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Open Thread 189: Russia/Ukraine
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I’ve been told that the previous Open Thread has become very sluggish, so here’s a new one.

—Ron Unz

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Open Thread, Russia, Ukraine 
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  1. I have been saying this war will be determined by attrition rates since March and that this almost certainly favors Russia, unlike flip floppers like Ritter, these views are being vindicated at an accelerating pace.

    Shock and disbelief, though delayed, remain inevitable.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The most important thing for Russia was to get the war off the front pages. That was job one.

    The war is being decided by good use of terrain. The Ukies are getting shoved up against river banks, coast lines, lakes and reservoirs then they get bagged. The Russians seem to fight better when the rivers aint frozen and the enemy can be trapped by bodies of water.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack

    , @Mikhail
    @Anatoly Karlin

    From today's 5/27, the DoD cranks this BS out:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/27052022-pentagon-says-russias-progress-in-ukraine-is-only-incremental/


    Despite an enormous advantage in numbers, Russian forces attacking the Donbas region of Ukraine have made only “incremental progress,” a senior defense official said Thursday.

    Russia has deployed 110 operational battalion tactical groups in Ukraine, the official said. The majority are in the south, and the remaining groups are split and fighting in the Donbas region. Even with the preponderance of troop numbers, officials say Russian forces have made small gains.

    These gains are offset by Ukrainian gains on other battlefields, most notably around Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second largest city.

    The Russian war on Ukraine is in its 92nd day, and Russia’s strategy is evolving, the official said. At first, Russian forces aimed to capture the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, and replace the democratically elected government. Three wings of the Russia army expected to quickly overtake the Ukrainian military. One wing attacked from the north; the second attacked Crimea, and the third wing squeezed in from the east. “Well, that didn’t work,” the official said. “So, they started to try to carve off the whole Donbas region by coming south out of Kharkiv and north out of Mariupol.”

    The Russians didn’t make much progress on that, either, and have now switched to another objective. They’re trying to pinch off the far eastern provinces on Ukraine, the official said. The fighting is hard and tough, and the switch in terrain and in the objective means a switch in battlefield tactics, leading to the increased importance of long-range fires.

    Nations are providing Ukraine with the capabilities it needs to fight the invaders. Of the 108 M-777 howitzers that nations pledged to Ukraine, 85 are now being used by the Ukrainian military the official said. These guns are firing some of the 190,000 155 mm shells that have already been transferred to Ukraine.

    Nations have also delivered nine Mi-17 helicopters, and 73 percent of the Switchblade unmanned aerial vehicles. More equipment is arriving every day, and this covers everything from armored personnel carriers and rations to medical supplies and anti-artillery radars and much more.

    The Russians have a large force with a lot of capabilities, but the Ukrainian military is more than holding its own. The Ukrainians turned back the Russians from the gates of Kyiv, and they are pushing the Russians back over the border in and around Kharkiv.

    Russian tactics and doctrine are helping the Ukrainians, too. “[The Russians] are trying to overcome some of the challenges that they’ve had — command and control, logistics sustainment, maneuver,” the official said. “But, by and large, what we’re seeing them do, it’s a more localized effort. They’re using smaller units to go after smaller objectives in more of a piecemeal approach.”

    But the Russian tactics haven’t evolved during the 92 days of combat. “They’re still doing it in a fairly doctrinal way — using artillery fire in advance and then, and then moving units only after they feel like they softened up the target enough,” he said. “But … they have the numbers on their side, so that’s why I think we continue to see this incremental progress.”

    Since the beginning of the Russian invasion, military officials have said they expect both sides to learn from the experience and evolve. Although the Ukrainians have, “We’re not really seeing a lot of innovative, creative ways of moving on targets [by the Russians]. It’s pretty much the same doctrinal approach that they’ve taken in the past,” the official said.
     

    Classic example of misinformation. In this instance, exaggerating the Kiev regime's military performance, while downplaying Russia's and confusing assumption with its actual objective.

    The Kiev regime tactic of stand alone and fight is quite intelligent eh? The enormous numbers bit is another doozy, given the actual Russian numbers used so far.

    In comparison, one can reasonably spin that despite apparent disappointment, Russia is still in a good position to achieve gaining all of Donbass, along with additional territory (some of which it already has) before the end of June.

    Some Kiev regime proponents talk of their gaining in an August counteroffensive. I'm sure Russia has that in mind relative to what it could do until then to prevent that from occurring.

    , @SIMP simp
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The only thing Russia would win in these battles of attrition are depopulated, ruined, miserable steppe towns, the kind of towns Russia already has hundreds within her own borders.
    Putin's delusional hope for a bloodless campaign like the Anschluss led to a significant part of russian ground forces spreading thin on hundreds of km of backroads and mudfields in NE Ukraine while dashing towards a Kiev they didn't had any hope in taking with their meager forces and their overextended and vulnerable supply line.
    This is where the russian army lost a significant share of her professional soldiers and modern equipment and whatever prestige still had was replaced by memes with ukrainian tractors capturing their T90s.
    Even if Russia wins now a battle of attrition, which is far from certain given ukrainian mobilisation and their access to Uncle Sam's stockpiles of weapons, Russia has already lost the war.
    Russia is an isolated pariah internationally, vital imports are cut off, NATO is more united than ever, Germany is finally rearming even under a left-wing government and Russia's prestige has sunk lower than RFS Moskva, partly due to her war of aggression, partly due to her incompetence.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Dave Pinsen

    , @Jim Richard
    @Anatoly Karlin

    My suspicion about Ritter is that he is a deep state actor that has been activated. What better way to propagandize than to have someone so well known with a long history of truthfulness start with pro state disinformation.

    Replies: @Observator

    , @Flip flopper hunter
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Hilarious to see you change your views suddenly again. Do you have a stable view on anything you dishonest grifter?

    https://twitter.com/powerfultakes/status/1530159996893376515

    You were in Richard Spencer's fan club only a few years ago:

    https://i.kym-cdn.com/entries/icons/original/000/039/649/Anatoly_Karlin_Richard_Spencer.jpg


    I endorse Richard Spencer. He started no wars and provoked no riots — much less "extremist" than Ziocons or BLM.
     
    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Anatoly_Karlin

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

    , @Flip flopper hunter
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Why do you lie on your blog by saying you never supported a white ethno-state when you clearly do (or did as recent as 2020)?

    Here's the sort of Richard Spencer white nationalist ethno-state nonsense all whites from the high-IQ European & Anglosphere countries would be welcome" you were espousing less than 2 years ago:

    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Anatoly_Karlin#White_ethno-state

    https://twitter.com/akarlin88/status/1275189397491679234

    The fact you added 'individual exceptions' is pretty much the same as Richard Spencer who argued for an ethnostate >99% but not 100% white.

    #AnatolyKarlinlyingturd

    , @Sean
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The attrition of equipment is is far less favourable to Russia. Jack F. Matlock Jr. the former US Ambassador (who agrees with Mearsheimer's view on the origins on the war), said that he would not be too sure the Russians won't solve the technical problems, and now we hear they are, MacGyver-style, cannibalizing washing machines and dryers for microchips to use in missiles. While Russian lash ups may give them the time to win by destroying the enemy army, attrition will give Ukraine the time to properly integrate Western equipment.

  2. I noticed a map showing the Ukies have around 12,000 surrounded in Lysychansk. There’s a corridor 14 miles wide the Ukies can walk out from with a right shoulder on the Donets. Will they follow stand & fight or retreat? Or just surrender?

    I feel quite sorry for them. They’ve been gallant.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Wokechoke


    I noticed a map showing the Ukies have around 12,000 surrounded in Lysychansk. There’s a corridor 14 miles wide the Ukies can walk out from with a right shoulder on the Donets. Will they follow stand & fight or retreat? Or just surrender?

    I feel quite sorry for them. They’ve been gallant.

     

    Al0ng with others in Ukraine, some of them may end up having second thoughts along the lines of what was said in this April 4 piece:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/04042022-handicapping-ukraine-and-russia-west-differences-oped/

    In time, a greater number of Ukrainians might begin questioning Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, as someone who (under the influence of some nationalists) further instigated and prolonged a conflict, whose end result could’ve occurred on better terms for Ukraine, without the deaths, displacement and destruction, resulting from Russia’s military action.

    In turn, Putin could be increasingly viewed as someone who for years had tried to reasonably see a peaceful implementation of the 2015 UN approved Minsk Protocol and need for a new European security arrangement.

    Likewise, contrary to the Kiev regime and Western mass media propaganda, Russia has so far waged a limited military operation, causing far less civilian deaths, when compared to the US military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq. Among the issues, are armed combatants using civilians and civilian areas as cover.

    For those selectively seeing Putin as a monster, consider Madeleine Albright’s infamous comment on the large-scale Iraqi deaths caused by US military action and how she has been given kudos by the likes of Wesley Clark.

    “Whataboutism” can be ethically utilized to offset the hypocritically arrogant, ignorant and bigoted moral supremacy that some have. One or more wrongs don’t make a right, with hypocrisy not being a virtue.

    A number of Kiev regime claims about Russia’s military action have been later proven false. It’s therefore prudent to not automatically believe everything that government says before a fully substantiated overview.
     
    , @TG
    @Wokechoke

    Not sure that it matters. The job of the Ukrainian soldiers is to die, to serve as human speed-bumps, to force the Russians to spend a lot of time and ammunition slowly grinding them down. But the Ukrainians can easily replace the men, and can easily replace the equipment.

    It would not surprise me if the most experienced troops and officers had already been withdrawn from the front lines in the Donbas, and only recent conscripts/volunteers left behind. Again, their job is to die. The real Ukrainian force is the Americans using their surveillance equipment, controlling the war, and dialing in the coordinates for Ukrainian artillery and missiles to hit. That will continue no matter how many Ukrainian soldiers die.

    I mean, the Russians 'won' the siege of Mariupol, but look at how much time, effort, and ammunition it cost them. Will the Russians finally 'take' this little pocket in the Donbas? Probably. After how much time and effort? And look at how much of the Ukraine stretches on to the west, even if the Russians only want to get to the Dnieper. And the Ukrainians are training entire new armies in the west...

    I guess the main issue is if the Ukrainian morale really does break, if they really do run out of manpower and supplies, and there is a route, and the Russians can speed up. But if the Ukrainians can manage to keep pulling back and force the Russians to fight hard for every kilometer, well, there are an awful lot of kilometers in the Ukraine. I guess we will see.

    Certainly the push by the west to give the Ukrainians long-range missiles (which will I think be actually controlled by the Americans) does suggest that the western elites are worried that things are not going all that well for the Ukrainians. Missiles launched from Ukraine to vital targets deep inside Russia itself, or hitting ships far out into the black sea, could cause a lot of pain for the Russians. But the Russians have a lot of options to escalate as well...

    Interesting times.

    Replies: @utu

  3. @Wokechoke
    I noticed a map showing the Ukies have around 12,000 surrounded in Lysychansk. There's a corridor 14 miles wide the Ukies can walk out from with a right shoulder on the Donets. Will they follow stand & fight or retreat? Or just surrender?


    I feel quite sorry for them. They've been gallant.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @TG

    I noticed a map showing the Ukies have around 12,000 surrounded in Lysychansk. There’s a corridor 14 miles wide the Ukies can walk out from with a right shoulder on the Donets. Will they follow stand & fight or retreat? Or just surrender?

    I feel quite sorry for them. They’ve been gallant.

    Al0ng with others in Ukraine, some of them may end up having second thoughts along the lines of what was said in this April 4 piece:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/04042022-handicapping-ukraine-and-russia-west-differences-oped/

    In time, a greater number of Ukrainians might begin questioning Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, as someone who (under the influence of some nationalists) further instigated and prolonged a conflict, whose end result could’ve occurred on better terms for Ukraine, without the deaths, displacement and destruction, resulting from Russia’s military action.

    In turn, Putin could be increasingly viewed as someone who for years had tried to reasonably see a peaceful implementation of the 2015 UN approved Minsk Protocol and need for a new European security arrangement.

    Likewise, contrary to the Kiev regime and Western mass media propaganda, Russia has so far waged a limited military operation, causing far less civilian deaths, when compared to the US military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq. Among the issues, are armed combatants using civilians and civilian areas as cover.

    For those selectively seeing Putin as a monster, consider Madeleine Albright’s infamous comment on the large-scale Iraqi deaths caused by US military action and how she has been given kudos by the likes of Wesley Clark.

    “Whataboutism” can be ethically utilized to offset the hypocritically arrogant, ignorant and bigoted moral supremacy that some have. One or more wrongs don’t make a right, with hypocrisy not being a virtue.

    A number of Kiev regime claims about Russia’s military action have been later proven false. It’s therefore prudent to not automatically believe everything that government says before a fully substantiated overview.

    • Agree: JR Foley
  4. @Anatoly Karlin
    I have been saying this war will be determined by attrition rates since March and that this almost certainly favors Russia, unlike flip floppers like Ritter, these views are being vindicated at an accelerating pace.

    Shock and disbelief, though delayed, remain inevitable.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail, @SIMP simp, @Jim Richard, @Flip flopper hunter, @Flip flopper hunter, @Sean

    The most important thing for Russia was to get the war off the front pages. That was job one.

    The war is being decided by good use of terrain. The Ukies are getting shoved up against river banks, coast lines, lakes and reservoirs then they get bagged. The Russians seem to fight better when the rivers aint frozen and the enemy can be trapped by bodies of water.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    The Russians are currently winning in an area where they've been enacamped for over 8 years, right on their own border. They have superior long range artillery that is tipping things in their favor at the moment. No huge battles have been lost by the Ukrainian side and they're slowly retreating waiting to get their own large howitzers from the West. This could go on all summer before a victor can be chosen in the area. The Ukrainian side is gallant and is willing to shed blood in order to hold on to their home turf. They've surprised us before, they'll surprise us again!

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    I'm surprised that a gret military expert like you doesn't understand that the Ukrainians are doing all that they can to minimize the aggressor's ability to cross any rivers, minimizing the ability to transport troops and weaponry. The rivers are great natural impediments for forward assault.

  5. @Anatoly Karlin
    I have been saying this war will be determined by attrition rates since March and that this almost certainly favors Russia, unlike flip floppers like Ritter, these views are being vindicated at an accelerating pace.

    Shock and disbelief, though delayed, remain inevitable.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail, @SIMP simp, @Jim Richard, @Flip flopper hunter, @Flip flopper hunter, @Sean

    From today’s 5/27, the DoD cranks this BS out:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/27052022-pentagon-says-russias-progress-in-ukraine-is-only-incremental/

    Despite an enormous advantage in numbers, Russian forces attacking the Donbas region of Ukraine have made only “incremental progress,” a senior defense official said Thursday.

    Russia has deployed 110 operational battalion tactical groups in Ukraine, the official said. The majority are in the south, and the remaining groups are split and fighting in the Donbas region. Even with the preponderance of troop numbers, officials say Russian forces have made small gains.

    These gains are offset by Ukrainian gains on other battlefields, most notably around Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second largest city.

    The Russian war on Ukraine is in its 92nd day, and Russia’s strategy is evolving, the official said. At first, Russian forces aimed to capture the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, and replace the democratically elected government. Three wings of the Russia army expected to quickly overtake the Ukrainian military. One wing attacked from the north; the second attacked Crimea, and the third wing squeezed in from the east. “Well, that didn’t work,” the official said. “So, they started to try to carve off the whole Donbas region by coming south out of Kharkiv and north out of Mariupol.”

    The Russians didn’t make much progress on that, either, and have now switched to another objective. They’re trying to pinch off the far eastern provinces on Ukraine, the official said. The fighting is hard and tough, and the switch in terrain and in the objective means a switch in battlefield tactics, leading to the increased importance of long-range fires.

    Nations are providing Ukraine with the capabilities it needs to fight the invaders. Of the 108 M-777 howitzers that nations pledged to Ukraine, 85 are now being used by the Ukrainian military the official said. These guns are firing some of the 190,000 155 mm shells that have already been transferred to Ukraine.

    Nations have also delivered nine Mi-17 helicopters, and 73 percent of the Switchblade unmanned aerial vehicles. More equipment is arriving every day, and this covers everything from armored personnel carriers and rations to medical supplies and anti-artillery radars and much more.

    The Russians have a large force with a lot of capabilities, but the Ukrainian military is more than holding its own. The Ukrainians turned back the Russians from the gates of Kyiv, and they are pushing the Russians back over the border in and around Kharkiv.

    Russian tactics and doctrine are helping the Ukrainians, too. “[The Russians] are trying to overcome some of the challenges that they’ve had — command and control, logistics sustainment, maneuver,” the official said. “But, by and large, what we’re seeing them do, it’s a more localized effort. They’re using smaller units to go after smaller objectives in more of a piecemeal approach.”

    But the Russian tactics haven’t evolved during the 92 days of combat. “They’re still doing it in a fairly doctrinal way — using artillery fire in advance and then, and then moving units only after they feel like they softened up the target enough,” he said. “But … they have the numbers on their side, so that’s why I think we continue to see this incremental progress.”

    Since the beginning of the Russian invasion, military officials have said they expect both sides to learn from the experience and evolve. Although the Ukrainians have, “We’re not really seeing a lot of innovative, creative ways of moving on targets [by the Russians]. It’s pretty much the same doctrinal approach that they’ve taken in the past,” the official said.

    Classic example of misinformation. In this instance, exaggerating the Kiev regime’s military performance, while downplaying Russia’s and confusing assumption with its actual objective.

    The Kiev regime tactic of stand alone and fight is quite intelligent eh? The enormous numbers bit is another doozy, given the actual Russian numbers used so far.

    In comparison, one can reasonably spin that despite apparent disappointment, Russia is still in a good position to achieve gaining all of Donbass, along with additional territory (some of which it already has) before the end of June.

    Some Kiev regime proponents talk of their gaining in an August counteroffensive. I’m sure Russia has that in mind relative to what it could do until then to prevent that from occurring.

  6. These three analysts impress me:

    Military Summary (Daily)
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUnc496-PPmFZVKlYxUnToA

    Brian Berletic – The New Atlas
    https://www.youtube.com/user/LandDestroyerReport/videos
    https://landdestroyer.blogspot.com/

    Jacob Dreizin – Ukraine War & Aftermath – A No Propaganda Zone
    https://thedreizinreport.com/

    Brian and Jacob both have experience serving in the U.S. military, and Jacob is fluent in Russian. Brian is a geopolitical analyst whose research is always first-rate and well-documented.

    I think that some in the senior leadership of the U.S. military are becoming concerned that an increasing number of genuine professionals within their middle-to-senior officer corps are observing what really is happening on the ground in the Ukraine, and are becoming disgusted with the Ukrainian military and political leadership. For example, to avoid paying widows and next-of-kin survivor benefits, the bodies of dead Ukrainian soldiers simply aren’t accepted when the Russians try to make truce arrangements to return them across the line of contact. The lives of Ukrainian soldiers are being wasted due to hopeless stand-and-fight orders which close the window of opportunity for their orderly operational retreat. A genuinely professional officer in the U.S. military would find all this callousness towards one’s own troops to be inexcusable.

    In contrast, the U.S. State Department, U.S. politicians, and the mainstream media are just parroting each other’s falsehoods and delusions.

    • Agree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    @Voltarde

    This seems to be the Russian habit of accusing Ukraine of what Russia has previously been accused of doing. No body, no pension was the reason given for Russia abandoning soldiers bodies during the retreats at Kiev.

  7. @Anatoly Karlin
    I have been saying this war will be determined by attrition rates since March and that this almost certainly favors Russia, unlike flip floppers like Ritter, these views are being vindicated at an accelerating pace.

    Shock and disbelief, though delayed, remain inevitable.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail, @SIMP simp, @Jim Richard, @Flip flopper hunter, @Flip flopper hunter, @Sean

    The only thing Russia would win in these battles of attrition are depopulated, ruined, miserable steppe towns, the kind of towns Russia already has hundreds within her own borders.
    Putin’s delusional hope for a bloodless campaign like the Anschluss led to a significant part of russian ground forces spreading thin on hundreds of km of backroads and mudfields in NE Ukraine while dashing towards a Kiev they didn’t had any hope in taking with their meager forces and their overextended and vulnerable supply line.
    This is where the russian army lost a significant share of her professional soldiers and modern equipment and whatever prestige still had was replaced by memes with ukrainian tractors capturing their T90s.
    Even if Russia wins now a battle of attrition, which is far from certain given ukrainian mobilisation and their access to Uncle Sam’s stockpiles of weapons, Russia has already lost the war.
    Russia is an isolated pariah internationally, vital imports are cut off, NATO is more united than ever, Germany is finally rearming even under a left-wing government and Russia’s prestige has sunk lower than RFS Moskva, partly due to her war of aggression, partly due to her incompetence.

    • Agree: Philip Owen
    • LOL: RadicalCenter
    • Troll: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @SIMP simp

    The Donbas is the ore and mineral wealth Center of Ukraine. The Kherson to Melitopol to Donetsk area is a very good area for crops if irrigated. Like California. The Sea of Azov is of course a Russian lake now.


    Depopulated areas, as long as they’ve killed Ukies is fine by Russia. They can colonise the areas with settlers if they’ve killed off Ukies in the area.

    Replies: @AP

    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @SIMP simp

    Germany is not the only one coming back--

    https://i.postimg.cc/nhFTnYQP/Assaut-Kin-Tche-ou.jpg

    Japanese assault on entrenched Russian positions 1904 at the Battle of Nanshan 南山の戦い Nanzan no tatakai

    https://i.postimg.cc/Yq5G3ptf/Jukendo-jeux-du-sanctuaire-Meiji.jpg

    Imperial Japanese Army was the last in world to maintain a tradition of training for close combat with bayonets 白兵戦 Hakuheisen. This is maintained as a martial arts discipline, Jūkendō 銃剣道

    Replies: @SIMP simp

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @SIMP simp

    Here's a good post explaining the Ukraine's importance to Russia:

    https://twitter.com/emeriticus/status/1530735136848896001?s=20&t=Tj0NqyBMboQEFFXV-thRew

    As far as the impact of Western sanctions on Russia:

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1531383016811024387?s=20&t=aM59QorG32St7YSV6YKOkg

    And as far as Russian prestige being diminished by facing a tough fight against quasi-Russians armed to the teeth with $50 billion+ of NATO weapons: what will it do to NATO prestige if Russia wins despite facing all those NATO weapons?

    After this war, Russia will be the only major power to have a military experienced in combined arms combat against a 1st world opponent. They will be more formidable, not less, militarily.

    Replies: @AP, @Yellowface Anon, @SIMP simp, @Corvinus

  8. @Anatoly Karlin
    I have been saying this war will be determined by attrition rates since March and that this almost certainly favors Russia, unlike flip floppers like Ritter, these views are being vindicated at an accelerating pace.

    Shock and disbelief, though delayed, remain inevitable.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail, @SIMP simp, @Jim Richard, @Flip flopper hunter, @Flip flopper hunter, @Sean

    My suspicion about Ritter is that he is a deep state actor that has been activated. What better way to propagandize than to have someone so well known with a long history of truthfulness start with pro state disinformation.

    • Disagree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Observator
    @Jim Richard

    It strikes me as unfounded to accuse Ritter of evil intention, of being a secret CIA asset, tool of the Deep State, and so on, because of his recent analyses. He has never wavered from the position that Ukraine has the same chance of defeating the Russian Federation that Mexico would have if Washington sent an army across its border. His points about the effect of the larger de facto NATO/US war against Russia are well taken. The Ukrop are not fools; they are learning from experience. And the Russians are not supermen: they make mistakes. Tens of billions of dollars of weapons cannot change the outcome of the war but they must impact its tactics. Someone online, maybe Ritter, recently quoted the WW2 General Omar Bradley’s comment that amateurs talk strategy while professionals talk logistics. Ritter is a professional, experienced military man. He understands from experience that it is the nuts and bolts of supply chains, intelligence, communication, that determine the battlefield outcome. Amateurs almost always look for quick, dashing victories over unworthy foemen, like the first Confederate Secretary of War Leroy Pope Walker who boasted he could wipe up all the blood spilled because of secession with his handkerchief, while the newspapers said at the same time that old Uncle Billy Sherman was mad as a hatter for stating it would take five years and five million men to crush the insurrection.

    Replies: @Jim Richard

  9. @SIMP simp
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The only thing Russia would win in these battles of attrition are depopulated, ruined, miserable steppe towns, the kind of towns Russia already has hundreds within her own borders.
    Putin's delusional hope for a bloodless campaign like the Anschluss led to a significant part of russian ground forces spreading thin on hundreds of km of backroads and mudfields in NE Ukraine while dashing towards a Kiev they didn't had any hope in taking with their meager forces and their overextended and vulnerable supply line.
    This is where the russian army lost a significant share of her professional soldiers and modern equipment and whatever prestige still had was replaced by memes with ukrainian tractors capturing their T90s.
    Even if Russia wins now a battle of attrition, which is far from certain given ukrainian mobilisation and their access to Uncle Sam's stockpiles of weapons, Russia has already lost the war.
    Russia is an isolated pariah internationally, vital imports are cut off, NATO is more united than ever, Germany is finally rearming even under a left-wing government and Russia's prestige has sunk lower than RFS Moskva, partly due to her war of aggression, partly due to her incompetence.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Dave Pinsen

    The Donbas is the ore and mineral wealth Center of Ukraine. The Kherson to Melitopol to Donetsk area is a very good area for crops if irrigated. Like California. The Sea of Azov is of course a Russian lake now.

    Depopulated areas, as long as they’ve killed Ukies is fine by Russia. They can colonise the areas with settlers if they’ve killed off Ukies in the area.

    • Agree: gT
    • Replies: @AP
    @Wokechoke

    Russia is itself below replacement, so repopulating Ukraine will mean depopulating Russia. This project would also require massive rebuilding, demining, etc.

  10. These comments are embarrassing:

    In order of comments:

    1. Karlin, who is stuck in “shock and disbelief”, makes his 93rd daily prediction of Ukrainian “shock and disbelief.” This time prompted by Russian gains of roughly a mile a day.

    3. Dishonest Russian propagandist engages in fantasy where pro-peace liberal comedian Zhelensky is the aggressor and Putin is the harmless innocent.

    Hilariously, this idiot then implies that Ukrainians will likely come to believe this. Was he in charge of the disastrous Russian “intelligence” effort on Ukraine before the invasion? In the real world, all but 2% of Ukrainians, of whatever ethnicity, now hate Russia. The exception has fallen from 34%.

    Does the propagandist believe his lies? No Ukrainian would. Or is it just some sort of forlorn hope that Westerners will? Does he not realise that only the most marginal losers in the West are plugged into Russian propaganda now?

    4. NEET engages in blood-soaked masturbation, for millionth time.

    5. Dishonest Russian propagandist returns to basically just tremble at reality of DoD presentation. He does not know how to engage with a sober and measured assessment as he is caught in his own hyperbole and lies.

    6. Some idiot pipes up that, because a handful of the millions of retired Western military personnel are willing to speak nonsense for Russian money or internet “fame”, this is important. No, it is not. You get all manner of freaks and reprobates in military service, or retired from it. I am actually surprised that less than 0.0001% of us are trying to capitalise on civilian ignorance and make bank from parotting absurdist Russian propaganda. I would get my own wooden desk and backdrop of military text books to film such clowning, if I could at least keep a straight face. It would be fun. I can imagine Ritter et al. have a good guffaw at their imbecilic audiences whenever they meet in private.

    8. Closing the insane asylums was a mistake. We should have reformed them and tripled their funding.

    9. NEET is back to masturbate on fantasy economics like he does on military matters. He should smash his laptop so that he can no longer play Paradox games and masturbate so much. Fortunately, he is young so there is a lot of hope. The “alt”, rather than “dissident”, right was better at this. Grabbing the young and giving them a simple path towards self-improvement and the willingness to take the first steps.

    Go to the gym. Find a girl who is kind to you. Looks are really not that important. Accept love. Stop masturbating. Eat properly. Find a technical course that guarantees a job after it. Move away from your parents, as you are not likely as you are because they are a good influence. Read self-help books, even Jordan Peterson. Immerse yourself in being better, because you deserve to feel better. You really do. Learn that older people who support death and destruction in Ukraine are not happy people, and will probably never be happy people. Ignore them. You wouldn’t follow the advice of a drunk homeless person on the street, so don’t follow theirs. They are worse. Instead, try my advice for 6 months. It’ll be interesting at least. Even if you doubt you can do it, just do it anyway. Be honest with yourself about your doubt and don’t make excuses, still just do it. Like putting on a uniform, or playing a part in a play. Pretend to be the person you would be happier being. Authenticity is important, but you’ve not even started your life. Develop yourself first.

    • Agree: SIMP simp
    • Replies: @songbird
    @Andrei Nikolayevich Bolkonsky

    10. Jordan Peterson fan?

  11. @Wokechoke
    @SIMP simp

    The Donbas is the ore and mineral wealth Center of Ukraine. The Kherson to Melitopol to Donetsk area is a very good area for crops if irrigated. Like California. The Sea of Azov is of course a Russian lake now.


    Depopulated areas, as long as they’ve killed Ukies is fine by Russia. They can colonise the areas with settlers if they’ve killed off Ukies in the area.

    Replies: @AP

    Russia is itself below replacement, so repopulating Ukraine will mean depopulating Russia. This project would also require massive rebuilding, demining, etc.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
  12. @Wokechoke
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The most important thing for Russia was to get the war off the front pages. That was job one.

    The war is being decided by good use of terrain. The Ukies are getting shoved up against river banks, coast lines, lakes and reservoirs then they get bagged. The Russians seem to fight better when the rivers aint frozen and the enemy can be trapped by bodies of water.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack

    The Russians are currently winning in an area where they’ve been enacamped for over 8 years, right on their own border. They have superior long range artillery that is tipping things in their favor at the moment. No huge battles have been lost by the Ukrainian side and they’re slowly retreating waiting to get their own large howitzers from the West. This could go on all summer before a victor can be chosen in the area. The Ukrainian side is gallant and is willing to shed blood in order to hold on to their home turf. They’ve surprised us before, they’ll surprise us again!

  13. @Wokechoke
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The most important thing for Russia was to get the war off the front pages. That was job one.

    The war is being decided by good use of terrain. The Ukies are getting shoved up against river banks, coast lines, lakes and reservoirs then they get bagged. The Russians seem to fight better when the rivers aint frozen and the enemy can be trapped by bodies of water.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack

    I’m surprised that a gret military expert like you doesn’t understand that the Ukrainians are doing all that they can to minimize the aggressor’s ability to cross any rivers, minimizing the ability to transport troops and weaponry. The rivers are great natural impediments for forward assault.

  14. @Andrei Nikolayevich Bolkonsky
    These comments are embarrassing:

    In order of comments:

    1. Karlin, who is stuck in "shock and disbelief", makes his 93rd daily prediction of Ukrainian "shock and disbelief." This time prompted by Russian gains of roughly a mile a day.

    3. Dishonest Russian propagandist engages in fantasy where pro-peace liberal comedian Zhelensky is the aggressor and Putin is the harmless innocent.

    Hilariously, this idiot then implies that Ukrainians will likely come to believe this. Was he in charge of the disastrous Russian "intelligence" effort on Ukraine before the invasion? In the real world, all but 2% of Ukrainians, of whatever ethnicity, now hate Russia. The exception has fallen from 34%.

    Does the propagandist believe his lies? No Ukrainian would. Or is it just some sort of forlorn hope that Westerners will? Does he not realise that only the most marginal losers in the West are plugged into Russian propaganda now?

    4. NEET engages in blood-soaked masturbation, for millionth time.

    5. Dishonest Russian propagandist returns to basically just tremble at reality of DoD presentation. He does not know how to engage with a sober and measured assessment as he is caught in his own hyperbole and lies.

    6. Some idiot pipes up that, because a handful of the millions of retired Western military personnel are willing to speak nonsense for Russian money or internet "fame", this is important. No, it is not. You get all manner of freaks and reprobates in military service, or retired from it. I am actually surprised that less than 0.0001% of us are trying to capitalise on civilian ignorance and make bank from parotting absurdist Russian propaganda. I would get my own wooden desk and backdrop of military text books to film such clowning, if I could at least keep a straight face. It would be fun. I can imagine Ritter et al. have a good guffaw at their imbecilic audiences whenever they meet in private.

    8. Closing the insane asylums was a mistake. We should have reformed them and tripled their funding.

    9. NEET is back to masturbate on fantasy economics like he does on military matters. He should smash his laptop so that he can no longer play Paradox games and masturbate so much. Fortunately, he is young so there is a lot of hope. The "alt", rather than "dissident", right was better at this. Grabbing the young and giving them a simple path towards self-improvement and the willingness to take the first steps.

    Go to the gym. Find a girl who is kind to you. Looks are really not that important. Accept love. Stop masturbating. Eat properly. Find a technical course that guarantees a job after it. Move away from your parents, as you are not likely as you are because they are a good influence. Read self-help books, even Jordan Peterson. Immerse yourself in being better, because you deserve to feel better. You really do. Learn that older people who support death and destruction in Ukraine are not happy people, and will probably never be happy people. Ignore them. You wouldn't follow the advice of a drunk homeless person on the street, so don't follow theirs. They are worse. Instead, try my advice for 6 months. It'll be interesting at least. Even if you doubt you can do it, just do it anyway. Be honest with yourself about your doubt and don't make excuses, still just do it. Like putting on a uniform, or playing a part in a play. Pretend to be the person you would be happier being. Authenticity is important, but you've not even started your life. Develop yourself first.

    Replies: @songbird

    10. Jordan Peterson fan?

  15. If a party in Germany could run on rounding up the Greens, I wonder what percentage of the vote it would get.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @songbird

    You don't need to wonder, Der 3. Weg (who actually are Nazis) had placards with the slogan Hängt die Grünen. They claimed it only referred to their green election placards. Was probably inspired by a placard of the left-wing "satirical" party Die Partei, which had the ambiguous slogan Nazis töten (Nazis kill or Kill Nazis!). Of course the reaction to the two placards was rather different.
    Anyway, Der 3. Weg got 0% of the vote in 2021 according to the official results. I don't know what this means in absolute numbers, I guess a few hundred votes.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Are you once again indulging in doomed fantasies, songbird?

    https://i.imgur.com/KChA2qw.jpg

    This is the future and you cannot stop it.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @Flip flopper hunter, @songbird, @Barbarossa, @dyauspitr, @RadicalCenter, @Barbarossa

  16. • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Mikhail


    Ukrainian leaders project an image of military invulnerability against Russia. But commanders offer a more realistic portrait of the war, where outgunned volunteers describe being abandoned by their military brass and facing certain death at the front.
     
    We've all noticed the massive tone shift in the Western media in recent days. Was Kissinger's comments the tipping point? It seems his frank admission that Ukraine needs to give up territory gave permission for others to speak plainly.

    With Germany's DAP news agency reporting that heavy weapons are being held off, has the West implicitly written off Ukraine's chances to seriously stall the invasion and is now preparing for an insurgency-style tactics instead, possibly under Russian occupation?

    Boris Johnson recently expressed frustration, suggesting a smaller informal alliance consisting of UK/PL/Baltics. The UK are truly warmongering diehards, when they aren't moonlighting as America's trojan horse in Europe. With each passing year, Brexit was truly a blessing in disguise.

  17. By not being on Twitter GermanReader is missing out on lots of Tweets about his countrymen like this one.

    songbird – The German Greens have gone from being Soviet lickspittles during the Cold War to American lickspittles post-Cold War. Given the post-Cold War US trajectory that actually makes sense.

    • Agree: songbird
    • Replies: @German_reader
    @Matra


    By not being on Twitter GermanReader is missing out on lots of Tweets about his countrymen like this one.
     
    Actually already knew that one, Ukraine's ambassador Melnyk tweeted it:
    https://twitter.com/MelnykAndrij/status/1529571924854071296?cxt=HHwWgICz9fjjkLoqAAAA

    It's possible that Scholz is indeed deliberately stalling on delivery of heavy weapons. However, German media claimed a few days ago that there is an informal agreement among all NATO members not to deliver Western-made tanks (let alone combat aircraft) to Ukraine, and indeed, as far as I can tell no NATO member so far has committed to delivery of anything but artillery pieces (that includes Germany which is set to send seven Panzerhaubitzen 2000 to Ukraine in June) and Eastern bloc left-overs. Obviously I can't claim to understand what's going on behind the scenes though.
  18. @Jim Richard
    @Anatoly Karlin

    My suspicion about Ritter is that he is a deep state actor that has been activated. What better way to propagandize than to have someone so well known with a long history of truthfulness start with pro state disinformation.

    Replies: @Observator

    It strikes me as unfounded to accuse Ritter of evil intention, of being a secret CIA asset, tool of the Deep State, and so on, because of his recent analyses. He has never wavered from the position that Ukraine has the same chance of defeating the Russian Federation that Mexico would have if Washington sent an army across its border. His points about the effect of the larger de facto NATO/US war against Russia are well taken. The Ukrop are not fools; they are learning from experience. And the Russians are not supermen: they make mistakes. Tens of billions of dollars of weapons cannot change the outcome of the war but they must impact its tactics. Someone online, maybe Ritter, recently quoted the WW2 General Omar Bradley’s comment that amateurs talk strategy while professionals talk logistics. Ritter is a professional, experienced military man. He understands from experience that it is the nuts and bolts of supply chains, intelligence, communication, that determine the battlefield outcome. Amateurs almost always look for quick, dashing victories over unworthy foemen, like the first Confederate Secretary of War Leroy Pope Walker who boasted he could wipe up all the blood spilled because of secession with his handkerchief, while the newspapers said at the same time that old Uncle Billy Sherman was mad as a hatter for stating it would take five years and five million men to crush the insurrection.

    • Replies: @Jim Richard
    @Observator

    How many times does 49 go into 15?

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

  19. @SIMP simp
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The only thing Russia would win in these battles of attrition are depopulated, ruined, miserable steppe towns, the kind of towns Russia already has hundreds within her own borders.
    Putin's delusional hope for a bloodless campaign like the Anschluss led to a significant part of russian ground forces spreading thin on hundreds of km of backroads and mudfields in NE Ukraine while dashing towards a Kiev they didn't had any hope in taking with their meager forces and their overextended and vulnerable supply line.
    This is where the russian army lost a significant share of her professional soldiers and modern equipment and whatever prestige still had was replaced by memes with ukrainian tractors capturing their T90s.
    Even if Russia wins now a battle of attrition, which is far from certain given ukrainian mobilisation and their access to Uncle Sam's stockpiles of weapons, Russia has already lost the war.
    Russia is an isolated pariah internationally, vital imports are cut off, NATO is more united than ever, Germany is finally rearming even under a left-wing government and Russia's prestige has sunk lower than RFS Moskva, partly due to her war of aggression, partly due to her incompetence.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Dave Pinsen

    Germany is not the only one coming back–

    Japanese assault on entrenched Russian positions 1904 at the Battle of Nanshan 南山の戦い Nanzan no tatakai

    Imperial Japanese Army was the last in world to maintain a tradition of training for close combat with bayonets 白兵戦 Hakuheisen. This is maintained as a martial arts discipline, Jūkendō 銃剣道

    • Replies: @SIMP simp
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Japanese soldiers repeatedly charged with bayonets soviet soldiers, especially in night attacks, during the battles of Khalkhin Gol.

  20. German_reader says:
    @songbird
    If a party in Germany could run on rounding up the Greens, I wonder what percentage of the vote it would get.

    Replies: @German_reader, @Thulean Friend

    You don’t need to wonder, Der 3. Weg (who actually are Nazis) had placards with the slogan Hängt die Grünen. They claimed it only referred to their green election placards. Was probably inspired by a placard of the left-wing “satirical” party Die Partei, which had the ambiguous slogan Nazis töten (Nazis kill or Kill Nazis!). Of course the reaction to the two placards was rather different.
    Anyway, Der 3. Weg got 0% of the vote in 2021 according to the official results. I don’t know what this means in absolute numbers, I guess a few hundred votes.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @German_reader

    They should have ran on my idea: to deport the Greens to the Sahel, since it is one the most practical places to utilize solar energy, and far from any potentially dangerous meltdowns.

    BTW, Japan says it is taking steps to restart nuclear power plants in order to deal with energy prices. IMO, one way to appreciate how Malthusian Japan is, is to try to count the number of nuclear-powered desalination plants.

  21. German_reader says:
    @Matra
    By not being on Twitter GermanReader is missing out on lots of Tweets about his countrymen like this one.

    songbird - The German Greens have gone from being Soviet lickspittles during the Cold War to American lickspittles post-Cold War. Given the post-Cold War US trajectory that actually makes sense.

    Replies: @German_reader

    By not being on Twitter GermanReader is missing out on lots of Tweets about his countrymen like this one.

    Actually already knew that one, Ukraine’s ambassador Melnyk tweeted it:

    It’s possible that Scholz is indeed deliberately stalling on delivery of heavy weapons. However, German media claimed a few days ago that there is an informal agreement among all NATO members not to deliver Western-made tanks (let alone combat aircraft) to Ukraine, and indeed, as far as I can tell no NATO member so far has committed to delivery of anything but artillery pieces (that includes Germany which is set to send seven Panzerhaubitzen 2000 to Ukraine in June) and Eastern bloc left-overs. Obviously I can’t claim to understand what’s going on behind the scenes though.

    • Thanks: Matra
  22. @Mikhail
    https://twitter.com/raghavanWaPo/status/1529918701960581146

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    Ukrainian leaders project an image of military invulnerability against Russia. But commanders offer a more realistic portrait of the war, where outgunned volunteers describe being abandoned by their military brass and facing certain death at the front.

    We’ve all noticed the massive tone shift in the Western media in recent days. Was Kissinger’s comments the tipping point? It seems his frank admission that Ukraine needs to give up territory gave permission for others to speak plainly.

    With Germany’s DAP news agency reporting that heavy weapons are being held off, has the West implicitly written off Ukraine’s chances to seriously stall the invasion and is now preparing for an insurgency-style tactics instead, possibly under Russian occupation?

    Boris Johnson recently expressed frustration, suggesting a smaller informal alliance consisting of UK/PL/Baltics. The UK are truly warmongering diehards, when they aren’t moonlighting as America’s trojan horse in Europe. With each passing year, Brexit was truly a blessing in disguise.

  23. @songbird
    If a party in Germany could run on rounding up the Greens, I wonder what percentage of the vote it would get.

    Replies: @German_reader, @Thulean Friend

    Are you once again indulging in doomed fantasies, songbird?

    This is the future and you cannot stop it.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
    @Thulean Friend

    The brown guy with the infant in the papousse has a definite MAP look about him.

    , @Flip flopper hunter
    @Thulean Friend

    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/Anatoly_Karlin#SJW.2C_Antifa_and_pro-LGBT_phase_.282008.29


    We support the goals of the feminist movement and consider that gender equality has not yet been achieved anywhere. Men are still more valued as bread-winners and women-more as home-makers, and changing these social perceptions is one of our goals. According to the Global Gender Gap Report 2007, Russia comes 45th out of 128 countries – it scores very well on female economic participation, but must make bigger efforts in political empowerment. Unfortunately, LGBT rights are weak in Russia – as in the rest of Visegrad/eastern Europe.
     
    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/Anatoly_Karlin#Communist_and_environmentalist_phase_.282009-2010.29

    The world is finite, and so the resource stocks and pollution sinks that sustain industrial civilization ("the System") are limited. We have been in a state of "overshoot", beyond the "carrying capacity" of the Earth, since the 1980's (The Limits to Growth, 2004). Limited resources have been drawn down much faster than they could be replenished, and the Earth's pollution sinks have been overfilled much faster than they could be regenerated.

    Elements of this overshoot can already be seen in phenomena as diverse as plateauing crop yields, topsoil loss, accelerating climate change, peak oil, collapsing fisheries, the depletion of higher-EROEI energy sources, dying rivers, global dimming, the proliferation of "failed states", neo-colonial exploitation, and rising antibiotic resistance. But things are yet going to get much worse...

    Based on paleoclimate reconstructions of CO2 levels, eventual global warming of above 2C is already inevitable. This will set off a cascade of climatic disasters that will speed up the rate of warming, leading to the desertification of much of the world's land and oceans, the drying of the great Asian rivers, and massive inundations of the low-lying coasts and deltas that harbor humanity's heartlands. States will collapse into anarchy, spawning Biblical-scale famines and floods of climate refugees.
     

    Replies: @Flip flopper hunter

    , @songbird
    @Thulean Friend

    It is good that they only show three stories, for when the power goes out, anyone above that will not have running water. And that is to say nothing of what will happen to the sewers.

    , @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend

    It's hard to believe that such things are made in earnest. Are you entirely sure that isn't some sort of biting satire?

    I'm sure it is in earnest, but man, how cringe! Can they check off a few more progressive right-think boxes there?!

    What about that viciously oppressed dog being forced to pull that tattooed lady in the chariot?! And those fruit trees being forced to give up their young for consumption by rapacious humans?! No one is free until we are all free!

    , @dyauspitr
    @Thulean Friend

    god jesus. imAGINE COMMITING SUICIDE AND DOING NOTHING YOURE TRAITIR TO YOPUR OWN RACE. WORSE YOU PEOPLE WILL EXPORT IT TO THE REST OF THE WORLD!!!!!!

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Thulean Friend

    Not to get, like, all technical and stuff, but for a future you generally need to have children.

    That's something that even the declining number of heterosexual Germans of child-bearing/-raising age just don't care about these days -- and something that the confused deviants depicted in the poster physically cannot do together even if they wanted to.

    , @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend

    I'm sure you're being tongue in cheek, but the funny thing is that the promises of Woke multiculturalism rarely work out as they are advertised to.

    As a recently noted example; it's long been a meme on the right how hard Left cities like Portland or San Fran have such a homeless problem. I witnessed it myself when a few years ago I went out towards Portland to visit my brother. The sheer scale and squalor of the homeless population were mind blowing to someone used to cities out East.

    Regardless of the political memeing I assumed that a fair part of the issue was just due to the temperate nature of these cities being much habitable to tent dwellers. I'm starting to think though that the problem may be exacerbated more by political orientation than I initially realized.

    Now Ithaca, a small super lefty city, a couple hours from me is grappling with a major homeless problem, with encampments sprawling out of control and police desperately trying to devise ways to keep them contained to approved areas. I guess Ithaca isn't called Portland of the East for nothing! An Ithaca Bakery employee told me it's not uncommon now for druggies to lock themselves in the bathrooms to get a high and sometimes OD.

    Of course it's not surprising since I'm sure potential homeless know they are likely to be treated with much more kid glove handling than in Rochester or Binghamton.

    The poster should also show some drug addicts who have lost hope after neo-liberalism destroyed their jobs, communities, and sense of purpose in life.

    Replies: @Mikel

  24. @Anatoly Karlin
    I have been saying this war will be determined by attrition rates since March and that this almost certainly favors Russia, unlike flip floppers like Ritter, these views are being vindicated at an accelerating pace.

    Shock and disbelief, though delayed, remain inevitable.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail, @SIMP simp, @Jim Richard, @Flip flopper hunter, @Flip flopper hunter, @Sean

    Hilarious to see you change your views suddenly again. Do you have a stable view on anything you dishonest grifter?

    You were in Richard Spencer’s fan club only a few years ago:

    I endorse Richard Spencer. He started no wars and provoked no riots — much less “extremist” than Ziocons or BLM.

    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Anatoly_Karlin

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @Flip flopper hunter

    Why do you hate your own photos so? Does it make you seethe that your multiple takedown requests came to naught?

    https://akarlin.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/oliver-d-smith-pedophile.png



    https://akarlin.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/olver-d-smith.jpg

    https://akarlin.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/oliver-d-smith-alone-in-dark.jpg

    Replies: @Anon

  25. RIP Andy Fletcher of the thoroughly brilliant Depeche Mode. (He’s the band member wearing the glasses at the ten second mark of the video.)

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Fletcher_(musician)

  26. @German_reader
    @songbird

    You don't need to wonder, Der 3. Weg (who actually are Nazis) had placards with the slogan Hängt die Grünen. They claimed it only referred to their green election placards. Was probably inspired by a placard of the left-wing "satirical" party Die Partei, which had the ambiguous slogan Nazis töten (Nazis kill or Kill Nazis!). Of course the reaction to the two placards was rather different.
    Anyway, Der 3. Weg got 0% of the vote in 2021 according to the official results. I don't know what this means in absolute numbers, I guess a few hundred votes.

    Replies: @songbird

    They should have ran on my idea: to deport the Greens to the Sahel, since it is one the most practical places to utilize solar energy, and far from any potentially dangerous meltdowns.

    BTW, Japan says it is taking steps to restart nuclear power plants in order to deal with energy prices. IMO, one way to appreciate how Malthusian Japan is, is to try to count the number of nuclear-powered desalination plants.

  27. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Are you once again indulging in doomed fantasies, songbird?

    https://i.imgur.com/KChA2qw.jpg

    This is the future and you cannot stop it.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @Flip flopper hunter, @songbird, @Barbarossa, @dyauspitr, @RadicalCenter, @Barbarossa

    The brown guy with the infant in the papousse has a definite MAP look about him.

    • Thanks: LatW
  28. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Are you once again indulging in doomed fantasies, songbird?

    https://i.imgur.com/KChA2qw.jpg

    This is the future and you cannot stop it.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @Flip flopper hunter, @songbird, @Barbarossa, @dyauspitr, @RadicalCenter, @Barbarossa

    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/Anatoly_Karlin#SJW.2C_Antifa_and_pro-LGBT_phase_.282008.29

    We support the goals of the feminist movement and consider that gender equality has not yet been achieved anywhere. Men are still more valued as bread-winners and women-more as home-makers, and changing these social perceptions is one of our goals. According to the Global Gender Gap Report 2007, Russia comes 45th out of 128 countries – it scores very well on female economic participation, but must make bigger efforts in political empowerment. Unfortunately, LGBT rights are weak in Russia – as in the rest of Visegrad/eastern Europe.

    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/Anatoly_Karlin#Communist_and_environmentalist_phase_.282009-2010.29

    The world is finite, and so the resource stocks and pollution sinks that sustain industrial civilization (“the System”) are limited. We have been in a state of “overshoot”, beyond the “carrying capacity” of the Earth, since the 1980’s (The Limits to Growth, 2004). Limited resources have been drawn down much faster than they could be replenished, and the Earth’s pollution sinks have been overfilled much faster than they could be regenerated.

    Elements of this overshoot can already be seen in phenomena as diverse as plateauing crop yields, topsoil loss, accelerating climate change, peak oil, collapsing fisheries, the depletion of higher-EROEI energy sources, dying rivers, global dimming, the proliferation of “failed states”, neo-colonial exploitation, and rising antibiotic resistance. But things are yet going to get much worse…

    Based on paleoclimate reconstructions of CO2 levels, eventual global warming of above 2C is already inevitable. This will set off a cascade of climatic disasters that will speed up the rate of warming, leading to the desertification of much of the world’s land and oceans, the drying of the great Asian rivers, and massive inundations of the low-lying coasts and deltas that harbor humanity’s heartlands. States will collapse into anarchy, spawning Biblical-scale famines and floods of climate refugees.

    • Replies: @Flip flopper hunter
    @Flip flopper hunter

    Mentally unstable people have dramatic identity changes. Anatoly Karlin has gone from being an eco-socialist self-described "green communist" LGBT rights activist who warned about climate change to a MAGA supporter to a fan of Richard Spencer and alt-right/white nationalist who denies the scientific consensus on global warming - in under a decade.

    Can you really trust his latest online persona as a Russian nationalist? He will probably become a Muslim in a few years...

    Despite his denials, digital footprint deletion attempts and pathological lying his bizarre history is factually documented here:

    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/Anatoly_Karlin
    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Anatoly_Karlin#Views

    The internet never forgets.

    LOL.

    https://twitter.com/Sharon_Kuruvila/status/1511337906937475075

    Replies: @dyauspitr

  29. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @SIMP simp

    Germany is not the only one coming back--

    https://i.postimg.cc/nhFTnYQP/Assaut-Kin-Tche-ou.jpg

    Japanese assault on entrenched Russian positions 1904 at the Battle of Nanshan 南山の戦い Nanzan no tatakai

    https://i.postimg.cc/Yq5G3ptf/Jukendo-jeux-du-sanctuaire-Meiji.jpg

    Imperial Japanese Army was the last in world to maintain a tradition of training for close combat with bayonets 白兵戦 Hakuheisen. This is maintained as a martial arts discipline, Jūkendō 銃剣道

    Replies: @SIMP simp

    Japanese soldiers repeatedly charged with bayonets soviet soldiers, especially in night attacks, during the battles of Khalkhin Gol.

  30. German_reader says:

    Decolonization comes to Germany:
    https://www.stuttgarter-nachrichten.de/inhalt.katholikentag-in-stuttgart-sollte-der-kaiser-endlich-verjagt-werden.5b9c65bc-dc1e-47ef-afe6-72b8c936d6ac.html

    An “artists’ collective” of POC has covered a statue of Wilhelm I, the emperor of the Bismarck era and of national unification, with red cloth in protest against Wilhelm’s alleged role in German colonialism. The action was timed to coincide with the 2nd anniversary of George Floyd’s death, and has been supported and endorsed by the Central Committee of German Catholics, the central association of Catholic laymen in Germany, who seem intent on combining old Kulturkampf grievances with modern “anticolonial” wokeness.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @German_reader


    who seem intent on combining old Kulturkampf grievances with modern “anticolonial” wokeness
     
    Sounds like a potential platform for AP.
  31. @Flip flopper hunter
    @Thulean Friend

    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/Anatoly_Karlin#SJW.2C_Antifa_and_pro-LGBT_phase_.282008.29


    We support the goals of the feminist movement and consider that gender equality has not yet been achieved anywhere. Men are still more valued as bread-winners and women-more as home-makers, and changing these social perceptions is one of our goals. According to the Global Gender Gap Report 2007, Russia comes 45th out of 128 countries – it scores very well on female economic participation, but must make bigger efforts in political empowerment. Unfortunately, LGBT rights are weak in Russia – as in the rest of Visegrad/eastern Europe.
     
    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/Anatoly_Karlin#Communist_and_environmentalist_phase_.282009-2010.29

    The world is finite, and so the resource stocks and pollution sinks that sustain industrial civilization ("the System") are limited. We have been in a state of "overshoot", beyond the "carrying capacity" of the Earth, since the 1980's (The Limits to Growth, 2004). Limited resources have been drawn down much faster than they could be replenished, and the Earth's pollution sinks have been overfilled much faster than they could be regenerated.

    Elements of this overshoot can already be seen in phenomena as diverse as plateauing crop yields, topsoil loss, accelerating climate change, peak oil, collapsing fisheries, the depletion of higher-EROEI energy sources, dying rivers, global dimming, the proliferation of "failed states", neo-colonial exploitation, and rising antibiotic resistance. But things are yet going to get much worse...

    Based on paleoclimate reconstructions of CO2 levels, eventual global warming of above 2C is already inevitable. This will set off a cascade of climatic disasters that will speed up the rate of warming, leading to the desertification of much of the world's land and oceans, the drying of the great Asian rivers, and massive inundations of the low-lying coasts and deltas that harbor humanity's heartlands. States will collapse into anarchy, spawning Biblical-scale famines and floods of climate refugees.
     

    Replies: @Flip flopper hunter

    Mentally unstable people have dramatic identity changes. Anatoly Karlin has gone from being an eco-socialist self-described “green communist” LGBT rights activist who warned about climate change to a MAGA supporter to a fan of Richard Spencer and alt-right/white nationalist who denies the scientific consensus on global warming – in under a decade.

    Can you really trust his latest online persona as a Russian nationalist? He will probably become a Muslim in a few years…

    Despite his denials, digital footprint deletion attempts and pathological lying his bizarre history is factually documented here:

    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/Anatoly_Karlin
    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Anatoly_Karlin#Views

    The internet never forgets.

    LOL.

    https://twitter.com/Sharon_Kuruvila/status/1511337906937475075

    • Replies: @dyauspitr
    @Flip flopper hunter

    this ois unz everybody is a racist here, if you dont like it fuck off

  32. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Are you once again indulging in doomed fantasies, songbird?

    https://i.imgur.com/KChA2qw.jpg

    This is the future and you cannot stop it.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @Flip flopper hunter, @songbird, @Barbarossa, @dyauspitr, @RadicalCenter, @Barbarossa

    It is good that they only show three stories, for when the power goes out, anyone above that will not have running water. And that is to say nothing of what will happen to the sewers.

    • LOL: LatW
  33. @Anatoly Karlin
    I have been saying this war will be determined by attrition rates since March and that this almost certainly favors Russia, unlike flip floppers like Ritter, these views are being vindicated at an accelerating pace.

    Shock and disbelief, though delayed, remain inevitable.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail, @SIMP simp, @Jim Richard, @Flip flopper hunter, @Flip flopper hunter, @Sean

    Why do you lie on your blog by saying you never supported a white ethno-state when you clearly do (or did as recent as 2020)?

    Here’s the sort of Richard Spencer white nationalist ethno-state nonsense all whites from the high-IQ European & Anglosphere countries would be welcome” you were espousing less than 2 years ago:

    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Anatoly_Karlin#White_ethno-state

    The fact you added ‘individual exceptions’ is pretty much the same as Richard Spencer who argued for an ethnostate >99% but not 100% white.

    #AnatolyKarlinlyingturd

  34. @German_reader
    Decolonization comes to Germany:
    https://www.stuttgarter-nachrichten.de/inhalt.katholikentag-in-stuttgart-sollte-der-kaiser-endlich-verjagt-werden.5b9c65bc-dc1e-47ef-afe6-72b8c936d6ac.html

    An "artists' collective" of POC has covered a statue of Wilhelm I, the emperor of the Bismarck era and of national unification, with red cloth in protest against Wilhelm's alleged role in German colonialism. The action was timed to coincide with the 2nd anniversary of George Floyd's death, and has been supported and endorsed by the Central Committee of German Catholics, the central association of Catholic laymen in Germany, who seem intent on combining old Kulturkampf grievances with modern "anticolonial" wokeness.

    Replies: @songbird

    who seem intent on combining old Kulturkampf grievances with modern “anticolonial” wokeness

    Sounds like a potential platform for AP.

  35. German_reader says:
    • Replies: @AP
    @German_reader

    One can only hope. Europe was kept safe from Russia and Germany when PLC existed and was strong.

    Replies: @German_reader

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @German_reader

    OK this is the laugh of the week. It's already 10:00 p.m. in Berlin so we can call it a wrap!

  36. utu says:

    Since there is no doubt left anymore that Scholz and all the rest of German twats and cunts are deliberately sabotaging Ukraine’s war effort:

    Olaf Scholz’s Ukrainian tank battle
    https://www.politico.eu/article/germany-olaf-scholz-ukraine-tank-military-support-conundrum/

    Scholz and Möller lied about NATO informal agreement: “Möller’s comments triggered an immediate backlash from the German center-right opposition. “Such an agreement does not exist,” said Roderich Kiesewetter, a lawmaker from the Christian Democratic Union, arguing that Möller had “promulgated false information. The absence of any agreement “is confirmed by different sources, among others, directly by NATO,” he added

    perhaps it is time for Zelensky to consider putting the Plan FG in motion: Supplies of gas and oil to Germany could be interrupted. Preferably on parts of pipelines still within Russia territory. Begin with Nord Stream 1. Baltic states and Poland will look the other way and won’t interfere with Ukrainian commandos movements and operations. (FG=Fuck Germany)

    • LOL: songbird
    • Replies: @German_reader
    @utu


    Poland has donated over 200 of its own Soviet-made tanks to Ukraine and was counting on Germany to replace them with modern German equivalents, Duda said, adding that Berlin had not honored a commitment to do so.
     
    The German explanation is that Poland insists on getting the latest Leopard 2 versions as replacement, which haven't even yet entered service in the Bundeswehr to any extent. Basically demanding a donation of the most modern stuff as compensation for their old Eastern bloc trash, which comes across as rather greedy.
    Obviously nobody here has any way of knowing what is true and isn't, but telling the Politico article omits to mention this. It's propaganda, nothing more.

    Supplies of gas and oil to Germany could be interrupted. Preferably on parts of pipelines still within Russia territory. Begin with Nord Stream 1.
     
    They should do it, it would be interesting to see if Scholz has the guts to activate Nordstream 2 in such a scenario (though I fear not).

    Replies: @Beckow

  37. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Are you once again indulging in doomed fantasies, songbird?

    https://i.imgur.com/KChA2qw.jpg

    This is the future and you cannot stop it.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @Flip flopper hunter, @songbird, @Barbarossa, @dyauspitr, @RadicalCenter, @Barbarossa

    It’s hard to believe that such things are made in earnest. Are you entirely sure that isn’t some sort of biting satire?

    I’m sure it is in earnest, but man, how cringe! Can they check off a few more progressive right-think boxes there?!

    What about that viciously oppressed dog being forced to pull that tattooed lady in the chariot?! And those fruit trees being forced to give up their young for consumption by rapacious humans?! No one is free until we are all free!

    • LOL: RadicalCenter
  38. TG says:
    @Wokechoke
    I noticed a map showing the Ukies have around 12,000 surrounded in Lysychansk. There's a corridor 14 miles wide the Ukies can walk out from with a right shoulder on the Donets. Will they follow stand & fight or retreat? Or just surrender?


    I feel quite sorry for them. They've been gallant.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @TG

    Not sure that it matters. The job of the Ukrainian soldiers is to die, to serve as human speed-bumps, to force the Russians to spend a lot of time and ammunition slowly grinding them down. But the Ukrainians can easily replace the men, and can easily replace the equipment.

    It would not surprise me if the most experienced troops and officers had already been withdrawn from the front lines in the Donbas, and only recent conscripts/volunteers left behind. Again, their job is to die. The real Ukrainian force is the Americans using their surveillance equipment, controlling the war, and dialing in the coordinates for Ukrainian artillery and missiles to hit. That will continue no matter how many Ukrainian soldiers die.

    I mean, the Russians ‘won’ the siege of Mariupol, but look at how much time, effort, and ammunition it cost them. Will the Russians finally ‘take’ this little pocket in the Donbas? Probably. After how much time and effort? And look at how much of the Ukraine stretches on to the west, even if the Russians only want to get to the Dnieper. And the Ukrainians are training entire new armies in the west…

    I guess the main issue is if the Ukrainian morale really does break, if they really do run out of manpower and supplies, and there is a route, and the Russians can speed up. But if the Ukrainians can manage to keep pulling back and force the Russians to fight hard for every kilometer, well, there are an awful lot of kilometers in the Ukraine. I guess we will see.

    Certainly the push by the west to give the Ukrainians long-range missiles (which will I think be actually controlled by the Americans) does suggest that the western elites are worried that things are not going all that well for the Ukrainians. Missiles launched from Ukraine to vital targets deep inside Russia itself, or hitting ships far out into the black sea, could cause a lot of pain for the Russians. But the Russians have a lot of options to escalate as well…

    Interesting times.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @utu
    @TG

    American decision to provide MLRS and HIMARS to Ukraine is deliberated as we speak:


    US preparing to approve advanced long-range rocket system for Ukraine as Russian TV host warns of crossing a ‘red line’. (Fri May 27, 2022)
    https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/26/politics/us-long-range-rockets-ukraine-mlrs/index.html

    "Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina responded to CNN’s reporting on Twitter Friday, saying he was frustrated the Biden administration has been “dragging their feet” on giving Ukraine the rocket systems."
     
    but I doubt that the really long range ammo (300km or more) would be provided.
  39. AP says:

    The Ukrainian Orthodox Church Moscow Patriarchate has apparently renounced it’s ties with Moscow and entered dialogue with the Orthodox Church of Ukraine that is under Constantinople:

    https://www.kommersant.ru/doc/5378842

    I guess Moscow murdering it’s believers and bombing it’s churches with the blessing of Moscow’s patriarch, who prefers the company of heathen Buddhist Buryat and Islamic Chechens, was too much.

    Because Ukraine is more religious than Russia, this removes a huge percentage of believers from Moscow’s authority. Hopefully the Orthodox Church of Ukraine will be gracious and forgiving.

  40. German_reader says:
    @utu
    Since there is no doubt left anymore that Scholz and all the rest of German twats and cunts are deliberately sabotaging Ukraine's war effort:

    Olaf Scholz’s Ukrainian tank battle
    https://www.politico.eu/article/germany-olaf-scholz-ukraine-tank-military-support-conundrum/

    Scholz and Möller lied about NATO informal agreement: "Möller’s comments triggered an immediate backlash from the German center-right opposition. “Such an agreement does not exist,” said Roderich Kiesewetter, a lawmaker from the Christian Democratic Union, arguing that Möller had “promulgated false information. The absence of any agreement “is confirmed by different sources, among others, directly by NATO,” he added
     
    perhaps it is time for Zelensky to consider putting the Plan FG in motion: Supplies of gas and oil to Germany could be interrupted. Preferably on parts of pipelines still within Russia territory. Begin with Nord Stream 1. Baltic states and Poland will look the other way and won't interfere with Ukrainian commandos movements and operations. (FG=Fuck Germany)

    Replies: @German_reader

    Poland has donated over 200 of its own Soviet-made tanks to Ukraine and was counting on Germany to replace them with modern German equivalents, Duda said, adding that Berlin had not honored a commitment to do so.

    The German explanation is that Poland insists on getting the latest Leopard 2 versions as replacement, which haven’t even yet entered service in the Bundeswehr to any extent. Basically demanding a donation of the most modern stuff as compensation for their old Eastern bloc trash, which comes across as rather greedy.
    Obviously nobody here has any way of knowing what is true and isn’t, but telling the Politico article omits to mention this. It’s propaganda, nothing more.

    Supplies of gas and oil to Germany could be interrupted. Preferably on parts of pipelines still within Russia territory. Begin with Nord Stream 1.

    They should do it, it would be interesting to see if Scholz has the guts to activate Nordstream 2 in such a scenario (though I fear not).

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @German_reader


    ...Scholz has the guts to activate Nordstream 2 in such a scenario
     
    NS2 runs in parallel with NS1, so if Kiev succeeds in blocking NS1 it would impact NS2. Russia said that at best 50% of NS2 would ever be available, the rest is redirected.

    Scholz is gutless, but that is a secondary issue. The real problem is that unless something changes, Europe is looking at paying 4 times more for energy than before 2022, or a slow deindustrialization. The numbers are not changeable, there will be no miracle from Qatar, US, or "Senegal". US can increase production by around 5% in 10 years. Norway even less. Holland is tapped out and ceasing production.

    There is always coal, Poles will get shovels and start digging. Greta will burst from anger, but that's where we are going. Nuclear build-up takes about a decade and can only be used for some energy. Europe's industry needs cheap energy, with Asian prices they will be uncompetetive.

    Replies: @German_reader

  41. @German_reader
    https://mobile.twitter.com/danieltilles1/status/1530170469151907840

    Lol, if true.

    Replies: @AP, @Emil Nikola Richard

    One can only hope. Europe was kept safe from Russia and Germany when PLC existed and was strong.

    • LOL: songbird
    • Replies: @German_reader
    @AP


    Europe was kept safe from Russia and Germany when PLC existed and was strong.
     
    I would welcome the idea, Eastern EU enlargement was a huge mistake in hindsight. I'm sure Brexit voters in Britain will be happy to pay for Poland's peasants and for the reconstruction of Ukraine, and relations with Erdogan's Turkey are certainly going to be very harmonious too. Good luck.

    Replies: @AP

  42. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Are you once again indulging in doomed fantasies, songbird?

    https://i.imgur.com/KChA2qw.jpg

    This is the future and you cannot stop it.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @Flip flopper hunter, @songbird, @Barbarossa, @dyauspitr, @RadicalCenter, @Barbarossa

    god jesus. imAGINE COMMITING SUICIDE AND DOING NOTHING YOURE TRAITIR TO YOPUR OWN RACE. WORSE YOU PEOPLE WILL EXPORT IT TO THE REST OF THE WORLD!!!!!!

  43. German_reader says:
    @AP
    @German_reader

    One can only hope. Europe was kept safe from Russia and Germany when PLC existed and was strong.

    Replies: @German_reader

    Europe was kept safe from Russia and Germany when PLC existed and was strong.

    I would welcome the idea, Eastern EU enlargement was a huge mistake in hindsight. I’m sure Brexit voters in Britain will be happy to pay for Poland’s peasants and for the reconstruction of Ukraine, and relations with Erdogan’s Turkey are certainly going to be very harmonious too. Good luck.

    • Replies: @AP
    @German_reader

    Ukraine will be rebuilt with money confiscated from Russia. Maybe British firms will be given some of the contracts for the rebuilding.

    Erdogan is indeed a wildcard. But this project would have American support.

    Replies: @German_reader

  44. Hadn’t heard about this incident before:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyoto_Animation_arson_attack

    But reviewing it, I wonder if it might be possible to effectively screen people for mental illness based on their compositions. I don’t buy this idea that it is impossible to tell.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @songbird

    Of course, the problem is that almost all of pop culture production is deeply pathological and this has been completely normalized so it's a bit of a moot point from a practical standpoint. Modern society is pathological and produces increasingly pathological people.

    Replies: @songbird

  45. @German_reader
    @utu


    Poland has donated over 200 of its own Soviet-made tanks to Ukraine and was counting on Germany to replace them with modern German equivalents, Duda said, adding that Berlin had not honored a commitment to do so.
     
    The German explanation is that Poland insists on getting the latest Leopard 2 versions as replacement, which haven't even yet entered service in the Bundeswehr to any extent. Basically demanding a donation of the most modern stuff as compensation for their old Eastern bloc trash, which comes across as rather greedy.
    Obviously nobody here has any way of knowing what is true and isn't, but telling the Politico article omits to mention this. It's propaganda, nothing more.

    Supplies of gas and oil to Germany could be interrupted. Preferably on parts of pipelines still within Russia territory. Begin with Nord Stream 1.
     
    They should do it, it would be interesting to see if Scholz has the guts to activate Nordstream 2 in such a scenario (though I fear not).

    Replies: @Beckow

    …Scholz has the guts to activate Nordstream 2 in such a scenario

    NS2 runs in parallel with NS1, so if Kiev succeeds in blocking NS1 it would impact NS2. Russia said that at best 50% of NS2 would ever be available, the rest is redirected.

    Scholz is gutless, but that is a secondary issue. The real problem is that unless something changes, Europe is looking at paying 4 times more for energy than before 2022, or a slow deindustrialization. The numbers are not changeable, there will be no miracle from Qatar, US, or “Senegal”. US can increase production by around 5% in 10 years. Norway even less. Holland is tapped out and ceasing production.

    There is always coal, Poles will get shovels and start digging. Greta will burst from anger, but that’s where we are going. Nuclear build-up takes about a decade and can only be used for some energy. Europe’s industry needs cheap energy, with Asian prices they will be uncompetetive.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @Beckow


    Nuclear build-up takes about a decade and can only be used for some energy.
     
    Greens in Germany still insist on closing down the remaining nuclear power stations by the end of this year...which makes both their bellicosity re Russia and their alleged concern about climate change even more ridiculous.
    You're probably right about the economic prospects, but business as usual is hardly possible when Russia seems intent on annexing large chunks of Ukrainian territory out of some phantom pain over lost imperial glory. But the whole situation certainly brings European impotence into stark relief and will only accelerate the continent's decline.

    Btw, Ukraine already seems to follow utu's recommendation in regard to Hungary, hinting that "something could happen" to the pipeline supplying Hungary, if Hungary continues to block sanctions:
    https://www.politico.eu/newsletter/brussels-playbook/ukraine-speaks-orbans-language-sanctions-push-spyware-moratorium/

    UKRAINE SPEAKS ORBÁN’S LANGUAGE: Kyiv is closely following the EU debate and applying significant pressure. An official has now reminded Budapest that a branch of the Druzhba oil pipeline that supplies Hungary runs through Ukrainian territory — and warned ominously that “something could happen” to it.

    Verbatim: “Hungary has taken advantage of the situation,” said Olena Zerkal, an adviser to the Ukrainian energy minister and Ukraine’s former deputy foreign minister, speaking at the Kyiv Security Forum on Wednesday evening. Budapest’s “appetite for European Union funds is growing every day,” she said, adding that Hungary thought “they could demand anything, so as not to destroy European unity.”

    Leverage: “Ukraine has a wonderful lever in its hands — the Druzhba oil pipeline,” Zerkal said. “Something could happen” to it, and “in my opinion, it would be very appropriate if something happened to it.” She said it would be up to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to decide “whether we really wants to speak with Orbán in the language he understands and which he imposes on the European Union.” (Watch it here, in Ukrainian.)
     

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Beckow, @A123

  46. German_reader says:
    @Beckow
    @German_reader


    ...Scholz has the guts to activate Nordstream 2 in such a scenario
     
    NS2 runs in parallel with NS1, so if Kiev succeeds in blocking NS1 it would impact NS2. Russia said that at best 50% of NS2 would ever be available, the rest is redirected.

    Scholz is gutless, but that is a secondary issue. The real problem is that unless something changes, Europe is looking at paying 4 times more for energy than before 2022, or a slow deindustrialization. The numbers are not changeable, there will be no miracle from Qatar, US, or "Senegal". US can increase production by around 5% in 10 years. Norway even less. Holland is tapped out and ceasing production.

    There is always coal, Poles will get shovels and start digging. Greta will burst from anger, but that's where we are going. Nuclear build-up takes about a decade and can only be used for some energy. Europe's industry needs cheap energy, with Asian prices they will be uncompetetive.

    Replies: @German_reader

    Nuclear build-up takes about a decade and can only be used for some energy.

    Greens in Germany still insist on closing down the remaining nuclear power stations by the end of this year…which makes both their bellicosity re Russia and their alleged concern about climate change even more ridiculous.
    You’re probably right about the economic prospects, but business as usual is hardly possible when Russia seems intent on annexing large chunks of Ukrainian territory out of some phantom pain over lost imperial glory. But the whole situation certainly brings European impotence into stark relief and will only accelerate the continent’s decline.

    Btw, Ukraine already seems to follow utu’s recommendation in regard to Hungary, hinting that “something could happen” to the pipeline supplying Hungary, if Hungary continues to block sanctions:
    https://www.politico.eu/newsletter/brussels-playbook/ukraine-speaks-orbans-language-sanctions-push-spyware-moratorium/

    [MORE]

    UKRAINE SPEAKS ORBÁN’S LANGUAGE: Kyiv is closely following the EU debate and applying significant pressure. An official has now reminded Budapest that a branch of the Druzhba oil pipeline that supplies Hungary runs through Ukrainian territory — and warned ominously that “something could happen” to it.

    Verbatim: “Hungary has taken advantage of the situation,” said Olena Zerkal, an adviser to the Ukrainian energy minister and Ukraine’s former deputy foreign minister, speaking at the Kyiv Security Forum on Wednesday evening. Budapest’s “appetite for European Union funds is growing every day,” she said, adding that Hungary thought “they could demand anything, so as not to destroy European unity.”

    Leverage: “Ukraine has a wonderful lever in its hands — the Druzhba oil pipeline,” Zerkal said. “Something could happen” to it, and “in my opinion, it would be very appropriate if something happened to it.” She said it would be up to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to decide “whether we really wants to speak with Orbán in the language he understands and which he imposes on the European Union.” (Watch it here, in Ukrainian.)

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @German_reader


    Greens in Germany still insist on closing down the remaining nuclear power stations by the end of this year…which makes both their bellicosity re Russia and their alleged concern about climate change even more ridiculous.
     
    That really is incredible that they think they can have their cake and eat it too. It's characteristic of true ideologues though. They clearly have no sense of prioritization and realpolitik. The real world of tradeoffs doesn't matter as long as they hold all sacred opinions simultaneu0sly.
    , @Beckow
    @German_reader


    ...but business as usual is hardly possible when Russia seems intent on annexing large chunks of Ukrainian territory
     
    Right, that's how it always goes, "simply not possible", "something must be done". I will refrain from what-about because business for some weird reason continued 'as usual' when the West was actively bombing and annexing chunks of other places. I refrain...

    That is a road to nowhere. Any realistic assessment says that Russia cannot be destroyed given today's realities, probably not even be locally defeated. You start from there, not from a virtue principle that is observed by the West only when suitable. Russia and pro-Russians in Ukraine have a right to their opinion - their demands are not unreasonable by normal standards: autonomy, language rights, no Nato, no Bandera, etc...Sooner or later both sides will talk, why not now? Out of some made-up "principle" that is never observed by the West when they want something badly enough?

    But ok, let's give it a few more months of suffering, destruction, and unnecessary deaths. It won't change anything, but clearly the ideologues are not ready.

    Replies: @AP

    , @A123
    @German_reader


    Ukraine already seems to follow utu’s recommendation in regard to Hungary, hinting that “something could happen” to the pipeline supplying Hungary, if Hungary continues to block sanctions:
     
    One of Orban's key character traits is, always respond when pushed. Hopefully, the comment is simply an unwise bluff from a junior official in Zelensky's administration. If "something" happens to the pipeline, "something" similar is near certain to happen in response. The most obvious vulnerabilities are the two major east-west rail arteries that link up to Poland. However, there are many other options available.

    Hungary has 14 Saab "Gripen/Griffin" JAS 39C/D fighter/bombers, including Rafael's LITENING targeting pod for ground attack. I believe all are in service and available.

    PEACE 😇
  47. @German_reader
    @Beckow


    Nuclear build-up takes about a decade and can only be used for some energy.
     
    Greens in Germany still insist on closing down the remaining nuclear power stations by the end of this year...which makes both their bellicosity re Russia and their alleged concern about climate change even more ridiculous.
    You're probably right about the economic prospects, but business as usual is hardly possible when Russia seems intent on annexing large chunks of Ukrainian territory out of some phantom pain over lost imperial glory. But the whole situation certainly brings European impotence into stark relief and will only accelerate the continent's decline.

    Btw, Ukraine already seems to follow utu's recommendation in regard to Hungary, hinting that "something could happen" to the pipeline supplying Hungary, if Hungary continues to block sanctions:
    https://www.politico.eu/newsletter/brussels-playbook/ukraine-speaks-orbans-language-sanctions-push-spyware-moratorium/

    UKRAINE SPEAKS ORBÁN’S LANGUAGE: Kyiv is closely following the EU debate and applying significant pressure. An official has now reminded Budapest that a branch of the Druzhba oil pipeline that supplies Hungary runs through Ukrainian territory — and warned ominously that “something could happen” to it.

    Verbatim: “Hungary has taken advantage of the situation,” said Olena Zerkal, an adviser to the Ukrainian energy minister and Ukraine’s former deputy foreign minister, speaking at the Kyiv Security Forum on Wednesday evening. Budapest’s “appetite for European Union funds is growing every day,” she said, adding that Hungary thought “they could demand anything, so as not to destroy European unity.”

    Leverage: “Ukraine has a wonderful lever in its hands — the Druzhba oil pipeline,” Zerkal said. “Something could happen” to it, and “in my opinion, it would be very appropriate if something happened to it.” She said it would be up to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to decide “whether we really wants to speak with Orbán in the language he understands and which he imposes on the European Union.” (Watch it here, in Ukrainian.)
     

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Beckow, @A123

    Greens in Germany still insist on closing down the remaining nuclear power stations by the end of this year…which makes both their bellicosity re Russia and their alleged concern about climate change even more ridiculous.

    That really is incredible that they think they can have their cake and eat it too. It’s characteristic of true ideologues though. They clearly have no sense of prioritization and realpolitik. The real world of tradeoffs doesn’t matter as long as they hold all sacred opinions simultaneu0sly.

  48. @songbird
    Hadn't heard about this incident before:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyoto_Animation_arson_attack

    But reviewing it, I wonder if it might be possible to effectively screen people for mental illness based on their compositions. I don't buy this idea that it is impossible to tell.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    Of course, the problem is that almost all of pop culture production is deeply pathological and this has been completely normalized so it’s a bit of a moot point from a practical standpoint. Modern society is pathological and produces increasingly pathological people.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Barbarossa

    I suspect that a lot of this tranny insanity stuff would die down automatically, if the education system were cut back to the point of actual usefulness. How many middle school girls would identify as male, if public school stopped in the 8th grade? I think this ongoing adolescence caused by continuing education is in large part what helps to lead to this crisis of identity.

  49. @German_reader
    https://mobile.twitter.com/danieltilles1/status/1530170469151907840

    Lol, if true.

    Replies: @AP, @Emil Nikola Richard

    OK this is the laugh of the week. It’s already 10:00 p.m. in Berlin so we can call it a wrap!

  50. @German_reader
    @AP


    Europe was kept safe from Russia and Germany when PLC existed and was strong.
     
    I would welcome the idea, Eastern EU enlargement was a huge mistake in hindsight. I'm sure Brexit voters in Britain will be happy to pay for Poland's peasants and for the reconstruction of Ukraine, and relations with Erdogan's Turkey are certainly going to be very harmonious too. Good luck.

    Replies: @AP

    Ukraine will be rebuilt with money confiscated from Russia. Maybe British firms will be given some of the contracts for the rebuilding.

    Erdogan is indeed a wildcard. But this project would have American support.

    • Agree: Philip Owen
    • Replies: @German_reader
    @AP


    Ukraine will be rebuilt with money confiscated from Russia.
     
    You can't seriously believe that. Even if such a scheme goes ahead, it will be a mere drop in the ocean. The cost for Ukraine's reconstruction will fall mainly on EU members (big bad Germany especially).
    And for the record: Personally I think it would be better if Scholz greenlighted at least the export of the 100 Marder infantry fighting vehicles (a weapons system whose risks of escalation are limited after all...unlike long-range missiles which could be used to hit targets within Russia). But this scapegoating of Germany is frankly ridiculous.


    Erdogan is indeed a wildcard. But this project would have American support.
     
    Yeah, all for the best of "Europe" of course.
    Currently in the Aegean:
    https://www.ekathimerini.com/news/1185320/greece-should-demilitarize-islands-or-turkey-may-challenge-their-sovereignty-cavusoglu-warns/
  51. German_reader says:
    @AP
    @German_reader

    Ukraine will be rebuilt with money confiscated from Russia. Maybe British firms will be given some of the contracts for the rebuilding.

    Erdogan is indeed a wildcard. But this project would have American support.

    Replies: @German_reader

    Ukraine will be rebuilt with money confiscated from Russia.

    You can’t seriously believe that. Even if such a scheme goes ahead, it will be a mere drop in the ocean. The cost for Ukraine’s reconstruction will fall mainly on EU members (big bad Germany especially).
    And for the record: Personally I think it would be better if Scholz greenlighted at least the export of the 100 Marder infantry fighting vehicles (a weapons system whose risks of escalation are limited after all…unlike long-range missiles which could be used to hit targets within Russia). But this scapegoating of Germany is frankly ridiculous.

    Erdogan is indeed a wildcard. But this project would have American support.

    Yeah, all for the best of “Europe” of course.
    Currently in the Aegean:
    https://www.ekathimerini.com/news/1185320/greece-should-demilitarize-islands-or-turkey-may-challenge-their-sovereignty-cavusoglu-warns/

  52. utu says:
    @TG
    @Wokechoke

    Not sure that it matters. The job of the Ukrainian soldiers is to die, to serve as human speed-bumps, to force the Russians to spend a lot of time and ammunition slowly grinding them down. But the Ukrainians can easily replace the men, and can easily replace the equipment.

    It would not surprise me if the most experienced troops and officers had already been withdrawn from the front lines in the Donbas, and only recent conscripts/volunteers left behind. Again, their job is to die. The real Ukrainian force is the Americans using their surveillance equipment, controlling the war, and dialing in the coordinates for Ukrainian artillery and missiles to hit. That will continue no matter how many Ukrainian soldiers die.

    I mean, the Russians 'won' the siege of Mariupol, but look at how much time, effort, and ammunition it cost them. Will the Russians finally 'take' this little pocket in the Donbas? Probably. After how much time and effort? And look at how much of the Ukraine stretches on to the west, even if the Russians only want to get to the Dnieper. And the Ukrainians are training entire new armies in the west...

    I guess the main issue is if the Ukrainian morale really does break, if they really do run out of manpower and supplies, and there is a route, and the Russians can speed up. But if the Ukrainians can manage to keep pulling back and force the Russians to fight hard for every kilometer, well, there are an awful lot of kilometers in the Ukraine. I guess we will see.

    Certainly the push by the west to give the Ukrainians long-range missiles (which will I think be actually controlled by the Americans) does suggest that the western elites are worried that things are not going all that well for the Ukrainians. Missiles launched from Ukraine to vital targets deep inside Russia itself, or hitting ships far out into the black sea, could cause a lot of pain for the Russians. But the Russians have a lot of options to escalate as well...

    Interesting times.

    Replies: @utu

    American decision to provide MLRS and HIMARS to Ukraine is deliberated as we speak:

    US preparing to approve advanced long-range rocket system for Ukraine as Russian TV host warns of crossing a ‘red line’. (Fri May 27, 2022)
    https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/26/politics/us-long-range-rockets-ukraine-mlrs/index.html

    “Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina responded to CNN’s reporting on Twitter Friday, saying he was frustrated the Biden administration has been “dragging their feet” on giving Ukraine the rocket systems.”

    but I doubt that the really long range ammo (300km or more) would be provided.

  53. @Flip flopper hunter
    @Flip flopper hunter

    Mentally unstable people have dramatic identity changes. Anatoly Karlin has gone from being an eco-socialist self-described "green communist" LGBT rights activist who warned about climate change to a MAGA supporter to a fan of Richard Spencer and alt-right/white nationalist who denies the scientific consensus on global warming - in under a decade.

    Can you really trust his latest online persona as a Russian nationalist? He will probably become a Muslim in a few years...

    Despite his denials, digital footprint deletion attempts and pathological lying his bizarre history is factually documented here:

    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/Anatoly_Karlin
    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Anatoly_Karlin#Views

    The internet never forgets.

    LOL.

    https://twitter.com/Sharon_Kuruvila/status/1511337906937475075

    Replies: @dyauspitr

    this ois unz everybody is a racist here, if you dont like it fuck off

  54. @German_reader
    @Beckow


    Nuclear build-up takes about a decade and can only be used for some energy.
     
    Greens in Germany still insist on closing down the remaining nuclear power stations by the end of this year...which makes both their bellicosity re Russia and their alleged concern about climate change even more ridiculous.
    You're probably right about the economic prospects, but business as usual is hardly possible when Russia seems intent on annexing large chunks of Ukrainian territory out of some phantom pain over lost imperial glory. But the whole situation certainly brings European impotence into stark relief and will only accelerate the continent's decline.

    Btw, Ukraine already seems to follow utu's recommendation in regard to Hungary, hinting that "something could happen" to the pipeline supplying Hungary, if Hungary continues to block sanctions:
    https://www.politico.eu/newsletter/brussels-playbook/ukraine-speaks-orbans-language-sanctions-push-spyware-moratorium/

    UKRAINE SPEAKS ORBÁN’S LANGUAGE: Kyiv is closely following the EU debate and applying significant pressure. An official has now reminded Budapest that a branch of the Druzhba oil pipeline that supplies Hungary runs through Ukrainian territory — and warned ominously that “something could happen” to it.

    Verbatim: “Hungary has taken advantage of the situation,” said Olena Zerkal, an adviser to the Ukrainian energy minister and Ukraine’s former deputy foreign minister, speaking at the Kyiv Security Forum on Wednesday evening. Budapest’s “appetite for European Union funds is growing every day,” she said, adding that Hungary thought “they could demand anything, so as not to destroy European unity.”

    Leverage: “Ukraine has a wonderful lever in its hands — the Druzhba oil pipeline,” Zerkal said. “Something could happen” to it, and “in my opinion, it would be very appropriate if something happened to it.” She said it would be up to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to decide “whether we really wants to speak with Orbán in the language he understands and which he imposes on the European Union.” (Watch it here, in Ukrainian.)
     

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Beckow, @A123

    …but business as usual is hardly possible when Russia seems intent on annexing large chunks of Ukrainian territory

    Right, that’s how it always goes, “simply not possible“, “something must be done“. I will refrain from what-about because business for some weird reason continued ‘as usual’ when the West was actively bombing and annexing chunks of other places. I refrain…

    That is a road to nowhere. Any realistic assessment says that Russia cannot be destroyed given today’s realities, probably not even be locally defeated. You start from there, not from a virtue principle that is observed by the West only when suitable. Russia and pro-Russians in Ukraine have a right to their opinion – their demands are not unreasonable by normal standards: autonomy, language rights, no Nato, no Bandera, etc…Sooner or later both sides will talk, why not now? Out of some made-up “principle” that is never observed by the West when they want something badly enough?

    But ok, let’s give it a few more months of suffering, destruction, and unnecessary deaths. It won’t change anything, but clearly the ideologues are not ready.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Beckow


    Russia and pro-Russians in Ukraine have a right to their opinion
     
    Thanks to Russia’s actions, at this point about 2% of Ukraine’s population is pro-Russian. Even Moscow’s Church has cut ties with Moscow. I know a few pro-Russians in Ukraine (as late as February), anti-Maidan, they are all anti-Russian now.

    Replies: @Beckow

  55. AP says:
    @Beckow
    @German_reader


    ...but business as usual is hardly possible when Russia seems intent on annexing large chunks of Ukrainian territory
     
    Right, that's how it always goes, "simply not possible", "something must be done". I will refrain from what-about because business for some weird reason continued 'as usual' when the West was actively bombing and annexing chunks of other places. I refrain...

    That is a road to nowhere. Any realistic assessment says that Russia cannot be destroyed given today's realities, probably not even be locally defeated. You start from there, not from a virtue principle that is observed by the West only when suitable. Russia and pro-Russians in Ukraine have a right to their opinion - their demands are not unreasonable by normal standards: autonomy, language rights, no Nato, no Bandera, etc...Sooner or later both sides will talk, why not now? Out of some made-up "principle" that is never observed by the West when they want something badly enough?

    But ok, let's give it a few more months of suffering, destruction, and unnecessary deaths. It won't change anything, but clearly the ideologues are not ready.

    Replies: @AP

    Russia and pro-Russians in Ukraine have a right to their opinion

    Thanks to Russia’s actions, at this point about 2% of Ukraine’s population is pro-Russian. Even Moscow’s Church has cut ties with Moscow. I know a few pro-Russians in Ukraine (as late as February), anti-Maidan, they are all anti-Russian now.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @AP

    2% is clearly nonsense. For one, why are you excluding all people in Donbas? Why, if Kiev claims that they will never give up the territory? You need to choose, but you don't want to.

    In the rest of rump-Ukraine under the current war conditions there is no way to know how many are for whom. The emotions and risks are too high. But to assume that 1/3 of the population that had pro-Russia sympathies has disappeared is nonsense. You need to wait until there is some normalcy and then we will see. I suspect - as always in the past - a large percentage will go with the winning side and claim that they were with them all along.

    You are fooled by the constant one-sided propaganda. If Russia keeps Kherson majority of people living there (who stay) will say in surveys that they are fine with it. Some will even be enthusiastic. More so in Mariupol.

    Stop hallucinating based on a few propaganda pieces. It is also not binary as you imply, most people just want peace and prosperity and won't hate either side in the long run.

    Replies: @AP

  56. @AP
    @Beckow


    Russia and pro-Russians in Ukraine have a right to their opinion
     
    Thanks to Russia’s actions, at this point about 2% of Ukraine’s population is pro-Russian. Even Moscow’s Church has cut ties with Moscow. I know a few pro-Russians in Ukraine (as late as February), anti-Maidan, they are all anti-Russian now.

    Replies: @Beckow

    2% is clearly nonsense. For one, why are you excluding all people in Donbas? Why, if Kiev claims that they will never give up the territory? You need to choose, but you don’t want to.

    In the rest of rump-Ukraine under the current war conditions there is no way to know how many are for whom. The emotions and risks are too high. But to assume that 1/3 of the population that had pro-Russia sympathies has disappeared is nonsense. You need to wait until there is some normalcy and then we will see. I suspect – as always in the past – a large percentage will go with the winning side and claim that they were with them all along.

    You are fooled by the constant one-sided propaganda. If Russia keeps Kherson majority of people living there (who stay) will say in surveys that they are fine with it. Some will even be enthusiastic. More so in Mariupol.

    Stop hallucinating based on a few propaganda pieces. It is also not binary as you imply, most people just want peace and prosperity and won’t hate either side in the long run.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @AP
    @Beckow


    2% is clearly nonsense
     
    We’ll, since it matches the change in attitude all of the pro-Russians in Ukraine I’ve known personally, and all the ones that are friends of friends, then it seems realistic.

    For one, why are you excluding all people in Donbas
     
    It only excludes those in the Donbas republics. They weren’t polled. Since the Russians weren’t bombing them they presumably haven’t changed their minds about the Russians to that great an extent.

    In the rest of rump-Ukraine under the current war conditions there is no way to know how many are for whom
     
    That’s a convenient excuse. They can polled anonymously. My sample size is a lot less than the 2,000 or so in the poll but it matches. Normal people are outraged at those who bomb and kill them, after all.

    But to assume that 1/3 of the population that had pro-Russia sympathies has disappeared is nonsense

     

    Those aren’t assumptions. They did not disappear, they changed their mind. A lot of Jews in Eastern Europe used to be pro-German, you know. Something changed their minds too.

    a large percentage will go with the winning side
     
    How many Balts, Galicians, and Poles went with the winning side and became pro-Russian after World War II?

    People whose homes were destroyed and neighbors murdered will not change their minds. But thanks for the insight into what you would likely do.

    Replies: @Sean, @Triteleia Laxa

  57. @Anatoly Karlin
    I have been saying this war will be determined by attrition rates since March and that this almost certainly favors Russia, unlike flip floppers like Ritter, these views are being vindicated at an accelerating pace.

    Shock and disbelief, though delayed, remain inevitable.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail, @SIMP simp, @Jim Richard, @Flip flopper hunter, @Flip flopper hunter, @Sean

    The attrition of equipment is is far less favourable to Russia. Jack F. Matlock Jr. the former US Ambassador (who agrees with Mearsheimer’s view on the origins on the war), said that he would not be too sure the Russians won’t solve the technical problems, and now we hear they are, MacGyver-style, cannibalizing washing machines and dryers for microchips to use in missiles. While Russian lash ups may give them the time to win by destroying the enemy army, attrition will give Ukraine the time to properly integrate Western equipment.

  58. AP says:
    @Beckow
    @AP

    2% is clearly nonsense. For one, why are you excluding all people in Donbas? Why, if Kiev claims that they will never give up the territory? You need to choose, but you don't want to.

    In the rest of rump-Ukraine under the current war conditions there is no way to know how many are for whom. The emotions and risks are too high. But to assume that 1/3 of the population that had pro-Russia sympathies has disappeared is nonsense. You need to wait until there is some normalcy and then we will see. I suspect - as always in the past - a large percentage will go with the winning side and claim that they were with them all along.

    You are fooled by the constant one-sided propaganda. If Russia keeps Kherson majority of people living there (who stay) will say in surveys that they are fine with it. Some will even be enthusiastic. More so in Mariupol.

    Stop hallucinating based on a few propaganda pieces. It is also not binary as you imply, most people just want peace and prosperity and won't hate either side in the long run.

    Replies: @AP

    2% is clearly nonsense

    We’ll, since it matches the change in attitude all of the pro-Russians in Ukraine I’ve known personally, and all the ones that are friends of friends, then it seems realistic.

    For one, why are you excluding all people in Donbas

    It only excludes those in the Donbas republics. They weren’t polled. Since the Russians weren’t bombing them they presumably haven’t changed their minds about the Russians to that great an extent.

    In the rest of rump-Ukraine under the current war conditions there is no way to know how many are for whom

    That’s a convenient excuse. They can polled anonymously. My sample size is a lot less than the 2,000 or so in the poll but it matches. Normal people are outraged at those who bomb and kill them, after all.

    But to assume that 1/3 of the population that had pro-Russia sympathies has disappeared is nonsense

    Those aren’t assumptions. They did not disappear, they changed their mind. A lot of Jews in Eastern Europe used to be pro-German, you know. Something changed their minds too.

    a large percentage will go with the winning side

    How many Balts, Galicians, and Poles went with the winning side and became pro-Russian after World War II?

    People whose homes were destroyed and neighbors murdered will not change their minds. But thanks for the insight into what you would likely do.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @AP

    More than a few Poles were murdered by their Ukrainian neighbours in WW2 Galicia. No ethnic Russian in Ukraine who voted for Zelensky because he promised peace is going to say what they really think of his performance now. People in other countries are going to be quite vocal about his blundering, as they become increasingly unable to heat their homes or feed their families. Public opinion in Ukraine does not matter now.

    Replies: @AP

    , @Triteleia Laxa
    @AP

    One moment Beckow is boasting gleefully of all of the destruction that Russia is inflicting on Ukraine. The next moment he is in shock and disbelief that Ukrainians no longer like Russia.

    I didn't realise just how bad it was, but something really is rotten with Russia. Just yesterday I saw a video clip of some Russian talking head practically screaming into the camera about how Russia must nuke Germany! His hysterical freak out went on for minutes. At this point, any sane Russian must be on the verge, at least, of consciously hating their own country and culture. It is sick.

    Indeed, I assume that this is what is driving much of their madness. The contradiction of feeling between wounded pride and becoming monstrous is too much for their limited minds to contain. They have no idea of the extremity of the cost that they will pay for this war; regardless of the mundane result.

    Personally, I'm sorry to Eastern Europeans for my past doubt on their pessimism as regards Russia. I see plenty of darkness and craziness, but I am always surprised at how individuals, or even nations, can get wrapped up in it so completely. You'd think that at least one of these Russian shills, who was boasting of an instant, almost bloodless victory, and a reuniting with their beloved brothers, would now have the courage to express the horror that they must profoundly feel at how their support has helped unleash such a catastrophe, but no, instead they revel in it, while also pretending that it has no actual effect. What pathetic people. I pity them, even as I occasionally wonder why they need exist.

    Ultimately, I do understand that they will very slowly learn and grow, but their limited spirit makes me think of a dumb yet cruel animal. It too deserves love, but sometimes love is stark honesty, of the situation, and your perception of the other person.

    The people still cheerleading the Russian invasion are so weak-minded and ignorant that they have allowed their existence to become a portal for horror, and some are even so diminished that they now identify as that horror. I wish them the searing pain, light and fire of self-awareness, and the strength to endure every moment of it.

    Replies: @utu, @Wokechoke

  59. @AP
    @Beckow


    2% is clearly nonsense
     
    We’ll, since it matches the change in attitude all of the pro-Russians in Ukraine I’ve known personally, and all the ones that are friends of friends, then it seems realistic.

    For one, why are you excluding all people in Donbas
     
    It only excludes those in the Donbas republics. They weren’t polled. Since the Russians weren’t bombing them they presumably haven’t changed their minds about the Russians to that great an extent.

    In the rest of rump-Ukraine under the current war conditions there is no way to know how many are for whom
     
    That’s a convenient excuse. They can polled anonymously. My sample size is a lot less than the 2,000 or so in the poll but it matches. Normal people are outraged at those who bomb and kill them, after all.

    But to assume that 1/3 of the population that had pro-Russia sympathies has disappeared is nonsense

     

    Those aren’t assumptions. They did not disappear, they changed their mind. A lot of Jews in Eastern Europe used to be pro-German, you know. Something changed their minds too.

    a large percentage will go with the winning side
     
    How many Balts, Galicians, and Poles went with the winning side and became pro-Russian after World War II?

    People whose homes were destroyed and neighbors murdered will not change their minds. But thanks for the insight into what you would likely do.

    Replies: @Sean, @Triteleia Laxa

    More than a few Poles were murdered by their Ukrainian neighbours in WW2 Galicia. No ethnic Russian in Ukraine who voted for Zelensky because he promised peace is going to say what they really think of his performance now. People in other countries are going to be quite vocal about his blundering, as they become increasingly unable to heat their homes or feed their families. Public opinion in Ukraine does not matter now.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Sean


    More than a few Poles were murdered by their Ukrainian neighbours in WW2 Galicia.
     
    Correct, and Poles hated Ukrainians right up until the 1990s. When my grandmother and aunt visited Poland in the 1970s they didn't even dare speak Ukrainian to each other when anyone was around.

    So maybe in 30-40 years Ukrainians will think normally about Russians.

    No ethnic Russian in Ukraine who voted for Zelensky because he promised peace is going to say what they really think of his performance now
     
    How many do you know?
  60. Dark features in Irish being attributed to the Spanish Armada probably goes back a ways, but I’m a bit of a skeptic on it, as it seems like most were killed or escaped.

    I read an old story once, where a Flemish character’s dark eyes (and those of other Flemish) were attributed to the Valan dominion. (Spain)

    Seems as though red hair on Taiwan is often attributed to the Dutch, though supposedly most of it comes from the native tribes.

    I wonder if there is anything else like that. (that is, probably false attributions of rare traits in populations to foreigners with the same traits)

  61. @Barbarossa
    @songbird

    Of course, the problem is that almost all of pop culture production is deeply pathological and this has been completely normalized so it's a bit of a moot point from a practical standpoint. Modern society is pathological and produces increasingly pathological people.

    Replies: @songbird

    I suspect that a lot of this tranny insanity stuff would die down automatically, if the education system were cut back to the point of actual usefulness. How many middle school girls would identify as male, if public school stopped in the 8th grade? I think this ongoing adolescence caused by continuing education is in large part what helps to lead to this crisis of identity.

  62. AP says:
    @Sean
    @AP

    More than a few Poles were murdered by their Ukrainian neighbours in WW2 Galicia. No ethnic Russian in Ukraine who voted for Zelensky because he promised peace is going to say what they really think of his performance now. People in other countries are going to be quite vocal about his blundering, as they become increasingly unable to heat their homes or feed their families. Public opinion in Ukraine does not matter now.

    Replies: @AP

    More than a few Poles were murdered by their Ukrainian neighbours in WW2 Galicia.

    Correct, and Poles hated Ukrainians right up until the 1990s. When my grandmother and aunt visited Poland in the 1970s they didn’t even dare speak Ukrainian to each other when anyone was around.

    So maybe in 30-40 years Ukrainians will think normally about Russians.

    No ethnic Russian in Ukraine who voted for Zelensky because he promised peace is going to say what they really think of his performance now

    How many do you know?

  63. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Are you once again indulging in doomed fantasies, songbird?

    https://i.imgur.com/KChA2qw.jpg

    This is the future and you cannot stop it.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @Flip flopper hunter, @songbird, @Barbarossa, @dyauspitr, @RadicalCenter, @Barbarossa

    Not to get, like, all technical and stuff, but for a future you generally need to have children.

    That’s something that even the declining number of heterosexual Germans of child-bearing/-raising age just don’t care about these days — and something that the confused deviants depicted in the poster physically cannot do together even if they wanted to.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
  64. A123 says: • Website
    @German_reader
    @Beckow


    Nuclear build-up takes about a decade and can only be used for some energy.
     
    Greens in Germany still insist on closing down the remaining nuclear power stations by the end of this year...which makes both their bellicosity re Russia and their alleged concern about climate change even more ridiculous.
    You're probably right about the economic prospects, but business as usual is hardly possible when Russia seems intent on annexing large chunks of Ukrainian territory out of some phantom pain over lost imperial glory. But the whole situation certainly brings European impotence into stark relief and will only accelerate the continent's decline.

    Btw, Ukraine already seems to follow utu's recommendation in regard to Hungary, hinting that "something could happen" to the pipeline supplying Hungary, if Hungary continues to block sanctions:
    https://www.politico.eu/newsletter/brussels-playbook/ukraine-speaks-orbans-language-sanctions-push-spyware-moratorium/

    UKRAINE SPEAKS ORBÁN’S LANGUAGE: Kyiv is closely following the EU debate and applying significant pressure. An official has now reminded Budapest that a branch of the Druzhba oil pipeline that supplies Hungary runs through Ukrainian territory — and warned ominously that “something could happen” to it.

    Verbatim: “Hungary has taken advantage of the situation,” said Olena Zerkal, an adviser to the Ukrainian energy minister and Ukraine’s former deputy foreign minister, speaking at the Kyiv Security Forum on Wednesday evening. Budapest’s “appetite for European Union funds is growing every day,” she said, adding that Hungary thought “they could demand anything, so as not to destroy European unity.”

    Leverage: “Ukraine has a wonderful lever in its hands — the Druzhba oil pipeline,” Zerkal said. “Something could happen” to it, and “in my opinion, it would be very appropriate if something happened to it.” She said it would be up to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to decide “whether we really wants to speak with Orbán in the language he understands and which he imposes on the European Union.” (Watch it here, in Ukrainian.)
     

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Beckow, @A123

    Ukraine already seems to follow utu’s recommendation in regard to Hungary, hinting that “something could happen” to the pipeline supplying Hungary, if Hungary continues to block sanctions:

    One of Orban’s key character traits is, always respond when pushed. Hopefully, the comment is simply an unwise bluff from a junior official in Zelensky’s administration. If “something” happens to the pipeline, “something” similar is near certain to happen in response. The most obvious vulnerabilities are the two major east-west rail arteries that link up to Poland. However, there are many other options available.

    Hungary has 14 Saab “Gripen/Griffin” JAS 39C/D fighter/bombers, including Rafael’s LITENING targeting pod for ground attack. I believe all are in service and available.

    PEACE 😇

  65. A123 says: • Website

    George IslamoSoros strikes again: (1)

    Two George Soros-funded leftist pressure groups — Faith in Public Life and Faithful America — have launched a petition drive protesting San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone’s decision to bar Nancy Pelosi from receiving Holy Communion because of her aggressive abortion advocacy.

    “A holy sacrament should never be weaponized for political ends or to fight the culture wars,” the letter accompanying the petition declares, adopting arguments famously articulated by then-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick in 2004.

    As an enemy of Judeo-Christian values, guess who The IslamoSoros supporting in Georgia. (2)

    Liberal billionaire George Soros has pushed \$1 million into Georgia to back Stacey Abrams’ second attempt at landing in the governor’s office, filings show.

    Soros’ Democracy PAC II, a federal committee bankrolled by \$125 million from the financier for the 2022 elections, made a \$1 million donation to One Georgia Inc. on March 11, Federal Election Commission records show.

    One Georgia Inc. is a leadership committee launched to aid Abrams’ candidacy, and Abrams nor the group appear to have publicly announced its existence.

    Is anyone surprised?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/faith/2022/05/26/soros-funded-groups-demand-pelosi-allowed-receive-communion/

    (2) https://www.foxnews.com/politics/soros-throws-1m-behind-stacey-abrams-second-gubernatorial-run

    • Replies: @songbird
    @A123

    I say at least press a wafer into her forehead to see if it burns her, or if she melts, or catches fire, or explodes.

    , @songbird
    @A123

    According to Tariq, Abrams is a tool of white supremacy.

  66. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Are you once again indulging in doomed fantasies, songbird?

    https://i.imgur.com/KChA2qw.jpg

    This is the future and you cannot stop it.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @Flip flopper hunter, @songbird, @Barbarossa, @dyauspitr, @RadicalCenter, @Barbarossa

    I’m sure you’re being tongue in cheek, but the funny thing is that the promises of Woke multiculturalism rarely work out as they are advertised to.

    As a recently noted example; it’s long been a meme on the right how hard Left cities like Portland or San Fran have such a homeless problem. I witnessed it myself when a few years ago I went out towards Portland to visit my brother. The sheer scale and squalor of the homeless population were mind blowing to someone used to cities out East.

    Regardless of the political memeing I assumed that a fair part of the issue was just due to the temperate nature of these cities being much habitable to tent dwellers. I’m starting to think though that the problem may be exacerbated more by political orientation than I initially realized.

    Now Ithaca, a small super lefty city, a couple hours from me is grappling with a major homeless problem, with encampments sprawling out of control and police desperately trying to devise ways to keep them contained to approved areas. I guess Ithaca isn’t called Portland of the East for nothing! An Ithaca Bakery employee told me it’s not uncommon now for druggies to lock themselves in the bathrooms to get a high and sometimes OD.

    Of course it’s not surprising since I’m sure potential homeless know they are likely to be treated with much more kid glove handling than in Rochester or Binghamton.

    The poster should also show some drug addicts who have lost hope after neo-liberalism destroyed their jobs, communities, and sense of purpose in life.

    • Replies: @Mikel
    @Barbarossa


    I assumed that a fair part of the issue was just due to the temperate nature of these cities being much habitable to tent dwellers. I’m starting to think though that the problem may be exacerbated more by political orientation than I initially realized.
     
    I was recently in Hawaii and the homeless masses seem to have found the perfect combination in Honolulu: warm weather all year long, left-wing politics and a big city full of tourists to prey on.

    I don't know what to make of this increasing problem of homelessness. It is clearly related to drug addiction and mental illness but those problems have always existed and they didn't drive so many people to set up communities of vagrants in every city. It seems to be the manifestation of some social illness but what can authorities really do when so many people decide to live on the street of their own accord?

    Replies: @Barbarossa

  67. @A123
    George IslamoSoros strikes again: (1)

    Two George Soros-funded leftist pressure groups — Faith in Public Life and Faithful America — have launched a petition drive protesting San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone’s decision to bar Nancy Pelosi from receiving Holy Communion because of her aggressive abortion advocacy.

    “A holy sacrament should never be weaponized for political ends or to fight the culture wars,” the letter accompanying the petition declares, adopting arguments famously articulated by then-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick in 2004.
     
    As an enemy of Judeo-Christian values, guess who The IslamoSoros supporting in Georgia. (2)

    Liberal billionaire George Soros has pushed $1 million into Georgia to back Stacey Abrams' second attempt at landing in the governor's office, filings show.

    Soros' Democracy PAC II, a federal committee bankrolled by $125 million from the financier for the 2022 elections, made a $1 million donation to One Georgia Inc. on March 11, Federal Election Commission records show.

    One Georgia Inc. is a leadership committee launched to aid Abrams' candidacy, and Abrams nor the group appear to have publicly announced its existence.
     
    Is anyone surprised?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/faith/2022/05/26/soros-funded-groups-demand-pelosi-allowed-receive-communion/

    (2) https://www.foxnews.com/politics/soros-throws-1m-behind-stacey-abrams-second-gubernatorial-run

    Replies: @songbird, @songbird

    I say at least press a wafer into her forehead to see if it burns her, or if she melts, or catches fire, or explodes.

  68. Scholz and Kishida, keirei and saikeirei

  69. @A123
    George IslamoSoros strikes again: (1)

    Two George Soros-funded leftist pressure groups — Faith in Public Life and Faithful America — have launched a petition drive protesting San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone’s decision to bar Nancy Pelosi from receiving Holy Communion because of her aggressive abortion advocacy.

    “A holy sacrament should never be weaponized for political ends or to fight the culture wars,” the letter accompanying the petition declares, adopting arguments famously articulated by then-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick in 2004.
     
    As an enemy of Judeo-Christian values, guess who The IslamoSoros supporting in Georgia. (2)

    Liberal billionaire George Soros has pushed $1 million into Georgia to back Stacey Abrams' second attempt at landing in the governor's office, filings show.

    Soros' Democracy PAC II, a federal committee bankrolled by $125 million from the financier for the 2022 elections, made a $1 million donation to One Georgia Inc. on March 11, Federal Election Commission records show.

    One Georgia Inc. is a leadership committee launched to aid Abrams' candidacy, and Abrams nor the group appear to have publicly announced its existence.
     
    Is anyone surprised?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/faith/2022/05/26/soros-funded-groups-demand-pelosi-allowed-receive-communion/

    (2) https://www.foxnews.com/politics/soros-throws-1m-behind-stacey-abrams-second-gubernatorial-run

    Replies: @songbird, @songbird

    According to Tariq, Abrams is a tool of white supremacy.

    • LOL: A123
  70. • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Mikhail

    Shock and disbelief.

    https://interactive.guim.co.uk/uploader/embed/2022/05/donbas_zoom-zip/giv-6562Bg2cPFqdO3Iy/Ukraine_Donbas_Zoom_270522-inArticle_620.png

  71. utu says:

    Scholz’s duplicity. Putin’s kompromats?

    https://www.eurointelligence.com
    Scholz’s double-game (23 May 2022)

    It is possible, of course, that Vladimir Putin has some kompromat on Scholz. Scholz has been close to two German financial scandals during his previous political lives, a tax evasion fraud by a Hamburg bank, and the Wirecard financial scandal. The media have dug up a few stories, stuff with a lot of innuendo, but no bullet. Maybe Putin, who has excellent contacts in the SPD, has more.

    Many trips by Scholz to East Germany as a leader in the youth wing of his Social Democratic Party.

    https://www.dw.com/en/german-chancellor-olaf-scholz-was-under-east-german-surveillance-report/a-60415640
    German Chancellor Olaf Scholz was under East German surveillance: report

    Current German Chancellor Olaf Scholz traveled to the GDR several times in the 1980s as a leader of his party’s youth wing. He was granted special treatment in the former East, then followed home and spied on in Hamburg.

    According to the Stasi documents seen by Bild, the agents had identified Scholz as an “old school political professional, who has a lot of influence.” They instructed their colleagues to give Scholz and his companions special treatment, such as “visas for Berlin, no fees” and to give them “polite clearance, without customs control.”

    He was also allowed to enter without the required exchange of currency at a rate favorable to the GDR.

  72. German_reader says:

    Sounds like a fairly risky strategy.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
    @German_reader

    Politically it makes sense, refusing to give up a claim to Donbass. Militarily it risks being on the wrong side of a Kesselschlacht.

    Replies: @German_reader

    , @Triteleia Laxa
    @German_reader

    Wow, I am very surprised. One of the greatest advantages that Ukraine has is just how much land they can trade as part of a defence in depth. Every mile they retreat stretches out the Russians and makes them more vulnerable.

    Indeed, it was clear from the beginning of the war that Russia is unable to operate across half of Ukraine and remain combat effective. Their force is too small, ends up to dispersed, logistsics becomes a nightmare, and the civilian population use them as target practice.

    Yet now Ukraine is bolstering their own forces in these seemingly vulnerable areas rather than using the most obvious and tried and tested strategy. I wonder where their confidence comes from? I'm amazed if this is true.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  73. @AP
    @Beckow


    2% is clearly nonsense
     
    We’ll, since it matches the change in attitude all of the pro-Russians in Ukraine I’ve known personally, and all the ones that are friends of friends, then it seems realistic.

    For one, why are you excluding all people in Donbas
     
    It only excludes those in the Donbas republics. They weren’t polled. Since the Russians weren’t bombing them they presumably haven’t changed their minds about the Russians to that great an extent.

    In the rest of rump-Ukraine under the current war conditions there is no way to know how many are for whom
     
    That’s a convenient excuse. They can polled anonymously. My sample size is a lot less than the 2,000 or so in the poll but it matches. Normal people are outraged at those who bomb and kill them, after all.

    But to assume that 1/3 of the population that had pro-Russia sympathies has disappeared is nonsense

     

    Those aren’t assumptions. They did not disappear, they changed their mind. A lot of Jews in Eastern Europe used to be pro-German, you know. Something changed their minds too.

    a large percentage will go with the winning side
     
    How many Balts, Galicians, and Poles went with the winning side and became pro-Russian after World War II?

    People whose homes were destroyed and neighbors murdered will not change their minds. But thanks for the insight into what you would likely do.

    Replies: @Sean, @Triteleia Laxa

    One moment Beckow is boasting gleefully of all of the destruction that Russia is inflicting on Ukraine. The next moment he is in shock and disbelief that Ukrainians no longer like Russia.

    I didn’t realise just how bad it was, but something really is rotten with Russia. Just yesterday I saw a video clip of some Russian talking head practically screaming into the camera about how Russia must nuke Germany! His hysterical freak out went on for minutes. At this point, any sane Russian must be on the verge, at least, of consciously hating their own country and culture. It is sick.

    Indeed, I assume that this is what is driving much of their madness. The contradiction of feeling between wounded pride and becoming monstrous is too much for their limited minds to contain. They have no idea of the extremity of the cost that they will pay for this war; regardless of the mundane result.

    Personally, I’m sorry to Eastern Europeans for my past doubt on their pessimism as regards Russia. I see plenty of darkness and craziness, but I am always surprised at how individuals, or even nations, can get wrapped up in it so completely. You’d think that at least one of these Russian shills, who was boasting of an instant, almost bloodless victory, and a reuniting with their beloved brothers, would now have the courage to express the horror that they must profoundly feel at how their support has helped unleash such a catastrophe, but no, instead they revel in it, while also pretending that it has no actual effect. What pathetic people. I pity them, even as I occasionally wonder why they need exist.

    Ultimately, I do understand that they will very slowly learn and grow, but their limited spirit makes me think of a dumb yet cruel animal. It too deserves love, but sometimes love is stark honesty, of the situation, and your perception of the other person.

    The people still cheerleading the Russian invasion are so weak-minded and ignorant that they have allowed their existence to become a portal for horror, and some are even so diminished that they now identify as that horror. I wish them the searing pain, light and fire of self-awareness, and the strength to endure every moment of it.

    • Disagree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @utu
    @Triteleia Laxa


    " The contradiction of feeling between wounded pride and becoming monstrous is too much for their limited minds to contain. "
     

    Умом — Россию не понять,
    Аршином общим не измерить:
    У ней особенная стать —
    В Россию можно только верить.

    Fyodor Tyutchev, November 28, 1866
     
    , @Wokechoke
    @Triteleia Laxa

    They should have ceded Crimea legally on day three. The Russians would have backed away then.

  74. @German_reader
    https://twitter.com/PhillipsPOBrien/status/1530433779776507905

    Sounds like a fairly risky strategy.

    Replies: @Wielgus, @Triteleia Laxa

    Politically it makes sense, refusing to give up a claim to Donbass. Militarily it risks being on the wrong side of a Kesselschlacht.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @Wielgus

    I agree, seems dictated by political considerations. Militarily it might be better if Ukraine withdrew to more defensible positions (maybe line Slovyansk-Kramatorsk, which iirc Ukraine's general staff has suggested) and straightened the front, instead of risking a major disaster.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  75. The ultra neocon Times has an editorial today complaining about those saying a peace deal needs to done, so hopefully there might really be something in it, although the reality of the concessions needed to be made probably hasn’t been recognised yet.

    • Replies: @Matra
    @LondonBob

    The Times started to go downhill within months of its purchase by Rupert Murdoch but it was still worth reading for the first ten years or so. Now it's a joke. Murdoch's influence is almost as pernicious as that of Soros.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  76. @German_reader
    https://twitter.com/PhillipsPOBrien/status/1530433779776507905

    Sounds like a fairly risky strategy.

    Replies: @Wielgus, @Triteleia Laxa

    Wow, I am very surprised. One of the greatest advantages that Ukraine has is just how much land they can trade as part of a defence in depth. Every mile they retreat stretches out the Russians and makes them more vulnerable.

    Indeed, it was clear from the beginning of the war that Russia is unable to operate across half of Ukraine and remain combat effective. Their force is too small, ends up to dispersed, logistsics becomes a nightmare, and the civilian population use them as target practice.

    Yet now Ukraine is bolstering their own forces in these seemingly vulnerable areas rather than using the most obvious and tried and tested strategy. I wonder where their confidence comes from? I’m amazed if this is true.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Triteleia Laxa

    They don’t really have space, nor do they have much time. The Russians want Donbas for ore and mineral rights. The Ukrainians can’t have their main industrial territory cut off from them. Although they do not appear to be able to stop that from happening.

  77. German_reader says:
    @Wielgus
    @German_reader

    Politically it makes sense, refusing to give up a claim to Donbass. Militarily it risks being on the wrong side of a Kesselschlacht.

    Replies: @German_reader

    I agree, seems dictated by political considerations. Militarily it might be better if Ukraine withdrew to more defensible positions (maybe line Slovyansk-Kramatorsk, which iirc Ukraine’s general staff has suggested) and straightened the front, instead of risking a major disaster.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @German_reader

    Is there an accessible betting market?

    I'm thinking Dniepro is getting close to 50-50; you seem wildly optimistic.

  78. @Mikhail
    Good to see Barry McCaffrey busted. Hyperbole and all, Pearson Sharp is much better than the CNN propped likes of Azeem Ibrahim - individuals utilizing PC hyperbole.

    https://www.oann.com/washington-mainstream-media-promote-anti-russian-propaganda-to-cover-for-war-crimes-in-ukraine/

    https://www.oann.com/globalist-senators-sell-out-america-with-40b-ukraine-aid-bill/

    https://www.oann.com/funding-ukrainian-biolabs-researching-covid-19/

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    Shock and disbelief.

  79. I notice that nobody is using NATO cut-out Oryx anymore after they’ve been caught time and again faking and inflating Russian losses. The last diehard Oryx respecter was Dmitry as I recall.

    The topic of losses is important, since Russia is tightlipped and Ukraine’s official numbers are bogus. In recent days, ancient T-62s have been spotted being moved to the front from Russia’s interior. They are nothing more than glorified tincans. Many immediately suggested that Russia is running dangerously low on tanks after supposedly huge losses, naturally without evidence.

    I wouldn’t jump to that conclusion, but it’s certain that they have no place on the battlefield as tanks. A primitive RPG could destroy them trivially. Even pro-RU telegrammers like RWA and Intelslava were gasping. I’ve seen it suggested that these old tanks could be used as static artillery perhaps.

  80. The river separating Lyman and Slavyansk offers a barrier of protection, but there’s also a direct land route from Bakhmut to Slavyansk.

    If Russians manage to break through at Bakhmut, it would pierce the front in two. If that happens, then the pressure for a breakthrough at Severodontesk loses its importance, since the city would become completely trapped and Russians could simply afford to slowly finish the job at a leisurely pace.

    Ultimately, which sequential action that comes first is immaterial. Ukraine has to hold both. If they can repel the Russians at Bakhmut, it would make any reinforcements to Severodonetsk difficult but doable and the river to the northeast is obviously preferable than an open land route from Bakhmut. Much now hangs in the balance on this small little central town.

  81. @German_reader
    @Wielgus

    I agree, seems dictated by political considerations. Militarily it might be better if Ukraine withdrew to more defensible positions (maybe line Slovyansk-Kramatorsk, which iirc Ukraine's general staff has suggested) and straightened the front, instead of risking a major disaster.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    Is there an accessible betting market?

    I’m thinking Dniepro is getting close to 50-50; you seem wildly optimistic.

  82. I want to congratulate the commenters here on reaching a lower quality of posts than the average /pol/ thread

    • Thanks: German_reader
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Korenchkin

    https://i.imgur.com/ByJEIFl.png

    I'd prefer principled. But yeah. Also, don't let the door hit you on the way out! ;)

    , @Barbarossa
    @Korenchkin

    It's only because we've been languishing here waiting for you to bestow your discourse elevating wisdom.

    Why, oh why have you kept your sage words from us o omniscient Korenchkin?

    Why do you only bestow the turmeric words upon us?

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    , @Yevardian
    @Korenchkin

    Yeah, this place has fallen precipitously from its glory days, when you could have furious arguments over whose national sheepdog would win in a cagefight.

  83. @Flip flopper hunter
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Hilarious to see you change your views suddenly again. Do you have a stable view on anything you dishonest grifter?

    https://twitter.com/powerfultakes/status/1530159996893376515

    You were in Richard Spencer's fan club only a few years ago:

    https://i.kym-cdn.com/entries/icons/original/000/039/649/Anatoly_Karlin_Richard_Spencer.jpg


    I endorse Richard Spencer. He started no wars and provoked no riots — much less "extremist" than Ziocons or BLM.
     
    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Anatoly_Karlin

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

    Why do you hate your own photos so? Does it make you seethe that your multiple takedown requests came to naught?

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Posted by real Oliver D. Smith.

    Sigh.

    Are you too stupid to yet work out all these screen names trolling you are Michael Coombs (main alias Mikemikev, although he uses hundreds), who is the same person constantly editing your RW and ED articles or their talk pages? He does this knowing you will blame me.

    I quit on The Unz Review over a year back under my real name and seldom post anonymously - the only reason I used an 'Anon' here despite identifying myself is because when I quit posting under my name in March 2021 - I asked Audacious Epigone to hide my comments archive. I also use my real on social media such as Twitter; in contrast, Mikemikev uses 100s of aliases and pseudonyms. If I wanted to waste time criticising you here - I would do so under my real name.

    The fake accounts in your name on ED are also Mikemikev:
    https://encyclopediadramatica.online/User:Anatoly_Karlin

    As for the Kiwi Farms screenshot you and Emil Kirkegaard copy and paste ~6 years later:

    https://i.ibb.co/BBTCNph/Kiwi-Farms.png

    You could find this in the same archived thread. It speaks for itself.

    Your life seems to be focused on the Russo-Ukrainian War which I have no interest in (hence I have zero mentions of it anywhere while you are fixated with it), so it's unclear why you think I would be random screen-names commenting on these war threads. You've never been someone who could think outside the box on any issue so it didn't surprise me you would take sides in the conflict.

    My DMCA complaints ('take-down' requests) were not unsuccessful. Ron Unz removed the photos Lance Welton posted infringing my copyright after I sent him a legal notice. The photos (including one with a defamatory caption) you are posting I can easily get removed but it's not something I've spent a lot of time on.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

  84. @Triteleia Laxa
    @AP

    One moment Beckow is boasting gleefully of all of the destruction that Russia is inflicting on Ukraine. The next moment he is in shock and disbelief that Ukrainians no longer like Russia.

    I didn't realise just how bad it was, but something really is rotten with Russia. Just yesterday I saw a video clip of some Russian talking head practically screaming into the camera about how Russia must nuke Germany! His hysterical freak out went on for minutes. At this point, any sane Russian must be on the verge, at least, of consciously hating their own country and culture. It is sick.

    Indeed, I assume that this is what is driving much of their madness. The contradiction of feeling between wounded pride and becoming monstrous is too much for their limited minds to contain. They have no idea of the extremity of the cost that they will pay for this war; regardless of the mundane result.

    Personally, I'm sorry to Eastern Europeans for my past doubt on their pessimism as regards Russia. I see plenty of darkness and craziness, but I am always surprised at how individuals, or even nations, can get wrapped up in it so completely. You'd think that at least one of these Russian shills, who was boasting of an instant, almost bloodless victory, and a reuniting with their beloved brothers, would now have the courage to express the horror that they must profoundly feel at how their support has helped unleash such a catastrophe, but no, instead they revel in it, while also pretending that it has no actual effect. What pathetic people. I pity them, even as I occasionally wonder why they need exist.

    Ultimately, I do understand that they will very slowly learn and grow, but their limited spirit makes me think of a dumb yet cruel animal. It too deserves love, but sometimes love is stark honesty, of the situation, and your perception of the other person.

    The people still cheerleading the Russian invasion are so weak-minded and ignorant that they have allowed their existence to become a portal for horror, and some are even so diminished that they now identify as that horror. I wish them the searing pain, light and fire of self-awareness, and the strength to endure every moment of it.

    Replies: @utu, @Wokechoke

    ” The contradiction of feeling between wounded pride and becoming monstrous is too much for their limited minds to contain. ”

    Умом — Россию не понять,
    Аршином общим не измерить:
    У ней особенная стать —
    В Россию можно только верить.

    Fyodor Tyutchev, November 28, 1866

  85. Under my more liberal plan, Greens will be given a special meter that only puts out when it is a very bright day, or the wind turbines are swiftly turning.

    However, each time they get a blackout (which will be most of the time), they can get up to an additional ten minutes of power, per day, by speaking a litany of “I love nuclear energy” 100x into a microphone in their meter.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    The myth that all environmentalists hate nuclear energy is a bit outdated, IMO. I don't have anything ideologically against it, but I have pointed out that its a technology that is racked with cost overruns.

    Besides, more and more Green parties are embracing it. Germany and Austria in particular are the negative outliers. Those attitudes don't exist in France among greens. I've personally noticed a shift here too over the past decade.

    Replies: @songbird, @Barbarossa

  86. Is Erdogan actually somehow more pozzed because he isn’t a secularist? (And thus likes Muslim migrants, with lower capacities than Turks and is attracted to the idea of getting political support from them)

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Interesting question. Islam is a very globalist religion, which you have to be if you want to win the religious wars. I recall ISIS denouncing Chechen recruits since they "flew the flag of Chechnya higher than that of the ummah". Seems like Islam, if taken seriously, has a very low tolerance for particularism.

    Turks have become steadily more secularised, despite Erdogan's best efforts, which means that national identity will increasingly center around language and ethnicity rather than religion, much like the Balkans. Even former "best friends" (admittedly, mostly one-sided) Pakistanis are no longer finding it easy to obtain a visa since their creeps stalking the streets of Istanbul and harassing Turkish women.

    A big undercurrent of resentment that works against Erdogan is precisely his lenient immigration policies. The recent murmors that Turkey will begin a new operation in Syria, to carve out a space in the northern part inhabitated by many Kurds, probably has a dual purpose in expelling potentially as many as a 1 million Syrians.

    Replies: @dyauspitr

  87. looks like i was wrong. there was a Zircon test fire. i didn’t expect that.

    not used against UKR so far, but RUS did get around to deploying one.

  88. For the first time and based on human rights considerations, the German government has reportedly refused to extend its investment guarantees to VW for its China engagement – meaning VW will need to cover its own financial risks

    Link

    Are the Germans going to de-industrialise in order to please their American masters?

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @Matra

    Probably going to happen anyway because of the demented energy policy.

    New video:
    https://twitter.com/i/status/1530087492178874370
    The three in this video are all members of parliament for the Greens. The one in the centre garnered a lot of attention with her first speech in the Bundestag , where she spoke out in favour of mandatory Corona vaccination for everybody and complained how the unvaccinated ruined her life.
    Idiotic country, idiotic people.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @A123
    @Matra



    German government has reportedly refused to extend its investment guarantees to VW for its China engagement
     
    Are the Germans going to de-industrialise in order to please their American masters?
     
    Not-The-President Biden cannot master appearing in public without committing horrible gaffes. The incoherent Taiwan ramble-fest is not substantial. The doctors can only do so much to medicate him. There is an entire team dedicated to "walking back" the White House Occupant's inability to grasp and articulate the simplest of ideas.

    To the extent that "Beijing Biden" has a position, it is pro-CCP. Xi arranged for the Big Guy to get his 10% [MORE]. (1)


    For those wondering why Joe Biden is soft on China, consider this never-before-reported revelation: The Biden family has done five deals in China totaling some $31 million arranged by individuals with direct ties to Chinese intelligence — some reaching the very top of China’s spy agency.

    Indeed, every known deal that the Biden family enjoyed with Beijing was reached courtesy of individuals with spy ties. And Joe Biden personally benefited from his family’s foreign deals.
     

    Blaming the U.S. is Pure Concentrate of COPE, by those who cannot deal with the fact that Germany dug this hole for themselves.

    -- -- The problem with GERMANY is GERMANY -- --

    The U.S. did not impose the incoherent Traffic Light coalition on Germany. The German people chose this on their own. The FDP (Yellow) Party and the Green Party agree on very little, except for Open [Muslim] Borders. How did Frank Herbert put it?


    "In politics, the tripod is he most unstable of all structures. It would be bad enough without the complication of a feudal trade culture which turns its back on most science.". ― Frank Herbert, Dune.
     
    Strike out the word "feudal" and it sounds exactly like government in Germany today. The Green Party turned their back on science with an absurd & unrealistic plan to shut off nuclear power. Ending an essential service without first arranging a viable replacement is irrational.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://nypost.com/2022/01/27/chinese-elite-have-paid-some-31m-to-hunter-and-the-bidens/

     
    https://www.whatdoesitmean.com/hunter2.jpg

     
    https://d12gryx1lo44v2.cloudfront.net/articles/18aa29bb-0634-4e24-a829-7777fae7bdfc.jpg

  89. @LondonBob
    The ultra neocon Times has an editorial today complaining about those saying a peace deal needs to done, so hopefully there might really be something in it, although the reality of the concessions needed to be made probably hasn't been recognised yet.

    Replies: @Matra

    The Times started to go downhill within months of its purchase by Rupert Murdoch but it was still worth reading for the first ten years or so. Now it’s a joke. Murdoch’s influence is almost as pernicious as that of Soros.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Matra

    Rupert Murdoch may be a jerk but he was a hero in the Theranos farce.

    Also Tracy Ulman's Thanksgiving Murdoch skit is one of the more hilarious things on the internet.

  90. @Triteleia Laxa
    @German_reader

    Wow, I am very surprised. One of the greatest advantages that Ukraine has is just how much land they can trade as part of a defence in depth. Every mile they retreat stretches out the Russians and makes them more vulnerable.

    Indeed, it was clear from the beginning of the war that Russia is unable to operate across half of Ukraine and remain combat effective. Their force is too small, ends up to dispersed, logistsics becomes a nightmare, and the civilian population use them as target practice.

    Yet now Ukraine is bolstering their own forces in these seemingly vulnerable areas rather than using the most obvious and tried and tested strategy. I wonder where their confidence comes from? I'm amazed if this is true.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    They don’t really have space, nor do they have much time. The Russians want Donbas for ore and mineral rights. The Ukrainians can’t have their main industrial territory cut off from them. Although they do not appear to be able to stop that from happening.

  91. @Triteleia Laxa
    @AP

    One moment Beckow is boasting gleefully of all of the destruction that Russia is inflicting on Ukraine. The next moment he is in shock and disbelief that Ukrainians no longer like Russia.

    I didn't realise just how bad it was, but something really is rotten with Russia. Just yesterday I saw a video clip of some Russian talking head practically screaming into the camera about how Russia must nuke Germany! His hysterical freak out went on for minutes. At this point, any sane Russian must be on the verge, at least, of consciously hating their own country and culture. It is sick.

    Indeed, I assume that this is what is driving much of their madness. The contradiction of feeling between wounded pride and becoming monstrous is too much for their limited minds to contain. They have no idea of the extremity of the cost that they will pay for this war; regardless of the mundane result.

    Personally, I'm sorry to Eastern Europeans for my past doubt on their pessimism as regards Russia. I see plenty of darkness and craziness, but I am always surprised at how individuals, or even nations, can get wrapped up in it so completely. You'd think that at least one of these Russian shills, who was boasting of an instant, almost bloodless victory, and a reuniting with their beloved brothers, would now have the courage to express the horror that they must profoundly feel at how their support has helped unleash such a catastrophe, but no, instead they revel in it, while also pretending that it has no actual effect. What pathetic people. I pity them, even as I occasionally wonder why they need exist.

    Ultimately, I do understand that they will very slowly learn and grow, but their limited spirit makes me think of a dumb yet cruel animal. It too deserves love, but sometimes love is stark honesty, of the situation, and your perception of the other person.

    The people still cheerleading the Russian invasion are so weak-minded and ignorant that they have allowed their existence to become a portal for horror, and some are even so diminished that they now identify as that horror. I wish them the searing pain, light and fire of self-awareness, and the strength to endure every moment of it.

    Replies: @utu, @Wokechoke

    They should have ceded Crimea legally on day three. The Russians would have backed away then.

  92. @Matra
    @LondonBob

    The Times started to go downhill within months of its purchase by Rupert Murdoch but it was still worth reading for the first ten years or so. Now it's a joke. Murdoch's influence is almost as pernicious as that of Soros.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    Rupert Murdoch may be a jerk but he was a hero in the Theranos farce.

    Also Tracy Ulman’s Thanksgiving Murdoch skit is one of the more hilarious things on the internet.

  93. @songbird
    Under my more liberal plan, Greens will be given a special meter that only puts out when it is a very bright day, or the wind turbines are swiftly turning.

    However, each time they get a blackout (which will be most of the time), they can get up to an additional ten minutes of power, per day, by speaking a litany of "I love nuclear energy" 100x into a microphone in their meter.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    The myth that all environmentalists hate nuclear energy is a bit outdated, IMO. I don’t have anything ideologically against it, but I have pointed out that its a technology that is racked with cost overruns.

    Besides, more and more Green parties are embracing it. Germany and Austria in particular are the negative outliers. Those attitudes don’t exist in France among greens. I’ve personally noticed a shift here too over the past decade.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Thulean Friend

    There's a lack of willingness to allow experimental reactors. We've done way more tests of nuclear weapons than reactor design tests. These should be made in the Pacific, on atolls or floating platforms. Maybe, in mineshafts.
    ____
    BTW, speaking of Pakis, I've been disappointed that nobody seems interested or willing to make predictions about Imran Khan. Not the British-based pederast and former MP, but the other one.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend

    I think there may be a bit more realism creeping in around nuclear power. I dislike nuclear for the waste issue and as you point out, the cost overruns.

    However, I think that there are really only two viable choices to reducing carbon footprint; either drastically scaling back consumption and relying on renewables or embracing nuclear to maintain the pace of consumption that we've become accustomed to.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

  94. @songbird
    Is Erdogan actually somehow more pozzed because he isn't a secularist? (And thus likes Muslim migrants, with lower capacities than Turks and is attracted to the idea of getting political support from them)

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    Interesting question. Islam is a very globalist religion, which you have to be if you want to win the religious wars. I recall ISIS denouncing Chechen recruits since they “flew the flag of Chechnya higher than that of the ummah”. Seems like Islam, if taken seriously, has a very low tolerance for particularism.

    Turks have become steadily more secularised, despite Erdogan’s best efforts, which means that national identity will increasingly center around language and ethnicity rather than religion, much like the Balkans. Even former “best friends” (admittedly, mostly one-sided) Pakistanis are no longer finding it easy to obtain a visa since their creeps stalking the streets of Istanbul and harassing Turkish women.

    A big undercurrent of resentment that works against Erdogan is precisely his lenient immigration policies. The recent murmors that Turkey will begin a new operation in Syria, to carve out a space in the northern part inhabitated by many Kurds, probably has a dual purpose in expelling potentially as many as a 1 million Syrians.

    • Replies: @dyauspitr
    @Thulean Friend

    pakistan is a cursed country. literally devils hell

  95. German_reader says:
    @Matra

    For the first time and based on human rights considerations, the German government has reportedly refused to extend its investment guarantees to VW for its China engagement - meaning VW will need to cover its own financial risks
     
    Link

    Are the Germans going to de-industrialise in order to please their American masters?

    Replies: @German_reader, @A123

    Probably going to happen anyway because of the demented energy policy.

    [MORE]

    New video:


    The three in this video are all members of parliament for the Greens. The one in the centre garnered a lot of attention with her first speech in the Bundestag , where she spoke out in favour of mandatory Corona vaccination for everybody and complained how the unvaccinated ruined her life.
    Idiotic country, idiotic people.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Thanks: A123
    • Replies: @songbird
    @German_reader

    They shall learn a new dance in the Sahel.

    Perhaps, some sort of rain dance.

  96. A123 says: • Website
    @Matra

    For the first time and based on human rights considerations, the German government has reportedly refused to extend its investment guarantees to VW for its China engagement - meaning VW will need to cover its own financial risks
     
    Link

    Are the Germans going to de-industrialise in order to please their American masters?

    Replies: @German_reader, @A123

    German government has reportedly refused to extend its investment guarantees to VW for its China engagement

    Are the Germans going to de-industrialise in order to please their American masters?

    Not-The-President Biden cannot master appearing in public without committing horrible gaffes. The incoherent Taiwan ramble-fest is not substantial. The doctors can only do so much to medicate him. There is an entire team dedicated to “walking back” the White House Occupant’s inability to grasp and articulate the simplest of ideas.

    To the extent that “Beijing Biden” has a position, it is pro-CCP. Xi arranged for the Big Guy to get his 10% [MORE]. (1)

    For those wondering why Joe Biden is soft on China, consider this never-before-reported revelation: The Biden family has done five deals in China totaling some \$31 million arranged by individuals with direct ties to Chinese intelligence — some reaching the very top of China’s spy agency.

    Indeed, every known deal that the Biden family enjoyed with Beijing was reached courtesy of individuals with spy ties. And Joe Biden personally benefited from his family’s foreign deals.

    Blaming the U.S. is Pure Concentrate of COPE, by those who cannot deal with the fact that Germany dug this hole for themselves.

    — — The problem with GERMANY is GERMANY — —

    The U.S. did not impose the incoherent Traffic Light coalition on Germany. The German people chose this on their own. The FDP (Yellow) Party and the Green Party agree on very little, except for Open [Muslim] Borders. How did Frank Herbert put it?

    “In politics, the tripod is he most unstable of all structures. It would be bad enough without the complication of a feudal trade culture which turns its back on most science.”. ― Frank Herbert, Dune.

    Strike out the word “feudal” and it sounds exactly like government in Germany today. The Green Party turned their back on science with an absurd & unrealistic plan to shut off nuclear power. Ending an essential service without first arranging a viable replacement is irrational.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://nypost.com/2022/01/27/chinese-elite-have-paid-some-31m-to-hunter-and-the-bidens/

    [MORE]

     
     

  97. @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend

    I'm sure you're being tongue in cheek, but the funny thing is that the promises of Woke multiculturalism rarely work out as they are advertised to.

    As a recently noted example; it's long been a meme on the right how hard Left cities like Portland or San Fran have such a homeless problem. I witnessed it myself when a few years ago I went out towards Portland to visit my brother. The sheer scale and squalor of the homeless population were mind blowing to someone used to cities out East.

    Regardless of the political memeing I assumed that a fair part of the issue was just due to the temperate nature of these cities being much habitable to tent dwellers. I'm starting to think though that the problem may be exacerbated more by political orientation than I initially realized.

    Now Ithaca, a small super lefty city, a couple hours from me is grappling with a major homeless problem, with encampments sprawling out of control and police desperately trying to devise ways to keep them contained to approved areas. I guess Ithaca isn't called Portland of the East for nothing! An Ithaca Bakery employee told me it's not uncommon now for druggies to lock themselves in the bathrooms to get a high and sometimes OD.

    Of course it's not surprising since I'm sure potential homeless know they are likely to be treated with much more kid glove handling than in Rochester or Binghamton.

    The poster should also show some drug addicts who have lost hope after neo-liberalism destroyed their jobs, communities, and sense of purpose in life.

    Replies: @Mikel

    I assumed that a fair part of the issue was just due to the temperate nature of these cities being much habitable to tent dwellers. I’m starting to think though that the problem may be exacerbated more by political orientation than I initially realized.

    I was recently in Hawaii and the homeless masses seem to have found the perfect combination in Honolulu: warm weather all year long, left-wing politics and a big city full of tourists to prey on.

    I don’t know what to make of this increasing problem of homelessness. It is clearly related to drug addiction and mental illness but those problems have always existed and they didn’t drive so many people to set up communities of vagrants in every city. It seems to be the manifestation of some social illness but what can authorities really do when so many people decide to live on the street of their own accord?

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Mikel

    My 2 cents is that the rapidly exploding cost of housing, coupled by the loss of many of the good jobs has driven many people over the brink. These energy increases are going to massively exacerbate the issue, especially when we get into the 2022/23 heating season. It's going to be really bad if the trajectory doesn't drastically change in the next couple months.

    It's a disparate impact because the upper rungs have consolidated their position while the lower and middle classes have drowned. I managed, as a fairly young person to carve out a secure economic niche, but that was mainly by ignoring every bit of conventional financial and business advice. I don't envy most younger people since it's not very favorable for many of them, especially once they get some school debt strapped on like a lead weight.

    The drug addiction and mental illness is I think a bit downstream of the economic and societal issues in many cases, but the drugs indeed are very very bad. Opioid usage is an epidemic around my area. It seems a symptom of complete despair and nihilism.

    I guess this is what advanced societal collapse looks like. And you are right, there is little that the authorities can do, since this is a problem decades in the making. It would take exceptional political will and consensus to turn it around, which is completely lacking. I think it's fair to expect that government will be no help and we as individuals will have to be ready to help the less fortunate where we can. Unfortunately, I'm afraid it's going to get worse before it gets better.

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Mikel

  98. @Korenchkin
    I want to congratulate the commenters here on reaching a lower quality of posts than the average /pol/ thread

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Barbarossa, @Yevardian


    I’d prefer principled. But yeah. Also, don’t let the door hit you on the way out! 😉

  99. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    The myth that all environmentalists hate nuclear energy is a bit outdated, IMO. I don't have anything ideologically against it, but I have pointed out that its a technology that is racked with cost overruns.

    Besides, more and more Green parties are embracing it. Germany and Austria in particular are the negative outliers. Those attitudes don't exist in France among greens. I've personally noticed a shift here too over the past decade.

    Replies: @songbird, @Barbarossa

    There’s a lack of willingness to allow experimental reactors. We’ve done way more tests of nuclear weapons than reactor design tests. These should be made in the Pacific, on atolls or floating platforms. Maybe, in mineshafts.
    ____
    BTW, speaking of Pakis, I’ve been disappointed that nobody seems interested or willing to make predictions about Imran Khan. Not the British-based pederast and former MP, but the other one.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @songbird


    BTW, speaking of Pakis, I’ve been disappointed that nobody seems interested or willing to make predictions about Imran Khan.
     
    https://twitter.com/HamzaAzhrSalam/status/1532037147838287872

    Doesn't seem like someone who is easy to make predictions about, especially as he's trying his level best to increase anarchy in the country as a means to gain political leverage. He also suggested Pakistan could balkanise into three parts and denuclearise.

    Situation in Pakistan is very grim right now, and too many in India are lackadaisical about it. I suspect there will be some kind of IMF package, but this new political chaos is unlikely to go away. In previous years, there was a consensus across the elites which has evaporated now.

    It's a country of 220+ million people and a nuclear state. It's surprising how little attention is paid to a country that is de facto on the brink of default and has a massive internal political crisis working in tandem.

    Replies: @dyauspitr

  100. @German_reader
    @Matra

    Probably going to happen anyway because of the demented energy policy.

    New video:
    https://twitter.com/i/status/1530087492178874370
    The three in this video are all members of parliament for the Greens. The one in the centre garnered a lot of attention with her first speech in the Bundestag , where she spoke out in favour of mandatory Corona vaccination for everybody and complained how the unvaccinated ruined her life.
    Idiotic country, idiotic people.

    Replies: @songbird

    They shall learn a new dance in the Sahel.

    Perhaps, some sort of rain dance.

  101. @Korenchkin
    I want to congratulate the commenters here on reaching a lower quality of posts than the average /pol/ thread

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Barbarossa, @Yevardian

    It’s only because we’ve been languishing here waiting for you to bestow your discourse elevating wisdom.

    Why, oh why have you kept your sage words from us o omniscient Korenchkin?

    Why do you only bestow the turmeric words upon us?

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Barbarossa

    There must be a language barrier or some similar misunderstanding.

    He does not and perhaps cannot appreciate the subtle artistry of what is occurring here. I will try and put it into the simplest possible English. What we have is a gradual unveiling of the lost/deleted chapters of the Brothers Karamazov. It was just a little too much to ask Dostoevsky to put everything in there.

    Anatoly Karamazov is the previously undocumented brother. He took his brother's words too much to his heart in the naivete of his youth.

    If there is no God then everything is permitted.

    Ivan actually intended the exact opposite message to Anatoly. He read:

    there is no God;
    hence everything is permitted.

    Slowly and gradually the truth is arousing itself in Anatoly Karamazov's mind.

    Everything is not permitted.
    Ergo, there is a God.

    Only foolish people who think everything is permitted will take on the entire bloody damn world.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9hDA0u6FO0

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  102. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    The myth that all environmentalists hate nuclear energy is a bit outdated, IMO. I don't have anything ideologically against it, but I have pointed out that its a technology that is racked with cost overruns.

    Besides, more and more Green parties are embracing it. Germany and Austria in particular are the negative outliers. Those attitudes don't exist in France among greens. I've personally noticed a shift here too over the past decade.

    Replies: @songbird, @Barbarossa

    I think there may be a bit more realism creeping in around nuclear power. I dislike nuclear for the waste issue and as you point out, the cost overruns.

    However, I think that there are really only two viable choices to reducing carbon footprint; either drastically scaling back consumption and relying on renewables or embracing nuclear to maintain the pace of consumption that we’ve become accustomed to.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    However, I think that there are really only two viable choices to reducing carbon footprint; either drastically scaling back consumption and relying on renewables or embracing nuclear to maintain the pace of consumption that we’ve become accustomed to.
     
    I agree. Sadly, the green movement is infested with these "degrowth" types. The more honest of them admit that we would all have to take a massive hit to our living standards (we're talking 80-90% less energy consumption per capita) if their theories are to be followed.

    The less honest - and more slimy - types will typically say that 3rd world countries can't use coal and that rich countries should slowly decarbonise. The implication is that most of the adjustment should fall on the poorest in the world.

    Personally, I don't believe in stagnation. I'm fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity's capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.

    I think most doomsday scenarios, whether leftoid (climate collapse!) or rightoid (race war!) is bunk.

    Replies: @songbird, @niceland, @Yellowface Anon, @Barbarossa

  103. Wonder if anyone is familiar with the old Welsh poem The Battle of the Trees. I really like the beginning:

    I HAVE been in a multitude of shapes,
    Before I assumed a consistent form.
    I have been a sword, narrow, variegated

    ,

    [MORE]

    I will believe when it is apparent.
    I have been a tear in the air,
    I have been the dullest of stars.
    I have been a word among letters,
    I have been a book in the origin.
    I have been the light of lanterns,
    A year and a half.
    I have been a continuing bridge,
    Over three score Abers.
    I have been a course, I have been an eagle.
    I have been a coracle in the seas:
    I have been compliant in the banquet.
    I have been a drop in a shower;
    I have been a sword in the grasp of the hand
    I have been a shield in battle.
    I have been a string in a harp,
    Disguised for nine years.
    in water, in foam.
    I have been sponge in the fire,
    I have been wood in the covert.
    I am not he who will not sing of
    A combat though small,
    The conflict in the battle of Godeu of sprigs.

    Later there is a couplet that can be taken to have a sort of yin yang meaning:

    Under the tongue root, a fight most dread,
    While another rages in the head

    To the earlier discussion on film compositions, composer John Williams had this translated into Sanskrit, for one of his Star Wars themes, Duel of the Fates.

    • Thanks: Philip Owen
  104. @Barbarossa
    @Korenchkin

    It's only because we've been languishing here waiting for you to bestow your discourse elevating wisdom.

    Why, oh why have you kept your sage words from us o omniscient Korenchkin?

    Why do you only bestow the turmeric words upon us?

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    There must be a language barrier or some similar misunderstanding.

    He does not and perhaps cannot appreciate the subtle artistry of what is occurring here. I will try and put it into the simplest possible English. What we have is a gradual unveiling of the lost/deleted chapters of the Brothers Karamazov. It was just a little too much to ask Dostoevsky to put everything in there.

    Anatoly Karamazov is the previously undocumented brother. He took his brother’s words too much to his heart in the naivete of his youth.

    If there is no God then everything is permitted.

    Ivan actually intended the exact opposite message to Anatoly. He read:

    there is no God;
    hence everything is permitted.

    Slowly and gradually the truth is arousing itself in Anatoly Karamazov’s mind.

    Everything is not permitted.
    Ergo, there is a God.

    Only foolish people who think everything is permitted will take on the entire bloody damn world.

    • Thanks: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Rather an important battle to show you when it’s time to retreat.

  105. @Mikel
    @Barbarossa


    I assumed that a fair part of the issue was just due to the temperate nature of these cities being much habitable to tent dwellers. I’m starting to think though that the problem may be exacerbated more by political orientation than I initially realized.
     
    I was recently in Hawaii and the homeless masses seem to have found the perfect combination in Honolulu: warm weather all year long, left-wing politics and a big city full of tourists to prey on.

    I don't know what to make of this increasing problem of homelessness. It is clearly related to drug addiction and mental illness but those problems have always existed and they didn't drive so many people to set up communities of vagrants in every city. It seems to be the manifestation of some social illness but what can authorities really do when so many people decide to live on the street of their own accord?

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    My 2 cents is that the rapidly exploding cost of housing, coupled by the loss of many of the good jobs has driven many people over the brink. These energy increases are going to massively exacerbate the issue, especially when we get into the 2022/23 heating season. It’s going to be really bad if the trajectory doesn’t drastically change in the next couple months.

    It’s a disparate impact because the upper rungs have consolidated their position while the lower and middle classes have drowned. I managed, as a fairly young person to carve out a secure economic niche, but that was mainly by ignoring every bit of conventional financial and business advice. I don’t envy most younger people since it’s not very favorable for many of them, especially once they get some school debt strapped on like a lead weight.

    The drug addiction and mental illness is I think a bit downstream of the economic and societal issues in many cases, but the drugs indeed are very very bad. Opioid usage is an epidemic around my area. It seems a symptom of complete despair and nihilism.

    I guess this is what advanced societal collapse looks like. And you are right, there is little that the authorities can do, since this is a problem decades in the making. It would take exceptional political will and consensus to turn it around, which is completely lacking. I think it’s fair to expect that government will be no help and we as individuals will have to be ready to help the less fortunate where we can. Unfortunately, I’m afraid it’s going to get worse before it gets better.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Barbarossa

    The interest on student loans here has already been bumped up to around ten percent. Looking at renewing my energy deal, the only fixed deal will be more than triple the previous at over £6k a year.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @Mikel
    @Barbarossa

    High levels of debt, bankruptcy and economic hardship in general must be part of the homelessness equation, no doubt, which is why I think that teaching financial literacy at school should be essential.

    It doesn't make sense that we teach our children all kinds of skills that will later allow them to make money but we do not teach them how to make that money work in their best interest at all. Many people become bankrupt just out of ignorance: since everybody takes on loans and uses credit cards, they just follow suit until one day they're barely earning enough to pay their debts back.

    But economic hardship by itself doesn't explain the phenomenon. People in the US, despite all, live in one of the most prosperous countries in the world with historically low levels of unemployment but many people just abandon any desire to prosper. They actually lose any self-respect. In Hawaii you would see them getting into hotels dressed in rags and looking for food in the trash bin by the pool restaurant. Apparently, the police do their best to protect tourist spaces but what do these people have to lose? Getting arrested once again when their immediate need is to fill their stomach?

    Silviosilver recently made an insightful comment about people in modern society living an experiment that is probably unprecedented in history. We no longer have the support of strong community and spiritual/religious structures that people relied on in the past. Instead we are currently encouraged to take individual choices and make sense of everything, including the meaning of our existence, by ourselves and this is possibly too hard for many people. It breaks them. Even though I am not a believer, I can see how institutionalized religion has some positive aspects for society.

    But the one institution that seems to be failing all these homeless people is family. Where are their parents and their children? Don't they know? Don't they care?

    Replies: @S

  106. @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend

    I think there may be a bit more realism creeping in around nuclear power. I dislike nuclear for the waste issue and as you point out, the cost overruns.

    However, I think that there are really only two viable choices to reducing carbon footprint; either drastically scaling back consumption and relying on renewables or embracing nuclear to maintain the pace of consumption that we've become accustomed to.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    However, I think that there are really only two viable choices to reducing carbon footprint; either drastically scaling back consumption and relying on renewables or embracing nuclear to maintain the pace of consumption that we’ve become accustomed to.

    I agree. Sadly, the green movement is infested with these “degrowth” types. The more honest of them admit that we would all have to take a massive hit to our living standards (we’re talking 80-90% less energy consumption per capita) if their theories are to be followed.

    The less honest – and more slimy – types will typically say that 3rd world countries can’t use coal and that rich countries should slowly decarbonise. The implication is that most of the adjustment should fall on the poorest in the world.

    Personally, I don’t believe in stagnation. I’m fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity’s capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.

    I think most doomsday scenarios, whether leftoid (climate collapse!) or rightoid (race war!) is bunk.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Thulean Friend


    I’m fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity’s capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.
     
    I also believe in innovations.

    That is why I advocate using A380s, to remigrate 1000 Nigerians with every flight.

    Am kind of skeptical of Musk's maximum plans for Starship, but it might also be possible to make point to point transfers of 1000 Nigerians in 10 minutes.
    , @niceland
    @Thulean Friend


    Personally, I don’t believe in stagnation. I’m fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity’s capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.
     
    What do you have in mind when you say stagnation? Are you talking about zero economic growth? If so - would that necessarily mean stagnation in living standards?

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @Yellowface Anon
    @Thulean Friend

    The last resort could be MAD of any type where the sheer destruction and the ensuring Nuclear Winter will ensure those goals are met. But this would involve an extraordinary level of tacit understanding between the sides doing MAD. Maybe having your main enemies on Davos a few times will suffice.

    , @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend

    I agree to a limited extent that most doomsday scenarios right and left are bunk. Usually there are real systemic problems undergirding these fears but they are sensationalized to the point of parody.

    I think there is cause for some pessimism though and I have far less faith than you in humanity's ability to innovate ourselves out of the corners that we've painted ourselves in. First and foremost because there seems to be precious little political or societal will to actually admit or engage with the true nature of the problems. Instead, things just progress on auto-pilot with little attempt to change course.

    One example would be the collapse of Western society. This often gets described in apocalyptic terms as a singular event or series of events. However, we are already living in that reality of decline. It's been going on for decades, but it's a slow process which tends to sneak up on people. When one compares the social and political state of America 30 years to today it becomes clear that the decline is quite real.

    A similar statement could be made about the environment. Environmentalist fantasies of humanity reducing the Earth to a lifeless ball are extremely extravagant, but all the same we are using up aquifers in California or Nevada at an alarming rate, burning up valuable topsoil with extractive farming techniques et cetera. These will make our lives quite a bit harder in the long term and there is really nothing being done to change course.

    Perhaps humanity is technically capable of innovating our way out of our issues, but collectively we seem to be operating very stupidly and that gives me little confidence that we will actually do so.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

  107. Always thought the comparisons of Ukraine to Afghanistan were really strange, for a variety of reasons that I’ve expressed here before. But I want to add one more:

    If you take the position that Afghanistan was Brzezinski’s trap, and he was ethnically motivated to get revenge, than when EEs make the comparison, to justify the arms shipments and cash, they are really just basing it entirely on their past efforts to get revenge. A revenge that ultimately was very costly to us (Osama), and which verged on being catastrophically costly to us – I.E. Yeltsin activating his nuclear suitcase, during a tense moment.

    It is a circular logic.

  108. @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    However, I think that there are really only two viable choices to reducing carbon footprint; either drastically scaling back consumption and relying on renewables or embracing nuclear to maintain the pace of consumption that we’ve become accustomed to.
     
    I agree. Sadly, the green movement is infested with these "degrowth" types. The more honest of them admit that we would all have to take a massive hit to our living standards (we're talking 80-90% less energy consumption per capita) if their theories are to be followed.

    The less honest - and more slimy - types will typically say that 3rd world countries can't use coal and that rich countries should slowly decarbonise. The implication is that most of the adjustment should fall on the poorest in the world.

    Personally, I don't believe in stagnation. I'm fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity's capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.

    I think most doomsday scenarios, whether leftoid (climate collapse!) or rightoid (race war!) is bunk.

    Replies: @songbird, @niceland, @Yellowface Anon, @Barbarossa

    I’m fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity’s capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.

    I also believe in innovations.

    That is why I advocate using A380s, to remigrate 1000 Nigerians with every flight.

    Am kind of skeptical of Musk’s maximum plans for Starship, but it might also be possible to make point to point transfers of 1000 Nigerians in 10 minutes.

  109. @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    However, I think that there are really only two viable choices to reducing carbon footprint; either drastically scaling back consumption and relying on renewables or embracing nuclear to maintain the pace of consumption that we’ve become accustomed to.
     
    I agree. Sadly, the green movement is infested with these "degrowth" types. The more honest of them admit that we would all have to take a massive hit to our living standards (we're talking 80-90% less energy consumption per capita) if their theories are to be followed.

    The less honest - and more slimy - types will typically say that 3rd world countries can't use coal and that rich countries should slowly decarbonise. The implication is that most of the adjustment should fall on the poorest in the world.

    Personally, I don't believe in stagnation. I'm fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity's capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.

    I think most doomsday scenarios, whether leftoid (climate collapse!) or rightoid (race war!) is bunk.

    Replies: @songbird, @niceland, @Yellowface Anon, @Barbarossa

    Personally, I don’t believe in stagnation. I’m fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity’s capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.

    What do you have in mind when you say stagnation? Are you talking about zero economic growth? If so – would that necessarily mean stagnation in living standards?

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @niceland


    What do you have in mind when you say stagnation? Are you talking about zero economic growth? If so – would that necessarily mean stagnation in living standards?
     
    Yes and yes. If you're interested in the topic, I recommend starting here.
  110. A123 says: • Website

    @silvosilver

    Here are some numbers showing overwhelming disapproval for the current Israeli coalition: (1)

    According to the poll conducted by Panels Politics Research following a year of Ra’am (United Arab List) being in the coalition, 69% – almost three quarters of the country – do not want an Arab party in the government next time, 22% would be in favor, and nine percent said they do not know. The number of people opposed to an Arab party in the coalition includes 40 percent of Israeli-Arabs.

    The poll found that 65% of Israelis are not satisfied with the performance of Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, and only 30% said he is performing well. Five percent said they did not know.

    The current coalition is obviously an unstable aberration. The only precedent that has been set is, “This type of compromise should never be repeated.”

    The article does go through a larger analysis of the data, and suggests that a new election could replicate the same split. Netanyahu’s faction at 59/120 seats in the Knesset.
    ___

    Germany and Israel are two versions of a common problem. The Parliament / Prime Minister concept is based on 50%+1 of voters having a common vision. Those votes should yield 50%+1 in the parliamentary body to select a Prime Minister to implement their coherent, shared policies.

    The concept becomes inherently dysfunctional when a “common policy” coalition cannot form. It becomes a “quest for the magic number”. Bennett is already a minority leader in Israel. After the disastrous elections in North Rhine-Westphalia, Scholz is headed towards the same fate.
    ___

    If there was an easy answer, we would not be having this conversation. And, I am not suggesting America’s “First Past The Post” concept. That has its own weaknesses.

    Perhaps the needed change is the ability to create a national government of “limited scope”?

    The parliamentary body establishes the subset of policies where there is consensus. Then they empower “Less than Prime” minister(s) restricted to those points of agreement?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://m.jpost.com/israel-news/article-707827

  111. @Korenchkin
    I want to congratulate the commenters here on reaching a lower quality of posts than the average /pol/ thread

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Barbarossa, @Yevardian

    Yeah, this place has fallen precipitously from its glory days, when you could have furious arguments over whose national sheepdog would win in a cagefight.

    • LOL: utu
  112. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Barbarossa

    There must be a language barrier or some similar misunderstanding.

    He does not and perhaps cannot appreciate the subtle artistry of what is occurring here. I will try and put it into the simplest possible English. What we have is a gradual unveiling of the lost/deleted chapters of the Brothers Karamazov. It was just a little too much to ask Dostoevsky to put everything in there.

    Anatoly Karamazov is the previously undocumented brother. He took his brother's words too much to his heart in the naivete of his youth.

    If there is no God then everything is permitted.

    Ivan actually intended the exact opposite message to Anatoly. He read:

    there is no God;
    hence everything is permitted.

    Slowly and gradually the truth is arousing itself in Anatoly Karamazov's mind.

    Everything is not permitted.
    Ergo, there is a God.

    Only foolish people who think everything is permitted will take on the entire bloody damn world.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9hDA0u6FO0

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    Rather an important battle to show you when it’s time to retreat.

  113. @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    However, I think that there are really only two viable choices to reducing carbon footprint; either drastically scaling back consumption and relying on renewables or embracing nuclear to maintain the pace of consumption that we’ve become accustomed to.
     
    I agree. Sadly, the green movement is infested with these "degrowth" types. The more honest of them admit that we would all have to take a massive hit to our living standards (we're talking 80-90% less energy consumption per capita) if their theories are to be followed.

    The less honest - and more slimy - types will typically say that 3rd world countries can't use coal and that rich countries should slowly decarbonise. The implication is that most of the adjustment should fall on the poorest in the world.

    Personally, I don't believe in stagnation. I'm fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity's capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.

    I think most doomsday scenarios, whether leftoid (climate collapse!) or rightoid (race war!) is bunk.

    Replies: @songbird, @niceland, @Yellowface Anon, @Barbarossa

    The last resort could be MAD of any type where the sheer destruction and the ensuring Nuclear Winter will ensure those goals are met. But this would involve an extraordinary level of tacit understanding between the sides doing MAD. Maybe having your main enemies on Davos a few times will suffice.

  114. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Interesting question. Islam is a very globalist religion, which you have to be if you want to win the religious wars. I recall ISIS denouncing Chechen recruits since they "flew the flag of Chechnya higher than that of the ummah". Seems like Islam, if taken seriously, has a very low tolerance for particularism.

    Turks have become steadily more secularised, despite Erdogan's best efforts, which means that national identity will increasingly center around language and ethnicity rather than religion, much like the Balkans. Even former "best friends" (admittedly, mostly one-sided) Pakistanis are no longer finding it easy to obtain a visa since their creeps stalking the streets of Istanbul and harassing Turkish women.

    A big undercurrent of resentment that works against Erdogan is precisely his lenient immigration policies. The recent murmors that Turkey will begin a new operation in Syria, to carve out a space in the northern part inhabitated by many Kurds, probably has a dual purpose in expelling potentially as many as a 1 million Syrians.

    Replies: @dyauspitr

    pakistan is a cursed country. literally devils hell

  115. @Barbarossa
    @Mikel

    My 2 cents is that the rapidly exploding cost of housing, coupled by the loss of many of the good jobs has driven many people over the brink. These energy increases are going to massively exacerbate the issue, especially when we get into the 2022/23 heating season. It's going to be really bad if the trajectory doesn't drastically change in the next couple months.

    It's a disparate impact because the upper rungs have consolidated their position while the lower and middle classes have drowned. I managed, as a fairly young person to carve out a secure economic niche, but that was mainly by ignoring every bit of conventional financial and business advice. I don't envy most younger people since it's not very favorable for many of them, especially once they get some school debt strapped on like a lead weight.

    The drug addiction and mental illness is I think a bit downstream of the economic and societal issues in many cases, but the drugs indeed are very very bad. Opioid usage is an epidemic around my area. It seems a symptom of complete despair and nihilism.

    I guess this is what advanced societal collapse looks like. And you are right, there is little that the authorities can do, since this is a problem decades in the making. It would take exceptional political will and consensus to turn it around, which is completely lacking. I think it's fair to expect that government will be no help and we as individuals will have to be ready to help the less fortunate where we can. Unfortunately, I'm afraid it's going to get worse before it gets better.

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Mikel

    The interest on student loans here has already been bumped up to around ten percent. Looking at renewing my energy deal, the only fixed deal will be more than triple the previous at over £6k a year.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @LondonBob

    Thanks, ouch, that sounds painful. I burn wood for heat so I'm in fine shape that way, but use propane for hot water and cooking. The propane price is way above what it was last year but it's not that big a deal because my usage is still fairly low. I bought a wood cook stove a couple years ago just in case energy prices ever went high enough to make such an option attractive. I was thinking more of a 20 year time-frame for such a scenario, but we seem to be approaching that more rapidly!

    I've been curious as to what inflation and energy costs have been in other regions. I haven't done any extensive looking but my impression is that the situation is worse in Europe than it currently is in the US.

    I don't think that Western governments can be much relied on for any bailouts either since they already did that with Covid, and they can't continue provoking inflation with free bucks forever.

    Interestingly, it seems that Biden is serious in passing some limited student debt forgiveness, which is timed purely for midterms PR. That would seemingly add inflationary pressure, but they may figure that much of it is already baked in since student loans have been on hold for 2 years now. Or they may just not give a crap if it gains some votes.

    Replies: @A123

  116. @niceland
    @Thulean Friend


    Personally, I don’t believe in stagnation. I’m fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity’s capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.
     
    What do you have in mind when you say stagnation? Are you talking about zero economic growth? If so - would that necessarily mean stagnation in living standards?

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    What do you have in mind when you say stagnation? Are you talking about zero economic growth? If so – would that necessarily mean stagnation in living standards?

    Yes and yes. If you’re interested in the topic, I recommend starting here.

  117. Pathetic:

    • Replies: @216
    @Mikhail

    There is no political confidence that rationing could be imposed. The West is losing because of its unseriousness, not because of geopolitics.

  118. @Observator
    @Jim Richard

    It strikes me as unfounded to accuse Ritter of evil intention, of being a secret CIA asset, tool of the Deep State, and so on, because of his recent analyses. He has never wavered from the position that Ukraine has the same chance of defeating the Russian Federation that Mexico would have if Washington sent an army across its border. His points about the effect of the larger de facto NATO/US war against Russia are well taken. The Ukrop are not fools; they are learning from experience. And the Russians are not supermen: they make mistakes. Tens of billions of dollars of weapons cannot change the outcome of the war but they must impact its tactics. Someone online, maybe Ritter, recently quoted the WW2 General Omar Bradley’s comment that amateurs talk strategy while professionals talk logistics. Ritter is a professional, experienced military man. He understands from experience that it is the nuts and bolts of supply chains, intelligence, communication, that determine the battlefield outcome. Amateurs almost always look for quick, dashing victories over unworthy foemen, like the first Confederate Secretary of War Leroy Pope Walker who boasted he could wipe up all the blood spilled because of secession with his handkerchief, while the newspapers said at the same time that old Uncle Billy Sherman was mad as a hatter for stating it would take five years and five million men to crush the insurrection.

    Replies: @Jim Richard

    How many times does 49 go into 15?

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Jim Richard

    Only once. Then he goes to jail.

  119. Food for thought for S: The main pattern of European and then World history after 1500 is how successive tellurocracies (France, Germany and Russia/Soviets) and competing thalassocracies (Spain, Holland and Japan) fail one after another in their bid to overcome one single group of thalassocratic powers, either from a strategically moronic bid that turned out fatal or general decadence. That is, the Anglo-Saxons (the UK & US), with the Jews and Brahmins emulating their bourgeois example.

    The two questions that will be answered in the 21th century is: Will China prove to be the exemption or the rule? Would India succeed the US in retaining “Anglo” dominance? (this could be one of the reasons AK was Indotriumphalist)

    • Thanks: S
  120. Looks about right.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Yahya

    The Basques never get any respect.

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Yahya

    The median age of people living in Germany is 46 for men and over 48 for women, and it continues to rise. If we could obtain a median age for actual Germans in Germany, it would be even slightly higher than these figures, as the median age of non-Europeans is lower.

    The total fertility rate in Germany is less than 1.5 children per woman in her lifetime.

    Even if they greatly increase their use of drones, where will Germany get the personnel for its military?

    Same comment for Italians. Median age in Italy is 44.5 for men and 46.5 for women and still rising. Total fertility rate in italy is a death-spiral 1.3 children per woman, and the TFR has fallen a bit for each of the past 14 consecutive years.

    Even the Italians greatly increase the use of drones, where will Italy get the personnel still needed for its military?

    That Turkish area of influence might end up being much larger than depicted, if Turkey can maintain its fertility rate slightly above replacement level and maintain its manufacturing and assembly (industrial) employment. Germany and Austria et al.can help by continuing to admit Turkish immigrants.

    Among weak, dying, demoralized, self-hating peoples like the Germans and Italians, Turks look strong despite their problems. Turks can expand at their expense given the Turks' superior reproduction, national pride, strong identity, relative cohesion, and merely passable replacement fertility rate.

    Now imagine Turkey being realistic, supporting a Russian-proposed deal in the ukraine, and cutting a favorable long-term energy import deal Russia. Meanwhile the Germans and british wreck their industries, and impoverish their people, by banning Russian energy imports without an adequate replacement. Turkey can extend its influence further, faster, with an old, subjugated, increasingly poor "German" and "Italian" population. The prospects for Turkish language, culture, and eventually political control are good, given that Turks constitute probably 10% of "Germans" under 18 and easily 25% of the youth in Vienna.

    Replies: @AP, @songbird

    , @Sher Singh
    @Yahya

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUjPc8wamM0

  121. @Yahya
    https://twitter.com/Baezantium/status/1530611235716210691?s=20&t=IAkxcf562hkPrQqSfWBe7Q

    Looks about right.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @RadicalCenter, @Sher Singh

    The Basques never get any respect.

    • Agree: Mikel
  122. Historian Timothy Snyder does a good job of explaining Putler’s motives for invading Ukraine and what he’s trying to accomplish there by destroying everything and everybody in sight. Putler is framed in categories about destroying the Ukrainian nation and the Ukrainian state (Ukrainian genocide) as being his preeminent ideology guiding his every move, and why Ukraine needs to win this war as the only starting place that makes any sense for its future survival.

    If anybody has a better idea about what Putler’s guiding principles are within Ukraine, I’m all ears…

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack


    Historian Timothy Snyder does a good job of explaining Putler’s motives for invading Ukraine and what he’s trying to accomplish there by destroying everything and everybody in sight. Putler is framed in categories about destroying the Ukrainian nation and the Ukrainian state (Ukrainian genocide) as being his preeminent ideology guiding his every move, and why Ukraine needs to win this war as the only starting place that makes any sense for its future survival.
     
    Has actually been explained numerous times at these threads, including this one.

    What the likes of Snyder block out:

    https://www.rt.com/news/556276-azov-ukraine-uk-nazi/

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Mr. Hack

    Historian Timothy Snyder is working overtime to get back into the good graces of the Jew Mafia. He is also wasting his time. He is forever blacklisted for having the gall to document that plenty people were liquidated in east Europe in the early 1940's other than Jews.

    A pity. He is a very talented man.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @German_reader
    @Mr. Hack

    Snyder is a sloppy historian at best. I'm increasingly more inclined to consider him an outright propagandist though. What Russia is doing in Ukraine is very bad and I don't doubt that Russian troops have committed many war crimes, but "genocide"? The term loses all meaning when used like that.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail

    , @utu
    @Mr. Hack

    English translation of Snyder interview in Polish weekly:



    Timothy Snyder: If Ukrainians hadn’t fought back, the world would’ve been a much darker place. (2022/03/31)

    https://euromaidanpress.com/2022/03/31/if-ukrainians-hadnt-fought-back-the-world-wouldve-been-a-much-darker-place/?__cf_chl_tk=2bXcUJ5HKsonzjgxGRz6T0jUBkHBj4crHr5tWpN4otM-1653839049-0-gaNycGzNDKU
     


     
    And here Snyder in Spegel few days ago:

    Warum fällt es Deutschland so schwer, von einem faschistischen Russland zu sprechen? (27.05.2022)

    https://www.spiegel.de/ausland/ukraine-krieg-warum-faellt-es-deutschland-so-schwer-von-einem-faschistischen-russland-zu-sprechen-a-6511c1ca-e90b-4497-a88f-76d7453a244d
     

    Or in other words why Ribbentrop - Molotov Pact is alive and fine under the guise of German guilt? The alleged German guilt is one big fake alibi that Germans invented for themselves so they can talk about it instead of searching for Russian agentur among themselves and answering the question why they are more anti-American than anti-Russian.

    Germans have no problems accepting that they are cunts and twats but will resist acknowledging that they are callous whores.

    Too bad that Timothy Snyder does not call spade a spade and only tries to make factual corrections that if Germans want to feel guilt their guilt to Belarusians and Ukrainian should be greater than to Russians.

    Replies: @sudden death, @German_reader

  123. @LondonBob
    @Barbarossa

    The interest on student loans here has already been bumped up to around ten percent. Looking at renewing my energy deal, the only fixed deal will be more than triple the previous at over £6k a year.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    Thanks, ouch, that sounds painful. I burn wood for heat so I’m in fine shape that way, but use propane for hot water and cooking. The propane price is way above what it was last year but it’s not that big a deal because my usage is still fairly low. I bought a wood cook stove a couple years ago just in case energy prices ever went high enough to make such an option attractive. I was thinking more of a 20 year time-frame for such a scenario, but we seem to be approaching that more rapidly!

    I’ve been curious as to what inflation and energy costs have been in other regions. I haven’t done any extensive looking but my impression is that the situation is worse in Europe than it currently is in the US.

    I don’t think that Western governments can be much relied on for any bailouts either since they already did that with Covid, and they can’t continue provoking inflation with free bucks forever.

    Interestingly, it seems that Biden is serious in passing some limited student debt forgiveness, which is timed purely for midterms PR. That would seemingly add inflationary pressure, but they may figure that much of it is already baked in since student loans have been on hold for 2 years now. Or they may just not give a crap if it gains some votes.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Barbarossa


    I’ve been curious as to what inflation and energy costs have been in other regions. I haven’t done any extensive looking but my impression is that the situation is worse in Europe than it currently is in the US.
     
    Food cost inflation is running wild in the U.S. (1)

    Food at home (grocery store) prices: up 7% to 8% in this monthly review, versus the April outlook of a rise of 5% to 6%. That means the USDA is predicting the highest grocery store price rise since 1980 when prices rose 8.1% (prices rose 7.2% in 1981). There is no reason to think the USDA forecast will not rise again in June.
    ...
    The core issue is this snowball of production costs inside the field to fork supply chain. Diesel prices, fertilizer prices, energy prices, seed and feed prices, all of it has doubled and tripled in less than a year.

    Add in transportation and distribution costs that have doubled, and all of that cumulative impact is going to flow through the food supply chain from the field to the processor (wholesaler), and into the supermarket. Fresh foods, especially in the produce section, will catch many people off guard.
     
    In America, chicken is the "cheap" protein. The industrial birds heavily consume corn, which requires significant amounts of fertilizer for the crop. Many farmers switched away from corn this season due to fertilizer high cost and/or lack of availability. The impending lack of feed corn could run up a 33-50% price hike on chicken. And, that is a particularly difficult substitution for the poorest workers.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/05/27/udsa-raises-food-price-forecast-to-highest-level-in-42-years-third-wave-of-u-s-food-inflation-will-dwarf-prior-price-increases/

    Replies: @songbird, @Barbarossa

  124. @Mr. Hack
    Historian Timothy Snyder does a good job of explaining Putler's motives for invading Ukraine and what he's trying to accomplish there by destroying everything and everybody in sight. Putler is framed in categories about destroying the Ukrainian nation and the Ukrainian state (Ukrainian genocide) as being his preeminent ideology guiding his every move, and why Ukraine needs to win this war as the only starting place that makes any sense for its future survival.

    https://youtu.be/4qdvjslwvIU

    If anybody has a better idea about what Putler's guiding principles are within Ukraine, I'm all ears...

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Emil Nikola Richard, @German_reader, @utu

    Historian Timothy Snyder does a good job of explaining Putler’s motives for invading Ukraine and what he’s trying to accomplish there by destroying everything and everybody in sight. Putler is framed in categories about destroying the Ukrainian nation and the Ukrainian state (Ukrainian genocide) as being his preeminent ideology guiding his every move, and why Ukraine needs to win this war as the only starting place that makes any sense for its future survival.

    Has actually been explained numerous times at these threads, including this one.

    What the likes of Snyder block out:

    https://www.rt.com/news/556276-azov-ukraine-uk-nazi/

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    "The likes" of Averko can offer no useful information, much less a rebuttal to Snyder's comments. The RT article doesn't even mention Snyder? More of your nonsensical dialogue that isn't centered on reality? Only genocide denier Averko is able to connect the dots of differing information sources to come up with some kind of a thesis, that only he understands. I've finished trying to make sense of your disparate rantings long ago, Averko! :-)

    Replies: @Mikhail

  125. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack


    Historian Timothy Snyder does a good job of explaining Putler’s motives for invading Ukraine and what he’s trying to accomplish there by destroying everything and everybody in sight. Putler is framed in categories about destroying the Ukrainian nation and the Ukrainian state (Ukrainian genocide) as being his preeminent ideology guiding his every move, and why Ukraine needs to win this war as the only starting place that makes any sense for its future survival.
     
    Has actually been explained numerous times at these threads, including this one.

    What the likes of Snyder block out:

    https://www.rt.com/news/556276-azov-ukraine-uk-nazi/

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    “The likes” of Averko can offer no useful information, much less a rebuttal to Snyder’s comments. The RT article doesn’t even mention Snyder? More of your nonsensical dialogue that isn’t centered on reality? Only genocide denier Averko is able to connect the dots of differing information sources to come up with some kind of a thesis, that only he understands. I’ve finished trying to make sense of your disparate rantings long ago, Averko! 🙂

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Your cuck comeback lacks merit and is indicative of your projection hypocrisy.

    As has been utilized, the genocide denier term is along the lines of Nina Jankowicz use of disinformation.

  126. @Mikhail
    Pathetic:

    https://twitter.com/StarboyHK/status/1530420997135863811

    Replies: @216

    There is no political confidence that rationing could be imposed. The West is losing because of its unseriousness, not because of geopolitics.

  127. @Mr. Hack
    Historian Timothy Snyder does a good job of explaining Putler's motives for invading Ukraine and what he's trying to accomplish there by destroying everything and everybody in sight. Putler is framed in categories about destroying the Ukrainian nation and the Ukrainian state (Ukrainian genocide) as being his preeminent ideology guiding his every move, and why Ukraine needs to win this war as the only starting place that makes any sense for its future survival.

    https://youtu.be/4qdvjslwvIU

    If anybody has a better idea about what Putler's guiding principles are within Ukraine, I'm all ears...

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Emil Nikola Richard, @German_reader, @utu

    Historian Timothy Snyder is working overtime to get back into the good graces of the Jew Mafia. He is also wasting his time. He is forever blacklisted for having the gall to document that plenty people were liquidated in east Europe in the early 1940’s other than Jews.

    A pity. He is a very talented man.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    So we're in agreement that Snyder is a "talented man" that is courageous enough to hold to his convictions on certain topics, even if it means that he is "blacklisted" and may even harm his own personal career ambitions. All the more reason to listen to the interview that I posted above and take the message within seriously.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  128. German_reader says:
    @Mr. Hack
    Historian Timothy Snyder does a good job of explaining Putler's motives for invading Ukraine and what he's trying to accomplish there by destroying everything and everybody in sight. Putler is framed in categories about destroying the Ukrainian nation and the Ukrainian state (Ukrainian genocide) as being his preeminent ideology guiding his every move, and why Ukraine needs to win this war as the only starting place that makes any sense for its future survival.

    https://youtu.be/4qdvjslwvIU

    If anybody has a better idea about what Putler's guiding principles are within Ukraine, I'm all ears...

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Emil Nikola Richard, @German_reader, @utu

    Snyder is a sloppy historian at best. I’m increasingly more inclined to consider him an outright propagandist though. What Russia is doing in Ukraine is very bad and I don’t doubt that Russian troops have committed many war crimes, but “genocide”? The term loses all meaning when used like that.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @German_reader

    BTW, it was I, in this instance who added the very unsavory descriptor of "genocide" to Putler's list of accomplishments within Ukraine, not Snyder. Although, how else could you describe a policy of completely destroying small Ukrainian villages that have absolutely no military significance or presence, including the destruction of civilians including the elderly, women and children. The destruction of kindergartens, schools, community centers, hospitals and historic Ukrainian churches? If you have a more accurate descriptor of this process, please let me know what it is, for I'm not aware of a better descriptor than "genocide"?...

    Replies: @German_reader

    , @Mikhail
    @German_reader


    What Russia is doing in Ukraine is very bad and I don’t doubt that Russian troops have committed many war crimes, but “genocide”? The term loses all meaning when used like that.
     
    How the Kiev regime has carried (war crimes and all) is very bad, but "genocide"? I think that's loaded, relative to how that term (probably before Bosnia) was typically used.

    Replies: @Beckow

  129. German_reader says:
    • Replies: @A123
    @German_reader

    While Haaretz is not officially the "Voice of Labour/Gesher", it effectively operates as such. Decades ago that would have implied great weight. Now, Haaretz is the voice of an extreme-Left minority, much like America's NPR. They try to avoid outright lies, and instead deceive by implication. This is achieved by picking strange & unimportant stories and elevating them to unwarranted prominence.

    In your article, Haaretz accolades the leader of "Tunisian Jews" as important. However the maximum population of Jews in Tunisia was only ~100,000. France was a more popular destination, so less than half that number returned home to Jewish Palestine. And, only a portion of that portion were ultra Orthodox.

    After doing the math, Haaretz is once again revealed as a bad joke of an extreme-Left tabloid.

    PEACE 😇

  130. @German_reader
    @Mr. Hack

    Snyder is a sloppy historian at best. I'm increasingly more inclined to consider him an outright propagandist though. What Russia is doing in Ukraine is very bad and I don't doubt that Russian troops have committed many war crimes, but "genocide"? The term loses all meaning when used like that.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail

    BTW, it was I, in this instance who added the very unsavory descriptor of “genocide” to Putler’s list of accomplishments within Ukraine, not Snyder. Although, how else could you describe a policy of completely destroying small Ukrainian villages that have absolutely no military significance or presence, including the destruction of civilians including the elderly, women and children. The destruction of kindergartens, schools, community centers, hospitals and historic Ukrainian churches? If you have a more accurate descriptor of this process, please let me know what it is, for I’m not aware of a better descriptor than “genocide”?…

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @Mr. Hack


    Although, how else could you describe a policy of completely destroying small Ukrainian villages that have absolutely no military significance or presence, including the destruction of civilians including the elderly, women and children.
     
    War crimes, or maybe crimes against humanity.
    Russia is certainly doing a lot of terrible things in its conduct of the war, and I assume in the areas they intend to annex they will try to demolish any independent Ukrainian identity with a sticks and carrot approach (rewards for collaborators, punishment up to being "disappeared" for people who disagree), also things like promoting Russian imperial greatness in school curricula etc. As I said this is all pretty bad, but it's not genocide in the Armenian genocide, Holocaust or Rwanda sense.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Barbarossa

  131. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Mr. Hack

    Historian Timothy Snyder is working overtime to get back into the good graces of the Jew Mafia. He is also wasting his time. He is forever blacklisted for having the gall to document that plenty people were liquidated in east Europe in the early 1940's other than Jews.

    A pity. He is a very talented man.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    So we’re in agreement that Snyder is a “talented man” that is courageous enough to hold to his convictions on certain topics, even if it means that he is “blacklisted” and may even harm his own personal career ambitions. All the more reason to listen to the interview that I posted above and take the message within seriously.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Mr. Hack

    Perhaps you do not understand the magnitude of the man's offense. If you read between the lines of Bloodlands (he does not put it in this wording) you get the message that there was nothing particularly special about the Jew experience in east Europe in the early 1940's. Everybody got it.

    He will never be forgiven. He is condemned to a career of biting the heads off of chickens and snakes.

    Replies: @utu

  132. German_reader says:
    @Mr. Hack
    @German_reader

    BTW, it was I, in this instance who added the very unsavory descriptor of "genocide" to Putler's list of accomplishments within Ukraine, not Snyder. Although, how else could you describe a policy of completely destroying small Ukrainian villages that have absolutely no military significance or presence, including the destruction of civilians including the elderly, women and children. The destruction of kindergartens, schools, community centers, hospitals and historic Ukrainian churches? If you have a more accurate descriptor of this process, please let me know what it is, for I'm not aware of a better descriptor than "genocide"?...

    Replies: @German_reader

    Although, how else could you describe a policy of completely destroying small Ukrainian villages that have absolutely no military significance or presence, including the destruction of civilians including the elderly, women and children.

    War crimes, or maybe crimes against humanity.
    Russia is certainly doing a lot of terrible things in its conduct of the war, and I assume in the areas they intend to annex they will try to demolish any independent Ukrainian identity with a sticks and carrot approach (rewards for collaborators, punishment up to being “disappeared” for people who disagree), also things like promoting Russian imperial greatness in school curricula etc. As I said this is all pretty bad, but it’s not genocide in the Armenian genocide, Holocaust or Rwanda sense.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @German_reader


    As I said this is all pretty bad, but it’s not genocide in the Armenian genocide, Holocaust or Rwanda sense.
     
    You may be right. It'll be looked upon in history as a Ukrainian form of genocide, similar to how the Intellectual Polish-Jewish thinker Raphael Lemkin viewed the genocide known as the Holodomor in Ukraine in the 1930's. BTW, important research and evidence is now being gathered to convict Russia's war crimes in Ukraine that will be adjudicated after this war ends.

    30 international experts conclude that genocide is afoot within Ukraine:

    https://youtu.be/Hx5ULoSinlg

    Replies: @LatW

    , @Barbarossa
    @German_reader

    I suppose under Mr. Hack's definition the Allied air war in WW2 would also be genocide.

    But why not? If today we are all Nazis then any war action must also be genocide. It's simple logic that we can all apply as we prefer.

    Person I Don't Like=Hitler

    Hitler=Genocide

    Actions by Person I Don't Like=Genocide

    Now how can anyone quibble with such an elegant formula?

    Replies: @German_reader, @Mr. Hack

  133. @German_reader
    @Mr. Hack


    Although, how else could you describe a policy of completely destroying small Ukrainian villages that have absolutely no military significance or presence, including the destruction of civilians including the elderly, women and children.
     
    War crimes, or maybe crimes against humanity.
    Russia is certainly doing a lot of terrible things in its conduct of the war, and I assume in the areas they intend to annex they will try to demolish any independent Ukrainian identity with a sticks and carrot approach (rewards for collaborators, punishment up to being "disappeared" for people who disagree), also things like promoting Russian imperial greatness in school curricula etc. As I said this is all pretty bad, but it's not genocide in the Armenian genocide, Holocaust or Rwanda sense.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Barbarossa

    As I said this is all pretty bad, but it’s not genocide in the Armenian genocide, Holocaust or Rwanda sense.

    You may be right. It’ll be looked upon in history as a Ukrainian form of genocide, similar to how the Intellectual Polish-Jewish thinker Raphael Lemkin viewed the genocide known as the Holodomor in Ukraine in the 1930’s. BTW, important research and evidence is now being gathered to convict Russia’s war crimes in Ukraine that will be adjudicated after this war ends.

    30 international experts conclude that genocide is afoot within Ukraine:

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Mr. Hack


    It’ll be looked upon in history as a Ukrainian form of genocide
     
    Yes, it is that (or possibly, if one cares about terms, an ethnocide or erasure of identity that quickly and inevitably turned into a genocide although I wouldn't put it past it that someone in the Moscovite military may have had this intention already before Feb 24). The language has been genocidal for a long time now (calling on national TV for mass deportation, "re-education camps", sterilization, etc.). Yep, welcome to 2022!

    What is peculiar, though, is that this massive violence is also directed at Russophones, against that special new Russophone identity that I mentioned a few threads back. As it obviously constitutes a danger to the Moscovite side.

    Btw, did you hear that the Moscovites stole some ancient Scythian items?


    And the lesson for Russia's neighbors here is how fast it is happening. In Kherson they are already forcing the Russian curriculum on kids. From what I've heard, the people of Kherson are resisting quite bravely.

    What is more important here, Mr Hack, is that, yes, voicing this and recording the crimes is very important (as well as making the world hear about them). But, if you look at it in abstract, it's just data. So what are we going to do about it? The Ukrainian men who are out there are bringing the perpetrators to accountability, as much as they can. They will be deciding the fate of Ukraine.

    However, the catastrophe is so immense that we, friends of Ukraine and Ukrainians themselves, have to do much more. Ideally, for every killed Ukrainian there should be a newborn child that will be raised as a Ukrainian. For every demolished church or cultural center, a new cultural center should be built somewhere in the West or Central Ukraine. Yes, it seems a bit unrealistic. But other things can be done as well, and these need to go beyond donations. More projects need to be started, no matter how small. I encourage you to think about this, Mr Hack. Even publishing a small, new book in Ukrainian language is worth it now.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  134. utu says:
    @Mr. Hack
    Historian Timothy Snyder does a good job of explaining Putler's motives for invading Ukraine and what he's trying to accomplish there by destroying everything and everybody in sight. Putler is framed in categories about destroying the Ukrainian nation and the Ukrainian state (Ukrainian genocide) as being his preeminent ideology guiding his every move, and why Ukraine needs to win this war as the only starting place that makes any sense for its future survival.

    https://youtu.be/4qdvjslwvIU

    If anybody has a better idea about what Putler's guiding principles are within Ukraine, I'm all ears...

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Emil Nikola Richard, @German_reader, @utu

    English translation of Snyder interview in Polish weekly:

    Timothy Snyder: If Ukrainians hadn’t fought back, the world would’ve been a much darker place. (2022/03/31)

    https://euromaidanpress.com/2022/03/31/if-ukrainians-hadnt-fought-back-the-world-wouldve-been-a-much-darker-place/?__cf_chl_tk=2bXcUJ5HKsonzjgxGRz6T0jUBkHBj4crHr5tWpN4otM-1653839049-0-gaNycGzNDKU

    And here Snyder in Spegel few days ago:

    Warum fällt es Deutschland so schwer, von einem faschistischen Russland zu sprechen? (27.05.2022)

    https://www.spiegel.de/ausland/ukraine-krieg-warum-faellt-es-deutschland-so-schwer-von-einem-faschistischen-russland-zu-sprechen-a-6511c1ca-e90b-4497-a88f-76d7453a244d

    Or in other words why Ribbentrop – Molotov Pact is alive and fine under the guise of German guilt? The alleged German guilt is one big fake alibi that Germans invented for themselves so they can talk about it instead of searching for Russian agentur among themselves and answering the question why they are more anti-American than anti-Russian.

    Germans have no problems accepting that they are cunts and twats but will resist acknowledging that they are callous whores.

    Too bad that Timothy Snyder does not call spade a spade and only tries to make factual corrections that if Germans want to feel guilt their guilt to Belarusians and Ukrainian should be greater than to Russians.

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @utu

    It's not exactly guilt, more similar to beaten puppy Stockholm syndrome mentality that some Germans, French or Swedes seem to share towards tzarist or communist regimes and RF is exploiting that by extension.

    Replies: @German_reader

    , @German_reader
    @utu


    answering the question why they are more anti-American than anti-Russian.
     
    I'm not aware Germany ever has sent weapons out of Bundeswehr stocks to some foreign conflict with the purpose of helping kill American soldiers, like it has done with regard to Ukraine and Russian soldiers.

    Too bad that Timothy Snyder does not call spade a spade and only tries to make factual corrections that if Germans want to feel guilt their guilt to Belarusians and Ukrainian should be greater than to Russians.
     
    Exactly, he tries his best to nourish and cultivate German guilt, he just wants it directed solely towards Poles and Ukrainians. His entire work (sloppy at best) seems to be a project for providing a historical narrative convenient for types like AP with their Intermarium fantasies. Would be interesting to know if it's merely Snyder's personal belief, or if there is something more to it...by your standards the question should be legitimate if he's on the CIA's payroll.
    Anyway, you are of course an imbecile who should be institutionalized and kept in a padded cell. The only value of your comments is that they provide a glimpse of the deranged thinking of many emotionally incontinent Eastern Euros. If Ukraine loses (as looks possible right now), no doubt that Germany will be made the scapegoat, it's just too good a narrative to resist.

    Replies: @Yevardian

  135. @utu
    @Mr. Hack

    English translation of Snyder interview in Polish weekly:



    Timothy Snyder: If Ukrainians hadn’t fought back, the world would’ve been a much darker place. (2022/03/31)

    https://euromaidanpress.com/2022/03/31/if-ukrainians-hadnt-fought-back-the-world-wouldve-been-a-much-darker-place/?__cf_chl_tk=2bXcUJ5HKsonzjgxGRz6T0jUBkHBj4crHr5tWpN4otM-1653839049-0-gaNycGzNDKU
     


     
    And here Snyder in Spegel few days ago:

    Warum fällt es Deutschland so schwer, von einem faschistischen Russland zu sprechen? (27.05.2022)

    https://www.spiegel.de/ausland/ukraine-krieg-warum-faellt-es-deutschland-so-schwer-von-einem-faschistischen-russland-zu-sprechen-a-6511c1ca-e90b-4497-a88f-76d7453a244d
     

    Or in other words why Ribbentrop - Molotov Pact is alive and fine under the guise of German guilt? The alleged German guilt is one big fake alibi that Germans invented for themselves so they can talk about it instead of searching for Russian agentur among themselves and answering the question why they are more anti-American than anti-Russian.

    Germans have no problems accepting that they are cunts and twats but will resist acknowledging that they are callous whores.

    Too bad that Timothy Snyder does not call spade a spade and only tries to make factual corrections that if Germans want to feel guilt their guilt to Belarusians and Ukrainian should be greater than to Russians.

    Replies: @sudden death, @German_reader

    It’s not exactly guilt, more similar to beaten puppy Stockholm syndrome mentality that some Germans, French or Swedes seem to share towards tzarist or communist regimes and RF is exploiting that by extension.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @sudden death


    French
     
    Yeah, "beaten puppies" send weapons systems like that to Ukraine, makes total sense:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAESAR_self-propelled_howitzer

    What the hell is wrong with you Balts? You sit in your tiny dwarf states that Russia could easily wipe off the map, and yet the only thing one ever hears from you is absolutely grotesque belligerency..."establish a no-fly-zone" (Estonian parliament"), "don't even talk to Putin", "send ships to the Black sea to break the Russian blockade" (Latvian foreign minister), "only acceptable way this ends is total Ukrainian victory, including expelling Russia from Crimea" (Estonian prime minister). Whatever legitimate criticism one can make of Germany's and France's approach (and I would even concede that Scholz should at least take steps to export Marder and Leopard 1), there's no point to listening to people who seem to live in fantasy land.

    Replies: @sudden death, @Anatoly Karlin

  136. • Replies: @songbird
    @Yellowface Anon

    The most interesting thing about the whole dispute is Taiwan's occasional attempts to claim that they are a different people, like all half-aborigines or something.

    Their rhetoric makes me wonder, if it is a secret inter-Chinese ethnic war. The Hakkan against the Northern Han or something.

  137. German_reader says:
    @utu
    @Mr. Hack

    English translation of Snyder interview in Polish weekly:



    Timothy Snyder: If Ukrainians hadn’t fought back, the world would’ve been a much darker place. (2022/03/31)

    https://euromaidanpress.com/2022/03/31/if-ukrainians-hadnt-fought-back-the-world-wouldve-been-a-much-darker-place/?__cf_chl_tk=2bXcUJ5HKsonzjgxGRz6T0jUBkHBj4crHr5tWpN4otM-1653839049-0-gaNycGzNDKU
     


     
    And here Snyder in Spegel few days ago:

    Warum fällt es Deutschland so schwer, von einem faschistischen Russland zu sprechen? (27.05.2022)

    https://www.spiegel.de/ausland/ukraine-krieg-warum-faellt-es-deutschland-so-schwer-von-einem-faschistischen-russland-zu-sprechen-a-6511c1ca-e90b-4497-a88f-76d7453a244d
     

    Or in other words why Ribbentrop - Molotov Pact is alive and fine under the guise of German guilt? The alleged German guilt is one big fake alibi that Germans invented for themselves so they can talk about it instead of searching for Russian agentur among themselves and answering the question why they are more anti-American than anti-Russian.

    Germans have no problems accepting that they are cunts and twats but will resist acknowledging that they are callous whores.

    Too bad that Timothy Snyder does not call spade a spade and only tries to make factual corrections that if Germans want to feel guilt their guilt to Belarusians and Ukrainian should be greater than to Russians.

    Replies: @sudden death, @German_reader

    answering the question why they are more anti-American than anti-Russian.

    I’m not aware Germany ever has sent weapons out of Bundeswehr stocks to some foreign conflict with the purpose of helping kill American soldiers, like it has done with regard to Ukraine and Russian soldiers.

    Too bad that Timothy Snyder does not call spade a spade and only tries to make factual corrections that if Germans want to feel guilt their guilt to Belarusians and Ukrainian should be greater than to Russians.

    Exactly, he tries his best to nourish and cultivate German guilt, he just wants it directed solely towards Poles and Ukrainians. His entire work (sloppy at best) seems to be a project for providing a historical narrative convenient for types like AP with their Intermarium fantasies. Would be interesting to know if it’s merely Snyder’s personal belief, or if there is something more to it…by your standards the question should be legitimate if he’s on the CIA’s payroll.
    Anyway, you are of course an imbecile who should be institutionalized and kept in a padded cell. The only value of your comments is that they provide a glimpse of the deranged thinking of many emotionally incontinent Eastern Euros. If Ukraine loses (as looks possible right now), no doubt that Germany will be made the scapegoat, it’s just too good a narrative to resist.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    @German_reader

    Since you despise modern Germany so much and see it as fundamentally unsalvageable, why even have a problem with it throwing itself on the pyre for East Euros? I don't.

    It's a better end than slowly sputtering out with a whimper whilst facilitating the Afro-Mohammadan demographic transformation of Europe, no?

    But yes, Snyder is a dubious historian at best.

  138. Auto translate of latest Strelkov notes about military movements:

    On the most important strategic direction – south of Izyum – no significant changes. The operation has been suspended for the time being, which gives the enemy time to prepare new fortifications and reserve positions in case the offensive on Slavyansk-Barvenkovo ​​is resumed.

    Direction to Liman – close to the final liquidation. The city has been taken either completely or by 90% (the difference is already insignificant, so we can confidently talk about the liberation of Liman) and now it makes sense for the enemy to hold a foothold (taking into account the fact that all bridges in the rear have been blown up) only as long as not all or most of the troops will be evacuated. It makes sense for our troops to prevent this evacuation in every possible way and try to finish off the enemy, preventing him from withdrawing his manpower beyond the Seversky Donets.

    Severodonetsk-Lysichansk direction.
    Information comes in as conflicting. On the one hand, there are statements that all the roads are either cut by our troops or kept under constant fire control. On the other hand, the enemy declares that the Artemovsk-Lysichansk highway has been unblocked. I have no reliable information about the state of affairs at the moment. In general, the enemy continues to maintain his positions in the “sack” in the area of ​​Lisichansk-Zolotoye, and this “sack” is still not “tied”.
    In Severodonetsk, street battles are taking place directly within the city, with the gradual advance of the RF Armed Forces and the “allies” (including the “Kadyrovites”). However, most of the city is still controlled by the UA. Whether the enemy is withdrawing his units to the western bank of the Seversky Donets, or not, is not yet clear. But most likely, the enemy will try (if circumstances allow him) to play out the same situation as in Popasnaya and Rubizhnoye, dragging out the street fights as much as possible.

    Near Avdiivka, the offensive of the Armed Forces of the DPR has been suspended since yesterday. The subunits consolidate in the positions they have reached, being subjected to continuous attacks by the enemy’s artillery and repulsing his local counterattacks.

    On the other fronts – in general, there are no changes. I expect confirmation or refutation of yesterday’s information about new attacks by the Armed Forces of Ukraine in the Kherson direction on a wide front (Davydov Brod – Belogorovka – Lozovaya – Andreevka).
    Clarifying information about the attack of the DRG of the Armed Forces of Ukraine on the border checkpoint in the area of ​​the settlement Zernovo of the Bryansk region and the losses suffered by the border guards there – I also don’t have it yet.

    https://vk.com/igoristrelkov?w=wall347260249_656721

  139. Pretty sure Snyder was all-in on the 24/7 Trump=Fascism hysteria of the last half decade. Hard to take him seriously after that. Mind you, I’ve noticed a number of historians, including those with unconventional, even groundbreaking, work in the field of history, often sound no different than CNN junkies when discussing current events.

    BTW E. Michael Jones v Greg Johnson on the Ukraine war: Link

  140. German_reader says:
    @sudden death
    @utu

    It's not exactly guilt, more similar to beaten puppy Stockholm syndrome mentality that some Germans, French or Swedes seem to share towards tzarist or communist regimes and RF is exploiting that by extension.

    Replies: @German_reader

    French

    Yeah, “beaten puppies” send weapons systems like that to Ukraine, makes total sense:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAESAR_self-propelled_howitzer

    What the hell is wrong with you Balts? You sit in your tiny dwarf states that Russia could easily wipe off the map, and yet the only thing one ever hears from you is absolutely grotesque belligerency…”establish a no-fly-zone” (Estonian parliament”), “don’t even talk to Putin”, “send ships to the Black sea to break the Russian blockade” (Latvian foreign minister), “only acceptable way this ends is total Ukrainian victory, including expelling Russia from Crimea” (Estonian prime minister). Whatever legitimate criticism one can make of Germany’s and France’s approach (and I would even concede that Scholz should at least take steps to export Marder and Leopard 1), there’s no point to listening to people who seem to live in fantasy land.

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @German_reader

    Should have written "SOME" in capital letters in that post, lol

    Myself certainly do not have much pretensions to the current leadership of Germany and France, imho in general they are behaving better than could be expected.


    You sit in your tiny dwarf states that Russia could easily wipe off the map..
     
    That is just objective potential fact of modern life which nevertheless cannot be used as justification for being paralyzed by trembling fear and inaction, way better to help the fight off instead:

    Hundreds of Lithuanians have chipped in together to buy an advanced military drone for Ukraine in its war against Russia in a show of solidarity with a fellow former Soviet Union country.

    The target of €5 million was raised in just three and a half days — largely in small amounts between €5 and €100 — to fund the purchase of a Byraktar TB2 military drone, according to Laisves TV, the Lithuanian internet broadcaster that launched the drive.

    "Before this war started, none of us thought that we would be buying guns. But it's a normal thing now. Something must be done for the world to get better," said Agne Belickaite, 32, who sent €100 as soon as the fundraising launched on Wednesday.

    "I've been donating to buy guns for Ukraine for a while now. And will do so until the victory," she told Reuters, adding she was motivated in part by fears Russia could attack Lithuania.

    The drone has proven effective in recent years against Russian forces and their allies in conflicts in Syria and Libya, and its purchase is being orchestrated by Lithuania's Ministry of Defence, which plans to sign a letter of intent to buy the craft from Turkey next week.

    Ukraine has bought more than 20 Bayraktar TB2 armed drones from Turkish company Baykar in recent years and ordered a further 16 on 27 January. That batch was delivered in early March.

    "This is the first case in history when ordinary people raise money to buy something like a Bayraktar. It is unprecedented, it is unbelievable," Beshta Petro, Ukraine's ambassador to Lithuania, told Laisves TV.
     

    https://www.euronews.com/2022/05/28/lithuanians-organise-donation-drive-to-buy-bayraktar-drone-for-ukraine

    Replies: @German_reader, @Beckow, @216

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    @German_reader


    What the hell is wrong with you Balts?
     
    How do small dogs behave around big dogs?

    https://www.thesprucepets.com/thmb/2Rp58h2tK4rAxffq4TitTOHb8DM=/2816x1584/smart/filters:no_upscale()/brown-chihuahua-snarling-with-teeth-showing-85587813-583a09185f9b58d5b17a065c.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Screechy Russian Pinscher.

  141. A123 says: • Website
    @German_reader
    Since Israel and Haredis were discussed here recently, here's some funny news about them:
    https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/2022-05-29/ty-article/.premium/top-haredi-rabbi-calls-for-the-death-of-nazi-israeli-ministers/00000181-0f00-d090-abe1-ef3d0c0d0000

    Replies: @A123

    While Haaretz is not officially the “Voice of Labour/Gesher”, it effectively operates as such. Decades ago that would have implied great weight. Now, Haaretz is the voice of an extreme-Left minority, much like America’s NPR. They try to avoid outright lies, and instead deceive by implication. This is achieved by picking strange & unimportant stories and elevating them to unwarranted prominence.

    In your article, Haaretz accolades the leader of “Tunisian Jews” as important. However the maximum population of Jews in Tunisia was only ~100,000. France was a more popular destination, so less than half that number returned home to Jewish Palestine. And, only a portion of that portion were ultra Orthodox.

    After doing the math, Haaretz is once again revealed as a bad joke of an extreme-Left tabloid.

    PEACE 😇

  142. @German_reader
    @sudden death


    French
     
    Yeah, "beaten puppies" send weapons systems like that to Ukraine, makes total sense:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAESAR_self-propelled_howitzer

    What the hell is wrong with you Balts? You sit in your tiny dwarf states that Russia could easily wipe off the map, and yet the only thing one ever hears from you is absolutely grotesque belligerency..."establish a no-fly-zone" (Estonian parliament"), "don't even talk to Putin", "send ships to the Black sea to break the Russian blockade" (Latvian foreign minister), "only acceptable way this ends is total Ukrainian victory, including expelling Russia from Crimea" (Estonian prime minister). Whatever legitimate criticism one can make of Germany's and France's approach (and I would even concede that Scholz should at least take steps to export Marder and Leopard 1), there's no point to listening to people who seem to live in fantasy land.

    Replies: @sudden death, @Anatoly Karlin

    Should have written “SOME” in capital letters in that post, lol

    Myself certainly do not have much pretensions to the current leadership of Germany and France, imho in general they are behaving better than could be expected.

    You sit in your tiny dwarf states that Russia could easily wipe off the map..

    That is just objective potential fact of modern life which nevertheless cannot be used as justification for being paralyzed by trembling fear and inaction, way better to help the fight off instead:

    Hundreds of Lithuanians have chipped in together to buy an advanced military drone for Ukraine in its war against Russia in a show of solidarity with a fellow former Soviet Union country.

    The target of €5 million was raised in just three and a half days — largely in small amounts between €5 and €100 — to fund the purchase of a Byraktar TB2 military drone, according to Laisves TV, the Lithuanian internet broadcaster that launched the drive.

    “Before this war started, none of us thought that we would be buying guns. But it’s a normal thing now. Something must be done for the world to get better,” said Agne Belickaite, 32, who sent €100 as soon as the fundraising launched on Wednesday.

    “I’ve been donating to buy guns for Ukraine for a while now. And will do so until the victory,” she told Reuters, adding she was motivated in part by fears Russia could attack Lithuania.

    The drone has proven effective in recent years against Russian forces and their allies in conflicts in Syria and Libya, and its purchase is being orchestrated by Lithuania’s Ministry of Defence, which plans to sign a letter of intent to buy the craft from Turkey next week.

    Ukraine has bought more than 20 Bayraktar TB2 armed drones from Turkish company Baykar in recent years and ordered a further 16 on 27 January. That batch was delivered in early March.

    “This is the first case in history when ordinary people raise money to buy something like a Bayraktar. It is unprecedented, it is unbelievable,” Beshta Petro, Ukraine’s ambassador to Lithuania, told Laisves TV.

    https://www.euronews.com/2022/05/28/lithuanians-organise-donation-drive-to-buy-bayraktar-drone-for-ukraine

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @sudden death


    That is just objective potential fact of modern life which nevertheless cannot be used as justification for being paralyzed by trembling fear and inaction
     
    No, and that wasn't my point, obviously there has to be a reaction to the Russian invasion, it would be very bad if Russia won, at least one has to prevent that Russia subjugates all of Ukraine. But a crusader mindset that Russia has to be totally defeated and Putin overthrown is pretty risky, one of the top goals must still be prevention of a direct war between NATO and Russia. It's not clear that a negotiated settlement is possible (if Russia just annexes the entire Black sea coast, as seems likely, that can't be the basis for an agreement), but saying one shouldn't even think about it strikes me as very foolish, as is imagining there'll be a sort of 1945 for a state with thousands of nuclear weapons.
    , @Beckow
    @sudden death


    ...Something must be done for the world to get better
     
    Yeah, a military drone that on average had survived for less than week when deployed. It is a classical mass psychosis: manipulated people with nothing but shallow emotions. The drone is useless, but the charity donation marginally increases the chance of Vilnius being blown up, from 0.5% to maybe 1%. It must feel good to parade to be targets.

    If the Balts want to make the world a better place they should start by being neighborly and cease the constant cultural, linguistic and military block provocations against Russians living in their countries. Then nothing at all would happen and we could all buy a small drone to harass elderly German tourists and take pictures.


    It is unprecedented, it is unbelievable
     
    Not at all. It happens all the time. Why would anyone think it is "unbelievable"? This is not going to end well, these guys are falling into a mental shoot deeper than the Azovstal catacombs.

    Replies: @LatW, @acementhead

    , @216
    @sudden death

    Did they paint the GayPride, BLM and TroonPride flag on that drone?

    Because that's the causes which it is actually being used for.

    Replies: @sudden death

  143. @Yellowface Anon
    Taiwan is acting up again: https://twitter.com/MOFA_Taiwan/status/1530751354805055488
    They have also retweeted this piece of military propaganda: https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/saving-taiwan-the-lessons-learned-from-the-war-in-ukraine

    Replies: @songbird

    The most interesting thing about the whole dispute is Taiwan’s occasional attempts to claim that they are a different people, like all half-aborigines or something.

    Their rhetoric makes me wonder, if it is a secret inter-Chinese ethnic war. The Hakkan against the Northern Han or something.

  144. German_reader says:
    @sudden death
    @German_reader

    Should have written "SOME" in capital letters in that post, lol

    Myself certainly do not have much pretensions to the current leadership of Germany and France, imho in general they are behaving better than could be expected.


    You sit in your tiny dwarf states that Russia could easily wipe off the map..
     
    That is just objective potential fact of modern life which nevertheless cannot be used as justification for being paralyzed by trembling fear and inaction, way better to help the fight off instead:

    Hundreds of Lithuanians have chipped in together to buy an advanced military drone for Ukraine in its war against Russia in a show of solidarity with a fellow former Soviet Union country.

    The target of €5 million was raised in just three and a half days — largely in small amounts between €5 and €100 — to fund the purchase of a Byraktar TB2 military drone, according to Laisves TV, the Lithuanian internet broadcaster that launched the drive.

    "Before this war started, none of us thought that we would be buying guns. But it's a normal thing now. Something must be done for the world to get better," said Agne Belickaite, 32, who sent €100 as soon as the fundraising launched on Wednesday.

    "I've been donating to buy guns for Ukraine for a while now. And will do so until the victory," she told Reuters, adding she was motivated in part by fears Russia could attack Lithuania.

    The drone has proven effective in recent years against Russian forces and their allies in conflicts in Syria and Libya, and its purchase is being orchestrated by Lithuania's Ministry of Defence, which plans to sign a letter of intent to buy the craft from Turkey next week.

    Ukraine has bought more than 20 Bayraktar TB2 armed drones from Turkish company Baykar in recent years and ordered a further 16 on 27 January. That batch was delivered in early March.

    "This is the first case in history when ordinary people raise money to buy something like a Bayraktar. It is unprecedented, it is unbelievable," Beshta Petro, Ukraine's ambassador to Lithuania, told Laisves TV.
     

    https://www.euronews.com/2022/05/28/lithuanians-organise-donation-drive-to-buy-bayraktar-drone-for-ukraine

    Replies: @German_reader, @Beckow, @216

    That is just objective potential fact of modern life which nevertheless cannot be used as justification for being paralyzed by trembling fear and inaction

    No, and that wasn’t my point, obviously there has to be a reaction to the Russian invasion, it would be very bad if Russia won, at least one has to prevent that Russia subjugates all of Ukraine. But a crusader mindset that Russia has to be totally defeated and Putin overthrown is pretty risky, one of the top goals must still be prevention of a direct war between NATO and Russia. It’s not clear that a negotiated settlement is possible (if Russia just annexes the entire Black sea coast, as seems likely, that can’t be the basis for an agreement), but saying one shouldn’t even think about it strikes me as very foolish, as is imagining there’ll be a sort of 1945 for a state with thousands of nuclear weapons.

  145. A123 says: • Website
    @Barbarossa
    @LondonBob

    Thanks, ouch, that sounds painful. I burn wood for heat so I'm in fine shape that way, but use propane for hot water and cooking. The propane price is way above what it was last year but it's not that big a deal because my usage is still fairly low. I bought a wood cook stove a couple years ago just in case energy prices ever went high enough to make such an option attractive. I was thinking more of a 20 year time-frame for such a scenario, but we seem to be approaching that more rapidly!

    I've been curious as to what inflation and energy costs have been in other regions. I haven't done any extensive looking but my impression is that the situation is worse in Europe than it currently is in the US.

    I don't think that Western governments can be much relied on for any bailouts either since they already did that with Covid, and they can't continue provoking inflation with free bucks forever.

    Interestingly, it seems that Biden is serious in passing some limited student debt forgiveness, which is timed purely for midterms PR. That would seemingly add inflationary pressure, but they may figure that much of it is already baked in since student loans have been on hold for 2 years now. Or they may just not give a crap if it gains some votes.

    Replies: @A123

    I’ve been curious as to what inflation and energy costs have been in other regions. I haven’t done any extensive looking but my impression is that the situation is worse in Europe than it currently is in the US.

    Food cost inflation is running wild in the U.S. (1)

    Food at home (grocery store) prices: up 7% to 8% in this monthly review, versus the April outlook of a rise of 5% to 6%. That means the USDA is predicting the highest grocery store price rise since 1980 when prices rose 8.1% (prices rose 7.2% in 1981). There is no reason to think the USDA forecast will not rise again in June.

    The core issue is this snowball of production costs inside the field to fork supply chain. Diesel prices, fertilizer prices, energy prices, seed and feed prices, all of it has doubled and tripled in less than a year.

    Add in transportation and distribution costs that have doubled, and all of that cumulative impact is going to flow through the food supply chain from the field to the processor (wholesaler), and into the supermarket. Fresh foods, especially in the produce section, will catch many people off guard.

    In America, chicken is the “cheap” protein. The industrial birds heavily consume corn, which requires significant amounts of fertilizer for the crop. Many farmers switched away from corn this season due to fertilizer high cost and/or lack of availability. The impending lack of feed corn could run up a 33-50% price hike on chicken. And, that is a particularly difficult substitution for the poorest workers.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/05/27/udsa-raises-food-price-forecast-to-highest-level-in-42-years-third-wave-of-u-s-food-inflation-will-dwarf-prior-price-increases/

    • Replies: @songbird
    @A123

    Not quite sure when it ended, but houses used to have slop buckets where they would collect their consumable garbage for pigs. It even happened pretty close to big cities, in what today are considered very wealthy neighborhoods. Maybe, inside of cities?

    I've wondered if we will ever go back to something like that. I guess pigs used to be closer to cities. And then of course there are the political implications of pig meat being haram to certain groups, in a multicult society

    Replies: @A123

    , @Barbarossa
    @A123

    I think that the official 8ish % inflation numbers are bull or at least bear no resemblance to actual conditions.

    In building prices have increased anywhere from 25% to 200%, mostly in the 50% to 100% range.
    As you say, food and fuel or very bad and getting worse too. A local mega farm is spreading about 50% of it's normal fertilizer to save money, which will impact yields substantially.

    I'm putting in a larger than normal garden this year and have pigs, and a beef calf up and coming as well as my normal sheep and chickens. I would say that it's going to be a good year to garden regardless of how small your yard is, since things might get very pricey come winter. If you personally don't need it you'll probably know someone who will.

  146. @A123
    @Barbarossa


    I’ve been curious as to what inflation and energy costs have been in other regions. I haven’t done any extensive looking but my impression is that the situation is worse in Europe than it currently is in the US.
     
    Food cost inflation is running wild in the U.S. (1)

    Food at home (grocery store) prices: up 7% to 8% in this monthly review, versus the April outlook of a rise of 5% to 6%. That means the USDA is predicting the highest grocery store price rise since 1980 when prices rose 8.1% (prices rose 7.2% in 1981). There is no reason to think the USDA forecast will not rise again in June.
    ...
    The core issue is this snowball of production costs inside the field to fork supply chain. Diesel prices, fertilizer prices, energy prices, seed and feed prices, all of it has doubled and tripled in less than a year.

    Add in transportation and distribution costs that have doubled, and all of that cumulative impact is going to flow through the food supply chain from the field to the processor (wholesaler), and into the supermarket. Fresh foods, especially in the produce section, will catch many people off guard.
     
    In America, chicken is the "cheap" protein. The industrial birds heavily consume corn, which requires significant amounts of fertilizer for the crop. Many farmers switched away from corn this season due to fertilizer high cost and/or lack of availability. The impending lack of feed corn could run up a 33-50% price hike on chicken. And, that is a particularly difficult substitution for the poorest workers.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/05/27/udsa-raises-food-price-forecast-to-highest-level-in-42-years-third-wave-of-u-s-food-inflation-will-dwarf-prior-price-increases/

    Replies: @songbird, @Barbarossa

    Not quite sure when it ended, but houses used to have slop buckets where they would collect their consumable garbage for pigs. It even happened pretty close to big cities, in what today are considered very wealthy neighborhoods. Maybe, inside of cities?

    I’ve wondered if we will ever go back to something like that. I guess pigs used to be closer to cities. And then of course there are the political implications of pig meat being haram to certain groups, in a multicult society

    • Replies: @A123
    @songbird

    I suspect that pig breeding has moved on, and the commercially viable ones are now simply too large for most people to cope with.

     
    https://www.sunnyskyz.com/uploads/2014/12/rsr8j-pig6.jpg
     

    Backyard chickens seem much more plausible. The "Transylvanian Naked Neck" is not a vampire joke. It has many fewer feathers and thus generates more meat.

    https://www.thefeatherbrain.com/blog/naked-neck-chickens

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

  147. @Mr. Hack
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    So we're in agreement that Snyder is a "talented man" that is courageous enough to hold to his convictions on certain topics, even if it means that he is "blacklisted" and may even harm his own personal career ambitions. All the more reason to listen to the interview that I posted above and take the message within seriously.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    Perhaps you do not understand the magnitude of the man’s offense. If you read between the lines of Bloodlands (he does not put it in this wording) you get the message that there was nothing particularly special about the Jew experience in east Europe in the early 1940’s. Everybody got it.

    He will never be forgiven. He is condemned to a career of biting the heads off of chickens and snakes.

    • Agree: Coconuts
    • Replies: @utu
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    "the magnitude of the man’s offense", "He will never be forgiven. " - I think that you are blowing up out of proportion some objections that initially were coming from mostly ignorant 'true believers' and activists of Holocaust industry.

    But what is true is that German and Austrian doctors almost killed him when they misdiagnosed his appendicitis and later he got another infection that American doctors misdiagnosed as well. He almost died. And coronavirus did not help.

    Timothy Snyder | OUR MALADY
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=eG9CPvSY0lc

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  148. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    "The likes" of Averko can offer no useful information, much less a rebuttal to Snyder's comments. The RT article doesn't even mention Snyder? More of your nonsensical dialogue that isn't centered on reality? Only genocide denier Averko is able to connect the dots of differing information sources to come up with some kind of a thesis, that only he understands. I've finished trying to make sense of your disparate rantings long ago, Averko! :-)

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Your cuck comeback lacks merit and is indicative of your projection hypocrisy.

    As has been utilized, the genocide denier term is along the lines of Nina Jankowicz use of disinformation.

  149. @German_reader
    @Mr. Hack

    Snyder is a sloppy historian at best. I'm increasingly more inclined to consider him an outright propagandist though. What Russia is doing in Ukraine is very bad and I don't doubt that Russian troops have committed many war crimes, but "genocide"? The term loses all meaning when used like that.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail

    What Russia is doing in Ukraine is very bad and I don’t doubt that Russian troops have committed many war crimes, but “genocide”? The term loses all meaning when used like that.

    How the Kiev regime has carried (war crimes and all) is very bad, but “genocide”? I think that’s loaded, relative to how that term (probably before Bosnia) was typically used.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Mikhail

    You see the ones like the German-reader simply don't see the other side - they blocked it from their minds. Kiev uber alles! And absolutely nothing happened before 2/24/2022.

    They would say that the act of "aggression" has made it black-and-white. The question is how to define the aggression, and when did it really start. But that is for after the war is over. Until then this block-headed simple-mindness will continue. It is pointless to argue with them, they don't want to see the other side.

    Replies: @German_reader, @Mikhail

  150. @sudden death
    @German_reader

    Should have written "SOME" in capital letters in that post, lol

    Myself certainly do not have much pretensions to the current leadership of Germany and France, imho in general they are behaving better than could be expected.


    You sit in your tiny dwarf states that Russia could easily wipe off the map..
     
    That is just objective potential fact of modern life which nevertheless cannot be used as justification for being paralyzed by trembling fear and inaction, way better to help the fight off instead:

    Hundreds of Lithuanians have chipped in together to buy an advanced military drone for Ukraine in its war against Russia in a show of solidarity with a fellow former Soviet Union country.

    The target of €5 million was raised in just three and a half days — largely in small amounts between €5 and €100 — to fund the purchase of a Byraktar TB2 military drone, according to Laisves TV, the Lithuanian internet broadcaster that launched the drive.

    "Before this war started, none of us thought that we would be buying guns. But it's a normal thing now. Something must be done for the world to get better," said Agne Belickaite, 32, who sent €100 as soon as the fundraising launched on Wednesday.

    "I've been donating to buy guns for Ukraine for a while now. And will do so until the victory," she told Reuters, adding she was motivated in part by fears Russia could attack Lithuania.

    The drone has proven effective in recent years against Russian forces and their allies in conflicts in Syria and Libya, and its purchase is being orchestrated by Lithuania's Ministry of Defence, which plans to sign a letter of intent to buy the craft from Turkey next week.

    Ukraine has bought more than 20 Bayraktar TB2 armed drones from Turkish company Baykar in recent years and ordered a further 16 on 27 January. That batch was delivered in early March.

    "This is the first case in history when ordinary people raise money to buy something like a Bayraktar. It is unprecedented, it is unbelievable," Beshta Petro, Ukraine's ambassador to Lithuania, told Laisves TV.
     

    https://www.euronews.com/2022/05/28/lithuanians-organise-donation-drive-to-buy-bayraktar-drone-for-ukraine

    Replies: @German_reader, @Beckow, @216

    …Something must be done for the world to get better

    Yeah, a military drone that on average had survived for less than week when deployed. It is a classical mass psychosis: manipulated people with nothing but shallow emotions. The drone is useless, but the charity donation marginally increases the chance of Vilnius being blown up, from 0.5% to maybe 1%. It must feel good to parade to be targets.

    If the Balts want to make the world a better place they should start by being neighborly and cease the constant cultural, linguistic and military block provocations against Russians living in their countries. Then nothing at all would happen and we could all buy a small drone to harass elderly German tourists and take pictures.

    It is unprecedented, it is unbelievable

    Not at all. It happens all the time. Why would anyone think it is “unbelievable”? This is not going to end well, these guys are falling into a mental shoot deeper than the Azovstal catacombs.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Beckow


    Yeah, a military drone that on average had survived for less than week when deployed. It is a classical mass psychosis: manipulated people with nothing but shallow emotions.
     
    Emotions between Ukrainians and Balts have been important. Every little caress counts. When Jesus was carrying His cross, there were different kind of people looking on, some were jeering but others knelt down and offered a small cup of water. It helps.

    Bayraktar has a lot of symbolism for Ukrainians, so this was more of a symbolic gesture of support. It's like blowing a kiss at somebody.

    Replies: @Beckow

    , @acementhead
    @Beckow

    It's better to be thought a fool than to buy a Bayraktar, as a present for Ukraine, and remove all doubt.

  151. @German_reader
    @Mr. Hack


    Although, how else could you describe a policy of completely destroying small Ukrainian villages that have absolutely no military significance or presence, including the destruction of civilians including the elderly, women and children.
     
    War crimes, or maybe crimes against humanity.
    Russia is certainly doing a lot of terrible things in its conduct of the war, and I assume in the areas they intend to annex they will try to demolish any independent Ukrainian identity with a sticks and carrot approach (rewards for collaborators, punishment up to being "disappeared" for people who disagree), also things like promoting Russian imperial greatness in school curricula etc. As I said this is all pretty bad, but it's not genocide in the Armenian genocide, Holocaust or Rwanda sense.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Barbarossa

    I suppose under Mr. Hack’s definition the Allied air war in WW2 would also be genocide.

    But why not? If today we are all Nazis then any war action must also be genocide. It’s simple logic that we can all apply as we prefer.

    Person I Don’t Like=Hitler

    Hitler=Genocide

    Actions by Person I Don’t Like=Genocide

    Now how can anyone quibble with such an elegant formula?

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @Barbarossa


    I suppose under Mr. Hack’s definition the Allied air war in WW2 would also be genocide.
     
    Russia is probably doing other things beyond just indiscriminate shelling without regard for civilian casualties etc. It's of course hard to be sure (I don't take Ukrainian claims at face value either), but it seems plausible to me that Russian security services torture and kill people they suspect of being Ukrainian national activists. At least it would fit right in with Russian traditions. And that would go beyond war crimes in the narrow sense.
    "Genocide" is really hyperbole though, imo that's just propaganda.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Barbarossa

    Is it really all that simple? Seems to me that you've got a real educated handle on it and yet you seem to be wasting your time on pig and dog breeding?

    Replies: @Barbarossa

  152. A123 says: • Website
    @songbird
    @A123

    Not quite sure when it ended, but houses used to have slop buckets where they would collect their consumable garbage for pigs. It even happened pretty close to big cities, in what today are considered very wealthy neighborhoods. Maybe, inside of cities?

    I've wondered if we will ever go back to something like that. I guess pigs used to be closer to cities. And then of course there are the political implications of pig meat being haram to certain groups, in a multicult society

    Replies: @A123

    I suspect that pig breeding has moved on, and the commercially viable ones are now simply too large for most people to cope with.

     

     

    Backyard chickens seem much more plausible. The “Transylvanian Naked Neck” is not a vampire joke. It has many fewer feathers and thus generates more meat.

    https://www.thefeatherbrain.com/blog/naked-neck-chickens

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @A123

    There are still many older heritage breeds of pigs which are manageable for a relatively small lot. Guinea Hogs are really small but produce a lot of lard and small cuts of meat. I like and use lard but I prefer larger bacons and chops so I've been going with Large Blacks since they are good foragers.

    https://livestockconservancy.org/heritage-breeds/heritage-breeds-list/large-black-pig/

    I would say that town pigs are just as viable as they ever were but that acceptance by neighbors would probably be quite the hurdle. Chickens are starting to become more accepted in communities again, so maybe pigs can make a comeback too! Something productive ought to be done with the huge amounts of food waste that we generate.

    Replies: @Philip Owen, @iffen

    , @songbird
    @A123


    and the commercially viable ones are now simply too large for most people to cope with.
     
    Guess my comment was confusing, but I meant to denote a separate man, who would go around the neighborhood collecting it. My grandfather's place used to have a special hole in the ground in which put the bucket, with a caste iron cover that would come up. But one day metal scrappers stole it.

    I suspect that pig breeding has moved on
     
    Yes, pigs have also gotten more feed efficient, like chickens. Both trends are pretty remarkable, even if the meat might be inferior in certain particulars or at least different-tasting

    I have often wondered whether there are big breeds of pigs that live longer than the big breeds of dogs.

    The “Transylvanian Naked Neck” is not a vampire joke. It has many fewer feathers and thus generates more meat.
     
    Quite interesting. Never heard of that one. Who was that guy who proposed editing the chicken genome in order to turn them back into T-rexes? Jack Horner, I think. Well, looks like something on that path.

    I have myself wondered why nobody seems to have tried to sell specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies, at a higher premium. (As in the chicken breeds that lay blue, purple, or green eggs).

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @A123

    Pigs are also useful for eliminating dead bodies. They eat everything but the teeth.

    , @Philip Owen
    @A123

    Commercial pigs are slaughtered at 100 kg. Most never get bigger.

  153. @Mikhail
    @German_reader


    What Russia is doing in Ukraine is very bad and I don’t doubt that Russian troops have committed many war crimes, but “genocide”? The term loses all meaning when used like that.
     
    How the Kiev regime has carried (war crimes and all) is very bad, but "genocide"? I think that's loaded, relative to how that term (probably before Bosnia) was typically used.

    Replies: @Beckow

    You see the ones like the German-reader simply don’t see the other side – they blocked it from their minds. Kiev uber alles! And absolutely nothing happened before 2/24/2022.

    They would say that the act of “aggression” has made it black-and-white. The question is how to define the aggression, and when did it really start. But that is for after the war is over. Until then this block-headed simple-mindness will continue. It is pointless to argue with them, they don’t want to see the other side.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @German_reader
    @Beckow

    Really amazing that I get shit both from mad utu and from a hyper-partisan like you who sees no fault with Russia ever. Looks like a no-win situation, lol.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Barbarossa

    , @Mikhail
    @Beckow

    As is true with many if not most conflicts, the one under discussion here isn't the comic book good guy/bad guy scenario as suggestively peddled by CNN, BBC, MSNBC, et al.

  154. @A123
    @Barbarossa


    I’ve been curious as to what inflation and energy costs have been in other regions. I haven’t done any extensive looking but my impression is that the situation is worse in Europe than it currently is in the US.
     
    Food cost inflation is running wild in the U.S. (1)

    Food at home (grocery store) prices: up 7% to 8% in this monthly review, versus the April outlook of a rise of 5% to 6%. That means the USDA is predicting the highest grocery store price rise since 1980 when prices rose 8.1% (prices rose 7.2% in 1981). There is no reason to think the USDA forecast will not rise again in June.
    ...
    The core issue is this snowball of production costs inside the field to fork supply chain. Diesel prices, fertilizer prices, energy prices, seed and feed prices, all of it has doubled and tripled in less than a year.

    Add in transportation and distribution costs that have doubled, and all of that cumulative impact is going to flow through the food supply chain from the field to the processor (wholesaler), and into the supermarket. Fresh foods, especially in the produce section, will catch many people off guard.
     
    In America, chicken is the "cheap" protein. The industrial birds heavily consume corn, which requires significant amounts of fertilizer for the crop. Many farmers switched away from corn this season due to fertilizer high cost and/or lack of availability. The impending lack of feed corn could run up a 33-50% price hike on chicken. And, that is a particularly difficult substitution for the poorest workers.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/05/27/udsa-raises-food-price-forecast-to-highest-level-in-42-years-third-wave-of-u-s-food-inflation-will-dwarf-prior-price-increases/

    Replies: @songbird, @Barbarossa

    I think that the official 8ish % inflation numbers are bull or at least bear no resemblance to actual conditions.

    In building prices have increased anywhere from 25% to 200%, mostly in the 50% to 100% range.
    As you say, food and fuel or very bad and getting worse too. A local mega farm is spreading about 50% of it’s normal fertilizer to save money, which will impact yields substantially.

    I’m putting in a larger than normal garden this year and have pigs, and a beef calf up and coming as well as my normal sheep and chickens. I would say that it’s going to be a good year to garden regardless of how small your yard is, since things might get very pricey come winter. If you personally don’t need it you’ll probably know someone who will.

    • Agree: A123
  155. German_reader says:
    @Barbarossa
    @German_reader

    I suppose under Mr. Hack's definition the Allied air war in WW2 would also be genocide.

    But why not? If today we are all Nazis then any war action must also be genocide. It's simple logic that we can all apply as we prefer.

    Person I Don't Like=Hitler

    Hitler=Genocide

    Actions by Person I Don't Like=Genocide

    Now how can anyone quibble with such an elegant formula?

    Replies: @German_reader, @Mr. Hack

    I suppose under Mr. Hack’s definition the Allied air war in WW2 would also be genocide.

    Russia is probably doing other things beyond just indiscriminate shelling without regard for civilian casualties etc. It’s of course hard to be sure (I don’t take Ukrainian claims at face value either), but it seems plausible to me that Russian security services torture and kill people they suspect of being Ukrainian national activists. At least it would fit right in with Russian traditions. And that would go beyond war crimes in the narrow sense.
    “Genocide” is really hyperbole though, imo that’s just propaganda.

    • LOL: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @German_reader


    At least it would fit right in with Russian traditions. And that would go beyond war crimes in the narrow sense.
     
    Tradition!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDtabTufxao

    More accurate to call the above excerpted bigoted than calling what the Russians are/were doing as genocide - noting the numerous busted Kiev regime lies.
  156. German_reader says:
    @Beckow
    @Mikhail

    You see the ones like the German-reader simply don't see the other side - they blocked it from their minds. Kiev uber alles! And absolutely nothing happened before 2/24/2022.

    They would say that the act of "aggression" has made it black-and-white. The question is how to define the aggression, and when did it really start. But that is for after the war is over. Until then this block-headed simple-mindness will continue. It is pointless to argue with them, they don't want to see the other side.

    Replies: @German_reader, @Mikhail

    Really amazing that I get shit both from mad utu and from a hyper-partisan like you who sees no fault with Russia ever. Looks like a no-win situation, lol.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Beckow
    @German_reader

    Then I assume that you agree - it is a no-win black-and-white polarization of discussion. We will just have to wait for the winner, that always clarifies things.

    , @Barbarossa
    @German_reader

    Oops. I meant to hit agree on your comment but I mistakenly hit it on Beckow's first.

  157. @A123
    @songbird

    I suspect that pig breeding has moved on, and the commercially viable ones are now simply too large for most people to cope with.

     
    https://www.sunnyskyz.com/uploads/2014/12/rsr8j-pig6.jpg
     

    Backyard chickens seem much more plausible. The "Transylvanian Naked Neck" is not a vampire joke. It has many fewer feathers and thus generates more meat.

    https://www.thefeatherbrain.com/blog/naked-neck-chickens

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

    There are still many older heritage breeds of pigs which are manageable for a relatively small lot. Guinea Hogs are really small but produce a lot of lard and small cuts of meat. I like and use lard but I prefer larger bacons and chops so I’ve been going with Large Blacks since they are good foragers.

    https://livestockconservancy.org/heritage-breeds/heritage-breeds-list/large-black-pig/

    I would say that town pigs are just as viable as they ever were but that acceptance by neighbors would probably be quite the hurdle. Chickens are starting to become more accepted in communities again, so maybe pigs can make a comeback too! Something productive ought to be done with the huge amounts of food waste that we generate.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    @Barbarossa

    In Russia, people keep chickens in the middle of cities (older houses with yards). I haven't seen pigs.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @iffen
    @Barbarossa

    Something productive ought to be done with the huge amounts of food waste that we generate.

    We could pass a law requiring all processed meats such as hot dogs, Spam, sausages, etc. to be contain at least 10% Canada Goose.

  158. @Barbarossa
    @Mikel

    My 2 cents is that the rapidly exploding cost of housing, coupled by the loss of many of the good jobs has driven many people over the brink. These energy increases are going to massively exacerbate the issue, especially when we get into the 2022/23 heating season. It's going to be really bad if the trajectory doesn't drastically change in the next couple months.

    It's a disparate impact because the upper rungs have consolidated their position while the lower and middle classes have drowned. I managed, as a fairly young person to carve out a secure economic niche, but that was mainly by ignoring every bit of conventional financial and business advice. I don't envy most younger people since it's not very favorable for many of them, especially once they get some school debt strapped on like a lead weight.

    The drug addiction and mental illness is I think a bit downstream of the economic and societal issues in many cases, but the drugs indeed are very very bad. Opioid usage is an epidemic around my area. It seems a symptom of complete despair and nihilism.

    I guess this is what advanced societal collapse looks like. And you are right, there is little that the authorities can do, since this is a problem decades in the making. It would take exceptional political will and consensus to turn it around, which is completely lacking. I think it's fair to expect that government will be no help and we as individuals will have to be ready to help the less fortunate where we can. Unfortunately, I'm afraid it's going to get worse before it gets better.

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Mikel

    High levels of debt, bankruptcy and economic hardship in general must be part of the homelessness equation, no doubt, which is why I think that teaching financial literacy at school should be essential.

    It doesn’t make sense that we teach our children all kinds of skills that will later allow them to make money but we do not teach them how to make that money work in their best interest at all. Many people become bankrupt just out of ignorance: since everybody takes on loans and uses credit cards, they just follow suit until one day they’re barely earning enough to pay their debts back.

    But economic hardship by itself doesn’t explain the phenomenon. People in the US, despite all, live in one of the most prosperous countries in the world with historically low levels of unemployment but many people just abandon any desire to prosper. They actually lose any self-respect. In Hawaii you would see them getting into hotels dressed in rags and looking for food in the trash bin by the pool restaurant. Apparently, the police do their best to protect tourist spaces but what do these people have to lose? Getting arrested once again when their immediate need is to fill their stomach?

    Silviosilver recently made an insightful comment about people in modern society living an experiment that is probably unprecedented in history. We no longer have the support of strong community and spiritual/religious structures that people relied on in the past. Instead we are currently encouraged to take individual choices and make sense of everything, including the meaning of our existence, by ourselves and this is possibly too hard for many people. It breaks them. Even though I am not a believer, I can see how institutionalized religion has some positive aspects for society.

    But the one institution that seems to be failing all these homeless people is family. Where are their parents and their children? Don’t they know? Don’t they care?

    • Replies: @S
    @Mikel


    People in the US, despite all, live in one of the most prosperous countries in the world with historically low levels of unemployment but many people just abandon any desire to prosper.
     
    Across the world over (and not 'just' the US) there seems to be an ever worsening massive problem with mental health. I'd compare the present situation with mental health to the situation that existed mid 19th century (and prior) in the area of physical health.

    The doctors of the physical body of that time were overwhelmed with patients and their physical ailments. They had only limited and often ineffective treatments to offer. Physical ailments that today would be almost as nothing as they are treatable, and, or, preventable, in many instances then 'carried people off' before they had had even a chance to live, irrespective of station.

    It was the cumulative effects of prevention in the area of physical health problems which began to turn the tide in the West by the latter 19th and early 20th century. The development of germ theory and its application towards clean water, food, operating theaters, etc, had a big impact. Mass vaccination against various diseases played a major roll. Of course, realizing the values of exercise and vitamins did their part too.

    A comparable revolution in the prevention of psychological disease needs to take place in the area of mental health. We have the model to follow, ie the great public health campaigns regarding clean water and food, mass vaccination programs, etc, of the early 20th century.

    Alas, rather than deal with these psychological health problems frontally in a healthy manner, society seems to be heading down the path of becoming a control freak Orwellian police state instead. [Should add, that of course hatefully and irresponsibly telling entire groups, ie Euros (for now) that they don't actually even exist, except as a negative, can only greatly exacerbate an already gigantic mental health problem.]

    Demonstration of the surgical use of ether in Boston, Mass (1847):


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/98/Demonstration_surgical_use_of_ether_1847_daguerreotype.jpeg

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @Mikel

  159. @A123
    @songbird

    I suspect that pig breeding has moved on, and the commercially viable ones are now simply too large for most people to cope with.

     
    https://www.sunnyskyz.com/uploads/2014/12/rsr8j-pig6.jpg
     

    Backyard chickens seem much more plausible. The "Transylvanian Naked Neck" is not a vampire joke. It has many fewer feathers and thus generates more meat.

    https://www.thefeatherbrain.com/blog/naked-neck-chickens

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

    and the commercially viable ones are now simply too large for most people to cope with.

    Guess my comment was confusing, but I meant to denote a separate man, who would go around the neighborhood collecting it. My grandfather’s place used to have a special hole in the ground in which put the bucket, with a caste iron cover that would come up. But one day metal scrappers stole it.

    I suspect that pig breeding has moved on

    Yes, pigs have also gotten more feed efficient, like chickens. Both trends are pretty remarkable, even if the meat might be inferior in certain particulars or at least different-tasting

    I have often wondered whether there are big breeds of pigs that live longer than the big breeds of dogs.

    The “Transylvanian Naked Neck” is not a vampire joke. It has many fewer feathers and thus generates more meat.

    Quite interesting. Never heard of that one. Who was that guy who proposed editing the chicken genome in order to turn them back into T-rexes? Jack Horner, I think. Well, looks like something on that path.

    I have myself wondered why nobody seems to have tried to sell specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies, at a higher premium. (As in the chicken breeds that lay blue, purple, or green eggs).

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @songbird


    specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies
     
    Nah, yuppies are passe. What they need are specially colored LGBTQ+++ eggs. It would be a micro-aggression to serve a trans person a mis-gendered colored egg.

    Replies: @A123, @songbird

  160. @A123
    @songbird

    I suspect that pig breeding has moved on, and the commercially viable ones are now simply too large for most people to cope with.

     
    https://www.sunnyskyz.com/uploads/2014/12/rsr8j-pig6.jpg
     

    Backyard chickens seem much more plausible. The "Transylvanian Naked Neck" is not a vampire joke. It has many fewer feathers and thus generates more meat.

    https://www.thefeatherbrain.com/blog/naked-neck-chickens

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

    Pigs are also useful for eliminating dead bodies. They eat everything but the teeth.

  161. Some more info to consider:

    Слава России

    • Thanks: Miro23
  162. Got into a debate about the patriotism of Russian minorities with Dmitry some time ago.

    I argued their disproportionate share of soldiers (and burden of casualties) suggests a high degree of patriotism, given lack of civil unrest and continued enthusiasm. Dmitry’s take was that it is purely driven by economic desperation and they often have resentful attitudes towards Russia.

    Judge for yourself:

    To my eyes, Russia seems like a fairly successful country at galvanizing minorities for their imperial objectives.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Thulean Friend

    Minorities in the Western sense does not translate across to Russia, which is a very large country with indigenous groups in certain regions.

    https://twitter.com/DimitriASimes/status/1530664696226926593?s=20&t=lefMId-7w5eTw3Fi8I4kkA

    Not surprised by this, man needs a purpose, a shared purpose.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  163. Baltics attack Franco-German talks with Putin over Black Sea blockade

    Leaders in eastern Europe have grown uneasy about the willingness of their western European counterparts to talk with Putin, reigniting suspicion that some EU countries are pushing Kyiv to cede territory to end the war.

    The Baltic countries believe such phone calls merely empower Putin, and that instead Europe should send more weapons to Ukraine.

    Some western capitals fear the looming food crisis and its devastating impact on poor households in Africa and the Middle East could trigger a new wave of migration to Europe.

    Putin, Scholz and Macron discussed whether a negotiated solution could be found to open Odesa to allow grain exports to leave Ukraine, according to an Elysée briefing after the call.

    As I’ve said, the world has too many countries and the Balts are excellent candidates to be put on the chopping block. We also need QMV in the EU and we needed it yesterday.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Thulean Friend

    As quoted in Western masc media, the Franco-German contingent expressed concern over the Russian treatment of POWs. If true, Putin was given the opportunity to bust on their hypocritical concern.

    I understand that Germany has a law on Nazi symbols. Does that apply to tattoos among other expressions of Nazi sympathy utilized by some of the Kiev regime forces?

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

  164. utu says:
    @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Mr. Hack

    Perhaps you do not understand the magnitude of the man's offense. If you read between the lines of Bloodlands (he does not put it in this wording) you get the message that there was nothing particularly special about the Jew experience in east Europe in the early 1940's. Everybody got it.

    He will never be forgiven. He is condemned to a career of biting the heads off of chickens and snakes.

    Replies: @utu

    “the magnitude of the man’s offense”, “He will never be forgiven. “ – I think that you are blowing up out of proportion some objections that initially were coming from mostly ignorant ‘true believers’ and activists of Holocaust industry.

    But what is true is that German and Austrian doctors almost killed him when they misdiagnosed his appendicitis and later he got another infection that American doctors misdiagnosed as well. He almost died. And coronavirus did not help.

    Timothy Snyder | OUR MALADY
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eG9CPvSY0lc

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @utu

    Have you read the book?

    It was a best seller as far as those books go and he was under the influence of an imp-perverse when he wrote it. It is a book which insufficiently respects the chosen people.

    His career is derailed permanent. And he could have been a contender.

  165. @German_reader
    @Beckow

    Really amazing that I get shit both from mad utu and from a hyper-partisan like you who sees no fault with Russia ever. Looks like a no-win situation, lol.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Barbarossa

    Then I assume that you agree – it is a no-win black-and-white polarization of discussion. We will just have to wait for the winner, that always clarifies things.

  166. @utu
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    "the magnitude of the man’s offense", "He will never be forgiven. " - I think that you are blowing up out of proportion some objections that initially were coming from mostly ignorant 'true believers' and activists of Holocaust industry.

    But what is true is that German and Austrian doctors almost killed him when they misdiagnosed his appendicitis and later he got another infection that American doctors misdiagnosed as well. He almost died. And coronavirus did not help.

    Timothy Snyder | OUR MALADY
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=eG9CPvSY0lc

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    Have you read the book?

    It was a best seller as far as those books go and he was under the influence of an imp-perverse when he wrote it. It is a book which insufficiently respects the chosen people.

    His career is derailed permanent. And he could have been a contender.

    • Troll: utu
  167. @German_reader
    @Beckow

    Really amazing that I get shit both from mad utu and from a hyper-partisan like you who sees no fault with Russia ever. Looks like a no-win situation, lol.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Barbarossa

    Oops. I meant to hit agree on your comment but I mistakenly hit it on Beckow’s first.

  168. LatW says:
    @Beckow
    @sudden death


    ...Something must be done for the world to get better
     
    Yeah, a military drone that on average had survived for less than week when deployed. It is a classical mass psychosis: manipulated people with nothing but shallow emotions. The drone is useless, but the charity donation marginally increases the chance of Vilnius being blown up, from 0.5% to maybe 1%. It must feel good to parade to be targets.

    If the Balts want to make the world a better place they should start by being neighborly and cease the constant cultural, linguistic and military block provocations against Russians living in their countries. Then nothing at all would happen and we could all buy a small drone to harass elderly German tourists and take pictures.


    It is unprecedented, it is unbelievable
     
    Not at all. It happens all the time. Why would anyone think it is "unbelievable"? This is not going to end well, these guys are falling into a mental shoot deeper than the Azovstal catacombs.

    Replies: @LatW, @acementhead

    Yeah, a military drone that on average had survived for less than week when deployed. It is a classical mass psychosis: manipulated people with nothing but shallow emotions.

    Emotions between Ukrainians and Balts have been important. Every little caress counts. When Jesus was carrying His cross, there were different kind of people looking on, some were jeering but others knelt down and offered a small cup of water. It helps.

    Bayraktar has a lot of symbolism for Ukrainians, so this was more of a symbolic gesture of support. It’s like blowing a kiss at somebody.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @LatW

    Too much living in symbolism can have unpleasant consequences.


    When Jesus was carrying His cross, there were different kind of people looking on...
     
    We don't really know that. It is also more about symbolism. Or, some would say that it was long time ago, and it wasn't true anyway.

    Ukraine needs to stay grounded, deal with realities as they are, accept its geography and demographic variety. All this symbolic nonsense is a distraction, it delays a solution - and longer it gets delayed, worse off the rump-Ukraine will be.

    Replies: @LatW

  169. @Barbarossa
    @German_reader

    I suppose under Mr. Hack's definition the Allied air war in WW2 would also be genocide.

    But why not? If today we are all Nazis then any war action must also be genocide. It's simple logic that we can all apply as we prefer.

    Person I Don't Like=Hitler

    Hitler=Genocide

    Actions by Person I Don't Like=Genocide

    Now how can anyone quibble with such an elegant formula?

    Replies: @German_reader, @Mr. Hack

    Is it really all that simple? Seems to me that you’ve got a real educated handle on it and yet you seem to be wasting your time on pig and dog breeding?

    • Thanks: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Mr. Hack

    Since I've already figured out the endless complexities of political discourse and geopolitics I've turned my attention to the much harder challenges of animal husbandry.

    I considered tackling nuclear fusion and time travel but they seemed piffling compared with the task of exerting my agricultural will on other sentient beings and an adverse natural environment.

    Although, to be completely accurate I don't get into dog breeding. I own dogs but I choose not to get into that world of insanity.

    In all seriousness though...If Russian war crimes in Ukraine constitute a genocide in your mind then why would the indiscriminate Allied fire bombing of Germany or Japan not constitute it? I don't doubt at all that the Russians have done bad things in Ukraine, but I agree with German_reader that playing fast and loose with the term genocide just reduces the term to meaninglessness.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  170. @songbird
    @A123


    and the commercially viable ones are now simply too large for most people to cope with.
     
    Guess my comment was confusing, but I meant to denote a separate man, who would go around the neighborhood collecting it. My grandfather's place used to have a special hole in the ground in which put the bucket, with a caste iron cover that would come up. But one day metal scrappers stole it.

    I suspect that pig breeding has moved on
     
    Yes, pigs have also gotten more feed efficient, like chickens. Both trends are pretty remarkable, even if the meat might be inferior in certain particulars or at least different-tasting

    I have often wondered whether there are big breeds of pigs that live longer than the big breeds of dogs.

    The “Transylvanian Naked Neck” is not a vampire joke. It has many fewer feathers and thus generates more meat.
     
    Quite interesting. Never heard of that one. Who was that guy who proposed editing the chicken genome in order to turn them back into T-rexes? Jack Horner, I think. Well, looks like something on that path.

    I have myself wondered why nobody seems to have tried to sell specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies, at a higher premium. (As in the chicken breeds that lay blue, purple, or green eggs).

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies

    Nah, yuppies are passe. What they need are specially colored LGBTQ+++ eggs. It would be a micro-aggression to serve a trans person a mis-gendered colored egg.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Barbarossa



    specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies
     
    Nah, yuppies are passe. What they need are specially colored LGBTQ+++ eggs. It would be a micro-aggression to serve a trans person a mis-gendered colored egg.
     
    That is not a LOL. We need GROAN as a response option.
    _____

    What breed(s) of chickens do you have?

    And, are you aware of anyone who has raised Naked Neck birds?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @songbird
    @Barbarossa


    What they need are specially colored LGBTQ+++ eggs.
     
    I think that crowd eats soy that they pour of a bottle, or something.
  171. @Mr. Hack
    @Barbarossa

    Is it really all that simple? Seems to me that you've got a real educated handle on it and yet you seem to be wasting your time on pig and dog breeding?

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    Since I’ve already figured out the endless complexities of political discourse and geopolitics I’ve turned my attention to the much harder challenges of animal husbandry.

    I considered tackling nuclear fusion and time travel but they seemed piffling compared with the task of exerting my agricultural will on other sentient beings and an adverse natural environment.

    Although, to be completely accurate I don’t get into dog breeding. I own dogs but I choose not to get into that world of insanity.

    In all seriousness though…If Russian war crimes in Ukraine constitute a genocide in your mind then why would the indiscriminate Allied fire bombing of Germany or Japan not constitute it? I don’t doubt at all that the Russians have done bad things in Ukraine, but I agree with German_reader that playing fast and loose with the term genocide just reduces the term to meaninglessness.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Barbarossa


    In all seriousness though…If Russian war crimes in Ukraine constitute a genocide in your mind then why would the indiscriminate Allied fire bombing of Germany or Japan not constitute it? I don’t doubt at all that the Russians have done bad things in Ukraine, but I agree with German_reader that playing fast and loose with the term genocide just reduces the term to meaninglessness.
     
    I was against the US bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and held a lively debate on this topic with one of our past blood & guts connoisseurs, Thorfinnsson, that lasted about a week in daily back & forths. The fire bombings in Germany towards the end of the war was also quite questionable. But the thing is, that was then and this is now. It's a lot more difficult to go back in time and muster the facts and energy needed to pursue such tribunals today. Although, the definition of "genocide" was definitely covered, with good result, after the war to cover the sordid details of the holocaust. These definitions can and will be used to crucify the Russian state for its recent crimes in Ukraine, and there's no reason to try and limit any such proceedings.

    I don’t doubt at all that the Russians have done bad things in Ukraine, but I agree with German_reader that playing fast and loose with the term genocide just reduces the term to meaninglessness.
     
    I agree, there's no sense in playing "fast and loose" with term genocide, but think that a strict application of the term, as has already been applied quite successfully in the past is more than a worthwhile project, but one that needs to be conducted, so that we get incrementally closer to a more perfect application of the term and the consequences of any such actions, so that any society hell bent on perpetrating these types of crimes is severely reprimanded and will think twice about any such actions going forward. Hiding your head in the sand may be easier for you to pull off, being the teacher, principal and head bureaucrat of your own little home school, but for the larger society outside of your well insulated home window, something more visible and conducive for all of humanity to behold is what's needed.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

  172. LatW says:
    @Mr. Hack
    @German_reader


    As I said this is all pretty bad, but it’s not genocide in the Armenian genocide, Holocaust or Rwanda sense.
     
    You may be right. It'll be looked upon in history as a Ukrainian form of genocide, similar to how the Intellectual Polish-Jewish thinker Raphael Lemkin viewed the genocide known as the Holodomor in Ukraine in the 1930's. BTW, important research and evidence is now being gathered to convict Russia's war crimes in Ukraine that will be adjudicated after this war ends.

    30 international experts conclude that genocide is afoot within Ukraine:

    https://youtu.be/Hx5ULoSinlg

    Replies: @LatW

    It’ll be looked upon in history as a Ukrainian form of genocide

    Yes, it is that (or possibly, if one cares about terms, an ethnocide or erasure of identity that quickly and inevitably turned into a genocide although I wouldn’t put it past it that someone in the Moscovite military may have had this intention already before Feb 24). The language has been genocidal for a long time now (calling on national TV for mass deportation, “re-education camps”, sterilization, etc.). Yep, welcome to 2022!

    What is peculiar, though, is that this massive violence is also directed at Russophones, against that special new Russophone identity that I mentioned a few threads back. As it obviously constitutes a danger to the Moscovite side.

    Btw, did you hear that the Moscovites stole some ancient Scythian items?

    [MORE]

    And the lesson for Russia’s neighbors here is how fast it is happening. In Kherson they are already forcing the Russian curriculum on kids. From what I’ve heard, the people of Kherson are resisting quite bravely.

    What is more important here, Mr Hack, is that, yes, voicing this and recording the crimes is very important (as well as making the world hear about them). But, if you look at it in abstract, it’s just data. So what are we going to do about it? The Ukrainian men who are out there are bringing the perpetrators to accountability, as much as they can. They will be deciding the fate of Ukraine.

    However, the catastrophe is so immense that we, friends of Ukraine and Ukrainians themselves, have to do much more. Ideally, for every killed Ukrainian there should be a newborn child that will be raised as a Ukrainian. For every demolished church or cultural center, a new cultural center should be built somewhere in the West or Central Ukraine. Yes, it seems a bit unrealistic. But other things can be done as well, and these need to go beyond donations. More projects need to be started, no matter how small. I encourage you to think about this, Mr Hack. Even publishing a small, new book in Ukrainian language is worth it now.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @LatW

    I agree with everything you write, and am glad to consider you as a friend of the Ukrainian nation. If it weren't for the support of America, the Baltic States, Great Britain and Poland, the Ukrainian situation would be much harder to bear. Thanks to you all!

    Replies: @LatW, @LondonBob

  173. @A123
    @songbird

    I suspect that pig breeding has moved on, and the commercially viable ones are now simply too large for most people to cope with.

     
    https://www.sunnyskyz.com/uploads/2014/12/rsr8j-pig6.jpg
     

    Backyard chickens seem much more plausible. The "Transylvanian Naked Neck" is not a vampire joke. It has many fewer feathers and thus generates more meat.

    https://www.thefeatherbrain.com/blog/naked-neck-chickens

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

    Commercial pigs are slaughtered at 100 kg. Most never get bigger.

    • Thanks: A123
  174. @Barbarossa
    @A123

    There are still many older heritage breeds of pigs which are manageable for a relatively small lot. Guinea Hogs are really small but produce a lot of lard and small cuts of meat. I like and use lard but I prefer larger bacons and chops so I've been going with Large Blacks since they are good foragers.

    https://livestockconservancy.org/heritage-breeds/heritage-breeds-list/large-black-pig/

    I would say that town pigs are just as viable as they ever were but that acceptance by neighbors would probably be quite the hurdle. Chickens are starting to become more accepted in communities again, so maybe pigs can make a comeback too! Something productive ought to be done with the huge amounts of food waste that we generate.

    Replies: @Philip Owen, @iffen

    In Russia, people keep chickens in the middle of cities (older houses with yards). I haven’t seen pigs.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Philip Owen

    Quite correct, though they will get far far bigger if not slaughtered.

    As an interesting aside, that was actually a major reason for pork shortages during covid. Disruptions in slaughter house schedules quickly created a backlog setting farmers delivery dates off. Even just a couple of weeks from target date was enough for the hogs to get physically larger than could be processed since the hyper-specialized facilities are designed to process a hog only within a fairly narrow weight range. Too big and they literally couldn't fit down the lines.

    Smaller scale local butchers which could process the hogs with no difficulty had no capacity to handle a sudden rush of that scale, so farmers were in a position of having to shoot and dispose of countless perfectly healthy pigs which happened to be 40lbs too big. All this while the super market shelves were empty.

    It's an interesting case study of when these extremely specific and fine tuned supply systems break down.

  175. @Voltarde
    These three analysts impress me:

    Military Summary (Daily)
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUnc496-PPmFZVKlYxUnToA

    Brian Berletic - The New Atlas
    https://www.youtube.com/user/LandDestroyerReport/videos
    https://landdestroyer.blogspot.com/

    Jacob Dreizin - Ukraine War & Aftermath – A No Propaganda Zone
    https://thedreizinreport.com/

    Brian and Jacob both have experience serving in the U.S. military, and Jacob is fluent in Russian. Brian is a geopolitical analyst whose research is always first-rate and well-documented.

    I think that some in the senior leadership of the U.S. military are becoming concerned that an increasing number of genuine professionals within their middle-to-senior officer corps are observing what really is happening on the ground in the Ukraine, and are becoming disgusted with the Ukrainian military and political leadership. For example, to avoid paying widows and next-of-kin survivor benefits, the bodies of dead Ukrainian soldiers simply aren't accepted when the Russians try to make truce arrangements to return them across the line of contact. The lives of Ukrainian soldiers are being wasted due to hopeless stand-and-fight orders which close the window of opportunity for their orderly operational retreat. A genuinely professional officer in the U.S. military would find all this callousness towards one's own troops to be inexcusable.

    In contrast, the U.S. State Department, U.S. politicians, and the mainstream media are just parroting each other's falsehoods and delusions.

    Replies: @Philip Owen

    This seems to be the Russian habit of accusing Ukraine of what Russia has previously been accused of doing. No body, no pension was the reason given for Russia abandoning soldiers bodies during the retreats at Kiev.

    • Troll: Mikhail
  176. @LatW
    @Beckow


    Yeah, a military drone that on average had survived for less than week when deployed. It is a classical mass psychosis: manipulated people with nothing but shallow emotions.
     
    Emotions between Ukrainians and Balts have been important. Every little caress counts. When Jesus was carrying His cross, there were different kind of people looking on, some were jeering but others knelt down and offered a small cup of water. It helps.

    Bayraktar has a lot of symbolism for Ukrainians, so this was more of a symbolic gesture of support. It's like blowing a kiss at somebody.

    Replies: @Beckow

    Too much living in symbolism can have unpleasant consequences.

    When Jesus was carrying His cross, there were different kind of people looking on…

    We don’t really know that. It is also more about symbolism. Or, some would say that it was long time ago, and it wasn’t true anyway.

    Ukraine needs to stay grounded, deal with realities as they are, accept its geography and demographic variety. All this symbolic nonsense is a distraction, it delays a solution – and longer it gets delayed, worse off the rump-Ukraine will be.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Beckow


    All this symbolic nonsense is a distraction, it delays a solution – and longer it gets delayed, worse off the rump-Ukraine will be.
     
    Actually, no. On our side (you're not on it, personally.. although your state seems to be.. I mean the Ukro-Balto-Polish side) gestures of kindness are more important than ever. Did you miss Duda's speech at Rada? If you have naturally stemming sympathy for each other, it can be quite powerful.

    As to "delaying the solution" - this is out of the politicians' hands now, the resolution will be found in the battle field. I mean, the French and Germans can keep calling Putin, and something might come out of it (he'll blackmail them with grain & refugees, it is their choice to give in to this blackmail and how that will make them look), but it doesn't seem that that's where the solution lies. We're way past that stage. By trying to pressure Ukraine, the Western Europeans will just show, once again, who is who. In the last 30 years, it could've just been accepted as it is, but after Feb 24, it's become much more critical (could become a dealbreaker).


    Ukraine needs to stay grounded, deal with realities as they are,
     
    Here I couldn't agree more. Grounded is a very accurate word (and Ukrainians have been, I admire their ability to keep a peaceful mind despite the circumstances). At this very difficult stage of the war, being grounded and realistic is of utmost importance. Lives and land depend on it. So to answer what you wrote, yes, there are spaces where emotions and symbolism are important (and can be beneficial), but there are other aspects, where a cold, calculating mind is needed.

    accept its geography and demographic variety.
     
    The acceptance of geography should've happened already in the 1990s (but 90s being what they were, the Ukrainians were fooled). Like Israel has accepted its geographic reality. As to demographic variety, large countries like Ukraine will have it for sure. It's not an easy thing to control, thus one needs a common core ideology. As to demographics in purely biological sense, the pro-Russian side is not quick to procreate. Even if they had bilingualism, this fact wouldn't change. And, btw, it's really not about language (there is a growing Russophone media space now growing globally that is on Ukraine's side - people of various nationalities are communicating in pure Russian).

    Replies: @Beckow

  177. A123 says: • Website
    @Barbarossa
    @songbird


    specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies
     
    Nah, yuppies are passe. What they need are specially colored LGBTQ+++ eggs. It would be a micro-aggression to serve a trans person a mis-gendered colored egg.

    Replies: @A123, @songbird

    specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies

    Nah, yuppies are passe. What they need are specially colored LGBTQ+++ eggs. It would be a micro-aggression to serve a trans person a mis-gendered colored egg.

    That is not a LOL. We need GROAN as a response option.
    _____

    What breed(s) of chickens do you have?

    And, are you aware of anyone who has raised Naked Neck birds?

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @A123

    I have not seen anyone raising Naked Neck birds. I would suspect that the advantages of not having as many feathers would be eliminated by my colder climate. Even now it gets chilly many nights and they might expend more energy from staying warm than they would gain through not making feathers.

    Right now I have a real variety of birds since we got a variety of chicks last year and then we've been given a couple groups of hens as well. I know we have Barred Rocks, Orpingtons, Ameraucanas and Auracanas, Australorps, and a few bantams. I'm probably missing a couple breeds.

    I have an excess of roosters right now, which I need to pare down, but it's amusing to watch them squabble over hens and preside over their harems. I suppose I can see how cock fighting became a thing since it's really fascinating to watch them spar. Fortunately the roosters aren't too vicious with each other, and don't seem to do each other any damage.

    Replies: @iffen

  178. @Beckow
    @LatW

    Too much living in symbolism can have unpleasant consequences.


    When Jesus was carrying His cross, there were different kind of people looking on...
     
    We don't really know that. It is also more about symbolism. Or, some would say that it was long time ago, and it wasn't true anyway.

    Ukraine needs to stay grounded, deal with realities as they are, accept its geography and demographic variety. All this symbolic nonsense is a distraction, it delays a solution - and longer it gets delayed, worse off the rump-Ukraine will be.

    Replies: @LatW

    All this symbolic nonsense is a distraction, it delays a solution – and longer it gets delayed, worse off the rump-Ukraine will be.

    Actually, no. On our side (you’re not on it, personally.. although your state seems to be.. I mean the Ukro-Balto-Polish side) gestures of kindness are more important than ever. Did you miss Duda’s speech at Rada? If you have naturally stemming sympathy for each other, it can be quite powerful.

    As to “delaying the solution” – this is out of the politicians’ hands now, the resolution will be found in the battle field. I mean, the French and Germans can keep calling Putin, and something might come out of it (he’ll blackmail them with grain & refugees, it is their choice to give in to this blackmail and how that will make them look), but it doesn’t seem that that’s where the solution lies. We’re way past that stage. By trying to pressure Ukraine, the Western Europeans will just show, once again, who is who. In the last 30 years, it could’ve just been accepted as it is, but after Feb 24, it’s become much more critical (could become a dealbreaker).

    [MORE]

    Ukraine needs to stay grounded, deal with realities as they are,

    Here I couldn’t agree more. Grounded is a very accurate word (and Ukrainians have been, I admire their ability to keep a peaceful mind despite the circumstances). At this very difficult stage of the war, being grounded and realistic is of utmost importance. Lives and land depend on it. So to answer what you wrote, yes, there are spaces where emotions and symbolism are important (and can be beneficial), but there are other aspects, where a cold, calculating mind is needed.

    accept its geography and demographic variety.

    The acceptance of geography should’ve happened already in the 1990s (but 90s being what they were, the Ukrainians were fooled). Like Israel has accepted its geographic reality. As to demographic variety, large countries like Ukraine will have it for sure. It’s not an easy thing to control, thus one needs a common core ideology. As to demographics in purely biological sense, the pro-Russian side is not quick to procreate. Even if they had bilingualism, this fact wouldn’t change. And, btw, it’s really not about language (there is a growing Russophone media space now growing globally that is on Ukraine’s side – people of various nationalities are communicating in pure Russian).

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @LatW


    ...Did you miss Duda’s speech at Rada?
     
    I did. I admit I have missed all of "Duda's" speeches. Did I really miss anything?

    the resolution will be found in the battle field.
     
    Exactly. But if the resolution is not to your liking will you accept it? If Russia keeps most of the Black See coast and Donbas? Or will the 'stemming sympathy for each other' make it impossible and we will just go on and on, fighting endlessly.

    the pro-Russian side is not quick to procreate. Even if they had bilingualism, this fact wouldn’t change.
     
    That is a weird non-sequitur. Are you suggesting that people can be deprived of basic rights, like a right to their own language, because they don't procreate enough? On second thought, let's go with that thought - I have always supported not giving any retirement benefits to the childless. But let's do it everywhere, not just in Donbas.

    It doesn't justify Kiev after 2014 calling its own Russian citizens "terrorists" (in Donbas for example) and bombing them for 8 years. They are as human as you and I, they have the same rights, ignoring and demonizing them doesn't help - that's how we got here.

    Replies: @LatW, @Miro23

  179. @Barbarossa
    @songbird


    specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies
     
    Nah, yuppies are passe. What they need are specially colored LGBTQ+++ eggs. It would be a micro-aggression to serve a trans person a mis-gendered colored egg.

    Replies: @A123, @songbird

    What they need are specially colored LGBTQ+++ eggs.

    I think that crowd eats soy that they pour of a bottle, or something.

  180. @LatW
    @Beckow


    All this symbolic nonsense is a distraction, it delays a solution – and longer it gets delayed, worse off the rump-Ukraine will be.
     
    Actually, no. On our side (you're not on it, personally.. although your state seems to be.. I mean the Ukro-Balto-Polish side) gestures of kindness are more important than ever. Did you miss Duda's speech at Rada? If you have naturally stemming sympathy for each other, it can be quite powerful.

    As to "delaying the solution" - this is out of the politicians' hands now, the resolution will be found in the battle field. I mean, the French and Germans can keep calling Putin, and something might come out of it (he'll blackmail them with grain & refugees, it is their choice to give in to this blackmail and how that will make them look), but it doesn't seem that that's where the solution lies. We're way past that stage. By trying to pressure Ukraine, the Western Europeans will just show, once again, who is who. In the last 30 years, it could've just been accepted as it is, but after Feb 24, it's become much more critical (could become a dealbreaker).


    Ukraine needs to stay grounded, deal with realities as they are,
     
    Here I couldn't agree more. Grounded is a very accurate word (and Ukrainians have been, I admire their ability to keep a peaceful mind despite the circumstances). At this very difficult stage of the war, being grounded and realistic is of utmost importance. Lives and land depend on it. So to answer what you wrote, yes, there are spaces where emotions and symbolism are important (and can be beneficial), but there are other aspects, where a cold, calculating mind is needed.

    accept its geography and demographic variety.
     
    The acceptance of geography should've happened already in the 1990s (but 90s being what they were, the Ukrainians were fooled). Like Israel has accepted its geographic reality. As to demographic variety, large countries like Ukraine will have it for sure. It's not an easy thing to control, thus one needs a common core ideology. As to demographics in purely biological sense, the pro-Russian side is not quick to procreate. Even if they had bilingualism, this fact wouldn't change. And, btw, it's really not about language (there is a growing Russophone media space now growing globally that is on Ukraine's side - people of various nationalities are communicating in pure Russian).

    Replies: @Beckow

    …Did you miss Duda’s speech at Rada?

    I did. I admit I have missed all of “Duda’s” speeches. Did I really miss anything?

    the resolution will be found in the battle field.

    Exactly. But if the resolution is not to your liking will you accept it? If Russia keeps most of the Black See coast and Donbas? Or will the ‘stemming sympathy for each other’ make it impossible and we will just go on and on, fighting endlessly.

    the pro-Russian side is not quick to procreate. Even if they had bilingualism, this fact wouldn’t change.

    That is a weird non-sequitur. Are you suggesting that people can be deprived of basic rights, like a right to their own language, because they don’t procreate enough? On second thought, let’s go with that thought – I have always supported not giving any retirement benefits to the childless. But let’s do it everywhere, not just in Donbas.

    It doesn’t justify Kiev after 2014 calling its own Russian citizens “terrorists” (in Donbas for example) and bombing them for 8 years. They are as human as you and I, they have the same rights, ignoring and demonizing them doesn’t help – that’s how we got here.

    • Agree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @LatW
    @Beckow


    I did. I admit I have missed all of “Duda’s” speeches. Did I really miss anything?
     
    Lol, pretty funny. :) Well, you wouldn't have enjoyed it anyway. It's not your cup of tea, I accept that. But you must've at least listened to your own Prime Minister, no? Who said that after Russia is done with Ukraine, they will attack Slovakia. Or was he just trying to rile up the Davos crowd? :)


    Exactly. But if the resolution is not to your liking will you accept it? If Russia keeps most of the Black See coast and Donbas?
     
    No, we will not accept it. At that point, it will be only about who is helping us, and that's already pretty much visible. Just because something is not to "one's liking", doesn't mean one needs to accept it. If that were the case, we could just wrap ourselves in a white sheet and head to the nearest cemetery.

    Or will the ‘stemming sympathy for each other’ make it impossible and we will just go on and on, fighting endlessly.
     
    Not the mutual sympathies of Poles et al but Russia's intentions. Unfortunately, yes, that's the reality post 2014. Unless the Russian people save us once more (like they did in 1991-93), which I'm kind of doubting they will. But you never know.

    Yes, unfortunately, in 2014, Ukraine went to bed in Europe, but woke up in Israel. Now, even more so. Their men and women have to make that decision for themselves, if they're able and willing to live that way. The 30 years of peace after 1991 was a lull, not the historic norm. I write this with great regret and bitterness. :(


    Are you suggesting that people can be deprived of basic rights, like a right to their own language, because they don’t procreate enough?
     
    No, I was just saying that if one doesn't take care of his own existence, then one shouldn't ask others to provide for it. This goes for all nationalities in EE. But you're right about the language rights, obviously, from the Russian perspective it's better to have them than not (even if the TFR is under 2). The re-Ukrainiazation of Eastern Ukraine was rightfully perceived by Russia as a "weapon of mass destruction" (it is such from their perspective). There will be another big bomb like that when the educated Kyiv Russophones make a stand. They've just only started.

    This is why the Muscovites are now stealing people from the occupied territories in the East, especially children. As well as enforcing a Russian curriculum where there was none before -- because all those kids add up and kids grow up quickly. These will be in tens of thousands if not more.

    Russia's neighbors better heed that lesson!

    They are as human as you and I, they have the same rights, ignoring and demonizing them doesn’t help – that’s how we got here.
     
    They are victims. Did you know that DNR will soon be called ZhNR? Or rather, Women's Republic of Donbas? Because all the men are now being rounded up to be sent to the frontlines. Women who will protest that will be sent to prison. Does anyone care about their rights?

    Replies: @Beckow

    , @Miro23
    @Beckow



    ... the resolution will be found in the battle field.

     

    Exactly. But if the resolution is not to your liking will you accept it? If Russia keeps most of the Black Sea coast and Donbas? Or will the ‘stemming sympathy for each other’ make it impossible and we will just go on and on, fighting endlessly.
     
    The way to avoid endless war is with total defeat. IOW the total defeat and occupation of Ukraine to the Polish/Rumanian border.

    This would have various advantages for the Russians:

    - No more proxy-war. Attacks on Russian forces would then have to come directly from Poland (NATO) bringing on explicit WW3 if the US/Europe really wanted that.

    - Russians could rebuild a functioning Ukrainian society with energy/food available + an improvement in the abysmal corruption/oligarch situation.

    The evidence seems to be, that many Ukrainians aren't too concerned about who their rulers are. They just want a functioning society and to be left alone.
  181. Wish I could read that Chinese textbook that the Taiwanese say explains modern American politics by making an analogy to the Qing.

    • LOL: German_reader
    • Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @songbird

    The best foil for PRC's "Century of Humiliation" narrative is the Japanese version of Chinese history-- the Japanese make the most formidable sinologists because there's no language barrier.

    - Weren't you already conquered and humiliated by the Manchu-Mongols before us and the whites showed up? Why do you single us out?

    - You begged us (Sun Yat-Sen) to help you overthrow the "Tatar yoke", then you are turning around and demanding Tatar Qing's homeland, Manchuria/Mongolia, also belongs to you. And you pay back for our support during your revolution (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1911_Revolution#Foreign_supporters) by siding with our mortal enemies, Russia-Soviets.

    - You are lumping us in with the Nazis, but didn't you also cooperate with the Nazis? German support for KMT at the Battle of Shanghai (1937) was so extensive that the Japanese media referred to it as the "Second Japan-German War" 第二次日独戦争 Dai-ni-ji nichi-doku sensō (the first one 日独戦争 being Siege of Qingdao (1914) in WWI).

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/日独戦争
    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/第二次上海事変#「第二次日独戦争」

    Replies: @German_reader, @216

  182. @Beckow
    @LatW


    ...Did you miss Duda’s speech at Rada?
     
    I did. I admit I have missed all of "Duda's" speeches. Did I really miss anything?

    the resolution will be found in the battle field.
     
    Exactly. But if the resolution is not to your liking will you accept it? If Russia keeps most of the Black See coast and Donbas? Or will the 'stemming sympathy for each other' make it impossible and we will just go on and on, fighting endlessly.

    the pro-Russian side is not quick to procreate. Even if they had bilingualism, this fact wouldn’t change.
     
    That is a weird non-sequitur. Are you suggesting that people can be deprived of basic rights, like a right to their own language, because they don't procreate enough? On second thought, let's go with that thought - I have always supported not giving any retirement benefits to the childless. But let's do it everywhere, not just in Donbas.

    It doesn't justify Kiev after 2014 calling its own Russian citizens "terrorists" (in Donbas for example) and bombing them for 8 years. They are as human as you and I, they have the same rights, ignoring and demonizing them doesn't help - that's how we got here.

    Replies: @LatW, @Miro23

    I did. I admit I have missed all of “Duda’s” speeches. Did I really miss anything?

    Lol, pretty funny. 🙂 Well, you wouldn’t have enjoyed it anyway. It’s not your cup of tea, I accept that. But you must’ve at least listened to your own Prime Minister, no? Who said that after Russia is done with Ukraine, they will attack Slovakia. Or was he just trying to rile up the Davos crowd? 🙂

    [MORE]

    Exactly. But if the resolution is not to your liking will you accept it? If Russia keeps most of the Black See coast and Donbas?

    No, we will not accept it. At that point, it will be only about who is helping us, and that’s already pretty much visible. Just because something is not to “one’s liking”, doesn’t mean one needs to accept it. If that were the case, we could just wrap ourselves in a white sheet and head to the nearest cemetery.

    Or will the ‘stemming sympathy for each other’ make it impossible and we will just go on and on, fighting endlessly.

    Not the mutual sympathies of Poles et al but Russia’s intentions. Unfortunately, yes, that’s the reality post 2014. Unless the Russian people save us once more (like they did in 1991-93), which I’m kind of doubting they will. But you never know.

    Yes, unfortunately, in 2014, Ukraine went to bed in Europe, but woke up in Israel. Now, even more so. Their men and women have to make that decision for themselves, if they’re able and willing to live that way. The 30 years of peace after 1991 was a lull, not the historic norm. I write this with great regret and bitterness. 🙁

    Are you suggesting that people can be deprived of basic rights, like a right to their own language, because they don’t procreate enough?

    No, I was just saying that if one doesn’t take care of his own existence, then one shouldn’t ask others to provide for it. This goes for all nationalities in EE. But you’re right about the language rights, obviously, from the Russian perspective it’s better to have them than not (even if the TFR is under 2). The re-Ukrainiazation of Eastern Ukraine was rightfully perceived by Russia as a “weapon of mass destruction” (it is such from their perspective). There will be another big bomb like that when the educated Kyiv Russophones make a stand. They’ve just only started.

    This is why the Muscovites are now stealing people from the occupied territories in the East, especially children. As well as enforcing a Russian curriculum where there was none before — because all those kids add up and kids grow up quickly. These will be in tens of thousands if not more.

    Russia’s neighbors better heed that lesson!

    They are as human as you and I, they have the same rights, ignoring and demonizing them doesn’t help – that’s how we got here.

    They are victims. Did you know that DNR will soon be called ZhNR? Or rather, Women’s Republic of Donbas? Because all the men are now being rounded up to be sent to the frontlines. Women who will protest that will be sent to prison. Does anyone care about their rights?

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @LatW

    If the men in Donbas fight there must be a reason, maybe all that bombing of them by Kiev? The bombing that everyone is suddenly pretending never happened, or that it was petering out, or that it was not 10k but only 3k victims (the media for years used the 10k+ figure when it was easy to confuse who the victims were). So they fight, men should defend their families, what's wrong with that?


    from the Russian perspective it’s better to have linguistic rights than not even if the TFR is under 2.
     
    A completely incoherent statement. You are just piling on rather lazily different things that really are not connected. Unless you actually think that a TFR quantitative test should be applied. But I think at this point you will say anything to dismiss any points from the other side - the polarization has set in. You will end up like Mr. Hacks hallucinating about a 'genocide'.

    Have you noticed how the narrative has shifted from "Kiev is winning!!!! Hurrah!!!!" to "omg, they are killing us, it is horrible, a genocide!!!" Why has the story changed? Where is all the optimism and victory spirit? With that Turkish flying hen contraption paid for by the Lithuanians they should be planning who takes what bedroom in Kremlin. But no, now it is all about self-pity. Why so fast? Kiev still has a chance...

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @German_reader, @LatW

  183. @German_reader
    @utu


    answering the question why they are more anti-American than anti-Russian.
     
    I'm not aware Germany ever has sent weapons out of Bundeswehr stocks to some foreign conflict with the purpose of helping kill American soldiers, like it has done with regard to Ukraine and Russian soldiers.

    Too bad that Timothy Snyder does not call spade a spade and only tries to make factual corrections that if Germans want to feel guilt their guilt to Belarusians and Ukrainian should be greater than to Russians.
     
    Exactly, he tries his best to nourish and cultivate German guilt, he just wants it directed solely towards Poles and Ukrainians. His entire work (sloppy at best) seems to be a project for providing a historical narrative convenient for types like AP with their Intermarium fantasies. Would be interesting to know if it's merely Snyder's personal belief, or if there is something more to it...by your standards the question should be legitimate if he's on the CIA's payroll.
    Anyway, you are of course an imbecile who should be institutionalized and kept in a padded cell. The only value of your comments is that they provide a glimpse of the deranged thinking of many emotionally incontinent Eastern Euros. If Ukraine loses (as looks possible right now), no doubt that Germany will be made the scapegoat, it's just too good a narrative to resist.

    Replies: @Yevardian

    Since you despise modern Germany so much and see it as fundamentally unsalvageable, why even have a problem with it throwing itself on the pyre for East Euros? I don’t.

    It’s a better end than slowly sputtering out with a whimper whilst facilitating the Afro-Mohammadan demographic transformation of Europe, no?

    But yes, Snyder is a dubious historian at best.

    • LOL: German_reader
  184. @Barbarossa
    @Mr. Hack

    Since I've already figured out the endless complexities of political discourse and geopolitics I've turned my attention to the much harder challenges of animal husbandry.

    I considered tackling nuclear fusion and time travel but they seemed piffling compared with the task of exerting my agricultural will on other sentient beings and an adverse natural environment.

    Although, to be completely accurate I don't get into dog breeding. I own dogs but I choose not to get into that world of insanity.

    In all seriousness though...If Russian war crimes in Ukraine constitute a genocide in your mind then why would the indiscriminate Allied fire bombing of Germany or Japan not constitute it? I don't doubt at all that the Russians have done bad things in Ukraine, but I agree with German_reader that playing fast and loose with the term genocide just reduces the term to meaninglessness.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    In all seriousness though…If Russian war crimes in Ukraine constitute a genocide in your mind then why would the indiscriminate Allied fire bombing of Germany or Japan not constitute it? I don’t doubt at all that the Russians have done bad things in Ukraine, but I agree with German_reader that playing fast and loose with the term genocide just reduces the term to meaninglessness.

    I was against the US bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and held a lively debate on this topic with one of our past blood & guts connoisseurs, Thorfinnsson, that lasted about a week in daily back & forths. The fire bombings in Germany towards the end of the war was also quite questionable. But the thing is, that was then and this is now. It’s a lot more difficult to go back in time and muster the facts and energy needed to pursue such tribunals today. Although, the definition of “genocide” was definitely covered, with good result, after the war to cover the sordid details of the holocaust. These definitions can and will be used to crucify the Russian state for its recent crimes in Ukraine, and there’s no reason to try and limit any such proceedings.

    I don’t doubt at all that the Russians have done bad things in Ukraine, but I agree with German_reader that playing fast and loose with the term genocide just reduces the term to meaninglessness.

    I agree, there’s no sense in playing “fast and loose” with term genocide, but think that a strict application of the term, as has already been applied quite successfully in the past is more than a worthwhile project, but one that needs to be conducted, so that we get incrementally closer to a more perfect application of the term and the consequences of any such actions, so that any society hell bent on perpetrating these types of crimes is severely reprimanded and will think twice about any such actions going forward. Hiding your head in the sand may be easier for you to pull off, being the teacher, principal and head bureaucrat of your own little home school, but for the larger society outside of your well insulated home window, something more visible and conducive for all of humanity to behold is what’s needed.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Mr. Hack


    being the teacher, principal and head bureaucrat of your own little home school
     
    Well, I'm afraid I can claim no such honor. That's almost exclusively my wife's domain. I keep quite busy with making the money and doing the fixing and building, but that division is just fine because she really enjoys teaching and is really very gifted at it.

    I don't think I'm hiding my head in the sand at all. It's perfectly possible to hold a country accountable for war crimes without it entailing the term genocide.

    It is obvious that you are eager to use the term genocide because you are a staunch Ukrainian partisan and deeply dislike Putin. I think it's fair to say that you would derive great satisfaction from Putin's Russia being slapped with the term genocidal.

    I'm not sure that this is justified though because while there have been civilian casualties and instances of horrific behavior by Russian troops, there certainly doesn't appear to be any systematic Russian attempt to exterminate Ukrainian civilians.

    So, I think you undermine your own case by jumping to the extremely dubious charge of genocide. Certainly, it's well and good to insist that Russia and all countries conduct war in as conscientious manner as possible. However, under your criteria it would seem that virtually every war ever conducted in human history would be a genocide. Terms like genocide only have power when used judiciously. When used to make a political point they quickly loose potency.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  185. @songbird
    Wish I could read that Chinese textbook that the Taiwanese say explains modern American politics by making an analogy to the Qing.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    The best foil for PRC’s “Century of Humiliation” narrative is the Japanese version of Chinese history– the Japanese make the most formidable sinologists because there’s no language barrier.

    – Weren’t you already conquered and humiliated by the Manchu-Mongols before us and the whites showed up? Why do you single us out?

    – You begged us (Sun Yat-Sen) to help you overthrow the “Tatar yoke”, then you are turning around and demanding Tatar Qing’s homeland, Manchuria/Mongolia, also belongs to you. And you pay back for our support during your revolution (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1911_Revolution#Foreign_supporters) by siding with our mortal enemies, Russia-Soviets.

    – You are lumping us in with the Nazis, but didn’t you also cooperate with the Nazis? German support for KMT at the Battle of Shanghai (1937) was so extensive that the Japanese media referred to it as the “Second Japan-German War” 第二次日独戦争 Dai-ni-ji nichi-doku sensō (the first one 日独戦争 being Siege of Qingdao (1914) in WWI).

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/日独戦争
    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/第二次上海事変#「第二次日独戦争」

    • Thanks: songbird
    • Replies: @German_reader
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    the Japanese make the most formidable sinologists because there’s no language barrier.
     
    Is that really true? Spoken Chinese and Japanese are totally unrelated languages after all, and are the commonalities in the writing systems enough to understand more than basic texts?
    The Japanese narrative as summarized by you also looks no less agenda-driven and biased than the PRC one tbh. Maybe inevitable though given the geopolitical tensions.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    , @216
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    The best foil for PRC’s “Century of Humiliation” narrative is the Japanese version of Chinese history– the Japanese make the most formidable sinologists because there’s no language barrier.
     
    The best foil is higher tariffs, and for the EU to show racial unity with the US Right and join in. It is time for a "Century of Humility".
  186. German_reader says:
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @songbird

    The best foil for PRC's "Century of Humiliation" narrative is the Japanese version of Chinese history-- the Japanese make the most formidable sinologists because there's no language barrier.

    - Weren't you already conquered and humiliated by the Manchu-Mongols before us and the whites showed up? Why do you single us out?

    - You begged us (Sun Yat-Sen) to help you overthrow the "Tatar yoke", then you are turning around and demanding Tatar Qing's homeland, Manchuria/Mongolia, also belongs to you. And you pay back for our support during your revolution (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1911_Revolution#Foreign_supporters) by siding with our mortal enemies, Russia-Soviets.

    - You are lumping us in with the Nazis, but didn't you also cooperate with the Nazis? German support for KMT at the Battle of Shanghai (1937) was so extensive that the Japanese media referred to it as the "Second Japan-German War" 第二次日独戦争 Dai-ni-ji nichi-doku sensō (the first one 日独戦争 being Siege of Qingdao (1914) in WWI).

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/日独戦争
    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/第二次上海事変#「第二次日独戦争」

    Replies: @German_reader, @216

    the Japanese make the most formidable sinologists because there’s no language barrier.

    Is that really true? Spoken Chinese and Japanese are totally unrelated languages after all, and are the commonalities in the writing systems enough to understand more than basic texts?
    The Japanese narrative as summarized by you also looks no less agenda-driven and biased than the PRC one tbh. Maybe inevitable though given the geopolitical tensions.

    • Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @German_reader

    The Japanese language is genetically and linguistically vastly different from Chinese, though has extensive borrowing from Chinese (The Chinese also later borrowed extensive vocabulary from the Japanese).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasei-kango

    The Japanese script is about 60 to 80 percent Chinese characters. Kublai Khan issued his ultimatum to Japan in Classical Chinese. Sun and his Japanese colleagues communicated in written Chinese without knowing each other's languages. Classical Chinese poetry was and remains highly prestigious in Japanese culture:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanshi_(poetry)

    The Japanese narrative as summarized by you also looks no less agenda-driven
    This is true. But it deserves to to told. The party that actually did almost all of the fighting against Japan, KMT, enjoyed good relations with her post-WW2,

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan–Taiwan_relations

    Lest it leads to pointless misunderstandings. Like here, Ukraine managed to offend both Japan and China simultaneously. It was totally inappropriate to compare Hirohito to Hitler from a historian's perspective. Hirohito was only a minor part of Japanese war-time decision-making.

    https://www.welt.de/politik/ausland/article238366557/Ukraine-entschuldigt-sich-fuer-Vergleich-von-Kaiser-Hirohito-mit-Hitler.html

    Replies: @German_reader, @Yellowface Anon

  187. @German_reader
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    the Japanese make the most formidable sinologists because there’s no language barrier.
     
    Is that really true? Spoken Chinese and Japanese are totally unrelated languages after all, and are the commonalities in the writing systems enough to understand more than basic texts?
    The Japanese narrative as summarized by you also looks no less agenda-driven and biased than the PRC one tbh. Maybe inevitable though given the geopolitical tensions.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    The Japanese language is genetically and linguistically vastly different from Chinese, though has extensive borrowing from Chinese (The Chinese also later borrowed extensive vocabulary from the Japanese).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasei-kango

    The Japanese script is about 60 to 80 percent Chinese characters. Kublai Khan issued his ultimatum to Japan in Classical Chinese. Sun and his Japanese colleagues communicated in written Chinese without knowing each other’s languages. Classical Chinese poetry was and remains highly prestigious in Japanese culture:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanshi_(poetry)

    The Japanese narrative as summarized by you also looks no less agenda-driven
    This is true. But it deserves to to told. The party that actually did almost all of the fighting against Japan, KMT, enjoyed good relations with her post-WW2,

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan–Taiwan_relations

    Lest it leads to pointless misunderstandings. Like here, Ukraine managed to offend both Japan and China simultaneously. It was totally inappropriate to compare Hirohito to Hitler from a historian’s perspective. Hirohito was only a minor part of Japanese war-time decision-making.

    https://www.welt.de/politik/ausland/article238366557/Ukraine-entschuldigt-sich-fuer-Vergleich-von-Kaiser-Hirohito-mit-Hitler.html

    • Thanks: German_reader
    • Replies: @German_reader
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    Like here, Ukraine managed to offend both Japan and China simultaneously.
     
    Hadn't heard of that incident, interesting (as is the fact that Japan made Ukraine apologize). Don't have a positive view of Hirohito tbh, but if they really want to draw dubious historical analogies they should have been diplomatic enough to stick to Tojo.
    Thanks for your comments on Japanese/Chinese language, sounds like classical Chinese had a similar function in East Asia as Latin in Europe until the early modern age.
    , @Yellowface Anon
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    Ukraine managed to offend both Japan and China simultaneously.
     
    Like how? I don't follow the context of this well.
  188. German_reader says:
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @German_reader

    The Japanese language is genetically and linguistically vastly different from Chinese, though has extensive borrowing from Chinese (The Chinese also later borrowed extensive vocabulary from the Japanese).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasei-kango

    The Japanese script is about 60 to 80 percent Chinese characters. Kublai Khan issued his ultimatum to Japan in Classical Chinese. Sun and his Japanese colleagues communicated in written Chinese without knowing each other's languages. Classical Chinese poetry was and remains highly prestigious in Japanese culture:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanshi_(poetry)

    The Japanese narrative as summarized by you also looks no less agenda-driven
    This is true. But it deserves to to told. The party that actually did almost all of the fighting against Japan, KMT, enjoyed good relations with her post-WW2,

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan–Taiwan_relations

    Lest it leads to pointless misunderstandings. Like here, Ukraine managed to offend both Japan and China simultaneously. It was totally inappropriate to compare Hirohito to Hitler from a historian's perspective. Hirohito was only a minor part of Japanese war-time decision-making.

    https://www.welt.de/politik/ausland/article238366557/Ukraine-entschuldigt-sich-fuer-Vergleich-von-Kaiser-Hirohito-mit-Hitler.html

    Replies: @German_reader, @Yellowface Anon

    Like here, Ukraine managed to offend both Japan and China simultaneously.

    Hadn’t heard of that incident, interesting (as is the fact that Japan made Ukraine apologize). Don’t have a positive view of Hirohito tbh, but if they really want to draw dubious historical analogies they should have been diplomatic enough to stick to Tojo.
    Thanks for your comments on Japanese/Chinese language, sounds like classical Chinese had a similar function in East Asia as Latin in Europe until the early modern age.

  189. @Beckow
    @Mikhail

    You see the ones like the German-reader simply don't see the other side - they blocked it from their minds. Kiev uber alles! And absolutely nothing happened before 2/24/2022.

    They would say that the act of "aggression" has made it black-and-white. The question is how to define the aggression, and when did it really start. But that is for after the war is over. Until then this block-headed simple-mindness will continue. It is pointless to argue with them, they don't want to see the other side.

    Replies: @German_reader, @Mikhail

    As is true with many if not most conflicts, the one under discussion here isn’t the comic book good guy/bad guy scenario as suggestively peddled by CNN, BBC, MSNBC, et al.

  190. @German_reader
    @Barbarossa


    I suppose under Mr. Hack’s definition the Allied air war in WW2 would also be genocide.
     
    Russia is probably doing other things beyond just indiscriminate shelling without regard for civilian casualties etc. It's of course hard to be sure (I don't take Ukrainian claims at face value either), but it seems plausible to me that Russian security services torture and kill people they suspect of being Ukrainian national activists. At least it would fit right in with Russian traditions. And that would go beyond war crimes in the narrow sense.
    "Genocide" is really hyperbole though, imo that's just propaganda.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    At least it would fit right in with Russian traditions. And that would go beyond war crimes in the narrow sense.

    Tradition!

    More accurate to call the above excerpted bigoted than calling what the Russians are/were doing as genocide – noting the numerous busted Kiev regime lies.

  191. @Thulean Friend

    Baltics attack Franco-German talks with Putin over Black Sea blockade

    Leaders in eastern Europe have grown uneasy about the willingness of their western European counterparts to talk with Putin, reigniting suspicion that some EU countries are pushing Kyiv to cede territory to end the war.

    The Baltic countries believe such phone calls merely empower Putin, and that instead Europe should send more weapons to Ukraine.

    Some western capitals fear the looming food crisis and its devastating impact on poor households in Africa and the Middle East could trigger a new wave of migration to Europe.

    Putin, Scholz and Macron discussed whether a negotiated solution could be found to open Odesa to allow grain exports to leave Ukraine, according to an Elysée briefing after the call.


     

    As I've said, the world has too many countries and the Balts are excellent candidates to be put on the chopping block. We also need QMV in the EU and we needed it yesterday.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    As quoted in Western masc media, the Franco-German contingent expressed concern over the Russian treatment of POWs. If true, Putin was given the opportunity to bust on their hypocritical concern.

    I understand that Germany has a law on Nazi symbols. Does that apply to tattoos among other expressions of Nazi sympathy utilized by some of the Kiev regime forces?

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Mikhail


    As quoted in Western masc media, the Franco-German contingent expressed concern over the Russian treatment of POWs. If true, Putin was given the opportunity to bust on their hypocritical concern.

    I understand that Germany has a law on Nazi symbols. Does that apply to tattoos among other expressions of Nazi sympathy utilized by some of the Kiev regime forces?

     

    That's an interesting point that I haven't seen brought up elsewhere. However, even Nazis deserve some basic human protection under intl law, IMO. I don't want to see a degeneration into a law of the jungle.

    Too bad nobody seems to care about the law, as even Greece is conducting outright piracy against Iranian vessels under the prodding of the US. The Iranians realise it is futile to complain to international organs, since they are often controlled or veto-blocked by the US, so they took two as revenge. Russian's FX reserves were outright stolen.

    We're seeing that behind all the lofty rhetoric of "rules-based order", simple gangsterism still reigns.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @A123

  192. @Mr. Hack
    @Barbarossa


    In all seriousness though…If Russian war crimes in Ukraine constitute a genocide in your mind then why would the indiscriminate Allied fire bombing of Germany or Japan not constitute it? I don’t doubt at all that the Russians have done bad things in Ukraine, but I agree with German_reader that playing fast and loose with the term genocide just reduces the term to meaninglessness.
     
    I was against the US bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and held a lively debate on this topic with one of our past blood & guts connoisseurs, Thorfinnsson, that lasted about a week in daily back & forths. The fire bombings in Germany towards the end of the war was also quite questionable. But the thing is, that was then and this is now. It's a lot more difficult to go back in time and muster the facts and energy needed to pursue such tribunals today. Although, the definition of "genocide" was definitely covered, with good result, after the war to cover the sordid details of the holocaust. These definitions can and will be used to crucify the Russian state for its recent crimes in Ukraine, and there's no reason to try and limit any such proceedings.

    I don’t doubt at all that the Russians have done bad things in Ukraine, but I agree with German_reader that playing fast and loose with the term genocide just reduces the term to meaninglessness.
     
    I agree, there's no sense in playing "fast and loose" with term genocide, but think that a strict application of the term, as has already been applied quite successfully in the past is more than a worthwhile project, but one that needs to be conducted, so that we get incrementally closer to a more perfect application of the term and the consequences of any such actions, so that any society hell bent on perpetrating these types of crimes is severely reprimanded and will think twice about any such actions going forward. Hiding your head in the sand may be easier for you to pull off, being the teacher, principal and head bureaucrat of your own little home school, but for the larger society outside of your well insulated home window, something more visible and conducive for all of humanity to behold is what's needed.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    being the teacher, principal and head bureaucrat of your own little home school

    Well, I’m afraid I can claim no such honor. That’s almost exclusively my wife’s domain. I keep quite busy with making the money and doing the fixing and building, but that division is just fine because she really enjoys teaching and is really very gifted at it.

    I don’t think I’m hiding my head in the sand at all. It’s perfectly possible to hold a country accountable for war crimes without it entailing the term genocide.

    It is obvious that you are eager to use the term genocide because you are a staunch Ukrainian partisan and deeply dislike Putin. I think it’s fair to say that you would derive great satisfaction from Putin’s Russia being slapped with the term genocidal.

    I’m not sure that this is justified though because while there have been civilian casualties and instances of horrific behavior by Russian troops, there certainly doesn’t appear to be any systematic Russian attempt to exterminate Ukrainian civilians.

    So, I think you undermine your own case by jumping to the extremely dubious charge of genocide. Certainly, it’s well and good to insist that Russia and all countries conduct war in as conscientious manner as possible. However, under your criteria it would seem that virtually every war ever conducted in human history would be a genocide. Terms like genocide only have power when used judiciously. When used to make a political point they quickly loose potency.

    • Disagree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Barbarossa

    While the murder of innocent civilians should be considered a large factor when considering the validity of assigning the term genocide to the actions of an invading army, it's not the only one.

    *The seizure and removal of Ukrainians, especially children, to parts of Russia far away from Ukraine, with the express purpose of Russifying these victims, with the express intent of using them as future cadres of their own society.
    * The removal of all Ukrainian literature and Ukrainian language resources in the newly conquered territories, as is being done within Kherson, including TV and radio broadcasts.
    * The complete curtailment of Ukrainian language schools, in exchange for Russian language schools, including using textbooks promoting a Russian imperial ideology.

    For completely ignoring these sorts of infractions, do I have any other reason to consider you to be anything more than a misinformed sympathizer of the Russian cause within Ukraine? I suspect that the video clip that you probably didn't even watch within my comment above didn't move you to consider that the word "genocide" is indeed a very appropriate term to use when assessing the motives and actions of the Russian war machine within Ukraine?

    Replies: @German_reader

  193. @sudden death
    @German_reader

    Should have written "SOME" in capital letters in that post, lol

    Myself certainly do not have much pretensions to the current leadership of Germany and France, imho in general they are behaving better than could be expected.


    You sit in your tiny dwarf states that Russia could easily wipe off the map..
     
    That is just objective potential fact of modern life which nevertheless cannot be used as justification for being paralyzed by trembling fear and inaction, way better to help the fight off instead:

    Hundreds of Lithuanians have chipped in together to buy an advanced military drone for Ukraine in its war against Russia in a show of solidarity with a fellow former Soviet Union country.

    The target of €5 million was raised in just three and a half days — largely in small amounts between €5 and €100 — to fund the purchase of a Byraktar TB2 military drone, according to Laisves TV, the Lithuanian internet broadcaster that launched the drive.

    "Before this war started, none of us thought that we would be buying guns. But it's a normal thing now. Something must be done for the world to get better," said Agne Belickaite, 32, who sent €100 as soon as the fundraising launched on Wednesday.

    "I've been donating to buy guns for Ukraine for a while now. And will do so until the victory," she told Reuters, adding she was motivated in part by fears Russia could attack Lithuania.

    The drone has proven effective in recent years against Russian forces and their allies in conflicts in Syria and Libya, and its purchase is being orchestrated by Lithuania's Ministry of Defence, which plans to sign a letter of intent to buy the craft from Turkey next week.

    Ukraine has bought more than 20 Bayraktar TB2 armed drones from Turkish company Baykar in recent years and ordered a further 16 on 27 January. That batch was delivered in early March.

    "This is the first case in history when ordinary people raise money to buy something like a Bayraktar. It is unprecedented, it is unbelievable," Beshta Petro, Ukraine's ambassador to Lithuania, told Laisves TV.
     

    https://www.euronews.com/2022/05/28/lithuanians-organise-donation-drive-to-buy-bayraktar-drone-for-ukraine

    Replies: @German_reader, @Beckow, @216

    Did they paint the GayPride, BLM and TroonPride flag on that drone?

    Because that’s the causes which it is actually being used for.

    • Agree: LondonBob
    • Replies: @sudden death
    @216

    Are you really the cuck type who would gladly watch your own woman being raped by foreign invader as long as you gullibly believe propaganda image of his leader allegedly being "antihomo racist"?

    https://wiwibloggs.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/philipp-kikorov-vladimir-putin-honour.jpg

    https://wiwibloggs.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Filipp-Kirkorov-mood-color-black-egor-kreed.jpg

    Replies: @LatW

  194. 216 says: • Website
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @songbird

    The best foil for PRC's "Century of Humiliation" narrative is the Japanese version of Chinese history-- the Japanese make the most formidable sinologists because there's no language barrier.

    - Weren't you already conquered and humiliated by the Manchu-Mongols before us and the whites showed up? Why do you single us out?

    - You begged us (Sun Yat-Sen) to help you overthrow the "Tatar yoke", then you are turning around and demanding Tatar Qing's homeland, Manchuria/Mongolia, also belongs to you. And you pay back for our support during your revolution (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1911_Revolution#Foreign_supporters) by siding with our mortal enemies, Russia-Soviets.

    - You are lumping us in with the Nazis, but didn't you also cooperate with the Nazis? German support for KMT at the Battle of Shanghai (1937) was so extensive that the Japanese media referred to it as the "Second Japan-German War" 第二次日独戦争 Dai-ni-ji nichi-doku sensō (the first one 日独戦争 being Siege of Qingdao (1914) in WWI).

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/日独戦争
    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/第二次上海事変#「第二次日独戦争」

    Replies: @German_reader, @216

    The best foil for PRC’s “Century of Humiliation” narrative is the Japanese version of Chinese history– the Japanese make the most formidable sinologists because there’s no language barrier.

    The best foil is higher tariffs, and for the EU to show racial unity with the US Right and join in. It is time for a “Century of Humility”.

    • Troll: German_reader
  195. @A123
    @Barbarossa



    specially-branded colored eggs to yuppies
     
    Nah, yuppies are passe. What they need are specially colored LGBTQ+++ eggs. It would be a micro-aggression to serve a trans person a mis-gendered colored egg.
     
    That is not a LOL. We need GROAN as a response option.
    _____

    What breed(s) of chickens do you have?

    And, are you aware of anyone who has raised Naked Neck birds?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    I have not seen anyone raising Naked Neck birds. I would suspect that the advantages of not having as many feathers would be eliminated by my colder climate. Even now it gets chilly many nights and they might expend more energy from staying warm than they would gain through not making feathers.

    Right now I have a real variety of birds since we got a variety of chicks last year and then we’ve been given a couple groups of hens as well. I know we have Barred Rocks, Orpingtons, Ameraucanas and Auracanas, Australorps, and a few bantams. I’m probably missing a couple breeds.

    I have an excess of roosters right now, which I need to pare down, but it’s amusing to watch them squabble over hens and preside over their harems. I suppose I can see how cock fighting became a thing since it’s really fascinating to watch them spar. Fortunately the roosters aren’t too vicious with each other, and don’t seem to do each other any damage.

    • Thanks: A123
    • Replies: @iffen
    @Barbarossa

    I suppose I can see how cock fighting became a thing

    Laws prohibiting cock fighting are a part of the ongoing cultural genocide of my people.

  196. Have just watched an anime that featured a flashback where a Japanese girl, then 5 y.o., ran from a concert hall, where classical music was being played, safely navigating the streets all alone, on her own, back to her parents’ bakery.

    Anyway, it may be because the story was something of a tearjerker, and it moved my cold heart. But I don’t care: I say do whatever it takes, to bring us back to that point!

    Whatever it takes…

    [MORE]
    nuke the boomers, if it is necessary!!!
    ☢️💣🔥🧓 😎

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    • Replies: @songbird
    @songbird

    Am sure that people have heard of this, but...

    https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2022/apr/07/old-enough-the-japanese-tv-show-that-abandons-toddlers-on-public-transport

    Supposedly, in the state of Illinois you can't be left home alone until you are 14. In Mississippi it is 12.

    , @Mikel
    @songbird


    nuke the boomers, if it is necessary!!!
     
    OK but boomer music was the best ever. By far.

    https://youtu.be/5Cg-j0X09Ag

    And besides, what have subsequent generations done about what boomers got wrong, except for doubling and tripling down?

    Replies: @songbird, @AP

  197. German_reader says:

    https://asiatimes.com/2022/05/ukraine-war-momentum-shifting-in-russias-favor/?fbclid=IwAR2cYeN5NYWwpXN6-YV5N8xvlJ6OfjY8Y4zunobfiJ1106FmRGsxfLqheSY

    Alarming prediction near the end:

    Elsewhere, there are indications that Russia is preparing for a renewed assault on Mykolaiv in the south – the land gateway to the Black Sea port of Odessa. A US military source told Asia Times, without offering details, that briefers expect the latter city to fall in July.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @German_reader

    Lol, not a chance. The "unamed military source" was likely a Twitter anon and The Asia Times is an outfit that mostly peddles geopolitical fan fiction of the Escobar or "Spengler" varieties.

    The Russian military seems to have learned what it is capable of, which is advancing about a mile a day on a single axis for a couple of weeks in a row, but there's no reason to think that they can take a city the size of Mykolaiv opposed. Nor that they can commit the troops to try without giving up in the Donbas.

    Mariupol was surrounded in the initial shock of their invasion, and possibly by treason. Yet it took them until longer than the "end of July" from now to take it. And had Mariupol not been surrounded and cut off, Russia would still be trying or would have given up. And to be honest, they would have been crazy to even try.

    So taking Mykolaiv opposed, from within and without, would be a legendary effort by a military with marked superiority, rigorous professionalism and a much larger concentration of forces. While its geography makes it very hard to surround and invest safely.

    Russia is much more likely to lose Kherson by then. It is geographically isolated and the population will work with their compatriots against Russia. Already, the Ukrainians must be building up substantial forces inside the city and having friendly civilians marking up Russian defensive positions and routines. Expect to see it fall rather suddenly.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @A123

  198. @Barbarossa
    @Mr. Hack


    being the teacher, principal and head bureaucrat of your own little home school
     
    Well, I'm afraid I can claim no such honor. That's almost exclusively my wife's domain. I keep quite busy with making the money and doing the fixing and building, but that division is just fine because she really enjoys teaching and is really very gifted at it.

    I don't think I'm hiding my head in the sand at all. It's perfectly possible to hold a country accountable for war crimes without it entailing the term genocide.

    It is obvious that you are eager to use the term genocide because you are a staunch Ukrainian partisan and deeply dislike Putin. I think it's fair to say that you would derive great satisfaction from Putin's Russia being slapped with the term genocidal.

    I'm not sure that this is justified though because while there have been civilian casualties and instances of horrific behavior by Russian troops, there certainly doesn't appear to be any systematic Russian attempt to exterminate Ukrainian civilians.

    So, I think you undermine your own case by jumping to the extremely dubious charge of genocide. Certainly, it's well and good to insist that Russia and all countries conduct war in as conscientious manner as possible. However, under your criteria it would seem that virtually every war ever conducted in human history would be a genocide. Terms like genocide only have power when used judiciously. When used to make a political point they quickly loose potency.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    While the murder of innocent civilians should be considered a large factor when considering the validity of assigning the term genocide to the actions of an invading army, it’s not the only one.

    *The seizure and removal of Ukrainians, especially children, to parts of Russia far away from Ukraine, with the express purpose of Russifying these victims, with the express intent of using them as future cadres of their own society.
    * The removal of all Ukrainian literature and Ukrainian language resources in the newly conquered territories, as is being done within Kherson, including TV and radio broadcasts.
    * The complete curtailment of Ukrainian language schools, in exchange for Russian language schools, including using textbooks promoting a Russian imperial ideology.

    For completely ignoring these sorts of infractions, do I have any other reason to consider you to be anything more than a misinformed sympathizer of the Russian cause within Ukraine? I suspect that the video clip that you probably didn’t even watch within my comment above didn’t move you to consider that the word “genocide” is indeed a very appropriate term to use when assessing the motives and actions of the Russian war machine within Ukraine?

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @Mr. Hack

    For genocide to mean anything you need at least some element of mass murder on ethnic/racial/religious grounds. That doesn't seem to be happening in Ukraine.
    What you mention could maybe be seen as ethnocide, that is an attempt to destroy a culture and identity through forced assimilation and the like (I think one could argue something like that characterised late Tsarist policies, when there was a ban on publishing books in Ukrainian iirc). However, I have to ask, what exactly does it mean to "Russify" Ukrainian children from eastern Ukraine, whose native language already is Russian? This seems to be more about political and social attitudes, views of history etc. than anything in the more narrow cultural or linguistic sense.
    "Genocide" is meant to evoke Auschwitz, and other cases of mass killings, to use those symbols of absolute evil with their "Never again" imperative as moral support for certain policies and shut down debate. It may be understandable that Ukraine in its plight resorts to such tactics, but there is no obligation to uncritically accept this framing (at least not here on this discussion board, which has no influence on larger events after all).

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  199. German_reader says:
    @Mr. Hack
    @Barbarossa

    While the murder of innocent civilians should be considered a large factor when considering the validity of assigning the term genocide to the actions of an invading army, it's not the only one.

    *The seizure and removal of Ukrainians, especially children, to parts of Russia far away from Ukraine, with the express purpose of Russifying these victims, with the express intent of using them as future cadres of their own society.
    * The removal of all Ukrainian literature and Ukrainian language resources in the newly conquered territories, as is being done within Kherson, including TV and radio broadcasts.
    * The complete curtailment of Ukrainian language schools, in exchange for Russian language schools, including using textbooks promoting a Russian imperial ideology.

    For completely ignoring these sorts of infractions, do I have any other reason to consider you to be anything more than a misinformed sympathizer of the Russian cause within Ukraine? I suspect that the video clip that you probably didn't even watch within my comment above didn't move you to consider that the word "genocide" is indeed a very appropriate term to use when assessing the motives and actions of the Russian war machine within Ukraine?

    Replies: @German_reader

    For genocide to mean anything you need at least some element of mass murder on ethnic/racial/religious grounds. That doesn’t seem to be happening in Ukraine.
    What you mention could maybe be seen as ethnocide, that is an attempt to destroy a culture and identity through forced assimilation and the like (I think one could argue something like that characterised late Tsarist policies, when there was a ban on publishing books in Ukrainian iirc). However, I have to ask, what exactly does it mean to “Russify” Ukrainian children from eastern Ukraine, whose native language already is Russian? This seems to be more about political and social attitudes, views of history etc. than anything in the more narrow cultural or linguistic sense.
    “Genocide” is meant to evoke Auschwitz, and other cases of mass killings, to use those symbols of absolute evil with their “Never again” imperative as moral support for certain policies and shut down debate. It may be understandable that Ukraine in its plight resorts to such tactics, but there is no obligation to uncritically accept this framing (at least not here on this discussion board, which has no influence on larger events after all).

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @German_reader

    A lot of experts in the field strongly feel that the atrocities committed in Bucha and Irpin by the Russian military rises to the level of genocide, that the large mass graves found in the Kyiv region indicate that mass murder did occur there. This is the criteria that these experts use in making their decisions:


    What is genocide?
    Genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

    Killing members of the group;
    Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
    Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
    Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
    Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.
    Source: Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide
     
    https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/27/europe/russia-ukraine-genocide-warning-intl/index.html

    https://youtu.be/6Wl6JKkk2xQ
    Mayor of Kyiv Vitali Klitschko calls it genocide.
  200. @songbird
    Have just watched an anime that featured a flashback where a Japanese girl, then 5 y.o., ran from a concert hall, where classical music was being played, safely navigating the streets all alone, on her own, back to her parents' bakery.

    Anyway, it may be because the story was something of a tearjerker, and it moved my cold heart. But I don't care: I say do whatever it takes, to bring us back to that point!

    Whatever it takes... nuke the boomers, if it is necessary!!!
    ☢️💣🔥🧓 😎

    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⠟⠿⠿⣿⣿⠿⠛⠛⠻⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⠿⠟⠛⠛⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠉⠀⠀⠀⠉⠛⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⡟⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠉⢿⣿
    ⣿⡿⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸⣿
    ⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢀⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣀⣠⣾⣿
    ⣿⣿⣄⡀⢀⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣠⣤⣤⣴⠿⠿⣦⣄⣀⣀⣴⣄⡀⠀⠀⣠⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣶⠶⠟⠋⠈⠉⠀⠀⠀⠀⠉⠉⠉⠁⠉⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣤⣴⣷⣤⣀⣠⣶⣄⣀⣴⣶⣤⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠉⠈⢹⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠿⠟⠛⠛⠛⠛⠉⠀⠀⠈⠙⠛⠛⠛⠛⠿⠿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⡏⠀⣤⣶⣶⣾⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠘⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣶⣦⡄⠈⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣦⣄⣈⣉⠉⠛⠛⠛⠀⠀⠀⠀⠙⠛⠛⠋⢉⣉⣠⣤⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠋⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣭⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣬⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿

    Replies: @songbird, @Mikel

    Am sure that people have heard of this, but…

    https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2022/apr/07/old-enough-the-japanese-tv-show-that-abandons-toddlers-on-public-transport

    Supposedly, in the state of Illinois you can’t be left home alone until you are 14. In Mississippi it is 12.

  201. @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    However, I think that there are really only two viable choices to reducing carbon footprint; either drastically scaling back consumption and relying on renewables or embracing nuclear to maintain the pace of consumption that we’ve become accustomed to.
     
    I agree. Sadly, the green movement is infested with these "degrowth" types. The more honest of them admit that we would all have to take a massive hit to our living standards (we're talking 80-90% less energy consumption per capita) if their theories are to be followed.

    The less honest - and more slimy - types will typically say that 3rd world countries can't use coal and that rich countries should slowly decarbonise. The implication is that most of the adjustment should fall on the poorest in the world.

    Personally, I don't believe in stagnation. I'm fundamentally optimistic about the future and humanity's capacity to constantly innovate ourselves out of problems.

    I think most doomsday scenarios, whether leftoid (climate collapse!) or rightoid (race war!) is bunk.

    Replies: @songbird, @niceland, @Yellowface Anon, @Barbarossa

    I agree to a limited extent that most doomsday scenarios right and left are bunk. Usually there are real systemic problems undergirding these fears but they are sensationalized to the point of parody.

    I think there is cause for some pessimism though and I have far less faith than you in humanity’s ability to innovate ourselves out of the corners that we’ve painted ourselves in. First and foremost because there seems to be precious little political or societal will to actually admit or engage with the true nature of the problems. Instead, things just progress on auto-pilot with little attempt to change course.

    One example would be the collapse of Western society. This often gets described in apocalyptic terms as a singular event or series of events. However, we are already living in that reality of decline. It’s been going on for decades, but it’s a slow process which tends to sneak up on people. When one compares the social and political state of America 30 years to today it becomes clear that the decline is quite real.

    A similar statement could be made about the environment. Environmentalist fantasies of humanity reducing the Earth to a lifeless ball are extremely extravagant, but all the same we are using up aquifers in California or Nevada at an alarming rate, burning up valuable topsoil with extractive farming techniques et cetera. These will make our lives quite a bit harder in the long term and there is really nothing being done to change course.

    Perhaps humanity is technically capable of innovating our way out of our issues, but collectively we seem to be operating very stupidly and that gives me little confidence that we will actually do so.

    • Agree: German_reader
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    However, we are already living in that reality of decline. It’s been going on for decades, but it’s a slow process which tends to sneak up on people. When one compares the social and political state of America 30 years to today it becomes clear that the decline is quite real.
     
    I think that what constitutes "decline" will vary depending on who you speak to. For many on the right, this includes social factors e.g. the acceptance of LGBT people or feminism. I would say that these are really political preferences rather than objective metrics.

    That said, America is a negative outlier in some ways. That cannot be denied.

    https://ourworldindata.org/uploads/2020/10/LE-vs-Health-Exp-2020-version.png

    As an American, you're in a better position to answer why this is the case than I am. Personally, my guess is that there are some unique factors at play here that aren't easily generalisable. I would say the same thing about mass shootings that also seem to be an American problem. (Gun availability is quite high in some European countries like Switzerland or Finland, yet they don't suffer these same pathologies).

    The world as a whole has certainly gotten more peaceful, prosperous and tolerant, despite occasional setbacks. I see no apparent reason why it wouldn't continue.


    Environmentalist fantasies of humanity reducing the Earth to a lifeless ball are extremely extravagant, but all the same we are using up aquifers in California or Nevada at an alarming rate, burning up valuable topsoil with extractive farming techniques et cetera. These will make our lives quite a bit harder in the long term and there is really nothing being done to change course.
     
    I thoroughly agree. I want to stress that I do identify as an environmentalist. I've changed my diet partly due to climate concerns but also for moral reasons (after you learn the intricate details of factory farming, it's hard not to). I've given up fossil fuel transportation to the greatest extent that I can, except long-distance travel where I still have to take an airplane, naturally climate-compensated for every trip. I'm involved in local groups to make Stockholm climate-neutral even faster than our official 2040 goal.

    I was simply criticising the "degrowth" ideology that presupposes that we can condemn the poor of this world to eternal destitute while we, in the rich world, can slowly but insignificantly lower our carbon footprint and thereby not make any serious sacrifices. It's a fantasy that would be paid by those who can least afford it, which is monstrous.

    The world as a whole will certainly see a worsening climate going forward. Let's be clear about that. But the apocalyptic prophecies should be treated with the caution they deserve.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @A123, @Barbarossa

  202. @LatW
    @Mr. Hack


    It’ll be looked upon in history as a Ukrainian form of genocide
     
    Yes, it is that (or possibly, if one cares about terms, an ethnocide or erasure of identity that quickly and inevitably turned into a genocide although I wouldn't put it past it that someone in the Moscovite military may have had this intention already before Feb 24). The language has been genocidal for a long time now (calling on national TV for mass deportation, "re-education camps", sterilization, etc.). Yep, welcome to 2022!

    What is peculiar, though, is that this massive violence is also directed at Russophones, against that special new Russophone identity that I mentioned a few threads back. As it obviously constitutes a danger to the Moscovite side.

    Btw, did you hear that the Moscovites stole some ancient Scythian items?


    And the lesson for Russia's neighbors here is how fast it is happening. In Kherson they are already forcing the Russian curriculum on kids. From what I've heard, the people of Kherson are resisting quite bravely.

    What is more important here, Mr Hack, is that, yes, voicing this and recording the crimes is very important (as well as making the world hear about them). But, if you look at it in abstract, it's just data. So what are we going to do about it? The Ukrainian men who are out there are bringing the perpetrators to accountability, as much as they can. They will be deciding the fate of Ukraine.

    However, the catastrophe is so immense that we, friends of Ukraine and Ukrainians themselves, have to do much more. Ideally, for every killed Ukrainian there should be a newborn child that will be raised as a Ukrainian. For every demolished church or cultural center, a new cultural center should be built somewhere in the West or Central Ukraine. Yes, it seems a bit unrealistic. But other things can be done as well, and these need to go beyond donations. More projects need to be started, no matter how small. I encourage you to think about this, Mr Hack. Even publishing a small, new book in Ukrainian language is worth it now.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I agree with everything you write, and am glad to consider you as a friend of the Ukrainian nation. If it weren’t for the support of America, the Baltic States, Great Britain and Poland, the Ukrainian situation would be much harder to bear. Thanks to you all!

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Mr. Hack

    Thanks to you as well. Let us keep going and let us not stop.

    I want to extend a special thanks to the great poet of your nation, the Kobzar, who birthed one of my most favorite and inspirational phrases.

    I can only compare this to the laconic words of the Spartans themselves:

    Борітеся — поборете!

    Fight, and thou shalt prevail!

    , @LondonBob
    @Mr. Hack

    Nope, you would have taken the peace deal offered in Turkey and everyone would have been better off.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack

  203. @Mikhail
    @Thulean Friend

    As quoted in Western masc media, the Franco-German contingent expressed concern over the Russian treatment of POWs. If true, Putin was given the opportunity to bust on their hypocritical concern.

    I understand that Germany has a law on Nazi symbols. Does that apply to tattoos among other expressions of Nazi sympathy utilized by some of the Kiev regime forces?

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    As quoted in Western masc media, the Franco-German contingent expressed concern over the Russian treatment of POWs. If true, Putin was given the opportunity to bust on their hypocritical concern.

    I understand that Germany has a law on Nazi symbols. Does that apply to tattoos among other expressions of Nazi sympathy utilized by some of the Kiev regime forces?

    That’s an interesting point that I haven’t seen brought up elsewhere. However, even Nazis deserve some basic human protection under intl law, IMO. I don’t want to see a degeneration into a law of the jungle.

    Too bad nobody seems to care about the law, as even Greece is conducting outright piracy against Iranian vessels under the prodding of the US. The Iranians realise it is futile to complain to international organs, since they are often controlled or veto-blocked by the US, so they took two as revenge. Russian’s FX reserves were outright stolen.

    We’re seeing that behind all the lofty rhetoric of “rules-based order”, simple gangsterism still reigns.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Thulean Friend

    Case in point, Switzerland complying with the sanctions on Russia and freezing Russian oligarchs' funds. It's both a breach of banking confidentiality (that ought to be abolished however for transparency) and more importantly a violation of their own neutrality. Even if they might find it somewhat moral, it is catastrophic to their banking business to every owner of wealth outside of the Western orbit.

    , @A123
    @Thulean Friend


    outright piracy against Iranian vessels under the prodding of the US. The Iranians realise it is futile to complain to international organs
    ...
    We’re seeing that behind all the lofty rhetoric of “rules-based order”, simple gangsterism still reigns.
     
    Iran jettisoned “rules-based order” when it abrogated JCPOA. This occurred during Obama's administration, long before Trump took office. The level of hypocrisy from the Iranian theocracy is amazing but not expected. Sociopaths, like Khamenei, are incapable of shame. They only care about their own aggrandizement.

    China twisted “rules-based order” into knots via organizations like the WTO. Rules about "developing countries" were intended to help the poorest nations, not economic super powers.

    Highly biased “rules-based order” is weighted against U.S. citizens.

    America needs to stand up and refuse to be exploited by One World Government / NWO gangsterism. The UN should be abolished sooner rather than later. It has created more violence, pain, suffering, and death than it has prevented.

    PEACE 😇
  204. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @German_reader

    The Japanese language is genetically and linguistically vastly different from Chinese, though has extensive borrowing from Chinese (The Chinese also later borrowed extensive vocabulary from the Japanese).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasei-kango

    The Japanese script is about 60 to 80 percent Chinese characters. Kublai Khan issued his ultimatum to Japan in Classical Chinese. Sun and his Japanese colleagues communicated in written Chinese without knowing each other's languages. Classical Chinese poetry was and remains highly prestigious in Japanese culture:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanshi_(poetry)

    The Japanese narrative as summarized by you also looks no less agenda-driven
    This is true. But it deserves to to told. The party that actually did almost all of the fighting against Japan, KMT, enjoyed good relations with her post-WW2,

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan–Taiwan_relations

    Lest it leads to pointless misunderstandings. Like here, Ukraine managed to offend both Japan and China simultaneously. It was totally inappropriate to compare Hirohito to Hitler from a historian's perspective. Hirohito was only a minor part of Japanese war-time decision-making.

    https://www.welt.de/politik/ausland/article238366557/Ukraine-entschuldigt-sich-fuer-Vergleich-von-Kaiser-Hirohito-mit-Hitler.html

    Replies: @German_reader, @Yellowface Anon

    Ukraine managed to offend both Japan and China simultaneously.

    Like how? I don’t follow the context of this well.

  205. @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend

    I agree to a limited extent that most doomsday scenarios right and left are bunk. Usually there are real systemic problems undergirding these fears but they are sensationalized to the point of parody.

    I think there is cause for some pessimism though and I have far less faith than you in humanity's ability to innovate ourselves out of the corners that we've painted ourselves in. First and foremost because there seems to be precious little political or societal will to actually admit or engage with the true nature of the problems. Instead, things just progress on auto-pilot with little attempt to change course.

    One example would be the collapse of Western society. This often gets described in apocalyptic terms as a singular event or series of events. However, we are already living in that reality of decline. It's been going on for decades, but it's a slow process which tends to sneak up on people. When one compares the social and political state of America 30 years to today it becomes clear that the decline is quite real.

    A similar statement could be made about the environment. Environmentalist fantasies of humanity reducing the Earth to a lifeless ball are extremely extravagant, but all the same we are using up aquifers in California or Nevada at an alarming rate, burning up valuable topsoil with extractive farming techniques et cetera. These will make our lives quite a bit harder in the long term and there is really nothing being done to change course.

    Perhaps humanity is technically capable of innovating our way out of our issues, but collectively we seem to be operating very stupidly and that gives me little confidence that we will actually do so.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    However, we are already living in that reality of decline. It’s been going on for decades, but it’s a slow process which tends to sneak up on people. When one compares the social and political state of America 30 years to today it becomes clear that the decline is quite real.

    I think that what constitutes “decline” will vary depending on who you speak to. For many on the right, this includes social factors e.g. the acceptance of LGBT people or feminism. I would say that these are really political preferences rather than objective metrics.

    That said, America is a negative outlier in some ways. That cannot be denied.

    As an American, you’re in a better position to answer why this is the case than I am. Personally, my guess is that there are some unique factors at play here that aren’t easily generalisable. I would say the same thing about mass shootings that also seem to be an American problem. (Gun availability is quite high in some European countries like Switzerland or Finland, yet they don’t suffer these same pathologies).

    The world as a whole has certainly gotten more peaceful, prosperous and tolerant, despite occasional setbacks. I see no apparent reason why it wouldn’t continue.

    Environmentalist fantasies of humanity reducing the Earth to a lifeless ball are extremely extravagant, but all the same we are using up aquifers in California or Nevada at an alarming rate, burning up valuable topsoil with extractive farming techniques et cetera. These will make our lives quite a bit harder in the long term and there is really nothing being done to change course.

    I thoroughly agree. I want to stress that I do identify as an environmentalist. I’ve changed my diet partly due to climate concerns but also for moral reasons (after you learn the intricate details of factory farming, it’s hard not to). I’ve given up fossil fuel transportation to the greatest extent that I can, except long-distance travel where I still have to take an airplane, naturally climate-compensated for every trip. I’m involved in local groups to make Stockholm climate-neutral even faster than our official 2040 goal.

    I was simply criticising the “degrowth” ideology that presupposes that we can condemn the poor of this world to eternal destitute while we, in the rich world, can slowly but insignificantly lower our carbon footprint and thereby not make any serious sacrifices. It’s a fantasy that would be paid by those who can least afford it, which is monstrous.

    The world as a whole will certainly see a worsening climate going forward. Let’s be clear about that. But the apocalyptic prophecies should be treated with the caution they deserve.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
    @Thulean Friend


    The world as a whole has certainly gotten more peaceful, prosperous and tolerant, despite occasional setbacks. I see no apparent reason why it wouldn’t continue.
     
    This is true, much of the world still has some way to go before reaching the level of the advanced democracies in the 2000s, but looks like in one way and another it is heading in that direction.

    Question is, what tendencies are developing in the most advanced democracies?

    It seems like tolerance is in decline, but we are not seeing the kind of masculine intolerance suggestive of vitality and capacity for creative confrontation, more the bovine feminine kind, enforced by bands of overbearing female primary school teachers.

    These societies are peaceful, but this is like the placidity and inertia of the obese or people bed ridden with illness. The absence of children can mean it feels something like the prequel to the quiet of the grave.

    There is almost ridiculous prosperity in places, but much of it inherited, no longer really due to creative labour, creativity and novelty often has to be imported from abroad (from places that are less feminist, more ethnocentric, more intolerant of male homosexuals).

    There were always concerns about the potential mediocrity and triviality of democratic man, but the potential for the empowerment of women and pathic men to lead to long term social/cultural stagnation and widespread sterility was imo under recognised.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @A123
    @Thulean Friend


    America is a negative outlier in some ways. That cannot be denied.
    [Life Expectancy vs. Health Expenditure]

    As an American, you’re in a better position to answer why this is the case than I am. Personally, my guess is that there are some unique factors at play here that aren’t easily generalisable
     
    The left hand axis starts at 70 Years Old. While that makes for a less compressed image, it also makes the disparity appear larger than it actually is. The actual spread is 2 or 3 years.

    Youth deaths have a huge impact on Life Expectancy. Presumably, the key factors here are largely the intersection of unwed mothers and poverty:

     
    https://cichprofile.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/International_E_5.3.7.jpg
     

    The U.S. is a top performer for Life Expectancy, if one limits the calculation to the cohort who make it to 25 or older.
    _____

    On the spending side -- In the U.S., ~50% of an individual's Total Lifetime Health Expenditure occurs in the last 6 months of life. If one does not have advance decrees in place, it is very easy for futile efforts to chew up huge dollars.

    Lawsuit risk is another key contributing factor. Private medical practices have logical reasons to engage in "Defensive Medicine", such as additional testing to rule out low probability issues.

    I would say the same thing about mass shootings that also seem to be an American problem. (Gun availability is quite high in some European countries like Switzerland or Finland, yet they don’t suffer these same pathologies).
     
    Mass shootings are actually quite uncommon in the U.S. as well. The Fake Stream Media are huge supporters of gun confiscation, much like Hitler's efforts in the 1930's. This leads to massive coverage raging against the U.S. Constitution. I suspect this leads to 'copycat' occurrences, which are then also hyper-covered.

     
    https://images.angelpub.com/2013/03/17906/death-by-weapon-type-chart.png
     

    Reducing mass shootings in the U.S. would require Press Control -not- Gun Control. If the Constitution is flexible, we might as well flex the 1st Amendment... Right?

    After all.... U.S. Media MegaCorporations are repeating Hitler's position. That makes them "Literally Nazis". Who could oppose Nazi Control?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend

    Even leaving aside the ideological and political preferences that you mention, I think that there is alarming and notable decline in the United States. This dovetails with the response that I need to get back to Mikel as well.

    While the US is a very wealthy country the distribution is getting more and more unequal. I believe that during Covid it will turn out to be perhaps the largest transfer of wealth upward in recent history. As the middle class gets increasingly squeezed downward it creates far more desperation and hopelessness as the reality of maintaining economic position, much less advancing it, appears increasingly impossible. The reality is that upward mobility in the US is now largely dead and the moneyed classes have largely reached a point where they can perpetuate advantages to their offspring in an increasingly insular world.

    The jobs which once were the stepping stones into the middle class and modest asset creation have largely disappeared. My area is haunted by the memories of the once proud and sufficient family farms and the stable industrial jobs which gave people like my grandparents a comfortable place in the middle class. Faced by that void in opportunity many just check out and succumb to despair. I see it all around me and my area is fairly typical of a great portion of the country.

    Another worrying sign of decline is in education. American public education is truly largely a farce at this point. Schools have endless ways to fudge the stats to make it look like they are doing a better job than they are, but the real life results are grim. It's becoming a regular occurrence for high school graduates to have essentially no basic literacy and math skills. Things like writing a cohesive paragraph with proper spelling and grammar or knowing multiplication tables is increasingly completely lacking in high school graduates.

    Colleges are doing more and more remediation, essentially having to re-teach high school or even grade school concepts to give their students a semblance of readiness. It's going to be (and already is) a disaster in employment. The trades are still dominated by 55 to 65 year old guys who are rapidly aging out of the workforce. There are so few capable young people to take over, that those who can hack it will do extremely well, but there are countless more who are nearly unemployable even as unskilled labor. In five to ten years, this dynamic will be extremely acute.

    Real environmental issues go completely unaddressed. The American West is running out of water in a big way and this poses some intractable problems for a large share of agriculture. Florida too is running into seawater intrusion as it's aquifers are drawn down unsustainably. Even in the fertile Midwest topsoil is being consumed at an alarming rate. Instead of real retrenchment we get politicians who want to sell us on a magical thinking solar panel future. We get massive subsidized solar farms in NY; an area with the worst solar resource in the country.

    On degrowth, I think that we actually could use a lot less energy without impacting our quality of life. So much consumption is purely wasteful, much of this waste by design to keep the economic hamster wheel turning. Conservation should be a huge push, but this is politically and economically unpalatable.

    Fundamentally, I think that world has arguably gotten more prosperous and tolerant under the umbrella of plentiful and cheap energy and resources and consumption. I think we are going to end up increasingly pinched in these regards and because the political classes have failed to engage the problems seriously no realistic solutions have been advanced. The lower classes can be kept happy with a larger TV and the newest cell phone for a while but once it becomes hard to afford food or heat the house it will get uglier. It's same dynamic which saw increased wheat prices fuel the Arab Spring, but coming increasingly for developed countries.

    I understand your horror of factory farming, by the way. When I got married my wife was a vegetarian and I joined her somewhat ambivalently for a while. We ended up believing that the "how" of what you eat is more important than the "what" and that informed quite a bit of our choice to come out to the middle of nowhere and have animals. Grass and animals are the original solar power, after all! It's actually really interesting how managing our land for livestock has also increased the wild biodiversity greatly. It doesn't have to be a zero sum game, but humans often make it that.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @AP

  206. LatW says:
    @Mr. Hack
    @LatW

    I agree with everything you write, and am glad to consider you as a friend of the Ukrainian nation. If it weren't for the support of America, the Baltic States, Great Britain and Poland, the Ukrainian situation would be much harder to bear. Thanks to you all!

    Replies: @LatW, @LondonBob

    Thanks to you as well. Let us keep going and let us not stop.

    I want to extend a special thanks to the great poet of your nation, the Kobzar, who birthed one of my most favorite and inspirational phrases.

    I can only compare this to the laconic words of the Spartans themselves:

    Борітеся — поборете!

    Fight, and thou shalt prevail!

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • LOL: Mikhail
  207. @Thulean Friend
    Got into a debate about the patriotism of Russian minorities with Dmitry some time ago.

    I argued their disproportionate share of soldiers (and burden of casualties) suggests a high degree of patriotism, given lack of civil unrest and continued enthusiasm. Dmitry's take was that it is purely driven by economic desperation and they often have resentful attitudes towards Russia.

    Judge for yourself:

    https://twitter.com/Russ_Warrior/status/1530627871257264128

    To my eyes, Russia seems like a fairly successful country at galvanizing minorities for their imperial objectives.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    Minorities in the Western sense does not translate across to Russia, which is a very large country with indigenous groups in certain regions.

    Not surprised by this, man needs a purpose, a shared purpose.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @LondonBob

    And what crashing depression will happen when they realise that Russia has no purpose in Ukraine?

    Or can you name one?

    Please try to be concrete, specific and realistic.

    SMART is a useful acronym.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Craig Nelsen

  208. @German_reader
    https://asiatimes.com/2022/05/ukraine-war-momentum-shifting-in-russias-favor/?fbclid=IwAR2cYeN5NYWwpXN6-YV5N8xvlJ6OfjY8Y4zunobfiJ1106FmRGsxfLqheSY

    Alarming prediction near the end:

    Elsewhere, there are indications that Russia is preparing for a renewed assault on Mykolaiv in the south – the land gateway to the Black Sea port of Odessa. A US military source told Asia Times, without offering details, that briefers expect the latter city to fall in July.
     

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    Lol, not a chance. The “unamed military source” was likely a Twitter anon and The Asia Times is an outfit that mostly peddles geopolitical fan fiction of the Escobar or “Spengler” varieties.

    The Russian military seems to have learned what it is capable of, which is advancing about a mile a day on a single axis for a couple of weeks in a row, but there’s no reason to think that they can take a city the size of Mykolaiv opposed. Nor that they can commit the troops to try without giving up in the Donbas.

    Mariupol was surrounded in the initial shock of their invasion, and possibly by treason. Yet it took them until longer than the “end of July” from now to take it. And had Mariupol not been surrounded and cut off, Russia would still be trying or would have given up. And to be honest, they would have been crazy to even try.

    So taking Mykolaiv opposed, from within and without, would be a legendary effort by a military with marked superiority, rigorous professionalism and a much larger concentration of forces. While its geography makes it very hard to surround and invest safely.

    Russia is much more likely to lose Kherson by then. It is geographically isolated and the population will work with their compatriots against Russia. Already, the Ukrainians must be building up substantial forces inside the city and having friendly civilians marking up Russian defensive positions and routines. Expect to see it fall rather suddenly.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Both Kherson and Mykolaiv hold a special place in my heart, as I got to intimately know a large contingent of folks from these areas back in the 90's when I still lived in Minneapolis. For those that don't know, they're both relatively close to one another, and represent a large swathe of southern Ukrainian land and culture. They're a hearty lot that loves to party. I spent many good times with these folks at large banquets helping to slowly empty the over flowing table with food and drink (afterwards a trip to the dry sauna and a dip into a cool pool too). Amongst themselves, these young people would mostly converse in Russian, but deep in their hearts you could not find better Ukrainian patriots.

    I remember one time, when the host of such a gathering, a sort of non descript guy, invited me to go with him to his bedroom, because he wanted to show me something. He opened a drawer and pulled out a large collection of very old paper money notes. Some were actually czarist roubles, but about half of them were historic notes printed during the time of Petliura, the famous leader of the UNR. In his heavily Russified voice, he tried to tell me in Ukrainian how proud his grandfather had been that he was able to fight on the side of the Ukrainians, because some of the worst tragedies of the revolution and later the Holodomor had taken place within southern Ukraine. Don't count the denizens of this southern zone out, most of them harbour a loving heart towards Ukraine, and there's absolutely nothing that the Russians have done since February 26 that has endeared them towards these people. NOTHING!

    , @A123
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Russia is much more likely to lose Kherson by then. It is geographically isolated
     
    Kherson is fully enveloped, not geographically isolated. The flat and open terrain near the Black Sea is highly favourable to Russia forces. Resupply via Crimea is quite straightforward.

    How will any Ukrainian offensive:
        • Ford the navigable ship channel south of Mykolaiv?
        • Advance over open land to assault Kherson?

    Avoiding the ship channel would generate a highly predictable, one dimensional attack from the North.

    Either option would result in massive Ukrainian casualties and offer little hope of success.
    _____

    Zelensky's best option remains a negotiated armistice. At this point, keeping the Black Sea port of Odessa would certainly be included.

    Trying to negotiate after Ukraine becomes landlocked is simply too late. Moldova could be won over by swapping Transnistria for a land corridor adjacent to Romania that would provide Black Sea access.

    PEACE 😇

     
    https://www.understandingwar.org/sites/default/files/Kherson-Mykolaiv%20Battle%20Map%20Draft%20May%2029%2C2022.png

  209. @LondonBob
    @Thulean Friend

    Minorities in the Western sense does not translate across to Russia, which is a very large country with indigenous groups in certain regions.

    https://twitter.com/DimitriASimes/status/1530664696226926593?s=20&t=lefMId-7w5eTw3Fi8I4kkA

    Not surprised by this, man needs a purpose, a shared purpose.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    And what crashing depression will happen when they realise that Russia has no purpose in Ukraine?

    Or can you name one?

    Please try to be concrete, specific and realistic.

    SMART is a useful acronym.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Triteleia Laxa

    They can switch grain exports On/off at will. No purpose?

    , @Craig Nelsen
    @Triteleia Laxa


    they realise that Russia has no purpose in Ukraine?
    Or can you name one? Please try to be concrete, specific and realistic.
     
    Oh, I don't know, Trite. Just off the top of my head I can think of a few like, say, PREVENTING US/KHAZAR BIOWEAPONS PROGRAMS ON THEIR BORDERS

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  210. @Mr. Hack
    @LatW

    I agree with everything you write, and am glad to consider you as a friend of the Ukrainian nation. If it weren't for the support of America, the Baltic States, Great Britain and Poland, the Ukrainian situation would be much harder to bear. Thanks to you all!

    Replies: @LatW, @LondonBob

    Nope, you would have taken the peace deal offered in Turkey and everyone would have been better off.

    • Agree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @LondonBob

    Better yet, the Minsk Protocol could've been implemented, with a neutrality pledge before the alternative independence recognition and follow-up military action was taken.

    Still better, would've been to respect the internationally brokered power sharing arrangement, instead of launching a coup that put in place a disproportionate number of nationalist anti-Russian elements - with the response being Crimea's reunification with Russia and rebellion in Donbass.

    , @Mr. Hack
    @LondonBob

    The only thing that a gun running Turk could offer the Ukrainians of any value, is to sell them many more bakhtiar drone missiles, a fines weapon that has helped Ukraine rid itself of unwanted guests. Oh, and to keep the Dardanelles closed, helping to shield the Ukrainians from additional moskal boats. Once the Ukrainians destroy the remaining Russian ships, have destroyed the bridge to Crimea, then they can let the remainder in for further destruction.

    Replies: @sher singh, @LondonBob, @Wokechoke

  211. @LondonBob
    @Mr. Hack

    Nope, you would have taken the peace deal offered in Turkey and everyone would have been better off.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack

    Better yet, the Minsk Protocol could’ve been implemented, with a neutrality pledge before the alternative independence recognition and follow-up military action was taken.

    Still better, would’ve been to respect the internationally brokered power sharing arrangement, instead of launching a coup that put in place a disproportionate number of nationalist anti-Russian elements – with the response being Crimea’s reunification with Russia and rebellion in Donbass.

    • Troll: Mr. Hack
  212. @216
    @sudden death

    Did they paint the GayPride, BLM and TroonPride flag on that drone?

    Because that's the causes which it is actually being used for.

    Replies: @sudden death

    Are you really the cuck type who would gladly watch your own woman being raped by foreign invader as long as you gullibly believe propaganda image of his leader allegedly being “antihomo racist”?

    • Replies: @LatW
    @sudden death


    Are you really the cuck type who would gladly watch your own woman being raped by foreign invader as long as you gullibly believe propaganda image of his leader allegedly being “antihomo racist”?
     
    I'm starting to suspect that some of them really wouldn't fight against a foreign invader (or wouldn't be able to). It's just that in their case there isn't one, so they can remain comfortable and untouched in their cowardliness. They might even not object to their women being abused, since those women are "feminists" anyway. That's how far some of the relationships have deteriorated.

    As to the big internal globohomo enemy, it's all just talk. Very few act like real trads.

    Replies: @German_reader, @216

  213. @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    However, we are already living in that reality of decline. It’s been going on for decades, but it’s a slow process which tends to sneak up on people. When one compares the social and political state of America 30 years to today it becomes clear that the decline is quite real.
     
    I think that what constitutes "decline" will vary depending on who you speak to. For many on the right, this includes social factors e.g. the acceptance of LGBT people or feminism. I would say that these are really political preferences rather than objective metrics.

    That said, America is a negative outlier in some ways. That cannot be denied.

    https://ourworldindata.org/uploads/2020/10/LE-vs-Health-Exp-2020-version.png

    As an American, you're in a better position to answer why this is the case than I am. Personally, my guess is that there are some unique factors at play here that aren't easily generalisable. I would say the same thing about mass shootings that also seem to be an American problem. (Gun availability is quite high in some European countries like Switzerland or Finland, yet they don't suffer these same pathologies).

    The world as a whole has certainly gotten more peaceful, prosperous and tolerant, despite occasional setbacks. I see no apparent reason why it wouldn't continue.


    Environmentalist fantasies of humanity reducing the Earth to a lifeless ball are extremely extravagant, but all the same we are using up aquifers in California or Nevada at an alarming rate, burning up valuable topsoil with extractive farming techniques et cetera. These will make our lives quite a bit harder in the long term and there is really nothing being done to change course.
     
    I thoroughly agree. I want to stress that I do identify as an environmentalist. I've changed my diet partly due to climate concerns but also for moral reasons (after you learn the intricate details of factory farming, it's hard not to). I've given up fossil fuel transportation to the greatest extent that I can, except long-distance travel where I still have to take an airplane, naturally climate-compensated for every trip. I'm involved in local groups to make Stockholm climate-neutral even faster than our official 2040 goal.

    I was simply criticising the "degrowth" ideology that presupposes that we can condemn the poor of this world to eternal destitute while we, in the rich world, can slowly but insignificantly lower our carbon footprint and thereby not make any serious sacrifices. It's a fantasy that would be paid by those who can least afford it, which is monstrous.

    The world as a whole will certainly see a worsening climate going forward. Let's be clear about that. But the apocalyptic prophecies should be treated with the caution they deserve.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @A123, @Barbarossa

    The world as a whole has certainly gotten more peaceful, prosperous and tolerant, despite occasional setbacks. I see no apparent reason why it wouldn’t continue.

    This is true, much of the world still has some way to go before reaching the level of the advanced democracies in the 2000s, but looks like in one way and another it is heading in that direction.

    Question is, what tendencies are developing in the most advanced democracies?

    It seems like tolerance is in decline, but we are not seeing the kind of masculine intolerance suggestive of vitality and capacity for creative confrontation, more the bovine feminine kind, enforced by bands of overbearing female primary school teachers.

    These societies are peaceful, but this is like the placidity and inertia of the obese or people bed ridden with illness. The absence of children can mean it feels something like the prequel to the quiet of the grave.

    There is almost ridiculous prosperity in places, but much of it inherited, no longer really due to creative labour, creativity and novelty often has to be imported from abroad (from places that are less feminist, more ethnocentric, more intolerant of male homosexuals).

    There were always concerns about the potential mediocrity and triviality of democratic man, but the potential for the empowerment of women and pathic men to lead to long term social/cultural stagnation and widespread sterility was imo under recognised.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Coconuts


    It seems like tolerance is in decline, but we are not seeing the kind of masculine intolerance suggestive of vitality and capacity for creative confrontation, more the bovine feminine kind, enforced by bands of overbearing female primary school teachers.
     
    That's a very manoid-centric conception of the universe, where conflict has to be concomitant to progress. Women have a more co-operative way of thinking and the feminisation of the world is easily one of the best social outcomes humanity can wish for.

    There is almost ridiculous prosperity in places, but much of it inherited, no longer really due to creative labour, creativity and novelty often has to be imported from abroad (from places that are less feminist, more ethnocentric, more intolerant of male homosexuals).
     
    Last I checked, countries with a high share of toxic masculinity (e.g. MENA region) are largely innovative wastelands. Not surprisingly, in the country with highest innovative capacity in region, Israel, women have by far the best rights and have made the greatest advances - though that will be threatened in the future by Haredi fundamentalism. On the other hand, Arab youth are secularising fast and there is an understanding among many Arab intellectuals that they have to change with regards to women's rights.
  214. @Thulean Friend
    @Mikhail


    As quoted in Western masc media, the Franco-German contingent expressed concern over the Russian treatment of POWs. If true, Putin was given the opportunity to bust on their hypocritical concern.

    I understand that Germany has a law on Nazi symbols. Does that apply to tattoos among other expressions of Nazi sympathy utilized by some of the Kiev regime forces?

     

    That's an interesting point that I haven't seen brought up elsewhere. However, even Nazis deserve some basic human protection under intl law, IMO. I don't want to see a degeneration into a law of the jungle.

    Too bad nobody seems to care about the law, as even Greece is conducting outright piracy against Iranian vessels under the prodding of the US. The Iranians realise it is futile to complain to international organs, since they are often controlled or veto-blocked by the US, so they took two as revenge. Russian's FX reserves were outright stolen.

    We're seeing that behind all the lofty rhetoric of "rules-based order", simple gangsterism still reigns.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @A123

    Case in point, Switzerland complying with the sanctions on Russia and freezing Russian oligarchs’ funds. It’s both a breach of banking confidentiality (that ought to be abolished however for transparency) and more importantly a violation of their own neutrality. Even if they might find it somewhat moral, it is catastrophic to their banking business to every owner of wealth outside of the Western orbit.

  215. @LondonBob
    @Mr. Hack

    Nope, you would have taken the peace deal offered in Turkey and everyone would have been better off.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack

    The only thing that a gun running Turk could offer the Ukrainians of any value, is to sell them many more bakhtiar drone missiles, a fines weapon that has helped Ukraine rid itself of unwanted guests. Oh, and to keep the Dardanelles closed, helping to shield the Ukrainians from additional moskal boats. Once the Ukrainians destroy the remaining Russian ships, have destroyed the bridge to Crimea, then they can let the remainder in for further destruction.

    • Troll: Mikhail
    • Replies: @sher singh
    @Mr. Hack

    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/945006882035212288/980651068599980092/unknown.png

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @LondonBob
    @Mr. Hack

    https://twitter.com/powerfultakes/status/1523698616065740801?s=20&t=7jcI6F3AwLEvGfBdleZk8A

    Replies: @sudden death, @German_reader, @Mr. Hack

    , @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    You mean Ukraine is beholden strategically to the Turk? Good to see you admit it.

  216. @Mr. Hack
    @LondonBob

    The only thing that a gun running Turk could offer the Ukrainians of any value, is to sell them many more bakhtiar drone missiles, a fines weapon that has helped Ukraine rid itself of unwanted guests. Oh, and to keep the Dardanelles closed, helping to shield the Ukrainians from additional moskal boats. Once the Ukrainians destroy the remaining Russian ships, have destroyed the bridge to Crimea, then they can let the remainder in for further destruction.

    Replies: @sher singh, @LondonBob, @Wokechoke

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @sher singh

    Why are you muttering your stupid banalities towards me?

    What does anything that you've written have anything to do with the situation in Ukraine vis-a-vis Turkey?

  217. @Triteleia Laxa
    @German_reader

    Lol, not a chance. The "unamed military source" was likely a Twitter anon and The Asia Times is an outfit that mostly peddles geopolitical fan fiction of the Escobar or "Spengler" varieties.

    The Russian military seems to have learned what it is capable of, which is advancing about a mile a day on a single axis for a couple of weeks in a row, but there's no reason to think that they can take a city the size of Mykolaiv opposed. Nor that they can commit the troops to try without giving up in the Donbas.

    Mariupol was surrounded in the initial shock of their invasion, and possibly by treason. Yet it took them until longer than the "end of July" from now to take it. And had Mariupol not been surrounded and cut off, Russia would still be trying or would have given up. And to be honest, they would have been crazy to even try.

    So taking Mykolaiv opposed, from within and without, would be a legendary effort by a military with marked superiority, rigorous professionalism and a much larger concentration of forces. While its geography makes it very hard to surround and invest safely.

    Russia is much more likely to lose Kherson by then. It is geographically isolated and the population will work with their compatriots against Russia. Already, the Ukrainians must be building up substantial forces inside the city and having friendly civilians marking up Russian defensive positions and routines. Expect to see it fall rather suddenly.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @A123

    Both Kherson and Mykolaiv hold a special place in my heart, as I got to intimately know a large contingent of folks from these areas back in the 90’s when I still lived in Minneapolis. For those that don’t know, they’re both relatively close to one another, and represent a large swathe of southern Ukrainian land and culture. They’re a hearty lot that loves to party. I spent many good times with these folks at large banquets helping to slowly empty the over flowing table with food and drink (afterwards a trip to the dry sauna and a dip into a cool pool too). Amongst themselves, these young people would mostly converse in Russian, but deep in their hearts you could not find better Ukrainian patriots.

    I remember one time, when the host of such a gathering, a sort of non descript guy, invited me to go with him to his bedroom, because he wanted to show me something. He opened a drawer and pulled out a large collection of very old paper money notes. Some were actually czarist roubles, but about half of them were historic notes printed during the time of Petliura, the famous leader of the UNR. In his heavily Russified voice, he tried to tell me in Ukrainian how proud his grandfather had been that he was able to fight on the side of the Ukrainians, because some of the worst tragedies of the revolution and later the Holodomor had taken place within southern Ukraine. Don’t count the denizens of this southern zone out, most of them harbour a loving heart towards Ukraine, and there’s absolutely nothing that the Russians have done since February 26 that has endeared them towards these people. NOTHING!

  218. @sher singh
    @Mr. Hack

    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/945006882035212288/980651068599980092/unknown.png

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Why are you muttering your stupid banalities towards me?

    What does anything that you’ve written have anything to do with the situation in Ukraine vis-a-vis Turkey?

    • LOL: sher singh
  219. @Mr. Hack
    @LondonBob

    The only thing that a gun running Turk could offer the Ukrainians of any value, is to sell them many more bakhtiar drone missiles, a fines weapon that has helped Ukraine rid itself of unwanted guests. Oh, and to keep the Dardanelles closed, helping to shield the Ukrainians from additional moskal boats. Once the Ukrainians destroy the remaining Russian ships, have destroyed the bridge to Crimea, then they can let the remainder in for further destruction.

    Replies: @sher singh, @LondonBob, @Wokechoke

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @LondonBob

    Selivanov's handlers from RF are propagating BLM&globohomo US political party black leader in their captured zones while state run media prints denazification manifesto announcing they're fighting against racism and the "highest form of Nazism being American racism", so this hypocrite who wants to kill christian Ukrainians just described nobody but himself perfectly as an enemy of a white race:

    https://twitter.com/mhmck/status/1523364027929272320?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1523364027929272320%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.unz.com%2Fcomments%2Fall%2F%3Fcommenterfilter%3Dsuddendeath

    US commie blackie tankie John Parker in military gear from the Workers World Party which is a revolutionary Marxist–Leninist political USA party that supports affirmative action as necessary in the fight for equality and it opposes all forms of racism and religious bigotry. The WWP and its affiliate Youth Against War and Fascism (YAWF) were known for their consistent defense of the Black Panthers, the Weather Underground, the Vietnam Veterans Against the War and the Puerto Rican Independence movement. The WWP was also an early advocate of gay rights.

    https://medium.com/@kravchenko_mm/what-should-russia-do-with-ukraine-translation-of-a-propaganda-article-by-a-russian-journalist-a3e92e3cb64


    ...Ukrainian Nazism is free from such “genre” norms and limitations (which are essentially a product of political technologies), it can spread freely just like a basis for any Nazism — both European and in its most developed form, the American racism.
     

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Yellowface Anon

    , @German_reader
    @LondonBob

    Stuff like this is more typical of Russian propaganda though, it's the same tired "anticolonial" nonsense as always:
    https://twitter.com/embassyofrussia/status/1398231926213906432

    As if Tsarist Russia hadn't committed actions that were similar or worse (e.g. against Circassians). Granted, there are also Western attempts to weaponize that history.

    Or this:
    https://twitter.com/mfa_russia/status/1529500757371797504?cxt=HHwWgICy7bm18LkqAAAA

    Just schizophrenic and mendacious given Russia's own imperial pretensions. Nothing to recommend here either from a white identitarian perspective.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    , @Mr. Hack
    @LondonBob

    I'm actually surprised that you're influenced by this kind of nonsense. Time for a brain tune-up?

  220. German_reader says:

    I may have to modify my views somewhat if it’s true that Germany hasn’t even delivered many light weapons to Ukraine for weeks, that would indeed by very disappointing, since the logistical and other issues here should be manageable. Scholz and his government at the very least are inept and terrible in communication.

  221. Increasing signs of Europe beginning to stand up for their own interests, even Scholz. The Jew crew in the State Department will be furious, but impotent.

  222. @LondonBob
    @Mr. Hack

    https://twitter.com/powerfultakes/status/1523698616065740801?s=20&t=7jcI6F3AwLEvGfBdleZk8A

    Replies: @sudden death, @German_reader, @Mr. Hack

    Selivanov’s handlers from RF are propagating BLM&globohomo US political party black leader in their captured zones while state run media prints denazification manifesto announcing they’re fighting against racism and the “highest form of Nazism being American racism”, so this hypocrite who wants to kill christian Ukrainians just described nobody but himself perfectly as an enemy of a white race:

    US commie blackie tankie John Parker in military gear from the Workers World Party which is a revolutionary Marxist–Leninist political USA party that supports affirmative action as necessary in the fight for equality and it opposes all forms of racism and religious bigotry. The WWP and its affiliate Youth Against War and Fascism (YAWF) were known for their consistent defense of the Black Panthers, the Weather Underground, the Vietnam Veterans Against the War and the Puerto Rican Independence movement. The WWP was also an early advocate of gay rights.

    https://medium.com/@kravchenko_mm/what-should-russia-do-with-ukraine-translation-of-a-propaganda-article-by-a-russian-journalist-a3e92e3cb64

    …Ukrainian Nazism is free from such “genre” norms and limitations (which are essentially a product of political technologies), it can spread freely just like a basis for any Nazism — both European and in its most developed form, the American racism.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @sudden death

    There are low IQ and low info suckers on both sides who will be fed their own propaganda to feed their delusions, the smarter blacks like Susan Rice and Barack Obama are the ones you need to worry about. Similarly you hav the Azov types dancing to the tune of Nuland, Sherman and Blinken, and their counterparts in the Ukraine, like Kolomoisky, Zelensky and Pinchuk.

    , @Yellowface Anon
    @sudden death

    Alignment by ideology is dead!

    Replies: @sudden death, @Emil Nikola Richard

  223. @sudden death
    @LondonBob

    Selivanov's handlers from RF are propagating BLM&globohomo US political party black leader in their captured zones while state run media prints denazification manifesto announcing they're fighting against racism and the "highest form of Nazism being American racism", so this hypocrite who wants to kill christian Ukrainians just described nobody but himself perfectly as an enemy of a white race:

    https://twitter.com/mhmck/status/1523364027929272320?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1523364027929272320%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.unz.com%2Fcomments%2Fall%2F%3Fcommenterfilter%3Dsuddendeath

    US commie blackie tankie John Parker in military gear from the Workers World Party which is a revolutionary Marxist–Leninist political USA party that supports affirmative action as necessary in the fight for equality and it opposes all forms of racism and religious bigotry. The WWP and its affiliate Youth Against War and Fascism (YAWF) were known for their consistent defense of the Black Panthers, the Weather Underground, the Vietnam Veterans Against the War and the Puerto Rican Independence movement. The WWP was also an early advocate of gay rights.

    https://medium.com/@kravchenko_mm/what-should-russia-do-with-ukraine-translation-of-a-propaganda-article-by-a-russian-journalist-a3e92e3cb64


    ...Ukrainian Nazism is free from such “genre” norms and limitations (which are essentially a product of political technologies), it can spread freely just like a basis for any Nazism — both European and in its most developed form, the American racism.
     

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Yellowface Anon

    There are low IQ and low info suckers on both sides who will be fed their own propaganda to feed their delusions, the smarter blacks like Susan Rice and Barack Obama are the ones you need to worry about. Similarly you hav the Azov types dancing to the tune of Nuland, Sherman and Blinken, and their counterparts in the Ukraine, like Kolomoisky, Zelensky and Pinchuk.

  224. @sudden death
    @LondonBob

    Selivanov's handlers from RF are propagating BLM&globohomo US political party black leader in their captured zones while state run media prints denazification manifesto announcing they're fighting against racism and the "highest form of Nazism being American racism", so this hypocrite who wants to kill christian Ukrainians just described nobody but himself perfectly as an enemy of a white race:

    https://twitter.com/mhmck/status/1523364027929272320?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1523364027929272320%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.unz.com%2Fcomments%2Fall%2F%3Fcommenterfilter%3Dsuddendeath

    US commie blackie tankie John Parker in military gear from the Workers World Party which is a revolutionary Marxist–Leninist political USA party that supports affirmative action as necessary in the fight for equality and it opposes all forms of racism and religious bigotry. The WWP and its affiliate Youth Against War and Fascism (YAWF) were known for their consistent defense of the Black Panthers, the Weather Underground, the Vietnam Veterans Against the War and the Puerto Rican Independence movement. The WWP was also an early advocate of gay rights.

    https://medium.com/@kravchenko_mm/what-should-russia-do-with-ukraine-translation-of-a-propaganda-article-by-a-russian-journalist-a3e92e3cb64


    ...Ukrainian Nazism is free from such “genre” norms and limitations (which are essentially a product of political technologies), it can spread freely just like a basis for any Nazism — both European and in its most developed form, the American racism.
     

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Yellowface Anon

    Alignment by ideology is dead!

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @Yellowface Anon

    Catholic cardinal Richelieu from good old times nods in agreement ;)


    In foreign policy, his primary objective was to check the power of the Habsburg dynasty in Spain and Austria, and ensure French dominance in the Thirty Years' War that engulfed Europe. Despite suppressing French Protestants, he made alliances with Protestant states like the Kingdom of England and the Dutch Republic to achieve his goals.
     
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9a/Triple_Portrait_of_Cardinal_de_Richelieu_probably_1642%2C_Philippe_de_Champaigne.jpg

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Yellowface Anon

    There is only one single ideology remaining and it is very much alive. We all are fascists now.

  225. German_reader says:
    @LondonBob
    @Mr. Hack

    https://twitter.com/powerfultakes/status/1523698616065740801?s=20&t=7jcI6F3AwLEvGfBdleZk8A

    Replies: @sudden death, @German_reader, @Mr. Hack

    Stuff like this is more typical of Russian propaganda though, it’s the same tired “anticolonial” nonsense as always:

    As if Tsarist Russia hadn’t committed actions that were similar or worse (e.g. against Circassians). Granted, there are also Western attempts to weaponize that history.

    Or this:

    Just schizophrenic and mendacious given Russia’s own imperial pretensions. Nothing to recommend here either from a white identitarian perspective.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @German_reader

    Mere rhetoric, action is what I care about. George Soros at Davos said, "The best and perhaps only way to preserve our civilization is to defeat Putin as soon as possible. That’s the bottom line.” I don't take that seriously, except perhaps the reverse of which he implies.

    Having the Ukrainians occupy the Donbass is of no importance to me, the only people it seems to matter to are people I consider a very real threat. Look at supposed Nazi Ukraine with all the foreign 'students' they were harbouring before sending on their way West, Russia wasn't and isn't doing that.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  226. @Yellowface Anon
    @sudden death

    Alignment by ideology is dead!

    Replies: @sudden death, @Emil Nikola Richard

    Catholic cardinal Richelieu from good old times nods in agreement 😉

    In foreign policy, his primary objective was to check the power of the Habsburg dynasty in Spain and Austria, and ensure French dominance in the Thirty Years’ War that engulfed Europe. Despite suppressing French Protestants, he made alliances with Protestant states like the Kingdom of England and the Dutch Republic to achieve his goals.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @sudden death

    https://asiatimes.com/2022/02/richelieus-ghost-almost-solves-americas-problems/

    Replies: @sudden death

  227. @Philip Owen
    @Barbarossa

    In Russia, people keep chickens in the middle of cities (older houses with yards). I haven't seen pigs.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    Quite correct, though they will get far far bigger if not slaughtered.

    As an interesting aside, that was actually a major reason for pork shortages during covid. Disruptions in slaughter house schedules quickly created a backlog setting farmers delivery dates off. Even just a couple of weeks from target date was enough for the hogs to get physically larger than could be processed since the hyper-specialized facilities are designed to process a hog only within a fairly narrow weight range. Too big and they literally couldn’t fit down the lines.

    Smaller scale local butchers which could process the hogs with no difficulty had no capacity to handle a sudden rush of that scale, so farmers were in a position of having to shoot and dispose of countless perfectly healthy pigs which happened to be 40lbs too big. All this while the super market shelves were empty.

    It’s an interesting case study of when these extremely specific and fine tuned supply systems break down.

  228. A123 says: • Website
    @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    However, we are already living in that reality of decline. It’s been going on for decades, but it’s a slow process which tends to sneak up on people. When one compares the social and political state of America 30 years to today it becomes clear that the decline is quite real.
     
    I think that what constitutes "decline" will vary depending on who you speak to. For many on the right, this includes social factors e.g. the acceptance of LGBT people or feminism. I would say that these are really political preferences rather than objective metrics.

    That said, America is a negative outlier in some ways. That cannot be denied.

    https://ourworldindata.org/uploads/2020/10/LE-vs-Health-Exp-2020-version.png

    As an American, you're in a better position to answer why this is the case than I am. Personally, my guess is that there are some unique factors at play here that aren't easily generalisable. I would say the same thing about mass shootings that also seem to be an American problem. (Gun availability is quite high in some European countries like Switzerland or Finland, yet they don't suffer these same pathologies).

    The world as a whole has certainly gotten more peaceful, prosperous and tolerant, despite occasional setbacks. I see no apparent reason why it wouldn't continue.


    Environmentalist fantasies of humanity reducing the Earth to a lifeless ball are extremely extravagant, but all the same we are using up aquifers in California or Nevada at an alarming rate, burning up valuable topsoil with extractive farming techniques et cetera. These will make our lives quite a bit harder in the long term and there is really nothing being done to change course.
     
    I thoroughly agree. I want to stress that I do identify as an environmentalist. I've changed my diet partly due to climate concerns but also for moral reasons (after you learn the intricate details of factory farming, it's hard not to). I've given up fossil fuel transportation to the greatest extent that I can, except long-distance travel where I still have to take an airplane, naturally climate-compensated for every trip. I'm involved in local groups to make Stockholm climate-neutral even faster than our official 2040 goal.

    I was simply criticising the "degrowth" ideology that presupposes that we can condemn the poor of this world to eternal destitute while we, in the rich world, can slowly but insignificantly lower our carbon footprint and thereby not make any serious sacrifices. It's a fantasy that would be paid by those who can least afford it, which is monstrous.

    The world as a whole will certainly see a worsening climate going forward. Let's be clear about that. But the apocalyptic prophecies should be treated with the caution they deserve.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @A123, @Barbarossa

    America is a negative outlier in some ways. That cannot be denied.
    [Life Expectancy vs. Health Expenditure]

    As an American, you’re in a better position to answer why this is the case than I am. Personally, my guess is that there are some unique factors at play here that aren’t easily generalisable

    The left hand axis starts at 70 Years Old. While that makes for a less compressed image, it also makes the disparity appear larger than it actually is. The actual spread is 2 or 3 years.

    Youth deaths have a huge impact on Life Expectancy. Presumably, the key factors here are largely the intersection of unwed mothers and poverty:

     

     

    The U.S. is a top performer for Life Expectancy, if one limits the calculation to the cohort who make it to 25 or older.
    _____

    On the spending side — In the U.S., ~50% of an individual’s Total Lifetime Health Expenditure occurs in the last 6 months of life. If one does not have advance decrees in place, it is very easy for futile efforts to chew up huge dollars.

    Lawsuit risk is another key contributing factor. Private medical practices have logical reasons to engage in “Defensive Medicine”, such as additional testing to rule out low probability issues.

    I would say the same thing about mass shootings that also seem to be an American problem. (Gun availability is quite high in some European countries like Switzerland or Finland, yet they don’t suffer these same pathologies).

    Mass shootings are actually quite uncommon in the U.S. as well. The Fake Stream Media are huge supporters of gun confiscation, much like Hitler’s efforts in the 1930’s. This leads to massive coverage raging against the U.S. Constitution. I suspect this leads to ‘copycat’ occurrences, which are then also hyper-covered.

     

     

    Reducing mass shootings in the U.S. would require Press Control -not- Gun Control. If the Constitution is flexible, we might as well flex the 1st Amendment… Right?

    After all…. U.S. Media MegaCorporations are repeating Hitler’s position. That makes them “Literally Nazis”. Who could oppose Nazi Control?

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @A123


    The U.S. is a top performer for Life Expectancy, if one limits the calculation to the cohort who make it to 25 or older.
     
    To me that comes across as cherrypicking.

    Presumably, the key factors here are largely the intersection of unwed mothers and poverty
     
    Iceland has one of the highest shares of out-of-wedlock births yet remains a peaceful and prosperous nation. I think this obsession with combining marriage and childbirth is a religious overhang for Americans.


    Lawsuit risk is another key contributing factor. Private medical practices have logical reasons to engage in “Defensive Medicine”, such as additional testing to rule out low probability issues.
     
    Wouldn't that paradoxically work in favour of the patients' longevity, even if an argument can be made that it racks up costs unnecessarily?

    Mass shootings are actually quite uncommon in the U.S. as well.
     
    On the whole, yes, but compared to other Western countries it seems to be a much bigger issue, even adjusted for population size.

    Replies: @A123

  229. Donets “Lowflow” season approaches. That’s Hydrology.

    River will be easily fordable from Studenok to Lysychansk.

    Expect new Russian assault on Sumy as a diversion.

  230. @Mr. Hack
    @LondonBob

    The only thing that a gun running Turk could offer the Ukrainians of any value, is to sell them many more bakhtiar drone missiles, a fines weapon that has helped Ukraine rid itself of unwanted guests. Oh, and to keep the Dardanelles closed, helping to shield the Ukrainians from additional moskal boats. Once the Ukrainians destroy the remaining Russian ships, have destroyed the bridge to Crimea, then they can let the remainder in for further destruction.

    Replies: @sher singh, @LondonBob, @Wokechoke

    You mean Ukraine is beholden strategically to the Turk? Good to see you admit it.

    • LOL: Mikhail
  231. @Triteleia Laxa
    @LondonBob

    And what crashing depression will happen when they realise that Russia has no purpose in Ukraine?

    Or can you name one?

    Please try to be concrete, specific and realistic.

    SMART is a useful acronym.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Craig Nelsen

    They can switch grain exports On/off at will. No purpose?

  232. @German_reader
    @LondonBob

    Stuff like this is more typical of Russian propaganda though, it's the same tired "anticolonial" nonsense as always:
    https://twitter.com/embassyofrussia/status/1398231926213906432

    As if Tsarist Russia hadn't committed actions that were similar or worse (e.g. against Circassians). Granted, there are also Western attempts to weaponize that history.

    Or this:
    https://twitter.com/mfa_russia/status/1529500757371797504?cxt=HHwWgICy7bm18LkqAAAA

    Just schizophrenic and mendacious given Russia's own imperial pretensions. Nothing to recommend here either from a white identitarian perspective.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    Mere rhetoric, action is what I care about. George Soros at Davos said, “The best and perhaps only way to preserve our civilization is to defeat Putin as soon as possible. That’s the bottom line.” I don’t take that seriously, except perhaps the reverse of which he implies.

    Having the Ukrainians occupy the Donbass is of no importance to me, the only people it seems to matter to are people I consider a very real threat. Look at supposed Nazi Ukraine with all the foreign ‘students’ they were harbouring before sending on their way West, Russia wasn’t and isn’t doing that.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @LondonBob

    If Russia wanted to boost the credibility of some sort of nationalist European civilisation then they could not have made a worse decision.

    Staying home and building their vast country into a paradise would have been highly effective.

    But murdering Ukrainians in an incompetent invasion is not. It is the opposite. It is as discrediting as it can get. At least for people who associate Russia with nationalism.

    Fortunately, the Russians don't. They call Ukrainian soldiers "nationalists" and "Nazis."

    This means that it will be Russian imperialism and the Russian Imperial ideology that will be completely discredited.

    As for you, try to be a bit less basic than simply pro-something because Soros is anti-it. That is mental servitude with added loserdom.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  233. A123 says: • Website
    @Thulean Friend
    @Mikhail


    As quoted in Western masc media, the Franco-German contingent expressed concern over the Russian treatment of POWs. If true, Putin was given the opportunity to bust on their hypocritical concern.

    I understand that Germany has a law on Nazi symbols. Does that apply to tattoos among other expressions of Nazi sympathy utilized by some of the Kiev regime forces?

     

    That's an interesting point that I haven't seen brought up elsewhere. However, even Nazis deserve some basic human protection under intl law, IMO. I don't want to see a degeneration into a law of the jungle.

    Too bad nobody seems to care about the law, as even Greece is conducting outright piracy against Iranian vessels under the prodding of the US. The Iranians realise it is futile to complain to international organs, since they are often controlled or veto-blocked by the US, so they took two as revenge. Russian's FX reserves were outright stolen.

    We're seeing that behind all the lofty rhetoric of "rules-based order", simple gangsterism still reigns.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @A123

    outright piracy against Iranian vessels under the prodding of the US. The Iranians realise it is futile to complain to international organs

    We’re seeing that behind all the lofty rhetoric of “rules-based order”, simple gangsterism still reigns.

    Iran jettisoned “rules-based order” when it abrogated JCPOA. This occurred during Obama’s administration, long before Trump took office. The level of hypocrisy from the Iranian theocracy is amazing but not expected. Sociopaths, like Khamenei, are incapable of shame. They only care about their own aggrandizement.

    China twisted “rules-based order” into knots via organizations like the WTO. Rules about “developing countries” were intended to help the poorest nations, not economic super powers.

    Highly biased “rules-based order” is weighted against U.S. citizens.

    America needs to stand up and refuse to be exploited by One World Government / NWO gangsterism. The UN should be abolished sooner rather than later. It has created more violence, pain, suffering, and death than it has prevented.

    PEACE 😇

  234. @Yellowface Anon
    @sudden death

    Alignment by ideology is dead!

    Replies: @sudden death, @Emil Nikola Richard

    There is only one single ideology remaining and it is very much alive. We all are fascists now.

  235. @sudden death
    @Yellowface Anon

    Catholic cardinal Richelieu from good old times nods in agreement ;)


    In foreign policy, his primary objective was to check the power of the Habsburg dynasty in Spain and Austria, and ensure French dominance in the Thirty Years' War that engulfed Europe. Despite suppressing French Protestants, he made alliances with Protestant states like the Kingdom of England and the Dutch Republic to achieve his goals.
     
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9a/Triple_Portrait_of_Cardinal_de_Richelieu_probably_1642%2C_Philippe_de_Champaigne.jpg

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Thanx for the link, some pure unintentional comedy gold there, knowing that Putler managed to flush roughly 70% of his regular ground army straight into Ukrainian wet mud just several weeks after this paragraph was written:


    Putin thinks what I did during the Thirty Years War—commit ground forces only as a last resort. I paid the Danes to fight the Austrians, and when they failed, I paid Gustavus Adolphus to invade the German Empire, and only when the Swedes were bled dry did I send French troops.”
     
  236. @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    However, we are already living in that reality of decline. It’s been going on for decades, but it’s a slow process which tends to sneak up on people. When one compares the social and political state of America 30 years to today it becomes clear that the decline is quite real.
     
    I think that what constitutes "decline" will vary depending on who you speak to. For many on the right, this includes social factors e.g. the acceptance of LGBT people or feminism. I would say that these are really political preferences rather than objective metrics.

    That said, America is a negative outlier in some ways. That cannot be denied.

    https://ourworldindata.org/uploads/2020/10/LE-vs-Health-Exp-2020-version.png

    As an American, you're in a better position to answer why this is the case than I am. Personally, my guess is that there are some unique factors at play here that aren't easily generalisable. I would say the same thing about mass shootings that also seem to be an American problem. (Gun availability is quite high in some European countries like Switzerland or Finland, yet they don't suffer these same pathologies).

    The world as a whole has certainly gotten more peaceful, prosperous and tolerant, despite occasional setbacks. I see no apparent reason why it wouldn't continue.


    Environmentalist fantasies of humanity reducing the Earth to a lifeless ball are extremely extravagant, but all the same we are using up aquifers in California or Nevada at an alarming rate, burning up valuable topsoil with extractive farming techniques et cetera. These will make our lives quite a bit harder in the long term and there is really nothing being done to change course.
     
    I thoroughly agree. I want to stress that I do identify as an environmentalist. I've changed my diet partly due to climate concerns but also for moral reasons (after you learn the intricate details of factory farming, it's hard not to). I've given up fossil fuel transportation to the greatest extent that I can, except long-distance travel where I still have to take an airplane, naturally climate-compensated for every trip. I'm involved in local groups to make Stockholm climate-neutral even faster than our official 2040 goal.

    I was simply criticising the "degrowth" ideology that presupposes that we can condemn the poor of this world to eternal destitute while we, in the rich world, can slowly but insignificantly lower our carbon footprint and thereby not make any serious sacrifices. It's a fantasy that would be paid by those who can least afford it, which is monstrous.

    The world as a whole will certainly see a worsening climate going forward. Let's be clear about that. But the apocalyptic prophecies should be treated with the caution they deserve.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @A123, @Barbarossa

    Even leaving aside the ideological and political preferences that you mention, I think that there is alarming and notable decline in the United States. This dovetails with the response that I need to get back to Mikel as well.

    While the US is a very wealthy country the distribution is getting more and more unequal. I believe that during Covid it will turn out to be perhaps the largest transfer of wealth upward in recent history. As the middle class gets increasingly squeezed downward it creates far more desperation and hopelessness as the reality of maintaining economic position, much less advancing it, appears increasingly impossible. The reality is that upward mobility in the US is now largely dead and the moneyed classes have largely reached a point where they can perpetuate advantages to their offspring in an increasingly insular world.

    The jobs which once were the stepping stones into the middle class and modest asset creation have largely disappeared. My area is haunted by the memories of the once proud and sufficient family farms and the stable industrial jobs which gave people like my grandparents a comfortable place in the middle class. Faced by that void in opportunity many just check out and succumb to despair. I see it all around me and my area is fairly typical of a great portion of the country.

    Another worrying sign of decline is in education. American public education is truly largely a farce at this point. Schools have endless ways to fudge the stats to make it look like they are doing a better job than they are, but the real life results are grim. It’s becoming a regular occurrence for high school graduates to have essentially no basic literacy and math skills. Things like writing a cohesive paragraph with proper spelling and grammar or knowing multiplication tables is increasingly completely lacking in high school graduates.

    Colleges are doing more and more remediation, essentially having to re-teach high school or even grade school concepts to give their students a semblance of readiness. It’s going to be (and already is) a disaster in employment. The trades are still dominated by 55 to 65 year old guys who are rapidly aging out of the workforce. There are so few capable young people to take over, that those who can hack it will do extremely well, but there are countless more who are nearly unemployable even as unskilled labor. In five to ten years, this dynamic will be extremely acute.

    Real environmental issues go completely unaddressed. The American West is running out of water in a big way and this poses some intractable problems for a large share of agriculture. Florida too is running into seawater intrusion as it’s aquifers are drawn down unsustainably. Even in the fertile Midwest topsoil is being consumed at an alarming rate. Instead of real retrenchment we get politicians who want to sell us on a magical thinking solar panel future. We get massive subsidized solar farms in NY; an area with the worst solar resource in the country.

    On degrowth, I think that we actually could use a lot less energy without impacting our quality of life. So much consumption is purely wasteful, much of this waste by design to keep the economic hamster wheel turning. Conservation should be a huge push, but this is politically and economically unpalatable.

    Fundamentally, I think that world has arguably gotten more prosperous and tolerant under the umbrella of plentiful and cheap energy and resources and consumption. I think we are going to end up increasingly pinched in these regards and because the political classes have failed to engage the problems seriously no realistic solutions have been advanced. The lower classes can be kept happy with a larger TV and the newest cell phone for a while but once it becomes hard to afford food or heat the house it will get uglier. It’s same dynamic which saw increased wheat prices fuel the Arab Spring, but coming increasingly for developed countries.

    I understand your horror of factory farming, by the way. When I got married my wife was a vegetarian and I joined her somewhat ambivalently for a while. We ended up believing that the “how” of what you eat is more important than the “what” and that informed quite a bit of our choice to come out to the middle of nowhere and have animals. Grass and animals are the original solar power, after all! It’s actually really interesting how managing our land for livestock has also increased the wild biodiversity greatly. It doesn’t have to be a zero sum game, but humans often make it that.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Barbarossa


    The reality is that upward mobility in the US is now largely dead and the moneyed classes have largely reached a point where they can perpetuate advantages to their offspring in an increasingly insular world.
     
    I agree. Many thoughtful US economists have noted that the "American dream", namely the idea that anyone from poverty can rise to prosperity is now actually a European dream.

    However, these outcomes are also the inevitable byproduct of a neoliberal system shift that began in the 1980s. As Piketty points out, a problem that has been created by man can be unmade by man.

    In other words, US decline in social mobility is much more staggering than in Europe and it was far from inevitable. That is both depressing - this could have been avoided - but it also carries a kernel of optimism: it can be changed.

    If more people had your insights, the ruling class in America would have a lot to fear. This is perhaps a bit speculative, but my suspicion is that the obsession with identity politics that the US corporate media has been ginning up is partly a way to distract the population from the fact that they'd being robbed in broad daylight.


    Colleges are doing more and more remediation, essentially having to re-teach high school or even grade school concepts to give their students a semblance of readiness. It’s going to be (and already is) a disaster in employment. The trades are still dominated by 55 to 65 year old guys who are rapidly aging out of the workforce. There are so few capable young people to take over, that those who can hack it will do extremely well, but there are countless more who are nearly unemployable even as unskilled labor. In five to ten years, this dynamic will be extremely acute.
     
    I'm trying to find points of disagreement so we could have a debate but we seem to agree again. I would just add that the jihad against SAT/ACT is a worrying sign to me. I want a purely meritocratic society. Standardised tests have their flaws, but they are far superior to the kind of vague "holistic admission process" that US colleges indulge themselves in. Frankly, it often seems to me to be a cover for racial prejudice and exclusion of capable candidates.

    Interestingly, research that I've read on US admissions to selective colleges have shown that there isn't just a bias in favour of less capable candidates based on race - which is what you'd expect - but also for "legacy admissions" and the offspring of donors. These latter groups are much less talked about in these contexts and these silent favors given to the offspring of the monied class is probably why there is little discontent with affirmative action among US ruling elites.

    More generally, I think the German model is superior, with a greater emphasis on skilled tradesmen and less overeducation. I would also re-plug Caplan's criticism of higher education more broadly, which has influenced my thinking.


    On degrowth, I think that we actually could use a lot less energy without impacting our quality of life. So much consumption is purely wasteful, much of this waste by design to keep the economic hamster wheel turning. Conservation should be a huge push, but this is politically and economically unpalatable.
     
    Here we finally get to some kind of disagreement - finally!

    While conservation is usually the best and "cheapest" way to combat climate change, I think many people in the West criminally underestimate how intricately tied our energy use is linked to our quality of life, which I define as our revealed preferences. Many people would simply never accept even a per capita energy reduction of -30%.

    The best hope lies in the transportation sector, especially in the urban cities where excessive car use should be radically cut down. I would argue that there are non-climate related reasons to do so too, such as making our cities walkable, pleasant and more interconnected rather than having giant stroads criss-crossing and marring our urban landscapes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORzNZUeUHAM


    I understand your horror of factory farming, by the way. When I got married my wife was a vegetarian and I joined her somewhat ambivalently for a while. We ended up believing that the “how” of what you eat is more important than the “what” and that informed quite a bit of our choice to come out to the middle of nowhere and have animals. Grass and animals are the original solar power, after all! It’s actually really interesting how managing our land for livestock has also increased the wild biodiversity greatly. It doesn’t have to be a zero sum game, but humans often make it that.
     
    I'm not militant on this topic. I've frequently alternated between veganism and vegetarianism at times; even lapsed into pescetarianism during rare moments of weakness.

    What's ultimately important here, I think, is for people to think about and engage these topics seriously and then make the choices they best deem fit for their situation, as you've clearly done. The issue arises from the fact that many - perhaps most - people never actively make these choices, but merely passively continue into the paths set out for them by society writ large.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @AP
    @Barbarossa

    I agree with almost all if this, but with regards to decline I think a large part of this involves demographic changes; a larger percentage of the American population comes from more poorly performing groups than in the past and this is reflected in the overall decline. However, the standards in the more elite settings remain fairly rigorous.* My kids’ upper middle class public school district in the Northeast offers university-level history (European and American), literature, physics and biology, four years of Latin, Classical Greek, Mandarin Chinese, etc.

    This is not to say that all is well. There appears to be a bifurcation, America is increasingly becoming a country not of the 1% as progressive activists claim but of the 20% or the 30%, who enjoy an unprecedentedly high standard of living while the rest experience stagnation if not downward pressure by the flood of immigrants and offshoring that benefit that top 20% to 30%. only. Utu, I think, mentioned that this may explain some affinity by American elites for the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth which had a similar social structure (it was a playground for the top 10% in that case) although most Americans are unaware of the PLC because the education system here is very West-centric. America’s situation is more stable because it has double or triple the percentage of stakeholders and because it is prosperous enough that even the losers live well by historical and international standards. But it is not ideal.

    FWIW your personal choice of vocation and its implications increases my respect for you. America would be a better place if it had more people like you.

    *Yes, in the last 1-3 years there have been some newsworthy elimination of entrance standards in certain elite publics schools in large urban areas but these are rigorously opposed by the often Asian high achiever parents

    Replies: @Barbarossa

  237. A123 says: • Website
    @Triteleia Laxa
    @German_reader

    Lol, not a chance. The "unamed military source" was likely a Twitter anon and The Asia Times is an outfit that mostly peddles geopolitical fan fiction of the Escobar or "Spengler" varieties.

    The Russian military seems to have learned what it is capable of, which is advancing about a mile a day on a single axis for a couple of weeks in a row, but there's no reason to think that they can take a city the size of Mykolaiv opposed. Nor that they can commit the troops to try without giving up in the Donbas.

    Mariupol was surrounded in the initial shock of their invasion, and possibly by treason. Yet it took them until longer than the "end of July" from now to take it. And had Mariupol not been surrounded and cut off, Russia would still be trying or would have given up. And to be honest, they would have been crazy to even try.

    So taking Mykolaiv opposed, from within and without, would be a legendary effort by a military with marked superiority, rigorous professionalism and a much larger concentration of forces. While its geography makes it very hard to surround and invest safely.

    Russia is much more likely to lose Kherson by then. It is geographically isolated and the population will work with their compatriots against Russia. Already, the Ukrainians must be building up substantial forces inside the city and having friendly civilians marking up Russian defensive positions and routines. Expect to see it fall rather suddenly.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @A123

    Russia is much more likely to lose Kherson by then. It is geographically isolated

    Kherson is fully enveloped, not geographically isolated. The flat and open terrain near the Black Sea is highly favourable to Russia forces. Resupply via Crimea is quite straightforward.

    How will any Ukrainian offensive:
        • Ford the navigable ship channel south of Mykolaiv?
        • Advance over open land to assault Kherson?

    Avoiding the ship channel would generate a highly predictable, one dimensional attack from the North.

    Either option would result in massive Ukrainian casualties and offer little hope of success.
    _____

    Zelensky’s best option remains a negotiated armistice. At this point, keeping the Black Sea port of Odessa would certainly be included.

    Trying to negotiate after Ukraine becomes landlocked is simply too late. Moldova could be won over by swapping Transnistria for a land corridor adjacent to Romania that would provide Black Sea access.

    PEACE 😇

     

  238. @German_reader
    @Mr. Hack

    For genocide to mean anything you need at least some element of mass murder on ethnic/racial/religious grounds. That doesn't seem to be happening in Ukraine.
    What you mention could maybe be seen as ethnocide, that is an attempt to destroy a culture and identity through forced assimilation and the like (I think one could argue something like that characterised late Tsarist policies, when there was a ban on publishing books in Ukrainian iirc). However, I have to ask, what exactly does it mean to "Russify" Ukrainian children from eastern Ukraine, whose native language already is Russian? This seems to be more about political and social attitudes, views of history etc. than anything in the more narrow cultural or linguistic sense.
    "Genocide" is meant to evoke Auschwitz, and other cases of mass killings, to use those symbols of absolute evil with their "Never again" imperative as moral support for certain policies and shut down debate. It may be understandable that Ukraine in its plight resorts to such tactics, but there is no obligation to uncritically accept this framing (at least not here on this discussion board, which has no influence on larger events after all).

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    A lot of experts in the field strongly feel that the atrocities committed in Bucha and Irpin by the Russian military rises to the level of genocide, that the large mass graves found in the Kyiv region indicate that mass murder did occur there. This is the criteria that these experts use in making their decisions:

    What is genocide?
    Genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

    Killing members of the group;
    Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
    Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
    Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
    Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.
    Source: Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide

    https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/27/europe/russia-ukraine-genocide-warning-intl/index.html

    Mayor of Kyiv Vitali Klitschko calls it genocide.

    • Troll: Mikhail
  239. @LondonBob
    @Mr. Hack

    https://twitter.com/powerfultakes/status/1523698616065740801?s=20&t=7jcI6F3AwLEvGfBdleZk8A

    Replies: @sudden death, @German_reader, @Mr. Hack

    I’m actually surprised that you’re influenced by this kind of nonsense. Time for a brain tune-up?

  240. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @sudden death

    https://asiatimes.com/2022/02/richelieus-ghost-almost-solves-americas-problems/

    Replies: @sudden death

    Thanx for the link, some pure unintentional comedy gold there, knowing that Putler managed to flush roughly 70% of his regular ground army straight into Ukrainian wet mud just several weeks after this paragraph was written:

    Putin thinks what I did during the Thirty Years War—commit ground forces only as a last resort. I paid the Danes to fight the Austrians, and when they failed, I paid Gustavus Adolphus to invade the German Empire, and only when the Swedes were bled dry did I send French troops.”

  241. I fear that the optimism of Pinkerites is really just a side effect of the increasing amount of micro-plastics in the environment.

  242. German_reader says:

    Part of an interview with Kotkin from a few days ago below more tag. He’s extremely negative about Ukraine’s economic state, sounds very bleak.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @German_reader

    He is seeing the glass half empty. The country remains the undisputed leader in the industries of sex tourism, surrogate motherhood, and the commercial adoption of white infants. Nittering nabob of negativity.

    Is he a bitcoin bear as well?

  243. @German_reader
    Part of an interview with Kotkin from a few days ago below more tag. He's extremely negative about Ukraine's economic state, sounds very bleak.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hefUaGw7PVQ

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    He is seeing the glass half empty. The country remains the undisputed leader in the industries of sex tourism, surrogate motherhood, and the commercial adoption of white infants. Nittering nabob of negativity.

    Is he a bitcoin bear as well?

    • LOL: Yahya
  244. Apparently not yet time for:

    “Open Thread has become very sluggish, so here’s a new one.”

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    You're such an idiot. To call me a troll regarding comment #244 you must be having a hard day coping. Sorry to prick your little imaginary world of "All things Putler, all things Russia good".
    Of course you don't really want to debate the merits of what the Russians are doing in Ukraine as constituting genocide. You've already made a name for yourself back in 2008 as: "Mike Averko Srebrenica Genocide Denier". What disgusting lout!

  245. @Mikhail
    Apparently not yet time for:

    "Open Thread has become very sluggish, so here’s a new one."

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    You’re such an idiot. To call me a troll regarding comment #244 you must be having a hard day coping. Sorry to prick your little imaginary world of “All things Putler, all things Russia good”.
    Of course you don’t really want to debate the merits of what the Russians are doing in Ukraine as constituting genocide. You’ve already made a name for yourself back in 2008 as: “Mike Averko Srebrenica Genocide Denier”. What disgusting lout!

    • Troll: Mikhail
  246. LatW says:
    @sudden death
    @216

    Are you really the cuck type who would gladly watch your own woman being raped by foreign invader as long as you gullibly believe propaganda image of his leader allegedly being "antihomo racist"?

    https://wiwibloggs.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/philipp-kikorov-vladimir-putin-honour.jpg

    https://wiwibloggs.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Filipp-Kirkorov-mood-color-black-egor-kreed.jpg

    Replies: @LatW

    Are you really the cuck type who would gladly watch your own woman being raped by foreign invader as long as you gullibly believe propaganda image of his leader allegedly being “antihomo racist”?

    I’m starting to suspect that some of them really wouldn’t fight against a foreign invader (or wouldn’t be able to). It’s just that in their case there isn’t one, so they can remain comfortable and untouched in their cowardliness. They might even not object to their women being abused, since those women are “feminists” anyway. That’s how far some of the relationships have deteriorated.

    As to the big internal globohomo enemy, it’s all just talk. Very few act like real trads.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @LatW


    I’m starting to suspect that some of them really wouldn’t fight against a foreign invader (or wouldn’t be able to).
     
    Most Western states haven't had conscription for some time, so that's obviously true (quite apart from other issues that are eroding patriotism).
    I've noticed though that Poland and Latvia haven't yet brought back conscription either, so talk doesn't really seem to match action. Estonia and Lithuania seem to be more serious in this regard at least.

    Replies: @LatW

    , @216
    @LatW


    I’m starting to suspect that some of them really wouldn’t fight against a foreign invader (or wouldn’t be able to).
     
    Western European regimes will literally jail people who are engaged in anti-immigration movements.

    They might even not object to their women being abused, since those women are “feminists” anyway. Very few act like real trads.
     
    "Real trads" are simps. I don't think so.

    The EU doesn't hide its disdain for social conservatives, and that is the proximal cause which Ukraine is fighting this war over. Victory for the Zelensky regime is a victory for Western liberals, and means Pride parades from Lviv to Mariupol. No thanks.
  247. LatW says:

    In Kherson region, the occupying forces tried to organize a roundup of school principles to instruct them on the new pro-Russian curriculum. 70 school principles were invited, only 20 showed up, during the meeting 14 of them walked out refusing to accept the new curriculum.

    In the occupied Melitopol, there was an attack on the Gauleiter.

  248. German_reader says:
    @LatW
    @sudden death


    Are you really the cuck type who would gladly watch your own woman being raped by foreign invader as long as you gullibly believe propaganda image of his leader allegedly being “antihomo racist”?
     
    I'm starting to suspect that some of them really wouldn't fight against a foreign invader (or wouldn't be able to). It's just that in their case there isn't one, so they can remain comfortable and untouched in their cowardliness. They might even not object to their women being abused, since those women are "feminists" anyway. That's how far some of the relationships have deteriorated.

    As to the big internal globohomo enemy, it's all just talk. Very few act like real trads.

    Replies: @German_reader, @216

    I’m starting to suspect that some of them really wouldn’t fight against a foreign invader (or wouldn’t be able to).

    Most Western states haven’t had conscription for some time, so that’s obviously true (quite apart from other issues that are eroding patriotism).
    I’ve noticed though that Poland and Latvia haven’t yet brought back conscription either, so talk doesn’t really seem to match action. Estonia and Lithuania seem to be more serious in this regard at least.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @German_reader


    I’ve noticed though that Poland and Latvia haven’t yet brought back conscription either, so talk doesn’t really seem to match action. Estonia and Lithuania seem to be more serious in this regard at least.
     
    I agree, the Lithuanian model of partial conscription should be adopted all across.

    That doesn't change that what I wrote above is likely true in the case of some Western right wingers. That one no longer feels they have a society to defend, doesn't mean they should be mocking the men who still want to defend their countries and families.

    Replies: @German_reader

  249. @German_reader
    @sudden death


    French
     
    Yeah, "beaten puppies" send weapons systems like that to Ukraine, makes total sense:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAESAR_self-propelled_howitzer

    What the hell is wrong with you Balts? You sit in your tiny dwarf states that Russia could easily wipe off the map, and yet the only thing one ever hears from you is absolutely grotesque belligerency..."establish a no-fly-zone" (Estonian parliament"), "don't even talk to Putin", "send ships to the Black sea to break the Russian blockade" (Latvian foreign minister), "only acceptable way this ends is total Ukrainian victory, including expelling Russia from Crimea" (Estonian prime minister). Whatever legitimate criticism one can make of Germany's and France's approach (and I would even concede that Scholz should at least take steps to export Marder and Leopard 1), there's no point to listening to people who seem to live in fantasy land.

    Replies: @sudden death, @Anatoly Karlin

    What the hell is wrong with you Balts?

    How do small dogs behave around big dogs?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Anatoly Karlin

    How do larger dogs get their faces bitten off from a smaller dog?

    https://www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/135773279.jpg?w=548

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Barbarossa

    , @Screechy Russian Pinscher.
    @Anatoly Karlin

    LOL, that is literally the Russia among USA and China.
    USA and China struggle for world domination, but we are all focusing on screechy barking of little Russian Pinscher.

  250. Sean says:

    Superpower Illusions: How Myths and False Ideologies Led America Astray–And How to Return to Reality
    by Jack F. Matlock, Jack F. Matlock, Jr.
    Former U.S. ambassador to the USSR Jack F. Matlock refutes the enduring idea that the United States forced the collapse of the Soviet Union by applying military and economic pressure—with wide-ranging implications for U.S. foreign policy. Matlock argues that Gorbachev, not Reagan, undermined Communist Party rule in the Soviet Union and that the Cold War ended in a negotiated settlement that benefited both sides. He posits that the end of the Cold War diminished rather than enhanced American power; with the removal of the Soviet threat, allies were less willing to accept American protection and leadership that seemed increasingly to ignore their interests.

  251. LatW says:
    @German_reader
    @LatW


    I’m starting to suspect that some of them really wouldn’t fight against a foreign invader (or wouldn’t be able to).
     
    Most Western states haven't had conscription for some time, so that's obviously true (quite apart from other issues that are eroding patriotism).
    I've noticed though that Poland and Latvia haven't yet brought back conscription either, so talk doesn't really seem to match action. Estonia and Lithuania seem to be more serious in this regard at least.

    Replies: @LatW

    I’ve noticed though that Poland and Latvia haven’t yet brought back conscription either, so talk doesn’t really seem to match action. Estonia and Lithuania seem to be more serious in this regard at least.

    I agree, the Lithuanian model of partial conscription should be adopted all across.

    That doesn’t change that what I wrote above is likely true in the case of some Western right wingers. That one no longer feels they have a society to defend, doesn’t mean they should be mocking the men who still want to defend their countries and families.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @LatW


    That one no longer feels they have a society to defend, doesn’t mean they should be mocking the men who still want to defend their countries and families.
     
    "216" is a particularly stupid commenter, not going to defend him. I also agree that Ukrainian soldiers shouldn't be mocked, whatever one thinks about other issues related to the war there's certainly a lot of admirable heroism among them. I can't imagine what they're facing, given the odds.
    However, I think you don't quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine. For whatever reason, Ukraine has become the cause du jour for the liberal establishment and its media apparatus throughout the West (and no, I don't believe at all that this is because progressives are somehow by nature more caring or opposed to tyranny), with exactly the same mechanisms used to silence any dissenting opinions that have been used to shut down debate on many other issues in recent years, like immigration or the measures related to the pandemic. It just feels again like an over-privileged, perpetually outraged pseudo-elite is using this crisis as merely the latest excuse to live out their frankly sadistic and authoritarian inclinations. It's hard to ignore that dynamic, and imo, combined with the likely effect of the economic sanctions, it's one factor why any consensus on support for Ukraine might turn out to be rather brittle in the long run.

    Replies: @LatW, @A123, @LondonBob, @216

  252. @Anatoly Karlin
    @German_reader


    What the hell is wrong with you Balts?
     
    How do small dogs behave around big dogs?

    https://www.thesprucepets.com/thmb/2Rp58h2tK4rAxffq4TitTOHb8DM=/2816x1584/smart/filters:no_upscale()/brown-chihuahua-snarling-with-teeth-showing-85587813-583a09185f9b58d5b17a065c.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Screechy Russian Pinscher.

    How do larger dogs get their faces bitten off from a smaller dog?

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    @Mr. Hack

    Let me just apologise vis-a-vis regarding my earlier comment the decline of this forum. Faith restored.

    What breed of dogs are they btw? Mr. Hack, do you have the full video to illustrate Baltic assymetric military superiority further? Could Karlin provide a counter example for the sundry limitrophes out here?

    Replies: @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Mr. Hack

    , @Barbarossa
    @Mr. Hack

    For what it's worth, what is going on there is actually wolves within a pack greeting each other. Licking the muzzle and inside of the mouth is a common form of showing affection and familiarity.

    So, it's not quite conveying what you intended but it's a neat picture nonetheless.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  253. @LatW
    @Beckow


    I did. I admit I have missed all of “Duda’s” speeches. Did I really miss anything?
     
    Lol, pretty funny. :) Well, you wouldn't have enjoyed it anyway. It's not your cup of tea, I accept that. But you must've at least listened to your own Prime Minister, no? Who said that after Russia is done with Ukraine, they will attack Slovakia. Or was he just trying to rile up the Davos crowd? :)


    Exactly. But if the resolution is not to your liking will you accept it? If Russia keeps most of the Black See coast and Donbas?
     
    No, we will not accept it. At that point, it will be only about who is helping us, and that's already pretty much visible. Just because something is not to "one's liking", doesn't mean one needs to accept it. If that were the case, we could just wrap ourselves in a white sheet and head to the nearest cemetery.

    Or will the ‘stemming sympathy for each other’ make it impossible and we will just go on and on, fighting endlessly.
     
    Not the mutual sympathies of Poles et al but Russia's intentions. Unfortunately, yes, that's the reality post 2014. Unless the Russian people save us once more (like they did in 1991-93), which I'm kind of doubting they will. But you never know.

    Yes, unfortunately, in 2014, Ukraine went to bed in Europe, but woke up in Israel. Now, even more so. Their men and women have to make that decision for themselves, if they're able and willing to live that way. The 30 years of peace after 1991 was a lull, not the historic norm. I write this with great regret and bitterness. :(


    Are you suggesting that people can be deprived of basic rights, like a right to their own language, because they don’t procreate enough?
     
    No, I was just saying that if one doesn't take care of his own existence, then one shouldn't ask others to provide for it. This goes for all nationalities in EE. But you're right about the language rights, obviously, from the Russian perspective it's better to have them than not (even if the TFR is under 2). The re-Ukrainiazation of Eastern Ukraine was rightfully perceived by Russia as a "weapon of mass destruction" (it is such from their perspective). There will be another big bomb like that when the educated Kyiv Russophones make a stand. They've just only started.

    This is why the Muscovites are now stealing people from the occupied territories in the East, especially children. As well as enforcing a Russian curriculum where there was none before -- because all those kids add up and kids grow up quickly. These will be in tens of thousands if not more.

    Russia's neighbors better heed that lesson!

    They are as human as you and I, they have the same rights, ignoring and demonizing them doesn’t help – that’s how we got here.
     
    They are victims. Did you know that DNR will soon be called ZhNR? Or rather, Women's Republic of Donbas? Because all the men are now being rounded up to be sent to the frontlines. Women who will protest that will be sent to prison. Does anyone care about their rights?

    Replies: @Beckow

    If the men in Donbas fight there must be a reason, maybe all that bombing of them by Kiev? The bombing that everyone is suddenly pretending never happened, or that it was petering out, or that it was not 10k but only 3k victims (the media for years used the 10k+ figure when it was easy to confuse who the victims were). So they fight, men should defend their families, what’s wrong with that?

    from the Russian perspective it’s better to have linguistic rights than not even if the TFR is under 2.

    A completely incoherent statement. You are just piling on rather lazily different things that really are not connected. Unless you actually think that a TFR quantitative test should be applied. But I think at this point you will say anything to dismiss any points from the other side – the polarization has set in. You will end up like Mr. Hacks hallucinating about a ‘genocide’.

    Have you noticed how the narrative has shifted from “Kiev is winning!!!! Hurrah!!!!” to “omg, they are killing us, it is horrible, a genocide!!!” Why has the story changed? Where is all the optimism and victory spirit? With that Turkish flying hen contraption paid for by the Lithuanians they should be planning who takes what bedroom in Kremlin. But no, now it is all about self-pity. Why so fast? Kiev still has a chance…

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Beckow

    And you're going to end up like your aging Puler, digging your holes deeper and deeper...I think that you're already up to your knees in BS:

    https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/7e/a7e0f159-3ed5-51f5-87bc-afa542928b74/624c86ebd69b8.image.jpg

    , @German_reader
    @Beckow


    You will end up like Mr. Hacks hallucinating about a ‘genocide’.
     
    Eh, two months ago you wrote:
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-182-russia-ukraine/#comment-5252746

    The above is a desperate attempt to justify an attempted genocide.
     
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-182-russia-ukraine/#comment-5253069

    Attempted means that they tried. And 3,000 killed civilians is not enough for you? How many are the minimum before you would consider the term ‘genocide’?
     
    Seems like a case of pot calling kettle black. And unlike Mr. Hack you don't even have the excuse of a personal connection to Ukraine.

    Replies: @Beckow

    , @LatW
    @Beckow


    men in Donbas fight there must be a reason
     
    I never said there was no reason, the reason is quite objective - not wanting to live under what they called "hunta" and not wanting to be integrated into the Western structures (understandable from the POV of their culture). However, the situation in Donbas was not black and white. You choose to ignore what really happened on the ground. A big portion of the population left for Russia, and many people who were pro-Ukrainian were also pushed out of their homes and displaced (they moved westwards). That was back in 2014, that's ancient history now, now their cities are getting completely decimated. They were basically screwed over by both sides.



    You are just piling on rather lazily different things that really are not connected.
     
    Just to clarify - yes, it makes sense for the Russian occupiers to try to assimilate or adopt the population even if it is shrinking because that is still a net gain for them. I am impressed by the speed and the rigorousness with which the occupier is imposing his will - it's a lesson to learn. That the occupier could just pick up and deport what appears like thousands of children into Russia's Far East means that Ukraine was very unprepared (which is partially forgivable because it's a huge territory that's hard to control but these kinds of things shouldn't have been overlooked especially given that there are historic precedents for it).

    Have you noticed how the narrative has shifted from “Kiev is winning!!!! Hurrah!!!!” to “omg, they are killing us, it is horrible, a genocide!!!” Why has the story changed?
     
    Because we have entered a very difficult stage of the war? Because Russia put the Syrian butcher in charge and he is doing his job? The narratives present on Ukrainian media are way broader than what you suggest. And, btw, what exactly is NOT horrible about this? It's been horror since day one. The war will be long, at least many months.

    I would suggest that you try to learn at least some spoken Russian so that you can get all the narratives coming out of both Russia and Ukraine in full. The English language sources are a bit limited.

    Replies: @Beckow

  254. @LondonBob
    @German_reader

    Mere rhetoric, action is what I care about. George Soros at Davos said, "The best and perhaps only way to preserve our civilization is to defeat Putin as soon as possible. That’s the bottom line.” I don't take that seriously, except perhaps the reverse of which he implies.

    Having the Ukrainians occupy the Donbass is of no importance to me, the only people it seems to matter to are people I consider a very real threat. Look at supposed Nazi Ukraine with all the foreign 'students' they were harbouring before sending on their way West, Russia wasn't and isn't doing that.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    If Russia wanted to boost the credibility of some sort of nationalist European civilisation then they could not have made a worse decision.

    Staying home and building their vast country into a paradise would have been highly effective.

    But murdering Ukrainians in an incompetent invasion is not. It is the opposite. It is as discrediting as it can get. At least for people who associate Russia with nationalism.

    Fortunately, the Russians don’t. They call Ukrainian soldiers “nationalists” and “Nazis.”

    This means that it will be Russian imperialism and the Russian Imperial ideology that will be completely discredited.

    As for you, try to be a bit less basic than simply pro-something because Soros is anti-it. That is mental servitude with added loserdom.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Just think of all of the wealth that Russia has already wasted on this stupid war? Remember, they were only a few days away from having their incredibly lucrative NS2 turned on in Germany, and now the EU is looking for ways to diversify away from Russian gas and oil (what a reversal of fortunes?).
    How many new roads could they have built and other public work and social welfare programs funded to help their own people prosper? And for what? Chasing Nazis within Ukraine, and ending up killing the elderly, women and children? Russian speakers too.....how stupid.

    Replies: @Seraphim

  255. German_reader says:
    @LatW
    @German_reader


    I’ve noticed though that Poland and Latvia haven’t yet brought back conscription either, so talk doesn’t really seem to match action. Estonia and Lithuania seem to be more serious in this regard at least.
     
    I agree, the Lithuanian model of partial conscription should be adopted all across.

    That doesn't change that what I wrote above is likely true in the case of some Western right wingers. That one no longer feels they have a society to defend, doesn't mean they should be mocking the men who still want to defend their countries and families.

    Replies: @German_reader

    That one no longer feels they have a society to defend, doesn’t mean they should be mocking the men who still want to defend their countries and families.

    “216” is a particularly stupid commenter, not going to defend him. I also agree that Ukrainian soldiers shouldn’t be mocked, whatever one thinks about other issues related to the war there’s certainly a lot of admirable heroism among them. I can’t imagine what they’re facing, given the odds.
    However, I think you don’t quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine. For whatever reason, Ukraine has become the cause du jour for the liberal establishment and its media apparatus throughout the West (and no, I don’t believe at all that this is because progressives are somehow by nature more caring or opposed to tyranny), with exactly the same mechanisms used to silence any dissenting opinions that have been used to shut down debate on many other issues in recent years, like immigration or the measures related to the pandemic. It just feels again like an over-privileged, perpetually outraged pseudo-elite is using this crisis as merely the latest excuse to live out their frankly sadistic and authoritarian inclinations. It’s hard to ignore that dynamic, and imo, combined with the likely effect of the economic sanctions, it’s one factor why any consensus on support for Ukraine might turn out to be rather brittle in the long run.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @German_reader


    However, I think you don’t quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine.
     
    I understand it very very well. It is an unfortunate coincidence of political currents intersecting. I would suggest that Western right wingers address their left-wing establishment with these issues directly, instead of channelling their anger and resentment towards Ukraine. The good news for Ukraine is that they don't really need Western right wingers (except the identitarians).

    Btw, my comment was not aimed at Germany (which still seems to retain something resembling a real ethnicity), but more towards a certain section of American right wingers. I wanted the Lithuanian poster to know this, he may not be aware how degenerate things are in some Western circles.

    And, btw, I do understand your frustration. A friend of mine recently returned from a trip to Germany, she did the German castles tour. When she shared the pics, there was a pic of the Hohenschwangau Castle with a giant Ukrainian flag displayed on the castle wall. So even there. I mean, it's certainly a very generous and a genuinely friendly gesture, but I understand how it might seem a little overdone to those who view it as annoying virtue signaling.

    Replies: @216, @LondonBob, @sudden death

    , @A123
    @German_reader


    don’t quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine. For whatever reason, Ukraine has become the cause du jour for the liberal establishment and its media apparatus throughout the West (and no, I don’t believe at all that this is because progressives are somehow by nature more caring or opposed to tyranny
     
    Progressive = SJW Globalist = Pro-Tyranny. What you call "pro-war / left-wingers" love Ukrainian war crimes such as dumping dead bodies on the roads of Bucha and inflicting collective punishment on defenseless civilians in Crimea.

    What do anti-war Christian Populists get out of backing Tyrant Zelensky's hate fuelled rage?

    Europe gets a new influx of MENA origin Muslim Rape-ugees. Actual Christian Refugees are discouraged from intra-EU relocation by warnings like these: (1)


    Ukrainian women in Sweden warned not to dress in a way that could provoke Muslim men
    The site manager at the accommodation had reportedly told the women that they should not wear light clothing that makes body parts visible, such as short shorts or skirts.

    There have been numerous reports of some Ukrainian women who sought refuge in Sweden feeling unsafe in their new surroundings because of attempts by migrant males to break into their accommodation.In March, the Swedish news outlet Samnytt spoke with female Ukrainian refugees residing in the town of Örebro following an incident where foreign males entered their homes and tried to attack them.
    ...
    In addition to the threats of sexual assault, a number of Ukrainians have reportedly refused to board buses in the Ukrainian capital set for Sweden over general concerns of the level of crime in the country.
     

    American Christian Populists do not want to be stuck paying for junk bills that spit on Judeo-Christian values at home and abroad: (2)

    Why the Once-Hawkish Heritage Foundation Opposed Aid to Ukraine

    Jessica Anderson, the executive director of Heritage’s lobbying operation, released a searing statement — its headline blaring “Ukraine Aid Package Puts America Last” — that framed the measure as reckless and ill-considered.

    “America is struggling with record-setting inflation, debt, a porous border, crime and energy depletion,” Ms. Anderson said, “yet progressives in Washington are prioritizing a $40 billion aid package to Ukraine.”
     

    Populists are not callous towards Ukraine. However, they are justifiably cynical about one-sided Fake Stream Media [FSM] coverage. The "Russia, Russia, Russia" myth was thoroughly demolished in court. That blow to SJW dogma badly hurt the credibility of FSM propaganda favoring Ukraine over Russia.
    ___

    Helping genuine Christian refugees would be supported by Christian Populists on both sides of the Atlantic.

    However, backing Tyrant Zelensky and other "pro-war / left-wing" WEF Elites makes no sense. Ending the Great Replacement requires an armistice in Ukraine that stops the flow of rape-ugees.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://rmx.news/article/ukrainian-women-in-sweden-warned-not-to-dress-in-a-way-that-could-provoke-muslim-men/

    (2) https://globalpolitics.info/us/why-the-once-hawkish-heritage-foundation-opposed-aid-to-ukraine.html

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @LondonBob
    @German_reader

    Callous and cynical are those who use Ukraine for their own ideological or ethnic prejudices, strange world where those who seek peace are denounced.

    Replies: @AP

    , @216
    @German_reader


    “216” is a particularly stupid commenter, not going to defend him.
     
    Your personal dislike for me should not extend to calling me "stupid". I have never made personal attacks on to your character. Why is reciprocity such a hard concept for you?

    Replies: @German_reader

  256. @Beckow
    @LatW

    If the men in Donbas fight there must be a reason, maybe all that bombing of them by Kiev? The bombing that everyone is suddenly pretending never happened, or that it was petering out, or that it was not 10k but only 3k victims (the media for years used the 10k+ figure when it was easy to confuse who the victims were). So they fight, men should defend their families, what's wrong with that?


    from the Russian perspective it’s better to have linguistic rights than not even if the TFR is under 2.
     
    A completely incoherent statement. You are just piling on rather lazily different things that really are not connected. Unless you actually think that a TFR quantitative test should be applied. But I think at this point you will say anything to dismiss any points from the other side - the polarization has set in. You will end up like Mr. Hacks hallucinating about a 'genocide'.

    Have you noticed how the narrative has shifted from "Kiev is winning!!!! Hurrah!!!!" to "omg, they are killing us, it is horrible, a genocide!!!" Why has the story changed? Where is all the optimism and victory spirit? With that Turkish flying hen contraption paid for by the Lithuanians they should be planning who takes what bedroom in Kremlin. But no, now it is all about self-pity. Why so fast? Kiev still has a chance...

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @German_reader, @LatW

    And you’re going to end up like your aging Puler, digging your holes deeper and deeper…I think that you’re already up to your knees in BS:

    • Troll: Mikhail
  257. @Triteleia Laxa
    @LondonBob

    If Russia wanted to boost the credibility of some sort of nationalist European civilisation then they could not have made a worse decision.

    Staying home and building their vast country into a paradise would have been highly effective.

    But murdering Ukrainians in an incompetent invasion is not. It is the opposite. It is as discrediting as it can get. At least for people who associate Russia with nationalism.

    Fortunately, the Russians don't. They call Ukrainian soldiers "nationalists" and "Nazis."

    This means that it will be Russian imperialism and the Russian Imperial ideology that will be completely discredited.

    As for you, try to be a bit less basic than simply pro-something because Soros is anti-it. That is mental servitude with added loserdom.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Just think of all of the wealth that Russia has already wasted on this stupid war? Remember, they were only a few days away from having their incredibly lucrative NS2 turned on in Germany, and now the EU is looking for ways to diversify away from Russian gas and oil (what a reversal of fortunes?).
    How many new roads could they have built and other public work and social welfare programs funded to help their own people prosper? And for what? Chasing Nazis within Ukraine, and ending up killing the elderly, women and children? Russian speakers too…..how stupid.

    • Replies: @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    The Vice Chancellor and Minister for Economic Affairs and Climate Protection of Germany Robert Habeck had to admit sadly that ''Russia makes more money by selling less oil''. In other words Russia gets wealthier by the day and the 'West' poorer.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @Mr. Hack

  258. @SIMP simp
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The only thing Russia would win in these battles of attrition are depopulated, ruined, miserable steppe towns, the kind of towns Russia already has hundreds within her own borders.
    Putin's delusional hope for a bloodless campaign like the Anschluss led to a significant part of russian ground forces spreading thin on hundreds of km of backroads and mudfields in NE Ukraine while dashing towards a Kiev they didn't had any hope in taking with their meager forces and their overextended and vulnerable supply line.
    This is where the russian army lost a significant share of her professional soldiers and modern equipment and whatever prestige still had was replaced by memes with ukrainian tractors capturing their T90s.
    Even if Russia wins now a battle of attrition, which is far from certain given ukrainian mobilisation and their access to Uncle Sam's stockpiles of weapons, Russia has already lost the war.
    Russia is an isolated pariah internationally, vital imports are cut off, NATO is more united than ever, Germany is finally rearming even under a left-wing government and Russia's prestige has sunk lower than RFS Moskva, partly due to her war of aggression, partly due to her incompetence.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Dave Pinsen

    Here’s a good post explaining the Ukraine’s importance to Russia:

    As far as the impact of Western sanctions on Russia:

    And as far as Russian prestige being diminished by facing a tough fight against quasi-Russians armed to the teeth with \$50 billion+ of NATO weapons: what will it do to NATO prestige if Russia wins despite facing all those NATO weapons?

    After this war, Russia will be the only major power to have a military experienced in combined arms combat against a 1st world opponent. They will be more formidable, not less, militarily.

    • Thanks: EddieSpaghetti
    • LOL: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @AP
    @Dave Pinsen

    Of course there will now be an account surplus. Europe refuses to sell things to Russia, but still buys Russian gas.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @Yellowface Anon
    @Dave Pinsen

    Essentially the same dynamic will prevail in Taiwan - China will be goaded into attacking like Japan in 1941 and WWIII will start, which is the goal of Kissinger - an open season to depopulate.

    , @SIMP simp
    @Dave Pinsen

    That contra article doesn't mention that Russia guaranteed Ukrainian borders and independence in exchange for 1400 soviet nukes that have been inherited by Ukraine from the Soviet Union.
    Does anyone really expect that a pro-russian regime in Ukraine was possible after what happened in 2014? Or even a neutral one? Putin chose the annexation of Crimea and a slow burning war in Donbass over any chance of good relations with Ukraine.
    Russia needs this and that resource from another country is a ridiculous argument that hasn't been flying since 1918.
    Ukraine was not about to join NATO because europeans don't want her in as long as her borders with Russia are disputed. European militaries, especially ground forces, are small and most are equipped with obsolete weapon systems. Americans have been constantly reducing their forces in Europe and focusing in the Middle East and Pacific since 1991.
    Russia doesn't need strategic depth from Ukraine as it has no major city near the border, unlike SPB with Finland (now actually joining NATO) or Khabarovsk with China.
    The idea of attacking Ukraine because of the NATO danger is as much propaganda as the denazification story.
    The fact that westerners don't care about Ukraine but care about punishing Russia doesn't make things any simpler for Putin.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    , @Corvinus
    @Dave Pinsen

    The elitist who creates the war in Ukraine was Putin, a Russian Deep Stater and champion of oligarchs.

  259. German_reader says:
    @Beckow
    @LatW

    If the men in Donbas fight there must be a reason, maybe all that bombing of them by Kiev? The bombing that everyone is suddenly pretending never happened, or that it was petering out, or that it was not 10k but only 3k victims (the media for years used the 10k+ figure when it was easy to confuse who the victims were). So they fight, men should defend their families, what's wrong with that?


    from the Russian perspective it’s better to have linguistic rights than not even if the TFR is under 2.
     
    A completely incoherent statement. You are just piling on rather lazily different things that really are not connected. Unless you actually think that a TFR quantitative test should be applied. But I think at this point you will say anything to dismiss any points from the other side - the polarization has set in. You will end up like Mr. Hacks hallucinating about a 'genocide'.

    Have you noticed how the narrative has shifted from "Kiev is winning!!!! Hurrah!!!!" to "omg, they are killing us, it is horrible, a genocide!!!" Why has the story changed? Where is all the optimism and victory spirit? With that Turkish flying hen contraption paid for by the Lithuanians they should be planning who takes what bedroom in Kremlin. But no, now it is all about self-pity. Why so fast? Kiev still has a chance...

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @German_reader, @LatW

    You will end up like Mr. Hacks hallucinating about a ‘genocide’.

    Eh, two months ago you wrote:
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-182-russia-ukraine/#comment-5252746

    The above is a desperate attempt to justify an attempted genocide.

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-182-russia-ukraine/#comment-5253069

    Attempted means that they tried. And 3,000 killed civilians is not enough for you? How many are the minimum before you would consider the term ‘genocide’?

    Seems like a case of pot calling kettle black. And unlike Mr. Hack you don’t even have the excuse of a personal connection to Ukraine.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Beckow
    @German_reader

    Look up the meaning of "attempted". Sometimes a qualifier is used for a reason.

    There is another key difference:
    - Kiev bombed its civilian population first - a sequence in any conflict matters. As a German you should understand that what happened to civilians in Belarus and East Prussia was similar, but Germans did it first and that was a decisive factor.

    My personal connection is to the traditional European culture and that includes treating A as I would treat B. Too many here immediately drop any pretense of equal rights when the word Russian appears - they can be deprived of language rights, basic minority status, they are told to "move to Russia", and their killing is minimized or explained away. Now substitute any other ethnic group for Russians and Europe would go ballistic. That's the core issue and why there is a war - Europe could not bring itself to ask Kiev to act normally towards its Russian population. They still can't.

    Replies: @AP, @Wielgus

  260. LatW says:
    @Beckow
    @LatW

    If the men in Donbas fight there must be a reason, maybe all that bombing of them by Kiev? The bombing that everyone is suddenly pretending never happened, or that it was petering out, or that it was not 10k but only 3k victims (the media for years used the 10k+ figure when it was easy to confuse who the victims were). So they fight, men should defend their families, what's wrong with that?


    from the Russian perspective it’s better to have linguistic rights than not even if the TFR is under 2.
     
    A completely incoherent statement. You are just piling on rather lazily different things that really are not connected. Unless you actually think that a TFR quantitative test should be applied. But I think at this point you will say anything to dismiss any points from the other side - the polarization has set in. You will end up like Mr. Hacks hallucinating about a 'genocide'.

    Have you noticed how the narrative has shifted from "Kiev is winning!!!! Hurrah!!!!" to "omg, they are killing us, it is horrible, a genocide!!!" Why has the story changed? Where is all the optimism and victory spirit? With that Turkish flying hen contraption paid for by the Lithuanians they should be planning who takes what bedroom in Kremlin. But no, now it is all about self-pity. Why so fast? Kiev still has a chance...

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @German_reader, @LatW

    men in Donbas fight there must be a reason

    I never said there was no reason, the reason is quite objective – not wanting to live under what they called “hunta” and not wanting to be integrated into the Western structures (understandable from the POV of their culture). However, the situation in Donbas was not black and white. You choose to ignore what really happened on the ground. A big portion of the population left for Russia, and many people who were pro-Ukrainian were also pushed out of their homes and displaced (they moved westwards). That was back in 2014, that’s ancient history now, now their cities are getting completely decimated. They were basically screwed over by both sides.

    [MORE]

    You are just piling on rather lazily different things that really are not connected.

    Just to clarify – yes, it makes sense for the Russian occupiers to try to assimilate or adopt the population even if it is shrinking because that is still a net gain for them. I am impressed by the speed and the rigorousness with which the occupier is imposing his will – it’s a lesson to learn. That the occupier could just pick up and deport what appears like thousands of children into Russia’s Far East means that Ukraine was very unprepared (which is partially forgivable because it’s a huge territory that’s hard to control but these kinds of things shouldn’t have been overlooked especially given that there are historic precedents for it).

    Have you noticed how the narrative has shifted from “Kiev is winning!!!! Hurrah!!!!” to “omg, they are killing us, it is horrible, a genocide!!!” Why has the story changed?

    Because we have entered a very difficult stage of the war? Because Russia put the Syrian butcher in charge and he is doing his job? The narratives present on Ukrainian media are way broader than what you suggest. And, btw, what exactly is NOT horrible about this? It’s been horror since day one. The war will be long, at least many months.

    I would suggest that you try to learn at least some spoken Russian so that you can get all the narratives coming out of both Russia and Ukraine in full. The English language sources are a bit limited.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @LatW


    the situation in Donbas was not black and white.
     
    True. But there was also a basic disregard by Kiev for very normal rights of the Russian speakers there. Of course in a population of 5-6 million you will find a lot of variance; many left, many ended on the wrong side. But in general the Donbas region was attacked by Kiev as if the people there had no rights. They actually called it "an anti-terrorist operation". It was an overreach and a mistake.

    The English language sources are a bit limited.
     
    I agree. What is it about the English media that makes it drop into silly stereotypes and cartoon-like nonsense every time a war happens?

    I understand enough Russian to get both sides. I talk to a lot of people from the region and their general attitudes match mine: an unnecessary war about an overly ambitious plan to turn Ukraine into a monolithic anti-Russia asset for Nato. Without really anything in it to make the lives of ordinary Ukrainians better. With the war, they at least get an avalanche of goodies and charity - and boy, they know how to milk it. I actually wish them luck - if Europeans are this incredibly gullible and stupid, why shouldn't they take advantage of them?

  261. LatW says:
    @German_reader
    @LatW


    That one no longer feels they have a society to defend, doesn’t mean they should be mocking the men who still want to defend their countries and families.
     
    "216" is a particularly stupid commenter, not going to defend him. I also agree that Ukrainian soldiers shouldn't be mocked, whatever one thinks about other issues related to the war there's certainly a lot of admirable heroism among them. I can't imagine what they're facing, given the odds.
    However, I think you don't quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine. For whatever reason, Ukraine has become the cause du jour for the liberal establishment and its media apparatus throughout the West (and no, I don't believe at all that this is because progressives are somehow by nature more caring or opposed to tyranny), with exactly the same mechanisms used to silence any dissenting opinions that have been used to shut down debate on many other issues in recent years, like immigration or the measures related to the pandemic. It just feels again like an over-privileged, perpetually outraged pseudo-elite is using this crisis as merely the latest excuse to live out their frankly sadistic and authoritarian inclinations. It's hard to ignore that dynamic, and imo, combined with the likely effect of the economic sanctions, it's one factor why any consensus on support for Ukraine might turn out to be rather brittle in the long run.

    Replies: @LatW, @A123, @LondonBob, @216

    However, I think you don’t quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine.

    I understand it very very well. It is an unfortunate coincidence of political currents intersecting. I would suggest that Western right wingers address their left-wing establishment with these issues directly, instead of channelling their anger and resentment towards Ukraine. The good news for Ukraine is that they don’t really need Western right wingers (except the identitarians).

    Btw, my comment was not aimed at Germany (which still seems to retain something resembling a real ethnicity), but more towards a certain section of American right wingers. I wanted the Lithuanian poster to know this, he may not be aware how degenerate things are in some Western circles.

    And, btw, I do understand your frustration. A friend of mine recently returned from a trip to Germany, she did the German castles tour. When she shared the pics, there was a pic of the Hohenschwangau Castle with a giant Ukrainian flag displayed on the castle wall. So even there. I mean, it’s certainly a very generous and a genuinely friendly gesture, but I understand how it might seem a little overdone to those who view it as annoying virtue signaling.

    • Replies: @216
    @LatW


    I would suggest that Western right wingers address their left-wing establishment with these issues directly, instead of channelling their anger and resentment towards Ukraine.
     
    They literally banned Trump and almost every single far-right figure in the US from using Big Tech social media. We are at perennial risk of doxxing and cancellation.

    No West Europe country has a far-right government or even far-right parties in the government. No polling indicates that this will change anytime soon.

    Indeed, in much of Europe, being pro-Russia has been criminalized. My cause loses nothing from seeing Russia annex Ukraine, while the liberal cause would suffer an immense collapse in prestige.

    I'm an actual "AmericaFirst" conservative, and while more partial to the Russian cause, I've been willing to condemn the invasion, the war crimes, the lack of social conservatism and A. Karlin's lack of support for the latter.

    None of the Ukrainains here are willing to condemn the liberalism of their President and the liberalism of their EU/US supporters; whose main goal is to destroy the two most conservative countries in Europe.
    , @LondonBob
    @LatW

    I would suggest the Ukraine let the people of the Donbass live in peace.

    , @sudden death
    @LatW


    Btw, my comment was not aimed at Germany (which still seems to retain something resembling a real ethnicity), but more towards a certain section of American right wingers. I wanted the Lithuanian poster to know this, he may not be aware how degenerate things are in some Western circles.
     
    imho there is nothing special or unprecedented about this, some people just always had, have and will be having their own preferential manias, which becomes the center of their own personal universe, be it gay obsessions (sometimes to the point of watching such porno in order to better know the enemy, lol) or Jew obsession through all the times or ages.

    If RF suddenly really gets some wunderwaffe not just in propaganda, but becomes able to defeat and conquer at least part of USA, those people will be neo-petainists cheering such occupation by foreign power and later would be sentenced to death by their own compatriots when national liberation movement prevails.

  262. @German_reader
    @Beckow


    You will end up like Mr. Hacks hallucinating about a ‘genocide’.
     
    Eh, two months ago you wrote:
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-182-russia-ukraine/#comment-5252746

    The above is a desperate attempt to justify an attempted genocide.
     
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-182-russia-ukraine/#comment-5253069

    Attempted means that they tried. And 3,000 killed civilians is not enough for you? How many are the minimum before you would consider the term ‘genocide’?
     
    Seems like a case of pot calling kettle black. And unlike Mr. Hack you don't even have the excuse of a personal connection to Ukraine.

    Replies: @Beckow

    Look up the meaning of “attempted“. Sometimes a qualifier is used for a reason.

    There is another key difference:
    Kiev bombed its civilian population first – a sequence in any conflict matters. As a German you should understand that what happened to civilians in Belarus and East Prussia was similar, but Germans did it first and that was a decisive factor.

    My personal connection is to the traditional European culture and that includes treating A as I would treat B. Too many here immediately drop any pretense of equal rights when the word Russian appears – they can be deprived of language rights, basic minority status, they are told to “move to Russia“, and their killing is minimized or explained away. Now substitute any other ethnic group for Russians and Europe would go ballistic. That’s the core issue and why there is a war – Europe could not bring itself to ask Kiev to act normally towards its Russian population. They still can’t.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Beckow


    There is another key difference:
    – Kiev bombed its civilian population first – a sequence in any conflict matters
     
    Not when it comes to the definition of genocide. If it turned out that some Armenians killed Turkish civilians first, would the mass murder of Armenians no longer be classified a genocide?

    We already knew you are a liar, German Reader highlighted your hypocrisy.
    , @Wielgus
    @Beckow

    Also an attitude similar to that of many Zionists as regards Palestinians - why don't they depart to the rest of the Arab world?

    Replies: @A123

  263. @LatW
    @Beckow


    men in Donbas fight there must be a reason
     
    I never said there was no reason, the reason is quite objective - not wanting to live under what they called "hunta" and not wanting to be integrated into the Western structures (understandable from the POV of their culture). However, the situation in Donbas was not black and white. You choose to ignore what really happened on the ground. A big portion of the population left for Russia, and many people who were pro-Ukrainian were also pushed out of their homes and displaced (they moved westwards). That was back in 2014, that's ancient history now, now their cities are getting completely decimated. They were basically screwed over by both sides.



    You are just piling on rather lazily different things that really are not connected.
     
    Just to clarify - yes, it makes sense for the Russian occupiers to try to assimilate or adopt the population even if it is shrinking because that is still a net gain for them. I am impressed by the speed and the rigorousness with which the occupier is imposing his will - it's a lesson to learn. That the occupier could just pick up and deport what appears like thousands of children into Russia's Far East means that Ukraine was very unprepared (which is partially forgivable because it's a huge territory that's hard to control but these kinds of things shouldn't have been overlooked especially given that there are historic precedents for it).

    Have you noticed how the narrative has shifted from “Kiev is winning!!!! Hurrah!!!!” to “omg, they are killing us, it is horrible, a genocide!!!” Why has the story changed?
     
    Because we have entered a very difficult stage of the war? Because Russia put the Syrian butcher in charge and he is doing his job? The narratives present on Ukrainian media are way broader than what you suggest. And, btw, what exactly is NOT horrible about this? It's been horror since day one. The war will be long, at least many months.

    I would suggest that you try to learn at least some spoken Russian so that you can get all the narratives coming out of both Russia and Ukraine in full. The English language sources are a bit limited.

    Replies: @Beckow

    the situation in Donbas was not black and white.

    True. But there was also a basic disregard by Kiev for very normal rights of the Russian speakers there. Of course in a population of 5-6 million you will find a lot of variance; many left, many ended on the wrong side. But in general the Donbas region was attacked by Kiev as if the people there had no rights. They actually called it “an anti-terrorist operation”. It was an overreach and a mistake.

    The English language sources are a bit limited.

    I agree. What is it about the English media that makes it drop into silly stereotypes and cartoon-like nonsense every time a war happens?

    I understand enough Russian to get both sides. I talk to a lot of people from the region and their general attitudes match mine: an unnecessary war about an overly ambitious plan to turn Ukraine into a monolithic anti-Russia asset for Nato. Without really anything in it to make the lives of ordinary Ukrainians better. With the war, they at least get an avalanche of goodies and charity – and boy, they know how to milk it. I actually wish them luck – if Europeans are this incredibly gullible and stupid, why shouldn’t they take advantage of them?

  264. china-russia-all-the-way says:

    Thousands of migrants mostly from Africa and Iraq who entered Lithuania through Belarus in 2021 toughed it out during the winter and stayed in Lithuanian camps. Only a trickle have been granted asylum.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/38261/migrants-in-lithuania-six-months-after-their-arrival-where-are-they-now

    Cubans are showing up in large numbers in Ltihuania.

    More migrants from Cuba are expected to arrive in Belarus while in transit to the EU due to the newly established visa-free regime between Russia and Cuba.

    https://reliefweb.int/report/belarus/iom-belarus-response-stranded-migrants-belarus-situation-report-17-31-march-2022

    Lithuania is receiving punishment for being Mike Pompeo’s puppet. Lithuania did not ratify the cooperation agreement between the EU and Cuba because Pompeo told them not to in 2020.

    “We are grateful to Lithuania for not ratifying the agreement and ask that you continue to vote against it, as a symbol of your support for the Cuban people,” Pompeo said in a letter to Prime Minister Saulius Skvernelis sent on Friday.

  265. A123 says: • Website
    @German_reader
    @LatW


    That one no longer feels they have a society to defend, doesn’t mean they should be mocking the men who still want to defend their countries and families.
     
    "216" is a particularly stupid commenter, not going to defend him. I also agree that Ukrainian soldiers shouldn't be mocked, whatever one thinks about other issues related to the war there's certainly a lot of admirable heroism among them. I can't imagine what they're facing, given the odds.
    However, I think you don't quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine. For whatever reason, Ukraine has become the cause du jour for the liberal establishment and its media apparatus throughout the West (and no, I don't believe at all that this is because progressives are somehow by nature more caring or opposed to tyranny), with exactly the same mechanisms used to silence any dissenting opinions that have been used to shut down debate on many other issues in recent years, like immigration or the measures related to the pandemic. It just feels again like an over-privileged, perpetually outraged pseudo-elite is using this crisis as merely the latest excuse to live out their frankly sadistic and authoritarian inclinations. It's hard to ignore that dynamic, and imo, combined with the likely effect of the economic sanctions, it's one factor why any consensus on support for Ukraine might turn out to be rather brittle in the long run.

    Replies: @LatW, @A123, @LondonBob, @216

    don’t quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine. For whatever reason, Ukraine has become the cause du jour for the liberal establishment and its media apparatus throughout the West (and no, I don’t believe at all that this is because progressives are somehow by nature more caring or opposed to tyranny

    Progressive = SJW Globalist = Pro-Tyranny. What you call “pro-war / left-wingers” love Ukrainian war crimes such as dumping dead bodies on the roads of Bucha and inflicting collective punishment on defenseless civilians in Crimea.

    What do anti-war Christian Populists get out of backing Tyrant Zelensky’s hate fuelled rage?

    Europe gets a new influx of MENA origin Muslim Rape-ugees. Actual Christian Refugees are discouraged from intra-EU relocation by warnings like these: (1)

    Ukrainian women in Sweden warned not to dress in a way that could provoke Muslim men
    The site manager at the accommodation had reportedly told the women that they should not wear light clothing that makes body parts visible, such as short shorts or skirts.

    There have been numerous reports of some Ukrainian women who sought refuge in Sweden feeling unsafe in their new surroundings because of attempts by migrant males to break into their accommodation.In March, the Swedish news outlet Samnytt spoke with female Ukrainian refugees residing in the town of Örebro following an incident where foreign males entered their homes and tried to attack them.

    In addition to the threats of sexual assault, a number of Ukrainians have reportedly refused to board buses in the Ukrainian capital set for Sweden over general concerns of the level of crime in the country.

    American Christian Populists do not want to be stuck paying for junk bills that spit on Judeo-Christian values at home and abroad: (2)

    Why the Once-Hawkish Heritage Foundation Opposed Aid to Ukraine

    Jessica Anderson, the executive director of Heritage’s lobbying operation, released a searing statement — its headline blaring “Ukraine Aid Package Puts America Last” — that framed the measure as reckless and ill-considered.

    “America is struggling with record-setting inflation, debt, a porous border, crime and energy depletion,” Ms. Anderson said, “yet progressives in Washington are prioritizing a \$40 billion aid package to Ukraine.”

    Populists are not callous towards Ukraine. However, they are justifiably cynical about one-sided Fake Stream Media [FSM] coverage. The “Russia, Russia, Russia” myth was thoroughly demolished in court. That blow to SJW dogma badly hurt the credibility of FSM propaganda favoring Ukraine over Russia.
    ___

    Helping genuine Christian refugees would be supported by Christian Populists on both sides of the Atlantic.

    However, backing Tyrant Zelensky and other “pro-war / left-wing” WEF Elites makes no sense. Ending the Great Replacement requires an armistice in Ukraine that stops the flow of rape-ugees.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://rmx.news/article/ukrainian-women-in-sweden-warned-not-to-dress-in-a-way-that-could-provoke-muslim-men/

    (2) https://globalpolitics.info/us/why-the-once-hawkish-heritage-foundation-opposed-aid-to-ukraine.html

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @A123

    kremlinstoogeA123 is trying to appeal to the reader's sense of fair play and morality when considering whether or not to support the Ukrainian cause of defending its sovereignty and inviolability. In his quest for justice, all of the masacres within Ukraine at the hands of Russian invaders are just staged photo ops that try to gain the sympathy of uweary westerners that are being manipulated against the wholesome and righteous actions of Russia's military in Ukraine, and need to be disclosed as such.

    In his convoluted world, the real reason that the west is supporting the Ukrainian cause is to allow more Muslims refugees (from where, and which actual Moslem refugees are benefiting from this influx?) into Eiurope. He's seemingly blind to the fact that it's actually millions of Christian Ukrainians that are flooding into Europe and the US now. I met two such refugees in Church last Sunday, one from Odesa and one actually from the Bucha and Irpin region. The one from Bucha seems to have missed the photo opp that A123 seems certain that was staged by the Ukrainian side?

    He's certainly going to garner support for another one of his crackpot ideas that somehow disgruntled "American Populist Christians" aren't willing to support aid to Ukraine, all based upon the opinion of one blue blooded member of the Heritage Foundation?

    But to his credit, I did find it refreshing to see that he really does show some sympathy towards Ukrainian women, and warns them to not consider emigrating to Sweden, where the level of safety is not conducive for women who are more used to being dressed in a western style.

    Thank you kremlinstoogeA123 for your heartfelt warning!

  266. How adapted are the Southern Han to malaria, compared to the Northern?

    Was thinking that somebody ought to write a book about the demographic history of the world. Something that concentrates more on the historical period. That would attempt to explain how the Chinese were able to move into Southern China (mix of rice crop adaptation and malaria resistance?), or how the Germans were able to form bigger and bigger coalitions until they could invade the Romans.

  267. @Mr. Hack
    @Anatoly Karlin

    How do larger dogs get their faces bitten off from a smaller dog?

    https://www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/135773279.jpg?w=548

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Barbarossa

    Let me just apologise vis-a-vis regarding my earlier comment the decline of this forum. Faith restored.

    What breed of dogs are they btw? Mr. Hack, do you have the full video to illustrate Baltic assymetric military superiority further? Could Karlin provide a counter example for the sundry limitrophes out here?

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • LOL: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @songbird
    @Yevardian

    The most powerful dog in all of history has to be the Belgian mastiff, (which I assume is also the star of Ouida's story The Dog of Flanders.) During WWI, these dogs were used to pull carts with Maxim guns in them - puissant enough to kill all other dogs combined.

    Or at least any combination of dogs that entered the Low Countries, as it is doubtful they could work in hillier terrain, or against high-altitude-adapted Tibetan mastiffs, that AP seems to scorn.

    Here is one of many romanticizations of the dog by Japanese artists: (though not phenotypically accurate)
    https://youtu.be/RMXm_qZvpMs

    Unfortunately, the original breed has died off, so the title might still be considered up for grabs.

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Yevardian

    Do you happen to know if The Ukraine has a national sheepdog like Armenia does?

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/79/Armenian_Gampr_01.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Gampr

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Yevardian

    Sorry, no Baltic, but how about this Ukrainian asymmetric military superiority?

    https://www.kyivpost.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/ruzzia_ukraine_1-800x520.jpg

  268. @Dave Pinsen
    @SIMP simp

    Here's a good post explaining the Ukraine's importance to Russia:

    https://twitter.com/emeriticus/status/1530735136848896001?s=20&t=Tj0NqyBMboQEFFXV-thRew

    As far as the impact of Western sanctions on Russia:

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1531383016811024387?s=20&t=aM59QorG32St7YSV6YKOkg

    And as far as Russian prestige being diminished by facing a tough fight against quasi-Russians armed to the teeth with $50 billion+ of NATO weapons: what will it do to NATO prestige if Russia wins despite facing all those NATO weapons?

    After this war, Russia will be the only major power to have a military experienced in combined arms combat against a 1st world opponent. They will be more formidable, not less, militarily.

    Replies: @AP, @Yellowface Anon, @SIMP simp, @Corvinus

    Of course there will now be an account surplus. Europe refuses to sell things to Russia, but still buys Russian gas.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @AP

    I got that chart from an ex-Goldman Sachs economist's thread where he says about a third of the spike in the current account surplus is from the decline in imports due to sanctions, and the other two thirds is due to the spike in energy prices due to sanctions.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  269. AP says:
    @Beckow
    @German_reader

    Look up the meaning of "attempted". Sometimes a qualifier is used for a reason.

    There is another key difference:
    - Kiev bombed its civilian population first - a sequence in any conflict matters. As a German you should understand that what happened to civilians in Belarus and East Prussia was similar, but Germans did it first and that was a decisive factor.

    My personal connection is to the traditional European culture and that includes treating A as I would treat B. Too many here immediately drop any pretense of equal rights when the word Russian appears - they can be deprived of language rights, basic minority status, they are told to "move to Russia", and their killing is minimized or explained away. Now substitute any other ethnic group for Russians and Europe would go ballistic. That's the core issue and why there is a war - Europe could not bring itself to ask Kiev to act normally towards its Russian population. They still can't.

    Replies: @AP, @Wielgus

    There is another key difference:
    – Kiev bombed its civilian population first – a sequence in any conflict matters

    Not when it comes to the definition of genocide. If it turned out that some Armenians killed Turkish civilians first, would the mass murder of Armenians no longer be classified a genocide?

    We already knew you are a liar, German Reader highlighted your hypocrisy.

  270. @Yevardian
    @Mr. Hack

    Let me just apologise vis-a-vis regarding my earlier comment the decline of this forum. Faith restored.

    What breed of dogs are they btw? Mr. Hack, do you have the full video to illustrate Baltic assymetric military superiority further? Could Karlin provide a counter example for the sundry limitrophes out here?

    Replies: @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Mr. Hack

    The most powerful dog in all of history has to be the Belgian mastiff, (which I assume is also the star of Ouida’s story The Dog of Flanders.) During WWI, these dogs were used to pull carts with Maxim guns in them – puissant enough to kill all other dogs combined.

    Or at least any combination of dogs that entered the Low Countries, as it is doubtful they could work in hillier terrain, or against high-altitude-adapted Tibetan mastiffs, that AP seems to scorn.

    [MORE]

    Here is one of many romanticizations of the dog by Japanese artists: (though not phenotypically accurate)

    Unfortunately, the original breed has died off, so the title might still be considered up for grabs.

  271. @Mr. Hack
    @Anatoly Karlin

    How do larger dogs get their faces bitten off from a smaller dog?

    https://www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/135773279.jpg?w=548

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Barbarossa

    For what it’s worth, what is going on there is actually wolves within a pack greeting each other. Licking the muzzle and inside of the mouth is a common form of showing affection and familiarity.

    So, it’s not quite conveying what you intended but it’s a neat picture nonetheless.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Barbarossa

    At least I got the parameters of size of the two wolves to display my thought pattern on the subject. :-)

  272. @Yevardian
    @Mr. Hack

    Let me just apologise vis-a-vis regarding my earlier comment the decline of this forum. Faith restored.

    What breed of dogs are they btw? Mr. Hack, do you have the full video to illustrate Baltic assymetric military superiority further? Could Karlin provide a counter example for the sundry limitrophes out here?

    Replies: @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Mr. Hack

    Do you happen to know if The Ukraine has a national sheepdog like Armenia does?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Gampr

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Maybe Yevardian knows more but all I know of is the Ovcharka, which is a Russian breed. The Gampr looks a lot like the Kangal or Anatolian Shepherd that I used to have, but that isn't surprising since I'm sure they are very closely related.

  273. @Mr. Hack
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Just think of all of the wealth that Russia has already wasted on this stupid war? Remember, they were only a few days away from having their incredibly lucrative NS2 turned on in Germany, and now the EU is looking for ways to diversify away from Russian gas and oil (what a reversal of fortunes?).
    How many new roads could they have built and other public work and social welfare programs funded to help their own people prosper? And for what? Chasing Nazis within Ukraine, and ending up killing the elderly, women and children? Russian speakers too.....how stupid.

    Replies: @Seraphim

    The Vice Chancellor and Minister for Economic Affairs and Climate Protection of Germany Robert Habeck had to admit sadly that ”Russia makes more money by selling less oil”. In other words Russia gets wealthier by the day and the ‘West’ poorer.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Seraphim

    With friends like Zelensky and Nuland you don't ever really need any enemies!

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Seraphim

    I think that will change soon enough...

    Replies: @Seraphim

  274. @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    The Vice Chancellor and Minister for Economic Affairs and Climate Protection of Germany Robert Habeck had to admit sadly that ''Russia makes more money by selling less oil''. In other words Russia gets wealthier by the day and the 'West' poorer.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @Mr. Hack

    With friends like Zelensky and Nuland you don’t ever really need any enemies!

    • Agree: LondonBob
  275. @Barbarossa
    @Mr. Hack

    For what it's worth, what is going on there is actually wolves within a pack greeting each other. Licking the muzzle and inside of the mouth is a common form of showing affection and familiarity.

    So, it's not quite conveying what you intended but it's a neat picture nonetheless.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    At least I got the parameters of size of the two wolves to display my thought pattern on the subject. 🙂

    • Agree: Barbarossa
  276. @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    The Vice Chancellor and Minister for Economic Affairs and Climate Protection of Germany Robert Habeck had to admit sadly that ''Russia makes more money by selling less oil''. In other words Russia gets wealthier by the day and the 'West' poorer.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @Mr. Hack

    I think that will change soon enough…

    • Replies: @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    You think... good. Sweet dreams. Anyway “You cannot wake up someone who is only pretending to be asleep.”

  277. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Yevardian

    Do you happen to know if The Ukraine has a national sheepdog like Armenia does?

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/79/Armenian_Gampr_01.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Gampr

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    Maybe Yevardian knows more but all I know of is the Ovcharka, which is a Russian breed. The Gampr looks a lot like the Kangal or Anatolian Shepherd that I used to have, but that isn’t surprising since I’m sure they are very closely related.

  278. @Yevardian
    @Mr. Hack

    Let me just apologise vis-a-vis regarding my earlier comment the decline of this forum. Faith restored.

    What breed of dogs are they btw? Mr. Hack, do you have the full video to illustrate Baltic assymetric military superiority further? Could Karlin provide a counter example for the sundry limitrophes out here?

    Replies: @songbird, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Mr. Hack

    Sorry, no Baltic, but how about this Ukrainian asymmetric military superiority?

    • LOL: Mikhail
  279. Getting back to reality –

  280. @songbird
    Have just watched an anime that featured a flashback where a Japanese girl, then 5 y.o., ran from a concert hall, where classical music was being played, safely navigating the streets all alone, on her own, back to her parents' bakery.

    Anyway, it may be because the story was something of a tearjerker, and it moved my cold heart. But I don't care: I say do whatever it takes, to bring us back to that point!

    Whatever it takes... nuke the boomers, if it is necessary!!!
    ☢️💣🔥🧓 😎

    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠿⠟⠿⠿⣿⣿⠿⠛⠛⠻⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⠿⠟⠛⠛⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠉⠀⠀⠀⠉⠛⢿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⡟⠁⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠉⢿⣿
    ⣿⡿⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢸⣿
    ⣿⡇⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⢀⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣀⣠⣾⣿
    ⣿⣿⣄⡀⢀⡀⠀⠀⠀⠀⣠⣤⣤⣴⠿⠿⣦⣄⣀⣀⣴⣄⡀⠀⠀⣠⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣷⣶⠶⠟⠋⠈⠉⠀⠀⠀⠀⠉⠉⠉⠁⠉⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣤⣴⣷⣤⣀⣠⣶⣄⣀⣴⣶⣤⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⠉⠈⢹⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠿⠟⠛⠛⠛⠛⠉⠀⠀⠈⠙⠛⠛⠛⠛⠿⠿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⡏⠀⣤⣶⣶⣾⣿⣿⣿⡇⠀⠀⠘⣿⣿⣿⣿⣶⣶⣦⡄⠈⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣦⣄⣈⣉⠉⠛⠛⠛⠀⠀⠀⠀⠙⠛⠛⠋⢉⣉⣠⣤⣾⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⡿⠋⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠈⠻⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿
    ⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣭⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣤⣬⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿⣿

    Replies: @songbird, @Mikel

    nuke the boomers, if it is necessary!!!

    OK but boomer music was the best ever. By far.

    And besides, what have subsequent generations done about what boomers got wrong, except for doubling and tripling down?

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Mikel

    Mainly meant it as a joke - thought it was too long since we had a powerful comment about nukes.

    TBH, not really one of these generational warfare guys. (Though I was half-serious that a society with social trust and safety like that would be worth nearly any sacrifice.) From talking to older people, I get the idea that they've been judged a little unfairly, and put up a bit more of a fight against the establishment than most people realize.

    , @AP
    @Mikel


    nuke the boomers, if it is necessary!!!

    OK but boomer music was the best ever. By far
     
    The bad things attributed to Boomers were mostly the work of the previous so-called Greatest Generation; Boomers just benefited most from it and no one wants to condemn the people who saved the West from Nazism as young men, for causing so much ruin to the West as they aged and took over.

    As for music, congratulations on not being biased in favour of the music of your youth. I haven’t escaped that trap and consider Gen X music to have been the best. Boomer music often seems too primitive.

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Mikel

  281. @Coconuts
    @Thulean Friend


    The world as a whole has certainly gotten more peaceful, prosperous and tolerant, despite occasional setbacks. I see no apparent reason why it wouldn’t continue.
     
    This is true, much of the world still has some way to go before reaching the level of the advanced democracies in the 2000s, but looks like in one way and another it is heading in that direction.

    Question is, what tendencies are developing in the most advanced democracies?

    It seems like tolerance is in decline, but we are not seeing the kind of masculine intolerance suggestive of vitality and capacity for creative confrontation, more the bovine feminine kind, enforced by bands of overbearing female primary school teachers.

    These societies are peaceful, but this is like the placidity and inertia of the obese or people bed ridden with illness. The absence of children can mean it feels something like the prequel to the quiet of the grave.

    There is almost ridiculous prosperity in places, but much of it inherited, no longer really due to creative labour, creativity and novelty often has to be imported from abroad (from places that are less feminist, more ethnocentric, more intolerant of male homosexuals).

    There were always concerns about the potential mediocrity and triviality of democratic man, but the potential for the empowerment of women and pathic men to lead to long term social/cultural stagnation and widespread sterility was imo under recognised.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    It seems like tolerance is in decline, but we are not seeing the kind of masculine intolerance suggestive of vitality and capacity for creative confrontation, more the bovine feminine kind, enforced by bands of overbearing female primary school teachers.

    That’s a very manoid-centric conception of the universe, where conflict has to be concomitant to progress. Women have a more co-operative way of thinking and the feminisation of the world is easily one of the best social outcomes humanity can wish for.

    There is almost ridiculous prosperity in places, but much of it inherited, no longer really due to creative labour, creativity and novelty often has to be imported from abroad (from places that are less feminist, more ethnocentric, more intolerant of male homosexuals).

    Last I checked, countries with a high share of toxic masculinity (e.g. MENA region) are largely innovative wastelands. Not surprisingly, in the country with highest innovative capacity in region, Israel, women have by far the best rights and have made the greatest advances – though that will be threatened in the future by Haredi fundamentalism. On the other hand, Arab youth are secularising fast and there is an understanding among many Arab intellectuals that they have to change with regards to women’s rights.

  282. @Mr. Hack
    @Seraphim

    I think that will change soon enough...

    Replies: @Seraphim

    You think… good. Sweet dreams. Anyway “You cannot wake up someone who is only pretending to be asleep.”

    • Agree: Mikhail
  283. @A123
    @Thulean Friend


    America is a negative outlier in some ways. That cannot be denied.
    [Life Expectancy vs. Health Expenditure]

    As an American, you’re in a better position to answer why this is the case than I am. Personally, my guess is that there are some unique factors at play here that aren’t easily generalisable
     
    The left hand axis starts at 70 Years Old. While that makes for a less compressed image, it also makes the disparity appear larger than it actually is. The actual spread is 2 or 3 years.

    Youth deaths have a huge impact on Life Expectancy. Presumably, the key factors here are largely the intersection of unwed mothers and poverty:

     
    https://cichprofile.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/International_E_5.3.7.jpg
     

    The U.S. is a top performer for Life Expectancy, if one limits the calculation to the cohort who make it to 25 or older.
    _____

    On the spending side -- In the U.S., ~50% of an individual's Total Lifetime Health Expenditure occurs in the last 6 months of life. If one does not have advance decrees in place, it is very easy for futile efforts to chew up huge dollars.

    Lawsuit risk is another key contributing factor. Private medical practices have logical reasons to engage in "Defensive Medicine", such as additional testing to rule out low probability issues.

    I would say the same thing about mass shootings that also seem to be an American problem. (Gun availability is quite high in some European countries like Switzerland or Finland, yet they don’t suffer these same pathologies).
     
    Mass shootings are actually quite uncommon in the U.S. as well. The Fake Stream Media are huge supporters of gun confiscation, much like Hitler's efforts in the 1930's. This leads to massive coverage raging against the U.S. Constitution. I suspect this leads to 'copycat' occurrences, which are then also hyper-covered.

     
    https://images.angelpub.com/2013/03/17906/death-by-weapon-type-chart.png
     

    Reducing mass shootings in the U.S. would require Press Control -not- Gun Control. If the Constitution is flexible, we might as well flex the 1st Amendment... Right?

    After all.... U.S. Media MegaCorporations are repeating Hitler's position. That makes them "Literally Nazis". Who could oppose Nazi Control?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    The U.S. is a top performer for Life Expectancy, if one limits the calculation to the cohort who make it to 25 or older.

    To me that comes across as cherrypicking.

    Presumably, the key factors here are largely the intersection of unwed mothers and poverty

    Iceland has one of the highest shares of out-of-wedlock births yet remains a peaceful and prosperous nation. I think this obsession with combining marriage and childbirth is a religious overhang for Americans.

    Lawsuit risk is another key contributing factor. Private medical practices have logical reasons to engage in “Defensive Medicine”, such as additional testing to rule out low probability issues.

    Wouldn’t that paradoxically work in favour of the patients’ longevity, even if an argument can be made that it racks up costs unnecessarily?

    Mass shootings are actually quite uncommon in the U.S. as well.

    On the whole, yes, but compared to other Western countries it seems to be a much bigger issue, even adjusted for population size.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Thulean Friend



    Presumably, the key factors here are largely the intersection of unwed mothers and poverty
     
    Iceland has one of the highest shares of out-of-wedlock births yet remains a peaceful and prosperous nation. I think this obsession with combining marriage and childbirth is a religious overhang for Americans.
     
    To me this comes across as cherrypicking.

    Iceland is incredibly small, both culturally and ethnically homogeneous. When every child in the country is effectively a genetic niece or nephew, different biological imperatives are at work. Essentially every adult looks after every child, especially where public misbehaviour is concerned.

    This concept is incompatible with multicultural modernism. Can you imagine the outrage if a Christian adult tried to encourage proper behaviour from non-Christian immigrant children?


    Lawsuit risk is another key contributing factor. Private medical practices have logical reasons to engage in “Defensive Medicine”, such as additional testing to rule out low probability issues.
     
    Wouldn’t that paradoxically work in favour of the patients’ longevity, even if an argument can be made that it racks up costs unnecessarily?
     
    It does work in favour of patient longevity. The U.S. is a top performer for Life Expectancy, if one limits the calculation to the cohort who make it to 25 or older.

    Poor mothers with children born out of wedlock are much more likely to use charity medical facilities that are difficult to impossible to sue. These facilities tend to be overworked and more more mistake prone.


    Mass shootings are actually quite uncommon in the U.S. as well.
     
    On the whole, yes, but compared to other Western countries it seems to be a much bigger issue, even adjusted for population size.
     
    The Lügenpresse over reports these cases in the America. While their intent is 1930's Germany inspired gun confiscation advocacy, to those who are mentally unstable it comes across as glorification. This yields copycat events.

    How many similar cases (e.g. school mass stabbings) occur in Europe, but are unreported because the perpetrator was a migrant while the victims were native Christians?

    The solution in both cases is, Propaganda Control -not- Weapon Control.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @German_reader, @Mikel

  284. @Mikel
    @songbird


    nuke the boomers, if it is necessary!!!
     
    OK but boomer music was the best ever. By far.

    https://youtu.be/5Cg-j0X09Ag

    And besides, what have subsequent generations done about what boomers got wrong, except for doubling and tripling down?

    Replies: @songbird, @AP

    Mainly meant it as a joke – thought it was too long since we had a powerful comment about nukes.

    TBH, not really one of these generational warfare guys. (Though I was half-serious that a society with social trust and safety like that would be worth nearly any sacrifice.) From talking to older people, I get the idea that they’ve been judged a little unfairly, and put up a bit more of a fight against the establishment than most people realize.

  285. @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend

    Even leaving aside the ideological and political preferences that you mention, I think that there is alarming and notable decline in the United States. This dovetails with the response that I need to get back to Mikel as well.

    While the US is a very wealthy country the distribution is getting more and more unequal. I believe that during Covid it will turn out to be perhaps the largest transfer of wealth upward in recent history. As the middle class gets increasingly squeezed downward it creates far more desperation and hopelessness as the reality of maintaining economic position, much less advancing it, appears increasingly impossible. The reality is that upward mobility in the US is now largely dead and the moneyed classes have largely reached a point where they can perpetuate advantages to their offspring in an increasingly insular world.

    The jobs which once were the stepping stones into the middle class and modest asset creation have largely disappeared. My area is haunted by the memories of the once proud and sufficient family farms and the stable industrial jobs which gave people like my grandparents a comfortable place in the middle class. Faced by that void in opportunity many just check out and succumb to despair. I see it all around me and my area is fairly typical of a great portion of the country.

    Another worrying sign of decline is in education. American public education is truly largely a farce at this point. Schools have endless ways to fudge the stats to make it look like they are doing a better job than they are, but the real life results are grim. It's becoming a regular occurrence for high school graduates to have essentially no basic literacy and math skills. Things like writing a cohesive paragraph with proper spelling and grammar or knowing multiplication tables is increasingly completely lacking in high school graduates.

    Colleges are doing more and more remediation, essentially having to re-teach high school or even grade school concepts to give their students a semblance of readiness. It's going to be (and already is) a disaster in employment. The trades are still dominated by 55 to 65 year old guys who are rapidly aging out of the workforce. There are so few capable young people to take over, that those who can hack it will do extremely well, but there are countless more who are nearly unemployable even as unskilled labor. In five to ten years, this dynamic will be extremely acute.

    Real environmental issues go completely unaddressed. The American West is running out of water in a big way and this poses some intractable problems for a large share of agriculture. Florida too is running into seawater intrusion as it's aquifers are drawn down unsustainably. Even in the fertile Midwest topsoil is being consumed at an alarming rate. Instead of real retrenchment we get politicians who want to sell us on a magical thinking solar panel future. We get massive subsidized solar farms in NY; an area with the worst solar resource in the country.

    On degrowth, I think that we actually could use a lot less energy without impacting our quality of life. So much consumption is purely wasteful, much of this waste by design to keep the economic hamster wheel turning. Conservation should be a huge push, but this is politically and economically unpalatable.

    Fundamentally, I think that world has arguably gotten more prosperous and tolerant under the umbrella of plentiful and cheap energy and resources and consumption. I think we are going to end up increasingly pinched in these regards and because the political classes have failed to engage the problems seriously no realistic solutions have been advanced. The lower classes can be kept happy with a larger TV and the newest cell phone for a while but once it becomes hard to afford food or heat the house it will get uglier. It's same dynamic which saw increased wheat prices fuel the Arab Spring, but coming increasingly for developed countries.

    I understand your horror of factory farming, by the way. When I got married my wife was a vegetarian and I joined her somewhat ambivalently for a while. We ended up believing that the "how" of what you eat is more important than the "what" and that informed quite a bit of our choice to come out to the middle of nowhere and have animals. Grass and animals are the original solar power, after all! It's actually really interesting how managing our land for livestock has also increased the wild biodiversity greatly. It doesn't have to be a zero sum game, but humans often make it that.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @AP

    The reality is that upward mobility in the US is now largely dead and the moneyed classes have largely reached a point where they can perpetuate advantages to their offspring in an increasingly insular world.

    I agree. Many thoughtful US economists have noted that the “American dream”, namely the idea that anyone from poverty can rise to prosperity is now actually a European dream.

    However, these outcomes are also the inevitable byproduct of a neoliberal system shift that began in the 1980s. As Piketty points out, a problem that has been created by man can be unmade by man.

    In other words, US decline in social mobility is much more staggering than in Europe and it was far from inevitable. That is both depressing – this could have been avoided – but it also carries a kernel of optimism: it can be changed.

    If more people had your insights, the ruling class in America would have a lot to fear. This is perhaps a bit speculative, but my suspicion is that the obsession with identity politics that the US corporate media has been ginning up is partly a way to distract the population from the fact that they’d being robbed in broad daylight.

    Colleges are doing more and more remediation, essentially having to re-teach high school or even grade school concepts to give their students a semblance of readiness. It’s going to be (and already is) a disaster in employment. The trades are still dominated by 55 to 65 year old guys who are rapidly aging out of the workforce. There are so few capable young people to take over, that those who can hack it will do extremely well, but there are countless more who are nearly unemployable even as unskilled labor. In five to ten years, this dynamic will be extremely acute.

    I’m trying to find points of disagreement so we could have a debate but we seem to agree again. I would just add that the jihad against SAT/ACT is a worrying sign to me. I want a purely meritocratic society. Standardised tests have their flaws, but they are far superior to the kind of vague “holistic admission process” that US colleges indulge themselves in. Frankly, it often seems to me to be a cover for racial prejudice and exclusion of capable candidates.

    Interestingly, research that I’ve read on US admissions to selective colleges have shown that there isn’t just a bias in favour of less capable candidates based on race – which is what you’d expect – but also for “legacy admissions” and the offspring of donors. These latter groups are much less talked about in these contexts and these silent favors given to the offspring of the monied class is probably why there is little discontent with affirmative action among US ruling elites.

    More generally, I think the German model is superior, with a greater emphasis on skilled tradesmen and less overeducation. I would also re-plug Caplan’s criticism of higher education more broadly, which has influenced my thinking.

    On degrowth, I think that we actually could use a lot less energy without impacting our quality of life. So much consumption is purely wasteful, much of this waste by design to keep the economic hamster wheel turning. Conservation should be a huge push, but this is politically and economically unpalatable.

    Here we finally get to some kind of disagreement – finally!

    While conservation is usually the best and “cheapest” way to combat climate change, I think many people in the West criminally underestimate how intricately tied our energy use is linked to our quality of life, which I define as our revealed preferences. Many people would simply never accept even a per capita energy reduction of -30%.

    The best hope lies in the transportation sector, especially in the urban cities where excessive car use should be radically cut down. I would argue that there are non-climate related reasons to do so too, such as making our cities walkable, pleasant and more interconnected rather than having giant stroads criss-crossing and marring our urban landscapes.

    I understand your horror of factory farming, by the way. When I got married my wife was a vegetarian and I joined her somewhat ambivalently for a while. We ended up believing that the “how” of what you eat is more important than the “what” and that informed quite a bit of our choice to come out to the middle of nowhere and have animals. Grass and animals are the original solar power, after all! It’s actually really interesting how managing our land for livestock has also increased the wild biodiversity greatly. It doesn’t have to be a zero sum game, but humans often make it that.

    I’m not militant on this topic. I’ve frequently alternated between veganism and vegetarianism at times; even lapsed into pescetarianism during rare moments of weakness.

    What’s ultimately important here, I think, is for people to think about and engage these topics seriously and then make the choices they best deem fit for their situation, as you’ve clearly done. The issue arises from the fact that many – perhaps most – people never actively make these choices, but merely passively continue into the paths set out for them by society writ large.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Thulean Friend


    my suspicion is that the obsession with identity politics that the US corporate media has been ginning up is partly a way to distract the population from the fact that they’d being robbed in broad daylight
     
    Emphatically yes. Woke is a perfect cover for corporate power in that it subsumes economically focused versions of leftist thought with one where mega corps can be rendered virtuous by posting a BLM or LGBT flag on their Twitter. For all it's talk, Woke poses zero threat to the establishment.

    On higher education, I think a lot has to do with the colleges as vested interests drumming up business. It's of course great for them to convince everyone to go to college and to push degree inflation as a value added "higher standard". I expect the college education industry to partially collapse in the next ten years since it has so over-saturated the market and the costs are so prohibitive compared to the benefits for many at this point.

    Your point on legacy admissions dovetails with our points on lack of social mobility. The upper crust is ossifying into an insular class of petty aristocracy of sorts which is accomplished at making sure their (many times unintelligent) prodigy maintain the same standing.

    Another aspect of diversity hires it that this is a cadre that will be very loyal to the structures which gave them their place. They will be a strong force against any change in a more meritocratic direction because they will perceive it as a threat.

    So, between the legacy and under-qualified diversity hires I think we are looking at an increasingly inept crop of leaders and managers up and coming. This is coupled by a great number of the mass work force who has terrible basic proficiency in reading and math as well as a terrible work ethic. Society as a whole will be very strained but anyone with some basic competency should be able to do quite well.

    To your point on revealed preferences, I agree that our collective choices show more than words. We are comfort seeking , materialistic, and lazy as a whole. But this is not immutable, and has been reinforced for generations by psychic saturation of advertising and pop culture which has made such behavior the norm, even virtuous. The worship of celebrities is a case in point. Our obsession with them is telling. They are our modern day saints and heroes, but sadly it does not speak highly of our aspirations. We could have other aspirations over time with the correct reinforcement, but have little collective will to break the febrile cycle.

    So I agree with you that it is in theory possible to turn things around but that all signs point to it getting far worse before it gets better, at least in the US. Again, my main source of pessimism is not that it's impossible to deal with issues, but that I don't think there is any collective will to deal with them. I see little to make me think that optimism is warranted in the short or medium term. Eventually it will come back around to a more sane outlook, but I think it will require a fair bit of pain to reinforce those points. Humans are generally bad at self regulation and seem to require circumstances to impose limits to their foolishness.

    Replies: @A123, @Thulean Friend

  286. @AP
    @Dave Pinsen

    Of course there will now be an account surplus. Europe refuses to sell things to Russia, but still buys Russian gas.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    I got that chart from an ex-Goldman Sachs economist’s thread where he says about a third of the spike in the current account surplus is from the decline in imports due to sanctions, and the other two thirds is due to the spike in energy prices due to sanctions.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Dave Pinsen

    The best way for any economy to deal with the loss of trade and capital flows (what sanctions and every disruption means) is to practice a resilient natural economy, to be a Buddhist, stop your craving and radically embrace degrowth, but capitalists and socialists alike won't tell you this.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  287. @German_reader
    @LatW


    That one no longer feels they have a society to defend, doesn’t mean they should be mocking the men who still want to defend their countries and families.
     
    "216" is a particularly stupid commenter, not going to defend him. I also agree that Ukrainian soldiers shouldn't be mocked, whatever one thinks about other issues related to the war there's certainly a lot of admirable heroism among them. I can't imagine what they're facing, given the odds.
    However, I think you don't quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine. For whatever reason, Ukraine has become the cause du jour for the liberal establishment and its media apparatus throughout the West (and no, I don't believe at all that this is because progressives are somehow by nature more caring or opposed to tyranny), with exactly the same mechanisms used to silence any dissenting opinions that have been used to shut down debate on many other issues in recent years, like immigration or the measures related to the pandemic. It just feels again like an over-privileged, perpetually outraged pseudo-elite is using this crisis as merely the latest excuse to live out their frankly sadistic and authoritarian inclinations. It's hard to ignore that dynamic, and imo, combined with the likely effect of the economic sanctions, it's one factor why any consensus on support for Ukraine might turn out to be rather brittle in the long run.

    Replies: @LatW, @A123, @LondonBob, @216

    Callous and cynical are those who use Ukraine for their own ideological or ethnic prejudices, strange world where those who seek peace are denounced.

    • Replies: @AP
    @LondonBob

    You a fan of Neville? Germany 1939 was a bit worse than Russia 2022 but the approach to peace and war were similar.

    Replies: @sudden death, @songbird

  288. 216 says: • Website
    @LatW
    @sudden death


    Are you really the cuck type who would gladly watch your own woman being raped by foreign invader as long as you gullibly believe propaganda image of his leader allegedly being “antihomo racist”?
     
    I'm starting to suspect that some of them really wouldn't fight against a foreign invader (or wouldn't be able to). It's just that in their case there isn't one, so they can remain comfortable and untouched in their cowardliness. They might even not object to their women being abused, since those women are "feminists" anyway. That's how far some of the relationships have deteriorated.

    As to the big internal globohomo enemy, it's all just talk. Very few act like real trads.

    Replies: @German_reader, @216

    I’m starting to suspect that some of them really wouldn’t fight against a foreign invader (or wouldn’t be able to).

    Western European regimes will literally jail people who are engaged in anti-immigration movements.

    They might even not object to their women being abused, since those women are “feminists” anyway. Very few act like real trads.

    “Real trads” are simps. I don’t think so.

    The EU doesn’t hide its disdain for social conservatives, and that is the proximal cause which Ukraine is fighting this war over. Victory for the Zelensky regime is a victory for Western liberals, and means Pride parades from Lviv to Mariupol. No thanks.

  289. @German_reader
    @LatW


    That one no longer feels they have a society to defend, doesn’t mean they should be mocking the men who still want to defend their countries and families.
     
    "216" is a particularly stupid commenter, not going to defend him. I also agree that Ukrainian soldiers shouldn't be mocked, whatever one thinks about other issues related to the war there's certainly a lot of admirable heroism among them. I can't imagine what they're facing, given the odds.
    However, I think you don't quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine. For whatever reason, Ukraine has become the cause du jour for the liberal establishment and its media apparatus throughout the West (and no, I don't believe at all that this is because progressives are somehow by nature more caring or opposed to tyranny), with exactly the same mechanisms used to silence any dissenting opinions that have been used to shut down debate on many other issues in recent years, like immigration or the measures related to the pandemic. It just feels again like an over-privileged, perpetually outraged pseudo-elite is using this crisis as merely the latest excuse to live out their frankly sadistic and authoritarian inclinations. It's hard to ignore that dynamic, and imo, combined with the likely effect of the economic sanctions, it's one factor why any consensus on support for Ukraine might turn out to be rather brittle in the long run.

    Replies: @LatW, @A123, @LondonBob, @216

    “216” is a particularly stupid commenter, not going to defend him.

    Your personal dislike for me should not extend to calling me “stupid”. I have never made personal attacks on to your character. Why is reciprocity such a hard concept for you?

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @216

    Just stop writing stupid comments, then I'll re-adjust my opinion of you.

  290. 216 says: • Website
    @LatW
    @German_reader


    However, I think you don’t quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine.
     
    I understand it very very well. It is an unfortunate coincidence of political currents intersecting. I would suggest that Western right wingers address their left-wing establishment with these issues directly, instead of channelling their anger and resentment towards Ukraine. The good news for Ukraine is that they don't really need Western right wingers (except the identitarians).

    Btw, my comment was not aimed at Germany (which still seems to retain something resembling a real ethnicity), but more towards a certain section of American right wingers. I wanted the Lithuanian poster to know this, he may not be aware how degenerate things are in some Western circles.

    And, btw, I do understand your frustration. A friend of mine recently returned from a trip to Germany, she did the German castles tour. When she shared the pics, there was a pic of the Hohenschwangau Castle with a giant Ukrainian flag displayed on the castle wall. So even there. I mean, it's certainly a very generous and a genuinely friendly gesture, but I understand how it might seem a little overdone to those who view it as annoying virtue signaling.

    Replies: @216, @LondonBob, @sudden death

    I would suggest that Western right wingers address their left-wing establishment with these issues directly, instead of channelling their anger and resentment towards Ukraine.

    They literally banned Trump and almost every single far-right figure in the US from using Big Tech social media. We are at perennial risk of doxxing and cancellation.

    No West Europe country has a far-right government or even far-right parties in the government. No polling indicates that this will change anytime soon.

    Indeed, in much of Europe, being pro-Russia has been criminalized. My cause loses nothing from seeing Russia annex Ukraine, while the liberal cause would suffer an immense collapse in prestige.

    I’m an actual “AmericaFirst” conservative, and while more partial to the Russian cause, I’ve been willing to condemn the invasion, the war crimes, the lack of social conservatism and A. Karlin’s lack of support for the latter.

    None of the Ukrainains here are willing to condemn the liberalism of their President and the liberalism of their EU/US supporters; whose main goal is to destroy the two most conservative countries in Europe.

  291. @LatW
    @German_reader


    However, I think you don’t quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine.
     
    I understand it very very well. It is an unfortunate coincidence of political currents intersecting. I would suggest that Western right wingers address their left-wing establishment with these issues directly, instead of channelling their anger and resentment towards Ukraine. The good news for Ukraine is that they don't really need Western right wingers (except the identitarians).

    Btw, my comment was not aimed at Germany (which still seems to retain something resembling a real ethnicity), but more towards a certain section of American right wingers. I wanted the Lithuanian poster to know this, he may not be aware how degenerate things are in some Western circles.

    And, btw, I do understand your frustration. A friend of mine recently returned from a trip to Germany, she did the German castles tour. When she shared the pics, there was a pic of the Hohenschwangau Castle with a giant Ukrainian flag displayed on the castle wall. So even there. I mean, it's certainly a very generous and a genuinely friendly gesture, but I understand how it might seem a little overdone to those who view it as annoying virtue signaling.

    Replies: @216, @LondonBob, @sudden death

    I would suggest the Ukraine let the people of the Donbass live in peace.

  292. @Beckow
    @LatW


    ...Did you miss Duda’s speech at Rada?
     
    I did. I admit I have missed all of "Duda's" speeches. Did I really miss anything?

    the resolution will be found in the battle field.
     
    Exactly. But if the resolution is not to your liking will you accept it? If Russia keeps most of the Black See coast and Donbas? Or will the 'stemming sympathy for each other' make it impossible and we will just go on and on, fighting endlessly.

    the pro-Russian side is not quick to procreate. Even if they had bilingualism, this fact wouldn’t change.
     
    That is a weird non-sequitur. Are you suggesting that people can be deprived of basic rights, like a right to their own language, because they don't procreate enough? On second thought, let's go with that thought - I have always supported not giving any retirement benefits to the childless. But let's do it everywhere, not just in Donbas.

    It doesn't justify Kiev after 2014 calling its own Russian citizens "terrorists" (in Donbas for example) and bombing them for 8 years. They are as human as you and I, they have the same rights, ignoring and demonizing them doesn't help - that's how we got here.

    Replies: @LatW, @Miro23

    … the resolution will be found in the battle field.

    Exactly. But if the resolution is not to your liking will you accept it? If Russia keeps most of the Black Sea coast and Donbas? Or will the ‘stemming sympathy for each other’ make it impossible and we will just go on and on, fighting endlessly.

    The way to avoid endless war is with total defeat. IOW the total defeat and occupation of Ukraine to the Polish/Rumanian border.

    This would have various advantages for the Russians:

    – No more proxy-war. Attacks on Russian forces would then have to come directly from Poland (NATO) bringing on explicit WW3 if the US/Europe really wanted that.

    – Russians could rebuild a functioning Ukrainian society with energy/food available + an improvement in the abysmal corruption/oligarch situation.

    The evidence seems to be, that many Ukrainians aren’t too concerned about who their rulers are. They just want a functioning society and to be left alone.

  293. AP says:
    @Mikel
    @songbird


    nuke the boomers, if it is necessary!!!
     
    OK but boomer music was the best ever. By far.

    https://youtu.be/5Cg-j0X09Ag

    And besides, what have subsequent generations done about what boomers got wrong, except for doubling and tripling down?

    Replies: @songbird, @AP

    nuke the boomers, if it is necessary!!!

    OK but boomer music was the best ever. By far

    The bad things attributed to Boomers were mostly the work of the previous so-called Greatest Generation; Boomers just benefited most from it and no one wants to condemn the people who saved the West from Nazism as young men, for causing so much ruin to the West as they aged and took over.

    As for music, congratulations on not being biased in favour of the music of your youth. I haven’t escaped that trap and consider Gen X music to have been the best. Boomer music often seems too primitive.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @AP

    I agree that WW2 was the real inflection point in America. In Europe it was perhaps more WW1.

    The Greatest Generation were the ones that raised the Boomers, as you point out. I think that the Boomers were spoiled because they were coddled by parents who remembered the Depression and had just gone through a shattering war. They wanted their children to be insulated from everything and had the material wealth to make it happen.

    It was a over-compensation with disastrous consequences. Likewise the Boomers as hippies rebelled against the vacuous materialism and conformity of their parents. So we have a generational pendulum swing of excesses and reactions always mediated by a culture of mass media and materialism. There are no cultural forces to moderate it into a more sustainable and stable form so it continues to oscillate.

    I suppose it's worth noting that generational animosity and rebellion is really a hallmark of the modern age. It doesn't seem to figure into the vast predominance of human history.

    Replies: @AP

    , @Mikel
    @AP


    As for music, congratulations on not being biased in favour of the music of your youth. I haven’t escaped that trap and consider Gen X music to have been the best. Boomer music often seems too primitive.
     
    I'm a bit older than you, from the gen divide era, and I do consider that the music from the 70s is better but a direct evolution from the 60s. But I think it all depends on the definition. Was music composed and performed by Boomers in the Gen X period Boomer or Gen X music? Are Madonna's latest releases Gen Alpha music?

    Replies: @AP, @Barbarossa

  294. @LatW
    @German_reader


    However, I think you don’t quite understand why many Western right-wingers are so cynical or even callous about Ukraine.
     
    I understand it very very well. It is an unfortunate coincidence of political currents intersecting. I would suggest that Western right wingers address their left-wing establishment with these issues directly, instead of channelling their anger and resentment towards Ukraine. The good news for Ukraine is that they don't really need Western right wingers (except the identitarians).

    Btw, my comment was not aimed at Germany (which still seems to retain something resembling a real ethnicity), but more towards a certain section of American right wingers. I wanted the Lithuanian poster to know this, he may not be aware how degenerate things are in some Western circles.

    And, btw, I do understand your frustration. A friend of mine recently returned from a trip to Germany, she did the German castles tour. When she shared the pics, there was a pic of the Hohenschwangau Castle with a giant Ukrainian flag displayed on the castle wall. So even there. I mean, it's certainly a very generous and a genuinely friendly gesture, but I understand how it might seem a little overdone to those who view it as annoying virtue signaling.

    Replies: @216, @LondonBob, @sudden death

    Btw, my comment was not aimed at Germany (which still seems to retain something resembling a real ethnicity), but more towards a certain section of American right wingers. I wanted the Lithuanian poster to know this, he may not be aware how degenerate things are in some Western circles.

    imho there is nothing special or unprecedented about this, some people just always had, have and will be having their own preferential manias, which becomes the center of their own personal universe, be it gay obsessions (sometimes to the point of watching such porno in order to better know the enemy, lol) or Jew obsession through all the times or ages.

    If RF suddenly really gets some wunderwaffe not just in propaganda, but becomes able to defeat and conquer at least part of USA, those people will be neo-petainists cheering such occupation by foreign power and later would be sentenced to death by their own compatriots when national liberation movement prevails.

  295. @LondonBob
    @German_reader

    Callous and cynical are those who use Ukraine for their own ideological or ethnic prejudices, strange world where those who seek peace are denounced.

    Replies: @AP

    You a fan of Neville? Germany 1939 was a bit worse than Russia 2022 but the approach to peace and war were similar.

    • Troll: Mikhail
    • Replies: @sudden death
    @AP

    Better to ask if he's a fan of Mosley, if he's indeed British, but not just RF-ian cosplaying on the net as such:


    As the European situation moved towards war, the BUF began to nominate Parliamentary by-election candidates and launched campaigns on the theme of "Mind Britain's Business". Mosley remained popular as late as summer 1939. His Britain First rally at the Earls Court Exhibition Hall on 16 July 1939 was the biggest indoor political rally in British history, with a reported 30,000 attendees.
    After the outbreak of war, Mosley led the campaign for a negotiated peace, but after the Fall of France and the commencement of aerial bombardment (see the Blitz) overall public opinion of him became hostile.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oswald_Mosley
    , @songbird
    @AP


    You a fan of Neville?
     
    Chamberlain represented the popular will, in the approach to peace, rather than the will of a narrow clique of war hawks or special interests. We should all be fans of him.

    The war was not in the interests of the British people, and it was not to their benefit that it was fought.

    @sudden death

    Better to ask if he’s a fan of Mosley
     
    Mosley wouldn't have let his country be invaded and his people be displaced, which is a big part of why he was villainized, he didn't support alien interests, and it wasn't the natives who spent the most energy trying to break up his rallies.

    Replies: @German_reader, @sudden death, @Emil Nikola Richard

  296. @AP
    @LondonBob

    You a fan of Neville? Germany 1939 was a bit worse than Russia 2022 but the approach to peace and war were similar.

    Replies: @sudden death, @songbird

    Better to ask if he’s a fan of Mosley, if he’s indeed British, but not just RF-ian cosplaying on the net as such:

    As the European situation moved towards war, the BUF began to nominate Parliamentary by-election candidates and launched campaigns on the theme of “Mind Britain’s Business”. Mosley remained popular as late as summer 1939. His Britain First rally at the Earls Court Exhibition Hall on 16 July 1939 was the biggest indoor political rally in British history, with a reported 30,000 attendees.
    After the outbreak of war, Mosley led the campaign for a negotiated peace, but after the Fall of France and the commencement of aerial bombardment (see the Blitz) overall public opinion of him became hostile.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oswald_Mosley

    • Agree: AP
  297. A123 says: • Website
    @Thulean Friend
    @A123


    The U.S. is a top performer for Life Expectancy, if one limits the calculation to the cohor