-off, here his fantasies of nuclear destruction are even more extensive and not limited to Germany:

    The amount of Jew hatred remaining in Europe is astounding. It’s not enough that Jews have largely been exterminated or harassed into leaving the continent. It is necessary that they be exterminated in their historic homeland. It is becoming clear why an Israeli theorist once pondered a Samson option for Israel. In the event that Israel is about to be overrun, a brace of nukes might target every European Axis power involved in the Holocaust, as well as Germany’s willing European collaborators, in addition to the Muslim capitals involved in the invasion of Israel.

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/nationalist-nutcases/#comment-3664107

    Just so commenters know about the background of this charming fellow.

    • Thanks: silviosilver
    • Replies: @A123
  161. Sean says:
    @AP

    Russia under even the current leadership was hardly either Pan Slavist or Nationalist if it wanted to join Nato. As for causing trouble for Greece and Turkey, they fought one another and both remained Nato members, yet Russia was fobbed off from even entering the joining process. There was always the UN , where Russia had a seat on the security council, but within several years Nato bypassed the UN security council to act against Serbia in the Balkans, then recognized Kosovo. Treated as if the country he led was of no account, Putin at the 2007 Munich Security conference gave a warning that Russia’s history was not one of responding with subservience to threats and sieges, but rather meeting them with “appropriate measures”. As Putin spoke, as the US politicians sat and smirked at the leader of the “third rate country”; not long after he recognized South Ossetia, thereby signifying ‘Challenge accepted!’

    • Replies: @AP
  162. Anne Lid says:
    @Johann Ricke

    What are you going on about? NATO is providing intel to Ukraine to help them strike accurately. Ukies have so much weaponry they are selling them to whoever pays for them.
    As for your harebrained idea of Putin directing Biden … well, the Moon landing hoax theory has more credibility.

  163. @Sean

    Powerful forces in America are invested Chinese growth and integration into global supply chains.

    Anyone familiar with the business situation on the ground will tell you some sort of divestment from China has begun in these few months after the missteps in keeping COVID Zero for too long and egged on by neocons intended to play both the decoupling and Taiwan cards. The manufacturing emergence of China was to supply a deindustrialized US – the neocons are to cut China down in size before China can overtake the US while managing a controlled downgrading of American production and living standards predicated on the gig economy, automation, “Green transition” and various ideological campaigns to increase alienation. That investment is gone.

    Anyway I would wish to see your version of Philip Owen’s post and how you would disagree or agree with him.

  164. @Miro23

    Elon Musk has no say in the way DoD requisitions civilian capabilities for aiding the preferred side of the war.

    Satellites being taken out is on a lower level of strategic warfare (reducing reconnaissance capabilities of your enemies) than strategic nuclear strikes (removing your enemies permanently from the map).

    Nuclear strikes from Russia depends on whether Putin would want to leave the EU & US to their own decadence (no reason not to if that will lead to friendly right-wing regimes decades down the road), or large swathes of blankness on the map that can’t challenge Russian supremacy. He would be more likely to drop it on North America than Western Europe (which maybe become part of the Russian sphere of influence and could be kept populous) That is, if he isn’t cornered like Hitler before his suicide.

  165. Mikhail says: • Website

  166. AP says:
    @Sean

    As for causing trouble for Greece and Turkey, they fought one another and both remained Nato members

    That was my point. As a NATO member, Russia would have been able to cause trouble for the Baltics, Finland not to mention Ukraine with far fewer consequences than as a non-NATO member. There is no contradiction between Russia seeking to join NATO and Russia being aggressive and nationalistic.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Sean
  167. @Yevardian

    German_Reader is probably right though, it’s a waste of time and looks pretentious to be writing paragraphs about this stuff here.

    Once upon a time the title of the blog was Russian Reaction so if we can’t write paragraphs about this stuff here we may as well quit the internet.

    Part of Dostoevsky’s scandal sensations about the Russian character were more scandal sensations about the human character. To the extent that he was on about bad Russian character part of it might have been opposition to Tolstoy being perceived as such a booster. I always thought this was a pretty weird perception since my first reaction to reading Tolstoy’s War and Peace (I remember this like I remember the September 11 terrorist attack inside job) was WTF? The Russian top dogs speak French?

    In my sector of the galaxy Tolstoy is at least 3X as popular as Dostoevsky. I believe this is because we all are hot for Natasha. This is stupid because Maria is the heroine of the book.

  168. A123 says: • Website
    @German_reader

    The amount of Jew hatred remaining in Europe is astounding. It is necessary that they be exterminated in their historic homeland

    Just so commenters know about the background of this charming fellow.

    While far too extreme. The point about anti-Semitism among decision making EU Elites is grounded in fact: (1)

    How EU Funding of West Bank Activities Breaches Int’l Law & Undermines Peace

    Brussels is bankrolling the Palestinian Authority’s (PA) illegal “takeover” of areas that are internationally recognized as being under Israeli control.

    The document details how foreign governments have funneled hundreds of millions of euros into Palestinian projects in Area C of the West Bank (also known as Judea and Samaria), in violation of the relevant international law and applicable agreements, namely the Oslo Accords that govern the current status of the territory.

    the Palestinians have used EU funds to build thousands of illegal structures, and to take hold of scores of square kilometers of agricultural land.

    The 76-page research study, prepared in June 2021, but only declassified and made public this year, describes:

    […] the systematic, institutional effort of the opponent [Palestinian] establishment to alter the security and civil reality in C territories in a manner which undermines the [Israeli] State’s authority and undermines the commitments the Palestinian Authority took upon itself as part of these [Oslo] agreements.

    How would you react if parts of Germany were being illegally annexed? And, you knew what foreign countries were funding the land takeovers?

    In the event that Israel is about to be overrun, a brace of nukes might target every European Axis power

    The jump from legitimate concern about EU anti-Semitism to this scenario is absurd.
        — It is hard to believe anyone said this BS.
        — No one could possibly believe it.

    It reads like the cover tag-line from a 4th rate thriller novel. What is next?
        — The dastardly plot will be stopped by a sexy but assertive investigative journalist?
        — And, her bodice may become ripped several times during her misadventures in The Seedy Underworld?
        — See villain mugshot below [MORE]

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.algemeiner.com/2022/04/04/how-eu-funding-of-west-bank-activities-breaches-intl-law-undermines-peace/

    [MORE]

     

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  169. @AP

    1. That is not a hike. That is a climb.
    2. She ain’t getting much past 100 yards dressed like that.
    3. This is actually fun if you aren’t more than 50 years old.
    4. Don’t forget the rattlesnakes. You are doing a home invasion on them and they don’t have a sense of humor.

    • Replies: @AP
  170. @LondonBob

    When people are fearful that is when it pays to be greedy.

    —Warren Buffett

  171. @A123

    If the EU was truly “anti-Semitic” then it would have instituted a BDS campaign just like there was one against Apartheid South Africa.

    In fact, such a campaign could easily be defended on humanist/liberal grounds given that the Israeli regime is similar or even worse than Apartheid South Africa.

    If the Afrikaner regime received the same soft touch treatment as Israel does (massive subsidies, iron-clad veto from the US in the security council, mass media rarely writing about the brutalities of the occupation anymore) then Mandela would have died in prison and Apartheid would have been ongoing even today.

    The major difference is that the Israel lobby is the most powerful political force in US politics, far surpassing even the gun lobby, whereas the Afrikaner regime had scant to no overseas lobbying muscle. Since the US has a colonial control over the EU, that’s sufficient to block any real action.

    The world is not run on charity or principle. Only power counts.

    • Agree: silviosilver
    • Replies: @A123
    , @Yellowface Anon
    , @216
  172. A123 says: • Website
    @Thulean Friend

    such a campaign could easily be defended on humanist/liberal grounds given that the Israeli regime is similar or even worse than Apartheid South Africa

    Thank you for your honesty. You are an excellent example of what indigenous Palestinian Jews receive from a highly biased EU. European hypocrites call out minor issues when Infidels try to protect their children, and simultaneously “white-wash” much larger offenses by Muslims.

    The ethnic cleansing performed by Apartheid Muslims against Jews is undeniable.
      

    A campaign supporting indigenous Palestinian Jews is easily supportable on humanist/liberal grounds.
    ___

    The same lack of humanity that plagues EU foreign relations is also seen in domestic affairs. (1)

    Father of Swedish Child Islamic Terror Victim Says Her Stockholm Grave Has Been Desecrated Over 100 Times

    The father of Ebba Åkerlund, the 11-year-old Swedish girl killed during an Islamic terror attack in 2017, says her grave in Stockholm has been desecrated over 100 times.

    Åkerlund was dismembered and killed when Islamic migrant terrorist Rakhmat Akilov drove a truck through a shopping street on April 7th, 2017, killing five people and seriously injuring 14 others.

    The culprit, 37-year-old Rakhmat Akilov, was a rejected asylum seeker from Uzbekistan.

    Åkerlund caught the culprit, an illegal immigrant, in the act of desecrating Ebba’s grave.

    “I personally caught him in the act of desecration, when he was pouring [candle wax] on Ebba’s grave; the police released him after only one hour in custody,” he said, adding, “That’s what my nightly visits to the graveyard were worth.”

    Stockholm continues to enjoy the benefits of Sweden’s open door liberal immigration policy.

    This includes a rash of shootings that officials say have left the capital “unrecognizable,” historic churches being firebombed and regular violent riots staged by migrant youths.

    Having been one of the safest countries in Europe 20 years ago before mass uncontrolled immigration, Sweden is now the continent’s second most dangerous in terms of gun crime behind only Croatia

    Why are EU Elites so inhumane to indigenous Europeans?
    And, how long will they get a way with it?

    If the police will not protect Christian children… Christians will have to protect their families. Once necessity makes vigilante ‘justice’ the de facto law of the land, it is very hard to stop.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://summit.news/2022/06/10/father-of-swedish-child-islamic-terror-victim-says-her-stockholm-grave-has-been-desecrated-over-100-times/

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  173. @Thulean Friend

    This also explains how Iran, Iraq and Syria never get as much breathing space as Saudi Arabia and Israel, because the US Middle East policies are bought out by Jews and Saudi royals. Needless to say, Iran is more democratic than Saudi Arabia, and somewhat less strict in its moralism than the Wahhabi regime. Syria’s treatment of minorities is superior to how Israel treats Palestinians (Assad is an Alawi himself even as a dynastic ruler). Iraq’s reconstruction was an intentional failure. All these places, regardless of how their politics are functional or dysfunctional, are kept in a state of relative weakness.

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @A123
  174. You’re chauvinistic scum, only value in your comments is that it’a a nice reminder how deeply sick in the head many Ameritards with their collective sadistic fantasies are (one sometimes forgets, since cretins like you mostly keep to Sailer’s boomer blog). Go fuck yourself.

    Coming from Hitler’s literal kin, that’s a little rich.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    , @iffen
  175. @German_reader

    To be fair the man is spot on if you swap out Germany and swap in France.

  176. Here’s another Johann Ricke gem, I had remembered correctly, it wasn’t a one-off, here his fantasies of nuclear destruction are even more extensive and not limited to Germany:

    Not my ideas, and perfectly reasonable, given the prominent Axis role as Hitler’s enthusiastic genocidaires. And the original author is, of course, Samson, and any number of patriots and warriors who tried to drown the architects of their destruction in their own blood. Blood cries out for blood. On the eve of Israel’s complete destruction, brought about by their European murderers, who could blame them?

    You should change your handle to The Eternal German, exterminationist to the core. Maybe Israel should go quietly to its final end as Jews did at Treblinka’s gas chambers and Babi Yar’s killing pits. Here’s the thing – Rome destroyed Carthage for far less. If Israel gets to the point where the third destruction of Jerusalem is imminent, Germania delenda est might be a fitting epitaph.

  177. AP says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    1. You can reach places like that out there by hiking. Or you can go off trail and climb. The sandstone is freakishly easy to grip.

    2. I’ve seen people dressed like that, use strong sunscreen. That girl looks very tan.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  178. A123 says: • Website
    @Yellowface Anon

    Iran has no functional democracy. It is a theocracy with a Supreme Leader. There are cosmetics that look like elections, but they only exist to rubber stamp decisions directed by sociopath Khamenei.

    Conditions created by the despotic Iranian theocracy are bad at home and abroad. And, they and getting worse: (1)

    Iran, among other atrocities, imprisons attorneys for defending human rights, executes minors, and criminalizes human rights activism. If that is how Iran’s regime treats its own people, what makes anyone think it will treat other countries — in the region or in Europe — any better?

    And in a rare occurrence, according to the veteran Iranian journalist Amir Taheri, demonstrators in Iran have recently been publicly calling for regime change.

    The Lebanese, last month, voted that they have had enough of Iran’s proxy, Hizbollah. The only question now remains what to do with Hizbollah’s masses of “peaceful” weapons.

    Another Iranian proxy, Yemen’s Houthis, showed their gratitude to the US for removing them from the US List of Foreign Terror Organizations, by attacking Abu Dhabi with drones and missiles and striking a Saudi oil depot.

    All signs now indicate that most people in the region are fed up with the anti-peace camp in the Arab and Muslim world, especially with Iran’s proxies Hamas, the Houthis and Hizbollah, all of which have offered the region, including the Palestinians, nothing but violence and bloodshed.

    Getting Iran out of Lebanon is an essential first step. However, there is so much animosity between the sides, a partition seems inevitable.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/18596/biden-fight-enemies

    • Troll: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
  179. Mr. Hack says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    I don’t know where you get your figures from, but I just happened to watch this incredible documentary about Mariupol last night thru youtube. It shows much footage that was new to me and is important because it is made up of commentary from locals who lived through the horrendous bombings. Indeed, one after one, they sited that most of the worst damage was delivered from the skies, that of course were controlled by the Russian military. From extensive video clips, it’s obvious that the damage was dispersed evenly throughout the whole city, “east and west” not just around the big metalworks factory, small houses too in many neighborhoods inhabited by civilians. This is a must watch, and don’t fall under the sway of liar kremlinstoogeA123. He’s an evil operator trying to hide under a false banner of being a “Christian” that’s probably quite depressed over the damning evidence that’s being presented against his idol, formerpresidentTrump during the day to day hearings in congress. The cynicism he regularly displays against the brave people in Ukraine, fighting for their freedom and sovereignty, is reprehensible and worthy of no respect.

    kreminstoogeA123 in his cynicism tries to assure us that because some electricity ha been restored within Mariupol, all will be well there. How about the healing process of those that lost loved ones (at least 26,000) there, only because of the Russian liberators, that bombed and killed thousands of Russian speaking Ukrainians, destroyed their homes and lives, all policies that kremlinstoogeA123 is content to endorse?

    Watch this video if you’re not afraid to be exposed to some very nasty truths. I’m leaving you with access to this documentary and also with a translation of a very brave resident of Mariupol, who lived through these horrid experiences, 1:00:46 (the film is in Russian with English subtitles):

    Those city districts where we lived were deliberately shelled. They launched airstrikes on residential buildings. The “Drama Theatre” for example. When the Information went public that it was a shelter and that there were people hiding inside, it was heavily bombed. It was a deliberate extermination of the city and its residents. I am certain of it, we saw it with our own eyes. This is a 100% genocide. The city was blocked and we people didn’t have any chance. We were deprived of everything. Literally everything. Of course this is a genocide of civilians, moreover, and I’ll stress this, this is a genocide of the Russian speaking residents of Mariupol.

  180. Beckow says:
    @AP

    …Who cares about the urban cityscape though, because the nature is magnificent.

    Well, you spend most of your time in that urban cityscape and on the freeways around it, so it matters.

    I like outdoors and one can escape the hellish city sprawl in places like Vegas or even Phoenix – but that’s not where they live. They live and breathe the sprawl – in 40-45 degree weather. There is only so much you can do to make it better. My point w Mr. Hacks was that Mariupol may have more potential in the long run than Phoenix – he took it personally. He doesn’t seem to be aware of the long run.

    Vegas is better, it has a certain oomph and a weird uniqueness. It is better built because it has to be. The demographic isn’t much, unless there is a good conference – mostly greedy elderly saying “f..ck this existence” with every pull on the silly machines and some really not needed swarthy fatty crowds searching for food.

    Vegas is a picture of modern America that says it all: we are done here, it is all just gluttony and greed now. As long as AC works, it can go on. But these people are not running the world, or anything, most can’t even manage their own stomachs. Or count the odds. Everybody should visit Vegas, it is an artifice of a has-been civilization. And the hills are nice.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @silviosilver
  181. @AP

    Fyodor Dostoevsky – A Writer’s Diary
    https://russianuniverse.org/2015/02/25/dostoyevsky-on-slavs/

    “This is my inner conviction, complete and overpowering, that Russia never will have and never has had anyone who can hate, envy, slander, and even display open enmity toward her as much as all these Slavic tribes will the moment Russia liberates them and Europe agrees to recognize their liberation! ”

    “After their liberation they will begin their new life by asking Europe—England and Germany, for instance—for guarantees and protection of their freedom, and even though Russia will also be part of the concert of European powers, they will do this precisely as a means of defense against Russia.”

    “It will be particularly pleasant for the liberated Slavs to announce and trumpet to the whole world that they are educated peoples capable of attaining the heights of European culture, while Russia is a barbaric country, a gloomy northern colossus, that she does not even have pure Slavic blood and is the oppressor and hater of European civilization.”

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Beckow
  182. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    You are posting what looks like a very quickly put together Kiev propaganda. What is worse, you believe it without any critical thinking. Anyone can link dozens of videos from the other side where Mariupol residents yell that it was the Ukie army that systematically shot at residential buildings, used civilians to hide behind and blocked any evacuations of civilians. There are plenty of those too. They are put together for a reason: to win a war. They are not truthful or objective.

    The point about aerial bombing makes no sense: all damage that we see was clearly done from ground level. Bombing from air looks different, check out videos of Beograd, Baghdad or Libya if you have the stomach to see what the “we mean well” people did around the world.

    The numbers thrown around are not verifiable. When one side in a war produces an emotional tear-jerk video any 3-digit-IQ person will take it with a grain of salt. You don’t. You also hang around monkeys in Phoenix and boast about being chased by rattlesnakes in some very dry-looking hills. How can we take you seriously?

    • Agree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @Mikhail
  183. @Mr. Hack

    You know it’s hard to tell whether you are a troll or a genuinely concerned person. The figures were from an article from some international foundation, can’t remember which one.

    The brave people in Ukraine, fighting for their freedom and sovereignty.

    They are fighting for a bunch of rich people who are not Ukrainians but own their country. They are fighting because they are being told to, and are forced to go to a war otherwise facing a prison term.

    Whatever is happening it has nothing to do with their freedom and sovereignty.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Mr. Hack
  184. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Interesting. But do you take this to mean that Dostoyevsky would have approved of the mass killing of Slavs in order to “liberate” them? I doubt it, based on the very essay you linked to –

    “through this whole century, perhaps, Russia will have to struggle against the narrow outlook and stubbornness of the Slavs, against their bad habits, against their certain betrayal of Slavdom—which is not far-off—for the sake of the European forms of social and political organization they are so eager to embrace”

    So Dostoyevsky opposes Russia imitating intra-Slavic killings that the smaller Slavic nations engaged in. And Putin has done exactly the opposite – engaged in it. Repeating crimes done by the smaller Slavic to one another, murder for the sake of petty nationalism, whose product is hatred. Putin is turning Russia into a European country of the 1930s, willing to kill its neighbors (Slavic ones!) while invoking the Westernizer Peter I.

    More from Dostoyevsky’s essay:

    “The purpose of it is to live a higher life, a superior life; to illuminate the world with a great, selfless, and pure idea; to realize and ultimately create a great and mighty organism of a brotherly union of peoples; to create this organism, not by political force, not by the sword, but by conviction, example, love, selflessness, and light

    So Dostoyevsky would be utterly disgusted by what Putin’s Russia is doing to Russia and Ukraine.

    Putin’s Russia is the stepchild of Bolshevik Russia, the Frankenstein’s monster built out of the corpse of Dostoyevsky’s Russia whom the Bolsheviks had murdered. It is all quite understandable.

    In his youth, Dostoyevsky was very loosely connected to the same circles as Shevchenko. Did he write anything about him later in life?

    Thanks for posting Dostoyevsky’s prophetic words.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  185. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    They are fighting for a bunch of rich people who are not Ukrainians but own their country.

    The ones whom I personally know who are fighting are fighting for their country. They appreciate that Zelensky has not run away and would be fighting if he had done so.

    They are fighting because they are being told to

    Even the 10,000s if not 100,000+, such as one of my cousins, who were abroad when he war started and returned to Ukraine precisely in order to fight for it?

  186. Beckow says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    .Dostoevsky – A Writer’s Diary:…anyone who can hate, envy, slander…as much as all these Slavic tribes the moment Russia liberates them and Europe agrees to recognize their liberation! ”

    There is some truth to it, but it also varies and is more complicated. Poles could claim that they were ‘liberated‘ from Russia. But also by Russia in 1945. Western Ukrainians have a terrible inferiority complex and a deep yearning to be someone else living elsewhere – so they attack “Russia” as part of themselves, it is a complicated mix of ambition and self-hatred.

    Bulgarians are a lost cause: their very low self-esteem and a clear lack of future make them into a sub-species of servant compradors – their only ambition is to be allowed in as house-slaves. Liberating them was a total waste of time.

    Czechs used to be quite pro-Russian, or at least divided. That has shifted with their domestication and the resulting brachycephaly of a large part of the population: they are mostly heavy-set beer-guzzling fat-heads obsessively interested in German cars, Florida bungalows, and – as always – absurd ‘humor’. But there are exceptions. Then you have Serbs and Croats who are actually quite thoughtful and can be found all over the place.

    Dostoevsky oversimplified it as most writers do. There is also the element of a very systematic and constant Western ideological Drang nach Osten push. If you turn over your culture to them, they will over time stick the ‘Asiatic barbarians started WWII but don’t know how to even make a fire!‘ memes in the general population.

    Any day now the Poles will announce that Auschwitz was possibly a Russian project – or something like that, maybe that it was secretly run by the Russian POWs. They can’t be helped. That’s why we are having a war.

    • Agree: Here Be Dragon
    • Replies: @Wielgus
  187. AP says:
    @Beckow

    Well, you spend most of your time in that urban cityscape and on the freeways around it, so it matters.

    You spend most of your time in a house (which can be pleasant in Vegas, with its pool etc.) and office which is the same anywhere. So it’s about how ugly the commute looks. That’s not too much time in the day. In Vegas (and presumably Phoenix) you can look beyond the boring streetscape and towards the spectacular mountains.

    Vegas is better, it has a certain oomph and a weird uniqueness

    It offers good restaurants, also.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  188. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    Anyone can link dozens of videos from the other side where Mariupol residents yell that it was the Ukie army that systematically shot at residential buildings, used civilians to hide behind and blocked any evacuations of civilians.

    Well lets see at least one, then w can compare and see what video looks quickly put together and which one doesn’t. I can only be swayed by what I hear and see, and so far it looks like a vast majority of the damage was done by the Russian side. Also, it stated in the video that many of the large sites that were bombed were from the sky, like the Drama Theater and the hospital, not everything though.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @Here Be Dragon
  189. Mr. Hack says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    You know it’s hard to tell whether you are a troll or a genuinely concerned person. The figures were from an article from some international foundation, can’t remember which one.

    And this is a bad thing? So you prefer to get your factual information from Putler’s private bunker or from his hospital bedroom?

    [MORE]

  190. gT says:
    @Yevardian

    Ok, there are indeed lots of myths about the Spartans, like all the 300 nonsense at Thermopylae, where they were the minority of Greek forces. But the Spartans did have some skills. They were better organised for one, with them supposedly going through a 150 year period in which they never lost a battle where they had been given time to form a phalanx up properly. But this was probably due to the Spartans initially being richer due to their slave holdings of fellow Greeks, so they were able to have the leisure time to think and to practice drills and manoeuvres plus they probably all had breastplate armour meaning better survivability in battle. I’ve read in countless books that the other Greeks only achieved similar hoplite discipline after being on the receiving end of such discipline.

    Sparta definitely wasn’t into the walled city business like the rest of the Greek city states, meaning their manpower was sufficient for defence. The Athenians built a lot, the Spartans build next to nothing. Never understood why all the Spartans are always depicted bare chested, when heavy armour was the mark of a hoplite. Sparta’s real downfall was that they weren’t really into trade, they never really had a navy, until the Persians sponsored them one to help defeat the Athenians that is, so their agricultural slave dependent society got left behind and they declined.

  191. @AP

    Not likely that Dostoyevsky would have said anything at all about Shevchenko. His writings never impressed anybody outside of Ukraine.

    Putin has done exactly the opposite – engaged in it. Repeating crimes done by the smaller Slavic to one another, murder for the sake of petty nationalism, whose product is hatred.

    However the war began in Donbas, when Poroshenko and Turchinov declared “anti-terrorist operation” against their own people, who refused to recognize their authority, for which these people didn’t vote.

    That’s a civil war, and there’s nothing wrong at this point that Russian soldiers are helping Russian people in Donbas.

    Hatred didn’t come from Donbas or Crimea either, let alone Russia.

    So Dostoyevsky would be utterly disgusted by what Putin’s Russia is doing to Russia and Ukraine.

    There’s no Putin’s Russia. This is some kind of really twisted thinking – what Putin’s Russia is doing to Russia. You need to come to your senses. This is a pointless, emotional statement.

    Dostoyevsky would be utterly disgusted seeing what’s happening with Ukraine and surely would support Russian interference on behalf of the Russian Ukrainians. That’s not even a question.

    But he would probably be not any less disgusted with contemporary Russia, considering the state of affairs.

    Putin’s Russia is the stepchild of Bolshevik Russia, the Frankenstein’s monster built out of the corpse of Dostoyevsky’s Russia whom the Bolsheviks had murdered.

    Well the Dostoyevsky’s Russia was hardly a good place to live in, unless you belong to an aristocratic family. Or a merchant’s family.

    Yes the present day Russia is a chimera, but the period after Stalin and up to Yeltsin was the best in the Russian history.

    This is interesting how you couldn’t see in that essay how many parallels in his words can be drawn to the modern Ukraine. Especially in the quotations above. Ukraine had been granted freedom and land.

    Look what it led to.

    • Replies: @AP
  192. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Try this one, it is in English:

    There are conflicting descriptions of what happened in Mariupol as one would expect in what is essentially a civil war. Two sides are:
    – pro-Western Ukrainians mostly in Western-Central Ukraine supported by Nato. They took over Kiev government in 2014.
    – pro-Russian or Russian-leaning Ukrainians – or more accurately: the not-pro-Nato population – in Donbas, South and East supported by Russia. They used to get consistently 40-50% of votes between 1991-2012. Post-Maidan they were basically outlawed as a political force.

    Civil wars are very ugly. How to assign blame? A fundamental principle in any free society is that a minority cannot be suppressed and fully dis-empowered because of who they are or what they prefer. In this case some economic-cultural links with Russia. To pretend that they don’t exist or that because they are “wrong” they can be ignored, expelled or killed is a dead-end – they are too strong and so is their sponsor Russia. To complain that how does Russia dare to support them is ahistorical and almost idiotic: of course they do, all nations would do it, we all support people like us.

    You don’t seem to get this and are fully in the one-side propaganda mode. It is a cul-de-sac and it only makes things worse. There was a peaceful solution available that required the pro-Western half to compromise – they absolutely refused. So now they are battling it out. The winner will dictate the terms. If you think it will be Kiev and Zelko you have not been paying attention. But keep on hoping.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Mr. Hack
    , @Wielgus
  193. S says:
    @Anne Lid

    Sadly, nefarious powers want to obliterate Russian progress and use the unlucky Ukrainians as expendable proxies.

    They (ruling elites of US/UK and their hangers on) should absolutely be ashamed of themselves. They have criminally and knowingly led the Ukrainian people down a primrose path towards destruction, the ultimate primary target of this endeavor (of course!) being Russia.

    If they beat the Russians, we are next in line.

    Indeed, this is part of a larger war being made against the peoples of the world, and, against mankind as a whole.

    Whatever happens to Russia, the Ukrainians, however, will not be forgotten.

    For Ukraine today is in much the same position Poland was in 1939, who was then similarly used by the very same forces, to both kickstart WWII, and bring ruin upon both Germany and Russia.

    The Polish weren’t forgotten by the US/UK for their great sacrifice.

    Whether the controversial plane crash was accident or sabotage, the death of the Pole’s natural leader, Władysław Sikorski, on July 4, 1943 (America’s Independence Day) on an American built RAF Liberator, whilst in British custody at Gibraltar, is heavily laden with a dark symbolism.

    ‘Now Poland is lost! Now Poland is lost!’ a Polish officer who had observed the crash from Gibraltar’s runway would cry out.

    Later, in February, 1945, at Yalta, the Polish people and nation, no longer having Sikorski to positively influence the Allies, would be handed over by the US/UK to the tender mercies of Soviet Communism. [I don’t say Russian Communism as I see the Russian people themselves as also having been a ‘captive nation’ of that system.]

    It should go without saying, one can say these things without either being ‘pro-Hitler’, or, ‘pro-Putin’, a false dichotomy, but rather simply being, pro-truth.

    Below is a mid-19th century description of the global revolutionary mission of the United States. Note the particular hostility aimed at the peoples of Europe, italics in the original:

    Sikorski’s body being removed to a ship at Gibraltar’s naval base after his funeral.

    ‘It is the duty of the American party to combat all European traditions which are incompatible with Americanism; but, above all, that of nationality. To vindicate individualism against nationality, is the office of America.’

    ‘This is, at the same time, the whole force and scope of the revolution; thus, the revolution which arose in and with America, must for ever return to it; and America, which began in revolution, must live in it, and end with it.’

    ‘When the dominion of nationality is crushed, and the sovereignty of the individual is attained, everywhere and everyhow, the missions of the revolution and of America will both be accomplished.’ The New Rome; or, the United States of the World (1853) – pg 71

    https://archive.org/details/newrome00poes/page/70/mode/2up

    • Thanks: Anne Lid
    • Replies: @German_reader
  194. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    pan-Slavist would view this killing

    For the empire politics, panslavism was a technology for creating uprisings or revolutionary pressure in the rival empires, as well as generating claims for territory expansion (as pangermanism or panturkism).

    This is because, rivals of the Russian Empire, were occupying various slavic nations, during the 19th century. So the purpose of promoting panslavism is to create problems for your enemies, while disguising your occupations (as a government representative of international slavs, you can occupy some other slavs, without the same incompatibility).

    In the 20th century, this was updated by communism, which allowed you to follow the same policy also in nonslavic regions like Cuba or Africa, by saying you are representative of the leader not of international slavs, but leaders of the international working class.

    In the second half of the 20th century, Russian Empire’s panslavism was actually achieved, as all the slavic countries (except Tito in Yugoslavia) became satellites of the Soviet Union.

    It’s interesting Erdogan today can use two vectors of panturkism and international Islam. If he wanted to influence in Dagestan or Indonesia, he could present his goals in relation to Islam. But if he wanted to extend in Central Asia, he could present panturkism.

    Russian nationalist would approve of the destruction of other Slavs

    Nationalism in Russia has a different verbal meaning. It refers to in positive presentation self-determination of Russians, or negative presentation (which is the mainstream government use of the words) a more violent racism.

    This is why in the media now and also military funerals this year, are talking about “fighting against nationalism”. “He died heroically in Donbass fighting against nationalism and neonazism”. In the last twenty years, they give the word “nationalism” a negative connotation, although more recently (while nationalists are in prison or killed) they at the same time try to astroturf imperialism as being the acceptable kind of nationalism. This is by various PR experts in the government.

    Ideology you refer to is really Russian imperialism, which has been socially acceptable or promoted by the authorities in the last decades. Russian imperialism has also verbal difficulties in Russia, because “imperialism” is a negative word after Lenin, who said it could only exist in capitalist societies (even while this allowed the USSR to disguise imperialist policy).

    Russian imperialism, implies Russia has the destiny to be the great world power, that by implication (if you don’t want to remove them) should rule various other nationalities and pseudonationalities, perhaps according to a divine right of kings. The latter is incompatible with self-determination of peoples. As most imperialist ideology, requires some messianic propaganda about having a special spiritual destiny, etc.

    Russian imperialism generates things which Russian nationalism complains about (rule by multinational elite and movement of the people from the periphery to core of empire). In Soviet times, problems were more managed by restrictions against internal movement. But in the postsoviet, some of the problems of the empire, becomes increasingly noticeable for the public, and for this reason the government needed to remove nationalism as a rival option (on one hand, considering it a taboo, on the other presenting it the socially acceptable supposed “nationalism” that is just pro-government imperialism).

    Bashibuzuk (sic/) is a pan-Slavist.

    If I recall, his political views were more like nationalist, in the sense he said he wanted a Russian government, for the interests of Russian people. But the Russian Federation constructed as a multinational empire, and you are perhaps already a utopian if you hope the leaders will be only moderately imperialist and moderately corrupt, and will only moderately crash the automobile into the brick wall only every couple decades.

    • Thanks: German_reader
    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  195. German_reader says:
    @S

    Later, in February, 1945, at Yalta, the Polish people and nation, no longer having Sikorski to positively influence the Allies, would be handed over by the US/UK to the tender mercies of Soviet Communism.

    What does handed over mean? The simple fact is that the Red army was on the ground in Eastern Europe, and short of starting another world war (with uncertain prospects, even the number of nuclear bombs the US had was rather limited in 1945/46 after all, not to mention the problems of delivery) there was nothing the US and UK could have done about it.

    • Disagree: S
    • Replies: @S
  196. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    There is no contradiction between Russia seeking to join NATO and Russia being aggressive and nationalistic.

    There’s no contradiction for Poland and some others being in NATO, while being stupidly chauvinistic.

  197. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Beckow

    Like the Mariupol area ethnic Greeks who fled to Greece, saying that Kiev regime forces were violently unfriendly unlike the Russian and the Donbass rebels.

    So much for the BBC BS about how civilians in Russian rebel areas are pressured into spinning a certain line.

  198. Dmitry says:
    @Coconuts

    more exotic than say, Don Quixote or Goethe.

    They are a lot less exotic, as Tolstoy, Chekhov, Dostoevsky, are based in English and French writers of the second half of the 19th century.

    They are directly inspired and writing in response to the developments in Paris and London, where the literary innovation was very high. In particular, their writing is very similar internationally to the decade of the 19th century when their books are written, following the latest techniques of realism.

    Whereas Cervantes is something that seems extremely exotic and original, although this can be artifact of the historical distance compared to our culture (maybe in the 17th century, he would not seem so exotic).

    rchaic Eurocentric provincial culture, before the influence of these guys like Edward Said

    I disagree. If you look in the bookshop in the United Kingdom, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy are some of the most popular books, very promoted. So also is Edward Said. But also strangely Solzhenitsyn is fashionable and promoted in the bookshops of England (much more than in Russia), sometimes in the front desk.

    Obviously, Dostoevsky is fashionable still, partly because he was promoted by Nietzsche, then psychoanalysis and existentialism in the 20th century. Both French and German writers were interested in Dostoevsky. But partly, because he is addictive to read. Probably, Dostoevsky will still be internationally fashionable in the 22nd century.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
  199. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    However the war began in Donbas, when Poroshenko and Turchinov declared “anti-terrorist operation” against their own people, who refused to recognize their authority, for which these people didn’t vote

    It began when Russia sent people in Donbas to cause trouble. If the trouble was with local elected figures than you would have had a point. Instead it was with foreign adventurers like Girkin or Borodai. It was like the Syrian government going after the foreign ISIS jihadists who came to Syria with Turkish, American etc, help (and who had local support of course).

    That’s a civil war,

    Yes, one initiated and and made possible through Russian interference in a way that is uncommon in most civil wars. The first PM of Donetsk was a Russian citizen from Moscow. So this Slav-on-Slav bloodshed was a Russian project. I doubt Dostoyevsky would have approved.

    There’s no Putin’s Russia. This is some kind of really twisted thinking – what Putin’s Russia is doing to Russia.

    Of course there is a Putin’s Russia. It is a consolidation and stabilization of Bolshevik Russia after the Bolsheviks usurpers decided to reorganize their project in the 1990s. He is the stabilization of that 90s iteration of Bolshevik Russia.

    Since you are likely a Sharikov (that is, a Soviet Russian Man) you are probably incapable of seeing that.

    Dostoyevsky would be utterly disgusted seeing what’s happening with Ukraine and surely would support Russian interference on behalf of the Russian Ukrainians

    As the quotes I provided indicated, he explicitly rejected bloodshed and integration by the sword. He also explicitly rejected Russia behaving like those little squabbling Slavic countries. Putin’s Russia is like the little Slavic nations whom Dostoyevsky held in contempt, killing other Slavs over land or glory or whatever.

    Again, Dostoyevsky’s own words: “The purpose of it is to live a higher life, a superior life; to illuminate the world with a great, selfless, and pure idea; to realize and ultimately create a great and mighty organism of a brotherly union of peoples; to create this organism, not by political force, not by the sword, but by conviction, example, love, selflessness, and light

    Putin has naturally soiled this legacy with his bloody invasion of Ukraine, sending Buryats and Chechens to murder and rape Ukrainian Slavs. There will be no brotherly union now.

    Well the Dostoyevsky’s Russia was hardly a good place to live in, unless you belong to an aristocratic family. Or a merchant’s family.

    Thanks to Stolypin’s reforms it was good for peasants who chose to work hard, also. The transition to industrialization wasn’t easy on factory workers (it wasn’t in England earlier either) but Russia did not need mass murder and ugliness to achieve modernity.

    Thanks for confirming that as the product of Soviet filth and vomit, you reject the Russia that produced Dostoyevsky. Completely predictable.

    Yes the present day Russia is a chimera, but the period after Stalin and up to Yeltsin was the best in the Russian history.

    Spoken like a true Sovok. A Sharikov who is grotesque because he does not know his place.

    This is interesting how you couldn’t see in that essay how many parallels in his words can be drawn to the modern Ukraine.

    It didn’t contradict what I wrote.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  200. AP says:
    @Beckow

    pro-Russian or Russian-leaning Ukrainians – or more accurately: the not-pro-Nato population – in Donbas, South and East supported by Russia. They used to get consistently 40-50% of votes between 1991-2012.

    This group is not a monolith and it does not equal pro-political union with Russia. Most of that 40% to 50% wanted Ukraine to be independent but in economic union with Russia, as Canada is with the USA. They did not want Russia to invade Ukraine or take its territories. Less than 10% of the Ukrainian population wanted to be part of Russia. Most of these ones got their wish in 2014. Most of the 40% to 50% pro-Russian voters until 2014 are disgusted by what Russia has done and as a result of the invasion have turned against Russia. Russia’s invasion is not supported by 40% to 50% of Ukraine’s population.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  201. @Mr. Hack

    Are you aware of the fact that the girl from the hospital, Marianna, the one who was pregnant, has said that there was no bombing and no airstrike.

    She said that there was an explosion outside of the building, and that there were reporters waiting there with professional cameras.

    You need to be really emotionally involved to believe anything from the Ukrainian side after their own chief of propaganda said that they lie as much as possible.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Mr. Hack
  202. Dmitry says:
    @Coconuts

    Dugin is a scam more than scholar, partly because he changes his view to reflect what the person wants to hear. He knows how to change his views, to match the PR requirements. But he is very clever relative to the requirements.

    So, he is not without skill, but a professional rhetorician in this area, a talented person.

    He actually wrote a good article recently to justify the invasion of Ukraine in the early stage, when the attack was more “ambitious”.
    (Russian resource https://tsargrad.tv/articles/gvozd-v-kryshku-groba-ukronacizma-aleksandr-dugin-raskryl-kto-takie-ukraincy-2_509841 )

    Basically he has transcribed the “anti-nationalist” Putin essay from last year, and says it is panslavism to deconstruct the Ukrainian nationalism.

    He is clever how quickly he can move around the different postsoviet narratives, to create something which matches the current situation, where Putin’s essay was less clearly able to say the same thing (that rejecting Ukrainian nationalism is a brotherhood).

  203. German_reader says:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jun/10/ukraine-casualty-rate-russia-war-tipping-point

    Headline is somewhat at odds with the article itself, where they say Ukraine’s army isn’t near collapse. But counter-offensives don’t seem very likely right now.
    Scholz, Macron and Draghi apparently intend to visit Kyiv this month.
    Shitlib magazine SPIEGEL ran a cover story today about Germany’s lack of supplying heavy weapons to Ukraine. I read it, totally worthless, about two pages of factual reporting (which however didn’t contain anything new), the rest was just fact-free emoting from one of their senior journalists. What is concerning however is that there are reports delivery of the four MLRS Germany intends to send to Ukraine might be delayed…supposedly there are software problems which preclude use of certain types of shells (?). I won’t hazard any estimate on how this is to be judged. I hope at least the Panzerhaubitzen 2000 will be delivered in coming weeks, training for Ukrainian soldiers on them has apparently now moved from theory to practice.

  204. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    A lot of what you say is true, but the video that you present doesn’t reflect the mood of the common everyday Mariupol civilian today – it was shot sometime between 2014 – 2021, not most recently. You show a video that shows a celebration of May 9th, that you could find most anywhere in Ukraine, certainly in Kyiv and even further west. So, all that you’ve really shown me is that Ukrainians and Russians could celebrate a common victory and it wasn’t always a bad relationship. But now, after 02/26/22? How much of this good will has been trampled into the ground, thrown out the window, after Russia’s clumsy invasion of Ukraine? This war is end of any goodwill between these two nations, unfortunately for a very long time. I doubt that either side will win any huge economic gains.

  205. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Are you aware of the fact that the girl from the hospital, Marianna

    The one who was captured by Russia? How credible you think her statements are under Russian watch?

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
  206. @AP

    You are immediately becoming emotional which indicates that nothing you say or think is based on common sense. Purely childish comprehension.

    Since you are likely a Sharikov (that is, a Soviet Russian Man) you are probably incapable of seeing that.

    Says who – an American immigrant who was a sperm when the transition from Socialism to that wonderful Democracy was happening before my eyes.

    You don’t know anything about that, you weren’t there, you didn’t live it through, you didn’t feel it with your own skin, so your opinion is not even real.

    Putin has naturally soiled this legacy with his bloody invasion of Ukraine, sending Buryats and Chechens to murder and rape Ukrainian Slavs.

    No one has ever raped any Ukrainian, that woman has been fired, she lied. But there are plenty of videos where Ukrainians torture people, cutting people’s throats, shooting them in the legs, poking out eyes with a knife and cutting out swastikas on women’s bellies.

    The Tornado Battalion committed multiple rapes and the Ukrainian parliament recognized that.

    You have a nerve to accuse the Russians of atrocities without any evidence whatsoever, whereas there is plenty of evidence of the atrocities that the Ukrainians have committed, which doesn’t bother you at all.

    The transition to industrialization wasn’t easy on factory workers (it wasn’t in England earlier either) but Russia did not need mass murder and ugliness to achieve modernity.

    Capitalism is not modernity, sweetheart. Capitalism is the same as that old archaic structure called Feudalism, except for the apparent absence of slavery which nevertheless is still there.

    Your wonderful country of the US has murdered a lot more people than died in Russia during the civil war.

    The number of fatalities in the US during the civil war, as well as in France, during the revolution was significantly larger in relation to population. Your entire narrative is a propagandist crap.

    Thanks for confirming that as the product of Soviet filth and vomit, you reject the Russia that produced Dostoyevsky. Completely predictable.

    You know, completely predictable is a conversation with someone like you.

    • Agree: Mikhail, A123
    • Replies: @AP
  207. Mikhail says: • Website

    • Replies: @AP
  208. Mr. Hack says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    So the girl said there was “no bombing and airstrike”? And you foolishly try to deflect blame from Russian airstrikes based on this single opinion from an obviously staged and frightened participant?
    What was her alternative theory then? What caused the huge crater that suddenly appeared that only could have been accomplished by a large bomb dropped from the sky? Ukrainian planes were not flying overhead at that time….hmmmm….2+2= ? C’mon Mr. Dragon Man, surely you can figure this one out?

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  209. @A123

    The ethnic cleansing performed by Apartheid Muslims against Jews is undeniable.

    So is the cleansing performed by the Jews on the Palestinian Arabs.

    Actually, the cleansing of Jews from Arab lands is technically “more deniable” than the cleansing of the Palestinians, since plenty of those Jews wanted to go to Israel anyway, and there wasn’t the sense that they are losing their homeland, as there was for Palestinians – quite the opposite, they were gaining a homeland. (Although living in Israel was no picnic for Jews from Arab lands. They were viewed and treated as undesirable on racial grounds, a social condition which only began to seriously improve under Begin in the late 70s.)

    The liberal solution to the problem is actually quite straightforward: both Jews and Palestinians should be allowed to return to their lands they were cleansed from. Any takers?

    • Replies: @A123
  210. @Johann Ricke

    Coming from Hitler’s literal kin, that’s a little rich.

    How’s it “rich”, dipshit? Seems perfectly reasonable to me. See, the sane human expectation is that as time goes by, outrage subsides. When you refuse to let go, when you refuse to recognize the enormous amends they’ve made, when you refuse to react to the attitudes they display today (instead substituting tortured historical memory), then patience quite understandably wears thin.

    As for Europeans criticizing Israel, it’s done on grounds no different to which Jews criticize Europeans no matter where on earth they live. You seriously need to shut the fuck up about this and be glad Israel’s getting off as lightly as it is.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  211. See, the sane human expectation is that as time goes by, outrage subsides.

    Let’s see – remembering the extermination of the majority of European Jews – that’s insane. But Europeans trying to finish the job vis-a-vis Jews in Israel by lending the Arabs a hand with the task – that’s not just sane, but a matter of simple humanity.

    There’s no outrage involved – just a debt. A blood debt. That, in time, might be repaid. In full. With interest.

  212. @Beckow

    Vegas is better, it has a certain oomph and a weird uniqueness. It is better built because it has to be

    I lived in Vegas for about a year. I haven’t been to Phoenix, but just from what I’ve seen on google street view, huge parts of it look extremely crappy. I don’t recall seeing anywhere in Vegas that was that bad, and I took a big tour of the place when I arrived, trying to decide where to live. (Which doesn’t necessarily mean much. You can live in a big city your entire life and not see every part of it.)

    And just lol at the latest absurdity from AP: the city’s an urban dump, but that doesn’t matter because it’s got pretty hills. Lmao.

    He’s certainly right about cookie-cutter sameness creating an ugly effect. I’ll give him that. I was at the peak Mammonite phase of my life back then so it doesn’t bother me. Today, I doubt I’d last a week.

    I haven’t found anything that beats Australian suburban life in the late 90s. The quality of the housing and the lot size that a working class family could afford is, in hindsight, simply astonishing. Given the economic and demographic trends in place, there will probably never be another time like it. (I’m sure there were plenty of places like that in America, perhaps even better, but I wasn’t there to see it.)

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @AP
  213. German_reader says:
    @silviosilver

    I don’t think it’s worth even trying to have a debate with him. He’s just a bloodthirsty psycho who gets off on fantasizing about extreme uses of military power (he’s also advocated bombing Iran in the past btw, Iraq war was just badly implemented according to him..but next time it will be totally different and work out just great!). Just thought I’d point out some of his record, not that anybody here gets the idea that his interest in the Ukrainian war and related matters extends beyond the most braindead chauvinism and political tribalism (as amply proven also by his nonsense about Biden being a Russian stooge, literally a mirror image of the claims about Trump, lol).

    • Agree: Barbarossa
  214. Coconuts says:
    @Dmitry

    I disagree. If you look in the bookshop in the United Kingdom, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy are some of the most popular books, very promoted. So also is Edward Said. But also strangely Solzhenitsyn is fashionable and promoted in the bookshops of England (much more than in Russia), sometimes in the front desk.

    I think with Solzhenitsyn it may have to do with Jordan Peterson, he started talking about him again and wrote an introduction to Gulag Archipelago (iirc Peterson talked about how it had gone out of print before this latest edition, though easy to find 2nd hand). He was quite big in the West in the 1970s, my parents still have a couple of his books in paperback from that time.

    I think Edward Said used to be much less known than he would be now, the selection of classics I read in my teens included few women writers, no specific writing or awareness of queer or LGBT themes, nothing overtly post-colonial, and as I mentioned I still remember the main left-wing influence being what might be called now ‘trad socialism’ (i.e. Orwell). Feminism was 1st/2nd wave, like Germaine Greer.

    I was working in public libraries in the mid-2000s, by this time selections of books with LGBT themes, black history, women’s writing etc. were starting to appear in larger numbers, though they were very rarely taken out. The same was actually true of most classics and literary fiction, though not quite to the same extent. The most popular topics by far in lending library fiction were still genre ‘love, crime and cowboys’, family saga books and sci-fi/fantasy.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  215. Mr. Hack says:
    @silviosilver

    And just lol at the latest absurdity from AP: the city’s an urban dump, but that doesn’t matter because it’s got pretty hills. Lmao.

    If you’re referring to Phoenix, then you’re clearly way off. The video I presented above, of the Encanto Park area is right smack dab in the center of town not far away from downtown. That’s over 260 acres! There are many other nice parts of town too. Of course, Phoeniex has some bad parts of town too, like any other large city. These would be found in the south of the city. But even there, major uplifts and the inclusion of some real nice neighborhood enclaves are sprouting up.

    As far as Vegas goes, I’ve only been there several times, and that was mostly related to work projects. I really enjoy the Cirque-Soleil acrobatic theater and magic arts stuff. And AP is right about it having plenty of fine restaurants, as does Phoenix, BTW. At my last job, I worked next to a guy who really loved Vegas, as he was a professional sports bettor. He told me all about it. He lived close to the central hub of activity along the strip, just one street off of the main drag. He kept telling me about all of the weird types that would be wandering around in front of his place. Lots of criminal activity too. He had to leave, because things were just to crazy there. He was planning to move back, so it couldn’t have been that bad. 🙂

  216. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    You are immediately becoming emotional

    I am describing something in a very objective and rational way that reflects the subject material.

    “Since you are likely a Sharikov (that is, a Soviet Russian Man) you are probably incapable of seeing that.”

    Says who – an American immigrant who was a sperm when the transition from Socialism to that wonderful Democracy was happening before my eyes.

    I visited Ukraine and Russia in the nineties and witnessed firsthand the unfolding of the project by the Soviet elites as they remade their country in a way that appealed to them more. It wasn’t pretty.

    Do you complain about the work done by the flowering elites of the Soviet system?

    You don’t know anything about that, you weren’t there, you didn’t live it through, you didn’t feel it with your own skin, so your opinion is not even real.

    The Sovok, like the American post-modern progressive, is all about “lived experience.”

    “Putin has naturally soiled this legacy with his bloody invasion of Ukraine, sending Buryats and Chechens to murder and rape Ukrainian Slavs.”

    No one has ever raped any Ukrainian, that woman has been fired, she lied

    She lied about children being raped. Reality was bad enough, it was wrong for her to lie so she was fired for it.

    But there are plenty of videos where Ukrainians torture people, cutting people’s throats, shooting them in the legs, poking out eyes with a knife and cutting out swastikas on women’s bellies…The Tornado Battalion committed multiple rapes and the Ukrainian parliament recognized that

    Tornado battalion were eastern Ukrainian Sovoks like you, what would one expect? Remember Sharikov’s favorite activity?

    But they were eventually prosecuted. The Russian butchers in Bucha, on the other hand, were awarded. This is a difference between the two countries.

    You have a nerve to accuse the Russians of atrocities without any evidence whatsoever

    There is plenty of evidence and it continues to be gathered. I have family in Bucha, lying to me is like lying to someone with family in Manhattan about 9-11 never occurring. As a result of Putin’s mass murders and destruction in Kiev, Chernihiv and Sumy regions central Ukrainians have come to hate Russians even more than Galicians do. You can lie to yourself and to your own people, but the people of central Ukraine saw with their own eyes what Russians did. Dostoyevsky warned about that. He would be disgusted by those who did it and those who defend that action as you do.

    Capitalism is not modernity, sweetheart. Capitalism is the same as that old archaic structure called Feudalism

    Feudalism produced the world’s greatest cultural monuments. Capitalism stifled that, but in compensation at least produced the world’s greatest material wealth, prosperity, life spans, etc. Communism (or rather, Sovok-style socialism) destroyed the beautiful feudalistic world while producing a cheap and inferior second rate material prosperity compared to that of the capitalist system. At the price of millions dead. The squalor (not to mention mass killings) of the Soviet system compared to Western Europe, USA and Canada highlight this difference.

    Your wonderful country of the US has murdered a lot more people than died in Russia during the civil war.

    Over 200 years versus over thee years? Sure. And? Most of America’s victims were foreigners. Bolsheviks killed the best of their own nation’s people. Then replaced them with crude Sharikovs who were taught to read and speak by their experimenter-masters.

    The number of fatalities in the US during the civil war, as well as in France, during the revolution was significantly larger in relation to population.

    Sovok can’t math. Total number of civilian plus military dead in US civil war was 600,000-1,000,000. Out of the 1860 population of 31.4 million.

    Total number of civilian plus military dead in the Russian Civil War was 7-12 million out of a total Russian Empire population in 1914 of 166 million. On a per capita basis the highest estimate for American casualties was still lower than the lowest estimate of Russian dead.

    So to seize power, the Bolsheviks butchered Russia. And out of its corpse they created the Frankenstein’s monster state – ugly, brutal and poor. The nineties was its ultimate legacy, and Putin the consolidation of that legacy.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @Here Be Dragon
  217. AP says:
    @silviosilver

    And just lol at the latest absurdity from AP: the city’s an urban dump, but that doesn’t matter because it’s got pretty hills.

    What’s absurd about that? Even an “urban dump” placed in the middle of natural wonderland becomes a decent place to be.

    I don’t describe Vegas as an urban “dump,” either. There was an ugliness to the relentless uniformity, but other than the North End (a ghetto) it was clean and neat. Individual houses were fine, one could have nice gardens, a decent house, a swimming pool and barbecue within the walls. It had good restaurants, nightclubs, and due to its size one could buy anything that was necessary, typically 24 hours a day. The ugliness is only evident during commutes, but in that case look to the purple mountains and feel better.

    And Valley of Fire, Red Rock Canyon (20 minutes from the suburbs, people can bicycle there), Mount Charleston are much more than merely “pretty hills.”

    I haven’t been to Phoenix but friends had lived there and described it to me as Vegas minus the casinos. Seems not bad. The nature looks pretty out there and they have cactuses rather than Joshua trees.

  218. AP says:
    @Mikhail

    So Russians can’t make up their minds. Either the city isn’t destroyed, or it’s the Azovites’ fault it is destroyed because they set up weapons on buildings in the city.

    Donbas rebels also had positions in urban areas, which is why civilians were being killed by Kiev once in a while (though not nearly on the scale that Russians have been killing civilians). Somehow they don’t give Kiev a free pass for that.

    It’s just layer after layer of hypocrisy.

    • Agree: Philip Owen
    • Disagree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mikhail
  219. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    One of your best comments ever (and there have been many good ones)! The synthesis of much thought and study of the subject matter. It shows.

    • Thanks: AP
  220. @Mr. Hack

    Of course.

    You should have known that Russia’s aircraft do not use bombs. The only two “bomber” class aircraft models are also missile carriers. They all use guided missiles with accuracy of 1 meter or less.

    How do you explain that two satellite-guided missiles missed a building?

    Very simple.

    The Russian edia had published three different reports regarding that hospital prior to the event, in which it was stated that the Azov troops were using it as a command outpost. So they blew a mine in the yard.

    Then made a propaganda footage and left.

    That girl wasn’t captured, she moved to Donetsk where she had friends or family. And you know the stories about rape of children and women also happened to be lies. And more importantly it doesn’t even matter.

    You and AP and John Johnson and Philip Owen, and whatever his name is – Triteleia Laxa and others of your ilk will continue to spread propaganda, and the Russians will continue to beat the crap out of Ukraine.

    And we will continue watching you, a pack of trolls becoming increasingly more inadequate, until one day you disappear.

    Have a good night.

    • Disagree: German_reader
    • LOL: Mikhail
    • Troll: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @AP
    , @Philip Owen
  221. Mr. Hack says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Keep watching and pay close attention to all of the boomerangs that will be hurled back at you with your silly nonsense. 🙂

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
  222. S says:
    @German_reader

    What does handed over mean?

    It means exactly what it says. The US/UK willfully gave Poland, as well as Eastern Europe, to Stalin.

    The simple fact is that the Red army was on the ground in Eastern Europe, and short of starting another world war (with uncertain prospects, even the number of nuclear bombs the US had was rather limited in 1945/46 after all, not to mention the problems of delivery) there was nothing the US and UK could have done about it.

    I come at history from what I see as a reasonable ‘big picture’. [Before going further, my thinking in this is certainly ‘unorthodox’, and it’s probably not most people’s cup of tea, which is cool. I no longer believe in the Right/Left paradigm (Thank God!) because I don’t believe anyone could be that consistently stupid without it being deliberate, such as American Capitalism’s many seemingly ‘over the top failures in it’s long standing purported ‘war’ with Communism. I find it much easier to believe that the stupidity is often quite deliberate rather than the idea sometimes (often?) trotted out that we are ‘led’ by a bunch of well meaning bungling idiots]

    [MORE]

    In this view, the world was already largely conquered (at the latest) when the US/UK formed the ‘special relationship’ in about 1900. See WT Stead’s 1902 book, The Americanization of the World, linked below (especially pg 10, 11, 12) where he calculates the US/UK has three times the wealth and economic resources of the combined French, Russian, and German empires, thus declaring the US/UK in that same chapter to be the ‘supreme power’ over the Earth, and to be the ‘world conquerers’. There were others at about that same time who made similar calculations as Stead’s.

    However, others going back as far as the late 18th century, declare that the British Empire was already approaching something like a global hegemony even then.

    I think much of that wealth and power was monetized, so despite the post WWII ‘Fall of the British Empire’, much of this power was retained within the Anglosphere.

    Broadly speaking, the British by themselves, and later with the US within the ‘special relationship’, certainly had the wealth and power to run ‘both sides’ of this Capitalist/Communist dialectic. Enough of a broad control, if only via manipulation of larger events, that Stalin would wind up in control of Eastern Europe. [Also see Anthony Sutton’s book on the financing of Soviet Communism.]

    The fact that London is where both Capitalism’s defacto manifesto, Smith’s Wealth of Nations in 1776, and Marx’s Communist Manifesto in 1848, were both first published, in each instance there being a tie in with the City of London financial district, should by itself be enough to cause true believers in the historic Capitalist vs Communist dialectic, and its paralleling derivitives, the gravest of concern.

    That’s the macro-cosm of how I think Poland was ‘handed over’ to Stalin

    Within the micro-cosm of Stalin’s armies in Eastern Europe in 1945-46, and only commenting here specifically about his military commentary in this regard, which can readily be found on the net (and not his known strong antipathy towards Russia and the Russian people, which I do not agree with, nor his eccentricities) George Patton certainly thought something could be done about Stalin’s troops in Eastern Europe at that time. Patton was not just anybody, he has long been generally considered one of the most competent of US wartime generals.

    Having said that, I tend to be in agreement with much of the Russian commentariat here in regards to this manufactured and broadly controlled (crimethink, I know) Hegelian dialectic of Capitalism vs Communism, in that being starved under Capitalism and the Oligarchs during the 90’s, and being mass murdered under the Communist during the 20’s, 30’s, and 40’s, wasn’t ‘helping’ them, nor any other peoples besides, and was no good, the ‘cure’ being far worse than the ‘disease’.

    Every people has their problems, and in that the Russians are certainly no different. The Russians had a good man, one of their own, named Stolypin, working diligently on the problems of his Russian people. His life was cut short in 1911 when he was murdered in cold blood by a charlatan, a fraud, a ‘red’.

    Other peoples had their own Stolypins that were also similarly murdered.

    Who knows what might of been had these good men lived?

    https://archive.org/details/americanizationo01stea/page/10/mode/2up

  223. Sean says:
    @AP

    As a NATO member, Russia would have been able to cause trouble for the Baltics, Finland not to mention Ukraine with far fewer consequences than as a non-NATO member.

    Before 2003, Russia was accepting things that no one during the Cold War dreamt the USSR would not fight to prevent; I speak of the accession to the Washington Treaty (AKA Nato) by countries in Eastern Europe including those abutting the Russian Federation. The location where Poland’s membership was concluded in Independence, Missouri! This was in 1999 , which was also the year that Nato attacked Serbia over Kosovo. Despite the Russian advice being ignored and its UN being bypassed, Russia remained quiescent.

    A key event in the shift in Russians attitude inclining to see NATO as targeting Russia, was when agreement was reached for the Transnistria issue, but the US pressured Moldavia to reject it. The next year Ukraine, for a decade and a half it subsidized with cheap gas against the World trade Organization’s pressing advice to begin charging Ukraine market prices, and the Orange revolution occurred, with at least the open approval of American diplomats. The famous Munich security conference speech by Putin was in 2007; he said Washington had sought geopolitical advantage at Russia;s expence.

    In Feb 2008 Kosovo unilaterally declared its independence, and in April of that year Georgia (and Ukraine) were announced to be future members of Nato Apr 2008. In August, 2008, Russia invaded Georgia, in the first European war of the century. Nevertheless, in November 2009 Putin gave a compromise deal to Ukraine on gas price after negotiations by Yulia Tymoshenko s. The next year Putin’s supposed puppet Viktor Yushchenko was elected president of Ukraine and to Putin’s fury jailed Tymoshenko for corruption in the negotiations.

    There is no contradiction between Russia seeking to join NATO and Russia being aggressive and nationalistic.

    Russia under Yeltsin and the early days of Putin was aggressive to the West? There were Nato countries conducting military exercises in Ukraine (even Crimea) sparking outraged demonstration by locals in this period yet Putin did not attempt to make trouble. The historical record of Russian assistance in the aftermath of 9/11 indicates Russia was trying to be on friendly terms with the West as late as 2002, and Putin’s own speeches explicitly stated that Russia was a part of Europe facing the same threats, and happy to help in the battle against Islamic terrorism. Read the above litany and it becomes obvious that Putin did not just get out of bed on the wrong side one morning and decide he was Peter the Great, who inherited his position, and height. Like Zelensky, the Russian president is a short man who could hardly have come to lead his country without a very strongly developed ego ,which has led him (and Zelensky) to make serious mistakes.

  224. @Mr. Hack

    That’s not how boomerangs work, Mr Moron. I guess we can’t expect better from a hack like you.

    • LOL: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  225. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    And you know the stories about rape of children and women also happened to be lies.

    So Sovok tells the truth lies at the UN?

    As I wrote, you can lie to yourself all you want, in Ukraine people witnessed what the Russians have done and they hate them now.

    https://www.un.org/press/en/2022/sc14926.doc.htm

    As of 3 June, the Human Rights Monitoring Team of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) had received reports of 124 alleged acts of conflict-related sexual violence, occurring against women, girls, men and boys in various Ukrainian cities and regions. Women and girls constitute most of the alleged victims, while some reporting instances of sexual violence were also men and boys. Verification of cases is ongoing, and a national hotline on domestic violence, human trafficking and gender-based discrimination has been set up. To date, it has received reports of rape, gang rape, pregnancy following rape, attempted rape, threats of rape, coercion to watch an act of sexual violence committed against a partner or a child, and forced nudity.

    NICOLAS DE RIVIÈRE (France) said that the sanctions adopted by the European Union have the sole objective of bringing Moscow to return to respecting the Charter of the United Nations. Expressing outrage at the many credible allegations of sexual violence, he urged all members to be “the guarantors of the resolutions of this Council on sexual violence”. France fully supports the action of the United Nations on the ground to discover the facts, and it provided Ukraine with expertise to collect evidence and establish accountability.

    etc.

    and the Russians will continue to beat the crap out of Ukraine.

    I.e. murder and rape Ukrainian civilians.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  226. @Dmitry

    If I recall, his political views were more like nationalist, in the sense he said he wanted a Russian government, for the interests of Russian people.

    That was the last iteration. He has reportedly undergone a conversion. And moved to Tuva or there about.

    min

    max

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  227. A123 says: • Website
    @silviosilver

    both Jews and Palestinians should be allowed to return to their lands they were cleansed from. Any takers?

    Your “land grab” idea is disingenuous, and obviously unworkable. There is no viable security solution to reintegrate the populations. The Apartheid Muslim majority would resume persecution of minority Jews.
    ___

    The common sense solution is to fully (or at least largely) separate the sides. The straightforward option to achieve this is for each faith to return to their religious homelands:

        • Indigenous Palestinian religions, Christianity and Judaism, will stay in Palestine.
        • The non-native faith of Islam will return to their Muslim religious homeland(s).

    This will have to be handled in a compassionate and practical manner. The descendants of Muslim Jihadists did not ask to be born as occupiers in a foreign land. They need an honorable path to an economically viable home.
    ___

    It is clear to all rational observers that the Muslim attempt to steal Infidel land has failed. How many more generations of non-native Muslim youth will be wasted in a futile and unwinnable offensive against indigenous Palestinian Jews.

        Muslim Colonies are the Problem.
           Muslim Decolonization is the Answer.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  228. Mr. Hack says:
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    Oh, I understand the principle. In case you don’t:

  229. @Here Be Dragon

    I don’t comment on atrocities from either side except to debunk them. For example, no one was actually shown being knee capped, the original twitter source merely said it was shown. Both sides are busy showing attractive young women, toddlers and babies in positions of peril. Both sides are known to use video production teams to generate fake atrocity videos. Fake videos are how the 2014 insurgency was justified in the first place. Before Google Image search was debased, it was possible to check. I tested 30 images. 28 were fakes with just one click. The other 2 took slightly longer to trace. The next phase was to flood the web with 3-400 fake news sites and so it goes on.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
  230. @AP

    You have a talent to pack a lot of ignorance in a comment, while spicing it with insults and arrogance, little man and if you want to continue this communiation with me you should reconsider your manners.

    You are talking like an insolent idiot before getting a slap in the face, so let’s not insult each other – you don’t know me, you have no idea who you are speaking with, so show a modicum of respect.

    Do you complain about the work done by the flowering elites of the Soviet system?

    You are calling people like the first president of Ukraine the flowering elite, that retarded piece of peasant – obviously you weren’t there, you would have known they were far from the elite.

    The Sovok, like the American post-modern progressive, is all about “lived experience.”

    Then read Kant – there is no knowledge outside of experience. But isn’t it clear that what you imagine is not the same as what you feel, see and hear for real? Of course without prior experience your opinion is not valid – you haven’t witnessed the reality so you can’t really say anything about it apart from what you imagine.

    And whatever you imagine is not the real thing. Stick with what you really know.

    She lied about children being raped. Reality was bad enough, it was wrong for her to lie so she was fired for it.

    She lied about everything. She admitted that. When the press started asking questions she couldn’t proide anything to back it up, not even a witness. She was a lier and has been fired, but you continue to spread her lie repeating this bullshit.

    Shame on you.

    Tornado battalion were eastern Ukrainian Sovoks like you, what would one expect? Remember Sharikov’s favorite activity?

    My place of birth is West Ukraine. And better stop referencing Sharikov – you don’t strike me as being a lot more intelligent than him. You parents must have loved you too much, that’s why you are so inadequate.

    But they were eventually prosecuted. The Russian butchers in Bucha, on the other hand, were awarded. This is a difference between the two countries.

    They have been let out. First prosecuted and then freed. Your hatred of Russia, and all things Russian, and the Russian people is histerical.

    You really think the Ukrainians can do no wrong?

    Communism destroyed the beautiful feudalistic world while producing a cheap and inferior second rate material prosperity compared to that of the capitalist system.

    Seriously, are you sane?

    You sound like a spoiled kid from a wealthy home, who has never known any hardship in life, never struggled and never achieved anything worth being proud of, and who is nevertheless proud of being someone he thinks is better than others.

    You are not better than anybody. An ignorant young man, living in a comic book world.

    Socialism produced a society of equal opportunities for everybody, or something very near that. You and people like you wouldn’t benefit from Socialism, because then you wouldn’t have any advantage, and become what you really should be – a loser.

    Sovok can’t math. On a per capita basis the highest estimate for American casualties was still lower than the lowest estimate of Russian dead.

    Depending on the source.

    Where do you get your numbers from – Wikipedia, which says “citation needed” everywhere? Here is a serious research, according to which the per capita number is for the Russian Empire 1,4% and 1,96 % for the US.

    Здоров А. А. Гражданская война: потери населения. Опыт сравнительного анализа. Свободная мысль-XXI, 1999, № 10, С. 115—122.

    • Replies: @AP
  231. @AP

    Both of your countries, Ukraine and the US, have been lying all the time in all kinds of places, including the UN.

    Nobody believes you anymore, anywhere.

    • Replies: @AP
  232. @A123

    If the Arabs aren’t indigenous to Palestine neither are Jews. They didn’t spring up out of the soil. They moved there and genocided the existing inhabitants, events which their religion celebrates to this day.

    As I’ve said before, I don’t propose libtard solutions to Israel. As far as I’m concerned, if the Jews can keep it, it’s theirs to keep. But we shouldn’t turn a blind eye to the genocide they committed to take it, either the first time around or the second. Facts should be forthrightly recognized.

    • Replies: @A123
  233. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    So says a liar, whose nation’a media claimed they would not invade Ukraine.

  234. A123 says: • Website
    @silviosilver

    As far as I’m concerned, if the Jews can keep it, it’s theirs to keep.

    As a practical matter, your statement makes sense.

    Palestinian Jews have finally regained their land after ~2,000 years of effort. There is 0% chance they will allow it to be stolen again. They will do whatever is required to keep it.

    genocide they committed to take it, either the first time around or the second. Facts should be forthrightly recognized

    One cannot forthrightly accept Muslim propaganda. In the real world, objective facts show that indigenous Palestinian Jews were attacked. They successfully defended their people and religious homeland.

    History does need to accurately capture the war crimes and ethnic cleansing committed by the non-native Jihadists.

    PEACE 😇

  235. Dmitry says:
    @Coconuts

    Solzhenitsyn it may have to do

    Not to say there was such a conspiracy, but it’s funny that before 2018, Waterstones (which had the Russian section in London) was indirectly, “in potentia” controlled by Putin, as it was owned by the oligarch Aleksandr Mamut.

    Mamut is working in the past as an informal branch of government. When the government wants to break http://www.lenta.ru, Mamut buys it. In the beginning, they made some effort to insert pro-government articles, written by political technologists. However, later it just becomes a zombie site, that reposts from the network of other news sites.

    rpopular topics by far in lending library fiction were still genre ‘love, crime and cowboys’, family saga books

    Isn’t it the same kind of books which are popular now?

    Now, in the UK, they add things like “Read for Ukraine”, where they donate money to Ukraine for each book you buy. But most of the books are not related to Ukraine, but maybe some popular science and romance writing.

    https://www.waterstones.com/campaign/read-for-ukraine

  236. Dmitry says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/36/Witsen%27s_Shaman.JPG/640px-Witsen%27s_Shaman.JPG

    We think this picture could be an illustration of his activities of the last year?

    Perhaps he has been meditating in the caves of the Atlas mountains, sleeping under stars, singing mysterious Arabic incantations. He might have developed strange and secretive insights from his life in the desert and the mountain. But it would be a waste for him to try to share them with people like us.

    Alternatively, his wife has installed Apple Screen Time on all his devices. She doesn’t say the password to him and only allows him 10 minutes of internet time per week. We’re lucky this year, he managed to work to quickly enough to write 1 post here.

  237. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    “Do you complain about the work done by the flowering elites of the Soviet system?”

    You are calling people like the first president of Ukraine the flowering elite

    Kravchuk was a member of the the Politburo of the Central Committee of the Communist Party in Ukraine. That qualifies him as an elite. Kuchma was a member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine. Also elite. In Russia, Yeltsin was of course, a candidate member of the Politburo. Berzovsky was head of a department in the Institute of Control Sciences of the USSR Academy of Sciences, Khodorkovsky was a young Komsomol leader whose business partner was the son of executives at the State Bank of the USSR. Golden Communist youths. I could go on and on but the 90s were an elite Sovok project created by insiders in a peaceful transition, not some sort of revolution led by renegades as 1917 had been.

    So filth begat filth, it wasn’t hard to understand. And produced filth. Which is murdering people in Ukraine now. Or acting as its apologist, as you are.

    The Sovok, like the American post-modern progressive, is all about “lived experience.”

    Then read Kant – there is no knowledge outside of experience

    Someone has taught Sharikov how to cite Kant – how profane.

    Of course without prior experience your opinion is not valid – you haven’t witnessed the reality so you can’t really say anything about it apart from what you imagine.

    I can compare what I saw when I visited, with lies I hear from Sovoks.

    My place of birth is West Ukraine.

    Bad for Western Ukraine. You are either some sort of traitor, or the child of Sovok colonists. Most of the latter left. Yavlinsky, Friedman, etc.

    And better stop referencing Sharikov – you don’t strike me as being a lot more intelligent than him

    But he was you – a new Soviet Man.

    Just as it was a pity that he was created (he had been a normal, nice dog), so is it a pity that creatures like you were allowed to read Kant. Or perhaps even read at all. Because, like Sharikov, you use these gifts unnaturally bestowed upon you, for ugly purposes.

    “But they were eventually prosecuted. The Russian butchers in Bucha, on the other hand, were awarded. This is a difference between the two countries.”

    They have been let out. First prosecuted and then freed.

    So they spent at least some time behind bars. The Bucha murderers and rapists weren’t even briefly imprisoned and prosecuted, but awarded. Ukraine should do better but Russia is uncomparably worse.

    Your hatred of Russia, and all things Russian, and the Russian people

    After February 24 I certainly hate the Russian state and its criminals on Ukrainian territory. All things Russian? No, I like Dostoyevsky, Bulgakov, etc. and my kids are fluent in that language and can recite plenty of Pushkin’s lines. Russian people? My Russian family and friends (all but one of whom condemn this stupid war, I forgive the exception, her father is a retired general) would be surprised. Maybe one day I will return to our old Stalin-era flat on Tverskaya. My multiple entry visa is still valid until 2023. But I won’t be back and won’t be spending in Russia while this war continues. It’s trivial but a small thing I can do.

    You really think the Ukrainians can do no wrong?

    No, but in the context of Russia creating the civil war from 2014 and finally invading, their crimes pale in comparison to Russia’s.

    Communism destroyed the beautiful feudalistic world while producing a cheap and inferior second rate material prosperity compared to that of the capitalist system.

    Seriously, are you sane?

    Just being objective. Compare Czechoslovakia and Hungary to Austria, North to South Korea, East to West Germany, Russia (or Estonia) to Finland, etc. etc. It always makes a place poorer and inferior. Galicia came face to face with this reality in 1939:

    The locals viewed the Soviets as some half-fed poor ape-like creatures who were also scary because they were often drunk and committed crimes such as rape. Soviet officers were looting everywhere. Their wives wore stolen nightgowns around town because they thought they were fancy dresses.

    Many of the Soviets did not know how to use toilets. They were a source of embarrassment for Galician Ukrainian nationalists in front of their Polish rivals – many of those Soviets were of their own ethnicity and it was painful to hear these “apes” speak the same language. Local writing by both Poles and Ukrainians when encountering Soviets for the first time reveals their impressions – Ukrainian theologian Havril Kostelnyk – “unintelligent, uncultured faces and simple-minded movements.” Lviv mathemetician Hugo Steinhaus was told by Sovoks that mathematics was a “class science.” Stanislaw Lem, who was 17 in Lwow when the Soviets invaded, stated “the Germans evoked only fear, at the Soviets you could also laugh.” He described them as “a terrible, gigantic ape.”

    Soviet filmmaker Dovzhenko had similar impressions, expressed in private of course, worrying about “our boorishness, our tactlessness, our lack of culture” and hoping that one day the Easterners would stop despising the Galicians for being “better and more cultivated.”
    (I wrote the previous three paragraphs a few years ago but they predict today’s Russian troops)

    :::::::

    Socialism produced a society of equal opportunities for everybody

    Speaking of a silly comic book world.

    No, it stole and persecuted the best of the society and gave to the worst. Because people are inherently unequal, equalizing people is a grotesque form of injustice. So opportunities were not equal. People were forced to hide or launder their former or their parents’ backgrounds to get around the Sovok affirmative action.

    To the extent that there was equality, it was equality in squalor. When I visited my aunt and uncle, secondary school teachers – they lived in a small crappy apartment materially equivalent to how poor people in American government housing ghettos live. I suppose someone like a street sweeper wouldn’t live much more poorly. So there was equality, for sure.

    Where do you get your numbers from – Wikipedia, which says “citation needed” everywhere?

    Well, Britannica claims up to 10 million people, mostly civilians, died in the Russian Civil War:

    https://www.britannica.com/event/Russian-Civil-War/Foreign-intervention

    That’s 6.1% of the Russian Empire’s 1914 population.

    The same source, Britannica, writes that 2% of the US population died during the Civil War.

    Even the Guinness Book or World Records agrees lol:

    https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/highest-death-toll-from-a-civil-war

    The world’s costliest civil war, in terms of the number of lives lost during combat and in events relating to the war, is the Russian Civil War of 1917-22. It is estimated that the former Soviet Union lost some 1.5 million combatants, and around 8 million civilians died following armed attacks, famine and disease.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @Here Be Dragon
  238. Lurker says:
    @Yellowface Anon

    It’s starting to look like that Czechia (Česko)/Czech Republic (Česká republika) thing, but that time both native forms are being Anglicized.

    Škoda, a car brand from Czechia is sold in the UK. In reality its now been owned by VW for 30 years.

    We all pronounce it sko-dah.

    Some years ago Škoda advertising tried to school us into pronouncing it as: skod-ah. It didn’t work, we carried on with sko-dah.

    Now new advertising is circulating, they’re trying for a new pronunciation: schko-dah.

    I find it fascinating. Apparently the newest attempt is the correct one. So why the earlier push for an incorrect one, just one that sounded vaguely more foreign than the default British one?

    • Replies: @AP
  239. Dmitry says:

    Nevzorov (a kind of local personality) escaped from Russia where he is a criminal for his comments misrepresenting facts about the Russian army in Ukraine, and received Ukrainian citizenship by presidential decree.
    https://meduza.io/news/2022/06/03/aleksandru-nevzorovu-dali-ukrainskoe-grazhdanstvo-za-vydayuschiesya-zaslugi-pered-stranoy

    In April 2021, Nevzorov presenting the very negative predictions about the war in Ukraine.

    It wasn’t these predictions in 2021, which have resulted in his conviction. But probably, they have annoyed some important people.

    Dmitry Glukhovsky (a young writer, who made a popular series “Metro 2033” some years ago) is also wanted as a criminal in Russia, for criticizing the government. But he doesn’t live usually in Russia anyway, but in Spain, which is why he was writing so aggressively.

    Probably he will just stay in Spain and will never visit Russia again, to avoid prison.

    Otherwise there would be the self-fulfilled prophecy.

    • Replies: @216
  240. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    Looks to me like you’ve had a lot of pent up thoughts that needed to come out. or be restated. Glad to be along for the ride…

  241. @AP

    Well and it seemed to me that you must be like twenty. You know – one foot in the childhood, that kind of person.

    You have kids?

    Dude you are too stupid for your age take my advice go get your head checked because something is certainly wrong with it.

    Seriously.

    Look at all this mess in it.

    So filth begat filth, it wasn’t hard to understand. And produced filth.

    You know that that what it produced first and foremost was your dear state of Ukraine – literally. And yes, Ukraine was and is filth, but you don’t realize that even when you’re saying it.

    That’s a clinical disorder.

    Or again, you continue to call me Sharikov while demonstrating the kind of stupidity that would make him look smart.

    Someone has taught Sharikov how to cite Kant – how profane.

    Profane is to pretend you know what you’re talking about when you don’t, but don’t know no better anyway. No one cited Kant.

    You are a child, a spoiled little child with pubic hair. You are not even a man, because you can’t think like a man, can’t talk like a man.

    I can compare what I saw when I visited, with lies I hear from Sovoks.

    Yes you can, but that doesn’t mean you have a slightest idea about what was really going on there. Doesn’t matter what you saw when you visited, you need to know the place and stay for a few years to understand what you see.

    Maybe one day I will return to our old Stalin-era flat on Tverskaya.

    That’s a good one. Did your father buy it with the oney he stole, when the country was being looted, or did your grandfather get it from the Communist party?

    Your type is well known – either a grandfather in the NKVD, or a father in the Yeltsin’s cabal of crooks. Dont tell me you’re a grandson of a great artist.

    Look at your idiotic reasoning.

    People are inherently unequal, equalizing people is a grotesque form of injustice.

    Can’t you see that there is no way know who is better and who is worse, until all have equal chances to prove they are worth something.

    Your idea of being biologially better than someone is obiously wrong – look at you. You are stupid, and it should be embarassing but you are too dumb to realize you ain’t smart, so you’re proud of yourself instead.

    How pathetic.

    Well, Britannica claims. The same source, Britannica, writes.

    Are you a complete idiot?

    That’s not a reference and that’s not a source. An article written by god knows who, citing god knows what, if anything at all.

    See a doctor son they have some pills now that might be helpful.

    • Replies: @AP
  242. AP says:
    @Lurker

    Škoda

    In the Ukrainian language, this word means (шкода) “too bad” or “it’s a pity..” (Polish szkoda, Russian жалко)

    Ukrainians still buy them though.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  243. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    Kiev regime salvos into Donbass have been sloppy, inclusive of leveling neighborhoods where there were no rebels.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  244. Jazman says:
    @Mr. Hack

    While there is a holed roof here or there,or burnt-out apartment,city is HARDLY destroyed.
    In comparison,find vids from Mosul or Raqqa(assuming they haven’t been censored)to see how actually destroyed city looks like.

    • Agree: Mikhail
  245. Mikhail says: • Website

  246. Seraphim says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Can you say that the recovery by Russia of Potemkin’s creations is ‘Potemkin village propaganda’?

  247. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Dude you are too stupid for your age…You are stupid, and it should be embarassing but you are too dumb to realize you ain’t smart…Are you a complete idiot…You are a child, a spoiled little child with pubic hair

    Look, I have gotten Sharikov to start barking.

    We are making progress. When everything you write is like that, you will finally express your true Soviet essence.

    But your mind went straight from children to pubic hair which is rather disturbing. A normal person wouldn’t go there. Are you a friend of Scott Ritter?

    “So filth begat filth, it wasn’t hard to understand. And produced filth”

    You know that that what it produced first and foremost was your dear state of Ukraine

    The Ukrainian state run by Sovok elites was not much to be proud of, as expected. It’s unfortunate that 2014 (or at least 2004) didn’t happen in 1991. So many lost years.

    Doesn’t matter what you saw when you visited, you need to know the place and stay for a few years to understand what you see.

    It isn’t necessary to live for a few years in squalor to recognize it as such.

    “Your type is well known – either a grandfather in the NKVD, or a father in the Yeltsin’s cabal of crooks. Dont tell me you’re a grandson of a great artist”

    None of the above. Why do you think those are the only three options?

    “People are inherently unequal, equalizing people is a grotesque form of injustice.”

    Can’t you see that there is no way know who is better and who is worse, until all have equal chances to prove they are worth something.

    Nonsense. In a traditional and capitalist society, one can infer who is better or worse by their parental position, as being better or worse is a function of a combination of culture/morality (transmitted within families) and genetics (and these factors are related). It is far more efficient to stick with these people and to further refine and use their God-given talents, than to mix everything up and try to turn dogs into Sharikovs which is a colossal waste of resources and potential. If an outlier emerges from the poor, let him or her do so. He will find his own way. I oppose serfdom or a strict caste system. And let the occasional degenerate fall, they can switch places.

    In the end, after mixing everything up and after a brief period of time when the criminal, the stupid and the lazy are at an artificial advantage, a natural order of some sort is restored. Bolsheviks just killed the best, had a shitty and poor system, and the winners were cognitive elites from different ethnic groups who had escaped the culling, plus survivors whose families had to waste a generation crawling back to their rightful positions. By killing off the native elites (including Russified Rurikids, Germans, etc.) Russia found itself with Jewish, Georgian, etc. ones instead. In ethnically homogenous places such as Poland or Hungary, the old elite families eventually reestablished their proper position in society, at the top. And as this bloody, cruel, unnatural and unnecessary process was moving forward under socialism, capitalist countries just focused on development and wealth generation, and left the socialist ones behind in terms of HDI, finances, etc.

    A caveat is that because Socialism opposed traditional morality, the emergent elites were more cruel and venal than the traditional ones even though they too are smart and hardworking.

    China:

    Hungary:

    https://eprints.lse.ac.uk/110873/1/Working_Paper_67.pdf

    “the descendants of the noble class in Hungary in the eighteenth century were still significantly privileged in 1949 and later”

    So creating Sharikovs such as you cost society dearly, with little long-term change in terms of whose families were at the top.

    Your idea of being biologially better than someone is obiously wrong

    There are numerous people writing here who are smarter than I am. You, Sharikov, are not one of them.

    “Well, Britannica claims. The same source, Britannica, writes.”

    That’s not a reference

    Encyclopedia Britannica isn’t a reference? LOL.

  248. Wielgus says:
    @Beckow

    A lot of the dynamics resemble those of civil wars. More fundamentalist-type Ukrainian nationalists would like a sharp dividing line between Ukrainians and Russians, but it simply is not there, except possibly in the far west of the country.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Beckow
  249. Wielgus says:
    @Beckow

    I read that in Warsaw Pact times Bulgarians tended to be regarded as the most pro-Moscow of the “satellites” and were somewhat despised by the others for it, but it was a Western source that stated that. There are pro-Russian Bulgarians now, but a lot of work seems to have gone into “turning” the Bulgarian elite in a NATO direction.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  250. @AP

    AP is a juggernaut in this thread. Every comment is higher quality than the one before it. As Mr. Hack noted, it’s a delight to just be along for the ride.

    Just a short addendum: your point about remarkable elite stability is also concurrent with research on Swedish elites (warning, pdf).

    Sweden didn’t have violent revolutions but we had one of the most longest and most radical left-leaning governments in Europe. The Social democrats ruled in an almost unbroken chain from the early 1930s until the early 1990s with only a brief interregnum.

    This peaked in the early 1980s, when we introduced some of the most radical anti-capitalist legislation anywhere in the West, which sought to forcibly confiscate corporate profits and transfer them to “employee funds”. The intention was to radically increase the bargaining power of workers, by giving trade unions an increasing share of corporate ownership itself. (Many of the largest firms fled Sweden during this period).

    Yet despite of nearly 50 years of increasingly radical social engineering, the composition of elite families remained fairly constant throughout this period.

    • Thanks: AP
    • Replies: @Sean
    , @Mr. Hack
    , @AP
  251. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Wielgus

    I read that in Warsaw Pact times Bulgarians tended to be regarded as the most pro-Moscow of the “satellites” and were somewhat despised by the others for it, but it was a Western source that stated that. There are pro-Russian Bulgarians now, but a lot of work seems to have gone into “turning” the Bulgarian elite in a NATO direction.

    The Congress of Berlin in the late 1870s influenced a Bulgarian political elite that wasn’t as pro-Russian as the Bulgarian population.

    I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know numerous Bulgarian of varying ages. Not one of them being anti-Russian. There’s a Sorosian Bulgarian by the name of Ivan Kravtsev, who contradicts that positive vibe.

  252. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Wielgus

    A lot of the dynamics resemble those of civil wars. More fundamentalist-type Ukrainian nationalists would like a sharp dividing line between Ukrainians and Russians, but it simply is not there, except possibly in the far west of the country.

    The dynamics aren’t so finely drawn. Not everyone in the western part buys into the svido line.

    The sad reality is that the svido view has increased in Kiev, as well as in some other parts that weren’t associated with the former Habsburg ruled territory. For a good number of years, the svidos have been able to manipulate segments of academia and media.

    The corrupt, undemocratic and neo-Nazi influenced Kiev regime has weakened Ukraine in a way that leaves open the possibility for an increased pro-Russian revival. As for the present, the pro-Russian view in Kiev regime controlled Ukrainian has to be understandably muted in its expression.

  253. @A123

    The closest analog to Iran’s system is hypothetically if the Papal State had survived to the 21th century (not as Vatican City but at least controlling the territories the Pope held after 1860), was forced to democratize in temporal matters, while the Pope has remained the religious authority and retain a large role even in secular politics; ideologically a pre-Vatican II conservative would have prevailed. Would you have been anti-Papist?

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    , @A123
  254. @AP

    You are completely wrong again and still ill-mannered. My language mirrors yours, and you seem to only feel more comfortable with it, which doesn’t surprise me. You are far from cultured, little man. And don’t even mention morals.

    Your Ukraine, as a state was created by those you call Sovok elites. Ukraine as a republic was created by those you call Bolshevik. Those who you despise created your Ukraine out of thin air – it had never existed.

    Your people were given a once in a lifetime chance, a historical chance and they managed to flush it down the toilet after only twenty-five years. Yes you had to live there to understand what’s going on in that squalor.

    Your people ran the country. The inflation was so high we were paying in millions for a pack of cigarettes. The factories stopped and many were closed, the lights were turned off at nine pm. Then the entire city was dark.

    People were walking with flashlights. The cops were sitting at the stations playing cards, they had no gasoline to patrol the streets. Young kids were carrying knives, they were the most dangerous people in the town.

    Three of my acquaintances were killed in three years. And it lasted and lasted, for a long time. There was no end to it. Engineers and doctors were selling books from their home libraries, standing on the sidewalks.

    And in the meantime your nationalist president was publishing his own books, about how Ukraine isn’t Russia, and how different we are. And they were closing Russian schools, and Russian TV channels and newspapers.

    Finally, when they finally created new currency, and printed something that resembles money, your wonderful Ukraine finally emerged – a corrupt entity owned and run by a bunch of criminals and oligarchs.

    Your Ukraine is not Ukrainian. There is no Ukraine – the name is wrong. There’s Khazaria 2.0 and Ukrainians are poor, brainwashed and hopeless even more than ever before. That entire Maidan thing was about getting out of there.

    Out of Ukraine.

    And you weren’t there, and anything you imagine is wrong. Your new government isn’t better than the old one – it’s worse. Now Ukraine is a failed state, and your people will never get it back. Sold out.

    Forget about it, or better watch it going back where it should be. Russia will get back the East, Poland will get back the West, and Ukraine will get back to its natural state, an agrarian country in the middle of the steppe.

    And even that will not be yours because it has been sold out.

    Soon enough you will see it with your own eyes. You will keep blaming Russia and never think that your people couldn’t manage. That’s the problem of your people – you are incapable to assess your own flaws.

    Your entire character is hysterical.

    You are never wrong, you are always right, you are always good, and in that hysteria you consider that everybody owes you something, whereas you never owe anything to anybody. You disregard other people’s opinion.

    You think and feel you have the right to take what you want. You don’t want the people but you want their land, you consider it yours because those who you despise gave it to you, and you still despise them.

    For how much longer do you think your new god, Uncle Satan will be sending them money – a year, two years? Russia will cope with it. And when it ends you will see what has remained of Ukraine and what it has become.

    You’re not gonna like it.

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @sudden death
    , @AP
  255. Sean says:
    @Thulean Friend

    The ethnic majority might use their potential solidarity and electoral strength to loot the rich, so the rich must control the government. Sweden is business friendly, with lower cooperate tax that the US, and has the world’s third largest arms per capita arms exports.

  256. 216 says: • Website

    Again, if this is going to be the unofficial propaganda line from RF, they deserve to lose and lose badly.

    • Agree: sher singh
  257. 216 says: • Website
    @Dmitry

    There are so many subversives in the Western lands that I wish we could expel like happened to these two.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  258. sher singh says:
    @216

    Should have an answer for you shortly,

    • LOL: German_reader
  259. 216 says: • Website
    @Thulean Friend

    Both the ANC, and Fatah/Hamas are unworthy wielders of power.

    This so-called “liberal, humanism” is just Third Worldist revanchism.

  260. iffen says:
    @Johann Ricke

    “Out damned spot!”

    “The Lord is long-suffering, and of great mercy, forgiving iniquity and transgression, and by no means clearing the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the sons to the third and fourth generation” (Numbers 14:18).

  261. Wokechoke says:
    @AP

    Skoda was the Austrian Empire’s main artillery factory, then the place where Third Reich Germany cranked out a lot of Panzers. The Yeti is a decent little SUV comparable to the nicer CRV’s made by Honda.

  262. Sean says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Ukraine sees Poland as a model, but Poland had land taken from it by the USSR, while Ukraine left the USSR with additional territory, a substantial amount of arms, and 15 years of energy subsidies before begining to get charged anything like the market price. Being a member of Nato was an unalloyed benefit for Poland because let them get defense on the cheap, and the charter 5 Nato guarantee of caused investment to flow into Poland. Ukraine saw that economically it was being left in the dust by Poland. Yet the two countries were not comparable inasmuch Ukraine had been part of the USSR and had a substantial Russian minority that was the basis for a flip flopping political system causing politicians to loot the country while in office and persecute their predecessors. Western aid to Ukraine was instantly stolen. So with these problem causing Ukraine’s one comparable standard of living to fall to a third of Poland’s within a few decades, Ukraine thought it could regain standard of living parity with now prosperous Poland by entering the Western camp just as Poland had. However Poland was not regarded by Russia as part of their “near abroad” Russia regarded the overthrow of Yanukovych for the second time as a betrayal and Ukraine as a traitor country for trying to join Nato. Putin has a thing about traitors, he punished them in the UK (trying to kill one along with his daughter) even though it seemed unnecessary.

    It in view of its particular situation, it was a counter productive policy for Ukraine to align itself with the West. The election of Zelensky, a man who had risen so far so fast that he would not have been human had it not gone the his head, caused a series of tone deaf interactions with Russia over the Minsk accords. Mere weeks before it the Russian attack, Zelensky publicly told Biden to shut up about warning that the Russian build of was for real and Ukraine was going to be invaded. What does that say about the president of Ukraine’s judgement? Deterring Russia ought to have been easy. but an angry man is a more dangerous man that a cost benefit analysis on paper would suggest.

    In his statements to the parliament of the Jewish state, Zelensky suggested Russia intended to exterminate Ukrainians. He also said he wanted Ukraine to become big Israel, suggesting ethnic Russians in Ukraine could look forward to the status enjoyed by Palestinians in Israel perhaps? It terms of the geopolitical significance, terrain, local population and supply lines, East Ukraine is not Afghanistan where getting the Russians to withdraw was something achievable at low cost

    The aid for rebuilding will not begin until the war ends and that may well be for years. Ukrainians will start leaving the country.

  263. eah says:
    @Sean

    Thanks.

    I largely disagree with this part though:

    … the emergence of Germany as a major power on the continent, …

    Germany is an effeminate country hamstrung by its past — it is afflicted with a puerile ruling class, which is perhaps the most incompetent in all of Europe, and a state media that is absolutely treacherous — its ‘power’ is the power of the purse, since it provides by far the largest share of EU funding — Germany’s toxic influence on Europe is comparable to the toxic influence of the US on the world (‘globohomo’).

    In addition, it is now caught in a demographic death spiral — I saw the tweet below yesterday — in it a young father is shocked that the 1st grade class of his child will be majority Arab — in Germany there is a process called Einschulung — as part of it, the family of a child beginning school will meet the teacher and learn something about their child’s class — he later says that in his area this change happened in less than one school generation.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  264. Coconuts says:
    @AP

    And as this bloody, cruel, unnatural and unnecessary process was moving forward under socialism, capitalist countries just focused on development and wealth generation, and left the socialist ones behind in terms of HDI, finances, etc.

    Italian elite theory is trending in a small way now, the ‘circulation of elites’ that was seen in the Russian Empire after 1917 may be part of a natural and constant historical process, only that was an unusually radical manifestation of it.

    Anglo countries mostly escaped the upheavals that post WW1 circulation caused in the rest of Europe, but the Anglo capitalist model is now producing a peaceful elite re-composition via mass immigration and demographic change. ‘Revolutionary Capitalism’ might be a good name for it, seeing the scope of the break with tradition it has been generating.

    Maybe the next big movement will be something like monarchist socialism as a reaction?

  265. German_reader says:
    @eah

    Last year they handed out German citizenship to 20 000 Syrians, it’s expected there’ll be a continuous increase, maybe an avalanche in coming years. Some got citizenship after just six years of residence (normally it would be at least eight years), for “special efforts at integration” like visiting language classes. There was a news story in 2021 about a Syrian who had come to Germany in 2014, attached himself to the SPD and became a migration activist, constantly bemoaning that Germany wasn’t generous enough with benefits to asylum seekers and family reunification. His activism in the SPD counted as “special efforts at integration” and he was naturalized in 2020. Clearly the German establishment is intent on bending the rules as much as possible and handing out citizenships like candy.
    Meanwhile you have the constant drip of horror crimes committed by recent non-European immigrants. Just a few days ago a Somali threw a 63-year old woman on the rails in a Munich subway station (an incoming train managed to stop 15 metres away from her). Another Somali (or some other sort of East African, who knows exactly) butchered three people (an old woman, a young student, a mother in front of her children) in a stabbing spree in Würzburg last year…the immediate reaction was an ecumenical service with prominent Jewish and Muslim participation (as far as I know none of those killed had been Jewish or Muslim), where the mayor of Würzburg said he cried not just for those killed and wounded, but also because he feared an increase in prejudice against refugees (mayor is a Christian Democrat btw, and Bavaria’s minister president, from the “conservative” CSU, said pretty much the same thing there). There have also been stabbing attacks in trains recently by “Allahu akbar” Syrians and Iraqis, but all these cases are quickly explained away with mental illness and buried by the national news media, nothing remarkable at all to see here.

    EDIT: Just a minor correction, but I believe the tweet you cited by Karl Hammer referred to Austria, not to Germany (not much difference though).

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @eah
  266. @Sean

    In his statements to the parliament of the Jewish state, Zelensky suggested Russia intended to exterminate Ukrainians. He also said he wanted Ukraine to become big Israel, suggesting ethnic Russians in Ukraine could look forward to the status enjoyed by Palestinians in Israel perhaps?

    It’s so clearly a Slavic neo-Nazi civil war now.

  267. @Sean

    Putin has a thing about traitors, he punished them in the UK (trying to kill one along with his daughter).

    Not likely.

    A lot more likely, that guy was a false defector or a double agent, and the British set him up. Simply because the Russians would rather have used a different poison, or shot him or hit him with a car.

    That story was clearly scripted.

    Zelensky suggested Russia intended to exterminate Ukrainians. He also said he wanted Ukraine to become big Israel.

    Ukraine had been Khazaria before it was Russia, and now it has returned to its natural state – well, soon it will.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  268. @Yellowface Anon

    That is some analog. Hypothetical Vatican state with democratic characteristics?

    Might as well be Hypothetical Vatican state with hypothetical Phoenecian child-sacrifice characteristics.

  269. Mr. Hack says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I’m glad that somebody other than myself has noted AP’s recent barrage of high quality remarks here. To be honest, up until this new high point he seemed to be sluggish and running on “automatica”, which actually isn’t a bad thing. I sincerely hope he has the energy to maintain this spurt of creative activity. BTW, I had you partially in mind when I wrote comment #119. Maybe you missed reading it?

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  270. Wokechoke says:
    @216

    This is why the blacks in South Africa don’t really deserve to run the place. Gangrape is a black speciality.

  271. Beckow says:
    @AP

    This group is not a monolith and it does not equal pro-political union with Russia. Most of that 40% to 50% wanted Ukraine to be independent but in economic union with Russia

    No group is ever a monolith – there are varied opinions among the pro-Western Ukies: most are only for EU, some for both EU and a deal with Russia, and some are fanatically for Nato and a fight to death, even grabbing Moscow. The last group is less than 10-20% and has been shrinking lately. Where do you stand?

    It is a reality that Ukraine had for most of its existence around 40-50% pro-Russians. Maidan attempted to wipe that out and force its views: that is simply not democratic and would not be tolerated in any European society. You know it, so you try all kinds of obscure arguments, play with timelines, sometimes you suggest that the pro-Russians should just be expelled, sometimes that there are now only “2%” of them, that they are all now disgusted with the war. Well, how about pre-February 2022, they were presumably not ‘disgusted’ yet, so they had no rights to their opinions then either? Why? Based on what convoluted logic?

    Ukraine had an incredible potential and they threw it away. They were rich and well-endowed, they had peace and they could have been a prosperous and peaceful European country that is friends with both EU and Russia, has minority rights and military neutrality. That Ukraine would never be touched by Russia – they would support their ethnics like any country would, but trade happily and enjoy the peace.

    Why did Kiev refuse that? Why were the basic Russian minority rights and not being a Nato tool against Russia not accepted? As in any normal country? You can now cry all you want, but Kiev was in the wrong. It is too late now, they threw it away and will be smaller, poorer and eventually irrelevant. They bluffed and Russia called their bluff. Now for the consequences.

    They only shot Kiev has left is to win this war. The odds are not good.

  272. I welcome this New Warrior Order:

  273. Beckow says:
    @German_reader

    They are all old ladies now mentally, SPD, CSU, even Bavarians. There is no going back, it is an emotional chute into oblivion tinged with a misguided Christian charity (St. Francis anyone?).

    activism in the SPD counted as “special efforts at integration”

    Of course it did. From their viewpoint what he did is ‘integration‘ – he was actively working on changing Germany and its society. So are they, naturally he works for the same goals. Integration is a code word for changing the demographics and culture.

    I was in London recently and they had a weird sign at the airport: “we love the Ukrainians“. I was trying to imagine an extraterrestrial seeing it and how it could even be explained, in what context would a society say that. It is puzzling, but then there were all those spinsters and rainbows doing it in 2015 all over Germany. This is not curable.

  274. A123 says: • Website
    @Yellowface Anon

    closest analog to Iran’s system is hypothetically if the Papal State had survived to the 21th century (not as Vatican City but at least controlling the territories the Pope held after 1860), was

    This works very poorly as an analogy.

    The Supreme Leader of Iran wields effectively unlimited temporal authority. The Theocracy’s Mullahs strike candidates from the “ballot” long before they reach voters. And, the religious authority can remove any “elected” official at any time, for any reason.

    At a national level, the Theocracy uses this process to create controlled opposition. The illusion of choice mollifies some of the population. Internal religious security monitors activity around reform candidates to weed out troublemakers.

    forced to democratize in temporal matters

    retain a large role even in secular politics; ideologically a pre-Vatican II conservative would have prevailed. Would you have been anti-Papist?

    There is an issue with your proposition. Temporal matters and secular politics are heavily over lapping concepts. Thus, if the Pope wields secular political authority, temporal matters have not been democratized.
    ___

    Would I support/oppose a hypothetical? That largely depends on the other options.

    Theocracy is a terrible form of government, prone to zealous excesses. However,
    what if Christian zealotry is necessary to raise and army and defend God’s lands? That is vastly better than being overrun by Jihadist invaders, rapists, colonists, slavers, and settlers.

    To genuine Christians, the ultimate sin is weakness:

     

     

    The King James version really should be updated. However, Leftoids would corrupt any such effort. The last thing this planet needs is a “Gay Bible (a.k.a. Queen James version)”.

    PEACE 😇

  275. @Here Be Dragon

    Young kids were carrying knives, they were the most dangerous people in the town.

    Three of my acquaintances were killed in three years. And it lasted and lasted, for a long time. There was no end to it.

    All those young kids were not imported from somewhere else, but been raised and educated by Soviet people, went into Soviet kindergartens and schools and in general were being indoctrinated from very young age with official propaganda. So what does really it in fact reflect on that oh so wonderful system and country if at the first opportunity those Soviet kids started to loot and kill while abandoning any decency?

    Wonder if anybody tried to do comparisons of overall hard criminality rates between Weimar Germany and post Soviet sphere during hyperinflation periods, cause do have suspicion about it being lower in background of traditional developed capitalistic society during such times than in a supposed yesterdays “equal society” full of wonderful Sovoks.

    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  276. @Beckow

    Why did Kiev refuse that?

    The answer to your question is top secret classified. All we can do is speculate. Who and for how much.

    It was likely for a piddly amount of money compared to what the [expletives deleted] threw away.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  277. @silviosilver

    AnonFromTN is a Russian immigrants who defecates on the country which gave him so many opportunities, and not in the conservative type of way where they lament the fading away of the America of the past, but in the butthurt Sovok way.

    In short, he is no different to a Somali.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  278. Wokechoke says:
    @A123

    you have to wonder if this statement was sarcasm.

    • Replies: @A123
  279. Some of these cartoons allegedly put out by the Kremlin were curiously accurate:

  280. @Beckow

    Yeah, no.

    Russia wouldn’t be facing such stubborn resistance in the East from Russian-speaking Ukrainians, whom Kremlinists call “ethnic Russians” (Russia is an ideology, not a real nation), if all those Russian speakers were pro-Kremlin.

    Any such sentiment which was present among them was quickly disabused when the Liberators started raining down high explosives on their brotherly friends.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  281. Beckow says:
    @A123

    …Theocracy uses this process to create controlled opposition

    Theocracy” is a feature of governments and it comes in degrees. All systems try to ‘control the opposition’, what do you think the current Dem-Rep or X-Y setups in the West are all about? They are often more subtle, but there are clear lines that are not to be crossed: the opposition is allowed if it is not too meaningful, in other words ‘controlled’.

    Starmer, Merz or Mike Pence are not a real opposition, they are vetted candidates aspiring to manage better than the current leaders. It is about the management not about any changes. It has been going on for so long you should have caught on by now. Trump was an aberration, an unusual failure to manage the opposition. That’s why so much was thrown at him to make him irrelevant. It will not be allowed again.

    Religion comes in different forms – it is simply defined as “the rules that bind a society together“. Of course, preferably the rules are divine, God-given. The West has a current religion, a set of rules it is forcing on its own people, and on others around the world. We know the rules, the Western culture screams them daily and offenders are punished and ostracized. So in a way it is also a weak form of a Theocracy.

    The Iranian version looks oddly unfamiliar to us but their rules are not far from what existed in Europe a few generations back. My understanding is that the Theocratic interference is both limited and also pervasive: some things are off limits, but the society has to function. So the usual half-baked compromise is in effect. In Iran women have to cover their hair, in the West guys get to pee in women’s restrooms. Both rules are not fully enforced. So easy with that Theocracy sh.t, maybe get a mirror first.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    , @A123
  282. @216

    Russian unofficial propaganda plays a double game with both sides, on one hand they court the white nationalist camp with their ideology of anti-LGBT and pro-whiteness (despite the fact Russia has the highest HIV/AIDS rates in the European world and Moscow is filled with Central Asians)

    On the other hand they feed hopes of further “liberation” to the global south, claiming NATO is a proxy for white people and how Russia is all multicultural and tolerant.

  283. Wokechoke says:
    @Beckow

    Jews mostly. Some half blind ultra-nationalists too.

  284. Beckow says:
    @Callsign Pidor

    Russia wouldn’t be facing such stubborn resistance in the East from Russian-speaking Ukrainians

    The stubborn resistance comes with being a professional army and it is currently slowly collapsing. Watch the POW videos or civilians in the liberated areas, it is not what you claim: some like it, some don’t, some are evasive. You misread what is going on.

    There are also about 100k Russian-speaking Ukrainians fighting on the pro-Russian side – Donbas militias – so it is obviously more complicated.

    Russia is an ideology, not a real nation

    That is nonsense you spout out of desperation. But if we accept that there is an ideology element about Russia – why not, there is one about Britishness, Frenchiness or Americanism – then remember that ideologies only prosper when they are winning. Thus preventing this win for the Russian ideology should had been the number one goal for the West (or Kiev). Instead they stupidly handed Russia an easy victory. Because the Western goal was to weaken or even destroy Russia using Ukraine. That goal was too ambitious and it depended on Russia’s inaction.

    You never turn over the success of your enterprise to your enemy. The West and Kiev did. Now for the crying part.

  285. An exploration of Russian nationalist fantasy land that slipped below my radar. Sub Third Empire stuff.

    • Disagree: Mikhail
  286. Beckow says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    …is top secret classified

    The actual paperwork is secret but the overall story is quite clear: the Kiev elites don’t plan to stick around for the consequences. The people who stay will curse them for generations.

    The vision of Ukrainians only angry at “Russia” is based on misreading how human mind works. The ones who move to Warsaw or Canada will be obediently forever angry and repeat what is expected of them. But the ones who stay will be first angry at everyone – and by then Zelko and his gang will be safely scuba-diving in Florida. Then they will accommodate to whatever comes.

    The hapless Mr. Hacks will be too busy learning Spanish so he can ask for scarce aqua from his caretakers (it is Phoenix). And AP will keep on fighting, good for him, long live the Habsburgs!!!!

  287. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    can infer who is better or worse by their parental position,

    This view is characteristic of any third world country and common to a dystopia. Nepotism and a mafia kind of fixed casino (“among the family and friends”) is one of the main indicators of a country’s lower level of development.

    When there is a more trusting and functioning society, with greater balance of power between citizens and government, there should be meritocracy. (Ideally you want to maximize meritocracy while still giving stable property rights).

    A problem of the Soviet Union (which is not so much of a change from the Russian Empire as you seem to claim, in most every way), was that it only moderates lack of meritocracy in a few areas, and there develops a narrow ruling caste, with hereditary elements.

    There were relative checks against conspicuous corruption of the rulers, but this has been like starving of wolf, that results in the absurd luxury of the elites in the postsoviet countries that we see in the 21st century now the limits have been removed. Therefore, Putin’s golden toilet brush, etc.

    Lack of property rights also contributes to the postsoviet third world style of capital flight, because politicians can expropriate your property for any reasons and you need to secure it abroad.

    Socialism opposed traditional morality,

    I would say more the opposite, at least in the sense you probably mean “traditional morality”. In 20th century, socialist government imposed the petit-bourgeois interpretation of “traditional morality”, continuing the process of the church in the 19th century countryside.

    It opposed the older morality and customs, but followed the morality of the 19th century bourgeoisie. But the older traditional morality and viewpoints of the Russian people, had been equally opposed by the church to the 19th century, which is why the church had to invest centuries of effort to “educating the peasants”.

    Boris Mironov (“Social history of Russia in the period of the empire”)

    elite families eventually reestablished their proper position in society, at the top

    It’s like from the recipe for third world dystopia. Perhaps after a couple centuries of decline, there can be a civil war in 23rd century America, with armies led by the Clinton family and Obama, fighting against the Trump family and Bush family.

  288. @Beckow

    Trump was an aberration, an unusual failure to manage the opposition. That’s why so much was thrown at him to make him irrelevant. It will not be allowed again.

    It was allowed because their experts said it couldn’t happen. They said the day before the election Clinton was the winner with .95 probability and the Economist declared her the winner in their issue that went into the mail on the Friday before the election.

    I’m pretty sure it won’t be allowed again until everybody who was over 40 years old in 2016 is dead. I don’t think I will ever forget the meltdown in half of America that happened that night. By total accident I turned on Rush’s radio show and was shocked when he said Trump had a chance. In fact I did not believe him. I went to a party that night and was 12 hours post shock and awe and it was simply amazing.

    Trump was and is a complete jackass but give him props for that.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  289. Beckow says:
    @Wielgus

    ….Ukrainian nationalists would like a sharp dividing line between Ukrainians and Russians, but it simply is not there

    They are their sponsors invested a lot in creating the dividing line. Now they think that ‘ok, the war is lost, but look at how this will create that line of mutual hatred‘. That is another miscalculation. There is too much “Russia” in almost all Ukrainians east of Galicia – self-hatred is not a sustainable emotion.

    The attempt to spin the terminology as ‘Kremlin‘ or ‘Putin Russia‘ is a tacit admission of this reality: Russia by itself is simply unhate-able for most Ukrainians. There is a resilience to ethnic emotions and identities.

    It is a civil war with foreign participation as most civil wars are. Some of the war is within each Ukrainian – they consider alternatives: today here, tomorrow there. This will still surprise, we are at the beginning. The minds are moving and there is no way to predict where they will end up. We know that a permanent martyrdom is not a state human mind can stay in. It is like anxiety, it can only last for so long.

  290. @Philip Owen

    And yet the Moskalis are turning it into reality.

  291. The nightmare on Pennsylvania Avenue:

  292. • Replies: @Mikhail
  293. Dmitry says:
    @216

    They are not expelled, but if they enter Russia they have potentially 15 years in prison, for misrepresenting the actions of the Russian army in Ukraine (or something like that).

    It’s like if Americans posted on social media something about My Lai massacre or wrote that Obama’s drone strike has targeted civilians. Then, you have potentially 15 years in prison for misrepresenting the American army.

    But the reason, they were posting so boldly, is because they have options to not live in Russia. They have the luxury of not being normal people. Nevzorov can be given Ukrainian nationality, while Glukhovsky has tens of millions of dollars and has been living in Barcelona for a decade.

    Even for celebrities, being illegal in the home country, is still difficult for visiting their family.

    Pavel Durov (a billionaire founder of VK and Telegram) says he can never return to Russia, as he will be immediately going to prison, as a result of not giving customer data to the FSB. At the same time, his parents don’t want to leave Russia.

    So anytime Durov wants to see his parents, they have to arrange to meet in a third country.

  294. A123 says: • Website
    @Beckow

    I am certainly not holding up America as a functioning democracy. All one has to do is look at the J6 propaganda hearings.

    However, it is infinitely better than the hellscapes that sociopath Khamenei has created.

    -A- Iran turned Lebanon into a failed state with the Nasrallah-shima blast at the Beirut Port. Iranian Hezbollah was storing NH4-NO3 along with explosives, ammunition, and apparently fireworks at their munitions dump with no regard for life or safety.

    -B- Iranian Hamas has irrevocably devastated Gaza. Sociopath Khamenei’s insatiable lust for power and murder diverted material away from the water supply system. Iran thus destroyed the fresh water source for Gaza. It can never be fixed.

    -C In Iran itself, negligence is everywhere. For example: (1)

    in Iran a large number of people, perhaps hundreds of thousands, have been protesting in more than 100 cities to vent their anger against a system that they consider to be corrupt, incompetent and oppressive. The movement was triggered by the collapse of a tall building in Abadan, which claimed dozens of lives. For the first time, some protesters there started chanting “Down with Khamenei”, targeting Iran’s “Supreme Guide”

    In some cities, at least 10 or 12 we could check with some reliability, slogans such as “Reza Shah, Bless Your soul!” hinted at a surge of nostalgia about Iran’s former monarchy. But, unlike some previous occasions, even those protesters who felt no nostalgia about the old monarchy did not challenge those slogans let alone part ways with demonstrators who chanted them.

    This is important because it may indicate that the regime cannot work its way out of a tight corner by inviting Iranians to continue fighting the fallen monarchy rather than the incumbent despotism.

    The Iranian people yearn for escape from zealot Khamenei’s tyranny and oppression.

    The Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps has gone capitalist. They run many State Owned Enterprises [SOE] and use the profits for their own purposes. However, under Khamenei, revenue from these ventures have become much more limited. It is not hard to envision a counter revolution that ends with a General leading Iran back towards civilization.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/18585/iran-summer-discontent

    • Replies: @Beckow
  295. @Here Be Dragon

    My take on Skripal. More detailed than anything you’ve read with links to Russian sources.

    https://waleseuroperussiafuture.blogspot.com/2018/03/revenge-of-spies-how-to-become-target.html

    • Replies: @Beckow
  296. No amount of copium will overcome your stupid decision to outsource your military supply chains.

    • Replies: @A123
  297. A123 says: • Website
    @Wokechoke

    you have to wonder if this statement was sarcasm.

    Yellowface’s rather esoteric hypothetical was hard to deal with in a entirely serious manner.

    This part of my response certainly contains some sarcasm:

    The King James version really should be updated. However, Leftoids would corrupt any such effort. The last thing this planet needs is a “Gay Bible (a.k.a. Queen James version)”.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  298. A123 says: • Website
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    No amount of copium will overcome your stupid decision to outsource your military supply chains.

    This is why MAGA Reindustrialization is necessary. Everything needed for advanced weapons and other national security essentials should be manufactured in America. Where possible the raw materials should also be extracted domestically.

    MAGA Reindustrialization is a WIN-WIN. It also creates high value blue collar employment.

    It cannot happen instantly. However, gradual decoupling from unreliable overseas suppliers is inevitable. The WUHAN-19 fiasco showed the fragility of current distribution chains.

    PEACE 😇

  299. Beckow says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    … it won’t be allowed again until everybody who was over 40 years old in 2016 is dead

    You are correct: they laughed, they cried, now they can go home. For 50 years. The lesson for the experts will be not allow something like this within a scoring range: in other words it will be prevented earlier in the process. They were too cocky, too self-assured, it won’t happen again.

    But who the f.ck thought that running a ‘wife of a former president‘ against a ‘son and brother of a former president‘ was a good idea? That is cockiness not seen since Borgia popes. Even Africans know enough not be that brazen. I sensed that they lost their bearing in 2015 when this wife-brother sh.t looked inevitable.

  300. @Mr. Hack

    BTW, I had you partially in mind when I wrote comment #119. Maybe you missed reading it?

    It’s sometimes difficult for me to write something that I feel add value to your comments when you discuss life in Phoenix because your life is so far removed from mine; not just geographically but also in terms of climate and lifestyle. It’s hard to even think of comparisons. Take the example of hiking. Most Swedes, at least ambitious types like myself, typically hike in places like Riksgränsen, but that’s several hundreds of kilometers away from the city.

    In Phoenix, by contrast, you have a fairly mountainous area right adjacent to the city. For me, that’s incredibly exciting to think about, but simultaneously hard to relate to.

    Another difference marine life; even many lower-middle class Swedes will often have a small wooden boat that they use in the summer. It’s such an ingrained aspect of life here. Many will have inherited a stuga, similar to a dacha in Russia, that these boat trips are often intended for. It’s almost a parallel life that’s happening alongside our regular one.

    Encanto Park. about 260 acres of Phoenix delight, located right in the center of town. Take a bikeride first around the park (also includes a golf course), around some old, middle clas neighborhoods. Thulean Friend, you’ve told me that you appreciate this sort of thing, what do you think? Livable? My stepfather had a beautiful old home in this neighborhood.

    I’m always impressed by the sheer size of American houses, even if we’re all aware of the memes. Still, I must confess I am somewhat disappointed by the park in your video which seemed a bit low on vegetation and high on asphalt.

    To be clear, I was also mildly disappointed by London’s park offerings, primarily because it was so heavy on grass. Even fairly big parks that I visited were underwhelming, with lots of empty space and little seeming thought given to the landscaping.

    I think I am just a very forest-oriented type of person. Forests are inherently more exciting, especially natural forests. Lots more animals and tons of pathways to use. Not too far from where I live, there’s a natural forest that’s been converted into a national park, and we’re talking several kilometers in length and about a km in width. Unlike most cities, this green space isn’t shuffled out to the outskirts of the urban area. We’re talking maybe 4-5 km from the central railway station. For me, that is one of many aspects which makes life in Stockholm unlike any other capital city.

    Perhaps this is just a mental bias I have that makes it hard to appreciate different types of parks. Sweden has an exceptionally high forest density, after all, and it would be strange if it didn’t affect my expectations/norms. That’s why I expressed such a surprise when you wrote how exciting the desert is, it was hard to even conceptualise. Your lifestyle and surroundings appears to be almost completely orthogonal to mine.

    One last observation. I must confess I’m somewhat jealous of is how sunny it seems to be in America – even in fairly temperate climate zones! – let alone in areas such as yours. Is it even possible to be moody if one lives in Phoenix? 😉

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Mr. Hack
  301. Beckow says:
    @A123

    You seem to have a thing against Iran, Lebanon and Palestinians. Your arguments are the usual assortment of self-serving and selective over-simplifications. There is a lot more to it. It is not my area, but there is an obsessiveness in your cherry-picking that suggests that you may also be a zealot. Maybe you and that guy Khamenei should have a drink together (ok, tea, I suspect he doesn’t drink with company).

    • LOL: A123
    • Replies: @A123
  302. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Philip Owen

    Second hand spin that’s suspect along with some of the established tripe you’ve posted.

  303. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Philip Owen

    So says an anti-Russian hack in SS.

  304. AP says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Thank you. I will be fairly busy for the next 3 days or so, but will try to reply to everyone.

    Just a short addendum: your point about remarkable elite stability is also concurrent with research on Swedish elites

    Yes. It’s present everywhere, also in England and in the United States. The same families end up in the same positions. Disruptive attempts to change this often have to involve bloodshed as in the Communist states, but as a result either foreign elites take over (Jews, Latvians, Georgians in the USSR) or in ethnically homogenous places everything comes back to normal eventually. the country just lost 20 years of wealth generation due to the struggle and is saddled with a stupid ideology. I wrote that on my last post.

    This peaked in the early 1980s, when we introduced some of the most radical anti-capitalist legislation anywhere in the West, which sought to forcibly confiscate corporate profits and transfer them to “employee funds”. The intention was to radically increase the bargaining power of workers, by giving trade unions an increasing share of corporate ownership itself. (Many of the largest firms fled Sweden during this period).

    Yet despite of nearly 50 years of increasingly radical social engineering, the composition of elite families remained fairly constant throughout this period.

    I knew the heir to an old Swedish industrialist family (of mixed German and Swedish descent. IIRC Goering had a similar background – are there many such people in Sweden?)

    Sweden had a rather brilliant system. It has one of the world’s highest wealth inequalities (a good thing) designed to prevent the dilution of the wealth of the old noble and industrialist families. No inheritance taxes, low capital gains taxes, low corporate taxes. But very high income taxes. The lords are not touched, but the workers are all equalized, the high-paying ones such as doctors or engineers who earn high income through highly taxed salaries paying off the lower ones. This prevents unrest among the lower classes by keeping them satisfied, but also limits the ability of upstarts from the bourgeoisie to achieve the levels of the traditional nobility because so much of their extra income is taxed. Still, they are doing okay enough that they won’t rebel either. Mass immigration seems to have disrupted the stability of this locally perfect system, it’s more palatable to give money to a not very smart but hardworking countryman than to generations of not-working foreigners.

    America in contrast is more of a paradise for the upper middle class professionals (those doctors and engineers who are so highly taxed in Sweden) who aren’t taxed as much but then much less is distributed to the poorer people because the rich aren’t taxed much either in the USA.

    So in Sweden, the magnates + peasants together keep the lower gentry and urban middle class in line.

    In America, it is more magnates + gentry versus peasants.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    , @Sean
  305. A massive L for Sweden. A pair of young Ukrainian children were brutalised by a large gang of Arabic-speaking teenagers while they were playing football in the evening. The youngest Ukrainian boy is just 12 and had his nose broken.

    The local newspaper interviewed a witness, who also happened to speak some Arabic, and who commented that the thugs were shouting to each other to “beat up the Ukrainians” and then told the boys to “go home”. Sadly, this may now happen. A Ukrainian woman who was present during the attack noted that she wasn’t afraid when she left the country but she is now, and she’s thinking of taking her family somewhere else. Who can blame her?

    The assault occurred in Ronneby, with a population of just 12K. It’s quite incredible that such activity happens in areas like that. Would be unthinkable even ten years ago. Clearly, the refugee policies of Sweden have manifestly failed. The good news is that we’ve instituted dramatically harsher rules since then. The bad news is that these imported trash are hard to remove now.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  306. AP says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I think I am just a very forest-oriented type of person. Forests are inherently more exciting, especially natural forests.

    I understand you. We lived in Vegas for about a year. My wife became fascinated by deserts, we were young, so we moved there. It was a great base to explore the deserts most weekends while enjoying nice restaurants and discos in the city, DJs like Oakenfold would come to town occasionally. The latter is why we didn’t choose Salt Lake City, as Utah is another natural paradise.

    Eventually I developed a strong longing for the smell of maple trees. The high elevation mountains mostly had pine trees so this was something largely missing, other than occasional ones planted in some park. So moved back East. But it was worth living there for awhile.

    One last observation. I must confess I’m somewhat jealous of is how sunny it seems to be in America – even in fairly temperate climate zones!

    You must be thinking of this map. Imagine deep forested zones in New England that are as sunny as Italy:

  307. A123 says: • Website
    @Beckow

    I made simple & accurate observations about what the current Iranian regime has done at home and abroad.

    Why are you so defensive, emotional, and resistant to the truth? It comes across like you are shilling for sociopath Khameni. Your blind, over-simplified acceptance of his Theocracy’s dogma, half truths, and outright lies is a rejection of objective reality.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Beckow
  308. @sudden death

    First of all there was no propaganda.

    Propaganda ended in the late sixties. During the seventies there were hippies, walking with no shoes and the general atmosphere was relaxed. Everybody was listening to rock and pop, the crime rate was low and economic was stable, salaries were decent.

    There were three or four channels on TV, no talk shows — educational programs, movies, cartoons, news, sports. There were great cartoons for kids and cartoons for adults, the movies were good as well, and there were good books to read. People read a lot.

    No one were indoctrinated, people weren’t participating in politics. There were sport palaces for free, music schools for free, summer camps for free. People were living, not surviving. Children were occupied either with sport or with music. Those who wanted.

    So the picture here is wrong in the first place, there was nothing like the atmosphere during the Stalin era. Most families went to the sea in summer, a vacation was a full month and there were opportunities to earn a lot in the north, for those who wanted.

    But that is a general view, of course it wasn’t the same in all places. There were better schools and bad schools, better neighborhoods and not so good ones. Depended on the people. Those who were moving uptown from the villages were not good people.

    The atmosphere could be different in the next neighborhood where the workers coming from the rural areas settled. From them was all the violence, and it was them who started killing people on the streets in the nineties. A different culture — peasants.

    And what was the cause of that change of demeanor in the late eighties, was a complete shutdown of normal life. Factories closed, their parents had to feed them, couldn’t earn so people began selling things on the marketplaces. And that’s cash.

    At the same time, all of a sudden there were no more summer camps, no more music schools, no more sport for free and kids were sitting on the benches doing nothing. Most people had no work. And after a while people started moving in groups.

    Those kids didn’t know any better, and their families were from the villages. Most of them would spend a summer in the village, and then come back doing the same things people were doing there — drinking and fighting, for the most part. Looking for troubles.

    And then out of nowhere came heroine, and some people started earning something. Some started looting, some started dealing, some started racketeering. Things were changing fast, and then started the killings. Sometimes it was done for fun.

    And if someone thinks it had something to do with the socialist economics before all that than he does get it all backwards, it was when it all disappeared this criminal culture came into being. The capitalist world is where it originated.

    There is no statistics regarding Weimar Republic, but in the US the crime rate per capita doubled between the sixties and the eighties, and remained high during the nineties. And in Russia it doubled between the eighties and the nineties.

    Whatever the reason was it wasn’t related to Socialism.

    Furthermore, it isn’t hard to notice a correlation between the economic situation and the crime rate which grows along with decline of opportunities in poor countries, for example — in Honduras, Nigeria and Venezuela the rate is 35-36.

    And at the same time in other more stable countries in the same regions but with better prospects for population the crime rate is a lot lower, for example — Dominican Republic, Kenya and Chile are withing 4-9 homicides per capita.

    And it has nothing to do with Socialism or Capitalism per se. Opportunities, abilities and feeling secure is what matters. And here even poor socialist countries perform better than most traditional capitalist countries.

    For a comparison — China is the same as Switzerland, Vietnam is the same as Iceland, Belarus is the same as New Zealand, Cuba is the same as Argentina.

    Socialism is a better order of things.

    [MORE]
    United States Population and Rate of Crime per 100,000 People 1960 – 2019
    https://www.disastercenter.com/crime/uscrime.htm

    Russia – The Crime Wave of the 1990s
    http://www.country-data.com/cgi-bin/query/r-11537.html

    List of countries by intentional homicide rate
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate

    • Thanks: German_reader, Barbarossa, Miro23
    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @sudden death
  309. Beckow says:
    @Philip Owen

    Good summary, looks about right. There are many red flags about the official UK story and the media was told that it is “off limits“. The constant lazy inclusion of “Skripals-novichok” on the anti-Russia demonization lists seem to be the only goal.

    The perfume bottle and the two FSB-ers partying in a cheap London hotel was outright bizarre. Not a good script and that means multiple competing authors. All sides basically said that we will never know.

    And how about that Navalny guy? First Novichok in his underwear, then a ‘revolution’ that wasn’t, and now they memory-holed him. That is not good for the morale.

  310. Beckow says:
    @A123

    I made a simple comment that you presented a one-sided view.

    If you can explain to us the difference in your mind between a ‘regime’ and a ‘government’, please do so. Your terminology betrays zealotry.

    • Replies: @A123
  311. @AP

    of mixed German and Swedish descent. IIRC Goering had a similar background – are there many such people in Sweden?

    Among the elite families, yes, but it’s not something people used to brag about in the immediate aftermath of WWII both because of who won and of course of our own diplomatic maneuvering.

    There’s a joke that one reason why English football became so popular – as opposed to German Bundesliga – in the 1960s and 1970s was that Sweden was trying to forget that we were always closer culturally to Germany than to England. Our kings often invited entire merchant families from Germany, wholesale, to settle and/or develop new cities. German culture had a decisive impact on our development, in a way that the UK just did not. A historical fact many Swedes have consciously or unconsciously forgotten in the postwar era.

    Naturally, this left its imprint in the make-up of our elites. Even today, the latest wife of the Wallenberg family’s patriach was surnamed Sachs, and she’s not Jewish to my knowledge, but of German extraction. German business families were instrumental in creating Nordiska Kompaniet, which is something of a Nordic version of Harrod’s. The Finns have their Stockmanns, which performs a similar function. Both business houses were founded by German merchant families.

    Sweden had a rather brilliant system. It has one of the world’s highest wealth inequalities (a good thing) designed to prevent the dilution of the wealth of the old noble and industrialist families. No inheritance taxes, low capital gains taxes, low corporate taxes. But very high income taxes. The lords are not touched, but the workers are all equalized, the high-paying ones such as doctors or engineers who earn high income through highly taxed salaries paying off the lower ones. This prevents unrest among the lower classes by keeping them satisfied, but also limits the ability of upstarts from the bourgeoisie to achieve the levels of the traditional nobility because so much of their extra income is taxed.

    This system is still fairly intact, but it has weakened somewhat lately. It’s more common now for professionals to start their own firms as a way to circumvent this. The benefits are simple: corporate tax is in the low 20s. The downside is that, like any corporation, you can typically only receive dividends once or twice per year and your wages must be fairly low between these dividends to avoid paying extra tax.

    Mass immigration seems to have disrupted the stability of this locally perfect system, it’s more palatable to give money to a not very smart but hardworking countryman than to generations of not-working foreigners.

    This is true, but there’s also been a deliberate shift towards a market economy on a parallel track. Sweden used to have a very extensive system of rent-controlled apartments, which helped social mobility for the less well-off. We call them allmännyttan, loosely translated “for the greater good”. It still exists, but it has been deliberately starved and sold off in a systematic way.

    Even 15 years ago, you’d wait no more than maybe 5 years for a decent place in a decent location for a reasonable sum. If you moved out at 18 and then spent some years in student dorms, you had your own place just in time for graduation (including a traditional gapyear for travels etc).

    Today, we’re talking maybe a dozen years for a minimally good place. Another aspect that has changed is that it’s possible for landlords to raise rents by dramatic amounts (often ~50%) by doing a few routine renovations, by using new loopholes in the law that did not exist previously. As a result, many tenants are increasingly protesting renovations that are needed, simply because they fear the landlords will push them out. Previously, the Stockholm municipality itself managed most of these properties but nowadays they are often managed by private landlords even if nominally owned by the city.

    Speaking of a German connection again, many of these private landlords are large German landlords who are running amok in Berlin massively raising rents there too.

    As a result, I’ve had to buy my way into the property ladder at a much younger age than if I had come of age in the 1990s or early 2000s. Many of those with less fortunate purchasing power are simply priced out. Most lower-middle class earners can simply forget a house (~\$750K is the median price in the entire metropolitan area. For the city, we’re talking >\$1 million or above) unless it’s inherited. I will inherit, and in that sense I’m lucky, but there’s something wrong about this on a fundamental level when luck becomes such a deciding factor.

    So in Sweden, the magnates + peasants together keep the lower gentry and urban middle class in line.

    In America, it is more magnates + gentry versus peasants.

    I think we have the highest per capita concentration of billionaires in Europe outside of Switzerland. It’s not hard to see why. I invest in something call ISK, or investeringssparkonto. Basically, it’s a way to channel your excess savings into stocks, but the catch is that most of what you can invest into are either Swedish or Nordic.

    It also happens to be a great way to preserve wealth since taxation is ridiculously low. We’re talking 0,375%. From the point of view of the state, it has a triple purpose: helps local firms raise capital, slow down capital flight and increase “patriotic wealth accumulation” among elites by encouraging them to keep a share of their riches onshore.

    For those of us who have plenty of investments in US commercial paper, it means that any dividends will be taxed much higher, unless you get a holding firm in Luxembourgh of course and then do some complicated tax re-routing. The rich do, but most of the professional middle class does not because you either need to know the intricate details like I do, or you need to hire someone who does for an expensive sum. Neither is a realistic investment (whether by time or money) for most of the PMC, so they either take the tax hit or stick to ISK. Once again, the rich win.

    • Thanks: AP
    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @silviosilver
  312. A123 says: • Website
    @Beckow

    I made a simple comment about objective Iranian realities. The difference between regime and government is immaterial to the case presented. Your failed attempt to deflect attention away from facts shows your zealotry.

    Why are you shilling for Khamenei’s ‘regime’ ‘government’ (which ever term you prefer)? Your zealful shilling comes across as a zealous expression of your zealotry.

    PEACE 😇

  313. Sean says:
    @AP

    Organised labour had that kind influence once in Sweden, but those days have long gone. Basically the indigenous working classes are redundant in the West, even as cannon fodder.

  314. Beckow says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    An interesting perspective and a more realistic picture of how most people lived. But an average Westerner is incapable of understanding it: good, bad, and changes over time.

    One issue is that people who perceived socialism as a problem for themselves were in general the smarter, harder working, more ambitious types. They learned foreign languages and dreamt of exotic travel. For them the system didn’t work well – they knew that they were subsidizing the rest of the society and would do better in capitalism.

    Socialism was more suited for an average person, especially children (all the free stuff!), elderly, mothers, sick, but also lazy and less ambitious people of all ages. It was a kind of paradise for them with little work required and all the basics for free. This is something most Westerners are not allowed to know. An enormous amount of propaganda in the West tries in endless ways to hide what the real life was under socialism. Anything goes, “Cuba”, Romania or Khmer Rouge. It would be like judging capitalism by the slums of Lagos, or by massacres of leftists in Indonesia, Chile or even some European countries, e.g. Finland in 1920’s, Greece, Spain, Turkey.

    I once argued with Thulean (I think) about availability of bananas under socialism. I was a kid and I had them in the 80’s – he claimed that I couldn’t. Because that’s what he was told. (Maybe by mom packed squash into yellow peels to fool us.) And he is not dumb.

    But you are wrong about the propaganda. It is always present and it was in the socialist countries till the end. Mostly by omission and by cherry-picking (“another volcano erupts in America!“).

    Any system should be primarily judged by the quality of people it produces. By that standard, socialism was an evolutionary success – it worked biologically, populations doubled, people were relatively healthy, well educated, families prospered, rainbow people were in mental institutions. But to be fair so did Western Europe and US of those generations. Maybe the tension and the competition made both sides better. It clearly collapsed in the last few years, the quality dropped dramatically. Maybe this cursed war will trigger changes for the better. The war is also a kind of belated consequence for the Western inability to understand their eastern neighbors.

  315. @Thulean Friend

    The government social workers will probably enact a plan to double the propaganda.

    [MORE]

    • LOL: S
  316. S says:
    @Philip Owen

    Thanks. This is more evidence that it seems both the people of the US and Russia are possibly being manipulated to fight a WWIII against each other, and against their own ultimate interests.

    Though I certainly don’t wish it, I think there is a real chance there is an intent by those promoting such a war that rather than either the US or Russia prevail, that they instead are intended to both largely destroy each other.

    As for your source, Sergej Sumlenny, a correspondent in Berlin (as of 2021 at least) for a Moscow based economics magazine called Expert, looking at some of his tweets he seems to have something of a visceral dislike (or, is that possibly, a hatred?), of Russians. It seems the Russian people don’t do much that is either right or good in his eyes

    Though he happily earns his living and profits from working for a Moscow based Russian magazine, is paid (presumably) by Russians, and has often worked amongst Russians, he simultaneously ‘thanks G_d’ he is not one of them, ie that he is ‘not Russian’.

    As for the Ukrainians, however, he is more or less okay with them…for now.

    July 24, 2021

    My landlady who was obsessed with controlling my apartment had found once some dirt spots in my washing machine. “Your cleaning lady is clearly a non-Russian”, she said immediately. I had no cleaning lady, cleaned my small apartment by myself. Yes, I was not Russian, thank G-d.

    Sergej Sumlenny
    @sumlenny

    [MORE]

    Jul 24, 2021

    In a tram, in the very center of Moscow, I have witnessed once a couple of drunk lads (clearly ethnic Russians) who were annoying. A couple of old ladies (looked like old Soviet elite) called them “migrants” (they were not). The lads answered aggressively: “we will take Berlin!”

    Sergej Sumlenny
    @sumlenny

    Jul 24, 2021

    I was shocked by this mixture of old ladies’ chauvinism and lads’ militarist intoxication.

    Sergej Sumlenny
    @sumlenny

    Jul 24, 2021

    This is just a top of Russian chauvinistic iceberg. Everyone who has a bit of understanding of Russia, and has Russian experience, is welcome to continue.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/sumlenny/status/1419000982713901058

    https://www.theeuropean.de/en/sergej-sumlenny-2/

    • Agree: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
  317. 216 says: • Website
    @Beckow

    An enormous amount of propaganda in the West tries in endless ways to hide what the real life was under socialism.

    The New York Times has run multiple apologia for communist states.

    The real story is that people in RussiaChina aren’t told about the horrors of communism, or else told a sanitized version that doesn’t impugn national guilt. Both nations are in dire need of lustration.

    And in the same way, Westerners are constantly told by their Culture Industry that past imperialism means that they must become hated minorities in their own lands. Westerners are beguiled and humbled, and genuinely think they can somehow make amends with Third Worlders aiming at a genocidal housecall.

    America put an end to Nazi Germany, but ordinary white conservatives are told it is their fault that the Holocaust happened. Russians aren’t told how essential Lend-Lease was to the survival of the USSR during the war, and they aren’t told to show gratitude toward the US for ending the tyranny of communism (Americans are told to show gratitude towards France for its help during our War for Independence).

    • Replies: @Beckow
  318. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    Socialism was more suited for an average person

    Of course particular countries were more tolerable for normal peoples’ living with socialism, in comparison with postsoviet capitalism (or by far more, presoviet capitalism).

    My parents were from a non-elite provincial background in the USSR, and say life was better in the 1970s and 1980s for them, and they are even a lot more comfortable than median people today – so this is quite a strong comparison.

    Partly there is idealization of childhood, but there is also simply basis in reality that many things related to public life were better in Soviet times. And of course, this is the mainstream view.

    But the problem was not the standard of living (which was relatively good relative even to international comparison*), instead of the deeper structural aspects of the situation. Soviet Union was an police state, dictatorship, requiring high level of repressions, with economic dependence from international markets, as well as costly imperialist external policy.

    This situation was historically not stable, and it prepares some of the foundations for the postsoviet dystopian situation, where certain good things of the previous decades have been partly removed and replaced with deindustrialization, inequality (Russia and Ukraine are somewhere around the top 5 most wealth unequally countries in the world), border wars between neighboring states and fraternal people, while many of the bad things cannot be fully removed (e.g. police state, censorship, imperialism, militarism, dictatorship, etc) and some have been accelerated (e.g. cultural and educational decline, oil dependence, “cult of the leader” which had been buried since 1953, corruption of the elite).


    *Male life expectancy in Ukraine and Belarus, during Khrushchev, was the same as France (with their healthy food and red wine). Whereas male life expectancy in Russia and Belarus, last year falls lower than Bangladesh again.

    Westerners are not allowed to know. An enormous amount of propaganda in the West

    Although Western Europe has a greater level of comfort, partly as it follows aspects of a developed socialism model. For example, United Kingdom has 0% tax for the first \$15,000. There is free housing for people with low incomes. There is excellent healthcare for all its citizens and also non-citizens. Etc. It reminds a bit of the positive aspects of socialism.

    And some of those oil rich monarchies like Saudi Arabia, are running very similar to socialism model in terms of giving free stuff to everyone.

    rainbow people were in mental institutions. But to be fair so did Western Europe and US of those generations.

    LGBT is significantly related to how comfortable the area is, like the other fashionable causes (Ukraine, environmentalism). You can see only in the safest, wealthiest, most comfortable area of the city in the West, there will be rainbow flags, something related to saving the ecology, “refugees welcome” and since early this year Ukraine flags (“Ukrainian refugees welcome”).

    • Agree: Coconuts
    • Replies: @216
    , @Beckow
    , @Yellowface Anon
  319. @Here Be Dragon

    Depended on the people. Those who were moving uptown from the villages were not good people.

    The atmosphere could be different in the next neighborhood where the workers coming from the rural areas settled. From them was all the violence, and it was them who started killing people on the streets in the nineties. A different culture — peasants.

    Those kids didn’t know any better, and their families were from the villages. Most of them would spend a summer in the village, and then come back doing the same things people were doing there — drinking and fighting, for the most part. Looking for troubles.

    Once again you seem to act as if those villages and their population came from outer space while it was direct, even if prolonged in time, result of Soviet collectivization when the most succesful, hardworking and productive native peasentry living there was mass deported or outright genocided by hunger and leftovers were forcefully put into collective farms as socialist equivalent of serfs.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  320. AP says:
    @Beckow

    I once argued with Thulean (I think) about availability of bananas under socialism. I was a kid and I had them in the 80’s – he claimed that I couldn’t.

    I just asked by wife. She said in Russia bananas were only available once in awhile, and in summer. And only in Moscow. When visiting family in the Urals they would bring bananas from Moscow. Bananas started to become more common at the end of the 80s.

    Probably Czechoslovakia was different.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  321. 216 says: • Website
    @Dmitry

    Although Western Europe has a greater level of comfort, partly as it follows aspects of a developed socialism model. For example, United Kingdom has 0% tax for the first \$15,000. There is free housing for people with low incomes. There is excellent healthcare for all its citizens and also non-citizens. Etc. It reminds a bit of the positive aspects of socialism.

    No it doesn’t. All of Western Europe except for Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Luxembourg has lower living standards than the US.

    And that’s after the US subsidizes Europe’s defense and drug costs. Not to mention that EU common external tariffs are higher than US tariffs on imports from the EU.

    There are no positive aspects to socialism, it is a corrosive and parasitical system. It wages war on the patriarchal and religious foundations of life. It produces Brutalism and famine.

    • Agree: sher singh
    • Replies: @Adept
  322. @S

    Martin Armstrong’s 2 main predictions are Davos failing in their economic objectives (which could require a Western collapse) and the center of the global economy shifting to China (I think by largely containing or staying out of the destruction). He has also published a report that predicts the global population to fall by 1-2 billion by 2030, which would be impossible without global catastrophes. He doesn’t exclude Russia from the countries that will collapse (but later than the West). For his track record he claimed to predict a 3rd party president in 2016 (Trump lying outside of both parties’ establishment) back in 1985.

    • Thanks: S
  323. Wokechoke says:
    @Philip Owen

    You only have to binge watch ww2 movies from Russia to see how they interpret Germany of the Nazi era. ahem… and then there’s good films about their amazing battles in Afghanistan or even a few about Spetsnaz in Nam. Don’t even start on their films about Mongols and Swedes and Tartars, or you see things like this current-thing coming. It’s like the shit you see in the UK or US only, only, only it’s about Battles we don’t get to hear about unless we consume professional military history books. Which I do.

    That Brad Pitt about the Sherman Tank called Fury is a basic rip off of several Russian films about t34 crews. Even Tarantino bases Inglorious Basterds on recent Russian flicks. He doesn’t admit it or realize it but the vibe is identical.

    Truth is the Wehrmacht were the good guys, in a sense, long term. Liberal Democracy is just a society run by Jews.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  324. Wokechoke says:
    @Beckow

    I recall seasonal tropical periods for things like Bananas back in London in the 80s. London was basically a hub for easy imports too. Probably available all the time but definitely a seasonal produce.

  325. songbird says:

    Wonder if part of the reason Serbs are so tall is that the country is mountainous and malaria is often absent in highlands.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  326. Wokechoke says:
    @Thulean Friend

    is Denmark like this as well? Red on the Outside, Neo Feudal on the inside?

  327. Mikhail says: • Website
    @songbird

    Montenegrins are the one with the rep of being especially tall.

    • Thanks: songbird
  328. Beckow says:
    @AP

    I really don’t know what the situation was like in Russia. In Czecho-Slovakia we had bananas. And tangerines, oranges, the whole damn thing. But no avocados or kiwis. I didn’t keep records so it is possible that it was seasonal. But I recall that a lot of fruits were also seasonal in the West until quite recently.

    My point is that the endless Western folklore about bananas, toilet paper, empty shelves and bread lines is simply not true. The narrative that West has fed its population was skewed and it amounted to propaganda. In movies they often used to switch to black-and-white when in Eastern Europe and the scenery was horrible. It would be like Hollywood filming its fairy tales about LA in the Compton garbage dumps.

    Why that much propaganda if the system was supposedly so dysfunctional? Why were they afraid of simple reality? They matched the latter-day commissars who also couldn’t face life as it was, both at home and in the West.

    The false pictures are haunting the Westerners to this day. They may never recover from it and we see the results today: a lala-land war against ‘Russians who can’t even change a light-bulb“. The Western morons bluffed the world into an unnecessary war because they believed the propaganda they were taught as kids.

    • Replies: @AP
  329. Beckow says:
    @216

    And a verified American know-nothing moron steps up to show us how stupidity works. Thank you, “216”, we get it – you know nothing and resent those who do.

    America put an end to Nazi Germany

    No, they didn’t. They came 10 months before the end of the war when Germany was already defeated to claim the spoils. You lie because the reality is too embarrassing – you didn’t have the balls to fight Germany when it was still strong.

    past imperialism means that they must become hated minorities in their own lands.

    No argument there. But don’t you think that you deserve it? You used hatred and violence on others for generations, what goes around comes around.

    • Agree: Here Be Dragon
  330. AP says:

    Russia Day in occupied Kherson. About 50 people showed up despite Russian government encouragement. In contrast, before Russia started arresting people, hundreds showed up with Ukrainian flags protesting Russian rule at the beginning of occupation:

    [MORE]

    Pro-Ukrainian demonstration in March:

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  331. Beckow says:
    @Dmitry

    ….Soviet Union was an police state, dictatorship, requiring high level of repressions, with economic dependence from international markets, as well as costly imperialist external policy.

    They were imperialist and not in a very smart way. But the ‘police state repression’ in the last 15-20 years was by global standards very mild. I don’t know about the Soviets, but in Czecho-Slovakia-Hungary-Poland there was not a “police state”. The police could barely keep track of their own hours and one had to really go out of his way to have much interaction with them. They would break up demonstrations and keep an eye on a few dozen people. They also kept a large number of real and invented sources to write semi-retarded “situation reports”. They had no computers and in Czecho-Slovakia simply moving to another district usually meant that you got a new start.

    The “police state” applied in the 50’s after WWII and its bloodletting. But to call the laid-back Czecho-Slovakia of the 80’s a “police state” is nonsense. The number of claimed “persecuted” was in dozens out of 15 million people. They were almost always prosecuted for non-political crimes (sometimes made up, but not always.) Havel was in jail originally for refusing to pay an import duty on a Volvo gifted to him by a German Foundation. It was chicanery and petty harassment, but hardly a police state. None of the dissidents ever claimed abuse. If that is a “police state”, how is that different from any others state that has a police and that likes to intimidate potential opponents?

    But my basic point was that the socialist states (and I am focusing on Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary) were evolutionary successful: very viable societies with an easy life, good infrastructure, strong families and all the basics taken care of. That may not be enough for all people (even for me), but it is deceptive to demonize it as the West does. It was certainly superior to systems that preceded it.

    • Thanks: sher singh
    • Replies: @Dmitry
  332. AP says:
    @Beckow

    My point is that the endless Western folklore about bananas, toilet paper, empty shelves and bread lines is simply not true.

    The bananas part was true about Russia, which was a much larger and more important country than Czechoslovakia, which itself was probably the richest of the Socialist countries (though under Socialism it had fallen very far behind its previous near-peer, Austria). Judging socialism based on Czechoslovakia was like judging capitalism based on Switzerland.

    In Russia it was often the job of grandmothers to wait in line for groceries because working people didn’t have time. Apologists for socialism could claim that this was a good thing because it helped the grandmothers to feel like useful members of the family, and waiting in line with other grandmothers was an opportunity to gossip and be social with other grandmothers. It was a warm community. And it wasn’t in black and white. See how great socialism was?

    • Disagree: Mikhail
  333. Mr. Hack says:
    @Thulean Friend

    If you want to see a lush garden style you need to go to the local Botanical garden, and you’ll be quite amazed at what you see. It’s of course composed of areas that have almost all been planted – its a land of what’s possible, but not necessarily what’s natural. Lots of imported shrubs, plants trees and even cactus from all over the world, to be seen in one garden park. If you seek real, natural greenery and a cooler climate, you need not go any further than Payson, a small town about 70 miles northeast of Phoenix. It’s one of my favorite close get away spaces. You can see mountains and green populated ponderosa forests while traveling by car on super smooth highways:

    You’re no longer in Phoenix. Roll down your window and inhale some fresh, cool mountain air. Mogollon trail has some great lakes to visit and places to cool down in too.

    Got to go. I have an hour and a half to get ready to go to the Musical Instrument Museum, and see and hear Gonzalo Rubalcaba. The museum is uniques in the whole world and Rubalcaba is well…
    jazz pianist virtuos0 #1. I can hardly wait with anticipation!

    • Thanks: Thulean Friend
  334. @sudden death

    A lot of good comments we have here.

    Once again you seem to act as if those villages and their population came from outer space while it was direct result of Soviet collectivization.

    No it’s not me, it’s misunderstanding of the Russian culture – or Ukrainian culture, for that matter.

    You are misunderstanding it.

    But imagine this – a pastoral terrain, nice houses, a winter morning, a lot of snow. People are gathering on the river’s bank – it’s Maslenitsa, there will be a fight. A religious folk ritual. The entire village will fight, or two villages, one against the other. A long and respected tradition, centuries old. You have to fight.

    And it doesn’t matter who is more hardworking, less hardworking, productive, not productive – doesn’t matter, it’s about something else. You have to fight. Even though during the communist times this tradition wasn’t celebrated as before, it was still there, and it wasn’t on that festival alone when it was done.

    Those lads from the villages were a lot tougher than us, urban dudes. We were smarter than them, and had better things. You understand where it’s going? We were singing and dancing, but not them. Those lads were standing there, looking. And it was a matter of time, till someone would push someone, and then there was a fight.

    Simple as that.

    And these peasant people weren’t poor either – most of them had houses in the village, a couple of pigs, a couple of cows, a piece of land, a car – we didn’t have all that. We had guitars, Levi’s, some shoes some shirts. Nothing of a real value. We had a better look, and that meant better chicks. We had records, tapes. Some fun things.

    And their parents hated our parents.

    We spoke Russian, as most people in the cities. Their parents spoke Ukrainian. Things like that. We were going to the seaside in summer, most of them had never seen the sea. There’s a lot of work in the village in summer. We were too different to get along, and not as tough as we had to be to deal with them.

    Competition, differences.

  335. Beckow says:
    @AP

    …See how great socialism was?

    It was like that, and it was also the way I described it. Societies are complex, it was a long period of time. You can find examples for different interpretations.

    You suddenly discovered the “importance” factor. So Czecho-Slovakia (Hungary, E Germany that were similar) is not relevant. Why? Why can’t we judge ‘capitalism’ of that time by Portugal, Spain, Greece, Ireland or southern Italy? Those were genuine poverty traps with a local version of what one could call a “police state”.

    You claim that you like ‘democracy’. Democracy if it means anything has to mean that peoples’ preferences are implemented. Most people in Central Europe by huge margins want socialized medicine, free education, subsidized housing, long vacations, maternity leave, reliable pensions and public transportation. People want it and the collection of those policies is called “socialism”.

    It is almost certainly also true about people in Ukraine (west and east). So why do you want to deny it to them? The globalist capitalism has a consistent support of about 15% (the people who can benefit from it, the ones maybe like us). But this unpopular policy has been ruling the West (and east) for decades. How is that democratic? And don’t tell us that people are stupid, “we can’t afford it”, blabla…we are living in a virtual faith-based financial world, any constraints are only political. Why is \$100 billion held by oligarchs (again west and east) ok, but what people want is not affordable?

    We are heading towards more socialism, it is simply inevitable, there is no other place the societies can go. You better get used to it. This will be very unpleasant for you: Russia will take the Black See coast and you will have to put up with more “socialism”. By the way, Russia has told the people in Kherson province that “all their debts to banks will be written off“. Smart, they are buying them with the oligarchs’ bank money. Once the word gets around even Lvivites may demand that Russia “occupies” them. Such is human nature, incentives work.

    • Replies: @sudden death
    , @AP
  336. @Callsign Pidor

    Thanks, I’m familiar with his story. I was fed up with his bullshit and did some ‘detective’ work on him once, and I think I have a reasonable idea of his IRL identity (not interested in doxxing, I was just curious about his background).

    and not in the conservative type of way where they lament the fading away of the America of the past

    He has made a show of caring about the ‘real’ America though. Transparent bullshit, of course, but for someone who routinely equates emoting on a topic with reasoned discourse on it, he probably imagines he was actually fooling people.

    “No different to a Somali” is a nice shorthand way to dismiss him, I agree.

  337. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    I see you couldn’t argue in favor of your ridiculous ideas about equality.

    Your Ukraine, as a state was created by those you call Sovok elites.

    Of course. This is why it had all of those problems. As with Russia in the 90s, for the same reason. Sovok legacy is a filthy one, there is no escape, as demonstrated by your very being.

    If Ukraine had gotten some non-Sovok dissident as a president, like Chornovil, it would have followed in the footsteps of the Baltics or Poland. But it had the poison pills of Crimea and Donbas so that would never have happened.

    Those who you despise created your Ukraine out of thin air – it had never existed.

    Both ZUNR and UNR existed prior to Bolshevism. Ukrainian ethnogenesis occurred sometime n the 14th century.

    Post-Soviet Ukraine was no ore artificial than post-Soviet Russia. In both cases, Sovok bureaucrats, the heirs of those who had killed legitimate authorities, made up some projects. The Russian ones may have been more offensive because they LARPed as the ones they killed, like a killer putting on the skin of his victim. That is how grotesque it is, when these Soviet creatures put on the mantle of the Tsars. A 40-something Jewish comedian is better than some Sovok Boomer.

    Your people were given a once in a lifetime chance

    They were the poorest of the three Slavic republics, saddled with a terrible Sovok legacy including an inherited Sovok elite, their best had been murdered, and they had a whole population of Sovok-lovers in the eastern third of the country anchoring them to the excrement that is the Soviet legacy.

    Your people ran the country

    No, those were your people – disgusting Soviet filth.

    Three of my acquaintances were killed in three years. And it lasted and lasted, for a long time. There was no end to it. Engineers and doctors were selling books from their home libraries, standing on the sidewalks.

    I don’t why you are complaining about that. This was all the project of the flower of the Soviet elite that you praised. This is what they did. And the killers were the ones who had been educated in Soviet schools and brought up in a Soviet environment. On every level, at every step, from the government reformers and thieves to the street-level thieves and killers, it was pure Soviet morality and culture. Your 70s were a brief ephemeral illusion.

    The 90s are your world unleashed, Sharikov. The ultimate and final expression of Soviet morality, created by Soviets, and done by them. Who would have thought, that a society based on theft and murder and the celebration of thieves and murderers like Lenin and co. would end up with a miniature Lenin beating someone to death with a hammer in order to steal \$200 that was in his apartment (this actually happened to the father of a guy from eastern Ukraine whom I knew).

    That is your culture, Sharikov. A drunk’s hammer smashing a man’s skull, living in an apartment whose legitimate owner had been murdered in the 1920s or 1930s, daily praises to thieves and murderers, it’s all of one piece.

    BTW crime in Ukraine was always the worst in the most Soviet parts of Ukraine and the lightest in the least Soviet parts:

    Crime rate by region, 2010:

    The long-term effects of Soviet demoralization and lack of culture.

    And in the meantime your nationalist president was publishing his own books, about how Ukraine isn’t Russia

    Kuchma was a Soviet factory director.

    There’s Khazaria 2.0 and Ukrainians are poor, brainwashed and hopeless even more than ever before.

    Russia indeed has a Jewish PM (one of several it has had) and plenty of Jewish oligarchs. It’s president started out with a Jewish business partner and married his daughter off to this guy’s son. Bykov’s book was fun but there isn’t that much of a divide between Ukraine and Russia in terms of Khazaria. It’s a silly argument for a pro-Russian to make.

    Your new government isn’t better than the old one – it’s worse

    Nonsense. By 2021 Ukraine had become the richest it had been after the Soviet breakup. Which isn’t much, but it was certainly improvement. People were more optimistic. And its economy was centered more on the ethnic Ukrainian parts. Loss of Crimea and Donbas was a true blessing.

    Ukrainian cities had become charming and pleasant places, far removed from the pathetic squalor and ugliness of Soviet times. Not only places like Lviv, even provincial ones like Vynnytsia.

    Russia will get back the East, Poland will get back the West

    Ideally there would be a union between Poland and all of Ukraine, minus Crimea and Donbas. This is Ukraine’s natural place, together with its Polish brothers rather than with its murderous Russian half-brother. But we will see how far Russia gets.

    • LOL: sher singh
  338. Wokechoke says:
    @A123

    I’m pretty sure Jesus was being sarcastic. “two’s enough then!” or something like “stfu larpers”

  339. @A123

    To genuine Christians, the ultimate sin is weakness:

    If only that were true.

    To real Christians “the strongest position is on your knees.”

    Whatever merit that phrase has – and it has some: give yourself to God and you will be stronger for it – is in all likelihood completely lost on the 21st century Christian cuckstain, who kneels to BLMers rather than kneeing them in the head.

    • Agree: sher singh
    • Replies: @sher singh
    , @A123
  340. @Beckow

    pensions

    more socialism

    people in Ukraine (west and east)

    lol what a clownery – pension age is higher in “more socialist” RF than “capitalist” UA by whole 5 years

    • Replies: @Beckow
  341. sher singh says:
    @AP

    *something something* Native American genocide, black (Nigger) slavery, colonialism, reperations.

    Both ZUNR and UNR existed prior to Bolshevism. Ukrainian ethnogenesis occurred sometime n the 14th century.

    HOLY fk lol.

  342. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    The bananas part was true about Russia, which was a much larger and more important country than Czechoslovakia, which itself was probably the richest of the Socialist countries (though under Socialism it had fallen very far behind its previous near-peer, Austria). Judging socialism based on Czechoslovakia was like judging capitalism based on Switzerland.

    Soviet era Hungary and the DDR had higher standards of living. This wasn’t so evident in the DDR on account of the adage that Prussians live to work whereas others are more prone to the opposite.

  343. sher singh says:
    @silviosilver

    “Western Europe, State Formation, and Genetic Pacification
    Peter Frost, Henry C. Harpending”

    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/147470491501300114

    You can execute violent men or give them prestigious positions.

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

  344. @AP

    What are you talking about, where did you get this crap, who told you all that?

    The bananas part was true about Russia, which was a much larger and more important country than Czechoslovakia.

    There were no bananas in Russia that’s true. Except for Moscow and Leningrad, perhaps Riga or Tallinn. Perhaps Kiev, sometimes.

    But there were a lot of fruits – apples of all kinds, a lot better than in the West, pears, apricots, melons and watermelons, and what not. And all of that was seasonal. But it was real!

    My first impressions in Europe, among other things were fruits and berries in winter. How disappointing was that. Yes, strawberries in December, except that they don’t even have the smell of strawberries.

    There were some sorts of winter apples in Ukraine so some fruits were on the table up to late November, and then there was a break till April or something. Not a big problem. We had good food.

    In Russia it was often the job of grandmothers to wait in line for groceries because working people didn’t have time.

    Total bullcrap.

    The groceries in the stores were milk and bread for the most part. To wait in line we have as much in supermarkets here, as it was there. Most of the food was bought in the marketplace. Fresh and clean.

    There were sorts of meat that no one knows about in the West. We didn’t have salami but we had other things. We didn’t have ten sorts of ketchup, we had one but it was better, more natural – Bulgarian.

    We didn’t have Coca-Cola but we had Tarkhuna. You don’t have it. You don’t have a lot of good things we had, and it’s amusing when we are told that we didn’t have McDonald’s, as if that’s bad.

    We had Chebureki!

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  345. AP says:
    @Beckow

    You suddenly discovered the “importance” factor. So Czecho-Slovakia (Hungary, E Germany that were similar) is not relevant. Why?

    I didn’t say they were not relevant, I said they were less relevant. The USSR had many more people. When discussing capitalism focus on the USA or Germany or UK, not Portugal or Switzerland.

    Why can’t we judge ‘capitalism’ of that time by Portugal, Spain, Greece, Ireland or southern Italy

    We could, we could also discuss Albania or North Korea. USSR was larger and important. See my previous comment.

    BTW the poorer capitalist countries like Spain and Portugal surpassed Czechoslovakia, one of the richest Socialist countries in terms of wealth and life expectancy by the 1980s.

    You claim that you like ‘democracy’.

    I like it better than Communist Party socialism.

    Most people in Central Europe by huge margins want socialized medicine, free education, subsidized housing, long vacations, maternity leave, reliable pensions and public transportation. People want it and the collection of those policies is called “socialism”

    Countries that have them and that are appealing are capitalist ones such as Denmark or Sweden. Just because some semi-retarded Americans mistakenly label these things “socialism” doesn’t make it so.

    By the way, Russia has told the people in Kherson province that “all their debts to banks will be written off“.

    How many you figure have debts worth caring about? It’s not the USA over there.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  346. @Adept

    Thanks, I was going to make a similar point. Both those who paint the past as a hellhole or an idyllic paradise are equally silly.

    Modernity has it’s advantages, but it’s chosen to throw the baby out with the bathwater, and as a consequence we live in a grossly atomized world.

    It is possible to strike some measure of balance though. Saturday I worked a 12 hour day putting up a friend of mine’s timber framed barn. I was getting paid since it’s my bread and butter, but all the other labor were a friends and family volunteer force. There were about 15 people helping out to make the raising happen, only compensated by great food, friendship, and the satisfaction of a job well done. The greatest thing about it was that half the people there were other members of the community that I had built houses or other structures for and most of them had all lent a hand on each others’ raisings too.

    Community and tradition don’t have to be dead letters, it just takes some effort to create those bonds in the face of a society which is inimical to them.

  347. @Yevardian

    For what it’s worth, I’m all for people being a bit pretentious showing off their knowledge provided they have something to say. I really do appreciate many of the “pretentious” exchanges on here even if I don’t comment on them. As you say there are precious few places anymore that one can even mention an interest in any sort of literature without getting stares of blank incomprehension.

    I always liked Tolstoy a bit more than Dostoevsky. Despite being a bit overly romantic in his regard for the serfs, I always felt that Tolstoy gave a truer picture of Russia, than Dostoevsky’s often overly grotesque view.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  348. A123 says: • Website
    @silviosilver

    To genuine Christians, the ultimate sin is weakness:

    If only that were true.

    To real Christians “the strongest position is on your knees.”

    Whatever merit that phrase has – and it has some: give yourself to God and you will be stronger for it –

    Absolutely. IMHO, both of our statements are 100% compatible.

    Kneeling in service to the one true God is a virtue. Doing so with your fellow Crusaders creates esprit de corps. It is an expression of strength, and an abjuration of weakness.

    is in all likelihood completely lost on the 21st century Christian cuckstain, who kneels to BLMers rather than kneeing them in the head.

    The number of Christian beliefs that have been lost to Leftoid submissiveness is mind boggling. Here is what should be an easy question:

    “How do sinners get into Heaven — Forgiveness? Or, Absolution?”

    To earn a place in Heaven, it has to be earned. Absolution involves admission of sin, and trying to make the situation ‘right’.

    Receiving forgiveness unearned. It does nothing for the forgiven. It is the way for the *forgiver* to let go of the transgression, and thus avoid hate and other motivations that could end in sin.

    How is this distinction not obvious to everyone?

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @sher singh
  349. sher singh says:
    @A123

    Crusader larping, Zionist baiting you live in another era LOL.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/07/30/most-common-age-among-us-racial-ethnic-groups/

    All this nerd nigga noise.

    https://www.amren.com/commentary/2017/05/black-on-white-rape-anti-white-racism-crime/

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

  350. @AP

    Hello, idiot.

    You couldn’t argue in favor of your ridiculous ideas about equality.

    Not equality – equal opportunities, like access to decent health care and higher education, for all people regardless of their social stratum. You know that in Germany higher education is free, even for foreigners? Well – almost free because foreigners have to put like ten thousand euro on the deposit account. To keep it there.

    But there’s no fees for the studies. Socialism. The Germans don’t complain.

    Sovok legacy is a filthy one, as demonstrated by your very being. If Ukraine had gotten some non-Sovok dissident as a president, it would have but it had so that would never have happened.

    You are mean, little man. Your insult doesn’t hurt me but it makes you look stupid. And if Ukraine was a real nation, than perhaps it would have but it ain’t a real nation. You don’t have what it takes.

    Whatever existed didn’t last. Ever. You never had what it takes that’s the reason of all these failures. You are not a nation, that’s it.

    Understand that Ukraine had been offered a compromise and guarantees and could have kept Donbas or let it go, or granted it a little more freedom and that would be a solution, and it was not Russia, not Communist elites but Ukrainian nationalist cabal that didn’t do that – at their own free will. Keep blaming the Russians though.

    Life will be easier.

    And let me also reply to your prior questions and remarks real quick.

    One can infer who is better or worse by their parental position, as being better or worse is a function of a combination of culture/morality (transmitted within families) and genetics (and these factors are related).

    Even without logical reasoning here a simple observation proves such an opinion to be absolutely wrong.

    There are so many examples of stupid and ungifted rich people who were born rich that it doesn’t even make sense mentioning names, as well as there are a lot of examples of gifted and intelligent people, who were born poor.

    Yuri Gagarin was born in a village, and his parents were peasants. Vasily Shukshin was also born in a village, and his parents were peasants. Sergei Bondarchuk was born in a village, and his parents were peasants.

    Maxim Gorky lived on the street for five years. Taras Shevchenko, whom you admire was born to serfdom. There are a lot people who were born at the bottom, but were talented, intelligent, gifted.

    And you are telling me that Hunter Biden, Donald Trump and such are better than them because they were supposed to inherit some magical qualities from their parents, because their parents were rich and therefore better.

    Even among the talented people the situation when children are average is common. John Lennon was born poor and was a genius, his son was born rich and isn’t. Bob Marley was born poor and was a genius, his children are not.

    So this is how that is – their parental position doesn’t mean shit.

    The old elite families eventually reestablished their proper position in society, at the top.

    Once successful people establish connections and ties with other successful people it becomes easy to get back on the top. As well as it becomes easy to maintain success once achieved. That doesn’t mean anything.

    A good school for your children, a good education, proper health care and a little money for the start is all that is needed to be successful, as long as there is experience in the family and necessary connections.

    Being born into a successful family doesn’t make anybody any more cultured, or moral than others per se, and genetics has nothing to do with it whatsoever.

    So yes compadre there are no more options for anybody to get an apartment in a Stalin’s house on Tverskaya Street, other than to inherit it from those who got it from the Communist Party or to buy it with stolen money.

    There was no other way to make that much money.

    [MORE]
    And no Encyclopedia Britannica isn’t a reference – a reference should point at something, like a historical research in that case.

    • Replies: @AP
  351. @AP

    I’ll still stick to a part of the country that has abundant water. That’s a big deal in my mind. I’m not bullish on how arid places like Vegas can maintain population density over the coming decades.

    @Mr. Hack
    How does the looming water issues look form your perspective?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  352. @Thulean Friend

    investeringssparkonto

    Never heard of this. Wow, that’s virtually tax-free. I couldn’t find much information about it in English. Specifically, does that tax rate include taxation on capital gains or are those taxed separately? Astonishing, if the former. (I understand dividends on Swedish stocks are untaxed.)

    Also, are there any restrictions on accessing funds from the account? It would be incredible if there were not, since the point of it (from the perspective of providing incentives to the saver) seems to be a form of what in America would be considered an IRA or a 401(k). (Or in Australia, ‘superannuation’, with both contributions and distributions taxed at a highly advantageous concessional rate, but not nearly as low as the Swedish ISK.)

    For those of us who have plenty of investments in US commercial paper, it means that any dividends will be taxed much higher,

    Are you sure you’re referring specifically to commercial paper? Commercial paper is very short-term , unsecured company debt – almost always less than 270 days in order to avoid having to register with the Securities Exchange Commission, but typically much shorter. It pays neither “dividends” nor coupons (like a normal bond), but is issued at a discount to face value (eg face value \$1000 purchased at \$950, and pays \$1000 at maturity, with the \$50 difference being the “interest” earned.)

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  353. Beckow says:
    @sudden death

    Most people would consider RF “more capitalist” than Ukraine, so I am not sure what your point is.

    • Replies: @sudden death
  354. Beckow says:
    @AP

    …we could also discuss Albania or North Korea

    And among capitalist examples how about Haiti or Nigeria, both very capitalist in every sense of that term.

    because some semi-retarded Americans mistakenly label these things “socialism” doesn’t make it so.

    They have no say in it. Socialism has been well defined for 100+ years: what I described with socialized medicine, education, etc… is how you define socialism. What else would it be? Conversely a private management of those areas is what capitalism is. Denmark-Sweden are mixed economies, in both around 50% of the economy is handled by the state. They also refer to their system as socialist or “social” with a large private sector. The parties that implemented these policies were called “Socialist”, look that up. There is a lot of retarded thinking coming out of US intellectual dilettantes – don’t add to it.

    You didn’t address my point: if people want it, why in a democracy would anyone prevent them from getting it because some nincompoop screams that it is “socialism!”

    I guess we will soon find out how big debts people in Kherson have, I am sure they have mortgages, car loans, credit cards… It is likely that the oligarchs losing money on this will demand to be compensated from the EU aid. A beautiful picture of a Dutch farmer or a German autoworker sending money to Kolomoisky and other oligarchs. Absolutely prescious. It doesn’t get any better than this :)…

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  355. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    global standards very mild

    But in the Soviet Union, which I presumed you were writing about, it was a police state, as was the Russian empire. It’s the same situation, whether the authorities claims to be following capitalism or communism. From 1845 (basically to 1991), it is illegal to criticize the government.

    I don’t know the relevance of the Czechoslovakia, but of course it was a different situation there, and the standard of living in Czechoslovakia was even higher. Central Europe has been relatively civilized already before the 20th century.

    I believe also Yugoslavia was successful with socialism.

    how is that different from any others state that has a police and that likes to intimidate potential opponents?

    Because the secret police is one of the most powerful element in the society, and the revolutionary authorities refortify them, so there will not be further revolutions. They simply expand the systems, which were already a highly repressive police state before the revolution.

    Here was the secret police town in the city of Sverdlovsk of the 1930s. When the secret police is one of the most prioritized institutions in the country.. the main building projects in a city can be to construct places for the secret police.

    on Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary) to demonize it as the West does. It was certainly superior to systems that preceded it.

    Because those relatively ordered and manageable countries. If communism was in Norway or Sweden, it would have association with wealthy and liberal countries.

    But when communism was in the Russian Empire, China, Cambodia, Zambia, etc, it has developed different associations characteristic of the more politically repressive situation in those countries.

  356. @Beckow

    We seem to be in agreement. You think like me.

    One issue is that people who perceived socialism as a problem for themselves were in general the smarter, harder working, more ambitious types. They learned foreign languages and dreamt of exotic travel. For them the system didn’t work well – they knew that they were subsidizing the rest of the society and would do better in capitalism.

    My dream was to leave as soon as possible and it came true. But the West wasn’t that place from my dream. Turned out it wasn’t all that pretty and a lot of things that we considered a lie actually were true. Homeless people sleeping on the ground, prostitutes on the streets, it was a shock to me.

    And the people in general, smiling and pretending to be in a good mood all the time. All that was strange to me. Dishonest people, fake people. Unreliable people.

    But you are wrong about the propaganda. It is always present and it was in the socialist countries till the end. Mostly by omission and by cherry-picking.

    Yes but it’s all relative. Were we being brainwashed? Of course not. Haven’t we seen American movies? We have. We knew about the big cars and big houses and we weren’t even told that it was a postcard. And compared to the propaganda in the West we had rather tolerant attitude toward them. At least in the USSR.

    Any system should be primarily judged by the quality of people it produces. By that standard, socialism was an evolutionary success – it worked biologically, populations doubled, people were relatively healthy, well educated, families prospered, rainbow people were in mental institutions.

    That’s right and that’s a lot. And we had great art. Not pop art, but great literature, great movies, good underground rock scene. Things were not bad. And we don’t have it now.

    But to be fair so did Western Europe and US of those generations.

    Western Europe perhaps so, though not all of it. There were problems in Britain, in other countries. A lot worse in the US. A lot of people were crushed, but it didn’t happen to no one in socialist countries in Europe.

    Socialism is good.

    Communism was horrible, but Socialism is good.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  357. @Beckow

    Beckowite copyright 😉

    Russia will take the Black See coast and you will have to put up with more “socialism”

    • Replies: @Beckow
  358. Beckow says:
    @Dmitry

    Zambia? 1930? “Sverdlovsk”? You are all over the map, I am not sure we are discussing the same thing. I know little about what Soviets did or didn’t do at home. But I know that a secret police pretty much exists in all major countries. Preventing a “revolution” is also something all governments are kind of into, for obvious reasons. It would seem that the all-powerful secret police in Russia wasn’t that powerful and scary if Russia is one of the few countries where a revolution happened.

    The “Norway-Sweden” canard is a distraction. We live where we live, the constant yearning to discard it and pretend what it would be like if we were “Norway” is not serious. In some Central-European countries (Czecho-Slovakia being a prime example, but also in some others) the socialist period of roughly 1970-1990 was neither poor nor particularly oppressive. It had other issues, but by any objective standard life at that time in those countries was among the best mankind has had in its history. There were definitely better places, but most of the world – even large parts of capitalist Europe – were much worse.

    Until this is understood the overlay of bulls.it and shallow propaganda that fogs up most peoples’ minds in the West (also the East) will not be lifted and the societies will continue to be paralyzed. This benefits the small group that wants a “global libertarian capitalism” – of course they want it, it means no oversight, unlimited ability to accumulate wealth, move money around, and control of both political institutions and media. It is exactly the thinking that demonizes the socialist past of Europe that is allowing the unchallenged dysfunctional oligarchic rule.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  359. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    socialism based on Czechoslovakia was like judging capitalism based

    I thought Beckow was writing about the Soviet Union as well.

    But communism in Czechoslovakia, would be more close to correct country to the communist theory, than in the Soviet Union or in China, as Czechoslovakia was a more developed economy.

    In Marxism, a real communist revolution, can only be in the world’s richest and most developed capitalist countries. That’s why the communist revolution in Russian empire or China, was disobeying any Marxism it claimed to follow, skipping a historical stage of industrialization.

    Communism was only a final, inevitable result of industrialization, but in 20th century post-revolutionary territories of the former Russian Empire or China, it is supposedly communist authorities who are trying to industrialize undeveloped pre-industrialized countries they have inherited.

    But in Soviet Union or China, association to Marxism is primarily marketing or branding project. If you know any theory, you will see they followed the opposite of Marxism.

    If Marx was living in 1917, he would have immediately said this revolution has no relation to communism, but was a kind of power-exchange trying to achieve legitimacy by using the terminology of communism, and enabling a very centralized and powerful government to incorporate some of the worst aspects of Tsarist autocracy (which communist writers had earlier criticized).

    Recall, communism was a humanistic ideology and postwar Czechslovakia’s situation matches more what communists had hoped for in the 19th century.

    warm community. And it wasn’t in black and white. See how great socialism was?

    Standard of living in the Soviet Union in the second half of 20th century was relatively high (above expectations for the region, including of Western economists), and objective convergence to the Western level was closer in those years than it is today, or was before the revolutions.

    So there is the truth that attempts to do socialist policies (or central planning) was temporarily more successful than what we see in the same region today.

    And this is surprising, as in theory central planning is not very efficient.

    Criticism of this argument about relatively high standard of living achieved by the 1970s, can be that the situation of today’s dystopian capitalist postsoviet states, is partly a historical result of many problems that were prepared in Soviet times.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  360. Beckow says:
    @sudden death

    The “more socialism” clearly referred to Europe. Read the paragraph again and learn the basic sentence structure and some reading comprehension.

    • Replies: @sudden death
  361. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    Zambia? 1930? “Sverdlovsk”? You are all over t

    Soviet Union was a police state and this was my comment you quoted and reply to. https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-190-russia-ukraine/#comment-5389440

    Czechoslovakia was a different country, with its own characteristics. But I wrote about the Soviet Union.

    By 1970s, the standard of living in the Soviet Union, was relatively high and the life was better in many ways than today for most people in the region. But when writing a comment about the positive aspects of the Soviet Union, it needs to be qualified with a sentence about less attractive aspects of the country, such as the police state, which can continue today, or can seem to re-emerge easily.

    all-powerful secret police in Russia wasn’t that powerful and scary if Russia is one of the few countries

    Why was Saddam Hussein so brutal in repressing populations like the Kurds? Because Iraq was a difficult country to manage, that could collapse to a civil war without a strict leader. But there are feedback problems, where the brutality of a government, also created more enemies, which therefore requires even more repressions.

    Russian empire had been very unstable, unequal, multinational and difficult to manage as a political entity. This can be incentivizing a government to choose increasingly autocratic policies. But there is the feedback problem, where the more repressive actions of the government, can also contribute to creating greater opposing rebellious forces.

    It’s like many engineering problems. You could try to reduce the level of repression, to eliminate the feedback, or you could increase the repression and overcome the feedback. After the revolutions, the government goes to increase the ability for repression. There is the building the secret police and internal security even stronger than the secret police they had defeated. The Soviet Union therefore had an unfortunately characteristic of being even more of a police state, than the Russian empire, which was already famous as the world’s worst police state.

    shallow propaganda that fogs up most peoples’ minds in the West (also the East) will not be lifted and the societies will continue to be paralyzed

    Partly because they associate “communism”, not only with Czechoslovakia, but also with more negative aspects in the USSR, China, Cambodia, Zambia.

    There is partly result of the Cold War propaganda in the West, where the historians like to focus on the communist branded third world governments, rather than socialism in more developed European countries.

    But there are also simply millions of uneducated people, who seem to use words like “socialism” as synonym for which ever political thing they do not like at this moment.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  362. AP says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    You couldn’t argue in favor of your ridiculous ideas about equality.

    Not equality – equal opportunities, like access to decent health care and higher education, for all people regardless of their social stratum.

    True of 90% of the US and about 100% of the rest of the developed capitalist world. So?

    You know that in Germany higher education is free

    It’s paid for by high taxes that result in lower take-home pay by the taxpayers. And it’s dependent on entrance examinations. In America, kids who do very well on entrance exams get scholarships.

    And if Ukraine was a real nation, than perhaps it would have but it ain’t a real nation.

    It is no more nor less real than Russia. But it was stuck with non-Ukrainian parts, another ugly legacy of its Soviet past.

    “One can infer who is better or worse by their parental position, as being better or worse is a function of a combination of culture/morality (transmitted within families) and genetics (and these factors are related).”

    Even without logical reasoning here a simple observation proves such an opinion to be absolutely wrong.

    There are so many examples of stupid and ungifted rich people who were born rich that it doesn’t even make sense mentioning names, as well as there are a lot of examples of gifted and intelligent people, who were born poor.

    Sharikov can’t reason.

    I speak of averages and you bring up exceptions. This is as stupid as stating that on some days the weather in Texas is colder than in Minnesota and therefore it isn’t true that Minnesota has a colder climate than Texas.

    And one of your examples involves poverty due to bad luck, not family. Such as:

    Maxim Gorky lived on the street for five years

    He was an orphaned son of the manager of the Astrakhan office of the shipping company I. S. Kolchin

    A lot of talented families became poor because of Bolsheviks. Those that survived reestablished their rightful place. See my previous post about research in China and Hungary. Same families are on top from the 18th century. In Sweden also. So if one knows the family, one can predict the child, just not with 100% accuracy.

    This is a great study that Thulean Friend provided earlier:

    http://faculty.econ.ucdavis.edu/faculty/gclark/The%20Son%20Also%20Rises/Sweden%202014.pdf

    “Rates of long run social mobility are indeed so low that the 18th century elite in Sweden have persisted to the present as a relatively advantaged group”

    You will next point out a dumb lottery winner as proof that there is no relationship between family, intelligence, and wealth.

    Taras Shevchenko

    Indeed. I am opposed to serfdom because exceptional people should be allowed to make something of themselves. But they should do it on their own, not at anyone’s expense. And these people are of course rare exceptions. Unnatural transformations are grotesque, as in your case Sharikov.

    John Lennon was born poor and was a genius…Bob Marley was born poor and was a genius

    LOL.

    Being born into a successful family doesn’t make anybody any more cultured, or moral than others per se, and genetics has nothing to do with it whatsoever.

    Sharikov can’t science.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  363. Beckow says:
    @Dmitry

    Given that Russia is by definition a very different society than the rest of Europe (size, location, resources, history, even the weather), looking at socialist societies in Central Eastern Europe is a much better benchmark. These societies were quite successful in the 1945-90 period. As I pointed out from a biological point of view they grew dramatically and in a very heathy way. The economy, infrastructure, culture also dramatically improved. There are two arguments that can be made:
    – it was going to happen anyway
    – some neighboring countries did even better (e.g. Austria or Finland)

    The ‘would happen anyway‘ argument is illogical. So after hundreds of years of ‘non-socialist’ societies when the lives for majority of people were miserable, the elites were just about to change it and do all those good things when the darn socialists (or commies) beat them to it. Really?

    The neighbors did better by implementing some of the same policies without the toxic presence of ‘class struggle’. The constant threat of the commie radicalism probably didn’t hurt. Fear is the only thing that ever gets elites to change things for the better.

    …If Marx was living in 1917…

    The problem with looking for an authentic implementation of any 19th century philosopher is that ideas and culture don’t travel well over time; they don’t last. This is true about mental life in general; language changes, meaning of words, phrases and thinking structures in our mind What was funny to people in the 1920’s or in mid-19th century is not equally funny or even understandable today. The stories age, they can still be interesting but they are no longer applicable.

    This inevitable drift makes old ideas by definition obsolete. Ideologues don’t understand this and try to cling to original texts and narratives often with disastrous results. Russian ‘Marxists‘ were no different: they were like a fish out if water, their reality was remote from the books they were reading not just geographically but because too much time has passed. They would had been much better of discarding it and building their ‘just society‘ based on instinct and common sense. A lot of murderous stuff had to do with the artificial struggle to fit 19th century theories to 20th century realities.

    …planning is not very efficient.

    True. The only thing less efficient is no planning.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Dmitry
  364. Wielgus says:
    @Mikhail

    The principle seems to be “targeting not needed as they are all katsap anyway”.

  365. Mikhail says: • Website

    We’re already seeing signs that the Kiev regime will inaccurately take the blame like the US supported South Vietnamese and Afghans:

    https://www.rt.com/shows/crosstalk/557032-blame-game-ukraine-war/

  366. eah says:
    @German_reader

    EDIT: Just a minor correction, but I believe the tweet you cited by Karl Hammer referred to Austria, not to Germany (not much difference though).

    Echt? — kann sein; hab’s nicht bemerkt — übrigens sah ich nur ein s.g. Retweet (hier).

  367. @Dmitry

    only in the safest, wealthiest, most comfortable area of the city in the West, there will be rainbow flags, something related to saving the ecology, “refugees welcome” and since early this year Ukraine flags (“Ukrainian refugees welcome”).

    Which is why I’d say all those virtual signalling ends when the draft comes, and it has been successfully repressed in Russia because of its militarization. They aren’t called by writers on the Right “decadence” for no reason, and its opposite is hardship.

  368. AP says:
    @Beckow

    The ‘would happen anyway‘ argument is illogical. So after hundreds of years of ‘non-socialist’ societies when the lives for majority of people were miserable, the elites were just about to change it and do all those good things when the darn socialists (or commies) beat them to it. Really

    Life was improving everywhere over time (other then during brief periods such as World War II). While it continued to improve in the Socialist countries of Central Europe it did so at a slower pace. As a result, Czechoslovakia and Hungary which had been about equal to Austria fell far behind Austria, and by the end these Central European socialist countries had fallen behind even Spain, Portugal and Greece in terms of wealth and life expectancy.

    Sure, they were still richer and healthier in 1985 than they had been in 1950, but unlike in 1950 they were now poorer than the poor Mediterranean countries and weren’t even close to their immediate non-Socialist neighbours who had previously been their equals.

    Your excuse is kind of sad – they sacrificed their relative health and prosperity for the sake of their western neighbors to do better.

    Without Socialism, Czechoslovakia and Hungary would have been like Austria, Poland like France or Germany, and Russia like Italy in terms of wealth and development.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @Dmitry
  369. @Dmitry

    Have you seen the NSA disk farm in Salt Lake City?

    https://i.insider.com/51b1c97769beddb34600002b?width=1700&format=jpeg

    Ghost of Joseph Stalin might eat his own heart out.

  370. Ron Unz says:
    @Yevardian

    I’m not really sure that’s true. Though that period is definitely outside my area, I don’t recall any sources every describing Sparta as using any innovative tactics, or fighting at all differently from other Greek states. A lot of their power seems to have been based on what one critic called ‘the Spartan mirage’, i.e they projected an image of invincibility, aided by fellow Greek fascination with their barracks-hall lifestyle.
    Also, the first state to resoundingly defeat the Spartans (on equal terms) was Thebes, and I think they had hardly ever fought each other before, though they were distant allies in the past. Sparta got crushed a little later by Makedon under Antipatros too, another new enemy for them. Sparta’s decline mostly seems to have been because of internal factors, rather than military.
    But you know, Ron Unz actually published a couple of papers on Classical Sparta and the Pentekontaitia period, if his memory isn’t too rusty, he might have something informative to say if he sees this.

    I don’t normally visit these threads, but fortunately happened to see your comment.

    I’ve been away from Classical History for decades, but your analysis seems entirely correct, with an important additional factor being the gradual decline in the number of Spartiates, which had already become a significant factor by the time of the Peloponnesian War.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  371. @Beckow

    So you are admittedly shilling for RF so hard knowing it will bring more negative side of capitalism to UA people while calling for more positive socialism everywhere else? Somehow not even surprised by such level of servility and hypocrisy.

    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @S
    , @Beckow
  372. @Barbarossa

    If you want your mind bent read this one closely.

    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  373. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    Kherson is Ukraine!

    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @Seraphim
  374. Mikhail says: • Website

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  375. iffen says:

    I have decided to explicitly take sides. I hope Russia takes the Donbas. and maybe Odessa if possible, and the sooner the better. I hope that the U. S. slackens off on the military aid so that the killing can perhaps stop sooner than it otherwise would.

    I regret the death and destruction, but I must be partisan.

    One benefit that I am hoping for is a continued loss of faith in the MSM by the populace. Hopefully, after reading for months about how Ukraine is winning all the battles, but they end up losing the war will make some people think. Understanding that the Jew York Times and the other warmonger press are the “enemy” will be a godsend.

    If Trump is re-elected, he (or the incoming Republican President) could be encouraged to cut the rich NATO countries’ apron strings. It is time for America to tend to America and let Germany and France tend to Europe.

  376. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    His shifty, beating eyes, strongly suggest that he is lying, you should know. 🙂

    • LOL: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mikhail
  377. S says:
    @sudden death

    Please disregard the ‘Thanks’. That was intended for another post. 🙂

  378. Mr. Hack says:
    @Barbarossa

    The water issue in Arizona is very real and should have been addressed at the very least 25 years ago. The Colorado river and the huge reservoirs up north are going dry at alarming rates. My 90 year old roommate who was a map specialist for his whole career and who moved to Arizona much sooner than I did tells me that he was already suggesting to the state that water and salt purification projects be established in the Sea of Cortez 40 years ago. Finally, you can hear about such ideas being expressed by the government bureaucrats on the TV news. Better late than never?…

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  379. @silviosilver

    Specifically, does that tax rate include taxation on capital gains or are those taxed separately? Astonishing, if the former. (I understand dividends on Swedish stocks are untaxed.)

    There are no capital gains taxes for ISK. You pay tax on the total value of your ISK portfolio. Only real downside with ISK is that this tax is insensitive to valuation changes, so even if your portfolio is down on the year, you still pay, despite losses.

    I should clarify that the 0.375% rate isn’t a constant rate, but merely the current one.

    To get down to the nittygritty: you pay 30% of a so-called “schablonintäkt”, or loosely translated as generic income (for them, not you). It’s calculated as the benchmark interest rate set by the Riksbank on the 30th of Nov the previous year plus one percentage point. Last year it was -0.10%, which if you add 1 ppt gives you 0.90%. Since the lowest possible schablonintäkt is 1.25%, set by law, it means that you pay 30% of that 1.25%, which comes out as 0.375%.

    Now that the Riksbank is raising rates, it will mean that the tax rate for ISK next year will slowly crawl above 0.375%, depending on where the Riksbank lands by Nov 30th this year. Yet it will still be a very minor sum.

    Also, are there any restrictions on accessing funds from the account?

    No, as long as you keep any transaction related to other ISK accounts.

    There are also possibilities of combining ISK with e.g. loan applications for a mortgage, which is something I took advantage of when I bought my current apartment.

    Are you sure you’re referring specifically to commercial paper?

    I was thinking of the Swedish term värdepapper and did an on-the-fly translation. Looked up the English term you mentioned and you’re correct that this isn’t what I had in mind.

    Värdepapper in Swedish is a broad umbrella term encompassing state & corporate bonds, mutual funds, stocks etc. Having looked up various candidates, I’m guessing securities being the proper translation in English, right? I’m not entirely sure. I only use Swedish terms in everyday use.

    • Thanks: silviosilver
    • Replies: @silviosilver
  380. @Beckow

    I once argued with Thulean (I think) about availability of bananas under socialism. I was a kid and I had them in the 80’s – he claimed that I couldn’t.

    We’ve never had this argument and this can be easily checked.

    It also doesn’t sound like something I would argue; too much of János Kornai’s excellent work has crossed my path.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  381. Beckow says:
    @AP

    ….Life was improving everywhere over time

    That’s a meaningless statement. Sometimes it was, other times it wasn’t. In C-E Europe it mostly wasn’t.

    Sure, they were still richer and healthier in 1985 than they had been in 1950, but unlike in 1950 they were now poorer than the poor Mediterranean countries

    Wrong generalization: there were – and are – large parts of the Med countries that were poorer and stayed poorer. I mentioned a few, southern Italy, Portugal, parts of Spain, add Ireland, northern England, backward France. All those places never came close to the living standards under socialism in better parts of Czecho-Slovakia, E Germany, Hungary. Palermo or Naples were sh.tholes compared to Prague or Budapest, and so was Dublin, Newcastle or Marseille. They still are. Since then more places in Western Europe dramatically dropped in quality of life and appearance, from Midlands to Brussels it is not a pretty picture.

    Vienna was an imperial capitol and Austria is blessedly neutral, socialist and normal (other than the weirdos). Austrians will tell you that their socialist good life was implemented with an eye on the commie neighbors – an example and a preventive measure. Look up a guy named Bruno Kreisky and how he run Austria. It was similar in W Germany. So yes, having the commie bugaboo did wonders for the willingness of the bosses to behave normally. That is an obvious truism.

    You and I argued this before and all you came up with were ‘statistics’, numbers that supposedly measure all of this. They don’t, quality of life is unmeasurable, it is too complex. How do you account for security, no fear of losing a job, no homelessness, lengthy time off, home from work at 3 pm, inexpensive basics including housing, easy life and no bosses that can push you around.

    Socialists tended to be very hard on any manager who tried to throw his way around. My dad and others told me that the quickest way to be removed as a director was to have a few lower level employees complain that ‘he is bossy, he doesn’t respect us‘. That was one of the strengths of the system – the lack of fear at a workplace. It was also its biggest economic shortcoming. But for most people, most of the time, the biggest stress is work and having to obey. Removing it – at least partially – was very pleasant for most people. That’s one reason they still remember it as better than today. For most people that is real freedom and not the ability to make absurdist theatre.

    Try to get out from your numbers, they are not that precise. In any case, the catch-up and back-and-forward varied from place to place and over time. Socialism clearly lost steam by the 80’s, easy work life turned into outright laziness and the hard-working (or ambitious) minority wanted a better deal for themselves. But if you would put it up to a vote, large percentage of people would opt to keep the system as it was. So where is your failed system, your totalitarian oppression? It was different, get out of your propagandized mindset.

  382. Beckow says:
    @sudden death

    Neither RF nor UA are relevant here, they are both backward socially. My comment was about Europe. You are mixing apples and oranges.

    An interesting side effect of Russia’s looming takeover of the South-East Ukraine will be dispossessing the oligarchs and a reset in economic relations. Probably eventually Russian or Donbas oligarchs will grab it, but the reset – the cancellation of debts – will be positive for most people living there. You take what you can, right? EU will tax me and you to pay off the oligarchs. That will be very popular.

  383. Adept says:
    @216

    What do you mean by “living standards?”

    I now live in Central Europe, and I have lived in various American cities, including San Francisco and NYC.

    I can state with complete confidence that life in an average German town — say, for instance, Schwäbisch Hall — is superior to life in an American town of comparable size in every way that matters.

    The food is vastly superior in quality. The architecture is far more pleasing to the eye. There is a sense of history and an oddly festive atmosphere in the streets of the old town, with public beer gardens and Christmas lights on display in June. There is much less crime, indeed America’s murder rate is more than 6x higher. Medical care is better and more sensible. There are fewer visible minorities and extremely obese people, the sight of which can upset one’s equilibrium. The countryside is more pleasant and less seemingly hostile — no poison ivy, fewer ticks. As someone who is self-employed, there’s less government intrusion in my life here than there was in the USA, and the tax burden doesn’t seem appreciably higher. And yet, at the same time, welfare for the less fortunate is here handled delicately and sufficiently.

    If you are wealthy, life here is better. If you are poor, life here is better. If you are a contemptible wagie, you might prefer life in a loathsome place like Phoenix, Arizona. But I doubt it. I think that you’d need to be some sort of masochist.

    All that aside, America’s “subsidies” on drug costs are largely the result of an overgrown bureaucratic regime. Getting a drug approved in America now costs, what, \$2B? More? Small firms are, of course, totally incapable of managing the regulatory process. So drugs are developed almost entirely by large firms that specialize in compliance, and these large firms know exactly how best to gouge their clients. They also make sure that the costs imposed on them by the FDA are passed on to American consumers.

    • Agree: Beckow, Here Be Dragon
    • Thanks: Miro23, Barbarossa
    • Replies: @German_reader
  384. Beckow says:
    @Thulean Friend

    We’ve never had this argument

    Thanks, I mixed it up. It was somebody from Sweden, sorry.

    Swedes are really into bananas: large consumption and high quality. Since I had what my parents at least claimed were ‘bananas‘, and often, I am puzzled by ‘there were no bananas!‘ that the more simple-minded Westerners resort to when losing an argument.

  385. German_reader says:
    @iffen

    I hope Russia takes the Donbas. and maybe Odessa if possible, and the sooner the better.

    Sounds rather extreme. A Russian conquest of Odessa would presumably involve massive carnage with lots of civilian casualties. It would also render Ukraine economically unviable. I have a lot of misgivings about certain aspects of the pro-Ukrainian side, but I really hope this can be avoided.

    It is time for America to tend to America and let Germany and France tend to Europe.

    I agree that Europeans ought to take care of their own security, their failure to do so is embarrassing.
    However, if they did, it wouldn’t mean America can come home and tend to her own problems, spend on infrastructure and help all those poor black and white people left behind in an increasingly unequal society.
    No, it means you’re going to focus on fighting China and defend the liberty of Taiwan. Or maybe even defend the “rights” of Japan to some rocks in the China sea 🙂

    • Replies: @Beckow
  386. @Beckow

    Swedes are really into bananas


    It’s an acquired taste, much like surströmming.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Beckow
  387. German_reader says:
    @Adept

    say, for instance, Schwäbisch Hall

    Schwäbisch Hall is absurdly picturesque even compared to most other German towns. Apparently wasn’t bombed much in WW2.
    I was there in 2020 and thought “What a lovely town. Like a sort of Hobbiton”. My mood was somewhat soured though by the sight of Africans scurrying around, doing who knows what. Not that many, but enough to make me think “Great, even in a place like this you already can’t escape them.”

    • Replies: @Adept
  388. Beckow says:
    @German_reader

    …render Ukraine economically unviable…hope this can be avoided.

    Neither Ukraine nor Russia can fight the war half-way. There was a window of opportunity at the beginning of the war to cut thru the crap and agree on a compromise: Donbas gone, no Nato… That moment has passed.

    How exactly would it stop now? The two armies are intermingled, the front line is long and volatile, weapons are plentiful. They will fight until one side gives up. The odds are it will be Kiev. Once that happens – given the sacrifices and bad blood – the winner will go maximalist. They may have to destroy Odessa to get it, but Russian strategy is to push Kiev “threats” as far away from the Russian lands as possible. Odessa has no future, it will be a contested border city.

    Ukraine is already economically unviable, they are down to a subsistence economy and massive foreign aid – a modern cargo cult society. What the West and Kiev missed is that Russia planned and prepared for this for years. They are not about to walk back.

    This is very bad for Europe. As I said before it was easily preventable if Berlin-Paris-Brussels had brains. Or a self-preservation instinct. To blow it all up as many are increasingly demanding (Laxa madness is spreading) is not a solution – it is an acceptance that there is no solution that they could live with. So they say ‘f.ck it all’ like a drunk stuck in a ditch. We are only at the beginning of this catastrophe. The Last Duel in real time.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    , @Aether
    , @Gerard1234
  389. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mr. Hack

    His shifty, beating eyes, strongly suggest that he is lying, you should know.

    Not like the rape lies of Denisova, along with others that include the bombings of a Mariupol mosque and Babi Yar monument, along with the Ghost of Kiev.

    As Tug McGraw said back in 1973: “You Gotta Believe”.

  390. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Thulean Friend

    Reminded of pineapple on pizza. Sardines are a good option, with spinach, mushroom and tri-color peppers. I’ve also heard of lox (smoked salmon) as a pizza topping.

  391. LondonBob says:
    @Beckow

    Maximalist aims are for the hot heads on twitter. A balanced peace is always wise, leave the unconditional surrender guff to the neocons, Bismarck made a mistake taking Alsace and Lorraine.

    Italian bond yields soaring, Eurozone peripheral bonds blowing up. Financial markets continue their unravelling from Friday.

    Interesting that the Gulf of Mexico is forecast to experience an above average hurricane season, impacts not just production but, more importantly, refineries.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  392. LondonBob says:
    @Mikhail

    Garlic and prawns is surprisingly good on pizza.

  393. Mikhail says: • Website

    She does the stupid again:

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  394. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    don’t travel well over time; they don’t last

    To an extent they have a deeper insight (and Marx was on the level of a philosopher, although perhaps the lowest level below Hegel), then this insight should be invariant across minor historical changes.

    But reality if you read him was, Lenin was a local scam, that uses a lot of terminology from Marxism, but more as a rebranding for ordinary revolutionary politics of the Russian Empire, without following the theories of 19th century German philosophy.

    People would say Stalin has betrayed Lenin, who was following some more truly communist models. But if you look at the early 1920s, the government was rapidly re-installing many parts of the previous system. And of course in some ways, Stalin was more communist and less pragmatic than Lenin.

    Lenin doesn’t even want collectivization of agriculture for many decades, while Stalin is crazy enough to go to it in already by 1928/1929.

    They would had been much better of discarding it and building their ‘just society‘ based on instinct

    I would disagree, as Lenin, Stalin or Mao, do not follow theory as the compelling force, but use jargon from the fashionable theories of the 19th century as a kind of cover, while they improvise their policies according to instinct, self-interest and discussions with advisors who are probably often scared to say their real opinion. Their theories are improvised to match their political needs.

    Although, Lenin is aware of how he breaks theory and this possibly constrains him relatively more moderate policy, and then Stalin goes all way with his large break (“velikiy perelom”) without any theoretic reasons.

    looking at socialist societies in Central Eastern Europe is a much better benchmark.

    Yes agree this is the more normal example of the developed socialism model. And it presents a real choice – for the developed world better in some ways, worse in others. It cannot be so easily disqualified from consideration.

    But for the undeveloped countries of the 20th century, then the socialism model has often less attractive results than in Central Europe, and it would be easier to disqualify. But this was already known in the 19th century – Marxism was only supposed to be relevant for the most developed countries after industrialization.

    only thing less efficient is no planning

    Central planning model had information problems with allocating of resources compared to the free market. This was constant in the 20th century.

    However, with new technologies (which we see already in the internet, where shopping cookies seem able to sometimes track preferences), the central planning policy will likely become relevant again.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
  395. LondonBob says:
    @Mikhail

    Ex Lib Dem and CND member.

    She should really be tackling the Indians on immigration and the undercutting of British workers by Indian outsourcers…

  396. Aether says:
    @Adept

    No one said that it was “all that bad” and I doubt you’ve read more than one old book.

    There’s two types of “trad”. The ignorant, psychologically shallow and spiritually bereft LARPing “trad”, of which you seem be.

    And the type of person who enters a conversation with writers, thinkers and concepts from the past, occasionally meeting them in central truth in moments of transcendence, but otherwise recognising that they are merely a tourist, unable of anything but the most fleeting of moments of true understanding.

    We’ll call them the “virgin lifestyle trad” and the “chad spiritual trad.”

    There aren’t any famous examples of “virgin lifestyle trads”, because trying to ape the lifestyle of the past, given your very different circumstances, is most ordinarily stupid. In fact, it is so stupid that no one actually does it, they just LARP as if it would be a good thing. And worse, they actually expect everyone else to change, in everything everyone else does, in order to fit their ridiculous egocentric narrative. Or maybe they just threaten them with “the end of the world.” To which most people just respond by rolling their eyes.

    On the other hand, there is the “chad spiritual trad”, who, rather than following “old books” for lifestyle tips, engages in internal spiritual struggle and allows that to lead them. Barbarossa is one such individual, and so is, as one of the most important people in this field, Sigmund Freud.

    These are people who realise that they have a greater self, or an unconscious, or a soul, and that they mostly know very little about it. “They” being their ego or consciousness or small self or whatever you want to call this fallen state.

    These people then start the epic journey of getting to know themselves, either through heroic and difficult lives, that test themselves and their reactions, while actively developing their spirituality, or through learning from myths, literature, religion, other more extreme people, care, and constant self-questioning.

    Always be self-questioning, otherwise you will always be ignorant. And let your soul, heart, examined, guide you. Don’t autistically pretend that some era in history had it right. You can split the difference on life expectancies, by cherrypicking adults, and cherrypicking the 1% nobility, but you’re only deceiving yourself if you think you have any idea about how they actually lived.

    And because we live in a silly time, where superficiality is easily enabled, you likely have never developed this internal culture of critique, also known as spiritual struggle. I wonder if you have even the courage to answer, when questioned on why you have done something hurtful to another person, with “I don’t know.”

    Instead, you likely just blame all of your failures (really unconscious choices) on everyone else being wrong and them forgetting the values that you supposedly have learned in “old books.” You probably even find “the culture of critique” a threatening and foreign imposition, rather than the absolute core of spiritual development as conducted with the help of society.

    In fact, I wager that you’re even tempted to accuse me of “gaslighting” you. After all, I am telling you that practically everyone, even me, probably knows your greater self better than you. But that is the nature of the tradition, not whatever nonsense you think it is. Evola would most certainly agree.

    And out of interest, what “old books” do you look to for lifestyle tips, that McDonalds of “tradition?”

    Most “old books” are outrageous. Racine’s Phaedre is a PornHub incest story gone wrong. Romeo & Juliet is about suicidal love obsession. Perhaps only works like Austen’s could ever serve your superficial purpose. After all, Pride & Prejudice opens with:

    “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”

    But, of course, that isn’t actually lifestyle advice. It is instead the start of a spiritual journey for the main characters’ to confront themselves, in particular, to confront their pride and their prejudices. You see, they think they want to get married and so on, but it isn’t happening, and it isn’t happening because they have unconscious desires to grow first, and getting married would stop that process. That “truth” is ironically not a truth for them at all. It is the statement that Austen starts the novel with, simply in order to demolish it. Their soul needs more. Even if, thankfully, they get their egocentric desires anyway, after they have done the spiritual work. Things work out nicely when you’re on the right path, though also often surprisingly.

    Perhaps again this, you would say: “earn money and get married” (while still unconsciously choosing to do nothing, but blaming society like a fat girl does for not being found sexy. Really, she should ask herself why does her greater self not want to lose weight and be sexy.)

    But Freud would advise you to know why you want to fail, as you know not now. And then maybe you would stop failing because you would come up with a more self-suitable aim or you might even grow into your original one. And then the next struggle would present itself. Like a sequel.

    • LOL: German_reader, Adept
    • Replies: @Adept
  397. Aether says:
    @Beckow

    Not “blow it all up.” But just, conventionally, blow up the Russian military in the field.

    If Russia can invade Ukraine, we can quite easily go and confront their troops on ground that they have not been invited to.

    Is a bombed out, rubble-strewn Eastern Ukraine worth a nuclear war for Russia?

    Certainly not.

    Is there a chance of them threatening us with nukes for conventionally kicked their forces out of the country they are trying to squat in?

    Of course, but then, if they are allowed to continue, there will be another confrontation and another, and another etc until we eventually develop the courage to stand up to them and send them packing back to Russia.

    If Russia chooses to respond to our conventional response with nuclear brinkmanship, better we just get to that point and face them down now, before they swell with the potential confidence of conquest or, more likely, and even worse, they realise that they can’t win this war against just Ukraine and threaten nukes to save their idiot pride.

    NATO should announce that we will obliterate all Russian forces in Ukraine in a week. Then. if they remain there, we should just do it. It would put Russia and Russians out of their misery over this completely stupid war. It would save many Ukrainian lives, and it would lower the chances of an eventual nuclear exchange.

    You only argue against it because you know that Russia would have to back down and go home, which, for some reason, you find personally humiliating. Pathetic.

    • Troll: German_reader
    • Replies: @Beckow
  398. Dmitry says:
    @AP

    Spain, Portugal and Greece in terms of wealth and life expectancy

    Those are Mediterranean countries, so they have possibility for more rapid improvement in life expectancy, because of healthier diet and climate.

    Although Czechoslovakia and Ukraine (!) and Austria have the same life expectancy until around 1973/1972, when improvements in Austria. In 1960s times, Ukraine was like a developed country in this measurement.

    fallen behind even Spain, Portugal and Greece in terms of wealth

    This is also related to trading relations, not only a model of “socialism vs. non-socialism”.

    Warsaw Pact countries are more constrained to trade on another side of the Iron Curtain, which limits their development. Whereas even though also non-democracies (with elements of command economies), Spain, Portugal and Greece, are trading with a Western bloc.

  399. Aether says:
    @iffen

    The fact is that we are almost 4 months in and Russia has advanced about 30 kms from where they started, and they have taken no major city, but Mariupol, which they got lucky to surround in the initial sweep. If you can find one msm source that said it would be this bad for Russia, I will be shocked.

    So where on earth do you get your impression of the msm from? What crackhead take is yours?

    • Agree: sher singh
  400. @Mikhail

    If you look closely, you’ll notice that pineapples are already on it and banana. We sometimes add curry just for the hell of it. The pizza is surprisingly good once your mind wears off the initial confusion and you can actually focus on the taste.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  401. Adept says:
    @German_reader

    I was there just the other day, which is why it came to mind. I didn’t see a single African, though I did see about two dozen Arabs or Turks — most of whom were loitering around a donair shop near the bus terminal by the river.

    Schwäbisch Hall is certainly prettier than most other German towns of a similar size. (Certain others, like Gottingen, are also extremely beautiful, though in a different and somewhat more austere way.) Nothing like it could exist in America.

    • Replies: @AP
  402. @Dmitry

    I think you mean Zimbabwe not Zambia. Zambia has run a politically successful decomcracy (power is transferred by real elections). It has a market economy of sorts which is improving as it liberalizes but is still plagued by subsidy. For example, no one will build a fertilizer factory while imported fertilizer is subsidized. It has white farmers running large agriculture and the last government but one had a white Vice President (with a PhD in robotics from Cambridge University) which many saw as a restraint on corruption.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  403. @Beckow

    Everybody is into bananas. Take a basket of bananas, apples, oranges into your office and set it out. The bananas go first. 100 times out of 100. They are all gone in 30 minutes. There will be an apple or an orange left there at quitting time for the housekeeping staff.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  404. Beckow says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    ….Take a basket of bananas, apples, oranges into your office and set it out. The bananas go first.

    Because of hygiene and convenience: bananas are pre-packaged and don’t drip. We modern people like it better that way when given a choice. My favorite fruit are pears, but they are seldom included in fruit baskets.

  405. Beckow says:
    @Thulean Friend

    A nutritional abomination!

    But, do they deliver?

  406. @Thulean Friend

    There is an important message here. That you can do that to pizza can only mean that pizza is a pretty stupid food format.

  407. Beckow says:
    @LondonBob

    We are heading towards a maximalist ending. In a hot war all that’s left are hot heads. You may be right that Russia risks an over-reach. Putin has been cautious, but given the emotions he could have no choice domestically. There was a reasonable compromise on the table, and Kiev rejected it.

    The West is heading into a deep economic downturn, that will change everything.

    ….Gulf of Mexico is forecast to experience an above average hurricane season, impacts not just production but, more importantly, refineries.

    Very interesting. One word: Putin!…somebody should look into it.

  408. He makes it sound like this is a bug, rather than a feature.

    • Replies: @Aether
  409. Dmitry says:
    @Philip Owen

    No, I was mentioning Zambia, of 1960s-1980s.

    Maybe Zambia is not such a famous example, as it was unorthodox and non-aligned socialist project, called by its rulers “Zambian humanism”.

    But Zambia’s socialist project “Zambian humanism” seems interesting, although half-cooked. Their dictator applies “democratic socialist” models like the “Moshavim”, from its independence to 1973 – a collectivization of agriculture (collective farm) model they import from Israel.
    https://books.openedition.org/editionsmsh/51525?lang=en

    • Thanks: Philip Owen
  410. AP says:
    @Adept

    Schwäbisch Hall is certainly prettier than most other German towns of a similar size. (Certain others, like Gottingen, are also extremely beautiful, though in a different and somewhat more austere way.) Nothing like it could exist in America

    That’s because people stopped building beautiful things around 1940, America is young, and so Germans have centuries of man-made beauty in their lands that America could not possibly have. But this is no more praise of Germany’s system than America’s spectacular national parks are of the American one.

    Germany is a noticeably poorer than the USA (there is overlap and the difference is tolerable, Germany is as rich as one of the poorest American states). And it’s people are heavily taxed. This benefits the poor and lower middle class. As a career dishwasher at a restaurant, or a grocery store cashier, or a nurse’s aide, you will certainly live a much better life in Germany. But as an engineer, physician, attorney, pharmacist, etc. not really. Your income will be much higher and you will keep a much higher percentage of it in the USA.

    Only minus is vacation time. While the legal minimum in the USA is 2 weeks, most people have at least 3 (I have 4). This is a lot worse than what Germans get.

    • Replies: @Aether
    , @Beckow
    , @Wokechoke
    , @Matra
  411. @AP

    Hello imbecile.

    True of 90% of the US and about 100% of the rest of the developed capitalist world.

    Bull crap — 30 million people in the US can’t afford health care and that’s enough to populate a mid-size country somewhere. That indicates that the US is not a developed world. Furthermore, what’s the percentage of this developed capitalist world in relation to the undeveloped?

    You are full of shit.

    Most people in the capitalist world can’t afford higher education. Therefore, most people in the capitalist world can’t get out of economic serfdom.

    It’s paid for by high taxes that result in lower take-home pay by the taxpayers. And it’s dependent on entrance examinations.

    There are no entrance examinations whatsoever, and lower take-home is compensated because people don’t have to spend on their children’s education.

    It is no more nor less real than Russia.

    You wish.

    Nowhere near, not even compared to Russia but to a more proportional societies, like Poland. The Poles are a nation. You are not — have never been, will never be. You don’t have what it takes.

    Sharikov can’t reason.

    With me being Sharikov you would be a chimpanzee in a suit.

    Look at yourself little clown. Your diatribes are emotional compensation for feeling inferior — talking about homogeneous societies while living in the most diverse in the world, talking about elite while the best you can hope for is middle class.

    Hating the commies, while being proud of the Stalin’s flat that the commies put you into. A pathetic fool.

    You bring up exceptions. And one of your examples involves poverty due to bad luck, not family.

    Gorky became an orphan at the age of eleven. He was brought up by his grandmother, that was his family, dumb-ass.

    A lot of talented families became poor because of Bolsheviks. Those that survived reestablished their rightful place.

    He ran away from home at the age of twelve in 1880. You are a real retard, have you forgotten how you were trying to prove, that Ukraine was independent, in the 17th century? That’s embarrassing, what an ignorant person you are.

    Learn history, clown.

    Exceptional people should be allowed to make something of themselves. But they should do it on their own, not at anyone’s expense.

    Exceptional people should not depend on a bunch of arrogant bitches, like you.

    Have a good night.

    • Replies: @Aether
    , @AP
  412. @iffen

    he (or the incoming Republican President) could be encouraged to cut the rich NATO countries’ apron strings. It is time for America to tend to America and let Germany and France tend to Europe.

    … and then reallocate all the freed up resources in the Western Pacific, once China has the confidence to retake Taiwan seeing Russian success. How ironic.

    • Replies: @A123
  413. Aether says:
    @Thulean Friend

    No, that is unfair and he is right. Gays do more often than is usual have a messed up, self-harming approach to sex, but he has a point.

    It wasn’t that long ago that gay people would be arrested for their adult consensual relationships. And who, nowadays, actually wants to send a woman to prison for having a girlfriend, or a man for having a boyfriend?

    Some internet LARPers, basically pretending to be psychopaths notwithstanding, there is no one who wants that. Imprisoning homos for sex.

    So tolerance for these people really is a significant social achievement.

    And turning a celebration of that tolerance, or acceptance, into some ridiculous bondage display is making a mockery of that achievement.

    I wonder, even here on Unz, home of idiots pretending to be psychopaths, is there anyone who would actually want to press the button that sent some gay to prison and destroyed their life, merely for going out and being gay with consensual adults?

    I will struggle to believe it. And, go be completely honest, I’ll justifiably assume anyone who claims to support it to be a flaming homosexual themselves.

    Therefore maybe Ron Unz will go for it.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  414. Aether says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    Oh, the completely pathetic Russian is offended that the Ukrainians don’t want to be like him!

    Here’s a formula for the last 2 centuries: the more psychologically distanced from Russia a group of white people are, the less f*cking miserable, backwards and just totally stupid they will be.

    You were meant to be here to help our collective lot, instead you’re a totally shameful and repulsive curse. The only natural response to you is hatred. You’re infants given a nuclear bomb, probably by Jews, and you didn’t even deserve their idealism. Pathetic.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  415. Aether says:
    @AP

    I took a train in Germany. It was an hour late. I was horrified and assumed that this was a once in a lifetime occurence. No German bat an eyelid. Germany is one of the nicest countries in the world. But things are easier in America. Living in our reality is hard. People create nonsense standards and are then like “but America is third world.” No, idiot, travel to the third world. America is as far apart from that as is anyone. You have no idea. You’re just advertising your total ignorance.

    I find people who think like above are utterly incompetent in their lives and just expect competence as a sort of childish entitlement. They have no idea how things really work or how much brilliance goes into the basic stuff. Contemptible, really.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @Matra
  416. Beckow says:
    @AP

    …America is young, and so Germans have centuries of man-made beauty in their lands

    That would make sense if America was building something nice right now. But they are not, all the beautiful buildings are from pre-1940’s. So it is not getting better no matter how long the young-country waits.

    Germany is a noticeably poorer than the USA…Germany is as rich as one of the poorest American states

    Alabama? New Mexico? Really? You are noticing what nobody else sees. I assume you go with the official statistics. As people pointed out to you US monetizes all activity, Germany doesn’t. Around 15% of US GNP are “financial transactions” – what the hell is that? How does that improve living standards? And why is it counted in “GNP”?

    If Germany starts doing more book-keeping and monetizes all activity – education, child care, elderly care, flipping houses, issuance of endless ‘loans’ on top of other loans, or leveraging lately called ‘derivatives’ – they can puff their GNP to a stratosphere too. You are living in a world of made-up numbers about made-up activities that mostly don’t exist in other countries.

    This fundamental fact escapes most average Americans. (The elites know it well and know how to manipulate it.) The only real economy is what can be consumed, all else is fluff, you can be making it up into trillions and it won’t make one iota difference to the actual living standards in the US.

    The bottom line is that Alabama is much poorer than Germany and the bottom 50% of Alabamans live worse and poorer lives than almost any country in Europe (well, maybe Albania or Moldova are worse).

    The magical dust that keeps this fantasy going is the reserve status of the dollar – it is like being a casino and controlling the chips, it is house money. That will go away, that is inevitable – the war in Ukraine is partially about how quickly.

    US is naturally very rich with material resources exceeding what Europe has. That will come into play in the next few years and Europe will do worse – they don’t have the stuff that their lifestyles require: energy. materials, timber, metals, some foods.

    US and Europe are at this point like two drunks leaning on each other, telling each other how much they like each other, yelling at others, laughing and crying, to eventually collapse into a ditch to sleep. US will end up on the top in the ditch, you got that right.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  417. Beckow says:
    @Aether

    conventionally, blow up the Russian military in the field.

    How would you do that? Planes, missiles? Do you realize that the moment something like that would start Russia would target those planes and missiles, and the bases and ships where they are coming from? They would take out some, hit a few civilians (it was the West that invented “collateral damage”). An escalation would be inevitable. At what point would one or the other side use a nuke? First a small tactical one, then a few more, and it would be a miracle if that wouldn’t escalate in hours (maybe minutes) into a full-blown nuclear exchange.

    If that’s what you want, you are a dangerous moron.

    Russia would have to back down and go home

    Why would they? They are at home there – it is US, UK or Germany who are the outsiders. How far is Donetsk from Russia and how far from Washington? You don’t seem to posses even minimal understanding of the situation and, what is worse, seem to just assume that the world belongs to you. It doesn’t, this war is about showing you that, sticking it in your face – that the others exist and can lead independent lives.

    As it unravels this will be very painful for your kind. But morons always blame their own shortcomings on others, so you will probably scream more, demand bloody revenge, etc…it will make it worse. Instead calm down and stay at home.

    • Replies: @Aether
  418. Wokechoke says:
    @Aether

    nigs have the run of many cities but life is nice enough in most of the suburbs.

    • Replies: @Aether
  419. A123 says: • Website
    @Yellowface Anon

    China has the confidence

    CCP Elites are feeling something. However, it is not confidence: (1)

    “China’s economy is smoke and mirrors all the way down”

    …Mountains of unused bikes for failed Chinese bike-sharing startups? Well, evidently the exact same thing happened with “green” cars — The mechanics of the scam:

    -1- First they put together a down payment, order a batch of vehicles, and license them at a vehicle administration office.
    -2- Then they contact government officials, present the vehicles in their hands and apply for permission on the grounds that they are operating an online car sharing business.
    -3- The third step is to get the government’s permission, then go to the bank to get a loan.
    -4- The fourth step is to find a financer and present the vehicles and the government papers to secure some venture capital from the financer.
    -5- Last mortgage the vehicles to some smaller financial institutions to squeeze out their final value.

    After all these steps are completed, the scammers disappear. The bank, the financer and the small financial institution are left with triangular disputes while the vehicles rot somewhere in the wilderness.

    China’s corner-cutting, get-rich-quick mentality combined with green government subsidies, interlocking corporate ownership, the usual Chinese scam artists and loose, bribe-able enforcement at various levels of Chinese government all combined for an especially appalling mountain of waste.

    Those talking about the CCP selling U.S. Treasuries may be right. The central authority will need a great deal of cash to fix this mess. Plus, the property crisis led by Evergrande. Plus, the WUHAN-19 virus response fiasco.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.battleswarmblog.com/?p=51659

  420. Wokechoke says:
    @AP

    My main complaint with Germany was simple enough. I ordered a round of beers in a Kassel located cafe and the glasses came out at different levels. The publican in the UK or bar owner in the US would be hosrsewhipped for doing this. Sin. Beer sin.

    I just frowned. The waitress was nice looking/ but looked a bit overworked.

    I’ve lived in Bonn while it was the capital. Wonderful place. Reintegrating the east was a mistake quite frankly.

  421. Wokechoke says:
    @Ron Unz

    Sparta had a Pseudo-Island on the Peloponnesus. Some of the invulnerable smugness of the British some of the Japanese bushido-mumbo-jumbo but linked to a larger landmass on an isthmus. Once they suppressed the Megarans as slaves they created a specialized aristocracy that was also a militia.

    I tend to see the Spartiate’s 10,000-5,000 men as a type of Spec Ops force. One of the big modern comparisons would be the Carolian era Swedes. A small tight knit army of very aggressive farmers. Once they got mugged by a larger army they fizzled out as their slaves revolted and were left with next to nothing.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @gT
  422. German_reader says:
    @Aether

    Sodomites are a public health issue, just look at their stratospheric rates of STDs, how they spread AIDS and how they’re spreading monkey pox now. They’re burdening the health care system, but (unlike with people who refused the Corona vaccines, where libs totally freaked out) you’re not allowed to point it out, you can’t even keep them from donating their possibly pozzed blood anymore, because that would be evil discrimination. As if there hadn’t been very good reasons for that ban, that is all those hemophiliacs who died of AIDS, just because sick degenerates enjoyed their anal penetration and fisting with hundreds of changing partners so much.
    More generally, the LGBTQ movement is clearly aiming at a radical transformation of society and destruction of all traditional values, this has become beyond clear with the rapid establishment of even something as insane (and obviously deeply harmful to many easily influencable people) as transsexualism as an unquestionable sacred truth in Western “values”, for whose denial you face social destruction in those wonderful open societies of ours.
    The “it’s only about tolerance, love is love” line was always a lie, Western conservatives were pathetic losers that they fell for this. Hate to say it, but the Iranian mullahs are much more deserving of respect on this issue at least.

    • Agree: songbird, LondonBob
    • Replies: @Aether
    , @silviosilver
  423. Beckow says:
    @Wokechoke

    ….modern comparisons would be the Carolian era Swedes. A small tight knit army of very aggressive farmers.

    Not a bad comparison, but a large part of the Swedish army were conscripted Finnish peasants. At least that was the case in the 30-year war when the Swedes were bivouac-ing around Bohemia. They lost there too, a bunch of Prague city boys beat them to a pulp on the Charles Bridge. There used to an annual celebration to remember it.

    There are a number of surnames in Bohemia derived from wounded Swedish soldiers left behind. The most famous is Svejk – of the The Good Soldier Svejk fame. And lots of Svejdas, Svedsky, etc…

    I can’t wait until they are in Nato and start raiding again. They should again start with Poland.

    • LOL: German_reader
  424. Aether says:
    @Wokechoke

    Anyone who has been to Africa or Brazil, or even France, will be like “the US is so well-run, how do they get so much productivity and general easiness from their black population?”

    Stupid people can’t see that.

  425. Aether says:
    @German_reader

    Your points, until the last sentence, are ok, but they don’t disagree with mine.

    The Iranian Mullahs literally force gay men into “sex changes.” They’re more insane than even the most extreme of the Western LGBTADNAUSEAM.

    I get you want to blow off steam, but what do you want to do to the gays? Arrest them? Do you think almost anyone will support you? Especially when the first 20 something, with anunimpeachable personal life, is destroyed for having a same sex romantic partner?

    Be real.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  426. @Aether

    Here is another chimpanzee in a suit.

    Hello, ape!

    Oh, the completely pathetic Russian is offended that the Ukrainians don’t want to be like him!

    My native language is Russian but that’s not my birthplace, nor is that my ethnic belonging.

    But regarding the Ukrainians take my word for it, they don’t have shit to make a Russian feel offended.

    The more distanced from Russia a group of white people are, the less f*cking miserable, backwards and stupid they will be.

    A group is – not are. You don’t need a degree in English to understand that. The more stupid a person is, the less he is able to see that.

    Not “will be” able. You are unable.

    You were meant to be here to help our collective lot, instead you’re a totally shameful and repulsive curse.

    Your lot is not the Russian people’s problem. You need help – ask for it.

    And be polite.

    • Disagree: Aether
  427. Aether says:
    @Beckow

    Lol. Russia is a joke. They can threaten the end of the world, but nothing in between. They can’t even conquer Kharkiv. It is on their f#cking border.

    Bomb and obliterate their military that is a poison in Ukraine. And watch them cope and seethe.

    And, honestly, bomb you too, for supporting the disgusting endeavour.

    “Oh, but the Western arrogance.” So what, deal with it. You only invade a country because we are so kind and tolerant that we don’t end your military in their positions. Anyone with any military knowledge knows how easy it would be. About a billion times easier than ‘closing the gap”, and a million times cheaper.

    We’ve spent years trying to make the savages civillised, and had some success, we can annihilate your bungled invasion in hours. Weep and threaten, but you know I’m right. Russia would never have dared to invade were Trump in charge, and Biden only won because we are so ridiculously kind and giving. But it won’t last, at least towards you, not forever.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    , @Here Be Dragon
  428. Coconuts says:
    @Dmitry

    Yes agree this is the more normal example of the developed socialism model. And it presents a real choice – for the developed world better in some ways, worse in others. It cannot be so easily disqualified from consideration.

    As I’ve been reading the argument about socialism it seems in some way distorted, because as you touched on in an earlier post post-1945 most Western European countries adopted forms of social democracy and implemented nationalisation, welfare states, had huge trade union movements and so on. The idea that no one in these countries was arguing for socialism is strange, as arguing about it was one of the main political issues of the period. Just Leninist models of socialism were not the most popular, though even they had a certain following.

    I think you also mentioned that Spain and Portugal were not straightforwardly ‘capitalist’, till the late 1950s or early 60s they were still corporate states pursuing autarky, or in the Portuguese case had many state controls in place to block Portuguese participation in international capitalist development, because it was seen as socially dangerous.

    The interesting thing imo is when socialism ceased to be a ‘live’ option, when people stopped believing it was a possible option, which in Britain I think was the 1980s, something really cemented when Tony Blair became leader of the Labour party.

    What Beckow writes here:

    Palermo or Naples were sh.tholes compared to Prague or Budapest, and so was Dublin, Newcastle or Marseille. They still are.

    North East England is where I am writing from, I have been to Budapest a number of times, but I failed to notice the massively higher standard of living people are supposed to be enjoying there compared to where I live. I doubt this was different in the past, other than for reasons related to things that are the opposite of socialism, like Budapest’s role as one of the Austro-Hungarian Empire’s capitals.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Beckow
  429. German_reader says:
    @Aether

    Do you think almost anyone will support you?

    Unfortunately probably not, people are too heavily propagandized for that.
    But you basically admitted my points that the LGBTQ movement in fact has had a lot of extremely negative consequences. Which is at odds with your claim that “tolerance” – as if it was limited to tolerance in the genuine sense – for LGBTQ people is a “significant social achievement” (which I assume was meant to indicate it’s something positive, an achievement to be proud of).

    • Replies: @Aether
  430. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    America was building something nice

    At least recently, it seems like they start to build more solid or fortified buildings in America, with stone (at least external) appearance. By comparison, many of the older houses in America, look like they are made of card.

    However, the problem in America is not architecture (as I explained to AP many times before), but urban planning, designed for the automobile and the other state capture 20th century industries.

    Not only in Russia, but even countries like Spain, there can be worse architecture than in America. However, what about the bad architecture in European countries like Spain?

    Many of the Spanish people prefer to live in modern boring, square, apartment buildings, with bad architecture.

    Yet neighborhoods of these ugly buildings, have the necessities for living, unlike similar areas in an American city. This is because they have mixed use (with local shops integrated with apartments), high population density, good infrastructure, etc.

    Most of Madrid looks like – very bad architecture, but the urban planning can still match to traditional Mediterranean lifestyle. It has mixed-used, public infrastructure, easy walking and often traditional shops and services. This urban planning is often more important for atmosphere and lifestyle, than the visual appearance of buildings (which even in 20th century Southern Europe, has been square boxes).


    Those can be working class areas. But even the upper class suburbs of Spain, will have often square modern architecture, that has little aesthetic value. At the same time, it will have mixed use and good infrastructure.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  431. Dmitry says:
    @Coconuts

    In the second half of the 20th century media space, Sweden ideologically presented like a kind of “wealthy, beautiful version of the USSR”, even with the same idealizations of nuclear energy.

    There was the 1963 BBC report about Sweden. It sounds like utopia from the communist perspective, according to the journalist.

    Spain and Portugal were not straightforwardly ‘capitalist

    Aspects of Spanish cities, still remind of 21st century Russia today, perhaps with a similar heritage in relation to urban planning. But like the “higher standard of living”, “carefully planned”, version of Russian cities. Varlamov (a Russian urban blogger) used to write some good posts about this topic. https://varlamov.ru/3248826.html

    • Thanks: Coconuts
    • Replies: @LondonBob
  432. Aether says:
    @German_reader

    I don’t find it hard to distinguish between one thing and another thing. Nor do you, really. Which is why you would never actually support arresting people for gay stuff, nor for executing them when they continued to do gay stuff in prison.

    Everything else you mentioned is separate from this fact. Basic tolerance is something you support too. The alternative is much worse.

    There’s no “at odds” between tolerance and LGBTQ nonsense. Only the handful of online “dissidents” and the larger portion of LGBTQ activists say this. Everyone normal knows that they don’t want to lock gays up and they also don’t want to engage in a bizarre ideology surrounding sexuality.

  433. German_reader says:
    @Aether

    Everyone normal knows that they don’t want to lock gays up and they also don’t want to engage in a bizarre ideology surrounding sexuality.

    I’m afraid you’re just as disconnected from realities in Western countries as at the front in Ukraine. We’re in PRIDE MONTH where every goddamned corporation and also many government agencies throughout the West are non-stop celebrating LGBTQ, and you’re telling me “everyone normal” doesn’t want to engage in an ideology about sexuality, as if we were in 1990 or so and the argument was “just let homos do their thing in private”. My rotten government literally employs a so-called Queer-Beauftragter (a kind of commissar to promote LGBTQ), a sodomite himself, who’s denouncing anybody opposed to transsexualism as religious reactionary nutcases etc.
    You’re deep in denial about what the West stands for today.

    • Replies: @Aether
  434. @Thulean Friend

    Thanks, a few more questions, if I may.

    No, as long as you keep any transaction related to other ISK accounts.

    To clarify, so one couldn’t withdraw funds to buy a car or pay for a holiday, right? (Meaning it functions as I thought, for the average Swede, as a vehicle for accumulating retirement savings.) At what age is this restriction relaxed?

    Also, is this only available to Swedish citizens or is it enough to be resident in Sweden?

    unless you get a holding firm in Luxembourgh of course and then do some complicated tax re-routing.

    Luxembourg specifically? You said you’re familiar with the process, so just how complex is it, and by how much would it reduce taxes? Taxes devastate long-term capital gains, so if it were me, it would have to be seriously financially prohibitive or legally dicey to dissuade me from pursuing it.

    I’m guessing securities being the proper translation in English, right?

    Securities would be the correct translation, but you would only use it speaking to a financially literate audience. Even educated non-financial people would be hazy about its meaning, and in everyday terms it sounds pretentious. Roughly as pretentious in everyday language but more comprehensible is “financial assets,” with which it is synonymous. In everyday use, the phrase “stocks and bonds” is the best way to refer to securities. In the example you used, “For those of us who own U.S. commercial paper…” , you could get away with saying financial assets because it’s clear from the context you have a reason to be precise (ie you’re talking about the tax implications).

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  435. German_reader says:

    Does anybody here know if there’s independent confirmation (or refutation) of Ukrainian forces shelling Donetsk with Western-supplied artillery?
    Obviously there are good reasons to be skeptical of such claims circulating on the net (because they’re a powerful argument against weapons shipments to Ukraine and therefore in Russia’s interest), but it would be nice to know for certain.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  436. @Beckow

    You didn’t address my point: if people want it, why in a democracy would anyone prevent them from getting it because some nincompoop screams that it is “socialism!”

    In the post you were replying to, AP stated he liked democracy better than the socialism of the Communist Party. That’s an important point, and it’s worth clearing up the semantic confusion regarding socialism and communism. To this end, I don’t think one can do better than Chapter 6 of Archie Brown’s “The Rise and Fall of Communism,” in which he defines a “communist system” according to six criteria, or six “pillars,” grouped in pairs, the first two political, the second pair economic, and the third ideological.

    (1) The monopoly on power of the Communist party. All organs of state are under the control of the communist party.

    (2) Democratic centralism, meaning that issues could be debated, but after a decision was reached the authority of higher party organs was binding and had to be implemented with strict discipline.

    (3) Non-capitalist ownership of the means of production, with particular emphasis on non-agricultural production.

    (4) A command economy. All decisions on what to produce, in what quantities, and at what prices, were the result of a top-down, hierarchical process.

    (5) The declared aim of building communism as the ultimate, legitimizing goal – the justification for any hardship experienced.

    (6) The existence of, and sense of belonging to, an international communist movement.

    Obviously no western manifestation of socialism came anywhere near to fulfilling any of these criteria, except perhaps the last, but mostly in terms of the aspirations of the individuals involved rather than the socialist party-led governments themselves.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  437. Beckow says:
    @Coconuts

    I have been to Budapest (many times) and Newcastle (once). It is not even close. I am not sure how you measure standard of living, to each his own, there are different ways. But life is – and was – better for most people in Budapest or Prague, better infrastructure, architecture, food, etc…

    It is not a fair comparison: capitals vs. a provincial city. I picked it show to AP that there was variance then in the way people lived. His ‘numbers‘ are just one metric. But often the variance within a system is bigger than difference between systems. That was true about Europe under capitalism and socialism.

  438. Wokechoke says:
    @Aether

    Turning Kharkov into a bombed out frontier city might be the plan.

  439. @Aether

    Everyone normal knows that they don’t want to lock gays up and they also don’t want to engage in a bizarre ideology surrounding sexuality.

    Ho boy, this is rich.

    Totally ass-backwards, of course. It’s the LBGTs themselves who are on bizarre, radical, ideological sexual crusade. The notion that their program was about mere “tolerance” has long ago vanished. The next step from tolerance was “appreciation” – the weird idea that the existence of homos was some priceless cultural boon to our otherwise bland lives. This is roughly where normie society is stuck at today, but the radicals themselves go much farther: they want to completely wreck normal, heterosexual family relations, and attack them at every turn, relentlessly blaming us for some imagined “harm” our very existence (when you get down to it) is doing to the sicko community.

    Fighting back against their insanity is entirely appropriate. I never had a problem actually tolerating them, but they’ve had their chance to prove that, aside from some harmless sexual eccentricities, they were as normal as anyone else, and imo they’ve completely blown it. Whereas I once might have thought that shoving them back in the closet was a step too far, I no longer give a shit.

    • Agree: German_reader
    • Replies: @sher singh
  440. Mr. Hack says:
    @German_reader

    The major theater of the war is now in Donbas, so I’d be surprised if the Ukrainians weren’t putting their newly acquired artillery to good use. So, why should this be a “powerful argument” against weapon shipments sent to Ukraine? It’s greatly a war of artillery right now, and Ukraine has a distinct advantage of having received longer range howitzers and caesars from the US and France. Some similar artillery from Italy too, if I’m not mistaken. Both sides are trying to knock off their opponents artillery weapons.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  441. Beckow says:
    @silviosilver

    I am not sure what your point is. I explicitly support socialist policies, I don’t think there is another way to run a modern society. We can move back and forward and adjust some parameters, e.g. I rather like the option of paying more for some health services as long as the basic healthcare is socialized. I don’t think the mythical market works – or even exists – in about half of what is the modern economy: health, education, transportation, housing, utilities, tech services, etc… to pretend that it does and will “self-regulate” is a fallacy.

    Regarding the socialism under commies (pre-1990): the economy was socialist, maybe too much so. The political system was a one-party state, as you pointed out. I don’t like one-party states, they bore me and they don’t work. They can also be very oppressive, although my experience was more towards boredom than seeing much oppression. I also don’t like “two-party” states, they are a bit more creative but they are not really a “democracy”. I also don’t the endless attempts to “manage democracy” – and this happens in the West in massive doses.

    My point about socialist policies (social guarantees if you prefer) was that they are preferred pretty consistently by large majorities of people in all European countries. Just ask them, they want the good stuff. So why are they not getting it if we live in democracies? Is it a democracy if people’s clear preferences never get implemented? Similarly, people have quite clear preferences about ‘migration’ or cultural debauchery – and again, those are ignored. That was my point, that at the end you can only judge any system by results – process is for birds, it really doesn’t matter.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  442. @Emil Nikola Richard

    For some reason I can’t see what you posted, only the words. I’ve noticed that some of your other content hasn’t been visible either, but it doesn’t seem to affect any other commenters. Can you repost another way?

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
  443. @Dmitry

    more solid or fortified buildings in America, with stone (at least external) appearance.

    It’s all synthetic veneer stone that you are seeing on anything new. “Stick um stone” as it’s sometimes called in the trades. I actually find it quite offensive because the more “real” it looks the more of the uncanny valley effect it gives me, especially since it gets used in ways that true structural stone never would. It breaks “the rules” of stone as it were and renders the effect architecturally incoherent.

    This all goes to the original sins of modernist architecture in treating the structure and the ” skins” as disconnected concepts. To me, the best architectural modalities showcase the continuity and interplay between structure and aesthetics.

  444. German_reader says:
    @Mr. Hack

    So, why should this be a “powerful argument” against weapon shipments sent to Ukraine?

    The claim is that Ukraine is shelling residential areas in Donetsk, killing civilians there. With Western-supplied artillery.
    Now I can well believe that this is merely Russian disinformation, but if there is any truth to it, it’s extraordinarily stupid behaviour on the part of Ukraine.

    • Replies: @sudden death
    , @Wielgus
    , @JL
  445. @Beckow

    The point is there are differences between ‘communism’ and ‘socialism’, and in that post I sought to make that difference clear. When you’re making international comparisons (as you and AP were), if you fail to keep that difference clear, it’s too easy to conflate socialism with communism, both to attack communism (as AP tends to) or to defend it (as you do).

    I actually agree with you that there was quite a lot to like about eastern European communism as it had developed by the 1970s. I wasn’t there to see it, but that’s the conclusion I draw from reading and talking to people who lived through it. You make good points about the difficult balancing act between productivity and people’s dislike of being bossed around and made to feel inferior or insignificant, and on top of that to have the threat of being fired hanging over their heads. I still opt for more market than socialists are generally prepared to entertain, but it’s not the slam dunk argument I once thought it was.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    , @Dmitry
  446. @Barbarossa

    It is an amazon link to a book. Jocelyn Godwin Upstate Cauldron. I believe everybody would enjoy this book but every upstate New Yorker ought to read it for sure.

    There was a historical period of creative chaos. Kind of like 1960’s California. Except it went on for 50 years. Godwin is an academic. But he is a music guy, not a historian. No historian has done this work and I don’t think 95% of historians would touch this subject with a ten foot pole. He includes (just the top 6): Spiritualism, Blavatsky, Mormons, the 7th day Adventists in their exciting end-of-the-world-in-1843 phase, women’s suffrage, emancipation. There’s a lot more all documented and referenced in case you want to check him.

    He does not promote but reports the theory that emptying the countryside of Indians (this was straightforward because they allied with the British in 1776 and had to accept terms dictated) and opening it up to white settlement completely pissed off and enraged the spirits of the dead Indians who didn’t go anywhere but stayed behind and raised bloody hell.

    Joseph Smith’s revelations were Indian spirits taking the piss at him in this theory.

    The Seth lady is kind of the last gasp as the Indian spirits only had so much energy I guess.

    • Thanks: Philip Owen
    • Replies: @Barbarossa
  447. Matra says:
    @AP

    Germany is a noticeably poorer than the USA

    Thanks. I needed a laugh today.

    Reminds me of when Americans come up with some dodgy statistics showing how better off the US is relative to Canada yet, strangely, every Canadian & foreign visitor to Canada who travels across the US border is struck by the poverty and crummy infrastructure on the US side. But hey, the stats put out by American think tanks say otherwise so our eyes must be lying.

    • Agree: LondonBob
    • Replies: @AP
  448. @Mikel

    I got my book…

    https://historypublishingco.com/authors/bracken/wordsofwar.php

    It’s been interesting that some of my impressions do seem to be borne out. In some contrast to the propagandistic, vested interest, salacious rags that Tocueville noted a few decades earlier, journalism was starting to have definite pretensions to something better by the Civil War with an emphasis on factual reporting. Many of the telegrams from the war correspondents on the ground were often conveyed straight to the presses without elaboration or edits.

    It certainly seems to me that after a fair stretch in which the press aspired (even if quite imperfectly) to some standards of factual and unbiased reporting we have now fully entered a period of emotive and manipulative “news” coverage.

    A characteristic example from the New York Times…

    “Charleston, Friday April 12 (1861)- The ball has opened. War is inaugurated. The batteries of Sullivan’s Island, Morris Island, and other points, were opened on Fort Sumpter at 4 o’clock this morning. Fort Sumpter has returned the fire, and a brisk cannonading has been kept up. No information has been received from the seaboard yet. The military are under arms, and the whole of our population are on the streets. Every available space facing the harbor is filled with anxious spectators. Of the nineteen batteries in position only seven have opened fire on Fort Sumpter, the remainder are held in reserve fro the expected fleet.
    Two thousand men reached this city this morning and embarked for Morris Island and the neighborhood.
    Charleston, Friday April 12- The bombardment of Fort Sumpter continues. The Floating Battery and Stephens Battery are operating freely and Fort Sumpter is returning the fire. It is reported that three war vessels are outside the bar.”

  449. Matra says:
    @Aether

    I took a train in Germany. It was an hour late. I was horrified and assumed that this was a once in a lifetime occurence. No German bat an eyelid

    So tragic. Nothing bad like that would ever happen in the US. lol

    German rail isn’t as good, in my experience, as in neighbouring countries but it is way better than in the US. Been to a US airport lately? Driven on roads in northern New England, Michigan, or upstate NY? German transportation is much better than in the US. No question.

    People create nonsense standards and are then like “but America is third world.” No, idiot, travel to the third world. America is as far apart from that as is anyone. You have no idea. You’re just advertising your total ignorance.

    I find people who think like above are utterly incompetent in their lives and just expect competence as a sort of childish entitlement. They have no idea how things really work or how much brilliance goes into the basic stuff. Contemptible, really

    .

    I think we got a new candidate for stupidest commenter here.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  450. @German_reader

    Footage from some shelled area inside Donetsk – secondary explosions can be heard from the burning shed and stationed cars with large painted Z signs cars are visible. All this itself is quite vague and inconslusive as it can be argued population like ordinary workers like to paint those signs just for fun, but if it indeed was small weapons depot inside, there’s nothing stupid about shooting at it from distance:

    • Replies: @German_reader
  451. Beckow says:
    @silviosilver

    …there are differences between ‘communism’ and ‘socialism’

    Of course there are, but it practise it is a continuum. E.g. Hungary developed a very flexible socialist model that allowed for small private enterprise. Czecho-Slovakia was more rigid and any non-government business (restaurants, shops,…) could only employ family members. On the other hand, Czecho-Slovakia had a very vibrant Coop economy that expanded to everything from building to servicing computers. The joke was that one Coop even had its own Opera.

    There was a lot of variety and day-to-day life was not political. The unhealthy emphasis on the political stuff that Westerners always talk about is very unrealistic – it simply didn’t matter to 99% of people, let them have their ‘one-party’, let them go to meetings, let them put stupid posters in windows. It wasn’t that far from the general indifference and skepticism that also exists in the West. French mock Macron, English BoJo, there is no sense that people actually see these leaders as representing them.

    E European Socialism, with all its political problems, achieved its goals by the 70’s. There was general prosperity, health care, education, housing, infrastructure, etc…it was a huge jump from where those countries were in 1945-50, a complete turn-around, one of the fastest in history. After that they had no idea what to do next: they couldn’t do consumer stuff because it required an open market, they were ideologically opposed to ‘monetization‘ because one idea they absorbed from Marx was ‘the end of money‘. They were stuck and it quickly ended. That’s roughly how it went and the Western version about the evil totalitarians is way over-dramatized. As if the desperate Western ideologues were so in need of a satanic enemy that they projected one on the mostly elderly and harmless commies.

    It looks like the trade-off between productivity and freedom from being bossed around at work is again being addressed. Maybe because the benefits from the increased productivity have petered out or were grabbed by the older generation. It is not obvious today that worshipping more productivity – with the inevitable loss of freedom at work for most people – is what the younger generation wants. There is not enough of an upside for them so why suffer bad working conditions. It is the usual turn of history. I am just a bit ahead of the times.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  452. Beckow says:
    @Matra

    I think we got a new candidate for stupidest commenter here.

    Aether came from nowhere and quickly established himself as so incredibly dumb that one wonders how he even found Unz. Stupidity this pronounced is suspicious, he may be playing it up.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  453. @silviosilver

    Luxembourg specifically? You said you’re familiar with the process, so just how complex is it, and by how much would it reduce taxes? Taxes devastate long-term capital gains, so if it were me, it would have to be seriously financially prohibitive or legally dicey to dissuade me from pursuing it.

    I have several books, written entirely in Swedish, on the topic with full Swedish terminology. They have long chapters on Luxembourg so I’m pretty familiar with the topic, but mere familiarity isn’t enough. At one point, I will have to translate all the jargon into English. One thing about accountancy that people underestimate is how “lawyerly” it is.

    I should add that all my growth stocks are in non-ISK accounts, principally US tech firms with a history of sparse dividends (e.g. Amazon), so it doesn’t affect me a great deal. My dividend stocks are in ISK. If I want to cash out, I will probably set up a holding firm, but that moment is still some time off in the future. I’m a long-term investor and capital isn’t a scarcity for me at this point in my life for my needs.

    Also, is this only available to Swedish citizens or is it enough to be resident in Sweden?

    The official demarcation line is that one has to “live in and pay taxes in Sweden”, which presumably means non-citizens can access it. One minor complication is that firms cannot use it, which is part of the reason why a holding firm in Luxembourg (or Jersey, or any of the Caribbean islands) would interfere. Then again, taxation is so low, which is precisely the point. It was created in no small part to combat capital flight.

    To clarify, so one couldn’t withdraw funds to buy a car or pay for a holiday, right? (Meaning it functions as I thought, for the average Swede, as a vehicle for accumulating retirement savings.) At what age is this restriction relaxed?

    I don’t use it as a bank account, so I haven’t actively checked this up but as far as I know, you can sell your holdings at any time and withdraw the cash. Unused dividends would also fall into this category.

    As for age, parents can even set up ISK accounts for their kids. At age 18, it becomes theirs to use.

  454. Seraphim says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Kherson WAS Ukraine, for a shorter time (1922-2022) than it was Russian (1778-1922). It was built, as you certainly remember by Potemkin, who is buried there. His monument (dismantled by Ukrainian Bolsheviks) was rebuilt to remind people of that and is still standing.
    It is Odessa’s turn shortly.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  455. Wielgus says:
    @Here Be Dragon

    I remember kvass stands in the USSR in 1984. Another memory was sky-blue painted vehicles with inscriptions like “bread” or “meat” on them travelling in city centres, presumably to restock shops or enterprises. Little or no commercial advertising, quite a shock actually if you lived in “Western” societies in which commercial advertising is ubiquitous. I remember a huge hammer and sickle on the top of a factory building in Kiev although it was presumably removed as far back as 1991.

    • Replies: @Here Be Dragon
  456. Wielgus says:
    @Mikhail

    A British TV commercial many years ago advertised some pizza company’s willingness to put the customer first. An order for a pizza with “tuna fish and banana” was received. Considered odd by the pizza staff but they make one. The man who ordered the pizza brings it home and gives it to his wife who turns out to be pregnant, which presumably explains her odd food cravings.

  457. Wielgus says:
    @German_reader

    Because the Ukrainians wouldn’t do anything stupid?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  458. @Beckow

    it was a huge jump from where those countries were in 1945-50, a complete turn-around, one of the fastest in history. After that they had no idea what to do next:

    I don’t think anyone else has any idea either. Not good ideas anyway. Today, despite the myriad ways we have of amusing and distracting ourselves, existential anxieties loom larger than ever. Turn on social media and it’s no longer distant movie stars living enviably glamorous lives. Your head is filled with images of your own neighbors, friends, peers looking better than you, having more fun than you, leading more exciting lives than you. The main constant in the enormous variety of lifestyle choices people make seems to be that as long as your social standing is high enough – as long there are enough people you can feel superior to – the hard questions of purpose and existence can be deferred till you are on your deathbed, shortly after which the answers won’t matter anyway.

  459. Adept says:
    @Aether

    You wrote:

    “Demographic research suggests that at the beginning of the 19th century no country in the world had a life expectancy longer than 40 years. India were ~25, while Belgium was around 40. For Europe as a whole, it was ~33 years.. . . The past was radically different, or rather, the various pasts were different. If you live until 35, spend most of your time drunk, among a Swedish urban murder rate that outdid Detroit, and suffered under a tremendous disease burden that stunted you and could kill you, or anyone you know, or everyone you know, at any time, then it is pointless comparing things.”

    So I tell you that, ackshually, people in 18th and 19th century Europe didn’t tend to drop dead at age 35.  That total life expectancy was, in those days, dragged down by those who didn’t survive infancy.  This effect is both extremely pronounced and extremely well known.

    You respond with a nearly 1000-word psychoanalytic profile of me, complete with reviews of Romeo and Juliet and Pride & Prejudice.  This is unhinged, rather detached from reality, and unwelcome. I see no point in engaging with it.

    But with respect to this: 

    You can split the difference on life expectancies, by cherrypicking adults, and cherrypicking the 1% nobility, but you’re only deceiving yourself if you think you have any idea about how they actually lived.

    Here’s some data on 19th century Sweden:  https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol26/23/26-23.pdf

    Even commoners lived long lives.  In Sundsvall circa 1820, nearly 10% of the men and over 10% of the women were over 60 years old.  This despite an average life expectancy of less than 40.

    • Agree: S
    • Replies: @Aether
  460. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Wielgus

    If it were an ABC Monday Night Football game –

  461. LondonBob says:
    @Dmitry
    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @S
  462. AP says:
    @Matra

    Reminds me of when Americans come up with some dodgy statistics showing how better off the US is relative to Canada yet, strangely, every Canadian & foreign visitor to Canada who travels across the US border is struck by the poverty and crummy infrastructure on the US side

    Thanks for the cheap dishonesty. This is because the richest parts of Canada (near the US border) are next to poor rural parts of the USA such upstate New York Appalachia and the ghetto of Detroit. Canada is indeed noticeably poorer than the USA, but the difference is not so extreme that richer parts of Canada aren’t richer than poorer parts of the USA. Toronto (Canada’s New York) is richer than rust belt Buffalo, and Montreal is richer than Plattsburgh and its surroundings. But these places are still poorer than Boston and New York City. The wealth difference is even greater when one excludes America’s former slave population, which depress American stats (though they remain higher on average than Canada’s).

    In terms of GDP per capita PPP, USA is at \$76k, Germany at \$63k and Canada at \$57k.

    If you don’t trust this figure, compare salary (such as glassdoor.com):

    For example –

    Civil engineer:

    \$51k – \$95k USA; \$51k – \$88k Germany; \$34k – 85k Canada

    Pharmacist:

    \$94k – \$150k per year USA; \$78k per year Germany; \$66k to \$130k Canada (currencies converted to US dollars)

    The take home pay is not as close due to higher taxes in Germany and Canada than USA.

    But hey, the stats put out by American think tanks say otherwise so our eyes must be lying.

    Eyes don’t lie when comparing Toronto to Buffalo or Detroit, but people lie when they imply that this comparison proves something about USA vs Canada. More Canadians move to USA for higher salaries than vice versa.

    • Replies: @Adept
  463. JL says:
    @German_reader

    Why is it extraordinarily stupid behavior on the part of Ukraine? First of all, whether they did it or not is immaterial, each side will believe it either did or did not happen according to their prejudices. The weapons they are using are also irrelevant. When people are killed, they’re indifferent to whether it’s a French or Soviet weapon that killed them. And, finally, perhaps Ukraine (if they did do this) have a good reason for it, like wanting to goad the Russians into making a mistake. The atrocity blame game is just silly, let the Ukrainians decide for themselves when this is all over who did what to whom.

  464. Adept says:
    @AP

    You are relying far too much on artificial statistics — abstractions.

    On the whole, and in a general sense, Germany in no way feels poorer than the USA — and some parts of Germany feel far wealthier than any part of the USA. Many of America’s wealthiest neighborhoods are full of kitsch reproductions of German schlosses and French chateaux. (And, underneath their facades, these reproductions are made of drywall and plywood. It is pale mimickry.)

    I don’t think that the tax situation is as bad as all that. The average tax on labor income in the USA is ~22%. In Germany, ~37%. But property taxes are much lower in Germany — I consider them especially onerous in the USA. And the things that money can buy — from property to food — are generally of a higher quality in Germany, and, at the same time, are often cheaper.

    The hidden “diversity tax” — where, for instance, you have to send your child to a \$30,000/year private school because the public schools in the city are a form of child abuse — also doesn’t exist to nearly the same extent in Germany.

    Simply put, the average “middle class” person lives a better life in Germany. The average “lower class” person also lives a vastly better life in Germany. And the wealthy, too, have it better.

    It is true that German doctors and lawyers don’t earn as much. But the USA’s legal and medical systems are un-fucking-believably perverse, and don’t provide you with better outcomes — indeed, quite the opposite. Lawyers in particular are a millstone around the neck of your nation. (If you ask me, you should look for ways to reduce their earnings and their influence.)

    But, yeah, certain white-collar wagies might have it better in the USA. Even so, I doubt it, because there’s no comparing a city like Bonn to a city like Phoenix. It’s one thing to live surrounded by beauty, and quite another to live in a grim suburban sprawl surrounded by foreboding mountains. What dollar value would you assign to this?

    • Replies: @AP
  465. sher singh says:
    @Aether

    Gays declare themselves the equal of the Khalsa, they get destroyed in equal measure.
    No different than any other, and since you’re so pro-Left get used to “brown culture”.

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

  466. sher singh says:
    @silviosilver

    Not treating gays & women like “trash” (political subalterns) is homophobic & mysoginistic.
    They crave submission, and destroy society when Men don’t give it to them||

    It is simple, Aether is a faggot.
    Glad we cleared that up||

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

  467. @Here Be Dragon

    And the people in general, smiling and pretending to be in a good mood all the time. All that was strange to me. Dishonest people, fake people. Unreliable people.

    What a load of garbage this is. As if there was any shortage of dishonest, fake and unreliable people in the commie world.

    And what’s so bad about smiling and being friendly anyway? I doubt humans can reliably distinguish fake from real niceness, and calling it “fake” probably says more about our own state of mind than other people’s. But even assuming we can reliably recognize fakeness, I would take fake niceness over sincere rudeness any day. Why not? Doesn’t it make everything go more smoothly, helping us to avoid getting in pointless disputes with strangers who rub us the wrong way?

    And if someone is smiling and putting on a brave face while his inner world is in turmoil, it’s more commendable and far preferable to someone who insists on letting everyone know how much he is suffering. Fuck him and the “sincerity” of his problems. I don’t know him, and frankly I don’t give a fuck that he’s suffering. If he wants help or even mere sympathy, he needs to approach people cap in hand, not by snarling or wailing and demanding attention.

    @singh

    It is simple, Aether is a faggot.

    Isn’t “Aether” just the latest emanation of Trit-Laxa?

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Here Be Dragon
  468. @German_reader

    They’re burdening the health care system, but (unlike with people who refused the Corona vaccines, where libs totally freaked out) you’re not allowed to point it out, you can’t even keep them from donating their possibly pozzed blood anymore, because that would be evil discrimination.

    I remember many years ago reading some forum on the topic of blood donation – my friend had just donated and I was curious about the ins and outs of the whole thing – and this gay poster wrote something about how the blood bank “doesn’t want my gay blood.” I wasn’t particularly political back then, but I still had the thought “gimme a break, you pushy faggot, as if it’s about the ‘gayness’ of your blood rather than a legitimate public health issue,” figuring this opinion was just common sense. Wow, was I wrong. The commiserations poured in. Around the same time I discovered, to my astonishment, what a lopsidedly homo disease AIDS was. Incredible that all it takes to conceal that reality is calling someone a “homophobe.” What a snow job the gay lobby and its friends have done on us all. Disgusting and depressing.

  469. S says:
    @LondonBob

    At the same time he analyses how sex was being “politicized” by design from above. The changes in the sexual behaviour of the Swedes was a matter of official direction. Sex had become the vicarious passion of a society otherwise trapped in boredom and the “engineered consent”.

    I’d heard for sometime how in those Caribbean ‘tin pot dictatorships’ that ‘who was having sex with who’ was of a central interest for many of these devolved islanders.

    While there’s been some of that mentality in the US for decades, I noticed after Biden’s coup/blatant and open theft of the 2020 US election, that there’s been a marked increase of just that same sort of thing on the US online news feeds. While ‘comments’ are now routinely turned off on most subjects, there’s a never ending stream of ‘bikini shots’ featured of various celebrities, along with plentiful other material of a prurient subject matter.

    Besides 1984, in our ever increasingly dumbed down and sexualized society, we may well live to see Fahrenheit 451 banned, as it strikes too close to home. We might even see public book burnings of such. The irony!

    Below ‘More’, from the same 1966 version of Fahrenheit 451 as the trailer below, is a pretty good rendition of a full blown ‘woke progressive’ police state, something we may not be all that far away from, even now…

    [MORE]