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Open Thread 185: Russia/Ukraine
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The previous Open Thread has passed 800 comments and reportedly getting a little sluggish, so here’s a new one for the Karlin Community.

— Ron Unz

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Open Thread, Russia, Ukraine 
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  1. Sher Singh is a committed Sikh partisan

    Not committed to the Sikh people – only the Maryada or Code of Conduct (death)

    Just honest about where the intentions/perspectives lie.

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    @sher singh

    Isn't there some famous Sikh martyr who was executed via being sawed in half and he took it without screaming? Does Sikhism teach magic ways to control pain? I could use such magic to help with my sinus problems.

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Sher Singh

    , @Barbarossa
    @sher singh

    You've gotten me interested in looking into the history of the Sikhs in India. The people within a people aspect seems like an interesting dynamic to learn more about. Do you have any recommendations on good histories?

    https://www.amazon.com/History-Sikhs-1469-1839-Oxford-Collection/dp/0195673085

    This one looks pretty promising to me, but what do I know?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Emil Nikola Richard, @RSDB

  2. Flashman At The Charge

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashman_at_the_Charge

    Congreve Rockets smash up a Russian expedition to conquer India. By sinking ships coming down the Rivers in Central Asia. Count Ignatieff makes an appearance. Real Life Almost playing out like fictional script.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Wokechoke

    I've heard some rumors that Moskva was done in by British-made missiles, but I don't see how it can be proved one way or the other.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    , @S
    @Wokechoke


    Flashman At The Charge
     
    Soooo...that's where the character Lord Flasheart came from in Rowan Atkinson's Blackadder series. As a related aside, Miranda Richardson as Queenie in the same series has to have been the hottest Queen Elizabeth there ever was.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/06/09/article-2653004-1E9D3ADF00000578-282_634x476.jpg

    http://i1.wp.com/www.frockflicks.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/tumblr_ms46wdTrxa1sy769zo5_1280.jpg

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @Philip Owen
    @Wokechoke

    The Russian invasion of India actually occured. There was French support. It disintegrated due to poor logistics before it even left Russian territory. IT did get East of the Caspian. Of course that could have been propaganda to discuss Flashman's use of missiles. Which is worse to admit to enemy competence or one's own incompetence.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  3. I am unashamedly pro-Russian and believed they have been goaded into this war.

    I would like to believe they are winning.

    I am waiting for the famed cauldron in the east to become a reality.

    I have been waiting such a long time, I am beginning to tke the MSM seriously again.

    I still don’t think the Russians were responsible for Bucha.

    • Thanks: JimDandy
    • LOL: Mr. Hack
    • Troll: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @utu
    @22pp22

    "I would like to believe they are winning." - Ask yourself a question why supply lines from Poland, Slovakia and Romania were not cut off by Russians. What stops them? There are ten transport planes with supplies from America coming every day to Poland. Then there are tens of thousands of tons of ammo moved daily and more and more heavy weapons are coming form all over Europe and even Australia. These supplies must go through several hundreds of miles on open roads and railways in Ukraine to reach place where they are needed. It is 750 miles from Lvov to Donetsk. Where is Russian air force and cruise missiles to bomb the supplies and where is Russian specnaz to blow up most important bridges on the supply lines?

    You are form NZ, aren't you? And you are big anti-vaxxer and so on, right? You would feel more at home here in the US where there is much more wackos like you per capita than in NZ so you rooting for America to be defeated is against your self interest. Most of the idiotic crap that you believe was invented and got traction in America first. W/o America people like you would be eliminated from societies long time ago. If you get your wish that Chinese or Russians come down there and take over NZ you will put in a cage.

    Replies: @22pp22, @22pp22, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

  4. Is the most popular porn search term map of France more alarming that the sickle cell tests for newborns?

    [MORE]

    Paris is “ebony.”

  5. @22pp22
    I am unashamedly pro-Russian and believed they have been goaded into this war.

    I would like to believe they are winning.

    I am waiting for the famed cauldron in the east to become a reality.

    I have been waiting such a long time, I am beginning to tke the MSM seriously again.

    I still don't think the Russians were responsible for Bucha.

    Replies: @utu

    “I would like to believe they are winning.” – Ask yourself a question why supply lines from Poland, Slovakia and Romania were not cut off by Russians. What stops them? There are ten transport planes with supplies from America coming every day to Poland. Then there are tens of thousands of tons of ammo moved daily and more and more heavy weapons are coming form all over Europe and even Australia. These supplies must go through several hundreds of miles on open roads and railways in Ukraine to reach place where they are needed. It is 750 miles from Lvov to Donetsk. Where is Russian air force and cruise missiles to bomb the supplies and where is Russian specnaz to blow up most important bridges on the supply lines?

    You are form NZ, aren’t you? And you are big anti-vaxxer and so on, right? You would feel more at home here in the US where there is much more wackos like you per capita than in NZ so you rooting for America to be defeated is against your self interest. Most of the idiotic crap that you believe was invented and got traction in America first. W/o America people like you would be eliminated from societies long time ago. If you get your wish that Chinese or Russians come down there and take over NZ you will put in a cage.

    • Troll: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @22pp22
    @utu

    I am not a big ant-vaxxer. I am a hesitant ant-vaxxer. I am not old enough or obese enough to be in serious danger. If I were a bit older, I would have taken the vaccine. And I see Australasia disappearing under a tidal wave of non-European immigration, so I cannot really see the point of backing Western governments, who really do not like their own people.

    Beijing is not African.

    And why would I want to live in Neocon America, a country I wholly despise?

    Replies: @Joe Paluka

    , @22pp22
    @utu

    And don't talk to me about democracy.

    Censorship is rampant in America, far worse than in many of the countries it criticises.

    And the J6 protestors were locked up without trial and without charge a year ago. Most of them did nothing but trespass dressed in silly costumes.

    America bombs, brutalises, kills and maims without scruple, and Americans still have the nerve to lecture the entire planet about morals. Libya, Syria and dozen other countries may never recover after a visit from US cowboys in white hats.

    I have been to your country. The drug addiction and mental illness have to be seen to be believed.

    I used to be an academic. If you were to say there were two genders at dinner table at a conference in the US, half the people would look scared and the other half would attack you.

    BLM, CRT, gender reassignment for kids - look in the bl00dy mirror. It's not a pretty sight.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @JimDandy

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @utu

    YOU'RE DESPICABLE

    https://ak1.ostkcdn.com/images/products/is/images/direct/b066bd5a8b854c3434df0620a5bd0edeb6db713b/%22Daffy-Duck-%28%29%22-Poster-Print.jpg

    , @Philip Owen
    @utu

    The missing Russian airforce is a big question.

    Russia has 350 jets left. They did try using them. They lost 11 in two days to anti aircraft missiles. IF they fly high S300 and BUKs can see them. If they fly low various MANPADs can hit them. They no longer fly over Ukrainian positions. The army, naval infantry, guards, VDV were fully committed to the war. The available navy has been put in harms way. The airforce is being kept back.

    In all cases Russia is using a non replenishable stock of equipment. Presumably the army and navy don't matter because in a war with NATO tactical nukes would be used instead. However, a war with NATO would be an airwar. To deliver and defend against tactical nukes aircraft will be needed. The argument "Russia is not using its best" fails with the army and navy but with the airforce there may be a case.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Dmitry

  6. @utu
    @22pp22

    "I would like to believe they are winning." - Ask yourself a question why supply lines from Poland, Slovakia and Romania were not cut off by Russians. What stops them? There are ten transport planes with supplies from America coming every day to Poland. Then there are tens of thousands of tons of ammo moved daily and more and more heavy weapons are coming form all over Europe and even Australia. These supplies must go through several hundreds of miles on open roads and railways in Ukraine to reach place where they are needed. It is 750 miles from Lvov to Donetsk. Where is Russian air force and cruise missiles to bomb the supplies and where is Russian specnaz to blow up most important bridges on the supply lines?

    You are form NZ, aren't you? And you are big anti-vaxxer and so on, right? You would feel more at home here in the US where there is much more wackos like you per capita than in NZ so you rooting for America to be defeated is against your self interest. Most of the idiotic crap that you believe was invented and got traction in America first. W/o America people like you would be eliminated from societies long time ago. If you get your wish that Chinese or Russians come down there and take over NZ you will put in a cage.

    Replies: @22pp22, @22pp22, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

    I am not a big ant-vaxxer. I am a hesitant ant-vaxxer. I am not old enough or obese enough to be in serious danger. If I were a bit older, I would have taken the vaccine. And I see Australasia disappearing under a tidal wave of non-European immigration, so I cannot really see the point of backing Western governments, who really do not like their own people.

    Beijing is not African.

    And why would I want to live in Neocon America, a country I wholly despise?

    • Replies: @Joe Paluka
    @22pp22

    The covid shot is not a vaccine and every time you use that term to describe it, you are playing into the hands of big pharma and strengthening their case. A "vaccine" is a doze of attenuated or dead virus or bacteria that is injected into a subject for the purpose of creating an immune response. The covid shots are an experimental bioweapon.

  7. @utu
    @22pp22

    "I would like to believe they are winning." - Ask yourself a question why supply lines from Poland, Slovakia and Romania were not cut off by Russians. What stops them? There are ten transport planes with supplies from America coming every day to Poland. Then there are tens of thousands of tons of ammo moved daily and more and more heavy weapons are coming form all over Europe and even Australia. These supplies must go through several hundreds of miles on open roads and railways in Ukraine to reach place where they are needed. It is 750 miles from Lvov to Donetsk. Where is Russian air force and cruise missiles to bomb the supplies and where is Russian specnaz to blow up most important bridges on the supply lines?

    You are form NZ, aren't you? And you are big anti-vaxxer and so on, right? You would feel more at home here in the US where there is much more wackos like you per capita than in NZ so you rooting for America to be defeated is against your self interest. Most of the idiotic crap that you believe was invented and got traction in America first. W/o America people like you would be eliminated from societies long time ago. If you get your wish that Chinese or Russians come down there and take over NZ you will put in a cage.

    Replies: @22pp22, @22pp22, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

    And don’t talk to me about democracy.

    Censorship is rampant in America, far worse than in many of the countries it criticises.

    And the J6 protestors were locked up without trial and without charge a year ago. Most of them did nothing but trespass dressed in silly costumes.

    America bombs, brutalises, kills and maims without scruple, and Americans still have the nerve to lecture the entire planet about morals. Libya, Syria and dozen other countries may never recover after a visit from US cowboys in white hats.

    I have been to your country. The drug addiction and mental illness have to be seen to be believed.

    I used to be an academic. If you were to say there were two genders at dinner table at a conference in the US, half the people would look scared and the other half would attack you.

    BLM, CRT, gender reassignment for kids – look in the bl00dy mirror. It’s not a pretty sight.

    • Agree: sher singh, JR Foley
    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @22pp22

    The Ukraine was a major arms exporter until 2019. That’s probably when they decided they better keep their manufactures inside Ukraine. Would love to see the top secret stuff in Whitehall, DC and Brussels. The exports dropped by 1/2. They make some good gear. They now have a wealth of data about the suitability of their industrial designs and manufacturing capacity for modern war.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1294319/ukraine-arms-exports-by-country/

    I’d guess the decision to have a war was made around 2018. Covid19 simply looks like the first skirmishes to get the East and West into a security focussed mindset. Prep for biological warfare, prep for paranoia and self destruction.

    , @JimDandy
    @22pp22

    Bravo. I like the cut of your jib, 22. Keep 'em coming.

  8. The truth is spreading.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
    @Thulean Friend

    Egalitarianism is evil, Egalitarianism is death. :)

  9. @utu
    @22pp22

    "I would like to believe they are winning." - Ask yourself a question why supply lines from Poland, Slovakia and Romania were not cut off by Russians. What stops them? There are ten transport planes with supplies from America coming every day to Poland. Then there are tens of thousands of tons of ammo moved daily and more and more heavy weapons are coming form all over Europe and even Australia. These supplies must go through several hundreds of miles on open roads and railways in Ukraine to reach place where they are needed. It is 750 miles from Lvov to Donetsk. Where is Russian air force and cruise missiles to bomb the supplies and where is Russian specnaz to blow up most important bridges on the supply lines?

    You are form NZ, aren't you? And you are big anti-vaxxer and so on, right? You would feel more at home here in the US where there is much more wackos like you per capita than in NZ so you rooting for America to be defeated is against your self interest. Most of the idiotic crap that you believe was invented and got traction in America first. W/o America people like you would be eliminated from societies long time ago. If you get your wish that Chinese or Russians come down there and take over NZ you will put in a cage.

    Replies: @22pp22, @22pp22, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

    YOU’RE DESPICABLE

  10. @sher singh

    Sher Singh is a committed Sikh partisan
     
    Not committed to the Sikh people - only the Maryada or Code of Conduct (death)
    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1319125593439559680

    Just honest about where the intentions/perspectives lie.



    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

    Replies: @Greasy William, @Barbarossa

    Isn’t there some famous Sikh martyr who was executed via being sawed in half and he took it without screaming? Does Sikhism teach magic ways to control pain? I could use such magic to help with my sinus problems.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Greasy William

    Why bother with the mysteries of Sikhism when Songbird and I can initiate you into the ancient Celtic pain tolerance abilities necessary to yell "FREEDOM" while being drawn and quartered? You can own your sinuses like William Wallace.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @Sher Singh
    @Greasy William

    Why don't we saw you in half and find out?

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

  11. lol, Dmitry Medvedev, former RF president and current chairman of ruling party, announced today in the morning that RF will shoot down Musk’s Starlink satellites, because it was used to locate and target fire at sunk flagman ship several days ago.

    Very good, it’s first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident. Making white antiwoke racist Musk and its technology empire public direct enemy of RF is also good news 😉

    https://www.er-duma.ru/news/predsedatel-partii-edinaya-rossiya-dmitrij-medvedev-zayavil-o-postavlennyh-vks-rossii-zadachah-po-unichtozheniyu-gruppirovki-sputnikov-starlink/

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @sudden death

    tbf, it is almost too good to be true that it might even be some hack or fake site which is copying the style of official "United Russia" page, so it would be better to wait for more confirmations...

    Replies: @22pp22

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @sudden death

    What is funnier:

    1. Russia declaring war on Musk;
    2. Twitter poison pilling their stock;
    3. His baby mama is dating Chelsea Manning?

    It is not impossible that poor Elon is one of those intelligence agency child prodigies who was buggered a couple hundred times before puberty as part of his onboarding program.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @songbird

    , @Yellowface Anon
    @sudden death

    They better not say it loud or else US gains another reason to intervene, to protect part of its communications network

    , @Mikel
    @sudden death


    it’s first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident
     
    OK, but don't forget the rough seas...

    I remember the days when Martyanov and Saker explained here to us all how the Black Sea was a Russian lake, NATO ships were just sitting ducks, Russia could easily put an end to the Ukrainian regime by arresting its leaders in a special operation,... they were so serious and self-confident in their assessments, using arcane technical terms and equations even.

    There is a reason why AK stopped repeating the "shock and disbelief" mantra a long time ago. Instead, he's now talking on Twitter about the "white pill" of the Moskva "big L" being that if a Neptune can do that, imagine what the much better Russian missiles can do. While regularly musing about what severe pains Russia would deserve if it failed to defeat Ukraine.

    I have actually started to think that there may not be an oncoming second phase of this war. The second phase perhaps is what we're already seeing: a slow and painful gain of territory in Donbass while Ukraine keeps receiving billions in sophisticated weapons without Russia apparently being able to do much about it.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @sudden death, @sudden death

  12. @sudden death
    lol, Dmitry Medvedev, former RF president and current chairman of ruling party, announced today in the morning that RF will shoot down Musk's Starlink satellites, because it was used to locate and target fire at sunk flagman ship several days ago.

    Very good, it's first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident. Making white antiwoke racist Musk and its technology empire public direct enemy of RF is also good news ;)

    https://www.er-duma.ru/news/predsedatel-partii-edinaya-rossiya-dmitrij-medvedev-zayavil-o-postavlennyh-vks-rossii-zadachah-po-unichtozheniyu-gruppirovki-sputnikov-starlink/

    Replies: @sudden death, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Yellowface Anon, @Mikel

    tbf, it is almost too good to be true that it might even be some hack or fake site which is copying the style of official “United Russia” page, so it would be better to wait for more confirmations…

    • Replies: @22pp22
    @sudden death

    Why is making an enemy of Russia a good thing?

    Remember Russiagate? Is it surprising they are paranoid?

    They have stuff we need. The end of cheap Russian gas to Europe will put a permanent brake on the economy.

    All we had to do was Finlandise Ukraine, but the Neocons have their own agenda and an army of useful idiots to back them up.

    P.S. The site looks legit.

    This war is in the brainchild of Satan, AKA Victoria Nuland. Do yo really wan to be a Nuland fanboy?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @sudden death

  13. @sudden death
    lol, Dmitry Medvedev, former RF president and current chairman of ruling party, announced today in the morning that RF will shoot down Musk's Starlink satellites, because it was used to locate and target fire at sunk flagman ship several days ago.

    Very good, it's first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident. Making white antiwoke racist Musk and its technology empire public direct enemy of RF is also good news ;)

    https://www.er-duma.ru/news/predsedatel-partii-edinaya-rossiya-dmitrij-medvedev-zayavil-o-postavlennyh-vks-rossii-zadachah-po-unichtozheniyu-gruppirovki-sputnikov-starlink/

    Replies: @sudden death, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Yellowface Anon, @Mikel

    What is funnier:

    1. Russia declaring war on Musk;
    2. Twitter poison pilling their stock;
    3. His baby mama is dating Chelsea Manning?

    It is not impossible that poor Elon is one of those intelligence agency child prodigies who was buggered a couple hundred times before puberty as part of his onboarding program.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Musk is turning out to be the modern equivalent of Cecil Rhodes, as you point out.

    Only that Rhodes mined pretty pyroclastic superheated pressurised carbon and Musk cornered the market on Carbon Dioxide.

    , @songbird
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    1. Russia declaring war on Musk;
     
    There are perils to being tied too much into MIC, but I wonder if Russia has the capability to take them all down. There are 2,103 in orbit - guessing they all fly over Russia and Ukraine. Doubt the Peresvet laser has that sort of range, and otherwise that would be a lot of missiles - possibly more expensive to shoot them down than put them up. (Maybe, it could be done cheaply with radio waves?)


    2. Twitter poison pilling their stock
     
    I'm not sure that it wasn't all play-acting. For example, in the past, Musk has supported an end to anonymity on Twitter.

    Razib is saying Musk should pay off Sri Lanka's debt and then become unquestioned ruler there.

    3. His baby mama is dating Chelsea Manning?
     
    Musk seems to employ an interesting reproductive strategy.

    First child died of SIDS. Then had twin sons via IVF. Then had triplet sons via IVF. (all previous with Wilson) Then had a son with Grimes. Then had a daughter with Grimes via surrogate.

    Maybe, when you have five sons already, that encourages you to shift to a more r-selected strategy, where the women are chosen for looks, and you don't care about the craziness? Me, I'd sacrifice one or two on the looks scale for more sanity.
  14. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @sudden death

    What is funnier:

    1. Russia declaring war on Musk;
    2. Twitter poison pilling their stock;
    3. His baby mama is dating Chelsea Manning?

    It is not impossible that poor Elon is one of those intelligence agency child prodigies who was buggered a couple hundred times before puberty as part of his onboarding program.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @songbird

    Musk is turning out to be the modern equivalent of Cecil Rhodes, as you point out.

    Only that Rhodes mined pretty pyroclastic superheated pressurised carbon and Musk cornered the market on Carbon Dioxide.

  15. @sudden death
    @sudden death

    tbf, it is almost too good to be true that it might even be some hack or fake site which is copying the style of official "United Russia" page, so it would be better to wait for more confirmations...

    Replies: @22pp22

    Why is making an enemy of Russia a good thing?

    Remember Russiagate? Is it surprising they are paranoid?

    They have stuff we need. The end of cheap Russian gas to Europe will put a permanent brake on the economy.

    All we had to do was Finlandise Ukraine, but the Neocons have their own agenda and an army of useful idiots to back them up.

    P.S. The site looks legit.

    This war is in the brainchild of Satan, AKA Victoria Nuland. Do yo really wan to be a Nuland fanboy?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @22pp22

    Ukraine may have its own imperial ambitions. It’s a major arms exporter. There’s an undercurrent of this in talk of an Intermarium. An empire stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea. One thing to note is the ongoing purge in Ukraine of politically moderate or pro Russian military, police, business, diplomatic, academic, technological and industrial elites. The Kievan regime dream of a country slightly bigger than Texas exporting weapons all over Africa and Asia and perhaps even technological exchange with Israel.

    Putin is just firing people who don’t perform, by comparison.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @sudden death
    @22pp22


    This war is in the brainchild of Satan, AKA Victoria Nuland. Do yo really wan to be a Nuland fanboy?
     
    Should adress this to the real Nuland fanboy named Putin, who did all he could exactly the way she wanted ;)
  16. @22pp22
    @sudden death

    Why is making an enemy of Russia a good thing?

    Remember Russiagate? Is it surprising they are paranoid?

    They have stuff we need. The end of cheap Russian gas to Europe will put a permanent brake on the economy.

    All we had to do was Finlandise Ukraine, but the Neocons have their own agenda and an army of useful idiots to back them up.

    P.S. The site looks legit.

    This war is in the brainchild of Satan, AKA Victoria Nuland. Do yo really wan to be a Nuland fanboy?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @sudden death

    Ukraine may have its own imperial ambitions. It’s a major arms exporter. There’s an undercurrent of this in talk of an Intermarium. An empire stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea. One thing to note is the ongoing purge in Ukraine of politically moderate or pro Russian military, police, business, diplomatic, academic, technological and industrial elites. The Kievan regime dream of a country slightly bigger than Texas exporting weapons all over Africa and Asia and perhaps even technological exchange with Israel.

    Putin is just firing people who don’t perform, by comparison.

    • Agree: Philip Owen
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Wokechoke

    More and more, "Ukraine" is starting to look to me like the America of Eastern Europe. That is, a country run by Jewish oligarchs with a foreign policy that serves the interests of Israel.

    Replies: @A123

  17. @sudden death
    lol, Dmitry Medvedev, former RF president and current chairman of ruling party, announced today in the morning that RF will shoot down Musk's Starlink satellites, because it was used to locate and target fire at sunk flagman ship several days ago.

    Very good, it's first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident. Making white antiwoke racist Musk and its technology empire public direct enemy of RF is also good news ;)

    https://www.er-duma.ru/news/predsedatel-partii-edinaya-rossiya-dmitrij-medvedev-zayavil-o-postavlennyh-vks-rossii-zadachah-po-unichtozheniyu-gruppirovki-sputnikov-starlink/

    Replies: @sudden death, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Yellowface Anon, @Mikel

    They better not say it loud or else US gains another reason to intervene, to protect part of its communications network

  18. @22pp22
    @utu

    And don't talk to me about democracy.

    Censorship is rampant in America, far worse than in many of the countries it criticises.

    And the J6 protestors were locked up without trial and without charge a year ago. Most of them did nothing but trespass dressed in silly costumes.

    America bombs, brutalises, kills and maims without scruple, and Americans still have the nerve to lecture the entire planet about morals. Libya, Syria and dozen other countries may never recover after a visit from US cowboys in white hats.

    I have been to your country. The drug addiction and mental illness have to be seen to be believed.

    I used to be an academic. If you were to say there were two genders at dinner table at a conference in the US, half the people would look scared and the other half would attack you.

    BLM, CRT, gender reassignment for kids - look in the bl00dy mirror. It's not a pretty sight.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @JimDandy

    The Ukraine was a major arms exporter until 2019. That’s probably when they decided they better keep their manufactures inside Ukraine. Would love to see the top secret stuff in Whitehall, DC and Brussels. The exports dropped by 1/2. They make some good gear. They now have a wealth of data about the suitability of their industrial designs and manufacturing capacity for modern war.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1294319/ukraine-arms-exports-by-country/

    I’d guess the decision to have a war was made around 2018. Covid19 simply looks like the first skirmishes to get the East and West into a security focussed mindset. Prep for biological warfare, prep for paranoia and self destruction.

  19. @sudden death
    lol, Dmitry Medvedev, former RF president and current chairman of ruling party, announced today in the morning that RF will shoot down Musk's Starlink satellites, because it was used to locate and target fire at sunk flagman ship several days ago.

    Very good, it's first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident. Making white antiwoke racist Musk and its technology empire public direct enemy of RF is also good news ;)

    https://www.er-duma.ru/news/predsedatel-partii-edinaya-rossiya-dmitrij-medvedev-zayavil-o-postavlennyh-vks-rossii-zadachah-po-unichtozheniyu-gruppirovki-sputnikov-starlink/

    Replies: @sudden death, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Yellowface Anon, @Mikel

    it’s first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident

    OK, but don’t forget the rough seas…

    I remember the days when Martyanov and Saker explained here to us all how the Black Sea was a Russian lake, NATO ships were just sitting ducks, Russia could easily put an end to the Ukrainian regime by arresting its leaders in a special operation,… they were so serious and self-confident in their assessments, using arcane technical terms and equations even.

    There is a reason why AK stopped repeating the “shock and disbelief” mantra a long time ago. Instead, he’s now talking on Twitter about the “white pill” of the Moskva “big L” being that if a Neptune can do that, imagine what the much better Russian missiles can do. While regularly musing about what severe pains Russia would deserve if it failed to defeat Ukraine.

    I have actually started to think that there may not be an oncoming second phase of this war. The second phase perhaps is what we’re already seeing: a slow and painful gain of territory in Donbass while Ukraine keeps receiving billions in sophisticated weapons without Russia apparently being able to do much about it.

    • Agree: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Mikel

    It’s ww3.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @sudden death

    , @sudden death
    @Mikel


    ...if a Neptune can do that, imagine what...
     
    ...will happen to CCP'ied China landing ships when they will sail closer to Taiwan? Maybe Ukraine should offer to sell some to Taipei government if China will try more seriously help RF in to order avoid sanctioning, lol

    Veering into more conspiratorial waters it might have been also joint US-UK-UA (3U alliance!) exercised operation including a goal to have a potential cautionary lesson against CCP naval plans regarding Taiwan too.

    After all RF just had banned almost all GB current government from entering RF, so that may be a sign that British were seriously involved, maybe even rockets really were made in and delivered by UK like Harpoon(?) missiles?

    Replies: @Dmitry

    , @sudden death
    @Mikel


    OK, but don’t forget the rough seas…
     
    Looks of those rough seas have surfaced rather quickly ;)

    https://twitter.com/oryxspioenkop/status/1515818747398955009

    Replies: @A123

  20. Bootlip & Snipcock discuss European identity.

    Ww3 has begun.

    https://twitter.com/ZeXeLife/status/1515332109317066758/photo/1

  21. @Mikel
    @sudden death


    it’s first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident
     
    OK, but don't forget the rough seas...

    I remember the days when Martyanov and Saker explained here to us all how the Black Sea was a Russian lake, NATO ships were just sitting ducks, Russia could easily put an end to the Ukrainian regime by arresting its leaders in a special operation,... they were so serious and self-confident in their assessments, using arcane technical terms and equations even.

    There is a reason why AK stopped repeating the "shock and disbelief" mantra a long time ago. Instead, he's now talking on Twitter about the "white pill" of the Moskva "big L" being that if a Neptune can do that, imagine what the much better Russian missiles can do. While regularly musing about what severe pains Russia would deserve if it failed to defeat Ukraine.

    I have actually started to think that there may not be an oncoming second phase of this war. The second phase perhaps is what we're already seeing: a slow and painful gain of territory in Donbass while Ukraine keeps receiving billions in sophisticated weapons without Russia apparently being able to do much about it.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @sudden death, @sudden death

    It’s ww3.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Wokechoke

    The moment Finland joins NATO?

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    , @sudden death
    @Wokechoke

    No, it's wwZ ;)

    https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/dralexandra/72511122/2256788/2256788_original.jpg

  22. Interview with the general counsel of the US state department. Basically Blinken’s right-hand man of sorts.

    He makes a startling disclosure. They never even gave Russia the opportunity to talk things like NATO expansion in the negotiations, which basically forced Russia’s hand. A hostile military alliance on Russia’s doorstep was obviously going to lead to war, just as if Mexico were to join China in a military alliance and station troops there.

    The hardliners were always in Washington. Ukraine’s fate was sealed by its ostensible allies.

    https://warontherocks.com/2022/04/a-conversation-with-the-counselor-derek-chollet-on-navigating-the-world/

    • Thanks: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @Juvenalis
    @Thulean Friend

    Russian Federation has never even come close to meeting the requirements to join NATO. There would be absolutely nothing to discuss with Moscow vis-à-vis NATO. Finland and Sweden are now joining NATO; no consultation of Moscow has been scheduled, nor will the Kremlin's opinion ever be sought.

    Putin's hardliners in the Moscow Kremlin have chosen national suicide for their Nigeria-with-nukes Third World garbage dump of a country.

    Ukraine's fate has been sealed by the courage and heroism of its warriors, by Armed Forces of Ukraine, by Azov Regiment—whose heroes at Mariupol closest thing to modern Spartans at Thermopylæ defending White European civilisation from dark hordes of barbaric oriental invader orc savages.

    Russian orcs can go ahead and commit the worst atrocities under Moscow's genocidal terror campaign strategy deliberately targeting civilians for destruction. But, ultimately Ukrainians will rebuild Ukraine—and Ukraine will integrate into NATO and the EU...whereas Russian Federation will collapse into the ash heap of history and war criminal Moskal monke Vladimir Putin will meet his demise in a fate that will make Gaddafi's end look serene by comparison.

  23. @Thulean Friend
    The truth is spreading.

    https://twitter.com/derelictcyborg/status/1515035295661633540

    Replies: @Coconuts

    Egalitarianism is evil, Egalitarianism is death. 🙂

  24. @Wokechoke
    Flashman At The Charge

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashman_at_the_Charge


    Congreve Rockets smash up a Russian expedition to conquer India. By sinking ships coming down the Rivers in Central Asia. Count Ignatieff makes an appearance. Real Life Almost playing out like fictional script.

    Replies: @songbird, @S, @Philip Owen

    I’ve heard some rumors that Moskva was done in by British-made missiles, but I don’t see how it can be proved one way or the other.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @songbird

    Turkish Drones and some kind of domestically manufactured Anti Ship Missile. The Ukrainians have designed such weaponry…

    Frankly I don’t think that the British or Americans want Ukraine to have missiles like this. That’s a strategically significant capability that gives Ukraine claim to Imperial reach.


    The strike was approved by the Americans and British though. So it’s complicated and it’s ww3 now.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  25. @songbird
    @Wokechoke

    I've heard some rumors that Moskva was done in by British-made missiles, but I don't see how it can be proved one way or the other.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    Turkish Drones and some kind of domestically manufactured Anti Ship Missile. The Ukrainians have designed such weaponry…

    Frankly I don’t think that the British or Americans want Ukraine to have missiles like this. That’s a strategically significant capability that gives Ukraine claim to Imperial reach.

    The strike was approved by the Americans and British though. So it’s complicated and it’s ww3 now.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    Ukraine...Imperial reach?? Gaining back lands that were recently part of the Ukrainian state isn't exactly enough fertilizer for any such conspiracy theories.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Seraphim

  26. @Wokechoke
    @Mikel

    It’s ww3.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @sudden death

    The moment Finland joins NATO?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Yellowface Anon

    The sunk ship. It’s strategic target that was sunk. Response could be areabombing and dehousing.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  27. @Wokechoke
    @songbird

    Turkish Drones and some kind of domestically manufactured Anti Ship Missile. The Ukrainians have designed such weaponry…

    Frankly I don’t think that the British or Americans want Ukraine to have missiles like this. That’s a strategically significant capability that gives Ukraine claim to Imperial reach.


    The strike was approved by the Americans and British though. So it’s complicated and it’s ww3 now.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Ukraine…Imperial reach?? Gaining back lands that were recently part of the Ukrainian state isn’t exactly enough fertilizer for any such conspiracy theories.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    In certain sections of the dissident racialist right there’s a debate about this peculiar but obscure Intermarium concept beloved of Ukrainian ultra nationalistic radicals. It’s created a lot of falling out among old friends. The Azov unit name clearly refers to keeping a presence on the Azov Sea by Ukrainians and their allies and volunteers in Poland, Baltic States. Perhaps it even refers to crossing the little sea to occupy the town of Azov to cut off the Don.

    Never the less there’s clearly some kind of ambition in the rhetoric I’ve heard about breaking up Russian Federation into Five Russias. The medieval and early modern area called “Sloboda Ukraine” encompasses Kursk and Belgorod. I’m sure there’s a party that claim them, and they’ve got MI6 and Zelenskyy’s ear. Some of these Ukrainian nationalists are clearly looking at Russian Federation oblasts with appetites bigger than their stomachs. Would they seek vassal oblasts of their own if the Russian Federation disintegrates? Yes.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @LatW, @Philip Owen, @Mikhail

    , @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    It is rather that Russia is "re-gathering the Russian lands".

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  28. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    Ukraine...Imperial reach?? Gaining back lands that were recently part of the Ukrainian state isn't exactly enough fertilizer for any such conspiracy theories.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Seraphim

    In certain sections of the dissident racialist right there’s a debate about this peculiar but obscure Intermarium concept beloved of Ukrainian ultra nationalistic radicals. It’s created a lot of falling out among old friends. The Azov unit name clearly refers to keeping a presence on the Azov Sea by Ukrainians and their allies and volunteers in Poland, Baltic States. Perhaps it even refers to crossing the little sea to occupy the town of Azov to cut off the Don.

    Never the less there’s clearly some kind of ambition in the rhetoric I’ve heard about breaking up Russian Federation into Five Russias. The medieval and early modern area called “Sloboda Ukraine” encompasses Kursk and Belgorod. I’m sure there’s a party that claim them, and they’ve got MI6 and Zelenskyy’s ear. Some of these Ukrainian nationalists are clearly looking at Russian Federation oblasts with appetites bigger than their stomachs. Would they seek vassal oblasts of their own if the Russian Federation disintegrates? Yes.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    It's reassuring to see that you consider the dismemberment of Russia into Five separate states as a distinct possibility. :-)

    The only parts of Russia that would have any possibility of joining a greater Ukrainian state might be the Kuban region or possibly even some of the areas settled by Ukrainians in Siberia (Zelenij Klyn etc.). But even this seems far fetched in this day and age.

    Replies: @LatW, @Wokechoke

    , @LatW
    @Wokechoke


    Intermarium [..] Would they seek vassal oblasts of their own if the Russian Federation disintegrates? Yes.
     
    This is your own imagination, hypothetical and overly ambitious, the original idea is to just improve communication among these states. However, you might find it interesting that the white-light blue-white flag of Novgorod has surfaced not just among Russian liberals, but also a small group of nationalists.

    A couple of weeks ago the Russian Legion "Freedom of Russia" was formed in Ukraine by a few bold Russian guys, real bogatyrs, who decided to come to the side of Ukraine and who want to fight for Russia free of any kind of tyranny. Of course, this is a very small group but these kinds of guys are not a new phenomenon, it's not a surprise they surface during this war, too.

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9B%D0%B5%D0%B3%D0%B8%D0%BE%D0%BD_%C2%AB%D0%A1%D0%B2%D0%BE%D0%B1%D0%BE%D0%B4%D0%B0_%D0%A0%D0%BE%D1%81%D1%81%D0%B8%D0%B8%C2%BB

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    , @Philip Owen
    @Wokechoke

    Belogord, Voronezh, Saratov and the Kuban still have Ukrainian speaking minorities that lived there before the Muscovites came down the Don valley.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @siberiancat, @Wokechoke

    , @Mikhail
    @Wokechoke

    The wishful thinking of some, as in not gonna happen.

    Replies: @Yevardian

  29. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @sudden death

    What is funnier:

    1. Russia declaring war on Musk;
    2. Twitter poison pilling their stock;
    3. His baby mama is dating Chelsea Manning?

    It is not impossible that poor Elon is one of those intelligence agency child prodigies who was buggered a couple hundred times before puberty as part of his onboarding program.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @songbird

    1. Russia declaring war on Musk;

    There are perils to being tied too much into MIC, but I wonder if Russia has the capability to take them all down. There are 2,103 in orbit – guessing they all fly over Russia and Ukraine. Doubt the Peresvet laser has that sort of range, and otherwise that would be a lot of missiles – possibly more expensive to shoot them down than put them up. (Maybe, it could be done cheaply with radio waves?)

    2. Twitter poison pilling their stock

    I’m not sure that it wasn’t all play-acting. For example, in the past, Musk has supported an end to anonymity on Twitter.

    Razib is saying Musk should pay off Sri Lanka’s debt and then become unquestioned ruler there.

    3. His baby mama is dating Chelsea Manning?

    Musk seems to employ an interesting reproductive strategy.

    First child died of SIDS. Then had twin sons via IVF. Then had triplet sons via IVF. (all previous with Wilson) Then had a son with Grimes. Then had a daughter with Grimes via surrogate.

    Maybe, when you have five sons already, that encourages you to shift to a more r-selected strategy, where the women are chosen for looks, and you don’t care about the craziness? Me, I’d sacrifice one or two on the looks scale for more sanity.

  30. @Yellowface Anon
    @Wokechoke

    The moment Finland joins NATO?

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    The sunk ship. It’s strategic target that was sunk. Response could be areabombing and dehousing.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Wokechoke

    He wishes to evict NATO out of former Warsaw Bloc countries, but Putin's current aims are mainly confined to Ukraine at the moment - it takes an actual escalatory move such as direct NATO involvement, or a deliberate false flag from either side for Putin to gain a casus belli for total war. Pearl Harbor this is not - Russian MoD so far says it was an ammunition explosion, of course, and most systems on the ship are (claimed to be) still functional.

    As soon as this year (but certainly not the ship sinking), and as late as 2025 - the date Martin Armstrong gives for the start of massive depopulation. The war in Ukraine 100% will be to WWIII what the 2nd Sino-Japanese War is to the Pacific War - Expansionism by regional powers becoming the obstacle to an emergent global order that is to be neutralized at the first possible opportunity. As history goes, aircraft carriers left the harbor and battleships sat duck...

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  31. @sher singh

    Sher Singh is a committed Sikh partisan
     
    Not committed to the Sikh people - only the Maryada or Code of Conduct (death)
    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1319125593439559680

    Just honest about where the intentions/perspectives lie.



    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

    Replies: @Greasy William, @Barbarossa

    You’ve gotten me interested in looking into the history of the Sikhs in India. The people within a people aspect seems like an interesting dynamic to learn more about. Do you have any recommendations on good histories?

    This one looks pretty promising to me, but what do I know?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Barbarossa

    Read George MacDonald Frazier’s “Flashman and the Mountain of Light” It’s about Flanshy banging out the Rhani and stealing the Kho i Nor diamond from the Sikhs.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashman_and_the_Mountain_of_Light


    It’s a nice primer for a westerner.

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Barbarossa

    There is a great interview with a Sikh holy man in Road Scholar, Andrei Codrescu road movie Romanian immigrant literature professor pokes fun at American culture.

    https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/road_scholar

    Which I saw one time twenty years ago and still remember this bit verbatim.

    Holiness concerns your holes. Control what goes in and out of your eyes and your mouth and your ears and whatnot and you will be holy.

    Sikhs consider you and I unholy scum. They are good at security.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @RSDB
    @Barbarossa

    I can't recommend any books on Sikhs specifically (that looks like an interesting one) but John Keay's monumental India: A History is great, at least as an introductory work, and, as I recall, points the reader to a number of other historians also worth reading.

    I am getting many good pointers on books here lately.

    We really need an Unz Review book rec section. For instance: Foucault, like Nietzsche, is surprisingly worth reading. Don't let the fact that these philosophers seem to have been degenerate nutcases make you underestimate them, but don't forget it, either.

    Fiction: I just finished going through Wuthering Heights. I am surprised by how much AaronB would like it, as it can be interpreted among other things as an allegory of power-- its origin in pain, its development in acquisitiveness, and, in the renewal of the new year at the end of the book, its ultimate failure.

    I have also gotten a few good movie recommendations on here. My family and I are currently watching Vadachennai, which is a commercial Tamil film that is so far not half as bad as I expected, though it is not particularly deep. Sinhalese films are often very good: I was very affected by Oba Nathuwa Oba Ekka ("With You, Without You"). Slavs on here should like it as it is based on a Dostoevsky story.

    Χριστός ἀνέστη!

    Replies: @songbird

  32. Has anyone read that new face study in Nature?

    Haven’t read it, but what I seem to have heard, unless I’m misinterpreting it, is that the differences in facial shape between Euros and East Asians (particularly the nose) are mainly do to directional selection in Euros, which, if true, surprises me greatly. I’m still trying to wrap my head around what the implications are.

    Is it mainly about ancient migratory routes, or does it say something about modern geography and climate?

  33. @Barbarossa
    @sher singh

    You've gotten me interested in looking into the history of the Sikhs in India. The people within a people aspect seems like an interesting dynamic to learn more about. Do you have any recommendations on good histories?

    https://www.amazon.com/History-Sikhs-1469-1839-Oxford-Collection/dp/0195673085

    This one looks pretty promising to me, but what do I know?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Emil Nikola Richard, @RSDB

    Read George MacDonald Frazier’s “Flashman and the Mountain of Light” It’s about Flanshy banging out the Rhani and stealing the Kho i Nor diamond from the Sikhs.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashman_and_the_Mountain_of_Light

    It’s a nice primer for a westerner.

    • Agree: songbird
  34. S says:
    @Wokechoke
    Flashman At The Charge

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashman_at_the_Charge


    Congreve Rockets smash up a Russian expedition to conquer India. By sinking ships coming down the Rivers in Central Asia. Count Ignatieff makes an appearance. Real Life Almost playing out like fictional script.

    Replies: @songbird, @S, @Philip Owen

    Flashman At The Charge

    Soooo…that’s where the character Lord Flasheart came from in Rowan Atkinson’s Blackadder series. As a related aside, Miranda Richardson as Queenie in the same series has to have been the hottest Queen Elizabeth there ever was.

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @S

    Ah yes, Blackadder was great fun. I ended up watching all the series within a couple weeks when I triple fractured my ankle a couple years back, since I had never seen them previously. It was good diversion at the time.

    The kid's (and I) like Mr. Bean since I own the original series but I'll have to pick up Blackadder at some point. Not that I'll be watching Blackadder with the kids! ;)

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @A123

  35. @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    In certain sections of the dissident racialist right there’s a debate about this peculiar but obscure Intermarium concept beloved of Ukrainian ultra nationalistic radicals. It’s created a lot of falling out among old friends. The Azov unit name clearly refers to keeping a presence on the Azov Sea by Ukrainians and their allies and volunteers in Poland, Baltic States. Perhaps it even refers to crossing the little sea to occupy the town of Azov to cut off the Don.

    Never the less there’s clearly some kind of ambition in the rhetoric I’ve heard about breaking up Russian Federation into Five Russias. The medieval and early modern area called “Sloboda Ukraine” encompasses Kursk and Belgorod. I’m sure there’s a party that claim them, and they’ve got MI6 and Zelenskyy’s ear. Some of these Ukrainian nationalists are clearly looking at Russian Federation oblasts with appetites bigger than their stomachs. Would they seek vassal oblasts of their own if the Russian Federation disintegrates? Yes.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @LatW, @Philip Owen, @Mikhail

    It’s reassuring to see that you consider the dismemberment of Russia into Five separate states as a distinct possibility. 🙂

    The only parts of Russia that would have any possibility of joining a greater Ukrainian state might be the Kuban region or possibly even some of the areas settled by Ukrainians in Siberia (Zelenij Klyn etc.). But even this seems far fetched in this day and age.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Mr. Hack


    But even this seems far fetched in this day and age.
     
    The Ukrainian nationalist maps from the 1930s show a much larger Ukraine (some of the territories originally inhabited by Ukrainians). Not only is this idea far fetched today and somewhat too aggressive, the problem is that the population in the East is being destroyed right now. The Russian occupation forces have apparently deported something like 100K women and children from the occupied territories to Russia (at least this info appeared in the Ukrainian media recently, I hope this isn't true, but unfortunately it could be - people are straight up being stolen and deported against the rules of the Geneva convention which state that local populations cannot be moved or mobilized during an occupation). You can argue that the majority of those are most likely Russophones, but still, it doesn't matter, they are Ukrainian citizens and many of them did not want to leave to Russia. It should be a priority to salvage this population, as well as try to replenish the population in the West, despite the difficulties.


    Btw, the parallels between this and the 1940s are uncanny... mass deportation, forced mobilization of locals into the occupying army & mass graves that are opened with people looking for their loved ones..

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    , @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    Christmas list is it?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  36. @Greasy William
    @sher singh

    Isn't there some famous Sikh martyr who was executed via being sawed in half and he took it without screaming? Does Sikhism teach magic ways to control pain? I could use such magic to help with my sinus problems.

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Sher Singh

    Why bother with the mysteries of Sikhism when Songbird and I can initiate you into the ancient Celtic pain tolerance abilities necessary to yell “FREEDOM” while being drawn and quartered? You can own your sinuses like William Wallace.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Barbarossa

    I once yelled that on the last day of school.

  37. @S
    @Wokechoke


    Flashman At The Charge
     
    Soooo...that's where the character Lord Flasheart came from in Rowan Atkinson's Blackadder series. As a related aside, Miranda Richardson as Queenie in the same series has to have been the hottest Queen Elizabeth there ever was.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/06/09/article-2653004-1E9D3ADF00000578-282_634x476.jpg

    http://i1.wp.com/www.frockflicks.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/tumblr_ms46wdTrxa1sy769zo5_1280.jpg

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    Ah yes, Blackadder was great fun. I ended up watching all the series within a couple weeks when I triple fractured my ankle a couple years back, since I had never seen them previously. It was good diversion at the time.

    The kid’s (and I) like Mr. Bean since I own the original series but I’ll have to pick up Blackadder at some point. Not that I’ll be watching Blackadder with the kids! 😉

    • LOL: S
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Barbarossa

    I too once watched most of at least the first series, possibly the second, probably not the third and certainly not the fourth series. Creative English humor presented within a veneer of costume parody, how can you go wrong? I do remember that at times it was a bit too crude and ribald for proper family participation, but overall I concur that it had its amusing moments. Did you ever watch the fourth series?

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    , @A123
    @Barbarossa

    Blackadder was very good.

    IMHO, the best comedy series from the UK is RED DWARF. They did thingS that would be unthinkable in America.

    PEACE 😇

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nUEZrA5WJM4

  38. The war has no effect on me or my country, but I do find it amazing how easily I get emotionally involved with the conflict. I have followed the situation in Donetsk, Lugansk and Syria for years now, so of course I support Z. It was very funny to look at social media and see how people suddenly became furious over news they ignored until they were told to start caring by twitter and/or facebook.

    The problem is that I feel the same anger, just for the opposite side to most new “experts” and sheep. I saw it first, dammit! A very peculiar feeling indeed, but I have to say I am entertained and thinking furiously at least. It beats local news, South Africa can be a very depressing place if you have to look at our news constantly.

    I’m thinking that maybe a Cold war situation could in the long run stabilize most parts of the world, curbing the West from running rampant. The problem is that I’m living in the third world, which is prime proxy war territory. The big players will likely end up exporting and sponsoring conflict in my neck of the woods. Apartheid suddenly ended when we were no longer useful fighting communism. The more things change, the more they stay the same, eh?

  39. @Barbarossa
    @sher singh

    You've gotten me interested in looking into the history of the Sikhs in India. The people within a people aspect seems like an interesting dynamic to learn more about. Do you have any recommendations on good histories?

    https://www.amazon.com/History-Sikhs-1469-1839-Oxford-Collection/dp/0195673085

    This one looks pretty promising to me, but what do I know?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Emil Nikola Richard, @RSDB

    There is a great interview with a Sikh holy man in Road Scholar, Andrei Codrescu road movie Romanian immigrant literature professor pokes fun at American culture.

    https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/road_scholar

    Which I saw one time twenty years ago and still remember this bit verbatim.

    Holiness concerns your holes. Control what goes in and out of your eyes and your mouth and your ears and whatnot and you will be holy.

    Sikhs consider you and I unholy scum. They are good at security.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    Holiness concerns your holes. Control what goes in and out of your eyes and your mouth and your ears and whatnot and you will be holy.

    Sikhs consider you and I unholy scum.
     
    The first bit seems like a valid enough piece of pithy advice. Most of the nuts and bolts of actual religious teaching is often very simple but quite hard to put into actual practice. I think that is why so many gravitate toward doctrine, it's so much easier to intellectually engage with right theorizing than the daily endless struggle with right practice.

    On the second I have little doubt. One can't really have a functional group identity or religion without some delineation of the "other". Still, it seems like it might be an interesting group to brush up on the history of.
  40. @AaaronB

    Yes, the question of “how do we know anything”, or “how do we know what we know” is one of the most important questions mankind can ask.

    It’s an interesting question, but for practical purposes I doubt we can really improve on defining knowledge as justified true belief. (Of course, epistemologists keep trying.)

    To me the more important question is not what can we be certain of, but what is the most reasonable thing to believe, given the available evidence?

    If we eschew reason, we open the door to a thousand absurdities. In your haste to remind us of how uncertain our knowledge is, you might remind yourself of this.

    On the other hand, what we believe strongly influences how we experience life, and therefore I can’t help thinking that, on certain points, some degree of faith is very necessary and more “reasonable.” For instance, a purely rational approach seems to eliminate the possibility of free will, so I am forced to resort to faith that such a thing exists, but I do believe the quality of my life is thereby considerably enhanced. In contrast, believing in determinism may be more rational, but it degrades my experience of life. So which is the more “reasonable” belief?

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @silviosilver

    You make an excellent point, and one that is essential to overcoming our age.

    A truly broad and wide conception of what constitutes rationality will take in the entire picture - is it "reasonable" to allow a mere theory - an abstract representation - to poison ones life?

    Even in terms of rationality, our approach isn't really rational - the idea that we must disbelieve in everything for which there isn't absolute certainty , even if this visibly harms our life and happiness, is a curious form of "rationality" indeed that no longer serves life (Logic is supposed to be the Emissary, but has usurped the place of the Master.)

    It's no longer true that reason and science suggest a deterministic universe - that's the old Newtonian mechanics. Today's quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.

    But your point is much more important. A big part of the narrative modernity likes to tell itself is that we are "martyrs for truth" - that's a big part of the modern mythos. Sure, a lifeless, deterministic universe may suck, but we're such impressive adults for believing what the cold hard facts say, however much we don't like it.

    But once you start examining how we know anything at all, how our minds work, what the limits and functions of our minds are, you learn that you are not "compelled" to believe in a lifeless deterministic universe at all - it's a choice.

    Such a universe isn't "proven" - there merely isn't absolutely conclusive evidence to think otherwise. But we now know all our beliefs and conclusions, even the most scientific and mathematical, lack this certainty, and that abstract representations themselves (knowledge) have intrinsic limitations and are only approximations to a reality we can never fully capture in terms of their limited categories.

    We think we have intellectual courage, but in fact we lack the courage to truly follow reasoning where it leads. We stop short.

    (BTW, this question about the foundation of our knowledge drove Bertrand Russell to despair, and was a problem he worked on extensively later in life without success. He was convinced the inability to put knowledge on a foundation of certainty would lead to the demise of science. Modern culture is built on the desire for ever escalating levels of certainty, leading to an ever narrowing intellectual range as so much of life cannot be out in a foundation of certainty.)

    So by examining the foundations of our knowledge, we can free ourselves of the "trap" of modernity. That's why it's so important.

    Ultimately, the ultimate - and final - move of logic and rationality is to turn it's examination onto itself .

    A truly thoroughgoing and serious scepticism must ultimately become sceptical of skepticism itself.

    That's the final move in the dance of logic that frees you from it - of course one still uses reason but as a proper servant, one is no longer trapped in it's fantast of itself as the only path to truth and as capable of providing certainty.

    That's when it is restored to it's proper place as a servant and not the master - logic is the emissary that when it comes to dominate as master kills life.

    So why hasn't our society yet taken this final move in the game of logic? The philosophical infrastructure has already been developed by the great Western philosophers, and science increasingly paints a picture of reality that shows very clearly that our mental categories, and especially logic, are insufficient to fully grasp it.

    Our entire civilization is poised on the brink of taking this next step....

    Our ability to become healthy again depends on it.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  41. @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    In certain sections of the dissident racialist right there’s a debate about this peculiar but obscure Intermarium concept beloved of Ukrainian ultra nationalistic radicals. It’s created a lot of falling out among old friends. The Azov unit name clearly refers to keeping a presence on the Azov Sea by Ukrainians and their allies and volunteers in Poland, Baltic States. Perhaps it even refers to crossing the little sea to occupy the town of Azov to cut off the Don.

    Never the less there’s clearly some kind of ambition in the rhetoric I’ve heard about breaking up Russian Federation into Five Russias. The medieval and early modern area called “Sloboda Ukraine” encompasses Kursk and Belgorod. I’m sure there’s a party that claim them, and they’ve got MI6 and Zelenskyy’s ear. Some of these Ukrainian nationalists are clearly looking at Russian Federation oblasts with appetites bigger than their stomachs. Would they seek vassal oblasts of their own if the Russian Federation disintegrates? Yes.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @LatW, @Philip Owen, @Mikhail

    Intermarium [..] Would they seek vassal oblasts of their own if the Russian Federation disintegrates? Yes.

    This is your own imagination, hypothetical and overly ambitious, the original idea is to just improve communication among these states. However, you might find it interesting that the white-light blue-white flag of Novgorod has surfaced not just among Russian liberals, but also a small group of nationalists.

    A couple of weeks ago the Russian Legion “Freedom of Russia” was formed in Ukraine by a few bold Russian guys, real bogatyrs, who decided to come to the side of Ukraine and who want to fight for Russia free of any kind of tyranny. Of course, this is a very small group but these kinds of guys are not a new phenomenon, it’s not a surprise they surface during this war, too.

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9B%D0%B5%D0%B3%D0%B8%D0%BE%D0%BD_%C2%AB%D0%A1%D0%B2%D0%BE%D0%B1%D0%BE%D0%B4%D0%B0_%D0%A0%D0%BE%D1%81%D1%81%D0%B8%D0%B8%C2%BB

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @LatW

    I’m not Russian. But I’ve got a good idea of the ambitions the ultra nationalist Ukrainians May have.

    Replies: @LatW

  42. @22pp22
    @utu

    And don't talk to me about democracy.

    Censorship is rampant in America, far worse than in many of the countries it criticises.

    And the J6 protestors were locked up without trial and without charge a year ago. Most of them did nothing but trespass dressed in silly costumes.

    America bombs, brutalises, kills and maims without scruple, and Americans still have the nerve to lecture the entire planet about morals. Libya, Syria and dozen other countries may never recover after a visit from US cowboys in white hats.

    I have been to your country. The drug addiction and mental illness have to be seen to be believed.

    I used to be an academic. If you were to say there were two genders at dinner table at a conference in the US, half the people would look scared and the other half would attack you.

    BLM, CRT, gender reassignment for kids - look in the bl00dy mirror. It's not a pretty sight.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @JimDandy

    Bravo. I like the cut of your jib, 22. Keep ’em coming.

  43. @Wokechoke
    @22pp22

    Ukraine may have its own imperial ambitions. It’s a major arms exporter. There’s an undercurrent of this in talk of an Intermarium. An empire stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea. One thing to note is the ongoing purge in Ukraine of politically moderate or pro Russian military, police, business, diplomatic, academic, technological and industrial elites. The Kievan regime dream of a country slightly bigger than Texas exporting weapons all over Africa and Asia and perhaps even technological exchange with Israel.

    Putin is just firing people who don’t perform, by comparison.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    More and more, “Ukraine” is starting to look to me like the America of Eastern Europe. That is, a country run by Jewish oligarchs with a foreign policy that serves the interests of Israel.

    • Agree: Wokechoke, LondonBob
    • Replies: @A123
    @JimDandy

    Israel has solid ties with Russia... Pro-Ukraine voices have been enthusiastically denouncing Israel and PM Bennett: (1)


    Bennett is siding with the ruthless killer Putin

    Prime Minister Bennett’s “neutrality” in the Russian war against Ukraine is outrageous and contemptable
    ...
    One might ask, what does it mean to be neutral? If you are neutral, what does this really translate to in the context of the unspeakable crimes Putin is committing against innocent Ukrainian citizens? In this case it simply means that while these crimes against humanity are happening in broad daylight, Bennett refuses to condemn the Russian butcher because of cold-blooded political calculations, which he justifies in the name of Israel’s national security.
     
    Israel values its partnerships with Russia. To keep that relationship going, they have maintained economic ties (2)

    Israel has so far desisted from joining nations including the US, Europe, the UK, Australia, and Japan in the imposition of an “unprecedented” number of sanctions on Russia, Belarus, and the two breakaway Ukrainian regions of Donetsk and Luhansk in the wake of the invasion.
     
    Israel has voiced objections. However, the track record of *actions* against Russian interests is quite slim & mostly symbolic (e.g. UNHRC membership).

    George IslamoSoros and his puppet Biden are quite upset with Israel & Hungary. Of course, Not-The-President Biden's popularity is so abysmal no major player takes him seriously.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2022/04/13/bennett-is-siding-with-the-ruthless-killer-putin/

    (2) https://www.timesofisrael.com/israel-hasnt-joined-anti-russia-sanctions-but-its-firms-need-to-tread-carefully/

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Greasy William

  44. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    It's reassuring to see that you consider the dismemberment of Russia into Five separate states as a distinct possibility. :-)

    The only parts of Russia that would have any possibility of joining a greater Ukrainian state might be the Kuban region or possibly even some of the areas settled by Ukrainians in Siberia (Zelenij Klyn etc.). But even this seems far fetched in this day and age.

    Replies: @LatW, @Wokechoke

    But even this seems far fetched in this day and age.

    The Ukrainian nationalist maps from the 1930s show a much larger Ukraine (some of the territories originally inhabited by Ukrainians). Not only is this idea far fetched today and somewhat too aggressive, the problem is that the population in the East is being destroyed right now. The Russian occupation forces have apparently deported something like 100K women and children from the occupied territories to Russia (at least this info appeared in the Ukrainian media recently, I hope this isn’t true, but unfortunately it could be – people are straight up being stolen and deported against the rules of the Geneva convention which state that local populations cannot be moved or mobilized during an occupation). You can argue that the majority of those are most likely Russophones, but still, it doesn’t matter, they are Ukrainian citizens and many of them did not want to leave to Russia. It should be a priority to salvage this population, as well as try to replenish the population in the West, despite the difficulties.

    [MORE]

    Btw, the parallels between this and the 1940s are uncanny… mass deportation, forced mobilization of locals into the occupying army & mass graves that are opened with people looking for their loved ones..

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @LatW

    Russia is going all in.

  45. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    It's reassuring to see that you consider the dismemberment of Russia into Five separate states as a distinct possibility. :-)

    The only parts of Russia that would have any possibility of joining a greater Ukrainian state might be the Kuban region or possibly even some of the areas settled by Ukrainians in Siberia (Zelenij Klyn etc.). But even this seems far fetched in this day and age.

    Replies: @LatW, @Wokechoke

    Christmas list is it?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    Nah, just wishing that this stupid war ends with Putler returning his troops home, the sooner the better. I am not looking forward to the carnage that is being envisioned by most of the pundits, in the eastern part of Ukraine. How about you? Or do you get turned on by this bloodshed like our former master and transhumanist vampire, Karlin?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail

  46. @LatW
    @Mr. Hack


    But even this seems far fetched in this day and age.
     
    The Ukrainian nationalist maps from the 1930s show a much larger Ukraine (some of the territories originally inhabited by Ukrainians). Not only is this idea far fetched today and somewhat too aggressive, the problem is that the population in the East is being destroyed right now. The Russian occupation forces have apparently deported something like 100K women and children from the occupied territories to Russia (at least this info appeared in the Ukrainian media recently, I hope this isn't true, but unfortunately it could be - people are straight up being stolen and deported against the rules of the Geneva convention which state that local populations cannot be moved or mobilized during an occupation). You can argue that the majority of those are most likely Russophones, but still, it doesn't matter, they are Ukrainian citizens and many of them did not want to leave to Russia. It should be a priority to salvage this population, as well as try to replenish the population in the West, despite the difficulties.


    Btw, the parallels between this and the 1940s are uncanny... mass deportation, forced mobilization of locals into the occupying army & mass graves that are opened with people looking for their loved ones..

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    Russia is going all in.

  47. @Barbarossa
    @S

    Ah yes, Blackadder was great fun. I ended up watching all the series within a couple weeks when I triple fractured my ankle a couple years back, since I had never seen them previously. It was good diversion at the time.

    The kid's (and I) like Mr. Bean since I own the original series but I'll have to pick up Blackadder at some point. Not that I'll be watching Blackadder with the kids! ;)

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @A123

    I too once watched most of at least the first series, possibly the second, probably not the third and certainly not the fourth series. Creative English humor presented within a veneer of costume parody, how can you go wrong? I do remember that at times it was a bit too crude and ribald for proper family participation, but overall I concur that it had its amusing moments. Did you ever watch the fourth series?

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @Mr. Hack

    Pretty ribald yes. Not for the kids by any stretch.

    The forth series, set in WW1 was by far the best. I would very much recommend it!

  48. @LatW
    @Wokechoke


    Intermarium [..] Would they seek vassal oblasts of their own if the Russian Federation disintegrates? Yes.
     
    This is your own imagination, hypothetical and overly ambitious, the original idea is to just improve communication among these states. However, you might find it interesting that the white-light blue-white flag of Novgorod has surfaced not just among Russian liberals, but also a small group of nationalists.

    A couple of weeks ago the Russian Legion "Freedom of Russia" was formed in Ukraine by a few bold Russian guys, real bogatyrs, who decided to come to the side of Ukraine and who want to fight for Russia free of any kind of tyranny. Of course, this is a very small group but these kinds of guys are not a new phenomenon, it's not a surprise they surface during this war, too.

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9B%D0%B5%D0%B3%D0%B8%D0%BE%D0%BD_%C2%AB%D0%A1%D0%B2%D0%BE%D0%B1%D0%BE%D0%B4%D0%B0_%D0%A0%D0%BE%D1%81%D1%81%D0%B8%D0%B8%C2%BB

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    I’m not Russian. But I’ve got a good idea of the ambitions the ultra nationalist Ukrainians May have.

    • Replies: @LatW
    @Wokechoke


    I’m not Russian. But I’ve got a good idea of the ambitions the ultra nationalist Ukrainians May have.
     
    I don't care who you are, but you're out to lunch.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  49. @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    Christmas list is it?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Nah, just wishing that this stupid war ends with Putler returning his troops home, the sooner the better. I am not looking forward to the carnage that is being envisioned by most of the pundits, in the eastern part of Ukraine. How about you? Or do you get turned on by this bloodshed like our former master and transhumanist vampire, Karlin?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    The only people who are not terrified about this are journalists, arms dealers and politicians

    , @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack


    Nah, just wishing that this stupid war ends with Putler returning his troops home, the sooner the better.
     
    Via non-war diplomacy, the Kiev regime could've gotten an autonomous Donbass, an agree to disagree on Crimea, as part of a deal seeing Ukraine not being a NATO beachhead.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  50. @Wokechoke
    @LatW

    I’m not Russian. But I’ve got a good idea of the ambitions the ultra nationalist Ukrainians May have.

    Replies: @LatW

    I’m not Russian. But I’ve got a good idea of the ambitions the ultra nationalist Ukrainians May have.

    I don’t care who you are, but you’re out to lunch.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @LatW

    It was from the horse’s mouth.

  51. Looks like Zemmour won in Corsica and SE coastal France.
    _____
    Will Russia do a general draft?

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @songbird

    Only after Putin nukes Helsinki the moment Finland signs the treaty to enter NATO. It's moot then because Moscow will blow up in a fireball very soon, along with most of the world's urban areas.

    Replies: @Seraphim

  52. @Barbarossa
    @Greasy William

    Why bother with the mysteries of Sikhism when Songbird and I can initiate you into the ancient Celtic pain tolerance abilities necessary to yell "FREEDOM" while being drawn and quartered? You can own your sinuses like William Wallace.

    Replies: @songbird

    I once yelled that on the last day of school.

    • LOL: Barbarossa
  53. @Thulean Friend
    Interview with the general counsel of the US state department. Basically Blinken's right-hand man of sorts.

    He makes a startling disclosure. They never even gave Russia the opportunity to talk things like NATO expansion in the negotiations, which basically forced Russia's hand. A hostile military alliance on Russia's doorstep was obviously going to lead to war, just as if Mexico were to join China in a military alliance and station troops there.

    The hardliners were always in Washington. Ukraine's fate was sealed by its ostensible allies.

    https://warontherocks.com/2022/04/a-conversation-with-the-counselor-derek-chollet-on-navigating-the-world/

    Replies: @Juvenalis

    Russian Federation has never even come close to meeting the requirements to join NATO. There would be absolutely nothing to discuss with Moscow vis-à-vis NATO. Finland and Sweden are now joining NATO; no consultation of Moscow has been scheduled, nor will the Kremlin’s opinion ever be sought.

    Putin’s hardliners in the Moscow Kremlin have chosen national suicide for their Nigeria-with-nukes Third World garbage dump of a country.

    Ukraine’s fate has been sealed by the courage and heroism of its warriors, by Armed Forces of Ukraine, by Azov Regiment—whose heroes at Mariupol closest thing to modern Spartans at Thermopylæ defending White European civilisation from dark hordes of barbaric oriental invader orc savages.

    Russian orcs can go ahead and commit the worst atrocities under Moscow’s genocidal terror campaign strategy deliberately targeting civilians for destruction. But, ultimately Ukrainians will rebuild Ukraine—and Ukraine will integrate into NATO and the EU…whereas Russian Federation will collapse into the ash heap of history and war criminal Moskal monke Vladimir Putin will meet his demise in a fate that will make Gaddafi’s end look serene by comparison.

    • LOL: Yellowface Anon
    • Troll: Mikhail
  54. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Barbarossa

    There is a great interview with a Sikh holy man in Road Scholar, Andrei Codrescu road movie Romanian immigrant literature professor pokes fun at American culture.

    https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/road_scholar

    Which I saw one time twenty years ago and still remember this bit verbatim.

    Holiness concerns your holes. Control what goes in and out of your eyes and your mouth and your ears and whatnot and you will be holy.

    Sikhs consider you and I unholy scum. They are good at security.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    Holiness concerns your holes. Control what goes in and out of your eyes and your mouth and your ears and whatnot and you will be holy.

    Sikhs consider you and I unholy scum.

    The first bit seems like a valid enough piece of pithy advice. Most of the nuts and bolts of actual religious teaching is often very simple but quite hard to put into actual practice. I think that is why so many gravitate toward doctrine, it’s so much easier to intellectually engage with right theorizing than the daily endless struggle with right practice.

    On the second I have little doubt. One can’t really have a functional group identity or religion without some delineation of the “other”. Still, it seems like it might be an interesting group to brush up on the history of.

  55. @Mr. Hack
    @Barbarossa

    I too once watched most of at least the first series, possibly the second, probably not the third and certainly not the fourth series. Creative English humor presented within a veneer of costume parody, how can you go wrong? I do remember that at times it was a bit too crude and ribald for proper family participation, but overall I concur that it had its amusing moments. Did you ever watch the fourth series?

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    Pretty ribald yes. Not for the kids by any stretch.

    The forth series, set in WW1 was by far the best. I would very much recommend it!

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
  56. A123 says: • Website
    @JimDandy
    @Wokechoke

    More and more, "Ukraine" is starting to look to me like the America of Eastern Europe. That is, a country run by Jewish oligarchs with a foreign policy that serves the interests of Israel.

    Replies: @A123

    Israel has solid ties with Russia… Pro-Ukraine voices have been enthusiastically denouncing Israel and PM Bennett: (1)

    Bennett is siding with the ruthless killer Putin

    Prime Minister Bennett’s “neutrality” in the Russian war against Ukraine is outrageous and contemptable

    One might ask, what does it mean to be neutral? If you are neutral, what does this really translate to in the context of the unspeakable crimes Putin is committing against innocent Ukrainian citizens? In this case it simply means that while these crimes against humanity are happening in broad daylight, Bennett refuses to condemn the Russian butcher because of cold-blooded political calculations, which he justifies in the name of Israel’s national security.

    Israel values its partnerships with Russia. To keep that relationship going, they have maintained economic ties (2)

    Israel has so far desisted from joining nations including the US, Europe, the UK, Australia, and Japan in the imposition of an “unprecedented” number of sanctions on Russia, Belarus, and the two breakaway Ukrainian regions of Donetsk and Luhansk in the wake of the invasion.

    Israel has voiced objections. However, the track record of *actions* against Russian interests is quite slim & mostly symbolic (e.g. UNHRC membership).

    George IslamoSoros and his puppet Biden are quite upset with Israel & Hungary. Of course, Not-The-President Biden’s popularity is so abysmal no major player takes him seriously.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2022/04/13/bennett-is-siding-with-the-ruthless-killer-putin/

    (2) https://www.timesofisrael.com/israel-hasnt-joined-anti-russia-sanctions-but-its-firms-need-to-tread-carefully/

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @A123

    Israel valued their relationship with Donald Trump, too, right? And their unhappiness over Russia standing in the way of regime change in Syria was symbolic pouting?

    But, yes, peace on you, too.

    Replies: @A123

    , @Greasy William
    @A123

    Ultimately, morality and national interests are one in the same. Israel should avoid involvement in the conflict and should not comment on the outstanding issues between Russia and Ukraine, but Israel is also morally obligated to explicitly condemn the Russian invasion as a criminal act of aggression and to join the western sanctions until Russia agrees to a ceasefire.

    Israel's failure to stand up for what is right in this case is a moral blemish and is certain to bring about Divine retribution at some point.

  57. @silviosilver
    @AaaronB

    Yes, the question of “how do we know anything”, or “how do we know what we know” is one of the most important questions mankind can ask.
     
    It's an interesting question, but for practical purposes I doubt we can really improve on defining knowledge as justified true belief. (Of course, epistemologists keep trying.)

    To me the more important question is not what can we be certain of, but what is the most reasonable thing to believe, given the available evidence?

    If we eschew reason, we open the door to a thousand absurdities. In your haste to remind us of how uncertain our knowledge is, you might remind yourself of this.

    On the other hand, what we believe strongly influences how we experience life, and therefore I can't help thinking that, on certain points, some degree of faith is very necessary and more "reasonable." For instance, a purely rational approach seems to eliminate the possibility of free will, so I am forced to resort to faith that such a thing exists, but I do believe the quality of my life is thereby considerably enhanced. In contrast, believing in determinism may be more rational, but it degrades my experience of life. So which is the more "reasonable" belief?

    Replies: @AaronB

    You make an excellent point, and one that is essential to overcoming our age.

    A truly broad and wide conception of what constitutes rationality will take in the entire picture – is it “reasonable” to allow a mere theory – an abstract representation – to poison ones life?

    Even in terms of rationality, our approach isn’t really rational – the idea that we must disbelieve in everything for which there isn’t absolute certainty , even if this visibly harms our life and happiness, is a curious form of “rationality” indeed that no longer serves life (Logic is supposed to be the Emissary, but has usurped the place of the Master.)

    It’s no longer true that reason and science suggest a deterministic universe – that’s the old Newtonian mechanics. Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.

    But your point is much more important. A big part of the narrative modernity likes to tell itself is that we are “martyrs for truth” – that’s a big part of the modern mythos. Sure, a lifeless, deterministic universe may suck, but we’re such impressive adults for believing what the cold hard facts say, however much we don’t like it.

    But once you start examining how we know anything at all, how our minds work, what the limits and functions of our minds are, you learn that you are not “compelled” to believe in a lifeless deterministic universe at all – it’s a choice.

    Such a universe isn’t “proven” – there merely isn’t absolutely conclusive evidence to think otherwise. But we now know all our beliefs and conclusions, even the most scientific and mathematical, lack this certainty, and that abstract representations themselves (knowledge) have intrinsic limitations and are only approximations to a reality we can never fully capture in terms of their limited categories.

    We think we have intellectual courage, but in fact we lack the courage to truly follow reasoning where it leads. We stop short.

    (BTW, this question about the foundation of our knowledge drove Bertrand Russell to despair, and was a problem he worked on extensively later in life without success. He was convinced the inability to put knowledge on a foundation of certainty would lead to the demise of science. Modern culture is built on the desire for ever escalating levels of certainty, leading to an ever narrowing intellectual range as so much of life cannot be out in a foundation of certainty.)

    So by examining the foundations of our knowledge, we can free ourselves of the “trap” of modernity. That’s why it’s so important.

    Ultimately, the ultimate – and final – move of logic and rationality is to turn it’s examination onto itself .

    A truly thoroughgoing and serious scepticism must ultimately become sceptical of skepticism itself.

    That’s the final move in the dance of logic that frees you from it – of course one still uses reason but as a proper servant, one is no longer trapped in it’s fantast of itself as the only path to truth and as capable of providing certainty.

    That’s when it is restored to it’s proper place as a servant and not the master – logic is the emissary that when it comes to dominate as master kills life.

    So why hasn’t our society yet taken this final move in the game of logic? The philosophical infrastructure has already been developed by the great Western philosophers, and science increasingly paints a picture of reality that shows very clearly that our mental categories, and especially logic, are insufficient to fully grasp it.

    Our entire civilization is poised on the brink of taking this next step….

    Our ability to become healthy again depends on it.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @AaronB


    It’s no longer true that reason and science suggest a deterministic universe – that’s the old Newtonian mechanics. Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.
     
    I was talking about the mind, not the universe. When talking about the mind, free will is generally contrasted with "determinism," which is the sense I was using the term.

    For me, the issue goes deeper than that though. It doesn't help me much to know that my decisions were not completely deterministic, but still nonetheless products of purely natural processes. In other words, if quantum events are able to influence or produce mental events, so what? That's not "me" doing anything; it's just something happening to me. I need to believe that there is a 'willing subject' - a subject that wills; essentially, that there is a me, a self, that actually exists.

    I suppose your Buddhist commitments would put you at odds with the notion that a self exists, that being one of the illusions that good living requires us to rid ourselves of. Personally, I've never understood how that helps me to live better at all. That's not to say I haven't "tried it on for size." Not once that I've flirted with it have I ever felt, "Phew, I don't really exist, what a relief. That really takes a load off my mind!" Not even an inkling of such feelings. If there has ever been a "skepticism to be skeptical of," for me this is it.

    Replies: @AaronB

  58. @22pp22
    @utu

    I am not a big ant-vaxxer. I am a hesitant ant-vaxxer. I am not old enough or obese enough to be in serious danger. If I were a bit older, I would have taken the vaccine. And I see Australasia disappearing under a tidal wave of non-European immigration, so I cannot really see the point of backing Western governments, who really do not like their own people.

    Beijing is not African.

    And why would I want to live in Neocon America, a country I wholly despise?

    Replies: @Joe Paluka

    The covid shot is not a vaccine and every time you use that term to describe it, you are playing into the hands of big pharma and strengthening their case. A “vaccine” is a doze of attenuated or dead virus or bacteria that is injected into a subject for the purpose of creating an immune response. The covid shots are an experimental bioweapon.

    • Agree: Catdompanj
  59. @LatW
    @Wokechoke


    I’m not Russian. But I’ve got a good idea of the ambitions the ultra nationalist Ukrainians May have.
     
    I don't care who you are, but you're out to lunch.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    It was from the horse’s mouth.

  60. @Barbarossa
    @S

    Ah yes, Blackadder was great fun. I ended up watching all the series within a couple weeks when I triple fractured my ankle a couple years back, since I had never seen them previously. It was good diversion at the time.

    The kid's (and I) like Mr. Bean since I own the original series but I'll have to pick up Blackadder at some point. Not that I'll be watching Blackadder with the kids! ;)

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @A123

    Blackadder was very good.

    IMHO, the best comedy series from the UK is RED DWARF. They did thingS that would be unthinkable in America.

    PEACE 😇

    • Thanks: Barbarossa
  61. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    Nah, just wishing that this stupid war ends with Putler returning his troops home, the sooner the better. I am not looking forward to the carnage that is being envisioned by most of the pundits, in the eastern part of Ukraine. How about you? Or do you get turned on by this bloodshed like our former master and transhumanist vampire, Karlin?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail

    The only people who are not terrified about this are journalists, arms dealers and politicians

  62. @A123
    @JimDandy

    Israel has solid ties with Russia... Pro-Ukraine voices have been enthusiastically denouncing Israel and PM Bennett: (1)


    Bennett is siding with the ruthless killer Putin

    Prime Minister Bennett’s “neutrality” in the Russian war against Ukraine is outrageous and contemptable
    ...
    One might ask, what does it mean to be neutral? If you are neutral, what does this really translate to in the context of the unspeakable crimes Putin is committing against innocent Ukrainian citizens? In this case it simply means that while these crimes against humanity are happening in broad daylight, Bennett refuses to condemn the Russian butcher because of cold-blooded political calculations, which he justifies in the name of Israel’s national security.
     
    Israel values its partnerships with Russia. To keep that relationship going, they have maintained economic ties (2)

    Israel has so far desisted from joining nations including the US, Europe, the UK, Australia, and Japan in the imposition of an “unprecedented” number of sanctions on Russia, Belarus, and the two breakaway Ukrainian regions of Donetsk and Luhansk in the wake of the invasion.
     
    Israel has voiced objections. However, the track record of *actions* against Russian interests is quite slim & mostly symbolic (e.g. UNHRC membership).

    George IslamoSoros and his puppet Biden are quite upset with Israel & Hungary. Of course, Not-The-President Biden's popularity is so abysmal no major player takes him seriously.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2022/04/13/bennett-is-siding-with-the-ruthless-killer-putin/

    (2) https://www.timesofisrael.com/israel-hasnt-joined-anti-russia-sanctions-but-its-firms-need-to-tread-carefully/

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Greasy William

    Israel valued their relationship with Donald Trump, too, right? And their unhappiness over Russia standing in the way of regime change in Syria was symbolic pouting?

    But, yes, peace on you, too.

    • Thanks: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @A123
    @JimDandy


    Israel valued their relationship with Donald Trump, too, right? And their unhappiness over Russia standing in the way of regime change in Syria was symbolic pouting?
     
    You should spend more time on facts, and less time on #NeverTrump propaganda from the Fake Stream Media. Organizations like WaPo and CNN deliberately try to manufacture enmity against those they deem "deplorable".

    The actual situation is:
    -- Regime change was an Obama / Erdogan concept.
    -- Trump's MAGA administration reversed that unworkable policy.

    MAGA and Israel agree that the main threat to regional stability is sociopath Khamenei. Iranian Hezbollah interference in Lebanon generated a failed state. The key requirenent for peace is a Syria 100% free of Iranian troops and proxies.

    None of the Syrian opposition groups are credible. Obama planned to impose an SJW"Color Revolution" puppet government from the outside. That has no chance of working. Realistically, Assad remaining in charge could be the only viable end-state.

    #LetsGoBrandon 😇

    Replies: @JimDandy

  63. You have a valid point that we have more physical power than ever before, which should translate into the freedom to live a happier life. That, after all, is the great promise of modernity, really.

    But does it? It really depends on your values and what sort of lifestyle one most values. For myself, the vastly expanded powers of the modern world have nevertheless created a lifestyle and physical reality that greatly restrict my ability to live the life I would truly want. The world is far uglier and less interesting on every level than it can and should be.

    Fascinating and complex ancient human cultures are being destroyed. Huge swathes of the worlds wilderness are also being destroyed. Cities and towns have become ugly and soulless.

    The beauty and wonder of the world and it’s human inhabitants has been massively degraded.

    And considering the extremely poor mental health increasingly afflicting the population of the developed world, I am certainly not alone.

    Perhaps vastly expanded powers aren’t the key to happiness, as so many myths and legends insist on warning us 🙂

    Now, you say that social pressure isn’t an absolute barrier to living an alternative lifestyle – and that’s true, but if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.

    But you make a good point that choice still exists, even if it has to be wrested from society – so my goal is much less to “transform” society than to win social support and approval for alternative lifestyles, and a kind of “spiritual infrastructure” that helps young people find this alternative path.

    In traditional China and India, most people lived ordinary lives, but leaving city life behind and abandoning the rat race was an honored and socially validated choice that had a lot of spiritual infrastructure to support it.

    So that needs to be restored to our society, I think.

    But I think there is a more fundamental point to be made here. If a huge – and perhaps even the decisive – factor in being happy is the correct use of our minds and the correct mental and emotional relationship to the external world, then the “metaphysics” undergirding modern life, with it’s belief that mathematical certainty alone is the correct relationship to reality, leads to perhaps the most unhappy generation to have ever lived 🙂

    I have enough of a problem convincing my two adult children of what they should do for what I see as their own good. If I cannot even convince my children to change their lives, who am I to start planning full societal changes?

    I don’t see the task as “persuasion” which suggests force. Rather, I see it as simply formulating an alternative ideal and “inviting” others to consider it.

    Many people today seem to suffer greatly from poor mental health in modern society without being aware there are alternatives.

    As we’ve discussed in the past, and Silviosilver recently mentioned, if we managed to convince a large amount of people to lead a better life by leaving their jobs and simplifying their existence, we would could actually cause a big economic harm to many people that do not share our perspective for no real benefit for us. Our ability to enjoy life in contact with nature while making use of so many technological advances that you and I are so used to (for example, exchanging our ideas through the internet) depends on the majority of society leading the lifestyle that we reject.

    Well, I would only want those who are genuinely unsatisfied with modernity and who will genuinely become significantly healthier and happier living an alternative life to do so – and I would “invite” them to consider it, and not “convince” them 🙂

    It’s obviously unfair for such people to remain “economic captives” in a system designed for the benefit of those who still think the point of life is to make money and acquire things – and moreover, I hold out hope that even such benighted people will at least somewhat see the light after they see people flourishing who live opposite to them 🙂

    Not to mention, the “economic lifestyle” of these mainstream people are not in themselves neutral, but actively contribute to an uglier and worse world.

    So on every level I think it would be a positive thing for everyone.

    I don’t believe there can be such “radical seperation” between those of us who pursue nature and the mainstream which seeks wealth and power – part of the “metaphysic” of nature-love, is the insight that we are all connected in a larger organic whole, and what goes on in one place affects everything.

    So I think we have a spiritual duty to not “leave others behind” but work towards their salvation as well 🙂

    No need to apologize for not having the time to respond! Is that lack of time not punishment enough on its own?

    Well said 🙂

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @AaronB


    I don’t see the task as “persuasion” which suggests force. Rather, I see it as simply formulating an alternative ideal and “inviting” others to consider it.
     
    This is basically the approach I am taking with my own children. We live a fairly unconventional life in many ways, although our goals and ideals would have been very common in the not so distant past. I'm quite aware that I have no power to force my children to follow in my footsteps, and they may even fully reject what I stand for. My intent is instead to formulate and demonstrate an alternative ethos to the dominant modern one and to let that stand on it's own merits.

    This puts quite a bit of responsibility on my wife and I since very much depends on whether we live up to our own hype and standards. Hypocrisy will be easily detected and discredit much of what we are attempting to instill. There can be no dragging them into it, they will either embrace it for themselves or not. My oldest used to give us more guff about our minimal tech use and strict controls on it for the kids, but now that she is seeing some of the neurotic, unhealthy, and anxiety ridden behavior of some of her tech immersed cousins she increasingly sees that there is a valid point to our guardrails.

    As you say, it is all about presenting an alternative. The way things seem to be increasingly headed I think many of those alternatives speak for themselves. I certainly see more and more people looking for an exit ramp.

    Replies: @AaronB

    , @Grahamsno(G64)
    @AaronB

    I want my broadband internet, TV, Refrigeration, air conditioning, electricity, shopping malls, supermarkets and all the amenities which our civilization affords us.

    I will accept all the neuroticism that seems to come with the package rather than your rural mysticism which you seem to offer. I might be strawmanning you but that's what I feel with you tens of thousands of words expressing your disenchantment with contemporary civilization - I love it.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Barbarossa

    , @Mikel
    @AaronB


    if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.
     
    I see this quite differently. Everybody is aware of the calls to escape from the rat race. It's a very old thing actually in our western society. Just listen to Pete Seeger's songs from the 60s. If those calls and songs reached me in a small town of the Basque Country when Spain had barely recovered democracy, they must have reached everybody. The other day, following a link provided by Yayah that got me curious about the Persian Gulf natives, I discovered that even in Iran they have their own communities of "hippies". Apparently, the only place where alternative lifestyles still have little traction is Eastern Europe. I get the impression that people in that region are much more interested in first enjoying all the good things (real or imaginary) of a western-style materialistic society.

    But we must indeed be realistic about human nature and accept that a great majority are totally voluntary participants in the Machine, even though they know that alternatives exist. And they have every right to make that choice, just like you and me have the right to reject it for ourselves. My elder son knows very well what kind of lifestyle I like but the other day he surprised me when he said that he's actually looking forward to going back to the office. He doesn't like working from home (!) and prefers to have daily contact with his coworkers at what I imagine must be some obscure office somewhere in uninspiring central Warsaw. What can I say? Just do whatever makes you happy, son. Life is challenging enough without me trying to impose rules on how you choose to live it.

    As far as I'm concerned, the only part of society that exerts any pressure on how to lead my life is my immediate family. And rightly so. How could I ignore their wishes and preferences? In fact, I exert an even bigger pressure on them. We live in a semi-rural part of the US West only because I chose it thinking about myself much more than about them. Fortunately, my wife is very happy now and my younger son hasn't really known any other life so he's cool of course.

    The other day I listed several groups that escape the Machine in one way or another and have become pretty mainstream, if not outright promoted by MSM, such as those famous pioneers of the Alaskan Frontier. But what to make of the epidemic of homeless people that you see most everywhere in the US? Is that not, in its own way, similar to that Indian tradition of abandoning material comfort and going for a life of wandering about, begging and contemplating? These people usually have all their means at their disposal to return to a conventional life but they're not interested. When authorities manage to get them accommodated somewhere, it's not long before many of them go back to the street again. And whatever personal problems lead them to that lifestyle, can we be sure that they are essentially different from the Indian traditional mendicants'?

    BTW, I'm not entirely sure that we have a bigger incidence of neuroses today than in the past. It certainly looks that way but many mental ailments in the past were masked by alcoholism, religious retreat, possession and witchery superstitions and who knows what else. I am totally certain that some of our old saints and heroes were not OK in the head.


    Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.
     
    Even Feynman once admitted that he didn't really understand quantum mechanics so what chance do the rest of us have? But I would dispute that assertion of yours. My understanding of the probabilistic nature of the universe is that in the macro world nothing much changes. The probabilities of an object like a tennis ball or a planet not following Newton/Einstein mechanics are not exactly zero but for all practical purposes they approach zero and that is what we consistently observe. Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn't lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Barbarossa, @A123, @S

  64. @Wokechoke
    Flashman At The Charge

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashman_at_the_Charge


    Congreve Rockets smash up a Russian expedition to conquer India. By sinking ships coming down the Rivers in Central Asia. Count Ignatieff makes an appearance. Real Life Almost playing out like fictional script.

    Replies: @songbird, @S, @Philip Owen

    The Russian invasion of India actually occured. There was French support. It disintegrated due to poor logistics before it even left Russian territory. IT did get East of the Caspian. Of course that could have been propaganda to discuss Flashman’s use of missiles. Which is worse to admit to enemy competence or one’s own incompetence.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Philip Owen

    The internal fire story might have spared Ukraine the rod of area bombing.

  65. @Greasy William
    @sher singh

    Isn't there some famous Sikh martyr who was executed via being sawed in half and he took it without screaming? Does Sikhism teach magic ways to control pain? I could use such magic to help with my sinus problems.

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Sher Singh

    Why don’t we saw you in half and find out?

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

    • LOL: Barbarossa
  66. @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    In certain sections of the dissident racialist right there’s a debate about this peculiar but obscure Intermarium concept beloved of Ukrainian ultra nationalistic radicals. It’s created a lot of falling out among old friends. The Azov unit name clearly refers to keeping a presence on the Azov Sea by Ukrainians and their allies and volunteers in Poland, Baltic States. Perhaps it even refers to crossing the little sea to occupy the town of Azov to cut off the Don.

    Never the less there’s clearly some kind of ambition in the rhetoric I’ve heard about breaking up Russian Federation into Five Russias. The medieval and early modern area called “Sloboda Ukraine” encompasses Kursk and Belgorod. I’m sure there’s a party that claim them, and they’ve got MI6 and Zelenskyy’s ear. Some of these Ukrainian nationalists are clearly looking at Russian Federation oblasts with appetites bigger than their stomachs. Would they seek vassal oblasts of their own if the Russian Federation disintegrates? Yes.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @LatW, @Philip Owen, @Mikhail

    Belogord, Voronezh, Saratov and the Kuban still have Ukrainian speaking minorities that lived there before the Muscovites came down the Don valley.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Philip Owen

    From what I know of the History the Russians built these cities as forts to impede Turkish and Tartar Invasion attempts. Kharkov was such a fort on the Muravsky Trail. The Invasion route from Crimea toward Moscow.

    , @siberiancat
    @Philip Owen

    According to the late Academician Zaliznyak, in the 14th century, there was no difference in how people spoke in Kyiv and in Moscow.

    Novgorod was a different matter even in the 10th century.

    So, looking for some ancient divisions between Russian or Ukrainian speakers is hardly historical

    , @Wokechoke
    @Philip Owen

    Come on man, who is paying your secondment?

  67. @Mikel
    @sudden death


    it’s first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident
     
    OK, but don't forget the rough seas...

    I remember the days when Martyanov and Saker explained here to us all how the Black Sea was a Russian lake, NATO ships were just sitting ducks, Russia could easily put an end to the Ukrainian regime by arresting its leaders in a special operation,... they were so serious and self-confident in their assessments, using arcane technical terms and equations even.

    There is a reason why AK stopped repeating the "shock and disbelief" mantra a long time ago. Instead, he's now talking on Twitter about the "white pill" of the Moskva "big L" being that if a Neptune can do that, imagine what the much better Russian missiles can do. While regularly musing about what severe pains Russia would deserve if it failed to defeat Ukraine.

    I have actually started to think that there may not be an oncoming second phase of this war. The second phase perhaps is what we're already seeing: a slow and painful gain of territory in Donbass while Ukraine keeps receiving billions in sophisticated weapons without Russia apparently being able to do much about it.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @sudden death, @sudden death

    …if a Neptune can do that, imagine what…

    …will happen to CCP’ied China landing ships when they will sail closer to Taiwan? Maybe Ukraine should offer to sell some to Taipei government if China will try more seriously help RF in to order avoid sanctioning, lol

    Veering into more conspiratorial waters it might have been also joint US-UK-UA (3U alliance!) exercised operation including a goal to have a potential cautionary lesson against CCP naval plans regarding Taiwan too.

    After all RF just had banned almost all GB current government from entering RF, so that may be a sign that British were seriously involved, maybe even rockets really were made in and delivered by UK like Harpoon(?) missiles?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @sudden death

    Amphibious invasion of Taiwan for occupation by China, is probably not very possible. There are a lot of academic papers about this topic you can see from the 1990s, including written by professors of geography.

    It seems like a lot of hype on this issue, which China would try only as a kind of suicidal policy, and they have a collective leadership there who you would expect should not be so irrational
    https://www.neweurope.eu/article/why-china-cannot-invade-taiwan/

  68. @utu
    @22pp22

    "I would like to believe they are winning." - Ask yourself a question why supply lines from Poland, Slovakia and Romania were not cut off by Russians. What stops them? There are ten transport planes with supplies from America coming every day to Poland. Then there are tens of thousands of tons of ammo moved daily and more and more heavy weapons are coming form all over Europe and even Australia. These supplies must go through several hundreds of miles on open roads and railways in Ukraine to reach place where they are needed. It is 750 miles from Lvov to Donetsk. Where is Russian air force and cruise missiles to bomb the supplies and where is Russian specnaz to blow up most important bridges on the supply lines?

    You are form NZ, aren't you? And you are big anti-vaxxer and so on, right? You would feel more at home here in the US where there is much more wackos like you per capita than in NZ so you rooting for America to be defeated is against your self interest. Most of the idiotic crap that you believe was invented and got traction in America first. W/o America people like you would be eliminated from societies long time ago. If you get your wish that Chinese or Russians come down there and take over NZ you will put in a cage.

    Replies: @22pp22, @22pp22, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Philip Owen

    The missing Russian airforce is a big question.

    Russia has 350 jets left. They did try using them. They lost 11 in two days to anti aircraft missiles. IF they fly high S300 and BUKs can see them. If they fly low various MANPADs can hit them. They no longer fly over Ukrainian positions. The army, naval infantry, guards, VDV were fully committed to the war. The available navy has been put in harms way. The airforce is being kept back.

    In all cases Russia is using a non replenishable stock of equipment. Presumably the army and navy don’t matter because in a war with NATO tactical nukes would be used instead. However, a war with NATO would be an airwar. To deliver and defend against tactical nukes aircraft will be needed. The argument “Russia is not using its best” fails with the army and navy but with the airforce there may be a case.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Philip Owen

    The Russians have 1,600 military aircraft at least. Around 600 aircraft that can dogfight and bomb. They have a few thousand qualified combat pilots. In the Battle of Britain it’s claimed the fighter command was down to 600 machines and several hundred pilots. Reality was there was a massive pool of excellent bomber pilots who could have easily jumped into Spitfires and Hurricanes and intercepted their German counterparts.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    , @Dmitry
    @Philip Owen

    From what I briefly read about the topic, with superficial understanding.

    Kalibr (a guided cruise missile, first pioneered in Sverdlovsk 1982), costs over $1,2 million each and production in Russia before sanctions was about 2-3 per week.

    It could destroy fixed targets according to satellite guidance. It could destroy things contain weapons, like warehouse or factories. But it would depend on intelligence about the location of the target. It doesn't destroy moving targets.

    Iskander would have the same ability, but it is far more expensive, supply of the weapon even more limited. It was cost-effective as designed for tactical nuclear warheads, not conventional bombing.

    Russian air force doesn't have targeting pods, to allow use of guided weapons against moving targets. There are air-launched cruise missiles like "Kh-101" for destroying fixed targets. https://www.iiss.org/blogs/military-balance/2022/04/ukraine-russias-air-launched-cruise-missiles-coming-up-short

    A lot of the bombing in Ukraine is using unguided bombs. They are bombing Ukraine with FAB-500 bombs (which were pioneered in 1954). http://roe.ru/eng/catalog/aerospace-systems/air-bombs/fab-500-m-62/

    This kind of bombing from smaller range with unguided weapons, also exposes planes to risk of being attacked from the ground.

    -

    With those limitations said, Ukraine are not necessarily very careful. There are reports their factories have been located by media reports (their factory for repairing tanks, was destroyed yesterday).

    There are reports tonight, one of Ukraine's transport planes containing Western supplies, was destroyed while flying. https://ria.ru/20220416/samolet-1783914498.html

    Replies: @siberiancat

  69. @JimDandy
    @A123

    Israel valued their relationship with Donald Trump, too, right? And their unhappiness over Russia standing in the way of regime change in Syria was symbolic pouting?

    But, yes, peace on you, too.

    Replies: @A123

    Israel valued their relationship with Donald Trump, too, right? And their unhappiness over Russia standing in the way of regime change in Syria was symbolic pouting?

    You should spend more time on facts, and less time on #NeverTrump propaganda from the Fake Stream Media. Organizations like WaPo and CNN deliberately try to manufacture enmity against those they deem “deplorable”.

    The actual situation is:
    — Regime change was an Obama / Erdogan concept.
    — Trump’s MAGA administration reversed that unworkable policy.

    MAGA and Israel agree that the main threat to regional stability is sociopath Khamenei. Iranian Hezbollah interference in Lebanon generated a failed state. The key requirenent for peace is a Syria 100% free of Iranian troops and proxies.

    None of the Syrian opposition groups are credible. Obama planned to impose an SJW”Color Revolution” puppet government from the outside. That has no chance of working. Realistically, Assad remaining in charge could be the only viable end-state.

    #LetsGoBrandon 😇

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @A123

    — PUTIN reversed that unworkable policy.

    Fixed that for you.

    Here's a fact, Mr. Peaceman--I voted for Trump twice and hope to make it thrice. He played ball with Israel but he drew the line at starting new wars for them. That's largely why he isn't president right now. You can try to change the subject, but you can't succeed. Israel wanted regime change in Syria. As a group, Jews hate Putin. The Jewish State is certainly not the exception.

    Replies: @A123, @Yellowface Anon

  70. @Philip Owen
    @utu

    The missing Russian airforce is a big question.

    Russia has 350 jets left. They did try using them. They lost 11 in two days to anti aircraft missiles. IF they fly high S300 and BUKs can see them. If they fly low various MANPADs can hit them. They no longer fly over Ukrainian positions. The army, naval infantry, guards, VDV were fully committed to the war. The available navy has been put in harms way. The airforce is being kept back.

    In all cases Russia is using a non replenishable stock of equipment. Presumably the army and navy don't matter because in a war with NATO tactical nukes would be used instead. However, a war with NATO would be an airwar. To deliver and defend against tactical nukes aircraft will be needed. The argument "Russia is not using its best" fails with the army and navy but with the airforce there may be a case.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Dmitry

    The Russians have 1,600 military aircraft at least. Around 600 aircraft that can dogfight and bomb. They have a few thousand qualified combat pilots. In the Battle of Britain it’s claimed the fighter command was down to 600 machines and several hundred pilots. Reality was there was a massive pool of excellent bomber pilots who could have easily jumped into Spitfires and Hurricanes and intercepted their German counterparts.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Wokechoke

    Never a shortage of fighter planes, British industry churned them out, the issue was pilots. The Battle of Britain was never a close contest, despite the mythology constructed.

    Replies: @Greasy William, @Wielgus

  71. @Philip Owen
    @Wokechoke

    Belogord, Voronezh, Saratov and the Kuban still have Ukrainian speaking minorities that lived there before the Muscovites came down the Don valley.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @siberiancat, @Wokechoke

    From what I know of the History the Russians built these cities as forts to impede Turkish and Tartar Invasion attempts. Kharkov was such a fort on the Muravsky Trail. The Invasion route from Crimea toward Moscow.

  72. @songbird
    Looks like Zemmour won in Corsica and SE coastal France.
    _____
    Will Russia do a general draft?

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    Only after Putin nukes Helsinki the moment Finland signs the treaty to enter NATO. It’s moot then because Moscow will blow up in a fireball very soon, along with most of the world’s urban areas.

    • Replies: @Seraphim
    @Yellowface Anon

    It is more likely that Russians will cut the gas and oil before they will join. Finland is 100% dependent on Russian gas.

  73. @Philip Owen
    @Wokechoke

    The Russian invasion of India actually occured. There was French support. It disintegrated due to poor logistics before it even left Russian territory. IT did get East of the Caspian. Of course that could have been propaganda to discuss Flashman's use of missiles. Which is worse to admit to enemy competence or one's own incompetence.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    The internal fire story might have spared Ukraine the rod of area bombing.

  74. @A123
    @JimDandy


    Israel valued their relationship with Donald Trump, too, right? And their unhappiness over Russia standing in the way of regime change in Syria was symbolic pouting?
     
    You should spend more time on facts, and less time on #NeverTrump propaganda from the Fake Stream Media. Organizations like WaPo and CNN deliberately try to manufacture enmity against those they deem "deplorable".

    The actual situation is:
    -- Regime change was an Obama / Erdogan concept.
    -- Trump's MAGA administration reversed that unworkable policy.

    MAGA and Israel agree that the main threat to regional stability is sociopath Khamenei. Iranian Hezbollah interference in Lebanon generated a failed state. The key requirenent for peace is a Syria 100% free of Iranian troops and proxies.

    None of the Syrian opposition groups are credible. Obama planned to impose an SJW"Color Revolution" puppet government from the outside. That has no chance of working. Realistically, Assad remaining in charge could be the only viable end-state.

    #LetsGoBrandon 😇

    Replies: @JimDandy

    — PUTIN reversed that unworkable policy.

    Fixed that for you.

    Here’s a fact, Mr. Peaceman–I voted for Trump twice and hope to make it thrice. He played ball with Israel but he drew the line at starting new wars for them. That’s largely why he isn’t president right now. You can try to change the subject, but you can’t succeed. Israel wanted regime change in Syria. As a group, Jews hate Putin. The Jewish State is certainly not the exception.

    • LOL: A123
    • Replies: @A123
    @JimDandy

    ROTFLMAO

    Apparently the #NeverTrump IffenBot (v2) has rolled out. Same Low-IQ, Yahoo lying with slightly different packaging.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @Yellowface Anon
    @JimDandy


    As a group, Jews hate Putin.
     
    There are 2 groups of Jews, Secular and Reformed Jews who are like extreme versions of secularized bourgeois Christians without the stupid and honest baggage, and Orthodox Jews who are like the Amish without the farming. One of them are cosmopolitan and one observant, one Liberal and one TradCon, one with a crashing fertility and one with a boom fertility.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @A123

  75. @Wokechoke
    @Yellowface Anon

    The sunk ship. It’s strategic target that was sunk. Response could be areabombing and dehousing.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    He wishes to evict NATO out of former Warsaw Bloc countries, but Putin’s current aims are mainly confined to Ukraine at the moment – it takes an actual escalatory move such as direct NATO involvement, or a deliberate false flag from either side for Putin to gain a casus belli for total war. Pearl Harbor this is not – Russian MoD so far says it was an ammunition explosion, of course, and most systems on the ship are (claimed to be) still functional.

    As soon as this year (but certainly not the ship sinking), and as late as 2025 – the date Martin Armstrong gives for the start of massive depopulation. The war in Ukraine 100% will be to WWIII what the 2nd Sino-Japanese War is to the Pacific War – Expansionism by regional powers becoming the obstacle to an emergent global order that is to be neutralized at the first possible opportunity. As history goes, aircraft carriers left the harbor and battleships sat duck…

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Yellowface Anon

    It’s a a Royal Oak or a Graf Spee though. Pearl Harbor it doesn’t need to be, Russia will retaliate with area bombing.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  76. In the spirit of developing a more right-hemisphere approach to living I am trying to focus more on “experience” and less on theory or philosophizing.

    Our society massively undervalues “experience for it’s own sake”, and yet that is surely the very “trunk” of the tree of life – besides, the ultimate purpose of abstract thinking is to let us see beyond itself and return us once more to the primacy of experience 🙂

    Thought overcomes thought.

    So I am once more focusing on novels – and especially, big, fat, Victorian novels, large volumes with musty yellowed pages that feel good in the hand and smell of old wood – a sensual experience as much as an intellectual one.

    I shall read them without any theorizing whatsoever but purely for the experience of being lost in these strange worlds, like I did when I was a child. I shall delight in the uselessly ornate and luxuriant language that serves no utilitarian purpose whatsoever, and I shall enjoy the old fashioned values and mores.

    So to that end I just ordered a physical copy of Charles Dickens David Copperfield, a massive musty old time if ever there was one. I have never yet finished a Dickens book but I think I have a different attitude now.

    And based on songbird and Barbarossa’s discussion of Kipling’s Captains Courageous, I ordered that too.

    Steve Sailer says on his blog that no one reads novels anymore, because they are “frivolous”, but Steve is a typical left-hemisphere sick modern, and his attitude exemplifies the modern downgrading of experience.

    I’m excited to dive into it!

    ——————-

    Television has been getting rather stale of late – I can’t think of anything interesting to watch lately, and as soon as I start a show I lose interest.

    A large majority of modern shows seem to actively celebrate psychopathy, which is very interesting. I believe the trend started with Breaking Bad, which was brilliant TV, but I did not realize at the time that this signalled a major shift in the cultural landscape that was going to be more permanent.

    While I thoroughly enjoyed Breaking Bad, these days I actively avoid this weird celebration of psychopathy our culture seems to have devolved into. I have no doubt it’s spiritually harmful to be exposed too much to that sort of thing.

    I’m rewatching all the old episodes of Star Trek the Next Generation, which I loved as a child. I find it generally quite relaxing and enjoyable. The values are generally old fashioned and wholesome and the atmosphere very optimistic and positive. And I find the show especially in the later seasons to have a pleasantly slow pace, an air of quiet and intelligent brooding that avoids being splashy, and a sense of cosmic mystery despite being scientific. And Patrick Stewart is infinitely fun to watch 🙂

    I know songbird thinks TNG to be deplorably Woke, or preparatory to Woke, but as a whole I can’t say I really agree 🙂

    • Replies: @songbird
    @AaronB


    I’m rewatching all the old episodes of Star Trek the Next Generation, which I loved as a child.
     
    Do you have a favorite episode? I think you already mentioned that one where Picard gets stabbed in the heart, as a youth.

    I believe my favorite would be "Boobytrap."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booby_Trap_(Star_Trek%3A_The_Next_Generation)

    It is subversive on multiple levels, including the ending. Though, one of the things that I appreciated about it was that I felt like it had a genuine connection to the past. (I know that technically there are lots of episodes with a connection to the past, but somehow this is the one that resonated the most with me.)

    Replies: @AaronB

  77. @Yellowface Anon
    @Wokechoke

    He wishes to evict NATO out of former Warsaw Bloc countries, but Putin's current aims are mainly confined to Ukraine at the moment - it takes an actual escalatory move such as direct NATO involvement, or a deliberate false flag from either side for Putin to gain a casus belli for total war. Pearl Harbor this is not - Russian MoD so far says it was an ammunition explosion, of course, and most systems on the ship are (claimed to be) still functional.

    As soon as this year (but certainly not the ship sinking), and as late as 2025 - the date Martin Armstrong gives for the start of massive depopulation. The war in Ukraine 100% will be to WWIII what the 2nd Sino-Japanese War is to the Pacific War - Expansionism by regional powers becoming the obstacle to an emergent global order that is to be neutralized at the first possible opportunity. As history goes, aircraft carriers left the harbor and battleships sat duck...

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    It’s a a Royal Oak or a Graf Spee though. Pearl Harbor it doesn’t need to be, Russia will retaliate with area bombing.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Wokechoke

    In Ukraine? Nothing new.

  78. @JimDandy
    @A123

    — PUTIN reversed that unworkable policy.

    Fixed that for you.

    Here's a fact, Mr. Peaceman--I voted for Trump twice and hope to make it thrice. He played ball with Israel but he drew the line at starting new wars for them. That's largely why he isn't president right now. You can try to change the subject, but you can't succeed. Israel wanted regime change in Syria. As a group, Jews hate Putin. The Jewish State is certainly not the exception.

    Replies: @A123, @Yellowface Anon

    ROTFLMAO

    Apparently the #NeverTrump IffenBot (v2) has rolled out. Same Low-IQ, Yahoo lying with slightly different packaging.

    PEACE 😇

    • LOL: iffen
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @A123

    That a lying fucking asshole like you signs off with "Peace" says it all.

    Shalom, you alter kaker you.

    Replies: @iffen

  79. @22pp22
    @sudden death

    Why is making an enemy of Russia a good thing?

    Remember Russiagate? Is it surprising they are paranoid?

    They have stuff we need. The end of cheap Russian gas to Europe will put a permanent brake on the economy.

    All we had to do was Finlandise Ukraine, but the Neocons have their own agenda and an army of useful idiots to back them up.

    P.S. The site looks legit.

    This war is in the brainchild of Satan, AKA Victoria Nuland. Do yo really wan to be a Nuland fanboy?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @sudden death

    This war is in the brainchild of Satan, AKA Victoria Nuland. Do yo really wan to be a Nuland fanboy?

    Should adress this to the real Nuland fanboy named Putin, who did all he could exactly the way she wanted 😉

    • Agree: Yellowface Anon
  80. @A123
    @JimDandy

    ROTFLMAO

    Apparently the #NeverTrump IffenBot (v2) has rolled out. Same Low-IQ, Yahoo lying with slightly different packaging.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @JimDandy

    That a lying fucking asshole like you signs off with “Peace” says it all.

    Shalom, you alter kaker you.

    • LOL: A123
    • Replies: @iffen
    @JimDandy

    A123 is an Israeli propaganda bot.

    It does not acknowledge concepts such as lying.

  81. @Philip Owen
    @utu

    The missing Russian airforce is a big question.

    Russia has 350 jets left. They did try using them. They lost 11 in two days to anti aircraft missiles. IF they fly high S300 and BUKs can see them. If they fly low various MANPADs can hit them. They no longer fly over Ukrainian positions. The army, naval infantry, guards, VDV were fully committed to the war. The available navy has been put in harms way. The airforce is being kept back.

    In all cases Russia is using a non replenishable stock of equipment. Presumably the army and navy don't matter because in a war with NATO tactical nukes would be used instead. However, a war with NATO would be an airwar. To deliver and defend against tactical nukes aircraft will be needed. The argument "Russia is not using its best" fails with the army and navy but with the airforce there may be a case.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Dmitry

    From what I briefly read about the topic, with superficial understanding.

    Kalibr (a guided cruise missile, first pioneered in Sverdlovsk 1982), costs over \$1,2 million each and production in Russia before sanctions was about 2-3 per week.

    It could destroy fixed targets according to satellite guidance. It could destroy things contain weapons, like warehouse or factories. But it would depend on intelligence about the location of the target. It doesn’t destroy moving targets.

    Iskander would have the same ability, but it is far more expensive, supply of the weapon even more limited. It was cost-effective as designed for tactical nuclear warheads, not conventional bombing.

    Russian air force doesn’t have targeting pods, to allow use of guided weapons against moving targets. There are air-launched cruise missiles like “Kh-101” for destroying fixed targets. https://www.iiss.org/blogs/military-balance/2022/04/ukraine-russias-air-launched-cruise-missiles-coming-up-short

    A lot of the bombing in Ukraine is using unguided bombs. They are bombing Ukraine with FAB-500 bombs (which were pioneered in 1954). http://roe.ru/eng/catalog/aerospace-systems/air-bombs/fab-500-m-62/

    This kind of bombing from smaller range with unguided weapons, also exposes planes to risk of being attacked from the ground.

    With those limitations said, Ukraine are not necessarily very careful. There are reports their factories have been located by media reports (their factory for repairing tanks, was destroyed yesterday).

    There are reports tonight, one of Ukraine’s transport planes containing Western supplies, was destroyed while flying. https://ria.ru/20220416/samolet-1783914498.html

    • Replies: @siberiancat
    @Dmitry

    The use of iron bombs goes with the relatively new bombing sight called СВП-24

    It takes into account Glonass positioning, wind, humidity, etc, guides the weapons platform to the point of release, and releases the bomb load automatically.

    Replies: @Dmitry

  82. Alexei Kudrin (Finance Minister 2000-2011 in Russia), is in Israel, likely to apply for citizenship before returning to Russia (https://www.vesty.co.il/main/article/hyezsn1vc). This is a kind of sanctions avoiding game, which Israel hasn’t closed yet. It’s not good for Israel reputation, to allow this, but they continue to accept the politicians and oligarchs (Mikhail Prokhorov last month).

    Less seriously, Morgenshtern is qualified for Israeli citizenship (his father is a Bashkir, while his mother has Jewish roots). https://www.cosmo.ru/stars/news/08-04-2022/morgenshtern-obnaruzhil-u-sebya-evreyskie-korni-i-oformlyaet-grazhdanstvo-izrailya/

    Israel should be welcome him, as he is not a Minister of Finance, just a bad rapper and good satirist. There is nothing related to sanctions. But I don’t see he would have much audience in Israel. Generation Z Israeli people, are not many of them, going to pay to listen to Russian pop singers/satirists.

    On another topic, I think Russian businessmen are a lot richer than Forbes knows. For example, just Jersey is removing \$7 billion of Abramovich assets. https://news.sky.com/story/jersey-seizes-7bn-in-assets-linked-to-roman-abramovich-12589752

  83. @AaronB
    @Mikel

    You have a valid point that we have more physical power than ever before, which should translate into the freedom to live a happier life. That, after all, is the great promise of modernity, really.

    But does it? It really depends on your values and what sort of lifestyle one most values. For myself, the vastly expanded powers of the modern world have nevertheless created a lifestyle and physical reality that greatly restrict my ability to live the life I would truly want. The world is far uglier and less interesting on every level than it can and should be.

    Fascinating and complex ancient human cultures are being destroyed. Huge swathes of the worlds wilderness are also being destroyed. Cities and towns have become ugly and soulless.

    The beauty and wonder of the world and it's human inhabitants has been massively degraded.

    And considering the extremely poor mental health increasingly afflicting the population of the developed world, I am certainly not alone.

    Perhaps vastly expanded powers aren't the key to happiness, as so many myths and legends insist on warning us :)

    Now, you say that social pressure isn't an absolute barrier to living an alternative lifestyle - and that's true, but if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.

    But you make a good point that choice still exists, even if it has to be wrested from society - so my goal is much less to "transform" society than to win social support and approval for alternative lifestyles, and a kind of "spiritual infrastructure" that helps young people find this alternative path.

    In traditional China and India, most people lived ordinary lives, but leaving city life behind and abandoning the rat race was an honored and socially validated choice that had a lot of spiritual infrastructure to support it.

    So that needs to be restored to our society, I think.

    But I think there is a more fundamental point to be made here. If a huge - and perhaps even the decisive - factor in being happy is the correct use of our minds and the correct mental and emotional relationship to the external world, then the "metaphysics" undergirding modern life, with it's belief that mathematical certainty alone is the correct relationship to reality, leads to perhaps the most unhappy generation to have ever lived :)

    I have enough of a problem convincing my two adult children of what they should do for what I see as their own good. If I cannot even convince my children to change their lives, who am I to start planning full societal changes?
     
    I don't see the task as "persuasion" which suggests force. Rather, I see it as simply formulating an alternative ideal and "inviting" others to consider it.

    Many people today seem to suffer greatly from poor mental health in modern society without being aware there are alternatives.

    As we’ve discussed in the past, and Silviosilver recently mentioned, if we managed to convince a large amount of people to lead a better life by leaving their jobs and simplifying their existence, we would could actually cause a big economic harm to many people that do not share our perspective for no real benefit for us. Our ability to enjoy life in contact with nature while making use of so many technological advances that you and I are so used to (for example, exchanging our ideas through the internet) depends on the majority of society leading the lifestyle that we reject.
     
    Well, I would only want those who are genuinely unsatisfied with modernity and who will genuinely become significantly healthier and happier living an alternative life to do so - and I would "invite" them to consider it, and not "convince" them :)

    It's obviously unfair for such people to remain "economic captives" in a system designed for the benefit of those who still think the point of life is to make money and acquire things - and moreover, I hold out hope that even such benighted people will at least somewhat see the light after they see people flourishing who live opposite to them :)

    Not to mention, the "economic lifestyle" of these mainstream people are not in themselves neutral, but actively contribute to an uglier and worse world.

    So on every level I think it would be a positive thing for everyone.

    I don't believe there can be such "radical seperation" between those of us who pursue nature and the mainstream which seeks wealth and power - part of the "metaphysic" of nature-love, is the insight that we are all connected in a larger organic whole, and what goes on in one place affects everything.

    So I think we have a spiritual duty to not "leave others behind" but work towards their salvation as well :)

    No need to apologize for not having the time to respond! Is that lack of time not punishment enough on its own?
     
    Well said :)

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Grahamsno(G64), @Mikel

    I don’t see the task as “persuasion” which suggests force. Rather, I see it as simply formulating an alternative ideal and “inviting” others to consider it.

    This is basically the approach I am taking with my own children. We live a fairly unconventional life in many ways, although our goals and ideals would have been very common in the not so distant past. I’m quite aware that I have no power to force my children to follow in my footsteps, and they may even fully reject what I stand for. My intent is instead to formulate and demonstrate an alternative ethos to the dominant modern one and to let that stand on it’s own merits.

    This puts quite a bit of responsibility on my wife and I since very much depends on whether we live up to our own hype and standards. Hypocrisy will be easily detected and discredit much of what we are attempting to instill. There can be no dragging them into it, they will either embrace it for themselves or not. My oldest used to give us more guff about our minimal tech use and strict controls on it for the kids, but now that she is seeing some of the neurotic, unhealthy, and anxiety ridden behavior of some of her tech immersed cousins she increasingly sees that there is a valid point to our guardrails.

    As you say, it is all about presenting an alternative. The way things seem to be increasingly headed I think many of those alternatives speak for themselves. I certainly see more and more people looking for an exit ramp.

    • Agree: AaronB
    • Replies: @AaronB
    @Barbarossa


    My intent is instead to formulate and demonstrate an alternative ethos to the dominant modern one and to let that stand on it’s own merits.
     
    Yes, this is by far the best way to go about it.

    Ultimately, "arguments" aren't particularly effective. But everyone can see who is flourishing and happy and who isn't.

    There is a fascinating book I'm reading now about the spread of early Christianity. Even though evangelizing later became a very big part of Christianity, in the early years in the Roman Empire this was not so. Evangelizing was deemphasized.

    Instead, Christianity spread because it offered a visibly healthier and happier way to live than late-decadent Paganism with it's sterile rationalism. Christians lived in a way that was completely against the mainstream of their time, and this provoked curiosity and interest.

    As you say, many people today are beginning to see that something is very wrong with modern life, but there are still also many people who believe the solution to this is to simply do more of what the modern world has been doing - more control, more technology, more sterile rationality, more attempts to rebel against nature - and who are not yet ready to heed the message of an alternative lifestyle even when they see it with their own eyes.

    There are even many who are so committed to the current system, that they will deny visibly healthier alternatives and even seek to crush them, unfortunately.

    So assuming our culture is broadly speaking tracing the same arc as the Greco-Roman world (with some notable features that are unique), having embraced their hyper-rationality, I believe we have to go a little bit deeper into late-modern decadence before large numbers of people can be open to alternatives.

    But even today, right now, many people are open to this message.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

  84. @Philip Owen
    @Wokechoke

    Belogord, Voronezh, Saratov and the Kuban still have Ukrainian speaking minorities that lived there before the Muscovites came down the Don valley.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @siberiancat, @Wokechoke

    According to the late Academician Zaliznyak, in the 14th century, there was no difference in how people spoke in Kyiv and in Moscow.

    Novgorod was a different matter even in the 10th century.

    So, looking for some ancient divisions between Russian or Ukrainian speakers is hardly historical

  85. @sudden death
    @Mikel


    ...if a Neptune can do that, imagine what...
     
    ...will happen to CCP'ied China landing ships when they will sail closer to Taiwan? Maybe Ukraine should offer to sell some to Taipei government if China will try more seriously help RF in to order avoid sanctioning, lol

    Veering into more conspiratorial waters it might have been also joint US-UK-UA (3U alliance!) exercised operation including a goal to have a potential cautionary lesson against CCP naval plans regarding Taiwan too.

    After all RF just had banned almost all GB current government from entering RF, so that may be a sign that British were seriously involved, maybe even rockets really were made in and delivered by UK like Harpoon(?) missiles?

    Replies: @Dmitry

    Amphibious invasion of Taiwan for occupation by China, is probably not very possible. There are a lot of academic papers about this topic you can see from the 1990s, including written by professors of geography.

    It seems like a lot of hype on this issue, which China would try only as a kind of suicidal policy, and they have a collective leadership there who you would expect should not be so irrational
    https://www.neweurope.eu/article/why-china-cannot-invade-taiwan/

    • Agree: Yellowface Anon
  86. @Dmitry
    @Philip Owen

    From what I briefly read about the topic, with superficial understanding.

    Kalibr (a guided cruise missile, first pioneered in Sverdlovsk 1982), costs over $1,2 million each and production in Russia before sanctions was about 2-3 per week.

    It could destroy fixed targets according to satellite guidance. It could destroy things contain weapons, like warehouse or factories. But it would depend on intelligence about the location of the target. It doesn't destroy moving targets.

    Iskander would have the same ability, but it is far more expensive, supply of the weapon even more limited. It was cost-effective as designed for tactical nuclear warheads, not conventional bombing.

    Russian air force doesn't have targeting pods, to allow use of guided weapons against moving targets. There are air-launched cruise missiles like "Kh-101" for destroying fixed targets. https://www.iiss.org/blogs/military-balance/2022/04/ukraine-russias-air-launched-cruise-missiles-coming-up-short

    A lot of the bombing in Ukraine is using unguided bombs. They are bombing Ukraine with FAB-500 bombs (which were pioneered in 1954). http://roe.ru/eng/catalog/aerospace-systems/air-bombs/fab-500-m-62/

    This kind of bombing from smaller range with unguided weapons, also exposes planes to risk of being attacked from the ground.

    -

    With those limitations said, Ukraine are not necessarily very careful. There are reports their factories have been located by media reports (their factory for repairing tanks, was destroyed yesterday).

    There are reports tonight, one of Ukraine's transport planes containing Western supplies, was destroyed while flying. https://ria.ru/20220416/samolet-1783914498.html

    Replies: @siberiancat

    The use of iron bombs goes with the relatively new bombing sight called СВП-24

    It takes into account Glonass positioning, wind, humidity, etc, guides the weapons platform to the point of release, and releases the bomb load automatically.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @siberiancat

    This use of unguided weapons, even if there is a new bombing sight for Su-25, Tu-22 and Tu-95, requires planes to be close to their target.

    This means they are vulnerable to being shot from the ground.

    As the planes do not have modern electronics for jamming or stealth. It's just not possible to fly them in a more dangerous area, like Western Ukraine.

    So they are limited to using expensive stand-off missiles (Kh-555 and Kh-101) from Tu-22, from airspace of Belarus. They can destroy fixed targets where they already have the geolocation, but the quantity of the conventional bombing available is very limited and expensive in areas where there is still air defense and the radar operating.

  87. @Barbarossa
    @AaronB


    I don’t see the task as “persuasion” which suggests force. Rather, I see it as simply formulating an alternative ideal and “inviting” others to consider it.
     
    This is basically the approach I am taking with my own children. We live a fairly unconventional life in many ways, although our goals and ideals would have been very common in the not so distant past. I'm quite aware that I have no power to force my children to follow in my footsteps, and they may even fully reject what I stand for. My intent is instead to formulate and demonstrate an alternative ethos to the dominant modern one and to let that stand on it's own merits.

    This puts quite a bit of responsibility on my wife and I since very much depends on whether we live up to our own hype and standards. Hypocrisy will be easily detected and discredit much of what we are attempting to instill. There can be no dragging them into it, they will either embrace it for themselves or not. My oldest used to give us more guff about our minimal tech use and strict controls on it for the kids, but now that she is seeing some of the neurotic, unhealthy, and anxiety ridden behavior of some of her tech immersed cousins she increasingly sees that there is a valid point to our guardrails.

    As you say, it is all about presenting an alternative. The way things seem to be increasingly headed I think many of those alternatives speak for themselves. I certainly see more and more people looking for an exit ramp.

    Replies: @AaronB

    My intent is instead to formulate and demonstrate an alternative ethos to the dominant modern one and to let that stand on it’s own merits.

    Yes, this is by far the best way to go about it.

    Ultimately, “arguments” aren’t particularly effective. But everyone can see who is flourishing and happy and who isn’t.

    There is a fascinating book I’m reading now about the spread of early Christianity. Even though evangelizing later became a very big part of Christianity, in the early years in the Roman Empire this was not so. Evangelizing was deemphasized.

    Instead, Christianity spread because it offered a visibly healthier and happier way to live than late-decadent Paganism with it’s sterile rationalism. Christians lived in a way that was completely against the mainstream of their time, and this provoked curiosity and interest.

    As you say, many people today are beginning to see that something is very wrong with modern life, but there are still also many people who believe the solution to this is to simply do more of what the modern world has been doing – more control, more technology, more sterile rationality, more attempts to rebel against nature – and who are not yet ready to heed the message of an alternative lifestyle even when they see it with their own eyes.

    There are even many who are so committed to the current system, that they will deny visibly healthier alternatives and even seek to crush them, unfortunately.

    So assuming our culture is broadly speaking tracing the same arc as the Greco-Roman world (with some notable features that are unique), having embraced their hyper-rationality, I believe we have to go a little bit deeper into late-modern decadence before large numbers of people can be open to alternatives.

    But even today, right now, many people are open to this message.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @AaronB

    What I expect is a continuing bifurcation. Part of the population will continue the modern priorities of increasing technological immersion coupled with peak consumerism while another segment will decouple more from that path and live in an intentionally less technological and control based reality. These two will have less and less in common and will truly live in alternate universes.

    This is really already true for me when I talk to people heavily submerged in social media. We have virtually nothing in common, no shared conceptual framework or experience. It's very disconcerting how quickly that has emerged as common, since even 10 years ago it was much less so.

    I'm not really sure where that is headed along with all other sharp divergences in our body politic. So many fundamental differences have piled up that it seems hard to imagine them ever coming to an sort of consensus.

    Out of curiosity, if you don't me asking, what do the people around you in the Big Apple make of you? I would expect that there would be some blank incomprehension if you got into any of these topics at the workplace!

    Replies: @AaronB

  88. @Wokechoke
    @Yellowface Anon

    It’s a a Royal Oak or a Graf Spee though. Pearl Harbor it doesn’t need to be, Russia will retaliate with area bombing.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    In Ukraine? Nothing new.

  89. @JimDandy
    @A123

    — PUTIN reversed that unworkable policy.

    Fixed that for you.

    Here's a fact, Mr. Peaceman--I voted for Trump twice and hope to make it thrice. He played ball with Israel but he drew the line at starting new wars for them. That's largely why he isn't president right now. You can try to change the subject, but you can't succeed. Israel wanted regime change in Syria. As a group, Jews hate Putin. The Jewish State is certainly not the exception.

    Replies: @A123, @Yellowface Anon

    As a group, Jews hate Putin.

    There are 2 groups of Jews, Secular and Reformed Jews who are like extreme versions of secularized bourgeois Christians without the stupid and honest baggage, and Orthodox Jews who are like the Amish without the farming. One of them are cosmopolitan and one observant, one Liberal and one TradCon, one with a crashing fertility and one with a boom fertility.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Yellowface Anon

    Yeah, but "liberal" Jews are still overwhelmingly Zionists and guided first and foremost by "Is it good for the Jews?"--with some exceptions. And it seems like there are distinctly different types of Orthodox Jews, too.

    , @A123
    @Yellowface Anon


    There are 2 groups of Jews, Secular and Reformed Jews who are like extreme versions of secularized bourgeois Christians
     
    In America, and presumably Europe, your summary is sound. Here is an indicative U.S. poll for New York (from 2011): (1)

     
    https://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/content/images/AIA2011092202-chart1.png
     

    While Israel also has a split, it is quite different. The "secularized bourgeois" Jews of Israel are strongly nationalist, believe in security & military defense, etc...

    The only group in Israel that even vaguely resembles the American Left is Labor/Gesher. In 2019 they only managed to capture 6 of 120 seats (~5% of the population).

     
    https://theglobepost.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Israeli-elections.jpg
     

    Indigenous Palestinian Jews view Russia with a national security perspective. Iran is an existential threat. Ukraine is not. Given Russia's presence in Syria, why would Palestinian Jews blow up that relationship by backing Zelensky?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/articles/aia2011092202/

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @Dmitry

  90. A123 says: • Website

    The conundrum that is BoJo….

    The latest plan from the British PM sounds pretty good. (1)

    Britain has unveiled plans to fly illegal migrants crossing the English Channel from France to the African country of Rwanda.

    The plans announced on Thursday by U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson will mean that thousands of economic migrants arriving by small boats from the French shores will be met by members of the British armed forces as they arrive, and escorted to purpose-built facilities, from which, within a week, they will be flown to Rwanda. At least that is the plan.

    The policy makes obvious sense. It is much like Trump’s successful Remain in Mexico initiative.

    The question becomes, “Will BoJo (and his administration) follow through?”

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://rmx.news/united-kingdom/britain-will-send-channel-migrants-to-rwanda/

  91. S says:

    This is a question for either AP or Hack.

    Euros of relatively recent times, and being sometimes in nearly impossible circumstances, seem all too often to fight the wrong wars. For instance, in the case of the US Civil War and at a cost of 700,000 lives, the chattel slavery of the US South was merely replaced with the US North’s even more malignant and destructive manifestation of slavery, wage slavery, ie specifically the so called cheap labor/mass immigration system, which is quite simply chattel slavery and it’s trade monetized (that is the horrid genocidal system was distilled down to it’s financial essence whilst profits were maximized).

    Therefore, I think when violence became inevitable in the Spring of 1861 that, rather than the guns being turned upon each other, they should have been turned upon slave owners in the South, and upon their corresponding same ilk in the US North, ie the hirers on, promoters of, and exploiters of the wage slaves (ie ‘immigrants’) and the ‘labor contractors’ who were ‘importing’ them in by diktat, both groups North and South driven by the same profound moral cause to do anything, but anything (God forbid!) than pay the prevailing real time local rates for labor, generally to their own people, and force them to stop their self destructive peoplehood destroying practices. No more chattel slavery, no more wage slavery, ie no more so called cheap labor/mass immigration. Self determination could then have been allowed for those peoples desiring it in the United States.

    That would have been a true abolition of slavery unlike the fraudulent one the world was presented with in the 19th century. That’s also the war against slavery, the essence of which is the systematic theft of the value of an individual’s labor, which should have been fought, but wasn’t. Of course, after the war, people were too spent to fight the war that should have been fought.

    After this current war is over, and provided Ukraine has retained at least some of it’s sovereignty, what will the Ukranian people do when it’s own government attempts to deliberately genocide (in the truest sense of the word) the Ukranian people by forcing it to adopt wage slavery, ie the cheap labor/mass immigration system, the economic and political basis of the modern ‘progressive’ Multi-cultural society?

    Will the Ukranian people have enough strength left after fighting this war to succesfully resist?

    • Replies: @songbird
    @S

    People often say that the Civil War was when the US took a more imperial turn. It was a very destructive war, and I can appreciate the dark side of it all, including its egalitarian legacy and the effective abolition of states' rights.

    Still, it is interesting to note that when Perry steamed into Edo Bay with his cannon pointing at samurai, that was in 1853, years before the Civil War.

    Not that it was necessarily bad for the Japanese. It may have been the kick in the pants that they needed.

    Replies: @S

  92. @Yellowface Anon
    @JimDandy


    As a group, Jews hate Putin.
     
    There are 2 groups of Jews, Secular and Reformed Jews who are like extreme versions of secularized bourgeois Christians without the stupid and honest baggage, and Orthodox Jews who are like the Amish without the farming. One of them are cosmopolitan and one observant, one Liberal and one TradCon, one with a crashing fertility and one with a boom fertility.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @A123

    Yeah, but “liberal” Jews are still overwhelmingly Zionists and guided first and foremost by “Is it good for the Jews?”–with some exceptions. And it seems like there are distinctly different types of Orthodox Jews, too.

  93. @AaronB
    @Barbarossa


    My intent is instead to formulate and demonstrate an alternative ethos to the dominant modern one and to let that stand on it’s own merits.
     
    Yes, this is by far the best way to go about it.

    Ultimately, "arguments" aren't particularly effective. But everyone can see who is flourishing and happy and who isn't.

    There is a fascinating book I'm reading now about the spread of early Christianity. Even though evangelizing later became a very big part of Christianity, in the early years in the Roman Empire this was not so. Evangelizing was deemphasized.

    Instead, Christianity spread because it offered a visibly healthier and happier way to live than late-decadent Paganism with it's sterile rationalism. Christians lived in a way that was completely against the mainstream of their time, and this provoked curiosity and interest.

    As you say, many people today are beginning to see that something is very wrong with modern life, but there are still also many people who believe the solution to this is to simply do more of what the modern world has been doing - more control, more technology, more sterile rationality, more attempts to rebel against nature - and who are not yet ready to heed the message of an alternative lifestyle even when they see it with their own eyes.

    There are even many who are so committed to the current system, that they will deny visibly healthier alternatives and even seek to crush them, unfortunately.

    So assuming our culture is broadly speaking tracing the same arc as the Greco-Roman world (with some notable features that are unique), having embraced their hyper-rationality, I believe we have to go a little bit deeper into late-modern decadence before large numbers of people can be open to alternatives.

    But even today, right now, many people are open to this message.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    What I expect is a continuing bifurcation. Part of the population will continue the modern priorities of increasing technological immersion coupled with peak consumerism while another segment will decouple more from that path and live in an intentionally less technological and control based reality. These two will have less and less in common and will truly live in alternate universes.

    This is really already true for me when I talk to people heavily submerged in social media. We have virtually nothing in common, no shared conceptual framework or experience. It’s very disconcerting how quickly that has emerged as common, since even 10 years ago it was much less so.

    I’m not really sure where that is headed along with all other sharp divergences in our body politic. So many fundamental differences have piled up that it seems hard to imagine them ever coming to an sort of consensus.

    Out of curiosity, if you don’t me asking, what do the people around you in the Big Apple make of you? I would expect that there would be some blank incomprehension if you got into any of these topics at the workplace!

    • Agree: AaronB
    • Replies: @AaronB
    @Barbarossa


    Out of curiosity, if you don’t me asking, what do the people around you in the Big Apple make of you? I would expect that there would be some blank incomprehension if you got into any of these topics at the workplace!
     
    It's more than blank incomprehension :)

    That I was prepared for. There is on the whole an active hostility and opposition to my way of thinking - and among several of my friends and acquaintances, a concerted and aggressive effort to "pull me back in" towards materialism, a life centred on money, and an obsession with physical survival.

    It was this experience that led me to finally give credence to the old idea of "spiritual warfare". I thought my position would be seen as eccentric, perhaps absurd, but I would be regarded as essentially innocuous and unthreatening.

    After all, if I want less money and have less ambition, there is less competition.

    Boy was I wrong. It seems certain people are motivated to destroy my attitude to life even if by it's very nature it lessens competition for them. This kind of "irrational" attack, I cannot help feel, suggests the battle is spiritual.

    There is another way my alternative attitude gets me into trouble - if you are no longer committed to modern civilization and have less ambition, you will stand out starkly for not being "serious" about work even if you are diligent and competent at your job, as the modern mythology says that nothing is more important than economic production, and one attitude must reflect this.

    No longer being obsessed with survival, my easy going and "light hearted" attitude towards life has also earned me surprising enmity and severe backlash in NY. Fear of death is also a sacred value to modern society, and to not have an appropriately serious and "heavy" provokes spiritual attack, I now see.

    Well, the picture is not wholly bad :)

    There are some people who have a certain amount of sympathy and understanding for my position.

    But on the whole the spiritual life cannot be well lived in one of the major ideological centers of modernity.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

  94. A123 says: • Website
    @Yellowface Anon
    @JimDandy


    As a group, Jews hate Putin.
     
    There are 2 groups of Jews, Secular and Reformed Jews who are like extreme versions of secularized bourgeois Christians without the stupid and honest baggage, and Orthodox Jews who are like the Amish without the farming. One of them are cosmopolitan and one observant, one Liberal and one TradCon, one with a crashing fertility and one with a boom fertility.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @A123

    There are 2 groups of Jews, Secular and Reformed Jews who are like extreme versions of secularized bourgeois Christians

    In America, and presumably Europe, your summary is sound. Here is an indicative U.S. poll for New York (from 2011): (1)

     

     

    While Israel also has a split, it is quite different. The “secularized bourgeois” Jews of Israel are strongly nationalist, believe in security & military defense, etc…

    The only group in Israel that even vaguely resembles the American Left is Labor/Gesher. In 2019 they only managed to capture 6 of 120 seats (~5% of the population).

     

     

    Indigenous Palestinian Jews view Russia with a national security perspective. Iran is an existential threat. Ukraine is not. Given Russia’s presence in Syria, why would Palestinian Jews blow up that relationship by backing Zelensky?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/articles/aia2011092202/

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @A123

    Israel wants to play both sides in the place they are at as America's sole ally, like China. They are on the side of Russian and Ukrainian oligarchs, while China wants resources from Russia and markets from the rest of the world. Israel hopes for Russia's hand to be lifted from Syria and China for Central Asia.

    Meanwhile an air convoy is leaving Moscow for Tehran to prepare for the flare-up again in Palestine.

    https://twitter.com/AuroraIntel/status/1515056960806207499

    Orthodox Jews' world is the next one, not this one where geopolitics divide loyalties. Some of them don't want Israel to exist because Israel existing means the End Times, but most of them are just happy to have a spot under the sun.



    The only indigenous Palestinean Jews are Mizrahim. All else are practically immigrants after 2k years of "exile". Deeply ironical to see you refering the settler colony of Jews "Palestine".

    Replies: @Yahya, @A123, @LondonBob

    , @Dmitry
    @A123

    Most Russians outside Russia, are not supporting the Russian authorities, certainly not this year.

    It is related to social class, age and education level, because for typical people, the support for the authorities requires a lot of information restriction and lack of scepticism.

    Russians living in Western bloc countries are including large young, middle class and upper class proportions who have access to many sources of media. Quite a good proportion of Russians in the West, are middle class or more elite. Most people with high incomes and high education level (many with postgraduate, technical education level). There is also a filter for people to leave the country, which shows their revealed preferences.

    In Israel, the proportion of support for Russia could be higher, because Israel is the only Western bloc country with open borders immigration policy with Russia (for people with Jewish roots, under "Law of Return"), with higher proportion of lower class, non-elite immigrants. Israel receives the lower class of immigration.

    Russian and Ukrainian immigrants in Israel have below average income level (it's very different to Russians in Western Europe).

    There are a lot more lower class and less educated immigrants in Israel, compared to other Western bloc countries. For this reason, Israel has received some problems from its immigrants. There are also a lot more older immigrants, as they had earlier immigration, and many pensioners (with "Law of Return" they can attain residence visas for retired parents and grandparents).

    In previous years, when I had last visited Israel, you could see a lot of Russian flags. The unassimilated immigrants used to add Russian flags on the balconies. There were a lot of old immigrants in Israel, who had immigrated decades ago. If you see drunk or homeless people in Israel, they are often immigrants from Russia/Ukraine.

    But still the majority of Russians in Israel would be unlikely supporting the Russian authorities (and the Ukrainians, by comparison, will be mostly supporting the Ukrainian government). Younger people who integrate to the new country, less, than older people.

    Israel also has hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians and Georgians, who have much higher rate of support to Ukraine's government, partly as those have become much more nationalist cultures than Russia.

    -

    With YouTube, you can see the protests in Israel for Ukraine and against the war.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZyNmbiHgZU

    Replies: @Dmitry

  95. @Barbarossa
    @AaronB

    What I expect is a continuing bifurcation. Part of the population will continue the modern priorities of increasing technological immersion coupled with peak consumerism while another segment will decouple more from that path and live in an intentionally less technological and control based reality. These two will have less and less in common and will truly live in alternate universes.

    This is really already true for me when I talk to people heavily submerged in social media. We have virtually nothing in common, no shared conceptual framework or experience. It's very disconcerting how quickly that has emerged as common, since even 10 years ago it was much less so.

    I'm not really sure where that is headed along with all other sharp divergences in our body politic. So many fundamental differences have piled up that it seems hard to imagine them ever coming to an sort of consensus.

    Out of curiosity, if you don't me asking, what do the people around you in the Big Apple make of you? I would expect that there would be some blank incomprehension if you got into any of these topics at the workplace!

    Replies: @AaronB

    Out of curiosity, if you don’t me asking, what do the people around you in the Big Apple make of you? I would expect that there would be some blank incomprehension if you got into any of these topics at the workplace!

    It’s more than blank incomprehension 🙂

    That I was prepared for. There is on the whole an active hostility and opposition to my way of thinking – and among several of my friends and acquaintances, a concerted and aggressive effort to “pull me back in” towards materialism, a life centred on money, and an obsession with physical survival.

    It was this experience that led me to finally give credence to the old idea of “spiritual warfare”. I thought my position would be seen as eccentric, perhaps absurd, but I would be regarded as essentially innocuous and unthreatening.

    After all, if I want less money and have less ambition, there is less competition.

    Boy was I wrong. It seems certain people are motivated to destroy my attitude to life even if by it’s very nature it lessens competition for them. This kind of “irrational” attack, I cannot help feel, suggests the battle is spiritual.

    There is another way my alternative attitude gets me into trouble – if you are no longer committed to modern civilization and have less ambition, you will stand out starkly for not being “serious” about work even if you are diligent and competent at your job, as the modern mythology says that nothing is more important than economic production, and one attitude must reflect this.

    No longer being obsessed with survival, my easy going and “light hearted” attitude towards life has also earned me surprising enmity and severe backlash in NY. Fear of death is also a sacred value to modern society, and to not have an appropriately serious and “heavy” provokes spiritual attack, I now see.

    Well, the picture is not wholly bad 🙂

    There are some people who have a certain amount of sympathy and understanding for my position.

    But on the whole the spiritual life cannot be well lived in one of the major ideological centers of modernity.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @AaronB

    I suppose that you represent a strange and disturbing aberration in the Big Apple. It sounds from previous comments as though you have found a reasonably accommodating employer at least and it allows you a great deal of freedom in the grand scheme of things.

    To share an amusing story...When my wife and I were buying our land and planning our initial little cabin, we were living in what was basically an ex-urb sort of area where I worked in a custom stair shop. I was probably the oddest person there, doing things like sitting at lunch with a small personal carving project while they talked about sports.

    When I explained to some of them how we were going to build this tiny cabin in the woods, but didn't have money initially for things like plumbing or electrical they were politely bemused. However, the lack of plumbing, which was more my concern, got no mention while the lack of electricity was a major sticking point, though again not for any of the reasons I might have guessed.

    The incredulous question came, "How are you going to watch TV?" When I explained that I wasn't going to be watching any TV, the second incredulous question arose. "Then what are you going to DO?" I told them I would probably not be lacking for things to do and in any case there are always books.

    I always found that response very funny, since TV was probably dead last of the potential issues on my mind. In the end I was glad to be out of that area. I got along fine with most people, but I was very much the oddball! On second thought, I might still be an oddball, I just live in area now with a preponderance of oddballs.

  96. @AaronB
    In the spirit of developing a more right-hemisphere approach to living I am trying to focus more on "experience" and less on theory or philosophizing.

    Our society massively undervalues "experience for it's own sake", and yet that is surely the very "trunk" of the tree of life - besides, the ultimate purpose of abstract thinking is to let us see beyond itself and return us once more to the primacy of experience :)

    Thought overcomes thought.

    So I am once more focusing on novels - and especially, big, fat, Victorian novels, large volumes with musty yellowed pages that feel good in the hand and smell of old wood - a sensual experience as much as an intellectual one.

    I shall read them without any theorizing whatsoever but purely for the experience of being lost in these strange worlds, like I did when I was a child. I shall delight in the uselessly ornate and luxuriant language that serves no utilitarian purpose whatsoever, and I shall enjoy the old fashioned values and mores.

    So to that end I just ordered a physical copy of Charles Dickens David Copperfield, a massive musty old time if ever there was one. I have never yet finished a Dickens book but I think I have a different attitude now.

    And based on songbird and Barbarossa's discussion of Kipling's Captains Courageous, I ordered that too.

    Steve Sailer says on his blog that no one reads novels anymore, because they are "frivolous", but Steve is a typical left-hemisphere sick modern, and his attitude exemplifies the modern downgrading of experience.

    I'm excited to dive into it!

    -------------------

    Television has been getting rather stale of late - I can't think of anything interesting to watch lately, and as soon as I start a show I lose interest.

    A large majority of modern shows seem to actively celebrate psychopathy, which is very interesting. I believe the trend started with Breaking Bad, which was brilliant TV, but I did not realize at the time that this signalled a major shift in the cultural landscape that was going to be more permanent.

    While I thoroughly enjoyed Breaking Bad, these days I actively avoid this weird celebration of psychopathy our culture seems to have devolved into. I have no doubt it's spiritually harmful to be exposed too much to that sort of thing.

    I'm rewatching all the old episodes of Star Trek the Next Generation, which I loved as a child. I find it generally quite relaxing and enjoyable. The values are generally old fashioned and wholesome and the atmosphere very optimistic and positive. And I find the show especially in the later seasons to have a pleasantly slow pace, an air of quiet and intelligent brooding that avoids being splashy, and a sense of cosmic mystery despite being scientific. And Patrick Stewart is infinitely fun to watch :)

    I know songbird thinks TNG to be deplorably Woke, or preparatory to Woke, but as a whole I can't say I really agree :)

    Replies: @songbird

    I’m rewatching all the old episodes of Star Trek the Next Generation, which I loved as a child.

    Do you have a favorite episode? I think you already mentioned that one where Picard gets stabbed in the heart, as a youth.

    I believe my favorite would be “Boobytrap.”
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booby_Trap_(Star_Trek%3A_The_Next_Generation)

    It is subversive on multiple levels, including the ending. Though, one of the things that I appreciated about it was that I felt like it had a genuine connection to the past. (I know that technically there are lots of episodes with a connection to the past, but somehow this is the one that resonated the most with me.)

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @songbird

    I don't know that I have a favorite episode, songbird, but recently I particularly enjoyed the episodes where the crew goes back to 19th century San Francisco and encounter Mark Twain, who they later bring to the 24th century.

    It was good fun! I even forgave the scene where Troy tells Twain that science has cured all social wills lol :)

    I'm now watching the one where Professor Moriarty comes out of the holodeck alive, which I'm enjoying.

    Booby trap is a great one too - and for a show rooted in the marvels of science, it's message that human intuition is superior is surely unusual and refreshing.

    The whole show seems to have a straightforward innocence and optimism that I don't think you'd find today in our terribly clever and ironic shows.

    If I had to choose a favorite, maybe it would be the one where Picard loses his identity and lives out his life on a primitive planet and becomes an old and wizened man, with scenes of him playing a flute under the stars and being strangely nostalgic about them without knowing why. That episode was poetic and poignant.

    Replies: @songbird

  97. @songbird
    @AaronB


    I’m rewatching all the old episodes of Star Trek the Next Generation, which I loved as a child.
     
    Do you have a favorite episode? I think you already mentioned that one where Picard gets stabbed in the heart, as a youth.

    I believe my favorite would be "Boobytrap."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booby_Trap_(Star_Trek%3A_The_Next_Generation)

    It is subversive on multiple levels, including the ending. Though, one of the things that I appreciated about it was that I felt like it had a genuine connection to the past. (I know that technically there are lots of episodes with a connection to the past, but somehow this is the one that resonated the most with me.)

    Replies: @AaronB

    I don’t know that I have a favorite episode, songbird, but recently I particularly enjoyed the episodes where the crew goes back to 19th century San Francisco and encounter Mark Twain, who they later bring to the 24th century.

    It was good fun! I even forgave the scene where Troy tells Twain that science has cured all social wills lol 🙂

    I’m now watching the one where Professor Moriarty comes out of the holodeck alive, which I’m enjoying.

    Booby trap is a great one too – and for a show rooted in the marvels of science, it’s message that human intuition is superior is surely unusual and refreshing.

    The whole show seems to have a straightforward innocence and optimism that I don’t think you’d find today in our terribly clever and ironic shows.

    If I had to choose a favorite, maybe it would be the one where Picard loses his identity and lives out his life on a primitive planet and becomes an old and wizened man, with scenes of him playing a flute under the stars and being strangely nostalgic about them without knowing why. That episode was poetic and poignant.

    • Thanks: songbird
    • Replies: @songbird
    @AaronB

    Guess I also have a soft spot for "Darmok." Heavy-handed and not very logical, but I can forgive it because I think it is a good analogy. Suppose it is an another episode that veers away from scientism. It made me read Gilgamesh, which sadly does not survive completely intact.

    I am getting a bit sentimental, but another one I liked is the one where Riker does the exchange on a Klingon ship. I think it is great how it acknowledges different cultures and loyalties.

    While I dislike the wokeness of TNG, I really appreciated how, for the most part, it was not a serial and most episodes could be judged on their own merits, or even given their own writers.

  98. @AaronB
    @silviosilver

    You make an excellent point, and one that is essential to overcoming our age.

    A truly broad and wide conception of what constitutes rationality will take in the entire picture - is it "reasonable" to allow a mere theory - an abstract representation - to poison ones life?

    Even in terms of rationality, our approach isn't really rational - the idea that we must disbelieve in everything for which there isn't absolute certainty , even if this visibly harms our life and happiness, is a curious form of "rationality" indeed that no longer serves life (Logic is supposed to be the Emissary, but has usurped the place of the Master.)

    It's no longer true that reason and science suggest a deterministic universe - that's the old Newtonian mechanics. Today's quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.

    But your point is much more important. A big part of the narrative modernity likes to tell itself is that we are "martyrs for truth" - that's a big part of the modern mythos. Sure, a lifeless, deterministic universe may suck, but we're such impressive adults for believing what the cold hard facts say, however much we don't like it.

    But once you start examining how we know anything at all, how our minds work, what the limits and functions of our minds are, you learn that you are not "compelled" to believe in a lifeless deterministic universe at all - it's a choice.

    Such a universe isn't "proven" - there merely isn't absolutely conclusive evidence to think otherwise. But we now know all our beliefs and conclusions, even the most scientific and mathematical, lack this certainty, and that abstract representations themselves (knowledge) have intrinsic limitations and are only approximations to a reality we can never fully capture in terms of their limited categories.

    We think we have intellectual courage, but in fact we lack the courage to truly follow reasoning where it leads. We stop short.

    (BTW, this question about the foundation of our knowledge drove Bertrand Russell to despair, and was a problem he worked on extensively later in life without success. He was convinced the inability to put knowledge on a foundation of certainty would lead to the demise of science. Modern culture is built on the desire for ever escalating levels of certainty, leading to an ever narrowing intellectual range as so much of life cannot be out in a foundation of certainty.)

    So by examining the foundations of our knowledge, we can free ourselves of the "trap" of modernity. That's why it's so important.

    Ultimately, the ultimate - and final - move of logic and rationality is to turn it's examination onto itself .

    A truly thoroughgoing and serious scepticism must ultimately become sceptical of skepticism itself.

    That's the final move in the dance of logic that frees you from it - of course one still uses reason but as a proper servant, one is no longer trapped in it's fantast of itself as the only path to truth and as capable of providing certainty.

    That's when it is restored to it's proper place as a servant and not the master - logic is the emissary that when it comes to dominate as master kills life.

    So why hasn't our society yet taken this final move in the game of logic? The philosophical infrastructure has already been developed by the great Western philosophers, and science increasingly paints a picture of reality that shows very clearly that our mental categories, and especially logic, are insufficient to fully grasp it.

    Our entire civilization is poised on the brink of taking this next step....

    Our ability to become healthy again depends on it.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    It’s no longer true that reason and science suggest a deterministic universe – that’s the old Newtonian mechanics. Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.

    I was talking about the mind, not the universe. When talking about the mind, free will is generally contrasted with “determinism,” which is the sense I was using the term.

    For me, the issue goes deeper than that though. It doesn’t help me much to know that my decisions were not completely deterministic, but still nonetheless products of purely natural processes. In other words, if quantum events are able to influence or produce mental events, so what? That’s not “me” doing anything; it’s just something happening to me. I need to believe that there is a ‘willing subject’ – a subject that wills; essentially, that there is a me, a self, that actually exists.

    I suppose your Buddhist commitments would put you at odds with the notion that a self exists, that being one of the illusions that good living requires us to rid ourselves of. Personally, I’ve never understood how that helps me to live better at all. That’s not to say I haven’t “tried it on for size.” Not once that I’ve flirted with it have I ever felt, “Phew, I don’t really exist, what a relief. That really takes a load off my mind!” Not even an inkling of such feelings. If there has ever been a “skepticism to be skeptical of,” for me this is it.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @silviosilver

    So quantum mechanics says the behavior of a particle is not entirely determined by any force - there is simply an element of what appears to be "choice" in the matter :)

    So it would seem that not just human beings, but what we generally call "matter" behaves in a manner not entirely determined by any force.

    As for Buddhism, the idea of "no self" is subtle but once you understand it you realize popular misconceptions about it are not accurate.

    Obviously we have a self - in a sense nothing is more obvious to us. The idea of no-self simply means we are connected on a deep level to everything else in the universe. That we do not exist "independently".

    To understand how this truth helps us live better, we can contrast it with the diametrically opposite view of modernity; we are isolated and independent individual entities, cut off from the rest of life.

    This modern view leads to fear of death, sees everything else as threatening to us, and makes us feel alienated and estranged from the universe.

    To see our deep underlying connection to everything means to realize we cannot die - everything is an expression of the underlying energy of the universe, and death is just transformation.

    We also feel deeply at home in the universe and with intimate connections to everything else - we are part of a larger whole and redeemed in it.

    So the Buddhist view here leads to light hearted cheerfulness as death loses its sting, to a sense of love and cooperation with the rest of life and lessening of anxious competition, and a deep sense of at-homeness in the universe and a sense of it's aliveness.

    But we must appreciate these truths on the level of imagination and intuition.

    However, excessive left-hemisphere thinking keeps us focused on the level of fine detail - analysis breaks down into parts - and we cannot see how things fit into a larger picture of the kind just described.

    Recovering spiritual health means invariably limiting analysis - which is just breaking into parts - and turning back towards a larger and more comprehensive picture.

    That is why I consistently describe modernity as in particular "stupid" - because it is precisely the narrowing of our focus until we can't see the larger picture anymore.

    But the larger picture is grasped better by imagination and intuition, our other paths to knowledge and truth, because the whole cannot be precisely defined in sharp categories but must remain somewhat implicit.

    Even the description I just gave is really only a hint :)

    That is why above and beyond words, spiritual practice is a practice designed to correctly orient out minds to truths that can't be precisely formulated in words.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  99. I am concerned enough about the nuclear-fallout scenario to have acquired a bottle of potassium iodide pills. My veterinarian, a serious woman, asked me for some of the pills, for herself and her dog. So that makes two of us concerned at the level of KI pills. But I would not say that a worldwide nuclear exchange “will” occur. I would say “might well.” 40% or so.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @SafeNow

    Probably the collective unconsciousness is having a fun time with the generic memories of Revelations in the West and Kali Yuga in the East.

    I'd put this at 30% right now and 75% when Russia and Nato start shooting each other.

  100. @S
    This is a question for either AP or Hack.

    Euros of relatively recent times, and being sometimes in nearly impossible circumstances, seem all too often to fight the wrong wars. For instance, in the case of the US Civil War and at a cost of 700,000 lives, the chattel slavery of the US South was merely replaced with the US North's even more malignant and destructive manifestation of slavery, wage slavery, ie specifically the so called cheap labor/mass immigration system, which is quite simply chattel slavery and it's trade monetized (that is the horrid genocidal system was distilled down to it's financial essence whilst profits were maximized).

    Therefore, I think when violence became inevitable in the Spring of 1861 that, rather than the guns being turned upon each other, they should have been turned upon slave owners in the South, and upon their corresponding same ilk in the US North, ie the hirers on, promoters of, and exploiters of the wage slaves (ie 'immigrants') and the 'labor contractors' who were 'importing' them in by diktat, both groups North and South driven by the same profound moral cause to do anything, but anything (God forbid!) than pay the prevailing real time local rates for labor, generally to their own people, and force them to stop their self destructive peoplehood destroying practices. No more chattel slavery, no more wage slavery, ie no more so called cheap labor/mass immigration. Self determination could then have been allowed for those peoples desiring it in the United States.

    That would have been a true abolition of slavery unlike the fraudulent one the world was presented with in the 19th century. That's also the war against slavery, the essence of which is the systematic theft of the value of an individual's labor, which should have been fought, but wasn't. Of course, after the war, people were too spent to fight the war that should have been fought.

    After this current war is over, and provided Ukraine has retained at least some of it's sovereignty, what will the Ukranian people do when it's own government attempts to deliberately genocide (in the truest sense of the word) the Ukranian people by forcing it to adopt wage slavery, ie the cheap labor/mass immigration system, the economic and political basis of the modern 'progressive' Multi-cultural society?

    Will the Ukranian people have enough strength left after fighting this war to succesfully resist?

    Replies: @songbird

    People often say that the Civil War was when the US took a more imperial turn. It was a very destructive war, and I can appreciate the dark side of it all, including its egalitarian legacy and the effective abolition of states’ rights.

    Still, it is interesting to note that when Perry steamed into Edo Bay with his cannon pointing at samurai, that was in 1853, years before the Civil War.

    Not that it was necessarily bad for the Japanese. It may have been the kick in the pants that they needed.

    • Replies: @S
    @songbird


    People often say that the Civil War was when the US took a more imperial turn.
     
    Yes, they do. The United States at it's founding had consciously modeled itself itself upon the Roman Republic. It was the Civil War era Lincoln administration where many see the US majorly breaking away from it's original republican ideals.

    In this view, Lincoln was a Julius Caesar who had 'crossed the Rubicon' with his centralization of government power, and John Wilkes Booth his Brutus. Accordingly, soon after the 1865 Lincoln assasination, the US would have it's own Varus ('Varus, Give me back my three legions!). [See the 'comments' link below under 'More' for just who the American Varus was.]

    The point by point close parallels between the history of the United States and that of ancient Republican and Imperial Rome are downright uncanny.

    Still, it is interesting to note that when Perry steamed into Edo Bay with his cannon pointing at samurai, that was in 1853, years before the Civil War...Not that it was necessarily bad for the Japanese. It may have been the kick in the pants that they needed.
     
    I would have left Japan, China, and Korea, alone. It was their prerogative to be left alone, and learn (or not learn) about the outside world, at their own discretion and pace. In many ways as peoples they were being the ideal 'global citizen' with their live and let live philosophy.

    It's interesting that you should mention 1853, Japan, and early signs of US imperial ambition. That was the very same year a now very obscure (though at the time of it's initial publication widely distributed and reviewed) book was published in the US entitled The New Rome. The book specifically references the then ongoing 1853 Perry expedition to Japan. [See excerpt and link below]

    According to it, hordes of US businessmen are to invade China, and many millions of Chinese will be taken to the US to be exploited as wage slaves (ie so called 'cheap labor').

    The New Rome purports to be a future history of the world. It claims that a yet to be formed US/UK united front will move to take over the world by first conquering continental Europe's center of power, ie Germany, thereby unleashing a 'world's war' upon the Earth. Immediately afterwards this united front will move against Russia.

    Incredibly, bearing in mind it's mid 19th century publication date, the book claims it will be the US air force which will be instrumental in the future defeat of Russia.

    For it's remarkable prescience, The New Rome is well worth the time spent to read.

    The New Rome (1853) - pg 77, 119

    The expedition to Japan and China has already
    started on its mission of making a breach for the entrance of American enterprise into these walled-up magazines of wealth and civilization....The signs of the times are clear and unmistakable, and "The New Rome" awakens to her task, and is resolved upon its execution. Let her raise her banner of stars over land and sea, the token of perdition to the despots and redemption to the peoples, who may be convinced: In hoc signo vincent!

     

    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/do-you-want-a-war-between-russia-and-nato/#comment-5172335

    https://archive.org/details/newrome00poes/page/n15/mode/2up

    https://archive.org/details/newrome00poes/page/76/mode/2up

    Replies: @S

  101. S says:

    In regards to my just previous post (#91) above, I should add that in the 19th century most of the ingredients for our modern progressive multicultural society were there then within the Anglosphere, and they were a lot more honest in their way about things at the time. [They hadn’t yet realized the power of Pavlovian conditioning, ie positive reinforcement, via the corporate mass media.]

    For instance, in my post archives you can find an 1851 London Times editorial which extols the wonders of mass immigration for the Irish people as wage slaves (ie so called ‘cheap labor’) to the United States, and then casually adds that this enmasse predation will directly result in the Irish people being ‘known no more’ as a people, and that the ideal replacement people in Ireland will be one that is ‘more mixed, more docile’ and ‘which can submit to a master’.

    From that same Famine era (1847-50) the Irish entirely concurred with the Times assessment about the genocidal effects upon them of the cheap labor/mass immigration system (see link to 1847 Spectator article ‘Extermination and Vengeance’ below). Hence the Irish term for this predation was ‘extermination’, as they (quite correctly) saw it as a genocidal act of hostility towards them, and not a ‘helping hand’. ‘Vengeance’, as outlined in the article, refers to the fact that members of the British aristocracy in Ireland were being shot for promoting the cheap labor/mass immigration scheme as good for the Irish people.

    With results like that, one can see why they went from then freely acknowledging the existence of race, to today denouncing it’s very existance with an anti-race campaign euphemistically referred to as ‘anti-racism’.

    When self declared ‘progressives’ go on about ‘genocide’, their unhealthy obsession with the destruction/genocide of races by ‘mixing’ them away manifesting itself by accusing others continuously of ‘racism’, and ‘hate’, they are projecting.

    Same with the promotion of drug use at gun point in the Opium wars, which created their own resistance, the ulterior motive of which may have been to reduce the Chinese people to a state where they, like the Irish, could be preyed upon enmasse as wage slaves (ie cheap labor), of which they have indeed reaped a rich harvest to this very day. It’s much more effective to promote drug use as ‘hip’, ‘cool, and ‘with it’, as was done in the 1960’s.

    When self declared ‘progressives’ go on about ‘genocide’, ‘racism’ and ‘hate’, they are projecting upon others the results of their own unhealthy obsession with the destruction/genocide of races by ‘mixing’ them away.

    http://archive.spectator.co.uk/article/20th-november-1847/12/extermination-and-vengeance

  102. @A123
    @Yellowface Anon


    There are 2 groups of Jews, Secular and Reformed Jews who are like extreme versions of secularized bourgeois Christians
     
    In America, and presumably Europe, your summary is sound. Here is an indicative U.S. poll for New York (from 2011): (1)

     
    https://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/content/images/AIA2011092202-chart1.png
     

    While Israel also has a split, it is quite different. The "secularized bourgeois" Jews of Israel are strongly nationalist, believe in security & military defense, etc...

    The only group in Israel that even vaguely resembles the American Left is Labor/Gesher. In 2019 they only managed to capture 6 of 120 seats (~5% of the population).

     
    https://theglobepost.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Israeli-elections.jpg
     

    Indigenous Palestinian Jews view Russia with a national security perspective. Iran is an existential threat. Ukraine is not. Given Russia's presence in Syria, why would Palestinian Jews blow up that relationship by backing Zelensky?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/articles/aia2011092202/

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @Dmitry

    Israel wants to play both sides in the place they are at as America’s sole ally, like China. They are on the side of Russian and Ukrainian oligarchs, while China wants resources from Russia and markets from the rest of the world. Israel hopes for Russia’s hand to be lifted from Syria and China for Central Asia.

    Meanwhile an air convoy is leaving Moscow for Tehran to prepare for the flare-up again in Palestine.

    Orthodox Jews’ world is the next one, not this one where geopolitics divide loyalties. Some of them don’t want Israel to exist because Israel existing means the End Times, but most of them are just happy to have a spot under the sun.

    [MORE]

    The only indigenous Palestinean Jews are Mizrahim. All else are practically immigrants after 2k years of “exile”. Deeply ironical to see you refering the settler colony of Jews “Palestine”.

    • Replies: @Yahya
    @Yellowface Anon


    The only indigenous Palestinean Jews are Mizrahim. All else are practically immigrants after 2k years of “exile”. Deeply ironical to see you refering the settler colony of Jews “Palestine”.

     

    Mizrahim mostly arrived in Palestine during the 20th century (1948-1980), when 850,00 of them were expelled or pressured to leave by Arab countries and Iran. In fact, most of them arrived after the Ashkenazim. By your definition, neither Mizrahi Jews nor Ashkenazim are indigenous to Palestine (with the exception of the pre-Zionist Jewish population of Palestine, the so-called "Old Yishuv", who numbered 20,000 in 1881).

    But the word "indigenous" is somewhat problematic in the context of Israeli Jews, since even though they are recent immigrants/settlers, most of them can trace part of their ancestry to the ancient Jews of antiquity. The only two exceptions being Yemeni and Ethiopian Jews, who are in the main local Yemeni and Ethiopian converts to Judaism. Other Mizrahi, Sephardi and Ashkenazi groups retain a significant presence of ancient Levantine ancestry, even though they've mixed some with their host populations in MENA and Europe following the Roman dispersion.

    *Ashkenazi Jews are roughly 45% Levantine, 40% Southern European, and 15% Northern European. The Levantine component though isn't necessarily Palestinian per se, but could be from any place Roman-period Jews inhabited from Alexandria up to Anatolia. The Southern European component is either Iberian or Italian, and is mostly carried on the maternal side, suggesting that Middle Eastern Jewish males inter-mixed with Southern European females following the fall of Rome. The Ashkenazim are the furthest group genetically (and probably phenotypically) from the Jews of the Bible.

    *Mesopotamian and Persian Jews, as well as related communities like Kurdish, Georgian and Bukharan Jews, are descendants of the Jews held in Babylonian captivity during the 6th century BC. Though the Jews eventually were allowed back to Palestine following the Persian conquest of Babylon, many remained in Mesopotamia. Iraqi and Iranian Jews are thus the closest genetically to the Jews of the Bible. Mesopotamia and Persia became the focus of Judaism for the next 1,000 years after the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem. Salima Murad was a famous 20th century Iraqi Jewish singer.

    *Moroccan Jews are a mix of ancient Levantine, indigenous Berbers, and Spanish Jews. They are distinct from gentile Moroccans in that they exhibit a substantial Levantine component generally not found in Muslims, and have slightly more European ancestry. The European ancestry was introduced by Spanish Jews who migrated to North Africa following their expulsion from Spain in 1492. They mixed in with the local Jews of North Africa and absorbed them into their Sephardic traditions. Though Moroccan Jews mostly follow the Sephardic religious tradition, genetically they remain slightly distinct from Sephardic Jews by their Berber ancestry. Roni Elkabetz, Emanuelle Chirqui, Ofir Ben Shitri are some examples of Moroccan Jews (Moroccan Jewish women are a pretty lot).

    *Sephardic Jews are fairly diverse. One cluster consists of Iberian, Turkish and Bulgarian Jews; who occupy a position near the Ashkenazim on a PCA map. Like the Ashkenazim, the Sephardim are originally a mix of Southern Europeans (Iberians and Italians) and Middle Eastern Jews (unlike the Ashkenazim though, they do not have a 15% Northern European component). 75% of Sephardic paternal lineage is Middle Eastern. Some migrated northwards following their expulsion from Spain in 1492 (David Ricardo, Baruch Spinoza and Benjamin Disraeli were of Sephardic Jewish origin), but most accepted the Ottoman Porte's invitation to settle in various parts of the Empire. Sephardic Jews were culturally and demographically dominant in and around Constantinople from 1500 to the 20th century when they emigrated en masse to Israel.

    https://images.ctfassets.net/cnu0m8re1exe/79Evr0FRORuIEb8iIvJvFB/cf5e6251c8b7198304ef70e276d9f8f2/jewadmixplot.png?fm=jpg&fl=progressive&w=660&h=433&fit=pad

    You can see here an admixture plot of various MENA populations. The colors represent different ancestral components:
    * Dark Blue = Eastern Euroepan Hunter Gatherer
    * Light Blue = Levant_Neolithic
    * Green = Iran_Neolithic
    * Red = Sub-Saharan


    A PCA of genetic distance:

    https://cdn.substack.com/image/fetch/w_1456,c_limit,f_webp,q_auto:good,fl_progressive:steep/https%3A%2F%2Fbucketeer-e05bbc84-baa3-437e-9518-adb32be77984.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fpublic%2Fimages%2F44aa9fd5-7fe0-4ad2-ad3c-5c8fd056817c_1042x688.jpeg

    Replies: @iffen

    , @A123
    @Yellowface Anon


    Israel hopes for Russia’s hand to be lifted from Syria and China for Central Asia.
     
    There are huge numbers of Palestinian Jews of Russia lineage. And, in many cases extended family members are still in Russia.

    Israel's Yisrael Beiteinu was originally formed for Russian language speakers. Not that long ago it held over 10% of the Knesset seats. Other parties, notably Likud, became more Russia friendly to woo voters away from Beiteinu. It still holds 5 or 6 seats and is well positioned to be a deciding factor in close elections.

    Israel and Russia collaborate on military coproduction ventures. Here is a particularly large example (1)


    The government is in the final stage of approving the acquisition of two Phalcon airborne warning and control systems (AWACS) for the Indian Air Force from Israel at a cost of around USD 1 billion, official sources said.
    ...
    The AWACS is mounted on Russian-origin Illyushin-76 transport aircraft and it is called an "eye in the sky" because of its superior surveillance capabilities.

    The Phalcon AWACS is capable of tracking enemy aircraft, hostile missiles, movement of troops across the border without crossing territorial limits.
     

    In Syria -- At a minimum, Russia is not interfering with Israel operations against Iranian offensive units. Is Russia actually helping the IDF? That rumor keeps circulating, and there is no way to prove or disprove it.

    Meanwhile an air convoy is leaving Moscow for Tehran to prepare for the flare-up again in Palestine.
     
    Israel headed off yet another unprovoked Iranian assault on Jewish families and children. Russian officials are probably trying to talk Khamenei out of doing something fantastically stupid.

    There is some good news. It looks like this latest round of senseless Iranian aggression has finally killed the idea of an unworkable JCPOA2 deal.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.al-monitor.com/originals/2020/09/israel-india-russia-narendra-modi-benjamin-netanyahu-phalcon.html


    The only indigenous Palestinean Jews are Mizrahim. All else are practically immigrants after 2k years of “exile”.
     
    All religious Jews have a claim on the indigenous religious home land of Judaism in Judea (a.k.a. Palestine). It is a religious matter, not an ethnic one.

    Deeply ironical to see you refering the settler colony of Jews “Palestine”.
     
    Muhammad the Colonial Prophet led his Jihadist Settlers to Palestine and stole Infidel land ~1,400 years ago. I am quite un-ironically suggesting that the non-indigenous religion of Islam should decolonize from their settlements and return stolen Infidel lands.
    , @LondonBob
    @Yellowface Anon

    An inevitability that a lot of the captured NATO weaponry will end up in Syria and Iraq. The US position there is very vulnerable, the breakdown of the Iran deal will likely see the Iranians looking to go on the offensive.

    Armchair Warlord on twitter has written a lot about how the Ukraine and NATO are running out of ammunition. I assume Russia has been stockpiling for a long time. We saw in Libya how quickly ammunition ran out and what NATO is sending is pretty much useless gear.

    https://twitter.com/ArmchairW/status/1514824311177064448?s=20&t=gDxvyf6MDk4-HAUneE6JwA

    Replies: @A123, @Barbarossa

  103. @SafeNow
    I am concerned enough about the nuclear-fallout scenario to have acquired a bottle of potassium iodide pills. My veterinarian, a serious woman, asked me for some of the pills, for herself and her dog. So that makes two of us concerned at the level of KI pills. But I would not say that a worldwide nuclear exchange “will” occur. I would say “might well.” 40% or so.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    Probably the collective unconsciousness is having a fun time with the generic memories of Revelations in the West and Kali Yuga in the East.

    I’d put this at 30% right now and 75% when Russia and Nato start shooting each other.

  104. @silviosilver
    @AaronB


    It’s no longer true that reason and science suggest a deterministic universe – that’s the old Newtonian mechanics. Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.
     
    I was talking about the mind, not the universe. When talking about the mind, free will is generally contrasted with "determinism," which is the sense I was using the term.

    For me, the issue goes deeper than that though. It doesn't help me much to know that my decisions were not completely deterministic, but still nonetheless products of purely natural processes. In other words, if quantum events are able to influence or produce mental events, so what? That's not "me" doing anything; it's just something happening to me. I need to believe that there is a 'willing subject' - a subject that wills; essentially, that there is a me, a self, that actually exists.

    I suppose your Buddhist commitments would put you at odds with the notion that a self exists, that being one of the illusions that good living requires us to rid ourselves of. Personally, I've never understood how that helps me to live better at all. That's not to say I haven't "tried it on for size." Not once that I've flirted with it have I ever felt, "Phew, I don't really exist, what a relief. That really takes a load off my mind!" Not even an inkling of such feelings. If there has ever been a "skepticism to be skeptical of," for me this is it.

    Replies: @AaronB

    So quantum mechanics says the behavior of a particle is not entirely determined by any force – there is simply an element of what appears to be “choice” in the matter 🙂

    So it would seem that not just human beings, but what we generally call “matter” behaves in a manner not entirely determined by any force.

    As for Buddhism, the idea of “no self” is subtle but once you understand it you realize popular misconceptions about it are not accurate.

    Obviously we have a self – in a sense nothing is more obvious to us. The idea of no-self simply means we are connected on a deep level to everything else in the universe. That we do not exist “independently”.

    To understand how this truth helps us live better, we can contrast it with the diametrically opposite view of modernity; we are isolated and independent individual entities, cut off from the rest of life.

    This modern view leads to fear of death, sees everything else as threatening to us, and makes us feel alienated and estranged from the universe.

    To see our deep underlying connection to everything means to realize we cannot die – everything is an expression of the underlying energy of the universe, and death is just transformation.

    We also feel deeply at home in the universe and with intimate connections to everything else – we are part of a larger whole and redeemed in it.

    So the Buddhist view here leads to light hearted cheerfulness as death loses its sting, to a sense of love and cooperation with the rest of life and lessening of anxious competition, and a deep sense of at-homeness in the universe and a sense of it’s aliveness.

    But we must appreciate these truths on the level of imagination and intuition.

    However, excessive left-hemisphere thinking keeps us focused on the level of fine detail – analysis breaks down into parts – and we cannot see how things fit into a larger picture of the kind just described.

    Recovering spiritual health means invariably limiting analysis – which is just breaking into parts – and turning back towards a larger and more comprehensive picture.

    That is why I consistently describe modernity as in particular “stupid” – because it is precisely the narrowing of our focus until we can’t see the larger picture anymore.

    But the larger picture is grasped better by imagination and intuition, our other paths to knowledge and truth, because the whole cannot be precisely defined in sharp categories but must remain somewhat implicit.

    Even the description I just gave is really only a hint 🙂

    That is why above and beyond words, spiritual practice is a practice designed to correctly orient out minds to truths that can’t be precisely formulated in words.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @AaronB


    So quantum mechanics says the behavior of a particle is not entirely determined by any force – there is simply an element of what appears to be “choice” in the matter
     
    Hmm, yeah, okay. I'll have to think some more about it. I'm still put off by the idea that a bunch of particles coming together and behaving "quantumly" can constitute sufficient "me-ness" for my purposes, but perhaps I could come around.

    This modern view leads to fear of death, sees everything else as threatening to us, and makes us feel alienated and estranged from the universe.

    To see our deep underlying connection to everything means to realize we cannot die – everything is an expression of the underlying energy of the universe, and death is just transformation.
     
    I'm not particularly bothered by the fact of death. It would be nice if there something beyond it - something "good", I mean - but if there isn't, at least death would eliminate the possibility of any further suffering, which is actually not a bad deal.

    Beyond that, I have some personal metaphysical views of the "purpose of the universe" which do a fine job of warding off nihilism. I'm not as brave as you though, so I'm not going to talk about them for fear of being laughed out of the room.

    That's not to say I'm not "afraid" of death. Of course I am. There are plenty of things I wouldn't do in life because I'm afraid I might die. I doubt Buddhists really differ much in this regard.

    Death-is-just-transformation seems like a bit of a cope to me. If I can't retain any "memory" - or whatever the equivalent is for a disembodied mind - of who I am/was, then whether I'm "transformed" or simply dead is a distinction without a difference. The more appealing concept of metempsychosis suffers from the same defect.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @AaronB

  105. @Yellowface Anon
    @A123

    Israel wants to play both sides in the place they are at as America's sole ally, like China. They are on the side of Russian and Ukrainian oligarchs, while China wants resources from Russia and markets from the rest of the world. Israel hopes for Russia's hand to be lifted from Syria and China for Central Asia.

    Meanwhile an air convoy is leaving Moscow for Tehran to prepare for the flare-up again in Palestine.

    https://twitter.com/AuroraIntel/status/1515056960806207499

    Orthodox Jews' world is the next one, not this one where geopolitics divide loyalties. Some of them don't want Israel to exist because Israel existing means the End Times, but most of them are just happy to have a spot under the sun.



    The only indigenous Palestinean Jews are Mizrahim. All else are practically immigrants after 2k years of "exile". Deeply ironical to see you refering the settler colony of Jews "Palestine".

    Replies: @Yahya, @A123, @LondonBob

    The only indigenous Palestinean Jews are Mizrahim. All else are practically immigrants after 2k years of “exile”. Deeply ironical to see you refering the settler colony of Jews “Palestine”.

    Mizrahim mostly arrived in Palestine during the 20th century (1948-1980), when 850,00 of them were expelled or pressured to leave by Arab countries and Iran. In fact, most of them arrived after the Ashkenazim. By your definition, neither Mizrahi Jews nor Ashkenazim are indigenous to Palestine (with the exception of the pre-Zionist Jewish population of Palestine, the so-called “Old Yishuv”, who numbered 20,000 in 1881).

    But the word “indigenous” is somewhat problematic in the context of Israeli Jews, since even though they are recent immigrants/settlers, most of them can trace part of their ancestry to the ancient Jews of antiquity. The only two exceptions being Yemeni and Ethiopian Jews, who are in the main local Yemeni and Ethiopian converts to Judaism. Other Mizrahi, Sephardi and Ashkenazi groups retain a significant presence of ancient Levantine ancestry, even though they’ve mixed some with their host populations in MENA and Europe following the Roman dispersion.

    *Ashkenazi Jews are roughly 45% Levantine, 40% Southern European, and 15% Northern European. The Levantine component though isn’t necessarily Palestinian per se, but could be from any place Roman-period Jews inhabited from Alexandria up to Anatolia. The Southern European component is either Iberian or Italian, and is mostly carried on the maternal side, suggesting that Middle Eastern Jewish males inter-mixed with Southern European females following the fall of Rome. The Ashkenazim are the furthest group genetically (and probably phenotypically) from the Jews of the Bible.

    *Mesopotamian and Persian Jews, as well as related communities like Kurdish, Georgian and Bukharan Jews, are descendants of the Jews held in Babylonian captivity during the 6th century BC. Though the Jews eventually were allowed back to Palestine following the Persian conquest of Babylon, many remained in Mesopotamia. Iraqi and Iranian Jews are thus the closest genetically to the Jews of the Bible. Mesopotamia and Persia became the focus of Judaism for the next 1,000 years after the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem. Salima Murad was a famous 20th century Iraqi Jewish singer.

    *Moroccan Jews are a mix of ancient Levantine, indigenous Berbers, and Spanish Jews. They are distinct from gentile Moroccans in that they exhibit a substantial Levantine component generally not found in Muslims, and have slightly more European ancestry. The European ancestry was introduced by Spanish Jews who migrated to North Africa following their expulsion from Spain in 1492. They mixed in with the local Jews of North Africa and absorbed them into their Sephardic traditions. Though Moroccan Jews mostly follow the Sephardic religious tradition, genetically they remain slightly distinct from Sephardic Jews by their Berber ancestry. Roni Elkabetz, Emanuelle Chirqui, Ofir Ben Shitri are some examples of Moroccan Jews (Moroccan Jewish women are a pretty lot).

    *Sephardic Jews are fairly diverse. One cluster consists of Iberian, Turkish and Bulgarian Jews; who occupy a position near the Ashkenazim on a PCA map. Like the Ashkenazim, the Sephardim are originally a mix of Southern Europeans (Iberians and Italians) and Middle Eastern Jews (unlike the Ashkenazim though, they do not have a 15% Northern European component). 75% of Sephardic paternal lineage is Middle Eastern. Some migrated northwards following their expulsion from Spain in 1492 (David Ricardo, Baruch Spinoza and Benjamin Disraeli were of Sephardic Jewish origin), but most accepted the Ottoman Porte’s invitation to settle in various parts of the Empire. Sephardic Jews were culturally and demographically dominant in and around Constantinople from 1500 to the 20th century when they emigrated en masse to Israel.

    [MORE]


    You can see here an admixture plot of various MENA populations. The colors represent different ancestral components:
    * Dark Blue = Eastern Euroepan Hunter Gatherer
    * Light Blue = Levant_Neolithic
    * Green = Iran_Neolithic
    * Red = Sub-Saharan

    A PCA of genetic distance:

    • Thanks: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @iffen
    @Yahya

    From Wiki:


    Etymology
    Further information: Palestine (region) § Etymology, and Timeline of the name "Palestine"
    Although the concept of the Palestine region and its geographical extent has varied throughout history, it is now considered to be composed by the modern State of Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.[47] General use of the term "Palestine" or related terms to the area at the southeast corner of the Mediterranean Sea beside Syria has historically been taking place since the times of Ancient Greece, with Herodotus being the first historian writing in the 5th century BC in The Histories of a "district of Syria, called Palaistine" in which Phoenicians interacted with other maritime peoples.[48][49] The term "Palestine" (in Latin, Palæstina) is thought to have been a term coined by the Ancient Greeks for the area of land occupied by the Philistines, although there are other explanations.[50]
     
    Excellent posts!

    What is the significance of Jewish ancestry to us non-Jews?

    Replies: @Yahya

  106. @AaronB
    @songbird

    I don't know that I have a favorite episode, songbird, but recently I particularly enjoyed the episodes where the crew goes back to 19th century San Francisco and encounter Mark Twain, who they later bring to the 24th century.

    It was good fun! I even forgave the scene where Troy tells Twain that science has cured all social wills lol :)

    I'm now watching the one where Professor Moriarty comes out of the holodeck alive, which I'm enjoying.

    Booby trap is a great one too - and for a show rooted in the marvels of science, it's message that human intuition is superior is surely unusual and refreshing.

    The whole show seems to have a straightforward innocence and optimism that I don't think you'd find today in our terribly clever and ironic shows.

    If I had to choose a favorite, maybe it would be the one where Picard loses his identity and lives out his life on a primitive planet and becomes an old and wizened man, with scenes of him playing a flute under the stars and being strangely nostalgic about them without knowing why. That episode was poetic and poignant.

    Replies: @songbird

    Guess I also have a soft spot for “Darmok.” Heavy-handed and not very logical, but I can forgive it because I think it is a good analogy. Suppose it is an another episode that veers away from scientism. It made me read Gilgamesh, which sadly does not survive completely intact.

    I am getting a bit sentimental, but another one I liked is the one where Riker does the exchange on a Klingon ship. I think it is great how it acknowledges different cultures and loyalties.

    While I dislike the wokeness of TNG, I really appreciated how, for the most part, it was not a serial and most episodes could be judged on their own merits, or even given their own writers.

    • Thanks: AaronB
  107. A123 says: • Website
    @Yellowface Anon
    @A123

    Israel wants to play both sides in the place they are at as America's sole ally, like China. They are on the side of Russian and Ukrainian oligarchs, while China wants resources from Russia and markets from the rest of the world. Israel hopes for Russia's hand to be lifted from Syria and China for Central Asia.

    Meanwhile an air convoy is leaving Moscow for Tehran to prepare for the flare-up again in Palestine.

    https://twitter.com/AuroraIntel/status/1515056960806207499

    Orthodox Jews' world is the next one, not this one where geopolitics divide loyalties. Some of them don't want Israel to exist because Israel existing means the End Times, but most of them are just happy to have a spot under the sun.



    The only indigenous Palestinean Jews are Mizrahim. All else are practically immigrants after 2k years of "exile". Deeply ironical to see you refering the settler colony of Jews "Palestine".

    Replies: @Yahya, @A123, @LondonBob

    Israel hopes for Russia’s hand to be lifted from Syria and China for Central Asia.

    There are huge numbers of Palestinian Jews of Russia lineage. And, in many cases extended family members are still in Russia.

    Israel’s Yisrael Beiteinu was originally formed for Russian language speakers. Not that long ago it held over 10% of the Knesset seats. Other parties, notably Likud, became more Russia friendly to woo voters away from Beiteinu. It still holds 5 or 6 seats and is well positioned to be a deciding factor in close elections.

    Israel and Russia collaborate on military coproduction ventures. Here is a particularly large example (1)

    The government is in the final stage of approving the acquisition of two Phalcon airborne warning and control systems (AWACS) for the Indian Air Force from Israel at a cost of around USD 1 billion, official sources said.

    The AWACS is mounted on Russian-origin Illyushin-76 transport aircraft and it is called an “eye in the sky” because of its superior surveillance capabilities.

    The Phalcon AWACS is capable of tracking enemy aircraft, hostile missiles, movement of troops across the border without crossing territorial limits.

    In Syria — At a minimum, Russia is not interfering with Israel operations against Iranian offensive units. Is Russia actually helping the IDF? That rumor keeps circulating, and there is no way to prove or disprove it.

    Meanwhile an air convoy is leaving Moscow for Tehran to prepare for the flare-up again in Palestine.

    Israel headed off yet another unprovoked Iranian assault on Jewish families and children. Russian officials are probably trying to talk Khamenei out of doing something fantastically stupid.

    There is some good news. It looks like this latest round of senseless Iranian aggression has finally killed the idea of an unworkable JCPOA2 deal.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.al-monitor.com/originals/2020/09/israel-india-russia-narendra-modi-benjamin-netanyahu-phalcon.html

    [MORE]

    The only indigenous Palestinean Jews are Mizrahim. All else are practically immigrants after 2k years of “exile”.

    All religious Jews have a claim on the indigenous religious home land of Judaism in Judea (a.k.a. Palestine). It is a religious matter, not an ethnic one.

    Deeply ironical to see you refering the settler colony of Jews “Palestine”.

    Muhammad the Colonial Prophet led his Jihadist Settlers to Palestine and stole Infidel land ~1,400 years ago. I am quite un-ironically suggesting that the non-indigenous religion of Islam should decolonize from their settlements and return stolen Infidel lands.

  108. @AaronB
    @silviosilver

    So quantum mechanics says the behavior of a particle is not entirely determined by any force - there is simply an element of what appears to be "choice" in the matter :)

    So it would seem that not just human beings, but what we generally call "matter" behaves in a manner not entirely determined by any force.

    As for Buddhism, the idea of "no self" is subtle but once you understand it you realize popular misconceptions about it are not accurate.

    Obviously we have a self - in a sense nothing is more obvious to us. The idea of no-self simply means we are connected on a deep level to everything else in the universe. That we do not exist "independently".

    To understand how this truth helps us live better, we can contrast it with the diametrically opposite view of modernity; we are isolated and independent individual entities, cut off from the rest of life.

    This modern view leads to fear of death, sees everything else as threatening to us, and makes us feel alienated and estranged from the universe.

    To see our deep underlying connection to everything means to realize we cannot die - everything is an expression of the underlying energy of the universe, and death is just transformation.

    We also feel deeply at home in the universe and with intimate connections to everything else - we are part of a larger whole and redeemed in it.

    So the Buddhist view here leads to light hearted cheerfulness as death loses its sting, to a sense of love and cooperation with the rest of life and lessening of anxious competition, and a deep sense of at-homeness in the universe and a sense of it's aliveness.

    But we must appreciate these truths on the level of imagination and intuition.

    However, excessive left-hemisphere thinking keeps us focused on the level of fine detail - analysis breaks down into parts - and we cannot see how things fit into a larger picture of the kind just described.

    Recovering spiritual health means invariably limiting analysis - which is just breaking into parts - and turning back towards a larger and more comprehensive picture.

    That is why I consistently describe modernity as in particular "stupid" - because it is precisely the narrowing of our focus until we can't see the larger picture anymore.

    But the larger picture is grasped better by imagination and intuition, our other paths to knowledge and truth, because the whole cannot be precisely defined in sharp categories but must remain somewhat implicit.

    Even the description I just gave is really only a hint :)

    That is why above and beyond words, spiritual practice is a practice designed to correctly orient out minds to truths that can't be precisely formulated in words.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    So quantum mechanics says the behavior of a particle is not entirely determined by any force – there is simply an element of what appears to be “choice” in the matter

    Hmm, yeah, okay. I’ll have to think some more about it. I’m still put off by the idea that a bunch of particles coming together and behaving “quantumly” can constitute sufficient “me-ness” for my purposes, but perhaps I could come around.

    This modern view leads to fear of death, sees everything else as threatening to us, and makes us feel alienated and estranged from the universe.

    To see our deep underlying connection to everything means to realize we cannot die – everything is an expression of the underlying energy of the universe, and death is just transformation.

    I’m not particularly bothered by the fact of death. It would be nice if there something beyond it – something “good”, I mean – but if there isn’t, at least death would eliminate the possibility of any further suffering, which is actually not a bad deal.

    Beyond that, I have some personal metaphysical views of the “purpose of the universe” which do a fine job of warding off nihilism. I’m not as brave as you though, so I’m not going to talk about them for fear of being laughed out of the room.

    That’s not to say I’m not “afraid” of death. Of course I am. There are plenty of things I wouldn’t do in life because I’m afraid I might die. I doubt Buddhists really differ much in this regard.

    Death-is-just-transformation seems like a bit of a cope to me. If I can’t retain any “memory” – or whatever the equivalent is for a disembodied mind – of who I am/was, then whether I’m “transformed” or simply dead is a distinction without a difference. The more appealing concept of metempsychosis suffers from the same defect.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @silviosilver

    https://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9907009

    Free will inferred from the basic principles of quantum mechanics is hokum.

    The scientific dilemma has not advanced a day beyond what Leibniz and Newton used to yammer about when they were in their "let us speculate here for a bit" mode.

    Demons are actually as good an explanation for UFO's as any other.

    , @AaronB
    @silviosilver

    Personally I regard free will as an "ontological primitive" - as self evident and irreducible.

    It's just interesting that modern science no longer subscribes to determinism. Its an interesting topic to explore if you're interested, the spiritual implications of modern science - but for myself, science no longer holds such an exalted place that I need it's permission :)

    As for survival as transformation, well a big part of Buddhism is to expand the concept of "me" - are you this skin-encapsulated ego, or are you something much larger and bigger?

    With such an expanded sense of "me", it's easier to see their point.

    Nevertheless that's just one way to express the mystery. For myself, I just have an intuitive sense that death of the body does not mean death - but I cannot use precise language to define it, not do I care to :)

    To my mind, there are realities that can't be captured in thought or words, and that is good and well :)

    But different traditions formulate different answers to the mystery of death that may be more satisfying to others. In the end, words can only hint.

    I for one would love to hear your spiritual beliefs! They can't possibly be more silly and absurd than my own :)

    I've been mocked here relentlessly by many, but that surely means the materialists feel threatened.

    I am sure your spiritual beliefs are interesting and capture some aspect of the truth.

    (Also, I am not "committed" to Buddhism, I simply find my own spiritual thinking heavily inspired by some sects of Buddhism)

  109. @AaronB
    @Mikel

    You have a valid point that we have more physical power than ever before, which should translate into the freedom to live a happier life. That, after all, is the great promise of modernity, really.

    But does it? It really depends on your values and what sort of lifestyle one most values. For myself, the vastly expanded powers of the modern world have nevertheless created a lifestyle and physical reality that greatly restrict my ability to live the life I would truly want. The world is far uglier and less interesting on every level than it can and should be.

    Fascinating and complex ancient human cultures are being destroyed. Huge swathes of the worlds wilderness are also being destroyed. Cities and towns have become ugly and soulless.

    The beauty and wonder of the world and it's human inhabitants has been massively degraded.

    And considering the extremely poor mental health increasingly afflicting the population of the developed world, I am certainly not alone.

    Perhaps vastly expanded powers aren't the key to happiness, as so many myths and legends insist on warning us :)

    Now, you say that social pressure isn't an absolute barrier to living an alternative lifestyle - and that's true, but if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.

    But you make a good point that choice still exists, even if it has to be wrested from society - so my goal is much less to "transform" society than to win social support and approval for alternative lifestyles, and a kind of "spiritual infrastructure" that helps young people find this alternative path.

    In traditional China and India, most people lived ordinary lives, but leaving city life behind and abandoning the rat race was an honored and socially validated choice that had a lot of spiritual infrastructure to support it.

    So that needs to be restored to our society, I think.

    But I think there is a more fundamental point to be made here. If a huge - and perhaps even the decisive - factor in being happy is the correct use of our minds and the correct mental and emotional relationship to the external world, then the "metaphysics" undergirding modern life, with it's belief that mathematical certainty alone is the correct relationship to reality, leads to perhaps the most unhappy generation to have ever lived :)

    I have enough of a problem convincing my two adult children of what they should do for what I see as their own good. If I cannot even convince my children to change their lives, who am I to start planning full societal changes?
     
    I don't see the task as "persuasion" which suggests force. Rather, I see it as simply formulating an alternative ideal and "inviting" others to consider it.

    Many people today seem to suffer greatly from poor mental health in modern society without being aware there are alternatives.

    As we’ve discussed in the past, and Silviosilver recently mentioned, if we managed to convince a large amount of people to lead a better life by leaving their jobs and simplifying their existence, we would could actually cause a big economic harm to many people that do not share our perspective for no real benefit for us. Our ability to enjoy life in contact with nature while making use of so many technological advances that you and I are so used to (for example, exchanging our ideas through the internet) depends on the majority of society leading the lifestyle that we reject.
     
    Well, I would only want those who are genuinely unsatisfied with modernity and who will genuinely become significantly healthier and happier living an alternative life to do so - and I would "invite" them to consider it, and not "convince" them :)

    It's obviously unfair for such people to remain "economic captives" in a system designed for the benefit of those who still think the point of life is to make money and acquire things - and moreover, I hold out hope that even such benighted people will at least somewhat see the light after they see people flourishing who live opposite to them :)

    Not to mention, the "economic lifestyle" of these mainstream people are not in themselves neutral, but actively contribute to an uglier and worse world.

    So on every level I think it would be a positive thing for everyone.

    I don't believe there can be such "radical seperation" between those of us who pursue nature and the mainstream which seeks wealth and power - part of the "metaphysic" of nature-love, is the insight that we are all connected in a larger organic whole, and what goes on in one place affects everything.

    So I think we have a spiritual duty to not "leave others behind" but work towards their salvation as well :)

    No need to apologize for not having the time to respond! Is that lack of time not punishment enough on its own?
     
    Well said :)

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Grahamsno(G64), @Mikel

    I want my broadband internet, TV, Refrigeration, air conditioning, electricity, shopping malls, supermarkets and all the amenities which our civilization affords us.

    I will accept all the neuroticism that seems to come with the package rather than your rural mysticism which you seem to offer. I might be strawmanning you but that’s what I feel with you tens of thousands of words expressing your disenchantment with contemporary civilization – I love it.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    Sure, and I'm not trying to forcibly deprive you of these things.

    This idea that life is a zero sum game, and politics the battle over who gets to "force" their vision on others, is something I vigorously reject.

    Actually, rather than restrict people's choices what I'm trying to do is expand the range of choices society offers.

    It's modern society that seeks to restrict the range of choices to one lifestyle and one value system - no previous society did this! Modern society is impoverished.

    Traditional India, for instance - your own culture - recognized the values of the merchant, the warrior, the farmer, the craftsman, the artist and poet, the spiritual aspirant, and crucially, those who rejected mainstream life altogether and chose to wander the forests and mountains in search of enlightenment.

    Our modern culture recognizes only the values of the merchant and his adjunct, the creator of technology.

    That being said, I certainly won't deny that I would also hope for social transformation even in the mainstream.

    But I do not envision giving up technology, just using it intelligently rather than being dominated by it. The level which I personally want to limit technology in my life isn't necessary for the mainstream, but a different relationship to it is needed, it seems to me.

    An example of being the servant of technology rather than it's master is the way we allowed cars to dominate cities and dictate how we build them, making them ugly and unpleasant.

    Or the way we decided that in an age of science, sentimental things like "beauty" don't matter so we don't have to build beautiful buildings, but only rational and utilitarian ones.

    Or that cities have to be designed in a boring square grid because the values of efficiency and convenience trump all else.

    , @Barbarossa
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    Have you considered the possibility that some of the best aspects of modernity can be preserved while minimizing the worst, most destructive aspects. I, and I suspect Aaron would agree with this sentiment, don't think it has to be an all or nothing proposition.

    Besides, it's not possible to turn back the clock and recreate the past. That is gone and what will come must necessarily be innovative. What form that innovation takes is the real answer. Will we look to the past and recover the best from that moving forward, or must we double down on pathological mistakes?

    Every choice has trade offs and there is not gain without a loss. Every path taken precludes others. It's all a question of what the most meaningful gains and losses are and if what we have lost is worth what we have gained. It's also not entirely a zero sum game. Moderation could give us much of the best of both worlds. However, out culture is violently against moderation in any form especially when it comes material consumption. This has created an insatiable hunger, as our world is actively hostile to the formation of contentment. Contentment makes happy people but bad consumers.

    I'd elaborate more, but I don't have time now. Perhaps I'll get to more in a couple days.

  110. @A123
    @JimDandy

    Israel has solid ties with Russia... Pro-Ukraine voices have been enthusiastically denouncing Israel and PM Bennett: (1)


    Bennett is siding with the ruthless killer Putin

    Prime Minister Bennett’s “neutrality” in the Russian war against Ukraine is outrageous and contemptable
    ...
    One might ask, what does it mean to be neutral? If you are neutral, what does this really translate to in the context of the unspeakable crimes Putin is committing against innocent Ukrainian citizens? In this case it simply means that while these crimes against humanity are happening in broad daylight, Bennett refuses to condemn the Russian butcher because of cold-blooded political calculations, which he justifies in the name of Israel’s national security.
     
    Israel values its partnerships with Russia. To keep that relationship going, they have maintained economic ties (2)

    Israel has so far desisted from joining nations including the US, Europe, the UK, Australia, and Japan in the imposition of an “unprecedented” number of sanctions on Russia, Belarus, and the two breakaway Ukrainian regions of Donetsk and Luhansk in the wake of the invasion.
     
    Israel has voiced objections. However, the track record of *actions* against Russian interests is quite slim & mostly symbolic (e.g. UNHRC membership).

    George IslamoSoros and his puppet Biden are quite upset with Israel & Hungary. Of course, Not-The-President Biden's popularity is so abysmal no major player takes him seriously.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2022/04/13/bennett-is-siding-with-the-ruthless-killer-putin/

    (2) https://www.timesofisrael.com/israel-hasnt-joined-anti-russia-sanctions-but-its-firms-need-to-tread-carefully/

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Greasy William

    Ultimately, morality and national interests are one in the same. Israel should avoid involvement in the conflict and should not comment on the outstanding issues between Russia and Ukraine, but Israel is also morally obligated to explicitly condemn the Russian invasion as a criminal act of aggression and to join the western sanctions until Russia agrees to a ceasefire.

    Israel’s failure to stand up for what is right in this case is a moral blemish and is certain to bring about Divine retribution at some point.

  111. @Wokechoke
    @Philip Owen

    The Russians have 1,600 military aircraft at least. Around 600 aircraft that can dogfight and bomb. They have a few thousand qualified combat pilots. In the Battle of Britain it’s claimed the fighter command was down to 600 machines and several hundred pilots. Reality was there was a massive pool of excellent bomber pilots who could have easily jumped into Spitfires and Hurricanes and intercepted their German counterparts.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    Never a shortage of fighter planes, British industry churned them out, the issue was pilots. The Battle of Britain was never a close contest, despite the mythology constructed.

    • Replies: @Greasy William
    @LondonBob

    Battle of Britain was a bust but the Blitz was effective and would have eventually forced a ceasefire if it had continued. By the end of the Blitz, the Luftwaffe was still getting through with minimal losses. It wasn't until the Luftwaffe returned over a year later that Britain was able to effectively defend against night bombing.

    , @Wielgus
    @LondonBob

    Despite aircraft plants being bombed, the Germans kept building planes without much interruption in WW2. But they lacked the pilots to fly them and eventually the fuel for them as well.

    Replies: @Philip Owen

  112. @Yellowface Anon
    @A123

    Israel wants to play both sides in the place they are at as America's sole ally, like China. They are on the side of Russian and Ukrainian oligarchs, while China wants resources from Russia and markets from the rest of the world. Israel hopes for Russia's hand to be lifted from Syria and China for Central Asia.

    Meanwhile an air convoy is leaving Moscow for Tehran to prepare for the flare-up again in Palestine.

    https://twitter.com/AuroraIntel/status/1515056960806207499

    Orthodox Jews' world is the next one, not this one where geopolitics divide loyalties. Some of them don't want Israel to exist because Israel existing means the End Times, but most of them are just happy to have a spot under the sun.



    The only indigenous Palestinean Jews are Mizrahim. All else are practically immigrants after 2k years of "exile". Deeply ironical to see you refering the settler colony of Jews "Palestine".

    Replies: @Yahya, @A123, @LondonBob

    An inevitability that a lot of the captured NATO weaponry will end up in Syria and Iraq. The US position there is very vulnerable, the breakdown of the Iran deal will likely see the Iranians looking to go on the offensive.

    Armchair Warlord on twitter has written a lot about how the Ukraine and NATO are running out of ammunition. I assume Russia has been stockpiling for a long time. We saw in Libya how quickly ammunition ran out and what NATO is sending is pretty much useless gear.

    https://twitter.com/ArmchairW/status/1514824311177064448?s=20&t=gDxvyf6MDk4-HAUneE6JwA

    • Replies: @A123
    @LondonBob


    what NATO is sending is pretty much useless gear.

     

    While the list has some obvious shortcomings, your designation of "useless" seems quite harsh. Some of the smaller gear, such as Switchblade, are current technology.

    To avoid months of personnel delay, complex systems are selected based current usage by the Ukrainian military. Russia transferred a short brigade of S-300 to Syria. How long did it take before they could run the system without direct support by RF trainers?

    captured NATO weaponry will end up in Syria and Iraq
     
    What side will "capture" the gear and then send it to an Arab/Persian combat zone?

    None of the parties in the current Ukraine conflict have an obvious reason to supply Iraq.

    Perhaps RF Chechen units might wish to bolster aligned units in Syria. Even if you make that assumption, there have to be easier options to achieve that objective. Transporting "captured" gear from Ukraine to Syria would be exceedingly inconvenient.

    the breakdown of the Iran deal will likely see the Iranians looking to go on the offensive
     
    Iran is financially pressed dealing with domestic issues. For example, the current water crisis requires prioritization of resources to maintain internal security. This greatly limits the damage they can create abroad. Turning Lebanon into a failed stated has maxed out their capability.

    Signing an inherently broken JCPOA2 deal would guarantee war. It would provide Iran funding for offensive operations. And, as an act of submission, it would signal weakness. That combination would convey the equivalent of a red carpet to violent zealot Khamenei.

    One can see why WEF Elites want additional conflicts. More fighting = More Rape-ugees illegally entering Europe. Fortunately, there is no way for their puppet, Not-The-President Biden, to achieve a new JCPOA2 arrangement. Most of the restrictions on Iran are required by law. and the deeply unpopular regime cannot obtain the 50+ Senators required for new legislation.

    The US position there is very vulnerable,
     
    What U.S. positions? There are very limited numbers of American troops left in Syria & Iraq.

    Trump relocated U.S. forces out of the kill sack between Turkish and Syrian lines. The new position has highly favorable terrain and minimal population to disguise Iranian terrorists.

    PEACE 😇
    , @Barbarossa
    @LondonBob

    If the Russians are digging into older equipment too than it hardly seems useless, even if one wanted to argue that there was some older stuff in there.

  113. @LondonBob
    @Wokechoke

    Never a shortage of fighter planes, British industry churned them out, the issue was pilots. The Battle of Britain was never a close contest, despite the mythology constructed.

    Replies: @Greasy William, @Wielgus

    Battle of Britain was a bust but the Blitz was effective and would have eventually forced a ceasefire if it had continued. By the end of the Blitz, the Luftwaffe was still getting through with minimal losses. It wasn’t until the Luftwaffe returned over a year later that Britain was able to effectively defend against night bombing.

  114. I give up.

    So many lies, so many uninformed opinions.

    The wisest answer to almost all questions is “I don’t know”. I’ll make that my motto from now on.

    I am going to immerse myself in astronomy, maths, geology, Latin and linguistics.

    Reading the media is fruitless. It is all lies and manipulation. The people who rule us are vermin.

    Have a nice life, everybody. I am retreating into my own little world.

    You’ll be happy to know, this is my last comment.

    • Replies: @Barbarossa
    @22pp22

    The media is useless and pointless, and I expect that you will be happier and more meaningfully productive in your imposed world. Your choice is doubtless an eminently sane one, even if I hate to see an interesting voice drop out.

    However, feel free to share some of the interesting insights you find in your study with us here. I think it would be fitting and appreciated and launch topics other than punting around the latest piece of useless state propaganda.

    If you don't pop back up here with future interesting discoveries, be well.

    , @sudden death
    @22pp22

    Looks like dealing with actual reality is increasingly becoming too hard for some RF propaganda junkies as UA capital is free while the famed Donbas cauldron is sooo late...

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  115. @silviosilver
    @AaronB


    So quantum mechanics says the behavior of a particle is not entirely determined by any force – there is simply an element of what appears to be “choice” in the matter
     
    Hmm, yeah, okay. I'll have to think some more about it. I'm still put off by the idea that a bunch of particles coming together and behaving "quantumly" can constitute sufficient "me-ness" for my purposes, but perhaps I could come around.

    This modern view leads to fear of death, sees everything else as threatening to us, and makes us feel alienated and estranged from the universe.

    To see our deep underlying connection to everything means to realize we cannot die – everything is an expression of the underlying energy of the universe, and death is just transformation.
     
    I'm not particularly bothered by the fact of death. It would be nice if there something beyond it - something "good", I mean - but if there isn't, at least death would eliminate the possibility of any further suffering, which is actually not a bad deal.

    Beyond that, I have some personal metaphysical views of the "purpose of the universe" which do a fine job of warding off nihilism. I'm not as brave as you though, so I'm not going to talk about them for fear of being laughed out of the room.

    That's not to say I'm not "afraid" of death. Of course I am. There are plenty of things I wouldn't do in life because I'm afraid I might die. I doubt Buddhists really differ much in this regard.

    Death-is-just-transformation seems like a bit of a cope to me. If I can't retain any "memory" - or whatever the equivalent is for a disembodied mind - of who I am/was, then whether I'm "transformed" or simply dead is a distinction without a difference. The more appealing concept of metempsychosis suffers from the same defect.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @AaronB

    https://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9907009

    Free will inferred from the basic principles of quantum mechanics is hokum.

    The scientific dilemma has not advanced a day beyond what Leibniz and Newton used to yammer about when they were in their “let us speculate here for a bit” mode.

    Demons are actually as good an explanation for UFO’s as any other.

  116. @silviosilver
    @AaronB


    So quantum mechanics says the behavior of a particle is not entirely determined by any force – there is simply an element of what appears to be “choice” in the matter
     
    Hmm, yeah, okay. I'll have to think some more about it. I'm still put off by the idea that a bunch of particles coming together and behaving "quantumly" can constitute sufficient "me-ness" for my purposes, but perhaps I could come around.

    This modern view leads to fear of death, sees everything else as threatening to us, and makes us feel alienated and estranged from the universe.

    To see our deep underlying connection to everything means to realize we cannot die – everything is an expression of the underlying energy of the universe, and death is just transformation.
     
    I'm not particularly bothered by the fact of death. It would be nice if there something beyond it - something "good", I mean - but if there isn't, at least death would eliminate the possibility of any further suffering, which is actually not a bad deal.

    Beyond that, I have some personal metaphysical views of the "purpose of the universe" which do a fine job of warding off nihilism. I'm not as brave as you though, so I'm not going to talk about them for fear of being laughed out of the room.

    That's not to say I'm not "afraid" of death. Of course I am. There are plenty of things I wouldn't do in life because I'm afraid I might die. I doubt Buddhists really differ much in this regard.

    Death-is-just-transformation seems like a bit of a cope to me. If I can't retain any "memory" - or whatever the equivalent is for a disembodied mind - of who I am/was, then whether I'm "transformed" or simply dead is a distinction without a difference. The more appealing concept of metempsychosis suffers from the same defect.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @AaronB

    Personally I regard free will as an “ontological primitive” – as self evident and irreducible.

    It’s just interesting that modern science no longer subscribes to determinism. Its an interesting topic to explore if you’re interested, the spiritual implications of modern science – but for myself, science no longer holds such an exalted place that I need it’s permission 🙂

    As for survival as transformation, well a big part of Buddhism is to expand the concept of “me” – are you this skin-encapsulated ego, or are you something much larger and bigger?

    With such an expanded sense of “me”, it’s easier to see their point.

    Nevertheless that’s just one way to express the mystery. For myself, I just have an intuitive sense that death of the body does not mean death – but I cannot use precise language to define it, not do I care to 🙂

    To my mind, there are realities that can’t be captured in thought or words, and that is good and well 🙂

    But different traditions formulate different answers to the mystery of death that may be more satisfying to others. In the end, words can only hint.

    I for one would love to hear your spiritual beliefs! They can’t possibly be more silly and absurd than my own 🙂

    I’ve been mocked here relentlessly by many, but that surely means the materialists feel threatened.

    I am sure your spiritual beliefs are interesting and capture some aspect of the truth.

    (Also, I am not “committed” to Buddhism, I simply find my own spiritual thinking heavily inspired by some sects of Buddhism)

  117. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @AaronB

    I want my broadband internet, TV, Refrigeration, air conditioning, electricity, shopping malls, supermarkets and all the amenities which our civilization affords us.

    I will accept all the neuroticism that seems to come with the package rather than your rural mysticism which you seem to offer. I might be strawmanning you but that's what I feel with you tens of thousands of words expressing your disenchantment with contemporary civilization - I love it.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Barbarossa

    Sure, and I’m not trying to forcibly deprive you of these things.

    This idea that life is a zero sum game, and politics the battle over who gets to “force” their vision on others, is something I vigorously reject.

    Actually, rather than restrict people’s choices what I’m trying to do is expand the range of choices society offers.

    It’s modern society that seeks to restrict the range of choices to one lifestyle and one value system – no previous society did this! Modern society is impoverished.

    Traditional India, for instance – your own culture – recognized the values of the merchant, the warrior, the farmer, the craftsman, the artist and poet, the spiritual aspirant, and crucially, those who rejected mainstream life altogether and chose to wander the forests and mountains in search of enlightenment.

    Our modern culture recognizes only the values of the merchant and his adjunct, the creator of technology.

    That being said, I certainly won’t deny that I would also hope for social transformation even in the mainstream.

    But I do not envision giving up technology, just using it intelligently rather than being dominated by it. The level which I personally want to limit technology in my life isn’t necessary for the mainstream, but a different relationship to it is needed, it seems to me.

    An example of being the servant of technology rather than it’s master is the way we allowed cars to dominate cities and dictate how we build them, making them ugly and unpleasant.

    Or the way we decided that in an age of science, sentimental things like “beauty” don’t matter so we don’t have to build beautiful buildings, but only rational and utilitarian ones.

    Or that cities have to be designed in a boring square grid because the values of efficiency and convenience trump all else.

  118. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @AaronB

    I want my broadband internet, TV, Refrigeration, air conditioning, electricity, shopping malls, supermarkets and all the amenities which our civilization affords us.

    I will accept all the neuroticism that seems to come with the package rather than your rural mysticism which you seem to offer. I might be strawmanning you but that's what I feel with you tens of thousands of words expressing your disenchantment with contemporary civilization - I love it.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Barbarossa

    Have you considered the possibility that some of the best aspects of modernity can be preserved while minimizing the worst, most destructive aspects. I, and I suspect Aaron would agree with this sentiment, don’t think it has to be an all or nothing proposition.

    Besides, it’s not possible to turn back the clock and recreate the past. That is gone and what will come must necessarily be innovative. What form that innovation takes is the real answer. Will we look to the past and recover the best from that moving forward, or must we double down on pathological mistakes?

    Every choice has trade offs and there is not gain without a loss. Every path taken precludes others. It’s all a question of what the most meaningful gains and losses are and if what we have lost is worth what we have gained. It’s also not entirely a zero sum game. Moderation could give us much of the best of both worlds. However, out culture is violently against moderation in any form especially when it comes material consumption. This has created an insatiable hunger, as our world is actively hostile to the formation of contentment. Contentment makes happy people but bad consumers.

    I’d elaborate more, but I don’t have time now. Perhaps I’ll get to more in a couple days.

  119. @22pp22
    I give up.

    So many lies, so many uninformed opinions.

    The wisest answer to almost all questions is "I don't know". I'll make that my motto from now on.

    I am going to immerse myself in astronomy, maths, geology, Latin and linguistics.

    Reading the media is fruitless. It is all lies and manipulation. The people who rule us are vermin.

    Have a nice life, everybody. I am retreating into my own little world.

    You'll be happy to know, this is my last comment.

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @sudden death

    The media is useless and pointless, and I expect that you will be happier and more meaningfully productive in your imposed world. Your choice is doubtless an eminently sane one, even if I hate to see an interesting voice drop out.

    However, feel free to share some of the interesting insights you find in your study with us here. I think it would be fitting and appreciated and launch topics other than punting around the latest piece of useless state propaganda.

    If you don’t pop back up here with future interesting discoveries, be well.

  120. Mystery as ‘dead’ captain of sunk Russian ship filmed at ‘survivors’ parade. Did he save his computer by any chance like the Italian captain who sunk his cruise ship but saved his computer upon leaving?

    https://www.the-sun.com/news/5140378/mystery-dead-captain-sunk-russian-moskva-survivors-parade?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=sharebarweb

  121. @22pp22
    I give up.

    So many lies, so many uninformed opinions.

    The wisest answer to almost all questions is "I don't know". I'll make that my motto from now on.

    I am going to immerse myself in astronomy, maths, geology, Latin and linguistics.

    Reading the media is fruitless. It is all lies and manipulation. The people who rule us are vermin.

    Have a nice life, everybody. I am retreating into my own little world.

    You'll be happy to know, this is my last comment.

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @sudden death

    Looks like dealing with actual reality is increasingly becoming too hard for some RF propaganda junkies as UA capital is free while the famed Donbas cauldron is sooo late…

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @sudden death

    The Russians are exploiting the area around Izyum.

    The area is designated as the Sloboda Front, referring to the older Sloboda Ukraine. The Russian army is moving south down the Muravsky Trail toward Kramatorsk. The Russians are positioning armor all along the shoulder from Kharkov around the Salient of Ukrainians loping to Donetsk all the way along to the Dnieper river. A spell of dry weather and the frontline will crack in a few places. A SuperMariupol.

    https://militaryland.net/ukraine/invasion-day-52-summary/

    Replies: @sudden death

  122. Currently, I think travelogues on Youtube must be the most mainstream place, where you can find the narrative challenged.
    _____
    Sweden is surprisingly undemocratic for all its talk of egalitarianism (no ballot on NATO)
    _____
    I think technology can be used to return to tradition. I’ve read several old books about the Old Country, using technology, that it would be nearly impossible to have read otherwise.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @songbird

    Our grandparents were sure that Atlantis was a myth. Scythians people only of legend. CBS News told them the truth.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @Barbarossa
    @songbird


    I think technology can be used to return to tradition. I’ve read several old books about the Old Country, using technology, that it would be nearly impossible to have read otherwise.
     
    It is possible, but on balance I think it will swing overwhelmingly in the other direction, for the reason that you mention in a subsequent comment; too much choice.

    Also my point would be that tradition must necessarily be an action performed and sustained by a group, so the reading may preserve the memory but it doesn't continue the tradition as a living entity.

    Tangentially, are you familiar with the Carmina Gadelica by Alexander Carmichael? The prayers and incantations, together with his notes provide an invaluable window into the lost world of Gaelic thought and practice.

    @AaronB You should check them out too. I think you would greatly appreciate the spiritual perspective.

    Replies: @songbird

  123. @AaronB
    @Mikel

    You have a valid point that we have more physical power than ever before, which should translate into the freedom to live a happier life. That, after all, is the great promise of modernity, really.

    But does it? It really depends on your values and what sort of lifestyle one most values. For myself, the vastly expanded powers of the modern world have nevertheless created a lifestyle and physical reality that greatly restrict my ability to live the life I would truly want. The world is far uglier and less interesting on every level than it can and should be.

    Fascinating and complex ancient human cultures are being destroyed. Huge swathes of the worlds wilderness are also being destroyed. Cities and towns have become ugly and soulless.

    The beauty and wonder of the world and it's human inhabitants has been massively degraded.

    And considering the extremely poor mental health increasingly afflicting the population of the developed world, I am certainly not alone.

    Perhaps vastly expanded powers aren't the key to happiness, as so many myths and legends insist on warning us :)

    Now, you say that social pressure isn't an absolute barrier to living an alternative lifestyle - and that's true, but if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.

    But you make a good point that choice still exists, even if it has to be wrested from society - so my goal is much less to "transform" society than to win social support and approval for alternative lifestyles, and a kind of "spiritual infrastructure" that helps young people find this alternative path.

    In traditional China and India, most people lived ordinary lives, but leaving city life behind and abandoning the rat race was an honored and socially validated choice that had a lot of spiritual infrastructure to support it.

    So that needs to be restored to our society, I think.

    But I think there is a more fundamental point to be made here. If a huge - and perhaps even the decisive - factor in being happy is the correct use of our minds and the correct mental and emotional relationship to the external world, then the "metaphysics" undergirding modern life, with it's belief that mathematical certainty alone is the correct relationship to reality, leads to perhaps the most unhappy generation to have ever lived :)

    I have enough of a problem convincing my two adult children of what they should do for what I see as their own good. If I cannot even convince my children to change their lives, who am I to start planning full societal changes?
     
    I don't see the task as "persuasion" which suggests force. Rather, I see it as simply formulating an alternative ideal and "inviting" others to consider it.

    Many people today seem to suffer greatly from poor mental health in modern society without being aware there are alternatives.

    As we’ve discussed in the past, and Silviosilver recently mentioned, if we managed to convince a large amount of people to lead a better life by leaving their jobs and simplifying their existence, we would could actually cause a big economic harm to many people that do not share our perspective for no real benefit for us. Our ability to enjoy life in contact with nature while making use of so many technological advances that you and I are so used to (for example, exchanging our ideas through the internet) depends on the majority of society leading the lifestyle that we reject.
     
    Well, I would only want those who are genuinely unsatisfied with modernity and who will genuinely become significantly healthier and happier living an alternative life to do so - and I would "invite" them to consider it, and not "convince" them :)

    It's obviously unfair for such people to remain "economic captives" in a system designed for the benefit of those who still think the point of life is to make money and acquire things - and moreover, I hold out hope that even such benighted people will at least somewhat see the light after they see people flourishing who live opposite to them :)

    Not to mention, the "economic lifestyle" of these mainstream people are not in themselves neutral, but actively contribute to an uglier and worse world.

    So on every level I think it would be a positive thing for everyone.

    I don't believe there can be such "radical seperation" between those of us who pursue nature and the mainstream which seeks wealth and power - part of the "metaphysic" of nature-love, is the insight that we are all connected in a larger organic whole, and what goes on in one place affects everything.

    So I think we have a spiritual duty to not "leave others behind" but work towards their salvation as well :)

    No need to apologize for not having the time to respond! Is that lack of time not punishment enough on its own?
     
    Well said :)

    Replies: @Barbarossa, @Grahamsno(G64), @Mikel

    if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.

    I see this quite differently. Everybody is aware of the calls to escape from the rat race. It’s a very old thing actually in our western society. Just listen to Pete Seeger’s songs from the 60s. If those calls and songs reached me in a small town of the Basque Country when Spain had barely recovered democracy, they must have reached everybody. The other day, following a link provided by Yayah that got me curious about the Persian Gulf natives, I discovered that even in Iran they have their own communities of “hippies”. Apparently, the only place where alternative lifestyles still have little traction is Eastern Europe. I get the impression that people in that region are much more interested in first enjoying all the good things (real or imaginary) of a western-style materialistic society.

    But we must indeed be realistic about human nature and accept that a great majority are totally voluntary participants in the Machine, even though they know that alternatives exist. And they have every right to make that choice, just like you and me have the right to reject it for ourselves. My elder son knows very well what kind of lifestyle I like but the other day he surprised me when he said that he’s actually looking forward to going back to the office. He doesn’t like working from home (!) and prefers to have daily contact with his coworkers at what I imagine must be some obscure office somewhere in uninspiring central Warsaw. What can I say? Just do whatever makes you happy, son. Life is challenging enough without me trying to impose rules on how you choose to live it.

    As far as I’m concerned, the only part of society that exerts any pressure on how to lead my life is my immediate family. And rightly so. How could I ignore their wishes and preferences? In fact, I exert an even bigger pressure on them. We live in a semi-rural part of the US West only because I chose it thinking about myself much more than about them. Fortunately, my wife is very happy now and my younger son hasn’t really known any other life so he’s cool of course.

    The other day I listed several groups that escape the Machine in one way or another and have become pretty mainstream, if not outright promoted by MSM, such as those famous pioneers of the Alaskan Frontier. But what to make of the epidemic of homeless people that you see most everywhere in the US? Is that not, in its own way, similar to that Indian tradition of abandoning material comfort and going for a life of wandering about, begging and contemplating? These people usually have all their means at their disposal to return to a conventional life but they’re not interested. When authorities manage to get them accommodated somewhere, it’s not long before many of them go back to the street again. And whatever personal problems lead them to that lifestyle, can we be sure that they are essentially different from the Indian traditional mendicants’?

    BTW, I’m not entirely sure that we have a bigger incidence of neuroses today than in the past. It certainly looks that way but many mental ailments in the past were masked by alcoholism, religious retreat, possession and witchery superstitions and who knows what else. I am totally certain that some of our old saints and heroes were not OK in the head.

    Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.

    Even Feynman once admitted that he didn’t really understand quantum mechanics so what chance do the rest of us have? But I would dispute that assertion of yours. My understanding of the probabilistic nature of the universe is that in the macro world nothing much changes. The probabilities of an object like a tennis ball or a planet not following Newton/Einstein mechanics are not exactly zero but for all practical purposes they approach zero and that is what we consistently observe. Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn’t lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @Mikel

    Thank you for your thoughtful reply.

    You make many valid points, although overall I do not think I can agree with you. But I do not think this is something that can be proved by arguments. Ultimately this is about "lived experience".

    While I utilize logical arguments in a variety of ways to support my position, none of my arguments are airtight, and there is certainly room to reasonably disagree.

    While I cannot "demolish" your counter-arguments against me, I would like to make a few - not very strong but perhaps interesting - points :)

    With regards to quantum mechanics - it's true that the "indeterminacy" exists on the subatomic level, while larger bodies seem to behave with a fair amount of predictability.

    However, this might support the view that matter, as a whole, is simply "choosing" to manifest fairly regular patterns - and it also leaves room for surprises on the margins.

    Logically, a deterministic universe rests on the idea that bodies at rest stay at rest, unless acted upon by an external force - but this is an unproven axiom, and the opposite may well be true.

    Feynman said he couldn't understand Quantum mechanics because it violated logic and common sense - a medieval mystic would have no trouble "understanding" it :)

    But clearly, insofar as understanding refers to grasping reality through reason, it is not understandable - yet true. And that should surely tell us something about reasons relationship to reality.

    With regards to mental illness - or spiritual sickness as I would call it - you are certainly correct that this isn't unique to our age.

    Nor is the Machine unique to our age. It can be seen already in ancient Egypt and Babylon, etc. All the worlds ancient spiritual traditions talk of mankind being "sick - 2,500 years ago the Buddha described man as fundamentally sick and needing to be cured.

    So certainly none of this is new, and many thinkers trace it to the move from hunter gathering and into agriculture - the first instance of the desire for power over nature in place of organic participation.

    Be that as it may, it clearly isn't new. My only contention is that this ancient sickness has reached an apogee in modern times, and I don't think I could definitively prove that.

    In the final analysis, all I can - and wish - to do is offer my "lived experience" as an alternative to modern life and my thoughtful commentary on the metaphysical significance of my experience. But the experience is primary.

    If someone does not find it attractive or compelling, then the last thing I would want to do is compel or coerce such a person!

    Everyone's spiritual needs are different - someone like your son may not be ready to consider alternatives and may be at a stage in his life where participating in modern life is exactly what he needs to support his growth. And he may never wish to consider alternatives - that choice must be respected too.

    I suppose, my writing is most suitable to people who are indeed unhappy with modern life but do not find enough social and spiritual support.

    Sure, we are all aware of alternatives in the ancient spiritual traditions and in recent movements like hippies - but it's incredibly supportive to find people now doing and talking about these things, and not just in some abstract past.

    One thing I absolutely do agree with you is that everyone has the right to make their own choice, even if that means staying in the Machine, and everyone should be treated with respect and dignity whatever their choice.


    Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn’t lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.
     
    That's actually not true.

    Iain Mcgilchrist in his Things book had an entire fairly large appendix showing the large number of eminent scientists who developed spiritual beliefs the deeper they got into science.

    Replies: @Mikel, @Philip Owen, @Colin Wright

    , @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Mikel


    Even Feynman once admitted that he didn’t really understand quantum mechanics so what chance do the rest of us have?
     
    You are close but not quite exactly.

    nobody understands quantum mechanics

     

    It is stated a bit more abstractly in his textbook. More like there isn't anything in our experience which is going to help.
    , @Barbarossa
    @Mikel

    Briefly, I would say that while mental illness has always been with us, the endemic depression and anxiety is very different. The shift is visible even within a couple generations in populations like college students who are now very anxious, depressed, and medicated for it, while when my parents were in college it would have been incomprehensible.


    It seems that there are definitely factors at work here above and beyond mere recognition of the problem, although that is a factor.

    Would you argue that there is no phenomenon really going on at all?

    Replies: @A123, @Mikel

    , @A123
    @Mikel

    Also for -- @AaronB, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Barbarossa


    The reality of "liberal arts" education in today's world is captured in cartoon form here:

    https://www.smbc-comics.com/comic/liberal-education

    The graphic is *far* too large to embed.

    PEACE 😇

    , @S
    @Mikel

    There was a 1974 movie entitled Zardoz which featured a future people that had the technology to have everything be automated. However, they willfully chose to do some physical labor as apparently they thought it healthy, ie making and baking their own bread, plowing their farm fields with a horse and plow, and horse and buggy instead of cars.

    A little bit Amish I suppose. I respect that.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zardoz

  124. @songbird
    Currently, I think travelogues on Youtube must be the most mainstream place, where you can find the narrative challenged.
    _____
    Sweden is surprisingly undemocratic for all its talk of egalitarianism (no ballot on NATO)
    _____
    I think technology can be used to return to tradition. I've read several old books about the Old Country, using technology, that it would be nearly impossible to have read otherwise.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @Barbarossa

    Our grandparents were sure that Atlantis was a myth. Scythians people only of legend. CBS News told them the truth.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    IMO, one the perils of technology is that it presents you with too much choice, and also certain things tend to be promoted to you (like WW2 or cat videos), and so you've got to have the initiative to reach beyond what they want you to see, so your brain doesn't turn to mush, with dross and repetition.

    I had to force myself to go to bed last night because I was drunk on history. First, listening to a podcast of a local historian talk about my grandfather's village during the Irish War of Independence. Next because I was reading an old book on an e-reader and had reached a section discussing the opinions of country peasants about Travelers. Before that it was about changelings, and some of it was genuinely creepy.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  125. @Mikel
    @AaronB


    if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.
     
    I see this quite differently. Everybody is aware of the calls to escape from the rat race. It's a very old thing actually in our western society. Just listen to Pete Seeger's songs from the 60s. If those calls and songs reached me in a small town of the Basque Country when Spain had barely recovered democracy, they must have reached everybody. The other day, following a link provided by Yayah that got me curious about the Persian Gulf natives, I discovered that even in Iran they have their own communities of "hippies". Apparently, the only place where alternative lifestyles still have little traction is Eastern Europe. I get the impression that people in that region are much more interested in first enjoying all the good things (real or imaginary) of a western-style materialistic society.

    But we must indeed be realistic about human nature and accept that a great majority are totally voluntary participants in the Machine, even though they know that alternatives exist. And they have every right to make that choice, just like you and me have the right to reject it for ourselves. My elder son knows very well what kind of lifestyle I like but the other day he surprised me when he said that he's actually looking forward to going back to the office. He doesn't like working from home (!) and prefers to have daily contact with his coworkers at what I imagine must be some obscure office somewhere in uninspiring central Warsaw. What can I say? Just do whatever makes you happy, son. Life is challenging enough without me trying to impose rules on how you choose to live it.

    As far as I'm concerned, the only part of society that exerts any pressure on how to lead my life is my immediate family. And rightly so. How could I ignore their wishes and preferences? In fact, I exert an even bigger pressure on them. We live in a semi-rural part of the US West only because I chose it thinking about myself much more than about them. Fortunately, my wife is very happy now and my younger son hasn't really known any other life so he's cool of course.

    The other day I listed several groups that escape the Machine in one way or another and have become pretty mainstream, if not outright promoted by MSM, such as those famous pioneers of the Alaskan Frontier. But what to make of the epidemic of homeless people that you see most everywhere in the US? Is that not, in its own way, similar to that Indian tradition of abandoning material comfort and going for a life of wandering about, begging and contemplating? These people usually have all their means at their disposal to return to a conventional life but they're not interested. When authorities manage to get them accommodated somewhere, it's not long before many of them go back to the street again. And whatever personal problems lead them to that lifestyle, can we be sure that they are essentially different from the Indian traditional mendicants'?

    BTW, I'm not entirely sure that we have a bigger incidence of neuroses today than in the past. It certainly looks that way but many mental ailments in the past were masked by alcoholism, religious retreat, possession and witchery superstitions and who knows what else. I am totally certain that some of our old saints and heroes were not OK in the head.


    Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.
     
    Even Feynman once admitted that he didn't really understand quantum mechanics so what chance do the rest of us have? But I would dispute that assertion of yours. My understanding of the probabilistic nature of the universe is that in the macro world nothing much changes. The probabilities of an object like a tennis ball or a planet not following Newton/Einstein mechanics are not exactly zero but for all practical purposes they approach zero and that is what we consistently observe. Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn't lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Barbarossa, @A123, @S

    Thank you for your thoughtful reply.

    You make many valid points, although overall I do not think I can agree with you. But I do not think this is something that can be proved by arguments. Ultimately this is about “lived experience”.

    While I utilize logical arguments in a variety of ways to support my position, none of my arguments are airtight, and there is certainly room to reasonably disagree.

    While I cannot “demolish” your counter-arguments against me, I would like to make a few – not very strong but perhaps interesting – points 🙂

    With regards to quantum mechanics – it’s true that the “indeterminacy” exists on the subatomic level, while larger bodies seem to behave with a fair amount of predictability.

    However, this might support the view that matter, as a whole, is simply “choosing” to manifest fairly regular patterns – and it also leaves room for surprises on the margins.

    Logically, a deterministic universe rests on the idea that bodies at rest stay at rest, unless acted upon by an external force – but this is an unproven axiom, and the opposite may well be true.

    Feynman said he couldn’t understand Quantum mechanics because it violated logic and common sense – a medieval mystic would have no trouble “understanding” it 🙂

    But clearly, insofar as understanding refers to grasping reality through reason, it is not understandable – yet true. And that should surely tell us something about reasons relationship to reality.

    With regards to mental illness – or spiritual sickness as I would call it – you are certainly correct that this isn’t unique to our age.

    Nor is the Machine unique to our age. It can be seen already in ancient Egypt and Babylon, etc. All the worlds ancient spiritual traditions talk of mankind being “sick – 2,500 years ago the Buddha described man as fundamentally sick and needing to be cured.

    So certainly none of this is new, and many thinkers trace it to the move from hunter gathering and into agriculture – the first instance of the desire for power over nature in place of organic participation.

    Be that as it may, it clearly isn’t new. My only contention is that this ancient sickness has reached an apogee in modern times, and I don’t think I could definitively prove that.

    In the final analysis, all I can – and wish – to do is offer my “lived experience” as an alternative to modern life and my thoughtful commentary on the metaphysical significance of my experience. But the experience is primary.

    If someone does not find it attractive or compelling, then the last thing I would want to do is compel or coerce such a person!

    Everyone’s spiritual needs are different – someone like your son may not be ready to consider alternatives and may be at a stage in his life where participating in modern life is exactly what he needs to support his growth. And he may never wish to consider alternatives – that choice must be respected too.

    I suppose, my writing is most suitable to people who are indeed unhappy with modern life but do not find enough social and spiritual support.

    Sure, we are all aware of alternatives in the ancient spiritual traditions and in recent movements like hippies – but it’s incredibly supportive to find people now doing and talking about these things, and not just in some abstract past.

    One thing I absolutely do agree with you is that everyone has the right to make their own choice, even if that means staying in the Machine, and everyone should be treated with respect and dignity whatever their choice.

    Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn’t lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.

    That’s actually not true.

    Iain Mcgilchrist in his Things book had an entire fairly large appendix showing the large number of eminent scientists who developed spiritual beliefs the deeper they got into science.

    • Replies: @Mikel
    @AaronB


    I do not think I can agree with you.
     
    That's OK. It's not very important for me to stop you from believing that we must change the world :-)

    It's much more important to see that we have similar views with regards to enjoying contact with nature and to discuss our different approaches as to how and why.

    How things change, by the way. It doesn't feel like it was such a long time ago when my father struggled with all his might to prevent my pursuing an alternative way of life. Now I have the opposite problem with my two adult children: they want to lead a conventional life. But what I learned from the experience of the battle with my father is not that an alternative way of life is necessarily better. Rather, that I should let them choose by themselves and just try to lead by example.
    , @Philip Owen
    @AaronB

    I've seen survey results that show that although overall numbers of believers are low among university research scientists, stereotypes hold. Physcists tend to be more believing in a God - more than the general public in the survey; Biologists tend more towards committed atheism.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @Colin Wright
    @AaronB

    '...In the final analysis, all I can – and wish – to do is offer my “lived experience” as an alternative to modern life and my thoughtful commentary on the metaphysical significance of my experience. But the experience is primary...'

    You're a hoot, Aaron, you really are.

    You think we could get Ron to post all your comments in a thread? It would be convenient.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  126. One of the “merely modern” ideas that have had disastrous consequences on the mental health of society is the notion of “trauma” (psychological).

    The idea is that suffering and adversity have no legitimate and useful place in the “larger economy of life” – they are mere aberrations, without meaning, and entirely negative.

    People are encouraged to view deep suffering as a meaningless tragedy that they are passive “victims” of, with the appropriate response being mere “recovery” (return to pre-suffering status quo) – not as part of a personal story of growth and redemption, and if properly integrated an essential part of the move towards greater health.

    We thus deprive people of the very psychological infrastructure needed to integrate suffering into a higher vision that transforms it into a vital ingredient for the building of greater health and vitality.

    The old spiritual idea that suffering and adversity are providential, specific challenges meant to stimulate spiritual growth – surely this was so much more health promoting!

    It’s well known that rates of PTSD among combat veterans plummet when you simply don’t believe in PTSD (that you are a passive victim of meaningless suffering, and your goal should be limited to recovering the pre-suffering status quo).

    We humans have an absolute need to integrate our experiences into a higher vision which makes sense of it all – to create a “narrative” that gives meaning and purpose to all aspects of our experience. This allows us to “digest” our experiences so to speak.

    The modern breakdown of the ability to “redeem” suffering in a larger whole has led to unprecedented fragility and suffering – in one of the paradoxes we now know the modern world abounds in, the “war” on suffering achieved exactly the opposite, and greatly increased suffering.

    “Self-defeating” measures are the hallmark of modernity.

    And yet if you ask the average person, I am sure they would say the solution is to try and eliminate suffering even more 🙂

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @AaronB

    '...And yet if you ask the average person, I am sure they would say the solution is to try and eliminate suffering even more.'

    Tell us about the suffering you've experienced, Aaron.

    I'm curious as to from whence you speak.

    , @silviosilver
    @AaronB


    And yet if you ask the average person, I am sure they would say the solution is to try and eliminate suffering even more
     
    Well, if the 'modern' methods of alleviating psychological suffering have, as you claim, only succeeded in prolonging or ingraining it, then a return to the older methods - which I approve of, let me be clear - would result in this suffering being alleviated. So unless you want to say "bad luck, you tried the modern methods, now you're stuck suffering forever," you too are arguing for renewed efforts to eliminate suffering - albeit via methods at odds with the prevailing paradigm.

    Replies: @AaronB

  127. @Mikel
    @AaronB


    if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.
     
    I see this quite differently. Everybody is aware of the calls to escape from the rat race. It's a very old thing actually in our western society. Just listen to Pete Seeger's songs from the 60s. If those calls and songs reached me in a small town of the Basque Country when Spain had barely recovered democracy, they must have reached everybody. The other day, following a link provided by Yayah that got me curious about the Persian Gulf natives, I discovered that even in Iran they have their own communities of "hippies". Apparently, the only place where alternative lifestyles still have little traction is Eastern Europe. I get the impression that people in that region are much more interested in first enjoying all the good things (real or imaginary) of a western-style materialistic society.

    But we must indeed be realistic about human nature and accept that a great majority are totally voluntary participants in the Machine, even though they know that alternatives exist. And they have every right to make that choice, just like you and me have the right to reject it for ourselves. My elder son knows very well what kind of lifestyle I like but the other day he surprised me when he said that he's actually looking forward to going back to the office. He doesn't like working from home (!) and prefers to have daily contact with his coworkers at what I imagine must be some obscure office somewhere in uninspiring central Warsaw. What can I say? Just do whatever makes you happy, son. Life is challenging enough without me trying to impose rules on how you choose to live it.

    As far as I'm concerned, the only part of society that exerts any pressure on how to lead my life is my immediate family. And rightly so. How could I ignore their wishes and preferences? In fact, I exert an even bigger pressure on them. We live in a semi-rural part of the US West only because I chose it thinking about myself much more than about them. Fortunately, my wife is very happy now and my younger son hasn't really known any other life so he's cool of course.

    The other day I listed several groups that escape the Machine in one way or another and have become pretty mainstream, if not outright promoted by MSM, such as those famous pioneers of the Alaskan Frontier. But what to make of the epidemic of homeless people that you see most everywhere in the US? Is that not, in its own way, similar to that Indian tradition of abandoning material comfort and going for a life of wandering about, begging and contemplating? These people usually have all their means at their disposal to return to a conventional life but they're not interested. When authorities manage to get them accommodated somewhere, it's not long before many of them go back to the street again. And whatever personal problems lead them to that lifestyle, can we be sure that they are essentially different from the Indian traditional mendicants'?

    BTW, I'm not entirely sure that we have a bigger incidence of neuroses today than in the past. It certainly looks that way but many mental ailments in the past were masked by alcoholism, religious retreat, possession and witchery superstitions and who knows what else. I am totally certain that some of our old saints and heroes were not OK in the head.


    Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.
     
    Even Feynman once admitted that he didn't really understand quantum mechanics so what chance do the rest of us have? But I would dispute that assertion of yours. My understanding of the probabilistic nature of the universe is that in the macro world nothing much changes. The probabilities of an object like a tennis ball or a planet not following Newton/Einstein mechanics are not exactly zero but for all practical purposes they approach zero and that is what we consistently observe. Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn't lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Barbarossa, @A123, @S

    Even Feynman once admitted that he didn’t really understand quantum mechanics so what chance do the rest of us have?

    You are close but not quite exactly.

    nobody understands quantum mechanics

    It is stated a bit more abstractly in his textbook. More like there isn’t anything in our experience which is going to help.

  128. @sudden death
    @22pp22

    Looks like dealing with actual reality is increasingly becoming too hard for some RF propaganda junkies as UA capital is free while the famed Donbas cauldron is sooo late...

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    The Russians are exploiting the area around Izyum.

    The area is designated as the Sloboda Front, referring to the older Sloboda Ukraine. The Russian army is moving south down the Muravsky Trail toward Kramatorsk. The Russians are positioning armor all along the shoulder from Kharkov around the Salient of Ukrainians loping to Donetsk all the way along to the Dnieper river. A spell of dry weather and the frontline will crack in a few places. A SuperMariupol.

    https://militaryland.net/ukraine/invasion-day-52-summary/

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @Wokechoke

    Instead of this day-to-day mundane military mumbo-jumbo coping which has been going for two months already in Donbas you should better read and refer to the practical people people who are pro-RF but at the same time have strong enough spine to acknowledge the politico-military reality of slow attritional grind.

    The grind, which can be be broken of course in theory, but certainly not because of some spell of dry weather at the moment.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  129. A123 says: • Website
    @LondonBob
    @Yellowface Anon

    An inevitability that a lot of the captured NATO weaponry will end up in Syria and Iraq. The US position there is very vulnerable, the breakdown of the Iran deal will likely see the Iranians looking to go on the offensive.

    Armchair Warlord on twitter has written a lot about how the Ukraine and NATO are running out of ammunition. I assume Russia has been stockpiling for a long time. We saw in Libya how quickly ammunition ran out and what NATO is sending is pretty much useless gear.

    https://twitter.com/ArmchairW/status/1514824311177064448?s=20&t=gDxvyf6MDk4-HAUneE6JwA

    Replies: @A123, @Barbarossa

    what NATO is sending is pretty much useless gear.

    While the list has some obvious shortcomings, your designation of “useless” seems quite harsh. Some of the smaller gear, such as Switchblade, are current technology.

    To avoid months of personnel delay, complex systems are selected based current usage by the Ukrainian military. Russia transferred a short brigade of S-300 to Syria. How long did it take before they could run the system without direct support by RF trainers?

    captured NATO weaponry will end up in Syria and Iraq

    What side will “capture” the gear and then send it to an Arab/Persian combat zone?

    None of the parties in the current Ukraine conflict have an obvious reason to supply Iraq.

    Perhaps RF Chechen units might wish to bolster aligned units in Syria. Even if you make that assumption, there have to be easier options to achieve that objective. Transporting “captured” gear from Ukraine to Syria would be exceedingly inconvenient.

    the breakdown of the Iran deal will likely see the Iranians looking to go on the offensive

    Iran is financially pressed dealing with domestic issues. For example, the current water crisis requires prioritization of resources to maintain internal security. This greatly limits the damage they can create abroad. Turning Lebanon into a failed stated has maxed out their capability.

    Signing an inherently broken JCPOA2 deal would guarantee war. It would provide Iran funding for offensive operations. And, as an act of submission, it would signal weakness. That combination would convey the equivalent of a red carpet to violent zealot Khamenei.

    One can see why WEF Elites want additional conflicts. More fighting = More Rape-ugees illegally entering Europe. Fortunately, there is no way for their puppet, Not-The-President Biden, to achieve a new JCPOA2 arrangement. Most of the restrictions on Iran are required by law. and the deeply unpopular regime cannot obtain the 50+ Senators required for new legislation.

    The US position there is very vulnerable,

    What U.S. positions? There are very limited numbers of American troops left in Syria & Iraq.

    Trump relocated U.S. forces out of the kill sack between Turkish and Syrian lines. The new position has highly favorable terrain and minimal population to disguise Iranian terrorists.

    PEACE 😇

  130. @Wokechoke
    @sudden death

    The Russians are exploiting the area around Izyum.

    The area is designated as the Sloboda Front, referring to the older Sloboda Ukraine. The Russian army is moving south down the Muravsky Trail toward Kramatorsk. The Russians are positioning armor all along the shoulder from Kharkov around the Salient of Ukrainians loping to Donetsk all the way along to the Dnieper river. A spell of dry weather and the frontline will crack in a few places. A SuperMariupol.

    https://militaryland.net/ukraine/invasion-day-52-summary/

    Replies: @sudden death

    Instead of this day-to-day mundane military mumbo-jumbo coping which has been going for two months already in Donbas you should better read and refer to the practical people people who are pro-RF but at the same time have strong enough spine to acknowledge the politico-military reality of slow attritional grind.

    The grind, which can be be broken of course in theory, but certainly not because of some spell of dry weather at the moment.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @sudden death

    MilitaryLand is quite pro Ukraine. They have tended to downplay Russian claims and boost Ukrainian best case scenarios.

    Replies: @sudden death

  131. S says:
    @songbird
    @S

    People often say that the Civil War was when the US took a more imperial turn. It was a very destructive war, and I can appreciate the dark side of it all, including its egalitarian legacy and the effective abolition of states' rights.

    Still, it is interesting to note that when Perry steamed into Edo Bay with his cannon pointing at samurai, that was in 1853, years before the Civil War.

    Not that it was necessarily bad for the Japanese. It may have been the kick in the pants that they needed.

    Replies: @S

    People often say that the Civil War was when the US took a more imperial turn.

    Yes, they do. The United States at it’s founding had consciously modeled itself itself upon the Roman Republic. It was the Civil War era Lincoln administration where many see the US majorly breaking away from it’s original republican ideals.

    In this view, Lincoln was a Julius Caesar who had ‘crossed the Rubicon’ with his centralization of government power, and John Wilkes Booth his Brutus. Accordingly, soon after the 1865 Lincoln assasination, the US would have it’s own Varus (‘Varus, Give me back my three legions!). [See the ‘comments’ link below under ‘More’ for just who the American Varus was.]

    The point by point close parallels between the history of the United States and that of ancient Republican and Imperial Rome are downright uncanny.

    Still, it is interesting to note that when Perry steamed into Edo Bay with his cannon pointing at samurai, that was in 1853, years before the Civil War…Not that it was necessarily bad for the Japanese. It may have been the kick in the pants that they needed.

    I would have left Japan, China, and Korea, alone. It was their prerogative to be left alone, and learn (or not learn) about the outside world, at their own discretion and pace. In many ways as peoples they were being the ideal ‘global citizen’ with their live and let live philosophy.

    It’s interesting that you should mention 1853, Japan, and early signs of US imperial ambition. That was the very same year a now very obscure (though at the time of it’s initial publication widely distributed and reviewed) book was published in the US entitled The New Rome. The book specifically references the then ongoing 1853 Perry expedition to Japan. [See excerpt and link below]

    According to it, hordes of US businessmen are to invade China, and many millions of Chinese will be taken to the US to be exploited as wage slaves (ie so called ‘cheap labor’).

    The New Rome purports to be a future history of the world. It claims that a yet to be formed US/UK united front will move to take over the world by first conquering continental Europe’s center of power, ie Germany, thereby unleashing a ‘world’s war’ upon the Earth. Immediately afterwards this united front will move against Russia.

    Incredibly, bearing in mind it’s mid 19th century publication date, the book claims it will be the US air force which will be instrumental in the future defeat of Russia.

    For it’s remarkable prescience, The New Rome is well worth the time spent to read.

    The New Rome (1853) – pg 77, 119

    The expedition to Japan and China has already
    started on its mission of making a breach for the entrance of American enterprise into these walled-up magazines of wealth and civilization….The signs of the times are clear and unmistakable, and “The New Rome” awakens to her task, and is resolved upon its execution. Let her raise her banner of stars over land and sea, the token of perdition to the despots and redemption to the peoples, who may be convinced: In hoc signo vincent!

    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/do-you-want-a-war-between-russia-and-nato/#comment-5172335

    https://archive.org/details/newrome00poes/page/n15/mode/2up

    https://archive.org/details/newrome00poes/page/76/mode/2up

    • Thanks: songbird, Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @S
    @S

    In reference to my just previous post regarding a future US air force as foreseen in 1853, they had sophisticated lighter than air (dirigibles) and heavier than air aircraft designs by the mid 19th century. Below are some pics of a patented 1842 British monoplane called the 'Aerial' designed for both passenger and air mail service.

    The illustrations are from a mass UK advertising campaign circa 1843 to sell both the general public and investors on the Aerial project.

    Alas, the Aerial's steam engine was too heavy to make the plane ultimately flyable. It would take the yet to be invented gasoline powered internal combustion engine to do that.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6b/Aerial_Steam_Carriage00.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/60/1843_engraving_of_the_Aerial_Steam_Carriage.jpg


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerial_steam_carriage

    Replies: @sudden death

  132. @Barbarossa
    @sher singh

    You've gotten me interested in looking into the history of the Sikhs in India. The people within a people aspect seems like an interesting dynamic to learn more about. Do you have any recommendations on good histories?

    https://www.amazon.com/History-Sikhs-1469-1839-Oxford-Collection/dp/0195673085

    This one looks pretty promising to me, but what do I know?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Emil Nikola Richard, @RSDB

    I can’t recommend any books on Sikhs specifically (that looks like an interesting one) but John Keay’s monumental India: A History is great, at least as an introductory work, and, as I recall, points the reader to a number of other historians also worth reading.

    [MORE]

    I am getting many good pointers on books here lately.

    We really need an Unz Review book rec section. For instance: Foucault, like Nietzsche, is surprisingly worth reading. Don’t let the fact that these philosophers seem to have been degenerate nutcases make you underestimate them, but don’t forget it, either.

    Fiction: I just finished going through Wuthering Heights. I am surprised by how much AaronB would like it, as it can be interpreted among other things as an allegory of power– its origin in pain, its development in acquisitiveness, and, in the renewal of the new year at the end of the book, its ultimate failure.

    I have also gotten a few good movie recommendations on here. My family and I are currently watching Vadachennai, which is a commercial Tamil film that is so far not half as bad as I expected, though it is not particularly deep. Sinhalese films are often very good: I was very affected by Oba Nathuwa Oba Ekka (“With You, Without You”). Slavs on here should like it as it is based on a Dostoevsky story.

    Χριστός ἀνέστη!

    • Thanks: Barbarossa
    • Replies: @songbird
    @RSDB


    Fiction: I just finished going through Wuthering Heights. I am surprised by how much AaronB would like it
     
    Wuthering Heights may have the best prose of any novel that I have ever read. To my mind, it is just dripping with genius, and especially quite a bit above any other female writer that I have ever read. (including the best-regarded) OTOH, it must also be the most horribly melodramatic book that I have ever read, and, on that basis, I think it would be torture to most readers, including, at least as I imagine, Aaron B. (though perhaps not? All depends on whether he changes his mind on Dickens)

    Years ago, I did read a religious tract by Sikhs, but it was poorly translated. Most of my knowledge of them actually comes from George MacDonald Fraser. His crassness can get tiresome, but he was very knowledgeable about history, and it can be a learning experience to read the explanatory notes at the end of his Flashman novels.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @AaronB

  133. @sudden death
    @Wokechoke

    Instead of this day-to-day mundane military mumbo-jumbo coping which has been going for two months already in Donbas you should better read and refer to the practical people people who are pro-RF but at the same time have strong enough spine to acknowledge the politico-military reality of slow attritional grind.

    The grind, which can be be broken of course in theory, but certainly not because of some spell of dry weather at the moment.

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    MilitaryLand is quite pro Ukraine. They have tended to downplay Russian claims and boost Ukrainian best case scenarios.

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @Wokechoke

    It was you fantasying about super mariupol which will be achieved after dry spell, not the MilitaryLand which was just describing factual daily mundane movements in a local rural setting ;)

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  134. @Wokechoke
    @sudden death

    MilitaryLand is quite pro Ukraine. They have tended to downplay Russian claims and boost Ukrainian best case scenarios.

    Replies: @sudden death

    It was you fantasying about super mariupol which will be achieved after dry spell, not the MilitaryLand which was just describing factual daily mundane movements in a local rural setting 😉

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @sudden death

    Is that so?

    The maps they are using indicate that Russia has developed a bridgehead over the Donets that’s preparation for a summer offensive. Izyum is approximately where Manstein and Popov fought Second Kharkov. It’s a very important crossing area of the Muravsky Trail and the Donets River.

    Replies: @sudden death, @Philip Owen

  135. @Mikel
    @AaronB


    if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.
     
    I see this quite differently. Everybody is aware of the calls to escape from the rat race. It's a very old thing actually in our western society. Just listen to Pete Seeger's songs from the 60s. If those calls and songs reached me in a small town of the Basque Country when Spain had barely recovered democracy, they must have reached everybody. The other day, following a link provided by Yayah that got me curious about the Persian Gulf natives, I discovered that even in Iran they have their own communities of "hippies". Apparently, the only place where alternative lifestyles still have little traction is Eastern Europe. I get the impression that people in that region are much more interested in first enjoying all the good things (real or imaginary) of a western-style materialistic society.

    But we must indeed be realistic about human nature and accept that a great majority are totally voluntary participants in the Machine, even though they know that alternatives exist. And they have every right to make that choice, just like you and me have the right to reject it for ourselves. My elder son knows very well what kind of lifestyle I like but the other day he surprised me when he said that he's actually looking forward to going back to the office. He doesn't like working from home (!) and prefers to have daily contact with his coworkers at what I imagine must be some obscure office somewhere in uninspiring central Warsaw. What can I say? Just do whatever makes you happy, son. Life is challenging enough without me trying to impose rules on how you choose to live it.

    As far as I'm concerned, the only part of society that exerts any pressure on how to lead my life is my immediate family. And rightly so. How could I ignore their wishes and preferences? In fact, I exert an even bigger pressure on them. We live in a semi-rural part of the US West only because I chose it thinking about myself much more than about them. Fortunately, my wife is very happy now and my younger son hasn't really known any other life so he's cool of course.

    The other day I listed several groups that escape the Machine in one way or another and have become pretty mainstream, if not outright promoted by MSM, such as those famous pioneers of the Alaskan Frontier. But what to make of the epidemic of homeless people that you see most everywhere in the US? Is that not, in its own way, similar to that Indian tradition of abandoning material comfort and going for a life of wandering about, begging and contemplating? These people usually have all their means at their disposal to return to a conventional life but they're not interested. When authorities manage to get them accommodated somewhere, it's not long before many of them go back to the street again. And whatever personal problems lead them to that lifestyle, can we be sure that they are essentially different from the Indian traditional mendicants'?

    BTW, I'm not entirely sure that we have a bigger incidence of neuroses today than in the past. It certainly looks that way but many mental ailments in the past were masked by alcoholism, religious retreat, possession and witchery superstitions and who knows what else. I am totally certain that some of our old saints and heroes were not OK in the head.


    Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.
     
    Even Feynman once admitted that he didn't really understand quantum mechanics so what chance do the rest of us have? But I would dispute that assertion of yours. My understanding of the probabilistic nature of the universe is that in the macro world nothing much changes. The probabilities of an object like a tennis ball or a planet not following Newton/Einstein mechanics are not exactly zero but for all practical purposes they approach zero and that is what we consistently observe. Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn't lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Barbarossa, @A123, @S

    Briefly, I would say that while mental illness has always been with us, the endemic depression and anxiety is very different. The shift is visible even within a couple generations in populations like college students who are now very anxious, depressed, and medicated for it, while when my parents were in college it would have been incomprehensible.

    It seems that there are definitely factors at work here above and beyond mere recognition of the problem, although that is a factor.

    Would you argue that there is no phenomenon really going on at all?

    • Agree: S
    • Replies: @A123
    @Barbarossa


    while mental illness has always been with us, the endemic depression and anxiety is very different. ... It seems that there are definitely factors at work here above and beyond mere recognition of the problem, although that is a factor.
     
    Facing appropriate challenges as a child produces resilience. Competitive sports yield essential life lessons such as, "You cannot win all the time" and "There are rules you cannot change".

    SJW upbringing ignores basic life facts and instead gives children:
        -- Unreasonable expectations (e.g. participation trophies)
        -- Overwhelming problems (e.g. CRT, LBGTQXYZ+)

    Raising children that are fragile, rather than resilient, generates adults that cannot cope with reality. This shows up as mental illness.

    PEACE 😇

    , @Mikel
    @Barbarossa


    Would you argue that there is no phenomenon really going on at all?
     
    No, I wouldn't dare say that. There is something going on, certainly, but I wouldn't rush to judge what the cause is. Mental suffering is arguably worse than the physical one. If there was an obvious remedy, researchers would have found it long ago.

    As you say, mental illnesses now are certainly more visible than in times past (all over the western world, as far as I can see) and we also feel a more urgent need to combat them, which perhaps leads to more people feeling that they are "sick", whereas in the past the same conditions would not have led to medical treatment. People just had to find some adjustment to their problems by themselves.

    What medical science is certain about is that most mental illnesses have a genetic component, which means that in some form or another they have always been with us. I once read that panic disorder and agoraphobia had been found even among Eskimos. How people coped with these diseases across the ages is difficult to know. As AaronB said, we live in an age where we try to avoid suffering at all costs, while people in the past were more stoic. They didn't have any other choice either.

    Another thing to consider before rushing to conclude that modern society is all crap is that in the past natural selection weeded out sickness in a brutal way. Someone suffering from certain mental illnesses in a hunter-gatherer environment was more unlikely to survive and thus pass on his genetic condition. But for several generations now, especially in the West, people survive and procreate almost regardless of their fitness so we should naturally expect to see more diseases of all kinds only on that account.

    Replies: @utu, @Barbarossa

  136. @LondonBob
    @Yellowface Anon

    An inevitability that a lot of the captured NATO weaponry will end up in Syria and Iraq. The US position there is very vulnerable, the breakdown of the Iran deal will likely see the Iranians looking to go on the offensive.

    Armchair Warlord on twitter has written a lot about how the Ukraine and NATO are running out of ammunition. I assume Russia has been stockpiling for a long time. We saw in Libya how quickly ammunition ran out and what NATO is sending is pretty much useless gear.

    https://twitter.com/ArmchairW/status/1514824311177064448?s=20&t=gDxvyf6MDk4-HAUneE6JwA

    Replies: @A123, @Barbarossa

    If the Russians are digging into older equipment too than it hardly seems useless, even if one wanted to argue that there was some older stuff in there.

  137. S says:
    @S
    @songbird


    People often say that the Civil War was when the US took a more imperial turn.
     
    Yes, they do. The United States at it's founding had consciously modeled itself itself upon the Roman Republic. It was the Civil War era Lincoln administration where many see the US majorly breaking away from it's original republican ideals.

    In this view, Lincoln was a Julius Caesar who had 'crossed the Rubicon' with his centralization of government power, and John Wilkes Booth his Brutus. Accordingly, soon after the 1865 Lincoln assasination, the US would have it's own Varus ('Varus, Give me back my three legions!). [See the 'comments' link below under 'More' for just who the American Varus was.]

    The point by point close parallels between the history of the United States and that of ancient Republican and Imperial Rome are downright uncanny.

    Still, it is interesting to note that when Perry steamed into Edo Bay with his cannon pointing at samurai, that was in 1853, years before the Civil War...Not that it was necessarily bad for the Japanese. It may have been the kick in the pants that they needed.
     
    I would have left Japan, China, and Korea, alone. It was their prerogative to be left alone, and learn (or not learn) about the outside world, at their own discretion and pace. In many ways as peoples they were being the ideal 'global citizen' with their live and let live philosophy.

    It's interesting that you should mention 1853, Japan, and early signs of US imperial ambition. That was the very same year a now very obscure (though at the time of it's initial publication widely distributed and reviewed) book was published in the US entitled The New Rome. The book specifically references the then ongoing 1853 Perry expedition to Japan. [See excerpt and link below]

    According to it, hordes of US businessmen are to invade China, and many millions of Chinese will be taken to the US to be exploited as wage slaves (ie so called 'cheap labor').

    The New Rome purports to be a future history of the world. It claims that a yet to be formed US/UK united front will move to take over the world by first conquering continental Europe's center of power, ie Germany, thereby unleashing a 'world's war' upon the Earth. Immediately afterwards this united front will move against Russia.

    Incredibly, bearing in mind it's mid 19th century publication date, the book claims it will be the US air force which will be instrumental in the future defeat of Russia.

    For it's remarkable prescience, The New Rome is well worth the time spent to read.

    The New Rome (1853) - pg 77, 119

    The expedition to Japan and China has already
    started on its mission of making a breach for the entrance of American enterprise into these walled-up magazines of wealth and civilization....The signs of the times are clear and unmistakable, and "The New Rome" awakens to her task, and is resolved upon its execution. Let her raise her banner of stars over land and sea, the token of perdition to the despots and redemption to the peoples, who may be convinced: In hoc signo vincent!

     

    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/do-you-want-a-war-between-russia-and-nato/#comment-5172335

    https://archive.org/details/newrome00poes/page/n15/mode/2up

    https://archive.org/details/newrome00poes/page/76/mode/2up

    Replies: @S

    In reference to my just previous post regarding a future US air force as foreseen in 1853, they had sophisticated lighter than air (dirigibles) and heavier than air aircraft designs by the mid 19th century. Below are some pics of a patented 1842 British monoplane called the ‘Aerial’ designed for both passenger and air mail service.

    The illustrations are from a mass UK advertising campaign circa 1843 to sell both the general public and investors on the Aerial project.

    Alas, the Aerial’s steam engine was too heavy to make the plane ultimately flyable. It would take the yet to be invented gasoline powered internal combustion engine to do that.

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @S

    Didn't go further into this whole "New Rome" 1853 theory book, but was there written something about nearing potential devastating implosion within USA which can divide the country into two warring states?

    If not, that's equal to somebody in 32 AD writing a book about spectacular new religion led by great Jesus which will conquer pagan Rome and all the world in the future, but failing to mention small detail about the existing real danger of him being tortured and murdered by Roman soldiers.

    Replies: @S

  138. A123 says: • Website
    @Barbarossa
    @Mikel

    Briefly, I would say that while mental illness has always been with us, the endemic depression and anxiety is very different. The shift is visible even within a couple generations in populations like college students who are now very anxious, depressed, and medicated for it, while when my parents were in college it would have been incomprehensible.


    It seems that there are definitely factors at work here above and beyond mere recognition of the problem, although that is a factor.

    Would you argue that there is no phenomenon really going on at all?

    Replies: @A123, @Mikel

    while mental illness has always been with us, the endemic depression and anxiety is very different. … It seems that there are definitely factors at work here above and beyond mere recognition of the problem, although that is a factor.

    Facing appropriate challenges as a child produces resilience. Competitive sports yield essential life lessons such as, “You cannot win all the time” and “There are rules you cannot change”.

    SJW upbringing ignores basic life facts and instead gives children:
        — Unreasonable expectations (e.g. participation trophies)
        — Overwhelming problems (e.g. CRT, LBGTQXYZ+)

    Raising children that are fragile, rather than resilient, generates adults that cannot cope with reality. This shows up as mental illness.

    PEACE 😇

    • Agree: Barbarossa
  139. @sudden death
    @Wokechoke

    It was you fantasying about super mariupol which will be achieved after dry spell, not the MilitaryLand which was just describing factual daily mundane movements in a local rural setting ;)

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    Is that so?

    The maps they are using indicate that Russia has developed a bridgehead over the Donets that’s preparation for a summer offensive. Izyum is approximately where Manstein and Popov fought Second Kharkov. It’s a very important crossing area of the Muravsky Trail and the Donets River.

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @Wokechoke


    that’s preparation for a summer offensive
     
    Should have specified at first that "dry spell" means month and a half at least ;)

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    , @Philip Owen
    @Wokechoke

    It looks as though the Russians in Izyum are getting trapped in cauldron judging by Ukraine's counterattacks south of Kharkiv today.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Dmitry

  140. @Mikel
    @AaronB


    if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.
     
    I see this quite differently. Everybody is aware of the calls to escape from the rat race. It's a very old thing actually in our western society. Just listen to Pete Seeger's songs from the 60s. If those calls and songs reached me in a small town of the Basque Country when Spain had barely recovered democracy, they must have reached everybody. The other day, following a link provided by Yayah that got me curious about the Persian Gulf natives, I discovered that even in Iran they have their own communities of "hippies". Apparently, the only place where alternative lifestyles still have little traction is Eastern Europe. I get the impression that people in that region are much more interested in first enjoying all the good things (real or imaginary) of a western-style materialistic society.

    But we must indeed be realistic about human nature and accept that a great majority are totally voluntary participants in the Machine, even though they know that alternatives exist. And they have every right to make that choice, just like you and me have the right to reject it for ourselves. My elder son knows very well what kind of lifestyle I like but the other day he surprised me when he said that he's actually looking forward to going back to the office. He doesn't like working from home (!) and prefers to have daily contact with his coworkers at what I imagine must be some obscure office somewhere in uninspiring central Warsaw. What can I say? Just do whatever makes you happy, son. Life is challenging enough without me trying to impose rules on how you choose to live it.

    As far as I'm concerned, the only part of society that exerts any pressure on how to lead my life is my immediate family. And rightly so. How could I ignore their wishes and preferences? In fact, I exert an even bigger pressure on them. We live in a semi-rural part of the US West only because I chose it thinking about myself much more than about them. Fortunately, my wife is very happy now and my younger son hasn't really known any other life so he's cool of course.

    The other day I listed several groups that escape the Machine in one way or another and have become pretty mainstream, if not outright promoted by MSM, such as those famous pioneers of the Alaskan Frontier. But what to make of the epidemic of homeless people that you see most everywhere in the US? Is that not, in its own way, similar to that Indian tradition of abandoning material comfort and going for a life of wandering about, begging and contemplating? These people usually have all their means at their disposal to return to a conventional life but they're not interested. When authorities manage to get them accommodated somewhere, it's not long before many of them go back to the street again. And whatever personal problems lead them to that lifestyle, can we be sure that they are essentially different from the Indian traditional mendicants'?

    BTW, I'm not entirely sure that we have a bigger incidence of neuroses today than in the past. It certainly looks that way but many mental ailments in the past were masked by alcoholism, religious retreat, possession and witchery superstitions and who knows what else. I am totally certain that some of our old saints and heroes were not OK in the head.


    Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.
     
    Even Feynman once admitted that he didn't really understand quantum mechanics so what chance do the rest of us have? But I would dispute that assertion of yours. My understanding of the probabilistic nature of the universe is that in the macro world nothing much changes. The probabilities of an object like a tennis ball or a planet not following Newton/Einstein mechanics are not exactly zero but for all practical purposes they approach zero and that is what we consistently observe. Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn't lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Barbarossa, @A123, @S

    Also for — , ,

    The reality of “liberal arts” education in today’s world is captured in cartoon form here:

    https://www.smbc-comics.com/comic/liberal-education

    The graphic is *far* too large to embed.

    PEACE 😇

  141. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @songbird

    Our grandparents were sure that Atlantis was a myth. Scythians people only of legend. CBS News told them the truth.

    Replies: @songbird

    IMO, one the perils of technology is that it presents you with too much choice, and also certain things tend to be promoted to you (like WW2 or cat videos), and so you’ve got to have the initiative to reach beyond what they want you to see, so your brain doesn’t turn to mush, with dross and repetition.

    I had to force myself to go to bed last night because I was drunk on history. First, listening to a podcast of a local historian talk about my grandfather’s village during the Irish War of Independence. Next because I was reading an old book on an e-reader and had reached a section discussing the opinions of country peasants about Travelers. Before that it was about changelings, and some of it was genuinely creepy.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @songbird


    Before that it was about changelings, and some of it was genuinely creepy.
     
    Have you seen the horror movie by that name, The Changeling (1980), with the great George C. Scott? I didn't think it was outright scary, but I enjoyed the building sense of creepiness.

    Replies: @songbird, @songbird

  142. @Wokechoke
    @sudden death

    Is that so?

    The maps they are using indicate that Russia has developed a bridgehead over the Donets that’s preparation for a summer offensive. Izyum is approximately where Manstein and Popov fought Second Kharkov. It’s a very important crossing area of the Muravsky Trail and the Donets River.

    Replies: @sudden death, @Philip Owen

    that’s preparation for a summer offensive

    Should have specified at first that “dry spell” means month and a half at least 😉

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @sudden death

    Driving tanks through mud isn’t ideal. On dry ground…dry spell. Summer Offensive. Late spring might do depending on the climate right there. The Russians are well positioned to envelope Kramatorsk. The line they’ve established between the Dneiper and Donetsk is going to be idea for a push north as the forces to the south and west of Kharkov push south.

    I understand the Ukies are busy flooding the areas with thaw, as much as possible to stymie the foldable areas around Izyum. This water will dry up and recede.

    Why are you such a Talmudo-Nudelist?

  143. @sudden death
    @Wokechoke


    that’s preparation for a summer offensive
     
    Should have specified at first that "dry spell" means month and a half at least ;)

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    Driving tanks through mud isn’t ideal. On dry ground…dry spell. Summer Offensive. Late spring might do depending on the climate right there. The Russians are well positioned to envelope Kramatorsk. The line they’ve established between the Dneiper and Donetsk is going to be idea for a push north as the forces to the south and west of Kharkov push south.

    I understand the Ukies are busy flooding the areas with thaw, as much as possible to stymie the foldable areas around Izyum. This water will dry up and recede.

    Why are you such a Talmudo-Nudelist?

  144. @S
    @S

    In reference to my just previous post regarding a future US air force as foreseen in 1853, they had sophisticated lighter than air (dirigibles) and heavier than air aircraft designs by the mid 19th century. Below are some pics of a patented 1842 British monoplane called the 'Aerial' designed for both passenger and air mail service.

    The illustrations are from a mass UK advertising campaign circa 1843 to sell both the general public and investors on the Aerial project.

    Alas, the Aerial's steam engine was too heavy to make the plane ultimately flyable. It would take the yet to be invented gasoline powered internal combustion engine to do that.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6b/Aerial_Steam_Carriage00.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/60/1843_engraving_of_the_Aerial_Steam_Carriage.jpg


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerial_steam_carriage

    Replies: @sudden death

    Didn’t go further into this whole “New Rome” 1853 theory book, but was there written something about nearing potential devastating implosion within USA which can divide the country into two warring states?

    If not, that’s equal to somebody in 32 AD writing a book about spectacular new religion led by great Jesus which will conquer pagan Rome and all the world in the future, but failing to mention small detail about the existing real danger of him being tortured and murdered by Roman soldiers.

    • Replies: @S
    @sudden death


    Didn’t go further into this whole “New Rome” 1853 theory book, but was there written something about nearing potential devastating implosion within USA which can divide the country into two warring states?
     
    No, it didn't. Though it does claim the 1776 American Revolution was a planned false split between the US/UK, and that someday America and Britain would reunite, and America would then take the lead.

    One of the New Rome's two authors, Theodore Poesche, spent a year in London in 1850 having fled the failed German 1848 Revolution. It so happens that 1850 was the same year that the powerful British Foreign Secretary (and future PM) Lord Palmerston would launch his 'New Rome' campaign from London as elaborated upon below by an author named Tarpley. [I don't agree with everything in regards to Tarpley, he can be a mixed bag, but I think his nuts and bolts of the history of the time are correct here.]

    I've linked below a recent Atlantic article about a circa 2006 book published in Russia called The Third Empire, Russia as it Ought to Be, which tells it's readers that Russia will someday defeat the US in a great war. The article calls this book a 'manual' for Putin, but says nothing about the US having it's own manual, the near completely memory holed The New Rome, which tells how it will be the US that is to defeat Russia in a future war.

    My concern is that these two respective books may represent what could be termed a 'suggestion' to the people of the United States and Russia to someday fight each other, but that someone (or something) is intending that rather one or the other prevail in creating a glorious future empire for themselves as the book's foretell, that the United States and Russia are instead intended to destroy each other, a bit like the plotline to an old 1961 Twilight Zone episode entitled 'Two'.

    People have their refusal.


    https://miro.medium.com/max/1400/0*KuG6i7NCpDeSqr35.jpg


    A NEW ROMAN EMPIRE

    'It is 1850. Lord Palmerston is engaged in a campaign to make London the undisputed center of a new, worldwide Roman Empire. He is attempting to conquer the world in the way that the British have already conquered India, reducing every other nation to the role of a puppet, client, and fall-guy for British imperial policy. Lord Palmerston’s campaign is not a secret. He has declared it here in the Houses of Parliament, saying that wherever in the world a British subject goes, he can flaunt the laws, secure that the British fleet will support him. “Civis Romanus sum, every Briton is a citizen of this new Rome,” thundered Lord Palmerston, and with that, the universal empire was proclaimed.'
     

    http://tarpley.net/online-books/against-oligarchy/lord-palmerstons-multicultural-human-zoo/

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/03/putin-kremlin-foreign-policy-strategy/629388/#:~:text=Mikhail Yuriev’s 2006 utopian novel%2C The Third Empire%3A,same year%2C and Russia’s current assault on Ukraine.

    https://medium.com/as-vast-as-space-and-as-timeless-as-infinity/twilight-zone-episode-review-3-1-two-4bd43f216be8

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  145. @Wokechoke
    @sudden death

    Is that so?

    The maps they are using indicate that Russia has developed a bridgehead over the Donets that’s preparation for a summer offensive. Izyum is approximately where Manstein and Popov fought Second Kharkov. It’s a very important crossing area of the Muravsky Trail and the Donets River.

    Replies: @sudden death, @Philip Owen

    It looks as though the Russians in Izyum are getting trapped in cauldron judging by Ukraine’s counterattacks south of Kharkiv today.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Philip Owen

    That was a feature of the Manstein v Popov and Kleist v Bagramyan battles.

    It is amazing how military geography tends to stay the same from era to era.


    The USSR had great trouble with Kharkov, which was originally built as a Russian fort to stop Crimea Tartars from raiding northwards into Moscow. The Germans and Russians fought several battles center
    Ed on Kharkov, Izyum and Barankove. The military geography abides.

    , @Dmitry
    @Philip Owen

    The use of language of cauldron in Russian, is based on Heinz Guderian (a famous German military general and strategist).

    This language would be maybe relevant if you are recreating "Blitzkrieg", but there was nothing like this in the war so far, with multiple echelon of advances, where rapid movement of first echelon of soldiers are trapping enemy forces behind themselves, allowing a second echelon to eliminate the trapped forces.

    As a result of the speed of the movements by the first echelon, the enemy group behind the first echelon of attack, would be still "hot" (fighting) the second echelon, therefore there is the use of the metaphor of Guderian of "cauldron" (it is an encircled area that contains very "hot" fighting inside it, as the forces are trapped by the "Blitzkrieg" advance).

    What we are talking about in this war so far, is some slow "encirclement", where forces would be surrounded by all sides and would slowly "freeze" without supplies.

    Especially in Donbass, the Ukrainian positions are defensive. Maybe it is more like you need to find a way to avoid the Germany "Gustav Line" in Italy in the Second World War, by moving around its sides. It wouldn't be "cauldron", but something like the surrounding of the German forces at the "Gustav line". (In "Operation Diadem" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Diadem )

  146. @AaronB
    @Mikel

    Thank you for your thoughtful reply.

    You make many valid points, although overall I do not think I can agree with you. But I do not think this is something that can be proved by arguments. Ultimately this is about "lived experience".

    While I utilize logical arguments in a variety of ways to support my position, none of my arguments are airtight, and there is certainly room to reasonably disagree.

    While I cannot "demolish" your counter-arguments against me, I would like to make a few - not very strong but perhaps interesting - points :)

    With regards to quantum mechanics - it's true that the "indeterminacy" exists on the subatomic level, while larger bodies seem to behave with a fair amount of predictability.

    However, this might support the view that matter, as a whole, is simply "choosing" to manifest fairly regular patterns - and it also leaves room for surprises on the margins.

    Logically, a deterministic universe rests on the idea that bodies at rest stay at rest, unless acted upon by an external force - but this is an unproven axiom, and the opposite may well be true.

    Feynman said he couldn't understand Quantum mechanics because it violated logic and common sense - a medieval mystic would have no trouble "understanding" it :)

    But clearly, insofar as understanding refers to grasping reality through reason, it is not understandable - yet true. And that should surely tell us something about reasons relationship to reality.

    With regards to mental illness - or spiritual sickness as I would call it - you are certainly correct that this isn't unique to our age.

    Nor is the Machine unique to our age. It can be seen already in ancient Egypt and Babylon, etc. All the worlds ancient spiritual traditions talk of mankind being "sick - 2,500 years ago the Buddha described man as fundamentally sick and needing to be cured.

    So certainly none of this is new, and many thinkers trace it to the move from hunter gathering and into agriculture - the first instance of the desire for power over nature in place of organic participation.

    Be that as it may, it clearly isn't new. My only contention is that this ancient sickness has reached an apogee in modern times, and I don't think I could definitively prove that.

    In the final analysis, all I can - and wish - to do is offer my "lived experience" as an alternative to modern life and my thoughtful commentary on the metaphysical significance of my experience. But the experience is primary.

    If someone does not find it attractive or compelling, then the last thing I would want to do is compel or coerce such a person!

    Everyone's spiritual needs are different - someone like your son may not be ready to consider alternatives and may be at a stage in his life where participating in modern life is exactly what he needs to support his growth. And he may never wish to consider alternatives - that choice must be respected too.

    I suppose, my writing is most suitable to people who are indeed unhappy with modern life but do not find enough social and spiritual support.

    Sure, we are all aware of alternatives in the ancient spiritual traditions and in recent movements like hippies - but it's incredibly supportive to find people now doing and talking about these things, and not just in some abstract past.

    One thing I absolutely do agree with you is that everyone has the right to make their own choice, even if that means staying in the Machine, and everyone should be treated with respect and dignity whatever their choice.


    Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn’t lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.
     
    That's actually not true.

    Iain Mcgilchrist in his Things book had an entire fairly large appendix showing the large number of eminent scientists who developed spiritual beliefs the deeper they got into science.

    Replies: @Mikel, @Philip Owen, @Colin Wright

    I do not think I can agree with you.

    That’s OK. It’s not very important for me to stop you from believing that we must change the world 🙂

    It’s much more important to see that we have similar views with regards to enjoying contact with nature and to discuss our different approaches as to how and why.

    How things change, by the way. It doesn’t feel like it was such a long time ago when my father struggled with all his might to prevent my pursuing an alternative way of life. Now I have the opposite problem with my two adult children: they want to lead a conventional life. But what I learned from the experience of the battle with my father is not that an alternative way of life is necessarily better. Rather, that I should let them choose by themselves and just try to lead by example.

    • Agree: AaronB
  147. Russian planes and helicopters such as the Mi and KA series use turbines manufactured by Sich in Ukraine. Maintenance is going to be tough. Any other Russian supply chains originate in Ukraine (tank gun barrels for one I saw in the Russian langauge business press last week).

  148. @RSDB
    @Barbarossa

    I can't recommend any books on Sikhs specifically (that looks like an interesting one) but John Keay's monumental India: A History is great, at least as an introductory work, and, as I recall, points the reader to a number of other historians also worth reading.

    I am getting many good pointers on books here lately.

    We really need an Unz Review book rec section. For instance: Foucault, like Nietzsche, is surprisingly worth reading. Don't let the fact that these philosophers seem to have been degenerate nutcases make you underestimate them, but don't forget it, either.

    Fiction: I just finished going through Wuthering Heights. I am surprised by how much AaronB would like it, as it can be interpreted among other things as an allegory of power-- its origin in pain, its development in acquisitiveness, and, in the renewal of the new year at the end of the book, its ultimate failure.

    I have also gotten a few good movie recommendations on here. My family and I are currently watching Vadachennai, which is a commercial Tamil film that is so far not half as bad as I expected, though it is not particularly deep. Sinhalese films are often very good: I was very affected by Oba Nathuwa Oba Ekka ("With You, Without You"). Slavs on here should like it as it is based on a Dostoevsky story.

    Χριστός ἀνέστη!

    Replies: @songbird

    Fiction: I just finished going through Wuthering Heights. I am surprised by how much AaronB would like it

    Wuthering Heights may have the best prose of any novel that I have ever read. To my mind, it is just dripping with genius, and especially quite a bit above any other female writer that I have ever read. (including the best-regarded) OTOH, it must also be the most horribly melodramatic book that I have ever read, and, on that basis, I think it would be torture to most readers, including, at least as I imagine, Aaron B. (though perhaps not? All depends on whether he changes his mind on Dickens)

    Years ago, I did read a religious tract by Sikhs, but it was poorly translated. Most of my knowledge of them actually comes from George MacDonald Fraser. His crassness can get tiresome, but he was very knowledgeable about history, and it can be a learning experience to read the explanatory notes at the end of his Flashman novels.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @songbird

    Mountain of Light was pretty good stuff.

    , @AaronB
    @songbird

    I've read Wuthering Heights and enjoyed it tremendously (thanks RSDB for bringing it up).

    Maybe it's due for another reading.

    I think it used to be standard practice to reread classics when one is older and has a more developed and mature take on the world.

    Maybe it's time for me to do that - haven't read the classics in ages.

    I don't necessarily dislike melodrama, and what I disliked in Dickens was the lack of what I'd call "masculine adventure", and what I thought was the sentimental attitude towards misfortune, poverty, etc.

    But these are the attitudes of youth, and was before I had any interest in spirituality. Reading Dickens through the eyes of spirituality I am sure will give me a completely different take.

    I'm also renewing my interest in DH Lawrence, who was a great critic of the Machine and modernity - he seems more topical now than ever!

    Replies: @Yevardian

  149. @AaronB
    @Mikel

    Thank you for your thoughtful reply.

    You make many valid points, although overall I do not think I can agree with you. But I do not think this is something that can be proved by arguments. Ultimately this is about "lived experience".

    While I utilize logical arguments in a variety of ways to support my position, none of my arguments are airtight, and there is certainly room to reasonably disagree.

    While I cannot "demolish" your counter-arguments against me, I would like to make a few - not very strong but perhaps interesting - points :)

    With regards to quantum mechanics - it's true that the "indeterminacy" exists on the subatomic level, while larger bodies seem to behave with a fair amount of predictability.

    However, this might support the view that matter, as a whole, is simply "choosing" to manifest fairly regular patterns - and it also leaves room for surprises on the margins.

    Logically, a deterministic universe rests on the idea that bodies at rest stay at rest, unless acted upon by an external force - but this is an unproven axiom, and the opposite may well be true.

    Feynman said he couldn't understand Quantum mechanics because it violated logic and common sense - a medieval mystic would have no trouble "understanding" it :)

    But clearly, insofar as understanding refers to grasping reality through reason, it is not understandable - yet true. And that should surely tell us something about reasons relationship to reality.

    With regards to mental illness - or spiritual sickness as I would call it - you are certainly correct that this isn't unique to our age.

    Nor is the Machine unique to our age. It can be seen already in ancient Egypt and Babylon, etc. All the worlds ancient spiritual traditions talk of mankind being "sick - 2,500 years ago the Buddha described man as fundamentally sick and needing to be cured.

    So certainly none of this is new, and many thinkers trace it to the move from hunter gathering and into agriculture - the first instance of the desire for power over nature in place of organic participation.

    Be that as it may, it clearly isn't new. My only contention is that this ancient sickness has reached an apogee in modern times, and I don't think I could definitively prove that.

    In the final analysis, all I can - and wish - to do is offer my "lived experience" as an alternative to modern life and my thoughtful commentary on the metaphysical significance of my experience. But the experience is primary.

    If someone does not find it attractive or compelling, then the last thing I would want to do is compel or coerce such a person!

    Everyone's spiritual needs are different - someone like your son may not be ready to consider alternatives and may be at a stage in his life where participating in modern life is exactly what he needs to support his growth. And he may never wish to consider alternatives - that choice must be respected too.

    I suppose, my writing is most suitable to people who are indeed unhappy with modern life but do not find enough social and spiritual support.

    Sure, we are all aware of alternatives in the ancient spiritual traditions and in recent movements like hippies - but it's incredibly supportive to find people now doing and talking about these things, and not just in some abstract past.

    One thing I absolutely do agree with you is that everyone has the right to make their own choice, even if that means staying in the Machine, and everyone should be treated with respect and dignity whatever their choice.


    Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn’t lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.
     
    That's actually not true.

    Iain Mcgilchrist in his Things book had an entire fairly large appendix showing the large number of eminent scientists who developed spiritual beliefs the deeper they got into science.

    Replies: @Mikel, @Philip Owen, @Colin Wright

    I’ve seen survey results that show that although overall numbers of believers are low among university research scientists, stereotypes hold. Physcists tend to be more believing in a God – more than the general public in the survey; Biologists tend more towards committed atheism.

    • Thanks: AaronB
    • Replies: @songbird
    @Philip Owen

    Biologists often seem to say "Things are only as good as they need to be." They tend not to see the perfection in things but rather the flaws. Perhaps, it is easier to see the perfection in physical laws than in our mortal coils.
    _________
    Elon could probably influence opinion more efficiently by investing $43 billion in building mass-drivers on the moon.

  150. @Philip Owen
    @Wokechoke

    It looks as though the Russians in Izyum are getting trapped in cauldron judging by Ukraine's counterattacks south of Kharkiv today.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Dmitry

    That was a feature of the Manstein v Popov and Kleist v Bagramyan battles.

    It is amazing how military geography tends to stay the same from era to era.

    The USSR had great trouble with Kharkov, which was originally built as a Russian fort to stop Crimea Tartars from raiding northwards into Moscow. The Germans and Russians fought several battles center
    Ed on Kharkov, Izyum and Barankove. The military geography abides.

  151. @Barbarossa
    @Mikel

    Briefly, I would say that while mental illness has always been with us, the endemic depression and anxiety is very different. The shift is visible even within a couple generations in populations like college students who are now very anxious, depressed, and medicated for it, while when my parents were in college it would have been incomprehensible.


    It seems that there are definitely factors at work here above and beyond mere recognition of the problem, although that is a factor.

    Would you argue that there is no phenomenon really going on at all?

    Replies: @A123, @Mikel

    Would you argue that there is no phenomenon really going on at all?

    No, I wouldn’t dare say that. There is something going on, certainly, but I wouldn’t rush to judge what the cause is. Mental suffering is arguably worse than the physical one. If there was an obvious remedy, researchers would have found it long ago.

    As you say, mental illnesses now are certainly more visible than in times past (all over the western world, as far as I can see) and we also feel a more urgent need to combat them, which perhaps leads to more people feeling that they are “sick”, whereas in the past the same conditions would not have led to medical treatment. People just had to find some adjustment to their problems by themselves.

    What medical science is certain about is that most mental illnesses have a genetic component, which means that in some form or another they have always been with us. I once read that panic disorder and agoraphobia had been found even among Eskimos. How people coped with these diseases across the ages is difficult to know. As AaronB said, we live in an age where we try to avoid suffering at all costs, while people in the past were more stoic. They didn’t have any other choice either.

    Another thing to consider before rushing to conclude that modern society is all crap is that in the past natural selection weeded out sickness in a brutal way. Someone suffering from certain mental illnesses in a hunter-gatherer environment was more unlikely to survive and thus pass on his genetic condition. But for several generations now, especially in the West, people survive and procreate almost regardless of their fitness so we should naturally expect to see more diseases of all kinds only on that account.

    • Replies: @utu
    @Mikel


    Someone suffering from certain mental illnesses in a hunter-gatherer environment was more unlikely to survive and thus pass on his genetic condition. But for several generations now, especially in the West, people survive and procreate almost regardless of their fitness so we should naturally expect to see more diseases of all kinds only on that account.
     
    I do not agree. While mental disease have a genetic component it's very polygenic and thus it is more resilient in the process of selection. Furthermore mental disease manifestation often occur in early adulthood meaning that when people procreated at much younger age than now genes associated with mental diseases were more likely to be passed to the next generation in hunter gatherer societies than now.

    " I once read that panic disorder and agoraphobia had been found even among Eskimos. " - If true, this is only because Eskimos now sit in their little houses drink alcohol and watch TV. A nomadic Eskimo had no occasion to realize that he felt anxiety as everybody felt anxiety when there was a polar bear nearby or there was scarcity of food which was 50% of time.

    Biological explanation are appealing because they are reductive and simple. This does not mean they are true. Environmental narratives are much more complex and require much more nuanced and subtle reasoning and thus they do not appeal to troglodytes who are enamored with genes.

    Then there is the most philosophical aspect of mental diseases which is related to our language and narratives that we now posses that were absent and not available in the past. We can describe our experiences in so many different colors and express minutiae of distinct differences creating micro slots of notions and classifications that did not exist in the past. And you can see it all on TV - and learn to mimic what you see.
    , @Barbarossa
    @Mikel

    I would make a separation when we talk about mental illness. There are mental illness like schizophrenia, which I have no reason to believe has increased or decreased. Perhaps they have moved one way or another, but they are not what I am talking about.

    I believe that anxiety and depression on the other hand, have increased dramatically. Partly I think it is because many people have the ability to indulge these destructive attitudes, which increases and deepens their hold. I think there is a benefit to having to being compelled by life's realities to "get over it" when it comes to our own existential insecurities. This is less and less expected by society, so inclined individuals are enabled to indulge their morbid fascination with themselves.

    We have also dismantled many of the structures which kept these feelings in check. Religion often provided a useful sense of perspective (It's not all about you!), and community and cultural identity gave the majority of individuals a comforting baseline to default to. As much as anything I think it's very difficult psychically to expect every person to be a self-defining self-actualizing individual. There are always some who break the mold in any age, but I think the majority of people need and want guidelines. The absence of these in society can lead to feelings of drift and anxiety.


    people survive and procreate almost regardless of their fitness
     
    This is true, and I think that it does lead to a greater incidence of negative traits being passed on. I'm not sure that this is a net kindness since it seems to entail a downward spiral as society is increasingly structured around the unwell. It seems to me that one could make a compelling "anti-vax" argument on these grounds. I'm not sure I would agree with it ethically, but I think it would be a compelling argument.

    If we ever have a large scale collapse resulting from over-extended modern resource management I wouldn't be surprised if all the avoided premature deaths and resulting population explosion will be just an act of kicking the can down the road.

    Replies: @AaronB, @silviosilver, @Mikel

  152. @songbird
    @RSDB


    Fiction: I just finished going through Wuthering Heights. I am surprised by how much AaronB would like it
     
    Wuthering Heights may have the best prose of any novel that I have ever read. To my mind, it is just dripping with genius, and especially quite a bit above any other female writer that I have ever read. (including the best-regarded) OTOH, it must also be the most horribly melodramatic book that I have ever read, and, on that basis, I think it would be torture to most readers, including, at least as I imagine, Aaron B. (though perhaps not? All depends on whether he changes his mind on Dickens)

    Years ago, I did read a religious tract by Sikhs, but it was poorly translated. Most of my knowledge of them actually comes from George MacDonald Fraser. His crassness can get tiresome, but he was very knowledgeable about history, and it can be a learning experience to read the explanatory notes at the end of his Flashman novels.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @AaronB

    Mountain of Light was pretty good stuff.

    • Agree: songbird
  153. @Philip Owen
    @AaronB

    I've seen survey results that show that although overall numbers of believers are low among university research scientists, stereotypes hold. Physcists tend to be more believing in a God - more than the general public in the survey; Biologists tend more towards committed atheism.

    Replies: @songbird

    Biologists often seem to say “Things are only as good as they need to be.” They tend not to see the perfection in things but rather the flaws. Perhaps, it is easier to see the perfection in physical laws than in our mortal coils.
    _________
    Elon could probably influence opinion more efficiently by investing \$43 billion in building mass-drivers on the moon.

  154. @Mikel
    @Barbarossa


    Would you argue that there is no phenomenon really going on at all?
     
    No, I wouldn't dare say that. There is something going on, certainly, but I wouldn't rush to judge what the cause is. Mental suffering is arguably worse than the physical one. If there was an obvious remedy, researchers would have found it long ago.

    As you say, mental illnesses now are certainly more visible than in times past (all over the western world, as far as I can see) and we also feel a more urgent need to combat them, which perhaps leads to more people feeling that they are "sick", whereas in the past the same conditions would not have led to medical treatment. People just had to find some adjustment to their problems by themselves.

    What medical science is certain about is that most mental illnesses have a genetic component, which means that in some form or another they have always been with us. I once read that panic disorder and agoraphobia had been found even among Eskimos. How people coped with these diseases across the ages is difficult to know. As AaronB said, we live in an age where we try to avoid suffering at all costs, while people in the past were more stoic. They didn't have any other choice either.

    Another thing to consider before rushing to conclude that modern society is all crap is that in the past natural selection weeded out sickness in a brutal way. Someone suffering from certain mental illnesses in a hunter-gatherer environment was more unlikely to survive and thus pass on his genetic condition. But for several generations now, especially in the West, people survive and procreate almost regardless of their fitness so we should naturally expect to see more diseases of all kinds only on that account.

    Replies: @utu, @Barbarossa

    Someone suffering from certain mental illnesses in a hunter-gatherer environment was more unlikely to survive and thus pass on his genetic condition. But for several generations now, especially in the West, people survive and procreate almost regardless of their fitness so we should naturally expect to see more diseases of all kinds only on that account.

    I do not agree. While mental disease have a genetic component it’s very polygenic and thus it is more resilient in the process of selection. Furthermore mental disease manifestation often occur in early adulthood meaning that when people procreated at much younger age than now genes associated with mental diseases were more likely to be passed to the next generation in hunter gatherer societies than now.

    ” I once read that panic disorder and agoraphobia had been found even among Eskimos. ” – If true, this is only because Eskimos now sit in their little houses drink alcohol and watch TV. A nomadic Eskimo had no occasion to realize that he felt anxiety as everybody felt anxiety when there was a polar bear nearby or there was scarcity of food which was 50% of time.

    Biological explanation are appealing because they are reductive and simple. This does not mean they are true. Environmental narratives are much more complex and require much more nuanced and subtle reasoning and thus they do not appeal to troglodytes who are enamored with genes.

    Then there is the most philosophical aspect of mental diseases which is related to our language and narratives that we now posses that were absent and not available in the past. We can describe our experiences in so many different colors and express minutiae of distinct differences creating micro slots of notions and classifications that did not exist in the past. And you can see it all on TV – and learn to mimic what you see.

  155. @siberiancat
    @Dmitry

    The use of iron bombs goes with the relatively new bombing sight called СВП-24

    It takes into account Glonass positioning, wind, humidity, etc, guides the weapons platform to the point of release, and releases the bomb load automatically.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    This use of unguided weapons, even if there is a new bombing sight for Su-25, Tu-22 and Tu-95, requires planes to be close to their target.

    This means they are vulnerable to being shot from the ground.

    As the planes do not have modern electronics for jamming or stealth. It’s just not possible to fly them in a more dangerous area, like Western Ukraine.

    So they are limited to using expensive stand-off missiles (Kh-555 and Kh-101) from Tu-22, from airspace of Belarus. They can destroy fixed targets where they already have the geolocation, but the quantity of the conventional bombing available is very limited and expensive in areas where there is still air defense and the radar operating.

  156. @Philip Owen
    @Wokechoke

    It looks as though the Russians in Izyum are getting trapped in cauldron judging by Ukraine's counterattacks south of Kharkiv today.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Dmitry

    The use of language of cauldron in Russian, is based on Heinz Guderian (a famous German military general and strategist).

    This language would be maybe relevant if you are recreating “Blitzkrieg”, but there was nothing like this in the war so far, with multiple echelon of advances, where rapid movement of first echelon of soldiers are trapping enemy forces behind themselves, allowing a second echelon to eliminate the trapped forces.

    As a result of the speed of the movements by the first echelon, the enemy group behind the first echelon of attack, would be still “hot” (fighting) the second echelon, therefore there is the use of the metaphor of Guderian of “cauldron” (it is an encircled area that contains very “hot” fighting inside it, as the forces are trapped by the “Blitzkrieg” advance).

    What we are talking about in this war so far, is some slow “encirclement”, where forces would be surrounded by all sides and would slowly “freeze” without supplies.

    Especially in Donbass, the Ukrainian positions are defensive. Maybe it is more like you need to find a way to avoid the Germany “Gustav Line” in Italy in the Second World War, by moving around its sides. It wouldn’t be “cauldron”, but something like the surrounding of the German forces at the “Gustav line”. (In “Operation Diadem” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Diadem )

  157. They have a sense of humor:

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    Victoria Nuland is the nominal top American dog such as it is. Her office is the brainquarters.

    Victoria's Secret is a retail underwear store owned by zion oligarch Leslie Wexner mentor of sex traffic (defunct) Jeffrey Epstein.

    Supposedly some of the pictures in the Victoria's Secret catalog are whores that are out of your and mine and damn near everybody else's price range. There are unpublicized court documents that Prince Andrew picked Virginia Roberts' picture out of a clandestine (barely legal) prostitute or rape-victim catalog promoted by the Victoria's Secret owner's agent.

    Hard to believe I know but for some reason the authorities are secretive regarding the facts needed for us little guys in the public to evaluate. Who knows. For sure there aren't any tank crews in combat that know. Maybe their commanding officer's commanding officer's commanding officer's commanding officer's commanding officer's commanding officer knows and he passed down an order to graffiti up that tank in such manner?

  158. @Mikel
    @sudden death


    it’s first direct confession of it being blown by enemy fire, instead of just some unfortunate accident
     
    OK, but don't forget the rough seas...

    I remember the days when Martyanov and Saker explained here to us all how the Black Sea was a Russian lake, NATO ships were just sitting ducks, Russia could easily put an end to the Ukrainian regime by arresting its leaders in a special operation,... they were so serious and self-confident in their assessments, using arcane technical terms and equations even.

    There is a reason why AK stopped repeating the "shock and disbelief" mantra a long time ago. Instead, he's now talking on Twitter about the "white pill" of the Moskva "big L" being that if a Neptune can do that, imagine what the much better Russian missiles can do. While regularly musing about what severe pains Russia would deserve if it failed to defeat Ukraine.

    I have actually started to think that there may not be an oncoming second phase of this war. The second phase perhaps is what we're already seeing: a slow and painful gain of territory in Donbass while Ukraine keeps receiving billions in sophisticated weapons without Russia apparently being able to do much about it.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @sudden death, @sudden death

    OK, but don’t forget the rough seas…

    Looks of those rough seas have surfaced rather quickly 😉

    • Replies: @A123
    @sudden death

    If the damage was caused by an external high explosive, there should be a "punched in" area. The USS Cole bomb damage looked like this:

     
    https://www.patriotspoint.org/news-and-events/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/cole_attack2.gif
     

    There is no comparable impact damage to the Moskva in your picture. It could be on the other side, but why would the source not share the better image?

    Also, the damage vastly exceeds what a Neptune (150kg warhead) could deliver.

    Something does not add up. Was there sabotage and/or crew negligence on the Moskva?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @songbird, @sudden death, @james wilson

  159. @Peripatetic Commenter
    They have a sense of humor:

    https://twitter.com/RWApodcast/status/1515783365663735809

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    Victoria Nuland is the nominal top American dog such as it is. Her office is the brainquarters.

    Victoria’s Secret is a retail underwear store owned by zion oligarch Leslie Wexner mentor of sex traffic (defunct) Jeffrey Epstein.

    Supposedly some of the pictures in the Victoria’s Secret catalog are whores that are out of your and mine and damn near everybody else’s price range. There are unpublicized court documents that Prince Andrew picked Virginia Roberts’ picture out of a clandestine (barely legal) prostitute or rape-victim catalog promoted by the Victoria’s Secret owner’s agent.

    Hard to believe I know but for some reason the authorities are secretive regarding the facts needed for us little guys in the public to evaluate. Who knows. For sure there aren’t any tank crews in combat that know. Maybe their commanding officer’s commanding officer’s commanding officer’s commanding officer’s commanding officer’s commanding officer knows and he passed down an order to graffiti up that tank in such manner?

  160. A123 says: • Website
    @sudden death
    @Mikel


    OK, but don’t forget the rough seas…
     
    Looks of those rough seas have surfaced rather quickly ;)

    https://twitter.com/oryxspioenkop/status/1515818747398955009

    Replies: @A123

    If the damage was caused by an external high explosive, there should be a “punched in” area. The USS Cole bomb damage looked like this:

     

     

    There is no comparable impact damage to the Moskva in your picture. It could be on the other side, but why would the source not share the better image?

    Also, the damage vastly exceeds what a Neptune (150kg warhead) could deliver.

    Something does not add up. Was there sabotage and/or crew negligence on the Moskva?

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @songbird
    @A123

    I'd suppose that a missile was targeted to hit one of the P-500 Bazalts.

    IMO, crazy design, having those things lined up, out on deck, on such a big hull. I believe it is a relic of Cold War thinking, where a lot of the fighting was pretend, or through disposable proxies. It has MAD written all over it. The design implicitly says to me that nobody thought it would ever be fired upon.

    Replies: @A123

    , @sudden death
    @A123

    The seawater level in this pic seems to be way above the waterline, whole ship is leaning on its side, so the impact hole (if it was on this side near/at the waterline) may be hidden under the water?

    , @james wilson
    @A123

    Remember the Maine

  161. @A123
    @sudden death

    If the damage was caused by an external high explosive, there should be a "punched in" area. The USS Cole bomb damage looked like this:

     
    https://www.patriotspoint.org/news-and-events/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/cole_attack2.gif
     

    There is no comparable impact damage to the Moskva in your picture. It could be on the other side, but why would the source not share the better image?

    Also, the damage vastly exceeds what a Neptune (150kg warhead) could deliver.

    Something does not add up. Was there sabotage and/or crew negligence on the Moskva?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @songbird, @sudden death, @james wilson

    I’d suppose that a missile was targeted to hit one of the P-500 Bazalts.

    IMO, crazy design, having those things lined up, out on deck, on such a big hull. I believe it is a relic of Cold War thinking, where a lot of the fighting was pretend, or through disposable proxies. It has MAD written all over it. The design implicitly says to me that nobody thought it would ever be fired upon.

    • Replies: @A123
    @songbird


    I’d suppose that a missile was targeted to hit one of the P-500 Bazalts.

    IMO, crazy design, having those things lined up, out on deck, on such a big hull. I believe it is a relic of Cold War thinking
     
    The USSR had periodic issues with bad rocket fuel. My understanding is that if a "weapon ignites but fails to leave the tube" the heat causes the launcher to detach itself from the ship. Everything on fire gets dumped into the sea.

    Alas, I do not have any mechanical details.
    ______________________

    @Sudden Death

    The seawater level in this pic seems to be way above the waterline, whole ship is leaning on its side, so the impact hole (if it was on this side near/at the waterline) may be hidden under the water?
     
    Trying to move while a hole is beneath the waterline? That sounds like a very risky option.

    Perhaps they were trying to lift a hole on the far side above the waterline?
    ______________________

    There are questions that need answers.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @sudden death, @songbird

  162. S says:
    @sudden death
    @S

    Didn't go further into this whole "New Rome" 1853 theory book, but was there written something about nearing potential devastating implosion within USA which can divide the country into two warring states?

    If not, that's equal to somebody in 32 AD writing a book about spectacular new religion led by great Jesus which will conquer pagan Rome and all the world in the future, but failing to mention small detail about the existing real danger of him being tortured and murdered by Roman soldiers.

    Replies: @S

    Didn’t go further into this whole “New Rome” 1853 theory book, but was there written something about nearing potential devastating implosion within USA which can divide the country into two warring states?

    No, it didn’t. Though it does claim the 1776 American Revolution was a planned false split between the US/UK, and that someday America and Britain would reunite, and America would then take the lead.

    One of the New Rome’s two authors, Theodore Poesche, spent a year in London in 1850 having fled the failed German 1848 Revolution. It so happens that 1850 was the same year that the powerful British Foreign Secretary (and future PM) Lord Palmerston would launch his ‘New Rome’ campaign from London as elaborated upon below by an author named Tarpley. [I don’t agree with everything in regards to Tarpley, he can be a mixed bag, but I think his nuts and bolts of the history of the time are correct here.]

    I’ve linked below a recent Atlantic article about a circa 2006 book published in Russia called The Third Empire, Russia as it Ought to Be, which tells it’s readers that Russia will someday defeat the US in a great war. The article calls this book a ‘manual’ for Putin, but says nothing about the US having it’s own manual, the near completely memory holed The New Rome, which tells how it will be the US that is to defeat Russia in a future war.

    My concern is that these two respective books may represent what could be termed a ‘suggestion’ to the people of the United States and Russia to someday fight each other, but that someone (or something) is intending that rather one or the other prevail in creating a glorious future empire for themselves as the book’s foretell, that the United States and Russia are instead intended to destroy each other, a bit like the plotline to an old 1961 Twilight Zone episode entitled ‘Two’.

    People have their refusal.

    A NEW ROMAN EMPIRE

    ‘It is 1850. Lord Palmerston is engaged in a campaign to make London the undisputed center of a new, worldwide Roman Empire. He is attempting to conquer the world in the way that the British have already conquered India, reducing every other nation to the role of a puppet, client, and fall-guy for British imperial policy. Lord Palmerston’s campaign is not a secret. He has declared it here in the Houses of Parliament, saying that wherever in the world a British subject goes, he can flaunt the laws, secure that the British fleet will support him. “Civis Romanus sum, every Briton is a citizen of this new Rome,” thundered Lord Palmerston, and with that, the universal empire was proclaimed.’

    http://tarpley.net/online-books/against-oligarchy/lord-palmerstons-multicultural-human-zoo/

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/03/putin-kremlin-foreign-policy-strategy/629388/#:~:text=Mikhail Yuriev’s 2006 utopian novel%2C The Third Empire%3A,same year%2C and Russia’s current assault on Ukraine.

    https://medium.com/as-vast-as-space-and-as-timeless-as-infinity/twilight-zone-episode-review-3-1-two-4bd43f216be8

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @S

    Pretty impressive foresight, but a lot of those made in Germany haven't come to pass (precisely because they are cast into the role of losers with Kaiser Wilhelm/Hitler). Very little have been written for China or India and this is what scares me.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @S

  163. @AaronB
    One of the "merely modern" ideas that have had disastrous consequences on the mental health of society is the notion of "trauma" (psychological).

    The idea is that suffering and adversity have no legitimate and useful place in the "larger economy of life" - they are mere aberrations, without meaning, and entirely negative.

    People are encouraged to view deep suffering as a meaningless tragedy that they are passive "victims" of, with the appropriate response being mere "recovery" (return to pre-suffering status quo) - not as part of a personal story of growth and redemption, and if properly integrated an essential part of the move towards greater health.

    We thus deprive people of the very psychological infrastructure needed to integrate suffering into a higher vision that transforms it into a vital ingredient for the building of greater health and vitality.

    The old spiritual idea that suffering and adversity are providential, specific challenges meant to stimulate spiritual growth - surely this was so much more health promoting!

    It's well known that rates of PTSD among combat veterans plummet when you simply don't believe in PTSD (that you are a passive victim of meaningless suffering, and your goal should be limited to recovering the pre-suffering status quo).

    We humans have an absolute need to integrate our experiences into a higher vision which makes sense of it all - to create a "narrative" that gives meaning and purpose to all aspects of our experience. This allows us to "digest" our experiences so to speak.

    The modern breakdown of the ability to "redeem" suffering in a larger whole has led to unprecedented fragility and suffering - in one of the paradoxes we now know the modern world abounds in, the "war" on suffering achieved exactly the opposite, and greatly increased suffering.

    "Self-defeating" measures are the hallmark of modernity.

    And yet if you ask the average person, I am sure they would say the solution is to try and eliminate suffering even more :)

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @silviosilver

    ‘…And yet if you ask the average person, I am sure they would say the solution is to try and eliminate suffering even more.’

    Tell us about the suffering you’ve experienced, Aaron.

    I’m curious as to from whence you speak.

  164. @AaronB
    One of the "merely modern" ideas that have had disastrous consequences on the mental health of society is the notion of "trauma" (psychological).

    The idea is that suffering and adversity have no legitimate and useful place in the "larger economy of life" - they are mere aberrations, without meaning, and entirely negative.

    People are encouraged to view deep suffering as a meaningless tragedy that they are passive "victims" of, with the appropriate response being mere "recovery" (return to pre-suffering status quo) - not as part of a personal story of growth and redemption, and if properly integrated an essential part of the move towards greater health.

    We thus deprive people of the very psychological infrastructure needed to integrate suffering into a higher vision that transforms it into a vital ingredient for the building of greater health and vitality.

    The old spiritual idea that suffering and adversity are providential, specific challenges meant to stimulate spiritual growth - surely this was so much more health promoting!

    It's well known that rates of PTSD among combat veterans plummet when you simply don't believe in PTSD (that you are a passive victim of meaningless suffering, and your goal should be limited to recovering the pre-suffering status quo).

    We humans have an absolute need to integrate our experiences into a higher vision which makes sense of it all - to create a "narrative" that gives meaning and purpose to all aspects of our experience. This allows us to "digest" our experiences so to speak.

    The modern breakdown of the ability to "redeem" suffering in a larger whole has led to unprecedented fragility and suffering - in one of the paradoxes we now know the modern world abounds in, the "war" on suffering achieved exactly the opposite, and greatly increased suffering.

    "Self-defeating" measures are the hallmark of modernity.

    And yet if you ask the average person, I am sure they would say the solution is to try and eliminate suffering even more :)

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @silviosilver

    And yet if you ask the average person, I am sure they would say the solution is to try and eliminate suffering even more

    Well, if the ‘modern’ methods of alleviating psychological suffering have, as you claim, only succeeded in prolonging or ingraining it, then a return to the older methods – which I approve of, let me be clear – would result in this suffering being alleviated. So unless you want to say “bad luck, you tried the modern methods, now you’re stuck suffering forever,” you too are arguing for renewed efforts to eliminate suffering – albeit via methods at odds with the prevailing paradigm.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @silviosilver

    Excellent point - you have a good eye for the paradoxes that govern reality :)

    But what I am advocating for is not the elimination of suffering, as the modern world wants, but merely it's amelioration.

    Aiming for zero suffering creates more suffering, while accepting suffering paradoxically lessens it.

    However, even more than just the amelioration of suffering, I want to preserve suffering as an indispensable element in growth and life.

    Instead of simply rejecting suffering, we need to integrate it and understand the role it plays in our development, both physical and spiritual.

    In a sense, the entire "project" of modernity is about creating a world without suffering, discomfort, and inconvenience - problem is, we wilt and die under such conditions :) We don't thrive in such a "utopia".

    I think it's extremely important to introduce "stresses" into ones life and not become too comfortable.

  165. @AaronB
    @Mikel

    Thank you for your thoughtful reply.

    You make many valid points, although overall I do not think I can agree with you. But I do not think this is something that can be proved by arguments. Ultimately this is about "lived experience".

    While I utilize logical arguments in a variety of ways to support my position, none of my arguments are airtight, and there is certainly room to reasonably disagree.

    While I cannot "demolish" your counter-arguments against me, I would like to make a few - not very strong but perhaps interesting - points :)

    With regards to quantum mechanics - it's true that the "indeterminacy" exists on the subatomic level, while larger bodies seem to behave with a fair amount of predictability.

    However, this might support the view that matter, as a whole, is simply "choosing" to manifest fairly regular patterns - and it also leaves room for surprises on the margins.

    Logically, a deterministic universe rests on the idea that bodies at rest stay at rest, unless acted upon by an external force - but this is an unproven axiom, and the opposite may well be true.

    Feynman said he couldn't understand Quantum mechanics because it violated logic and common sense - a medieval mystic would have no trouble "understanding" it :)

    But clearly, insofar as understanding refers to grasping reality through reason, it is not understandable - yet true. And that should surely tell us something about reasons relationship to reality.

    With regards to mental illness - or spiritual sickness as I would call it - you are certainly correct that this isn't unique to our age.

    Nor is the Machine unique to our age. It can be seen already in ancient Egypt and Babylon, etc. All the worlds ancient spiritual traditions talk of mankind being "sick - 2,500 years ago the Buddha described man as fundamentally sick and needing to be cured.

    So certainly none of this is new, and many thinkers trace it to the move from hunter gathering and into agriculture - the first instance of the desire for power over nature in place of organic participation.

    Be that as it may, it clearly isn't new. My only contention is that this ancient sickness has reached an apogee in modern times, and I don't think I could definitively prove that.

    In the final analysis, all I can - and wish - to do is offer my "lived experience" as an alternative to modern life and my thoughtful commentary on the metaphysical significance of my experience. But the experience is primary.

    If someone does not find it attractive or compelling, then the last thing I would want to do is compel or coerce such a person!

    Everyone's spiritual needs are different - someone like your son may not be ready to consider alternatives and may be at a stage in his life where participating in modern life is exactly what he needs to support his growth. And he may never wish to consider alternatives - that choice must be respected too.

    I suppose, my writing is most suitable to people who are indeed unhappy with modern life but do not find enough social and spiritual support.

    Sure, we are all aware of alternatives in the ancient spiritual traditions and in recent movements like hippies - but it's incredibly supportive to find people now doing and talking about these things, and not just in some abstract past.

    One thing I absolutely do agree with you is that everyone has the right to make their own choice, even if that means staying in the Machine, and everyone should be treated with respect and dignity whatever their choice.


    Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn’t lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.
     
    That's actually not true.

    Iain Mcgilchrist in his Things book had an entire fairly large appendix showing the large number of eminent scientists who developed spiritual beliefs the deeper they got into science.

    Replies: @Mikel, @Philip Owen, @Colin Wright

    ‘…In the final analysis, all I can – and wish – to do is offer my “lived experience” as an alternative to modern life and my thoughtful commentary on the metaphysical significance of my experience. But the experience is primary…’

    You’re a hoot, Aaron, you really are.

    You think we could get Ron to post all your comments in a thread? It would be convenient.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Colin Wright


    You think we could get Ron to post all your comments in a thread? It would be convenient.
     
    AaronB All Comments All Years = 8,010

    Coling Wright All Comments All Years = 16,604
  166. @songbird
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    IMO, one the perils of technology is that it presents you with too much choice, and also certain things tend to be promoted to you (like WW2 or cat videos), and so you've got to have the initiative to reach beyond what they want you to see, so your brain doesn't turn to mush, with dross and repetition.

    I had to force myself to go to bed last night because I was drunk on history. First, listening to a podcast of a local historian talk about my grandfather's village during the Irish War of Independence. Next because I was reading an old book on an e-reader and had reached a section discussing the opinions of country peasants about Travelers. Before that it was about changelings, and some of it was genuinely creepy.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    Before that it was about changelings, and some of it was genuinely creepy.

    Have you seen the horror movie by that name, The Changeling (1980), with the great George C. Scott? I didn’t think it was outright scary, but I enjoyed the building sense of creepiness.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @silviosilver


    Have you seen the horror movie by that name, The Changeling (1980), with the great George C. Scott?
     
    Haven't seen it, but sounds interesting even just based on the fact that George C. Scott is in it.
    , @songbird
    @silviosilver

    Just watched it. IMO, definitely worth a watch.

    Atmospheric. Good performances, and locations. I was expecting it to be a regular haunted house story, but I appreciated (spoilers)how it tied to things outside the house. If I had to nitpick a little:
    1.) two baptism medals: it didn't made sense to me, when I was watching it, as the murder was probably premeditated, so he should have grabbed it. But I guess I can forgive it, as it could be explained away - if he forgot to remove it in the heat of the moment, before dumping the body.

    My second point I make more because it amuses me:

    2.) I felt like someone was cucked, but I can't figure out who. Maybe, the ghost, as he did not get his revenge on the guy that killed him, or his natural progeny, who carried his evil genes, but rather on an adoptee, who did not take part in the killing. Or, maybe, the murderer because he had no natural progeny to which to funnel the inheritance.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  167. @A123
    @sudden death

    If the damage was caused by an external high explosive, there should be a "punched in" area. The USS Cole bomb damage looked like this:

     
    https://www.patriotspoint.org/news-and-events/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/cole_attack2.gif
     

    There is no comparable impact damage to the Moskva in your picture. It could be on the other side, but why would the source not share the better image?

    Also, the damage vastly exceeds what a Neptune (150kg warhead) could deliver.

    Something does not add up. Was there sabotage and/or crew negligence on the Moskva?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @songbird, @sudden death, @james wilson

    The seawater level in this pic seems to be way above the waterline, whole ship is leaning on its side, so the impact hole (if it was on this side near/at the waterline) may be hidden under the water?

  168. @Colin Wright
    @AaronB

    '...In the final analysis, all I can – and wish – to do is offer my “lived experience” as an alternative to modern life and my thoughtful commentary on the metaphysical significance of my experience. But the experience is primary...'

    You're a hoot, Aaron, you really are.

    You think we could get Ron to post all your comments in a thread? It would be convenient.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    You think we could get Ron to post all your comments in a thread? It would be convenient.

    AaronB All Comments All Years = 8,010

    Coling Wright All Comments All Years = 16,604

  169. @songbird
    Currently, I think travelogues on Youtube must be the most mainstream place, where you can find the narrative challenged.
    _____
    Sweden is surprisingly undemocratic for all its talk of egalitarianism (no ballot on NATO)
    _____
    I think technology can be used to return to tradition. I've read several old books about the Old Country, using technology, that it would be nearly impossible to have read otherwise.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @Barbarossa

    I think technology can be used to return to tradition. I’ve read several old books about the Old Country, using technology, that it would be nearly impossible to have read otherwise.

    It is possible, but on balance I think it will swing overwhelmingly in the other direction, for the reason that you mention in a subsequent comment; too much choice.

    Also my point would be that tradition must necessarily be an action performed and sustained by a group, so the reading may preserve the memory but it doesn’t continue the tradition as a living entity.

    Tangentially, are you familiar with the Carmina Gadelica by Alexander Carmichael? The prayers and incantations, together with his notes provide an invaluable window into the lost world of Gaelic thought and practice.

    You should check them out too. I think you would greatly appreciate the spiritual perspective.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Barbarossa


    are you familiar with the Carmina Gadelica by Alexander Carmichael?
     
    Actually, never heard of it, but thanks for mentioning it. Seems popular, which is unexpected to me, as I feel like the Celtic Revival is a period we are long past, for a variety of reasons, including dysgenics and a move away from reading. Most of the more interesting books that I have read about Ireland seem like forgotten tomes.

    Some weeks ago, I was reading about poets and I came across one story that still sticks in my imagination: there was a poet walking along a lonely road, that took shelter under a bush, while it was raining. When the rain was not getting through, he praised the bush so that it grew thick and luxurious. When a single drop got through, he started cursing the bush, so that it wilted, and the downpour soaked him.

    Also my point would be that tradition must necessarily be an action performed and sustained by a group, so the reading may preserve the memory but it doesn’t continue the tradition as a living entity.
     
    We may be past the time that books can be an organizing force for culture. At least, in a systematic and group-orientated way, not considering the effect on the individual.

    What seems to be a more potent organizing force is film. The bad thing about film is that it takes resources to make an engaging film, and these can be beyond the reach of small countries, and, moreover, film seems to be more of a commercial endeavor, geared towards maximizing profit. Without a nationalist strategic framework, it is probably inherently globalist as well as morally degenerate.
  170. S says:
    @Mikel
    @AaronB


    if we are being realistic about human nature as it is I think we have to admit that the social environment plays a huge role in circumscribing our choices.
     
    I see this quite differently. Everybody is aware of the calls to escape from the rat race. It's a very old thing actually in our western society. Just listen to Pete Seeger's songs from the 60s. If those calls and songs reached me in a small town of the Basque Country when Spain had barely recovered democracy, they must have reached everybody. The other day, following a link provided by Yayah that got me curious about the Persian Gulf natives, I discovered that even in Iran they have their own communities of "hippies". Apparently, the only place where alternative lifestyles still have little traction is Eastern Europe. I get the impression that people in that region are much more interested in first enjoying all the good things (real or imaginary) of a western-style materialistic society.

    But we must indeed be realistic about human nature and accept that a great majority are totally voluntary participants in the Machine, even though they know that alternatives exist. And they have every right to make that choice, just like you and me have the right to reject it for ourselves. My elder son knows very well what kind of lifestyle I like but the other day he surprised me when he said that he's actually looking forward to going back to the office. He doesn't like working from home (!) and prefers to have daily contact with his coworkers at what I imagine must be some obscure office somewhere in uninspiring central Warsaw. What can I say? Just do whatever makes you happy, son. Life is challenging enough without me trying to impose rules on how you choose to live it.

    As far as I'm concerned, the only part of society that exerts any pressure on how to lead my life is my immediate family. And rightly so. How could I ignore their wishes and preferences? In fact, I exert an even bigger pressure on them. We live in a semi-rural part of the US West only because I chose it thinking about myself much more than about them. Fortunately, my wife is very happy now and my younger son hasn't really known any other life so he's cool of course.

    The other day I listed several groups that escape the Machine in one way or another and have become pretty mainstream, if not outright promoted by MSM, such as those famous pioneers of the Alaskan Frontier. But what to make of the epidemic of homeless people that you see most everywhere in the US? Is that not, in its own way, similar to that Indian tradition of abandoning material comfort and going for a life of wandering about, begging and contemplating? These people usually have all their means at their disposal to return to a conventional life but they're not interested. When authorities manage to get them accommodated somewhere, it's not long before many of them go back to the street again. And whatever personal problems lead them to that lifestyle, can we be sure that they are essentially different from the Indian traditional mendicants'?

    BTW, I'm not entirely sure that we have a bigger incidence of neuroses today than in the past. It certainly looks that way but many mental ailments in the past were masked by alcoholism, religious retreat, possession and witchery superstitions and who knows what else. I am totally certain that some of our old saints and heroes were not OK in the head.


    Today’s quantum science suggests a very non deterministic universe indeed.
     
    Even Feynman once admitted that he didn't really understand quantum mechanics so what chance do the rest of us have? But I would dispute that assertion of yours. My understanding of the probabilistic nature of the universe is that in the macro world nothing much changes. The probabilities of an object like a tennis ball or a planet not following Newton/Einstein mechanics are not exactly zero but for all practical purposes they approach zero and that is what we consistently observe. Note also that the discovery of quantum mechanics didn't lead to scientists becoming more mystic or religious. Most great quantum theorists are declared atheists.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Emil Nikola Richard, @Barbarossa, @A123, @S

    There was a 1974 movie entitled Zardoz which featured a future people that had the technology to have everything be automated. However, they willfully chose to do some physical labor as apparently they thought it healthy, ie making and baking their own bread, plowing their farm fields with a horse and plow, and horse and buggy instead of cars.

    A little bit Amish I suppose. I respect that.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zardoz

  171. @S
    @sudden death


    Didn’t go further into this whole “New Rome” 1853 theory book, but was there written something about nearing potential devastating implosion within USA which can divide the country into two warring states?
     
    No, it didn't. Though it does claim the 1776 American Revolution was a planned false split between the US/UK, and that someday America and Britain would reunite, and America would then take the lead.

    One of the New Rome's two authors, Theodore Poesche, spent a year in London in 1850 having fled the failed German 1848 Revolution. It so happens that 1850 was the same year that the powerful British Foreign Secretary (and future PM) Lord Palmerston would launch his 'New Rome' campaign from London as elaborated upon below by an author named Tarpley. [I don't agree with everything in regards to Tarpley, he can be a mixed bag, but I think his nuts and bolts of the history of the time are correct here.]

    I've linked below a recent Atlantic article about a circa 2006 book published in Russia called The Third Empire, Russia as it Ought to Be, which tells it's readers that Russia will someday defeat the US in a great war. The article calls this book a 'manual' for Putin, but says nothing about the US having it's own manual, the near completely memory holed The New Rome, which tells how it will be the US that is to defeat Russia in a future war.

    My concern is that these two respective books may represent what could be termed a 'suggestion' to the people of the United States and Russia to someday fight each other, but that someone (or something) is intending that rather one or the other prevail in creating a glorious future empire for themselves as the book's foretell, that the United States and Russia are instead intended to destroy each other, a bit like the plotline to an old 1961 Twilight Zone episode entitled 'Two'.

    People have their refusal.


    https://miro.medium.com/max/1400/0*KuG6i7NCpDeSqr35.jpg


    A NEW ROMAN EMPIRE

    'It is 1850. Lord Palmerston is engaged in a campaign to make London the undisputed center of a new, worldwide Roman Empire. He is attempting to conquer the world in the way that the British have already conquered India, reducing every other nation to the role of a puppet, client, and fall-guy for British imperial policy. Lord Palmerston’s campaign is not a secret. He has declared it here in the Houses of Parliament, saying that wherever in the world a British subject goes, he can flaunt the laws, secure that the British fleet will support him. “Civis Romanus sum, every Briton is a citizen of this new Rome,” thundered Lord Palmerston, and with that, the universal empire was proclaimed.'
     

    http://tarpley.net/online-books/against-oligarchy/lord-palmerstons-multicultural-human-zoo/

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/03/putin-kremlin-foreign-policy-strategy/629388/#:~:text=Mikhail Yuriev’s 2006 utopian novel%2C The Third Empire%3A,same year%2C and Russia’s current assault on Ukraine.

    https://medium.com/as-vast-as-space-and-as-timeless-as-infinity/twilight-zone-episode-review-3-1-two-4bd43f216be8

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    Pretty impressive foresight, but a lot of those made in Germany haven’t come to pass (precisely because they are cast into the role of losers with Kaiser Wilhelm/Hitler). Very little have been written for China or India and this is what scares me.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Yellowface Anon

    I didn't look up on what similar predictions was made in Germany and China but couldn't delete the comment in time, so apologies for talking without a clear idea in mind.

    A lot of those was also written in late Qing times where China pursued successful economic reforms and becoming a force for international peace, but one title that stands out is Bigehuan Zhuren's New Era describing an apocalyptic World War based on the clash of civilizations between the West and China that ends in chemical WMD usage by both sides of the conflict.

    Replies: @S, @S

    , @S
    @Yellowface Anon


    Very little have been written for China or India and this is what scares me.
     
    Those two books are very obscure, which reinforces my belief that information is to an extent controlled.

    The New Rome is completely memory holed in the US, ie it's not spoken of in the corporate mass media on TV or radio. Even those late night esoteric radio talk shows (that talk about most everything) I can just about guarantee have never spoken of it. I only heard about the book when reading other 19th century books that talked about it.

    As for The Third Empire about Russia, it too is quite obscure. Though I'd hypothesized about such a book possibly existing prior, I only heard about it's actual existance because Philip Owen mentioned it recently in one of AK's threads here.

    Going by that as a guide, there might be similar 'lost' books about India or China which attempt to foretell their future in old libraries or dusty museums. If such exist it would be interesting to hear what they might say.
  172. A123 says: • Website
    @songbird
    @A123

    I'd suppose that a missile was targeted to hit one of the P-500 Bazalts.

    IMO, crazy design, having those things lined up, out on deck, on such a big hull. I believe it is a relic of Cold War thinking, where a lot of the fighting was pretend, or through disposable proxies. It has MAD written all over it. The design implicitly says to me that nobody thought it would ever be fired upon.

    Replies: @A123

    I’d suppose that a missile was targeted to hit one of the P-500 Bazalts.

    IMO, crazy design, having those things lined up, out on deck, on such a big hull. I believe it is a relic of Cold War thinking

    The USSR had periodic issues with bad rocket fuel. My understanding is that if a “weapon ignites but fails to leave the tube” the heat causes the launcher to detach itself from the ship. Everything on fire gets dumped into the sea.

    Alas, I do not have any mechanical details.
    ______________________

    udden Death

    The seawater level in this pic seems to be way above the waterline, whole ship is leaning on its side, so the impact hole (if it was on this side near/at the waterline) may be hidden under the water?

    Trying to move while a hole is beneath the waterline? That sounds like a very risky option.

    Perhaps they were trying to lift a hole on the far side above the waterline?
    ______________________

    There are questions that need answers.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @A123

    Looking at this pic of healthy Moskva from closer angle it can be seen there was quite enough room even below the white waterline where rocket could strike in theory at least:

    https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEicH3ZlCryd1WiM6jDkBizt7b4Aieeif_9Vz7QNS6yjeNDsloGOd75rrXMH6lkt09HTChRPJUktqpszG6-IJ3ni1NRSwtE71aEixd_Vc3mIF2O9kWnOqw4WDRvQmxL4th2ak0m4GZdmKE24SMdgpZmDnXzHZE3RQEjIqEaJIn7XpK8YhKQmlE9ifk2O/s2200/35i.png

    , @songbird
    @A123


    My understanding is that if a “weapon ignites but fails to leave the tube” the heat causes the launcher to detach itself from the ship. Everything on fire gets dumped into the sea.
     
    That's interesting - I hadn't heard of that.

    From what I understand, the ship wasn't actually being used to fire cruise missiles at the time, but for its anti-air capabilities, so it was probably fully loaded.

    I'd suppose a missile strike would compromise the ditch ability, maybe causing the fuel from the Bazalts to leak out and burn through the deck. But I might be mistaken could have been a hit above the waterline.

    During the Falklands, the HMS Sheffield is thought to have sunk without the exocet's warhead actually detonating. It was the fuel from the rocket motor that did the ship in. Though, it did take a few days to sink.
  173. @Yellowface Anon
    @S

    Pretty impressive foresight, but a lot of those made in Germany haven't come to pass (precisely because they are cast into the role of losers with Kaiser Wilhelm/Hitler). Very little have been written for China or India and this is what scares me.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @S

    I didn’t look up on what similar predictions was made in Germany and China but couldn’t delete the comment in time, so apologies for talking without a clear idea in mind.

    A lot of those was also written in late Qing times where China pursued successful economic reforms and becoming a force for international peace, but one title that stands out is Bigehuan Zhuren’s New Era describing an apocalyptic World War based on the clash of civilizations between the West and China that ends in chemical WMD usage by both sides of the conflict.

    • Replies: @S
    @Yellowface Anon

    Thanks. It seems many a people have developed such 'myths'. As stated, my concern is that someone (or something) operating behind the scenes might be attempting to manipulate the peoples of the world and humanity as a whole with such 'stories', and not necessarily for their good.

    Replies: @utu

    , @S
    @Yellowface Anon


    ...one title that stands out is Bigehuan Zhuren’s New Era describing an apocalyptic World War based on the clash of civilizations between the West and China that ends in chemical WMD usage by both sides of the conflict.
     
    I find the timing (presumably late 19th century) interesting.

    I can't recall every detail, but I remember reading that almost as soon as the British Empire touched China (late 18th century perhaps) that suddenly China too had its own secret society (the Triads?) that had almost identical rituals to Scottish Rite Freemasonry. I'm thinking it maybe Freemasonry which is the transmission route of some (many?) of these relatively modern, but similar, end of world stories including possibly the New Rome.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  174. @AaronB
    @Barbarossa


    Out of curiosity, if you don’t me asking, what do the people around you in the Big Apple make of you? I would expect that there would be some blank incomprehension if you got into any of these topics at the workplace!
     
    It's more than blank incomprehension :)

    That I was prepared for. There is on the whole an active hostility and opposition to my way of thinking - and among several of my friends and acquaintances, a concerted and aggressive effort to "pull me back in" towards materialism, a life centred on money, and an obsession with physical survival.

    It was this experience that led me to finally give credence to the old idea of "spiritual warfare". I thought my position would be seen as eccentric, perhaps absurd, but I would be regarded as essentially innocuous and unthreatening.

    After all, if I want less money and have less ambition, there is less competition.

    Boy was I wrong. It seems certain people are motivated to destroy my attitude to life even if by it's very nature it lessens competition for them. This kind of "irrational" attack, I cannot help feel, suggests the battle is spiritual.

    There is another way my alternative attitude gets me into trouble - if you are no longer committed to modern civilization and have less ambition, you will stand out starkly for not being "serious" about work even if you are diligent and competent at your job, as the modern mythology says that nothing is more important than economic production, and one attitude must reflect this.

    No longer being obsessed with survival, my easy going and "light hearted" attitude towards life has also earned me surprising enmity and severe backlash in NY. Fear of death is also a sacred value to modern society, and to not have an appropriately serious and "heavy" provokes spiritual attack, I now see.

    Well, the picture is not wholly bad :)

    There are some people who have a certain amount of sympathy and understanding for my position.

    But on the whole the spiritual life cannot be well lived in one of the major ideological centers of modernity.

    Replies: @Barbarossa

    I suppose that you represent a strange and disturbing aberration in the Big Apple. It sounds from previous comments as though you have found a reasonably accommodating employer at least and it allows you a great deal of freedom in the grand scheme of things.

    To share an amusing story…When my wife and I were buying our land and planning our initial little cabin, we were living in what was basically an ex-urb sort of area where I worked in a custom stair shop. I was probably the oddest person there, doing things like sitting at lunch with a small personal carving project while they talked about sports.

    When I explained to some of them how we were going to build this tiny cabin in the woods, but didn’t have money initially for things like plumbing or electrical they were politely bemused. However, the lack of plumbing, which was more my concern, got no mention while the lack of electricity was a major sticking point, though again not for any of the reasons I might have guessed.

    The incredulous question came, “How are you going to watch TV?” When I explained that I wasn’t going to be watching any TV, the second incredulous question arose. “Then what are you going to DO?” I told them I would probably not be lacking for things to do and in any case there are always books.

    I always found that response very funny, since TV was probably dead last of the potential issues on my mind. In the end I was glad to be out of that area. I got along fine with most people, but I was very much the oddball! On second thought, I might still be an oddball, I just live in area now with a preponderance of oddballs.

    • LOL: AaronB
  175. @A123
    @Yellowface Anon


    There are 2 groups of Jews, Secular and Reformed Jews who are like extreme versions of secularized bourgeois Christians
     
    In America, and presumably Europe, your summary is sound. Here is an indicative U.S. poll for New York (from 2011): (1)

     
    https://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/content/images/AIA2011092202-chart1.png
     

    While Israel also has a split, it is quite different. The "secularized bourgeois" Jews of Israel are strongly nationalist, believe in security & military defense, etc...

    The only group in Israel that even vaguely resembles the American Left is Labor/Gesher. In 2019 they only managed to capture 6 of 120 seats (~5% of the population).

     
    https://theglobepost.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Israeli-elections.jpg
     

    Indigenous Palestinian Jews view Russia with a national security perspective. Iran is an existential threat. Ukraine is not. Given Russia's presence in Syria, why would Palestinian Jews blow up that relationship by backing Zelensky?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/articles/aia2011092202/

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @Dmitry

    Most Russians outside Russia, are not supporting the Russian authorities, certainly not this year.

    It is related to social class, age and education level, because for typical people, the support for the authorities requires a lot of information restriction and lack of scepticism.

    Russians living in Western bloc countries are including large young, middle class and upper class proportions who have access to many sources of media. Quite a good proportion of Russians in the West, are middle class or more elite. Most people with high incomes and high education level (many with postgraduate, technical education level). There is also a filter for people to leave the country, which shows their revealed preferences.

    In Israel, the proportion of support for Russia could be higher, because Israel is the only Western bloc country with open borders immigration policy with Russia (for people with Jewish roots, under “Law of Return”), with higher proportion of lower class, non-elite immigrants. Israel receives the lower class of immigration.

    Russian and Ukrainian immigrants in Israel have below average income level (it’s very different to Russians in Western Europe).

    There are a lot more lower class and less educated immigrants in Israel, compared to other Western bloc countries. For this reason, Israel has received some problems from its immigrants. There are also a lot more older immigrants, as they had earlier immigration, and many pensioners (with “Law of Return” they can attain residence visas for retired parents and grandparents).

    In previous years, when I had last visited Israel, you could see a lot of Russian flags. The unassimilated immigrants used to add Russian flags on the balconies. There were a lot of old immigrants in Israel, who had immigrated decades ago. If you see drunk or homeless people in Israel, they are often immigrants from Russia/Ukraine.

    But still the majority of Russians in Israel would be unlikely supporting the Russian authorities (and the Ukrainians, by comparison, will be mostly supporting the Ukrainian government). Younger people who integrate to the new country, less, than older people.

    Israel also has hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians and Georgians, who have much higher rate of support to Ukraine’s government, partly as those have become much more nationalist cultures than Russia.

    With YouTube, you can see the protests in Israel for Ukraine and against the war.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Dmitry


    support for the authorities requires a lot of information restriction and lack of scepticism
     
    To add to this paragraph. It's also related a lot to power.

    When the authorities don't have power on you (e.g. if you in Western Europe), your brain resets after some years, as you don't feel any social or authoritative pressure on your views.

    There is also in the consciousness of the immigrant, a sense of distance which feels like greater objectivity. It's like a bookmark has formed from the previous life. Among immigrants, people are talking in a different way, like it was put through a filter or some kind of extraction process. Everyone starts saying e.g. "one thing I really didn't like but we never noticed at the time was.." or "it's strange how this thing seemed always normal".

    Although it's not really objective, as it depends on what you find in the new countries, and the comparison is based in the divergence. If we all immigrated to India, your mind would probably extract many different things, than if you went to Switzerland or Singapore. Much of the negativity in the conversation of the immigrants to their previous country, is based on upgrading to unusually elite countries like those.

  176. S says:
    @Yellowface Anon
    @S

    Pretty impressive foresight, but a lot of those made in Germany haven't come to pass (precisely because they are cast into the role of losers with Kaiser Wilhelm/Hitler). Very little have been written for China or India and this is what scares me.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @S

    Very little have been written for China or India and this is what scares me.

    Those two books are very obscure, which reinforces my belief that information is to an extent controlled.

    The New Rome is completely memory holed in the US, ie it’s not spoken of in the corporate mass media on TV or radio. Even those late night esoteric radio talk shows (that talk about most everything) I can just about guarantee have never spoken of it. I only heard about the book when reading other 19th century books that talked about it.

    As for The Third Empire about Russia, it too is quite obscure. Though I’d hypothesized about such a book possibly existing prior, I only heard about it’s actual existance because Philip Owen mentioned it recently in one of AK’s threads here.

    Going by that as a guide, there might be similar ‘lost’ books about India or China which attempt to foretell their future in old libraries or dusty museums. If such exist it would be interesting to hear what they might say.

  177. @Yellowface Anon
    @Yellowface Anon

    I didn't look up on what similar predictions was made in Germany and China but couldn't delete the comment in time, so apologies for talking without a clear idea in mind.

    A lot of those was also written in late Qing times where China pursued successful economic reforms and becoming a force for international peace, but one title that stands out is Bigehuan Zhuren's New Era describing an apocalyptic World War based on the clash of civilizations between the West and China that ends in chemical WMD usage by both sides of the conflict.

    Replies: @S, @S

    Thanks. It seems many a people have developed such ‘myths’. As stated, my concern is that someone (or something) operating behind the scenes might be attempting to manipulate the peoples of the world and humanity as a whole with such ‘stories’, and not necessarily for their good.

    • Replies: @utu
    @S

    "my concern is that someone (or something) operating behind the scenes might be attempting to manipulate the peoples of the world and humanity" - The idée fixe that permeates many of your comments but not until now you have stated it explicitly. And I would opt for the "something" rather than the "someone" in your case as often you made observations about events that were outside of the causal chains of events that are part of how we understand the world operates. Common sense explanations do not satisfy you. You have an eye for the unusual and the bizarre which gives you a great pleasure when you spot them and no amount of rational arguments can dispel the charm and the grip of your finding so you keep them forever. Your mind is like the Mütter Museum of conspiracies.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  178. @Dmitry
    @A123

    Most Russians outside Russia, are not supporting the Russian authorities, certainly not this year.

    It is related to social class, age and education level, because for typical people, the support for the authorities requires a lot of information restriction and lack of scepticism.

    Russians living in Western bloc countries are including large young, middle class and upper class proportions who have access to many sources of media. Quite a good proportion of Russians in the West, are middle class or more elite. Most people with high incomes and high education level (many with postgraduate, technical education level). There is also a filter for people to leave the country, which shows their revealed preferences.

    In Israel, the proportion of support for Russia could be higher, because Israel is the only Western bloc country with open borders immigration policy with Russia (for people with Jewish roots, under "Law of Return"), with higher proportion of lower class, non-elite immigrants. Israel receives the lower class of immigration.

    Russian and Ukrainian immigrants in Israel have below average income level (it's very different to Russians in Western Europe).

    There are a lot more lower class and less educated immigrants in Israel, compared to other Western bloc countries. For this reason, Israel has received some problems from its immigrants. There are also a lot more older immigrants, as they had earlier immigration, and many pensioners (with "Law of Return" they can attain residence visas for retired parents and grandparents).

    In previous years, when I had last visited Israel, you could see a lot of Russian flags. The unassimilated immigrants used to add Russian flags on the balconies. There were a lot of old immigrants in Israel, who had immigrated decades ago. If you see drunk or homeless people in Israel, they are often immigrants from Russia/Ukraine.

    But still the majority of Russians in Israel would be unlikely supporting the Russian authorities (and the Ukrainians, by comparison, will be mostly supporting the Ukrainian government). Younger people who integrate to the new country, less, than older people.

    Israel also has hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians and Georgians, who have much higher rate of support to Ukraine's government, partly as those have become much more nationalist cultures than Russia.

    -

    With YouTube, you can see the protests in Israel for Ukraine and against the war.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZyNmbiHgZU

    Replies: @Dmitry

    support for the authorities requires a lot of information restriction and lack of scepticism

    To add to this paragraph. It’s also related a lot to power.

    When the authorities don’t have power on you (e.g. if you in Western Europe), your brain resets after some years, as you don’t feel any social or authoritative pressure on your views.

    There is also in the consciousness of the immigrant, a sense of distance which feels like greater objectivity. It’s like a bookmark has formed from the previous life. Among immigrants, people are talking in a different way, like it was put through a filter or some kind of extraction process. Everyone starts saying e.g. “one thing I really didn’t like but we never noticed at the time was..” or “it’s strange how this thing seemed always normal”.

    Although it’s not really objective, as it depends on what you find in the new countries, and the comparison is based in the divergence. If we all immigrated to India, your mind would probably extract many different things, than if you went to Switzerland or Singapore. Much of the negativity in the conversation of the immigrants to their previous country, is based on upgrading to unusually elite countries like those.

  179. S says:
    @Yellowface Anon
    @Yellowface Anon

    I didn't look up on what similar predictions was made in Germany and China but couldn't delete the comment in time, so apologies for talking without a clear idea in mind.

    A lot of those was also written in late Qing times where China pursued successful economic reforms and becoming a force for international peace, but one title that stands out is Bigehuan Zhuren's New Era describing an apocalyptic World War based on the clash of civilizations between the West and China that ends in chemical WMD usage by both sides of the conflict.

    Replies: @S, @S

    …one title that stands out is Bigehuan Zhuren’s New Era describing an apocalyptic World War based on the clash of civilizations between the West and China that ends in chemical WMD usage by both sides of the conflict.

    I find the timing (presumably late 19th century) interesting.

    I can’t recall every detail, but I remember reading that almost as soon as the British Empire touched China (late 18th century perhaps) that suddenly China too had its own secret society (the Triads?) that had almost identical rituals to Scottish Rite Freemasonry. I’m thinking it maybe Freemasonry which is the transmission route of some (many?) of these relatively modern, but similar, end of world stories including possibly the New Rome.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @S

    The ones I mentioned are written in the 20th century, the dozen of years before the Republic when reforming Qing dynasty was still taken as a serious possibility. The dates are often off (and a lot of predictions didn't come to pass as usual) but enough of them are realized for your theory about those being manuals instead of simple predictions.

    It could be just be sandboxing or groups taken on agendas after being inspired by those, maybe even some self-fulfillment as the telos of particular political or social institutions.

  180. @S
    @Yellowface Anon


    ...one title that stands out is Bigehuan Zhuren’s New Era describing an apocalyptic World War based on the clash of civilizations between the West and China that ends in chemical WMD usage by both sides of the conflict.
     
    I find the timing (presumably late 19th century) interesting.

    I can't recall every detail, but I remember reading that almost as soon as the British Empire touched China (late 18th century perhaps) that suddenly China too had its own secret society (the Triads?) that had almost identical rituals to Scottish Rite Freemasonry. I'm thinking it maybe Freemasonry which is the transmission route of some (many?) of these relatively modern, but similar, end of world stories including possibly the New Rome.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    The ones I mentioned are written in the 20th century, the dozen of years before the Republic when reforming Qing dynasty was still taken as a serious possibility. The dates are often off (and a lot of predictions didn’t come to pass as usual) but enough of them are realized for your theory about those being manuals instead of simple predictions.

    It could be just be sandboxing or groups taken on agendas after being inspired by those, maybe even some self-fulfillment as the telos of particular political or social institutions.

    • Thanks: S
  181. @S
    @Yellowface Anon

    Thanks. It seems many a people have developed such 'myths'. As stated, my concern is that someone (or something) operating behind the scenes might be attempting to manipulate the peoples of the world and humanity as a whole with such 'stories', and not necessarily for their good.

    Replies: @utu

    “my concern is that someone (or something) operating behind the scenes might be attempting to manipulate the peoples of the world and humanity” – The idée fixe that permeates many of your comments but not until now you have stated it explicitly. And I would opt for the “something” rather than the “someone” in your case as often you made observations about events that were outside of the causal chains of events that are part of how we understand the world operates. Common sense explanations do not satisfy you. You have an eye for the unusual and the bizarre which gives you a great pleasure when you spot them and no amount of rational arguments can dispel the charm and the grip of your finding so you keep them forever. Your mind is like the Mütter Museum of conspiracies.

    • Agree: silviosilver
    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @utu

    Everybody is a conspiracy theo-rizismist. If you don't think Mossad did nine eleven you think that a fraternity of holocaust deniers is on the prowl who want to gas jews. Don't call the man a stupid name. If you wish to criticize the point he is making then do that.

    Ad hominem arguments do not convince anybody of anything that is paying attention.

    Who runs the Mutter Museum? HMMMMMMM? : )

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Yevardian

  182. @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    In certain sections of the dissident racialist right there’s a debate about this peculiar but obscure Intermarium concept beloved of Ukrainian ultra nationalistic radicals. It’s created a lot of falling out among old friends. The Azov unit name clearly refers to keeping a presence on the Azov Sea by Ukrainians and their allies and volunteers in Poland, Baltic States. Perhaps it even refers to crossing the little sea to occupy the town of Azov to cut off the Don.

    Never the less there’s clearly some kind of ambition in the rhetoric I’ve heard about breaking up Russian Federation into Five Russias. The medieval and early modern area called “Sloboda Ukraine” encompasses Kursk and Belgorod. I’m sure there’s a party that claim them, and they’ve got MI6 and Zelenskyy’s ear. Some of these Ukrainian nationalists are clearly looking at Russian Federation oblasts with appetites bigger than their stomachs. Would they seek vassal oblasts of their own if the Russian Federation disintegrates? Yes.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @LatW, @Philip Owen, @Mikhail

    The wishful thinking of some, as in not gonna happen.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    @Mikhail

    Unfortunately I think both Ukraine and Russia are heading for a very hard fall with no immediate end in sight, whatever the short-term outcomes of this war. Even in the near-impossible scenario Ukraine manages to drive Russia from all its pre-feb.24 territory, it's lost something like 5 million people.. from a rapidly aging population. But a big win for Poland if it manages to avoid a similar conflict in the near future.
    The past month's events have been an icy cold shower for anyone with personal or professional connections to Russia who hasn't been deliberately burying their hand in the sand.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @Mikhail, @Ron Unz

  183. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    Nah, just wishing that this stupid war ends with Putler returning his troops home, the sooner the better. I am not looking forward to the carnage that is being envisioned by most of the pundits, in the eastern part of Ukraine. How about you? Or do you get turned on by this bloodshed like our former master and transhumanist vampire, Karlin?

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mikhail

    Nah, just wishing that this stupid war ends with Putler returning his troops home, the sooner the better.

    Via non-war diplomacy, the Kiev regime could’ve gotten an autonomous Donbass, an agree to disagree on Crimea, as part of a deal seeing Ukraine not being a NATO beachhead.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Mikhail

    Both sides could have used clever diplomacy but alas, Putin jumped the literal gun. If Putin's objective had only been Donbas he would have just sent Wagner mercenaries into Donbas.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail

  184. @Mikhail
    @Wokechoke

    The wishful thinking of some, as in not gonna happen.

    Replies: @Yevardian

    Unfortunately I think both Ukraine and Russia are heading for a very hard fall with no immediate end in sight, whatever the short-term outcomes of this war. Even in the near-impossible scenario Ukraine manages to drive Russia from all its pre-feb.24 territory, it’s lost something like 5 million people.. from a rapidly aging population. But a big win for Poland if it manages to avoid a similar conflict in the near future.
    The past month’s events have been an icy cold shower for anyone with personal or professional connections to Russia who hasn’t been deliberately burying their hand in the sand.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Disagree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Yevardian

    ... And why staging a military reunification of Taiwan anytime soon is totally misguided over a long-termist approach

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    , @Mikhail
    @Yevardian


    The past month’s events have been an icy cold shower for anyone with personal or professional connections to Russia who hasn’t been deliberately burying their hand in the sand.
     
    Overlooking Kiev regime fault lines is neither ethical nor accurate.

    Replies: @Yevardian

    , @Ron Unz
    @Yevardian


    The past month’s events have been an icy cold shower for anyone with personal or professional connections to Russia who hasn’t been deliberately burying their hand in the sand.
     
    I happened to glance through this comment-thread, and noticed your statement. You generally seem like a level-headed individual with pretty good familiarity of that part of the world so I'm curious about your view. Based upon some of your other remarks, I assume it's related to Russia's supposed military failure.

    I probably haven't been following the details as closely as many other people, but I wonder if you're correct. My impression is that although lots of pro-Russian activists (e.g. Karlin, the Saker) made rather grandiose predictions about how quickly Russia would win, the Russian government itself never said such things. So perhaps some of those pundits have been discredited, but I'm not sure if the Russians themselves have been.

    My impression is that the Russians did indeed hope that the Ukrainian government would quickly collapse and they'd win very quickly, but they merely viewed this as a good possibility worth attempting rather than something with high likelihood. So their daring airborne assault on Kiev was repulsed with considerable casualties, and they got a bloody nose. But that happens with lots of ultimately successful military ventures.

    Scott Ritter, Douglas Macgregor, and Larry Johnson all seem like experienced military experts, and when I've listened to their accounts, even quite recently, they seem to think Russian victory was almost assured. Indeed, Macgregor's concern was that when the Ukrainian side collapses, the American government may be so horrified at the collapse of its ridiculous propaganda-bubble that it might do something dangerous:

    https://youtu.be/38hPs23WAxM

    Larry Johnson also had a good podcast interview a few days ago:

    https://www.unz.com/CONTENTS/AUDIO/kbarrett/KB-TJ_2022-0414_johnson_web.mp3

    Maybe Macgregor and all the others are completely wrong, but why do you think that? The facts will soon enough become apparent one way or the other, so what would Macgregor, Ritter, Johnson, and others have to gain by lies or distortions.

    The key factor to keep in mind is that the Western MSM landscape is 100% pro-Ukraine, as extreme as anything I've ever seen, so all information is being presented on a totally tilted floor. That tilt must be taken into account when evaluating what's really going on.

    Meanwhile, the actual results of the war are completely independent of that propaganda battle, except insofar as it persuades NATO to give lots of weapons to the Ukrainians.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Wokechoke, @Mikhail, @Peripatetic Commenter, @A123, @Mikel, @Yevardian

  185. @A123
    @songbird


    I’d suppose that a missile was targeted to hit one of the P-500 Bazalts.

    IMO, crazy design, having those things lined up, out on deck, on such a big hull. I believe it is a relic of Cold War thinking
     
    The USSR had periodic issues with bad rocket fuel. My understanding is that if a "weapon ignites but fails to leave the tube" the heat causes the launcher to detach itself from the ship. Everything on fire gets dumped into the sea.

    Alas, I do not have any mechanical details.
    ______________________

    @Sudden Death

    The seawater level in this pic seems to be way above the waterline, whole ship is leaning on its side, so the impact hole (if it was on this side near/at the waterline) may be hidden under the water?
     
    Trying to move while a hole is beneath the waterline? That sounds like a very risky option.

    Perhaps they were trying to lift a hole on the far side above the waterline?
    ______________________

    There are questions that need answers.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @sudden death, @songbird

    Looking at this pic of healthy Moskva from closer angle it can be seen there was quite enough room even below the white waterline where rocket could strike in theory at least:

  186. @Yevardian
    @Mikhail

    Unfortunately I think both Ukraine and Russia are heading for a very hard fall with no immediate end in sight, whatever the short-term outcomes of this war. Even in the near-impossible scenario Ukraine manages to drive Russia from all its pre-feb.24 territory, it's lost something like 5 million people.. from a rapidly aging population. But a big win for Poland if it manages to avoid a similar conflict in the near future.
    The past month's events have been an icy cold shower for anyone with personal or professional connections to Russia who hasn't been deliberately burying their hand in the sand.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @Mikhail, @Ron Unz

    … And why staging a military reunification of Taiwan anytime soon is totally misguided over a long-termist approach

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Yellowface Anon

    If I were Xi right now I’d sink a couple of cargo ships outside Taiwan. I’d do it sooner rather than later as well.

  187. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack


    Nah, just wishing that this stupid war ends with Putler returning his troops home, the sooner the better.
     
    Via non-war diplomacy, the Kiev regime could've gotten an autonomous Donbass, an agree to disagree on Crimea, as part of a deal seeing Ukraine not being a NATO beachhead.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    Both sides could have used clever diplomacy but alas, Putin jumped the literal gun. If Putin’s objective had only been Donbas he would have just sent Wagner mercenaries into Donbas.

    • Disagree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Yellowface Anon

    His initial plans to subdue all of Ukraine, following a three day romp into Kyiv, were soundly upended.

    Now he has to be satisfied by enlarging his possessions in Donbass, and that isn't even a given at this point and time. With Russia sharing a large border with Donbas, and having already carved out and secured a large portion of it for 8 years, you'd think that it would be a sure thing for Russia, but we'll have to unfortunately wait and see to know how it will actually all end up.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Mikhail

    , @Mikhail
    @Yellowface Anon


    Both sides could have used clever diplomacy but alas, Putin jumped the literal gun. If Putin’s objective had only been Donbas he would have just sent Wagner mercenaries into Donbas.
     
    Prior to the Russian military action taken, Russia exhibited agreement with what I noted:

    - implementation of the Minsk Protocol
    - no NATO in Ukraine, or Ukraine in NATO
    - agree to disagree on Crimea.

    Russia advocated and waited long enough, as the Kiev regime became militarily stronger, plus the Banderite element.You know the related Clausweitz quote.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  188. @Philip Owen
    @Wokechoke

    Belogord, Voronezh, Saratov and the Kuban still have Ukrainian speaking minorities that lived there before the Muscovites came down the Don valley.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @siberiancat, @Wokechoke

    Come on man, who is paying your secondment?

    • Troll: Yellowface Anon
  189. @silviosilver
    @AaronB


    And yet if you ask the average person, I am sure they would say the solution is to try and eliminate suffering even more
     
    Well, if the 'modern' methods of alleviating psychological suffering have, as you claim, only succeeded in prolonging or ingraining it, then a return to the older methods - which I approve of, let me be clear - would result in this suffering being alleviated. So unless you want to say "bad luck, you tried the modern methods, now you're stuck suffering forever," you too are arguing for renewed efforts to eliminate suffering - albeit via methods at odds with the prevailing paradigm.

    Replies: @AaronB

    Excellent point – you have a good eye for the paradoxes that govern reality 🙂

    But what I am advocating for is not the elimination of suffering, as the modern world wants, but merely it’s amelioration.

    Aiming for zero suffering creates more suffering, while accepting suffering paradoxically lessens it.

    However, even more than just the amelioration of suffering, I want to preserve suffering as an indispensable element in growth and life.

    Instead of simply rejecting suffering, we need to integrate it and understand the role it plays in our development, both physical and spiritual.

    In a sense, the entire “project” of modernity is about creating a world without suffering, discomfort, and inconvenience – problem is, we wilt and die under such conditions 🙂 We don’t thrive in such a “utopia”.

    I think it’s extremely important to introduce “stresses” into ones life and not become too comfortable.

  190. @Yellowface Anon
    @songbird

    Only after Putin nukes Helsinki the moment Finland signs the treaty to enter NATO. It's moot then because Moscow will blow up in a fireball very soon, along with most of the world's urban areas.

    Replies: @Seraphim

    It is more likely that Russians will cut the gas and oil before they will join. Finland is 100% dependent on Russian gas.

  191. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    Ukraine...Imperial reach?? Gaining back lands that were recently part of the Ukrainian state isn't exactly enough fertilizer for any such conspiracy theories.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Seraphim

    It is rather that Russia is “re-gathering the Russian lands”.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Seraphim

    Sounds about as promising as the "regathering of the Carolingian lands", or perhaps, the regathering of the "Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth lands"...the "regathering of the Scythian lands". This current war shows the world how ridiculous Russian political through has become, mired in the muck of the 12th century. :-)

    Replies: @Seraphim

  192. @utu
    @S

    "my concern is that someone (or something) operating behind the scenes might be attempting to manipulate the peoples of the world and humanity" - The idée fixe that permeates many of your comments but not until now you have stated it explicitly. And I would opt for the "something" rather than the "someone" in your case as often you made observations about events that were outside of the causal chains of events that are part of how we understand the world operates. Common sense explanations do not satisfy you. You have an eye for the unusual and the bizarre which gives you a great pleasure when you spot them and no amount of rational arguments can dispel the charm and the grip of your finding so you keep them forever. Your mind is like the Mütter Museum of conspiracies.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    Everybody is a conspiracy theo-rizismist. If you don’t think Mossad did nine eleven you think that a fraternity of holocaust deniers is on the prowl who want to gas jews. Don’t call the man a stupid name. If you wish to criticize the point he is making then do that.

    Ad hominem arguments do not convince anybody of anything that is paying attention.

    Who runs the Mutter Museum? HMMMMMMM? : )

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Mossad might well have done the job. The distinction between Bin Laden and the CIA and MI6 is hazy enough to begin with

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    , @Yevardian
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    Who runs the Mutter Museum? HMMMMMMM? : )
     
    Our Benevolent Overlord? (PBUH)

    So I finally took time to listen to Peter Zeihan, the man is certainly seems like an unapologetic American imperialist, but he's quite affable, makes a good case, and most importantly, doesn't seem to be a hypocrite or intentionally dishonest. I might even try reading one of his triumphalist books

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2C42p_8XfI

    This second interview is also decent, though the host is apparently some crypto-troglodyte, his questions can be safely skipped in the final quarter.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2C42p_8XfI

    Replies: @utu

  193. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @utu

    Everybody is a conspiracy theo-rizismist. If you don't think Mossad did nine eleven you think that a fraternity of holocaust deniers is on the prowl who want to gas jews. Don't call the man a stupid name. If you wish to criticize the point he is making then do that.

    Ad hominem arguments do not convince anybody of anything that is paying attention.

    Who runs the Mutter Museum? HMMMMMMM? : )

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Yevardian

    Mossad might well have done the job. The distinction between Bin Laden and the CIA and MI6 is hazy enough to begin with

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Wokechoke

    All of the critical evidence is top secret.

    You and I are never going to know what happened in the Kennedy assassination let alone nine eleven and everybody who actually had a hand in that is freakin' dead.

    With secrecy/compartments there may never have been one individual who knew all of what had to happen. All of what was going to happen. Bush I am sure knew something was going to happen and he may have been more shock and awed than anybody.

    (Well .99 Prob so let's say sure just for the hell of it.)

  194. @Yellowface Anon
    @Yevardian

    ... And why staging a military reunification of Taiwan anytime soon is totally misguided over a long-termist approach

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    If I were Xi right now I’d sink a couple of cargo ships outside Taiwan. I’d do it sooner rather than later as well.

    • Troll: Yellowface Anon
  195. @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    It is rather that Russia is "re-gathering the Russian lands".

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Sounds about as promising as the “regathering of the Carolingian lands”, or perhaps, the regathering of the “Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth lands”…the “regathering of the Scythian lands”. This current war shows the world how ridiculous Russian political through has become, mired in the muck of the 12th century. 🙂

    • Replies: @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    What I hope for is the 'regathering' of the Romanian lands. Their liberation from the Ukrainian yoke.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  196. @songbird
    @RSDB


    Fiction: I just finished going through Wuthering Heights. I am surprised by how much AaronB would like it
     
    Wuthering Heights may have the best prose of any novel that I have ever read. To my mind, it is just dripping with genius, and especially quite a bit above any other female writer that I have ever read. (including the best-regarded) OTOH, it must also be the most horribly melodramatic book that I have ever read, and, on that basis, I think it would be torture to most readers, including, at least as I imagine, Aaron B. (though perhaps not? All depends on whether he changes his mind on Dickens)

    Years ago, I did read a religious tract by Sikhs, but it was poorly translated. Most of my knowledge of them actually comes from George MacDonald Fraser. His crassness can get tiresome, but he was very knowledgeable about history, and it can be a learning experience to read the explanatory notes at the end of his Flashman novels.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @AaronB

    I’ve read Wuthering Heights and enjoyed it tremendously (thanks RSDB for bringing it up).

    Maybe it’s due for another reading.

    I think it used to be standard practice to reread classics when one is older and has a more developed and mature take on the world.

    Maybe it’s time for me to do that – haven’t read the classics in ages.

    I don’t necessarily dislike melodrama, and what I disliked in Dickens was the lack of what I’d call “masculine adventure”, and what I thought was the sentimental attitude towards misfortune, poverty, etc.

    But these are the attitudes of youth, and was before I had any interest in spirituality. Reading Dickens through the eyes of spirituality I am sure will give me a completely different take.

    I’m also renewing my interest in DH Lawrence, who was a great critic of the Machine and modernity – he seems more topical now than ever!

    • Thanks: songbird
    • Replies: @Yevardian
    @AaronB


    I’m also renewing my interest in DH Lawrence, who was a great critic of the Machine and modernity – he seems more topical now than ever!
     
    D.H. Lawrence is terrible.. maybe even the worst English writer to have ever got into the canon. Lawrence also criticised the recent late-Victorian/Georgian past more than ever addressing modernity.
    Although if you're interested in authors that dealt with similar thematic issues of sex, propriety and relationships as Lawrence, George Meredith and Samuel Butler are alright.
    Although I don't find the English write very good romantic literature generally (too emotionally balanced a people?), the Russians do that subgenre much better.

    Of course for the early 20th century reaction to modernity the best English writers are pretty obvious: H.G. Wells, Huxley, Orwell's essays, and surprisingly Jack London has aged very well. Rhys Davies could write quite movingly about the impact of industrialisation on small Welsh towns. Also Joseph Conrad, though his outlook remained very Eastern European and not at all English.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Wokechoke, @Philip Owen

  197. @Yellowface Anon
    @Mikhail

    Both sides could have used clever diplomacy but alas, Putin jumped the literal gun. If Putin's objective had only been Donbas he would have just sent Wagner mercenaries into Donbas.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail

    His initial plans to subdue all of Ukraine, following a three day romp into Kyiv, were soundly upended.

    Now he has to be satisfied by enlarging his possessions in Donbass, and that isn’t even a given at this point and time. With Russia sharing a large border with Donbas, and having already carved out and secured a large portion of it for 8 years, you’d think that it would be a sure thing for Russia, but we’ll have to unfortunately wait and see to know how it will actually all end up.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Mr. Hack

    Russia can't sustain a long war again a Westen-backed Ukraine. This is why Putin needed a very short and total victory. Taking the Donbas secures him nothing, as Ukraine will simply keep fighting. There is no path to victory without taking Kyiv and probably even Lviv, without Ukrainian acquiescence. I therefore don't fancy his chances of getting anything better than he could have gotten had he simply negotiated at the beginning of the war, and, in fact, he'll likely get substantially less.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mr. Hack

    , @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack


    His initial plans to subdue all of Ukraine, following a three day romp into Kyiv, were soundly upended.
     
    You don't know that for sure, with reasonable evidence to the contrary.
  198. @Mr. Hack
    @Yellowface Anon

    His initial plans to subdue all of Ukraine, following a three day romp into Kyiv, were soundly upended.

    Now he has to be satisfied by enlarging his possessions in Donbass, and that isn't even a given at this point and time. With Russia sharing a large border with Donbas, and having already carved out and secured a large portion of it for 8 years, you'd think that it would be a sure thing for Russia, but we'll have to unfortunately wait and see to know how it will actually all end up.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Mikhail

    Russia can’t sustain a long war again a Westen-backed Ukraine. This is why Putin needed a very short and total victory. Taking the Donbas secures him nothing, as Ukraine will simply keep fighting. There is no path to victory without taking Kyiv and probably even Lviv, without Ukrainian acquiescence. I therefore don’t fancy his chances of getting anything better than he could have gotten had he simply negotiated at the beginning of the war, and, in fact, he’ll likely get substantially less.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Triteleia Laxa

    I expect the Chinese to show up fairly soon. Pilots over Crimea and or submariners in Taiwan straits

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Isn't it about time for one of your 20 point updates regarding the Russia/Ukraine war? They're really a special treat because of the factual material that you include is right on, not to mention your very own special sauce of sarcasm. It's nice to see somebody put the various kremlin stooges that show up here regularly in their place. I don't think that you've yet commented on the sinking of the "Moscow" by Odesa yet?

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

  199. @Wokechoke
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Mossad might well have done the job. The distinction between Bin Laden and the CIA and MI6 is hazy enough to begin with

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    All of the critical evidence is top secret.

    You and I are never going to know what happened in the Kennedy assassination let alone nine eleven and everybody who actually had a hand in that is freakin’ dead.

    With secrecy/compartments there may never have been one individual who knew all of what had to happen. All of what was going to happen. Bush I am sure knew something was going to happen and he may have been more shock and awed than anybody.

    (Well .99 Prob so let’s say sure just for the hell of it.)

  200. • Replies: @AP
    @sher singh

    I saw lots of Sikhs in a Sikh aid organization at the Polish-Ukrainian border, making free food for incoming refugees. Thanks guys!

    Replies: @sher singh

  201. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Mr. Hack

    Russia can't sustain a long war again a Westen-backed Ukraine. This is why Putin needed a very short and total victory. Taking the Donbas secures him nothing, as Ukraine will simply keep fighting. There is no path to victory without taking Kyiv and probably even Lviv, without Ukrainian acquiescence. I therefore don't fancy his chances of getting anything better than he could have gotten had he simply negotiated at the beginning of the war, and, in fact, he'll likely get substantially less.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mr. Hack

    I expect the Chinese to show up fairly soon. Pilots over Crimea and or submariners in Taiwan straits

    • Disagree: Yellowface Anon
    • LOL: Barbarossa
  202. @silviosilver
    @songbird


    Before that it was about changelings, and some of it was genuinely creepy.
     
    Have you seen the horror movie by that name, The Changeling (1980), with the great George C. Scott? I didn't think it was outright scary, but I enjoyed the building sense of creepiness.

    Replies: @songbird, @songbird

    Have you seen the horror movie by that name, The Changeling (1980), with the great George C. Scott?

    Haven’t seen it, but sounds interesting even just based on the fact that George C. Scott is in it.

  203. @Mr. Hack
    @Yellowface Anon

    His initial plans to subdue all of Ukraine, following a three day romp into Kyiv, were soundly upended.

    Now he has to be satisfied by enlarging his possessions in Donbass, and that isn't even a given at this point and time. With Russia sharing a large border with Donbas, and having already carved out and secured a large portion of it for 8 years, you'd think that it would be a sure thing for Russia, but we'll have to unfortunately wait and see to know how it will actually all end up.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Mikhail

    His initial plans to subdue all of Ukraine, following a three day romp into Kyiv, were soundly upended.

    You don’t know that for sure, with reasonable evidence to the contrary.

    • Disagree: Yellowface Anon
  204. @Yellowface Anon
    @Mikhail

    Both sides could have used clever diplomacy but alas, Putin jumped the literal gun. If Putin's objective had only been Donbas he would have just sent Wagner mercenaries into Donbas.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail

    Both sides could have used clever diplomacy but alas, Putin jumped the literal gun. If Putin’s objective had only been Donbas he would have just sent Wagner mercenaries into Donbas.

    Prior to the Russian military action taken, Russia exhibited agreement with what I noted:

    – implementation of the Minsk Protocol
    – no NATO in Ukraine, or Ukraine in NATO
    – agree to disagree on Crimea.

    Russia advocated and waited long enough, as the Kiev regime became militarily stronger, plus the Banderite element.You know the related Clausweitz quote.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Mikhail

    NATO's influence in Ukraine inevitable triggers confrontation with Russia, and Russia is indeed cornered diplomatically economically. But why it has to be a full-scale invasion aiming for wholesale annexation, of which the premise is based on Putin negating Ukrainian identity?

    Replies: @Mikhail

  205. @Yevardian
    @Mikhail

    Unfortunately I think both Ukraine and Russia are heading for a very hard fall with no immediate end in sight, whatever the short-term outcomes of this war. Even in the near-impossible scenario Ukraine manages to drive Russia from all its pre-feb.24 territory, it's lost something like 5 million people.. from a rapidly aging population. But a big win for Poland if it manages to avoid a similar conflict in the near future.
    The past month's events have been an icy cold shower for anyone with personal or professional connections to Russia who hasn't been deliberately burying their hand in the sand.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @Mikhail, @Ron Unz

    The past month’s events have been an icy cold shower for anyone with personal or professional connections to Russia who hasn’t been deliberately burying their hand in the sand.

    Overlooking Kiev regime fault lines is neither ethical nor accurate.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    @Mikhail

    Ipse dixit. You'd have to be more specific. From my vantage point (which includes many pro-Russian commentators, Yuri Podolyaka, Starikov, etc), seeing such fault lines where there were in fact none, is probably the number one mistake Russian made in getting into this war.

    I mean, Russia's initial plan seems to have been to re-instate Yanukovich from exile, you would think they would have picked someone less divisive if someone else was available. I thought Medvechuk would be more competent at least, but now the Ukrainians have taken their former MP as a POW, while he was hiding incognito as a common soldier, no less.

    But I'm all ears if you have any real facts you think people should know about.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @siberiancat

  206. @Mikhail
    @Yellowface Anon


    Both sides could have used clever diplomacy but alas, Putin jumped the literal gun. If Putin’s objective had only been Donbas he would have just sent Wagner mercenaries into Donbas.
     
    Prior to the Russian military action taken, Russia exhibited agreement with what I noted:

    - implementation of the Minsk Protocol
    - no NATO in Ukraine, or Ukraine in NATO
    - agree to disagree on Crimea.

    Russia advocated and waited long enough, as the Kiev regime became militarily stronger, plus the Banderite element.You know the related Clausweitz quote.

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    NATO’s influence in Ukraine inevitable triggers confrontation with Russia, and Russia is indeed cornered diplomatically economically. But why it has to be a full-scale invasion aiming for wholesale annexation, of which the premise is based on Putin negating Ukrainian identity?

    • Disagree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Yellowface Anon


    NATO’s influence in Ukraine inevitable triggers confrontation with Russia, and Russia is indeed cornered diplomatically economically. But why it has to be a full-scale invasion aiming for wholesale annexation, of which the premise is based on Putin negating Ukrainian identity?
     
    No substantive proof of a full scale invasion and seeking to wipe out Ukrainian identity.

    A force of no greater than 20o,000 on territory the size of Ukraine isn't indicative of s full scale military operation. The Kiev regime has been actively favoring the denigration of pro-Russian sentiment in Ukraine. These two points combined, contradict the image of Russia seeking to wipe out Ukrainian identity - unless that identity is by definition anti-Russian, which I don't accept.
  207. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Mr. Hack

    Russia can't sustain a long war again a Westen-backed Ukraine. This is why Putin needed a very short and total victory. Taking the Donbas secures him nothing, as Ukraine will simply keep fighting. There is no path to victory without taking Kyiv and probably even Lviv, without Ukrainian acquiescence. I therefore don't fancy his chances of getting anything better than he could have gotten had he simply negotiated at the beginning of the war, and, in fact, he'll likely get substantially less.

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Mr. Hack

    Isn’t it about time for one of your 20 point updates regarding the Russia/Ukraine war? They’re really a special treat because of the factual material that you include is right on, not to mention your very own special sauce of sarcasm. It’s nice to see somebody put the various kremlin stooges that show up here regularly in their place. I don’t think that you’ve yet commented on the sinking of the “Moscow” by Odesa yet?

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Mr. Hack

    This is a big moment. Russia appears to be making a last throw of the dice and committing to an attack along the entire Donbas Front. I assume that they have worked out what I have been saying, which is the following:

    Ukraine gets stronger every day and Russia gets weaker, therefore Russia will never have a better chance, than they do today, of defeating the Ukrainian military and forcing a treaty from a position of strength. Conquest of Kyiv, Odesa, Kharkhov or Mykolaiv is out of the question. The very idea is now ridiculous.

    This is because, despite Russocopes, like "the West is running out of arms with which to supply the Ukrainians", the truth is that Western supply is flexible and essentially unlimited. It can be scaled up very fast, easily represents the majority of military industrial production in the world, and will only increase in sophistication over time as Ukrainians get trained up.

    In other words, the current Russian offensive is it for Russia. And, given that it is a last throw of the dice, it means that Russia has accepted their now limited possible gains. They will not enact a general mobilisation and will be seeking to "win" the Donbas now, or withdraw to at least pre-war lines. Any other plan is undermined by their current operation.

    These are important facts for the Ukrainians to keep in mind, as they should boost morale. This war is not going to last much longer, if only Ukraine can hold in the inferno. Russia is gambling everything on this.

    So can Russia succeed in this limited way in this gamble?

    In order to succeed, Russia will have to completely rout the Ukrainian forces in the East. It is not enough for Russia to force them to tactically withdraw, as Russia will be exhausted by their attempted advance and will then be extremely vulnerable.

    However this does not mean that Ukraine should withdraw, except to trade limited space for enemy attrition, as momentum can have an effect of its own, but Ukraine losing some ground is not a problem.

    Furthermore, given the desperation of the overall situation for Russia, I am still surprised at how lightly manned they are for the task ahead. They seem to have only maybe 60,000 troops "concentrated" on a massive front.

    I assume this means that they will attempt to break Ukrainian lines at specific points, in order to reinforce success and hope for a Ukrainian panic, but such advances will be extremely vulnerable to Ukrainian reserves used offensively. Russian fires will not be able to protect those Russian infiltrations. Putin is truly playing double or nothing.

    Perhaps all of this is why Russia seems to be attempting some of this at night, which is a bizarre fact given that the Russians have so far failed to conduct effective combined arms operations even during the day. Night time is scary for humans and the Russian plan is almost all dependent on Russia somehow fracturing Ukrainian frontline morale. Russia is putting everything into it.

    In other words, other than a miracle, Russia can only hope to win this phase if the Ukrainian forces lose their nerve, and this could happen, so the Russian plan is not hopeless, even if it is desperate.

    In other to achieve the desired effect, Russia is also making extreme use of fires. Artillery and missiles are hitting all Ukrainian lines. It is far more traumatic to be under sustained indirect fire than any other aspect of combat. Even more traumatic than watching all of your platoon get shot. This is because soldiers are not able to fire back. Psychologically, this is horrible.

    Nonetheless, indirect fire is not going to destroy the Ukrainian forces. They are dug in and these fires can only attempt to demoralise them and fix them in place. If Ukrainians can hold, then Russia will need to coordinate a massive assault, with their fires ongoing. Russia will also need to do this before they run out of shells. They do not seem to have this ability, so perhaps they are hoping that them merely showing up will see the Ukrainians rout, which reminds me of their plan to take Kyiv, or perhaps they are hoping to affect a WW1-style fudge; whereby fires "prepare" Ukrainian positions for sequential Russian assault, but if they plan on the latter, they are due for disaster. This would be militarily ignorant of them and quite bizarre.

    The biggest uncertainty, if my overall evaluation is correct, and I don't see a reasonable alternative, is how many hours of rounds does Russia have on the Donbas front?

    Can they sustain their "preparation" for days, weeks or only hours? I suspect it is a few days, at the very most, as Russian logistics have been poor so far and they seemed to be recently scrimping on artillery useage. In other words, the final Russian assault will be attempted tomorrow, the day after, or probably never.

    May God be with the Ukrainians! The sun of victory will begin its rise soon, in no more than 72 hours, and, if they still stand, Ukraine will have won the day, the war and their national freedom.

    Or Russia will completely bottle it and this huge increase in fires will not even be followed up with an assault. In which case, Russia will still look like a viable force, but will be back in the pure horror maths of constantly weakening, while their enemy strengthens. They will have no workable plan going forward and will steadily be defeated, but they will also be depleted by their feinting towards this plan, in which I don't see how they can last more than another month or so.

    I appreciate that this is a very definite and bold summary of the situation. But Russia, other than general mobilisation, has no other options.

    Look for a huge upswell in Russian propagandistic predictions of shock and awe "victory" to confirm my appraisal. They really are relying on an all-in strategy, dependent on collapsing Ukrainian morale.

    It is not a plan that I would do, though I can see why they are doing it. Their chances of success are very slim, but if they do win then Putin's pride and position will be secured. If they fail, then they will only be back into their otherwise hopeless position now, but with even more of their men dead, and it isn't like Putin seems to give a sh*t about the lives of his men. So Putin is gambling nothing that he cares about, with a small chance of winning, which is why he is likely doing it.

    I have not written a humorous list, because it seems that this point really is critical. Either the Russians will not do what I am describing and are accepting their eventual defeat, or they are doing it and will either "win" in the East in the next few days or lose the war completely.

    I do not rate the Russian plan. It is desperation masquerading as strength. It is basically a loud and murderous bluff. But I don't think they have another option. Ukrainians should be firm. The nightmare that Russia is unleashing has no follow-up. It will be truly terrible, but it will also be temporary. I will pray for Ukrainian forces with all of my heart.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  208. Worrisome rumors about Gonzalo Lira abducted by ukronazis are going up.

    • Replies: @Aedib
    @Aedib

    https://twitter.com/Anabel_Villeroy/status/1516068183911903237

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  209. @Aedib
    Worrisome rumors about Gonzalo Lira abducted by ukronazis are going up.

    https://twitter.com/georgegalloway/status/1516127038289158158?cxt=HHwWnIC5-cXgrooqAAAA

    Replies: @Aedib

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Aedib

    How to assess Russian kills.

    Is the Ukrainian a Male between 18-60. Yes.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

  210. The Poles had enough land to keep the aurochs alive, on a preserve, if there had been better management:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C5%82%C4%99d%C3%B3w_Desert

  211. @Aedib
    @Aedib

    https://twitter.com/Anabel_Villeroy/status/1516068183911903237

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    How to assess Russian kills.

    Is the Ukrainian a Male between 18-60. Yes.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Wokechoke

    Info war.

    Alex Jones should be covering this story with what remains of his wits.

    This was funny in spots:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhmUixSXxDo

  212. @Barbarossa
    @songbird


    I think technology can be used to return to tradition. I’ve read several old books about the Old Country, using technology, that it would be nearly impossible to have read otherwise.
     
    It is possible, but on balance I think it will swing overwhelmingly in the other direction, for the reason that you mention in a subsequent comment; too much choice.

    Also my point would be that tradition must necessarily be an action performed and sustained by a group, so the reading may preserve the memory but it doesn't continue the tradition as a living entity.

    Tangentially, are you familiar with the Carmina Gadelica by Alexander Carmichael? The prayers and incantations, together with his notes provide an invaluable window into the lost world of Gaelic thought and practice.

    @AaronB You should check them out too. I think you would greatly appreciate the spiritual perspective.

    Replies: @songbird

    are you familiar with the Carmina Gadelica by Alexander Carmichael?

    Actually, never heard of it, but thanks for mentioning it. Seems popular, which is unexpected to me, as I feel like the Celtic Revival is a period we are long past, for a variety of reasons, including dysgenics and a move away from reading. Most of the more interesting books that I have read about Ireland seem like forgotten tomes.

    Some weeks ago, I was reading about poets and I came across one story that still sticks in my imagination: there was a poet walking along a lonely road, that took shelter under a bush, while it was raining. When the rain was not getting through, he praised the bush so that it grew thick and luxurious. When a single drop got through, he started cursing the bush, so that it wilted, and the downpour soaked him.

    Also my point would be that tradition must necessarily be an action performed and sustained by a group, so the reading may preserve the memory but it doesn’t continue the tradition as a living entity.

    We may be past the time that books can be an organizing force for culture. At least, in a systematic and group-orientated way, not considering the effect on the individual.

    What seems to be a more potent organizing force is film. The bad thing about film is that it takes resources to make an engaging film, and these can be beyond the reach of small countries, and, moreover, film seems to be more of a commercial endeavor, geared towards maximizing profit. Without a nationalist strategic framework, it is probably inherently globalist as well as morally degenerate.

  213. @Yellowface Anon
    @Mikhail

    NATO's influence in Ukraine inevitable triggers confrontation with Russia, and Russia is indeed cornered diplomatically economically. But why it has to be a full-scale invasion aiming for wholesale annexation, of which the premise is based on Putin negating Ukrainian identity?

    Replies: @Mikhail

    NATO’s influence in Ukraine inevitable triggers confrontation with Russia, and Russia is indeed cornered diplomatically economically. But why it has to be a full-scale invasion aiming for wholesale annexation, of which the premise is based on Putin negating Ukrainian identity?

    No substantive proof of a full scale invasion and seeking to wipe out Ukrainian identity.

    A force of no greater than 20o,000 on territory the size of Ukraine isn’t indicative of s full scale military operation. The Kiev regime has been actively favoring the denigration of pro-Russian sentiment in Ukraine. These two points combined, contradict the image of Russia seeking to wipe out Ukrainian identity – unless that identity is by definition anti-Russian, which I don’t accept.

    • Agree: LondonBob
  214. @Wokechoke
    @Aedib

    How to assess Russian kills.

    Is the Ukrainian a Male between 18-60. Yes.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard

    Info war.

    Alex Jones should be covering this story with what remains of his wits.

    This was funny in spots:

  215. @A123
    @songbird


    I’d suppose that a missile was targeted to hit one of the P-500 Bazalts.

    IMO, crazy design, having those things lined up, out on deck, on such a big hull. I believe it is a relic of Cold War thinking
     
    The USSR had periodic issues with bad rocket fuel. My understanding is that if a "weapon ignites but fails to leave the tube" the heat causes the launcher to detach itself from the ship. Everything on fire gets dumped into the sea.

    Alas, I do not have any mechanical details.
    ______________________

    @Sudden Death

    The seawater level in this pic seems to be way above the waterline, whole ship is leaning on its side, so the impact hole (if it was on this side near/at the waterline) may be hidden under the water?
     
    Trying to move while a hole is beneath the waterline? That sounds like a very risky option.

    Perhaps they were trying to lift a hole on the far side above the waterline?
    ______________________

    There are questions that need answers.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @sudden death, @songbird

    My understanding is that if a “weapon ignites but fails to leave the tube” the heat causes the launcher to detach itself from the ship. Everything on fire gets dumped into the sea.

    That’s interesting – I hadn’t heard of that.

    From what I understand, the ship wasn’t actually being used to fire cruise missiles at the time, but for its anti-air capabilities, so it was probably fully loaded.

    I’d suppose a missile strike would compromise the ditch ability, maybe causing the fuel from the Bazalts to leak out and burn through the deck. But I might be mistaken could have been a hit above the waterline.

    During the Falklands, the HMS Sheffield is thought to have sunk without the exocet’s warhead actually detonating. It was the fuel from the rocket motor that did the ship in. Though, it did take a few days to sink.

  216. @AaronB
    @songbird

    I've read Wuthering Heights and enjoyed it tremendously (thanks RSDB for bringing it up).

    Maybe it's due for another reading.

    I think it used to be standard practice to reread classics when one is older and has a more developed and mature take on the world.

    Maybe it's time for me to do that - haven't read the classics in ages.

    I don't necessarily dislike melodrama, and what I disliked in Dickens was the lack of what I'd call "masculine adventure", and what I thought was the sentimental attitude towards misfortune, poverty, etc.

    But these are the attitudes of youth, and was before I had any interest in spirituality. Reading Dickens through the eyes of spirituality I am sure will give me a completely different take.

    I'm also renewing my interest in DH Lawrence, who was a great critic of the Machine and modernity - he seems more topical now than ever!

    Replies: @Yevardian

    I’m also renewing my interest in DH Lawrence, who was a great critic of the Machine and modernity – he seems more topical now than ever!

    D.H. Lawrence is terrible.. maybe even the worst English writer to have ever got into the canon. Lawrence also criticised the recent late-Victorian/Georgian past more than ever addressing modernity.
    Although if you’re interested in authors that dealt with similar thematic issues of sex, propriety and relationships as Lawrence, George Meredith and Samuel Butler are alright.
    Although I don’t find the English write very good romantic literature generally (too emotionally balanced a people?), the Russians do that subgenre much better.

    Of course for the early 20th century reaction to modernity the best English writers are pretty obvious: H.G. Wells, Huxley, Orwell’s essays, and surprisingly Jack London has aged very well. Rhys Davies could write quite movingly about the impact of industrialisation on small Welsh towns. Also Joseph Conrad, though his outlook remained very Eastern European and not at all English.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @Yevardian

    I will keep your words in mind, Yevardian, but I shall have to see for myself.

    I'm actually quite curious about how I will respond to Lawrence - to be honest, I don't remember loving him when younger, but partially, I'm trying to "reassess" my attitude to the classics in light of who I am now, which is a very different person.

    I know Orwell was very appreciative of Lawrence and regarded him as capable of real depth and power, but also being very uneven and somewhat weak in writing novels.

    As far as I understand, Lawrence was very critical of what he saw as the overly intellectual and excessively abstract European civilization of his time, and counselled a return to instinct, emotion, the body, and Nature.

    These themes continue to be highly relevant today, and converge with my current philosophical interests, so I'm very curious about what he has to say.

    I ordered the Plumed Serpent and Women in Love - I shall report my impressions here :)

    I know that George Meredith was hugely popular among intellectuals of his time, and I tried reading him once or twice but couldn't quite get into him - maybe it's time to revisit him too!

    Wells is a fascinating figure because he deals with the themes of modernity, progress, and rationality seemingly from the vantage point of being a supporter of these things - but his "unconscious" mind keeps on "leaking" out the troubling darker side of these phenomena.

    I went through a period where I read most of Wells non-science fiction novels (Tono Bungay, etc), and found them all very enjoyable and surprisingly deep. I don't remember who turned me on to his social fiction - either Orwell, or John Gray.

    Jack London has always been one of my favorites - I've read nearly everything he wrote, including his non-wilderness books, like his memoir of alcoholism John Barleycorn, his travel account of voyaging on his boat, and such works as the Iron Heel, Martin Eden, and People of the Abyss, Before Adam, etc.

    Joseph Conrad has always been one of my all time favorites! I shall have to revisit him too, however he is already a little bit too close to modern nihilism, which I am trying to move away from. But his work deals with themes that can help us overcome modernity, such as how superficial and false the rationalistic outlook is, and human nature is far more mysterious and irrational than modernity pretends, and his work often has a very strong emotional and mythic element and a sense of the sheer wonder and strangeness of the world.

    , @Wokechoke
    @Yevardian

    The Man Who Would be Thursday by Chesterton aged well.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @Philip Owen
    @Yevardian

    I never understood Lawrence. The writing didn't say much to me.

    I have just about heard of Rhys Davies due to a Welsh literary view I subscribe to, Planet. I have never read him. I suppose I must now.

    Replies: @Yevardian, @utu

  217. True pinnacle multireligious multiracialism – union of Muslims, Buddhists and Christians, what’s not to like?

    Perhaps former forum member AltanBakshi is going to war too?:

  218. @Mr. Hack
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Isn't it about time for one of your 20 point updates regarding the Russia/Ukraine war? They're really a special treat because of the factual material that you include is right on, not to mention your very own special sauce of sarcasm. It's nice to see somebody put the various kremlin stooges that show up here regularly in their place. I don't think that you've yet commented on the sinking of the "Moscow" by Odesa yet?

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    This is a big moment. Russia appears to be making a last throw of the dice and committing to an attack along the entire Donbas Front. I assume that they have worked out what I have been saying, which is the following:

    Ukraine gets stronger every day and Russia gets weaker, therefore Russia will never have a better chance, than they do today, of defeating the Ukrainian military and forcing a treaty from a position of strength. Conquest of Kyiv, Odesa, Kharkhov or Mykolaiv is out of the question. The very idea is now ridiculous.

    This is because, despite Russocopes, like “the West is running out of arms with which to supply the Ukrainians”, the truth is that Western supply is flexible and essentially unlimited. It can be scaled up very fast, easily represents the majority of military industrial production in the world, and will only increase in sophistication over time as Ukrainians get trained up.

    In other words, the current Russian offensive is it for Russia. And, given that it is a last throw of the dice, it means that Russia has accepted their now limited possible gains. They will not enact a general mobilisation and will be seeking to “win” the Donbas now, or withdraw to at least pre-war lines. Any other plan is undermined by their current operation.

    These are important facts for the Ukrainians to keep in mind, as they should boost morale. This war is not going to last much longer, if only Ukraine can hold in the inferno. Russia is gambling everything on this.

    So can Russia succeed in this limited way in this gamble?

    In order to succeed, Russia will have to completely rout the Ukrainian forces in the East. It is not enough for Russia to force them to tactically withdraw, as Russia will be exhausted by their attempted advance and will then be extremely vulnerable.

    However this does not mean that Ukraine should withdraw, except to trade limited space for enemy attrition, as momentum can have an effect of its own, but Ukraine losing some ground is not a problem.

    Furthermore, given the desperation of the overall situation for Russia, I am still surprised at how lightly manned they are for the task ahead. They seem to have only maybe 60,000 troops “concentrated” on a massive front.

    I assume this means that they will attempt to break Ukrainian lines at specific points, in order to reinforce success and hope for a Ukrainian panic, but such advances will be extremely vulnerable to Ukrainian reserves used offensively. Russian fires will not be able to protect those Russian infiltrations. Putin is truly playing double or nothing.

    Perhaps all of this is why Russia seems to be attempting some of this at night, which is a bizarre fact given that the Russians have so far failed to conduct effective combined arms operations even during the day. Night time is scary for humans and the Russian plan is almost all dependent on Russia somehow fracturing Ukrainian frontline morale. Russia is putting everything into it.

    In other words, other than a miracle, Russia can only hope to win this phase if the Ukrainian forces lose their nerve, and this could happen, so the Russian plan is not hopeless, even if it is desperate.

    In other to achieve the desired effect, Russia is also making extreme use of fires. Artillery and missiles are hitting all Ukrainian lines. It is far more traumatic to be under sustained indirect fire than any other aspect of combat. Even more traumatic than watching all of your platoon get shot. This is because soldiers are not able to fire back. Psychologically, this is horrible.

    Nonetheless, indirect fire is not going to destroy the Ukrainian forces. They are dug in and these fires can only attempt to demoralise them and fix them in place. If Ukrainians can hold, then Russia will need to coordinate a massive assault, with their fires ongoing. Russia will also need to do this before they run out of shells. They do not seem to have this ability, so perhaps they are hoping that them merely showing up will see the Ukrainians rout, which reminds me of their plan to take Kyiv, or perhaps they are hoping to affect a WW1-style fudge; whereby fires “prepare” Ukrainian positions for sequential Russian assault, but if they plan on the latter, they are due for disaster. This would be militarily ignorant of them and quite bizarre.

    The biggest uncertainty, if my overall evaluation is correct, and I don’t see a reasonable alternative, is how many hours of rounds does Russia have on the Donbas front?

    Can they sustain their “preparation” for days, weeks or only hours? I suspect it is a few days, at the very most, as Russian logistics have been poor so far and they seemed to be recently scrimping on artillery useage. In other words, the final Russian assault will be attempted tomorrow, the day after, or probably never.

    May God be with the Ukrainians! The sun of victory will begin its rise soon, in no more than 72 hours, and, if they still stand, Ukraine will have won the day, the war and their national freedom.

    Or Russia will completely bottle it and this huge increase in fires will not even be followed up with an assault. In which case, Russia will still look like a viable force, but will be back in the pure horror maths of constantly weakening, while their enemy strengthens. They will have no workable plan going forward and will steadily be defeated, but they will also be depleted by their feinting towards this plan, in which I don’t see how they can last more than another month or so.

    I appreciate that this is a very definite and bold summary of the situation. But Russia, other than general mobilisation, has no other options.

    Look for a huge upswell in Russian propagandistic predictions of shock and awe “victory” to confirm my appraisal. They really are relying on an all-in strategy, dependent on collapsing Ukrainian morale.

    It is not a plan that I would do, though I can see why they are doing it. Their chances of success are very slim, but if they do win then Putin’s pride and position will be secured. If they fail, then they will only be back into their otherwise hopeless position now, but with even more of their men dead, and it isn’t like Putin seems to give a sh*t about the lives of his men. So Putin is gambling nothing that he cares about, with a small chance of winning, which is why he is likely doing it.

    I have not written a humorous list, because it seems that this point really is critical. Either the Russians will not do what I am describing and are accepting their eventual defeat, or they are doing it and will either “win” in the East in the next few days or lose the war completely.

    I do not rate the Russian plan. It is desperation masquerading as strength. It is basically a loud and murderous bluff. But I don’t think they have another option. Ukrainians should be firm. The nightmare that Russia is unleashing has no follow-up. It will be truly terrible, but it will also be temporary. I will pray for Ukrainian forces with all of my heart.

    • Thanks: Philip Owen
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Triteleia Laxa

    Thank you very much for your very sober analyses of the situation in Ukraine today. I too will be praying especially hard for the next 72 hours for the Lord's protection, in the guise of St. Michael the Archangel the patron saint of Kyiv.

  219. @Mr. Hack
    @Seraphim

    Sounds about as promising as the "regathering of the Carolingian lands", or perhaps, the regathering of the "Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth lands"...the "regathering of the Scythian lands". This current war shows the world how ridiculous Russian political through has become, mired in the muck of the 12th century. :-)

    Replies: @Seraphim

    What I hope for is the ‘regathering’ of the Romanian lands. Their liberation from the Ukrainian yoke.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Seraphim

    Romania is not even able to unite with Moldavia, certainly a core Romanian land, thanks to Russian duplicity, that you seem Okay with. You're a Romanian Russophile right?

    Replies: @Seraphim

  220. @Yevardian
    @AaronB


    I’m also renewing my interest in DH Lawrence, who was a great critic of the Machine and modernity – he seems more topical now than ever!
     
    D.H. Lawrence is terrible.. maybe even the worst English writer to have ever got into the canon. Lawrence also criticised the recent late-Victorian/Georgian past more than ever addressing modernity.
    Although if you're interested in authors that dealt with similar thematic issues of sex, propriety and relationships as Lawrence, George Meredith and Samuel Butler are alright.
    Although I don't find the English write very good romantic literature generally (too emotionally balanced a people?), the Russians do that subgenre much better.

    Of course for the early 20th century reaction to modernity the best English writers are pretty obvious: H.G. Wells, Huxley, Orwell's essays, and surprisingly Jack London has aged very well. Rhys Davies could write quite movingly about the impact of industrialisation on small Welsh towns. Also Joseph Conrad, though his outlook remained very Eastern European and not at all English.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Wokechoke, @Philip Owen

    I will keep your words in mind, Yevardian, but I shall have to see for myself.

    I’m actually quite curious about how I will respond to Lawrence – to be honest, I don’t remember loving him when younger, but partially, I’m trying to “reassess” my attitude to the classics in light of who I am now, which is a very different person.

    I know Orwell was very appreciative of Lawrence and regarded him as capable of real depth and power, but also being very uneven and somewhat weak in writing novels.

    As far as I understand, Lawrence was very critical of what he saw as the overly intellectual and excessively abstract European civilization of his time, and counselled a return to instinct, emotion, the body, and Nature.

    These themes continue to be highly relevant today, and converge with my current philosophical interests, so I’m very curious about what he has to say.

    I ordered the Plumed Serpent and Women in Love – I shall report my impressions here 🙂

    I know that George Meredith was hugely popular among intellectuals of his time, and I tried reading him once or twice but couldn’t quite get into him – maybe it’s time to revisit him too!

    Wells is a fascinating figure because he deals with the themes of modernity, progress, and rationality seemingly from the vantage point of being a supporter of these things – but his “unconscious” mind keeps on “leaking” out the troubling darker side of these phenomena.

    I went through a period where I read most of Wells non-science fiction novels (Tono Bungay, etc), and found them all very enjoyable and surprisingly deep. I don’t remember who turned me on to his social fiction – either Orwell, or John Gray.

    Jack London has always been one of my favorites – I’ve read nearly everything he wrote, including his non-wilderness books, like his memoir of alcoholism John Barleycorn, his travel account of voyaging on his boat, and such works as the Iron Heel, Martin Eden, and People of the Abyss, Before Adam, etc.

    Joseph Conrad has always been one of my all time favorites! I shall have to revisit him too, however he is already a little bit too close to modern nihilism, which I am trying to move away from. But his work deals with themes that can help us overcome modernity, such as how superficial and false the rationalistic outlook is, and human nature is far more mysterious and irrational than modernity pretends, and his work often has a very strong emotional and mythic element and a sense of the sheer wonder and strangeness of the world.

  221. @Yevardian
    @AaronB


    I’m also renewing my interest in DH Lawrence, who was a great critic of the Machine and modernity – he seems more topical now than ever!
     
    D.H. Lawrence is terrible.. maybe even the worst English writer to have ever got into the canon. Lawrence also criticised the recent late-Victorian/Georgian past more than ever addressing modernity.
    Although if you're interested in authors that dealt with similar thematic issues of sex, propriety and relationships as Lawrence, George Meredith and Samuel Butler are alright.
    Although I don't find the English write very good romantic literature generally (too emotionally balanced a people?), the Russians do that subgenre much better.

    Of course for the early 20th century reaction to modernity the best English writers are pretty obvious: H.G. Wells, Huxley, Orwell's essays, and surprisingly Jack London has aged very well. Rhys Davies could write quite movingly about the impact of industrialisation on small Welsh towns. Also Joseph Conrad, though his outlook remained very Eastern European and not at all English.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Wokechoke, @Philip Owen

    The Man Who Would be Thursday by Chesterton aged well.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Wokechoke

    Chesterton has said that he wasn't a Christian when he wrote it, which makes it a weird read to me.

  222. Let’s assume for a moment the Russians packed up their gear and went home. They would continue to keep and defend Crimea but nothing more.

    How would things play out in Ukraine?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @niceland

    They have to keep Kherson and Melitopol. For the water.

  223. @niceland
    Let's assume for a moment the Russians packed up their gear and went home. They would continue to keep and defend Crimea but nothing more.

    How would things play out in Ukraine?

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    They have to keep Kherson and Melitopol. For the water.

  224. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Mr. Hack

    This is a big moment. Russia appears to be making a last throw of the dice and committing to an attack along the entire Donbas Front. I assume that they have worked out what I have been saying, which is the following:

    Ukraine gets stronger every day and Russia gets weaker, therefore Russia will never have a better chance, than they do today, of defeating the Ukrainian military and forcing a treaty from a position of strength. Conquest of Kyiv, Odesa, Kharkhov or Mykolaiv is out of the question. The very idea is now ridiculous.

    This is because, despite Russocopes, like "the West is running out of arms with which to supply the Ukrainians", the truth is that Western supply is flexible and essentially unlimited. It can be scaled up very fast, easily represents the majority of military industrial production in the world, and will only increase in sophistication over time as Ukrainians get trained up.

    In other words, the current Russian offensive is it for Russia. And, given that it is a last throw of the dice, it means that Russia has accepted their now limited possible gains. They will not enact a general mobilisation and will be seeking to "win" the Donbas now, or withdraw to at least pre-war lines. Any other plan is undermined by their current operation.

    These are important facts for the Ukrainians to keep in mind, as they should boost morale. This war is not going to last much longer, if only Ukraine can hold in the inferno. Russia is gambling everything on this.

    So can Russia succeed in this limited way in this gamble?

    In order to succeed, Russia will have to completely rout the Ukrainian forces in the East. It is not enough for Russia to force them to tactically withdraw, as Russia will be exhausted by their attempted advance and will then be extremely vulnerable.

    However this does not mean that Ukraine should withdraw, except to trade limited space for enemy attrition, as momentum can have an effect of its own, but Ukraine losing some ground is not a problem.

    Furthermore, given the desperation of the overall situation for Russia, I am still surprised at how lightly manned they are for the task ahead. They seem to have only maybe 60,000 troops "concentrated" on a massive front.

    I assume this means that they will attempt to break Ukrainian lines at specific points, in order to reinforce success and hope for a Ukrainian panic, but such advances will be extremely vulnerable to Ukrainian reserves used offensively. Russian fires will not be able to protect those Russian infiltrations. Putin is truly playing double or nothing.

    Perhaps all of this is why Russia seems to be attempting some of this at night, which is a bizarre fact given that the Russians have so far failed to conduct effective combined arms operations even during the day. Night time is scary for humans and the Russian plan is almost all dependent on Russia somehow fracturing Ukrainian frontline morale. Russia is putting everything into it.

    In other words, other than a miracle, Russia can only hope to win this phase if the Ukrainian forces lose their nerve, and this could happen, so the Russian plan is not hopeless, even if it is desperate.

    In other to achieve the desired effect, Russia is also making extreme use of fires. Artillery and missiles are hitting all Ukrainian lines. It is far more traumatic to be under sustained indirect fire than any other aspect of combat. Even more traumatic than watching all of your platoon get shot. This is because soldiers are not able to fire back. Psychologically, this is horrible.

    Nonetheless, indirect fire is not going to destroy the Ukrainian forces. They are dug in and these fires can only attempt to demoralise them and fix them in place. If Ukrainians can hold, then Russia will need to coordinate a massive assault, with their fires ongoing. Russia will also need to do this before they run out of shells. They do not seem to have this ability, so perhaps they are hoping that them merely showing up will see the Ukrainians rout, which reminds me of their plan to take Kyiv, or perhaps they are hoping to affect a WW1-style fudge; whereby fires "prepare" Ukrainian positions for sequential Russian assault, but if they plan on the latter, they are due for disaster. This would be militarily ignorant of them and quite bizarre.

    The biggest uncertainty, if my overall evaluation is correct, and I don't see a reasonable alternative, is how many hours of rounds does Russia have on the Donbas front?

    Can they sustain their "preparation" for days, weeks or only hours? I suspect it is a few days, at the very most, as Russian logistics have been poor so far and they seemed to be recently scrimping on artillery useage. In other words, the final Russian assault will be attempted tomorrow, the day after, or probably never.

    May God be with the Ukrainians! The sun of victory will begin its rise soon, in no more than 72 hours, and, if they still stand, Ukraine will have won the day, the war and their national freedom.

    Or Russia will completely bottle it and this huge increase in fires will not even be followed up with an assault. In which case, Russia will still look like a viable force, but will be back in the pure horror maths of constantly weakening, while their enemy strengthens. They will have no workable plan going forward and will steadily be defeated, but they will also be depleted by their feinting towards this plan, in which I don't see how they can last more than another month or so.

    I appreciate that this is a very definite and bold summary of the situation. But Russia, other than general mobilisation, has no other options.

    Look for a huge upswell in Russian propagandistic predictions of shock and awe "victory" to confirm my appraisal. They really are relying on an all-in strategy, dependent on collapsing Ukrainian morale.

    It is not a plan that I would do, though I can see why they are doing it. Their chances of success are very slim, but if they do win then Putin's pride and position will be secured. If they fail, then they will only be back into their otherwise hopeless position now, but with even more of their men dead, and it isn't like Putin seems to give a sh*t about the lives of his men. So Putin is gambling nothing that he cares about, with a small chance of winning, which is why he is likely doing it.

    I have not written a humorous list, because it seems that this point really is critical. Either the Russians will not do what I am describing and are accepting their eventual defeat, or they are doing it and will either "win" in the East in the next few days or lose the war completely.

    I do not rate the Russian plan. It is desperation masquerading as strength. It is basically a loud and murderous bluff. But I don't think they have another option. Ukrainians should be firm. The nightmare that Russia is unleashing has no follow-up. It will be truly terrible, but it will also be temporary. I will pray for Ukrainian forces with all of my heart.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Thank you very much for your very sober analyses of the situation in Ukraine today. I too will be praying especially hard for the next 72 hours for the Lord’s protection, in the guise of St. Michael the Archangel the patron saint of Kyiv.

  225. @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    What I hope for is the 'regathering' of the Romanian lands. Their liberation from the Ukrainian yoke.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Romania is not even able to unite with Moldavia, certainly a core Romanian land, thanks to Russian duplicity, that you seem Okay with. You’re a Romanian Russophile right?

    • Replies: @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    How many times did I tell you and your sidekick AP (to my recollection in no uncertain terms) that I am guilty as charged?
    Anyway it is not for Romania to unite with 'Moldavia', but the other way round. It is not 'Moldavia' which is the 'core Romanian land'. Moldova is a 'Romanian land' but it is at the external margin of the 'core' of Romanian lands towards the Scythian/Sarmatian/Khazar/Cossack 'Barbaricum'. The 'spine' of the Romanian lands is the Danube and its affluent rivers from north and south. The core of Romania is the ancient Kingdom of Dacia, the Roman Provinces of Dacia, Moesia, Scythia Minor. Romania is called 'Romania' because it was always part of the 'Imperium Romanorum'/Byzantine Commonwealth, to which the 'Rus' adhered forever when the savage Varangians have would been illuminated by their baptism in the waters of the Dnieper and became the fiercest 'Guard of the Empire', the 'Katehon' that ''holds back the coming into the world of the antichrist."
    Do you really think that 'pride parades' are what would keep the Russians at bay? Plying piano with the dick (reason why Elenski was bombarded as president) in front of guffawing audiences who wouldn't cover their faces in shame?

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Mr. Hack

  226. Trump has said that the Russian invasion of Ukraine is a genocide, but has he called the Holodomor a genocide? And if not, why not?

    Too bad there wasn’t a way to switch his brain with Zemmour.

  227. @Wokechoke
    @Yevardian

    The Man Who Would be Thursday by Chesterton aged well.

    Replies: @songbird

    Chesterton has said that he wasn’t a Christian when he wrote it, which makes it a weird read to me.

  228. @silviosilver
    @songbird


    Before that it was about changelings, and some of it was genuinely creepy.
     
    Have you seen the horror movie by that name, The Changeling (1980), with the great George C. Scott? I didn't think it was outright scary, but I enjoyed the building sense of creepiness.

    Replies: @songbird, @songbird

    Just watched it. IMO, definitely worth a watch.

    Atmospheric. Good performances, and locations. I was expecting it to be a regular haunted house story, but I appreciated (spoilers)

    [MORE]
    how it tied to things outside the house. If I had to nitpick a little:
    1.) two baptism medals: it didn’t made sense to me, when I was watching it, as the murder was probably premeditated, so he should have grabbed it. But I guess I can forgive it, as it could be explained away – if he forgot to remove it in the heat of the moment, before dumping the body.

    My second point I make more because it amuses me:

    2.) I felt like someone was cucked, but I can’t figure out who. Maybe, the ghost, as he did not get his revenge on the guy that killed him, or his natural progeny, who carried his evil genes, but rather on an adoptee, who did not take part in the killing. Or, maybe, the murderer because he had no natural progeny to which to funnel the inheritance.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @songbird


    Just watched it. IMO, definitely worth a watch.
     
    Great, always happy to hear it when a recommendation works out. :)

    Regarding the medallion, maybe it wasn't on the body, but the "ghost" made it appear there the way it did with his daughter's ball in the house, after it had been thrown into the river.

    And yeah, the ending wasn't particularly satisfying. I find that a bit more forgivable in a horror than in other sorts of movies.

    Replies: @songbird

  229. Bezos only has one child compared to Musk’s seven.

    OTOH, two of Musk’s came from a crazy woman who is now dating a tranny. And five underwent some form of womb-sharing and weren’t created by sperm running the natural gauntlet that it is supposed to run. Perhaps, he would have been better off with a harem.

    Anyway, it would be really interesting to learn more about the billionaires who have a lot of children, compared to those who have few.

  230. @Mr. Hack
    @Seraphim

    Romania is not even able to unite with Moldavia, certainly a core Romanian land, thanks to Russian duplicity, that you seem Okay with. You're a Romanian Russophile right?

    Replies: @Seraphim

    How many times did I tell you and your sidekick AP (to my recollection in no uncertain terms) that I am guilty as charged?
    Anyway it is not for Romania to unite with ‘Moldavia’, but the other way round. It is not ‘Moldavia’ which is the ‘core Romanian land’. Moldova is a ‘Romanian land’ but it is at the external margin of the ‘core’ of Romanian lands towards the Scythian/Sarmatian/Khazar/Cossack ‘Barbaricum’. The ‘spine’ of the Romanian lands is the Danube and its affluent rivers from north and south. The core of Romania is the ancient Kingdom of Dacia, the Roman Provinces of Dacia, Moesia, Scythia Minor. Romania is called ‘Romania’ because it was always part of the ‘Imperium Romanorum’/Byzantine Commonwealth, to which the ‘Rus’ adhered forever when the savage Varangians have would been illuminated by their baptism in the waters of the Dnieper and became the fiercest ‘Guard of the Empire’, the ‘Katehon’ that ”holds back the coming into the world of the antichrist.”
    Do you really think that ‘pride parades’ are what would keep the Russians at bay? Plying piano with the dick (reason why Elenski was bombarded as president) in front of guffawing audiences who wouldn’t cover their faces in shame?

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    @Seraphim


    Romania is not even able to unite with Moldavia, certainly a core Romanian land, thanks to Russian duplicity, that you seem Okay with. You’re a Romanian Russophile right?
     

    How many times did I tell you and your sidekick AP (to my recollection in no uncertain terms) that I am guilty as charged?
     
    Tbh, I myself find it pretty hard to reconcile these two things. Certainly a Bulgarian, Serbian, Christian Caucasian, Greek or pre-2014-Ukrainian Russophile is easily explicable, I could even see a creative case made for a Balt (without Russian rule, Balts and their language would have been assimilated as Swedes, Germans or Danes), but from my pov, Romania went from the only civilised Balkan country (or at least government) to having probably the worst Communist regime in all of Europe except Albania.

    I suppose it could be argued Romania owes its independence from the Turks to Russia, and cultural similarities. But from my wide experience of Romanians, they're the most anti-Russia people in all of Europe, excepting Balts and Poles.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Seraphim

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Seraphim

    So, you try to distance yourself from Moldavia by claiming some sort of half truth about its "external margin of the "core" of the Romanian land", and have concocted some tragic-comedy outcry about wanting a ‘regathering’ of the Romanian lands. Their liberation from the Ukrainian yoke."

    The only lands that have really been under any sort of dispute between Ukraine and Romania have been in Bukovina. So Moldova is an "external margin" according to your revisionist jargon, yet Bukovina, it seems, is in need of liberation from the Ukrainian yoke? Your arguments are weak indeed for you seem to forget that Bukovina was at one time wholly a part of Moldova. Do you want to try again?

    Replies: @Wokechoke

  231. @LondonBob
    @Wokechoke

    Never a shortage of fighter planes, British industry churned them out, the issue was pilots. The Battle of Britain was never a close contest, despite the mythology constructed.

    Replies: @Greasy William, @Wielgus

    Despite aircraft plants being bombed, the Germans kept building planes without much interruption in WW2. But they lacked the pilots to fly them and eventually the fuel for them as well.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    @Wielgus

    The Germans made all their own ocmponents and machine tools.

  232. @sher singh
    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1498556301022007296?s=20

    Replies: @AP

    I saw lots of Sikhs in a Sikh aid organization at the Polish-Ukrainian border, making free food for incoming refugees. Thanks guys!

    • Agree: sher singh
    • LOL: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @sher singh
    @AP

    No credit to me only those Sevadars (volunteers) and the Guru.
    It's called Langar btw,

    Degh Tegh Fateh or the Victory to Cauldron & Sword - references protection & alms to the poor.
    It is the Sikh spiritual-political slogan of universal rule||

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

  233. For the conspiratorially-inclined, watch when this piece (on New York Times of all places) is gone. If it is indeed like the theory of Hitler being a British agent, even weakly argued suggestions on MSM like this will be memory-holed.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/03/opinion/putin-cia-weakening-russia.html

  234. In another time those who are wishing for a NATO-Russia showdown and then NATO/US defeat with MAD would be apocalypticists. And you know what, Revelations are driving how Putin and Judeo-Christian-Islamic religious nationalists think. They won’t be wrong because 55% of the world belong to these religions and a further 22% believe in religions with a concept of Kali Yuga.

    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @S
    @Yellowface Anon


    And you know what, Revelations are driving how Putin and Judeo-Christian-Islamic religious nationalists think. They won’t be wrong because 55% of the world belong to these religions and a further 22% believe in religions with a concept of Kali Yuga.
     
    Thanks. It can indeed be useful to have a good grasp of the various belief systems held by the peoples of the world to better understand the global situation.

    People generally seem to have a consciousness of right and wrong, truth and lie. However, all too often when a chance for ill gotten gain (from someone else) comes along they will 'short circuit' this consciousness with a tall tale they tell themselves, ie that they are somehow 'helping' this individual or people which they are in truth robbing and plundering, what I call 'civilizing the barbarians'.

    As an example, I doubt Vercingetorix and his Gauls saw it as help or 'civilizing' when he, as their leader, was ritually strangled in a Roman dungeon and many thousands of the defeated Gauls were taken to Rome as slaves when their revolt failed. The Gallic Wars, from whence their revolt sprang, in reality likely had much more to do with Julius Caesar satisfying his personal political ambitions in Rome via a victoriously fought war, not to mention the rich gold mines the Gauls reportedly held, than anything else.

    But, people have to live with themselves and their conscious, and hence the tall tales.

    This unfortunate human tendency can be compounded with certain belief systems. In the case of the US and UK, as well as Australia, New Zealand, and Canada, historically some powerful members of the Anglo-Saxon establishment and their hangers on have held the absurd belief that they were of the 'lost tribes of Israel'. This was called 'Anglo-American Israelism', aka 'British Israelism'. [This unhealthy situation is compounded even further with the long dysfunctional relationship that has existed between the Anglo-Saxon and Jewish peoples, the latter actually really being Jewish, much unlike those Anglo-Saxons who believe in the idea of British Israelism.]

    Below is an excerpt from an outstanding (albeit lengthy) article on this subject, entitled
    Imperial British-Israelism: Justification for an Empire. Well worth the time to read in full for it's insights.

    '...many British-Israelites viewed the Second World War as just a precursor to a war with the Soviet Union which would usher in the Second Coming of Christ and the Millennium.'

    CONCLUSION: THE MANDATE OF IMPERIAL BRITISH-ISRAELISM

    'If the British people are understood as the modern-day descendants of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel, then their "just title" to a world empire should be obvious. Their mandate is their birthright as the Lost Ten Tribes of Israel, their royalty as descending from Judah and David, and their faith in Jesus Christ. God had promised that they would be as numerous as the stars in the night sky and the sand on all the beaches of the world. Their domain was to be characterized by a large community of nations which would push the inhabitants of the regions they occupied to the very ends of their land.'
     

    'They were to be the most powerful nation on the earth--indeed, they would OWN the world. They would control the strategic positions of the planet, the economic points of power would be within their sphere rule, and under their flags would reside the people who would herald the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the ends of the earth. The British people would have nothing to fear from their upstart neighbors on the continent; France had been put in her place through the defeat of Napoleon's navy at the Battle of Trafalgar, and his army at Waterloo. Both the Kaiser's Germany and the Fuehrer's Third Reich would continue to be an irritant, but both would eventually crumble to the mighty Anglo-Saxon Union of the British Empire and the United States, the modern day manifestations of Ephraim and Manasseh.'
     

    'As [British] Israel, everything they did had cosmic importance, and every war they fought was just, noble, and within God's plan. While being waged, each of the world wars had been viewed as the war of Armageddon: the First World War had been the "war to end all wars", and many British-Israelites viewed the Second World War as just a precursor to a war with the Soviet Union which would usher in the Second Coming of Christ and the Millennium.'
     
    http://revneal.org/Writings/Writings/british.htm
  235. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @utu

    Everybody is a conspiracy theo-rizismist. If you don't think Mossad did nine eleven you think that a fraternity of holocaust deniers is on the prowl who want to gas jews. Don't call the man a stupid name. If you wish to criticize the point he is making then do that.

    Ad hominem arguments do not convince anybody of anything that is paying attention.

    Who runs the Mutter Museum? HMMMMMMM? : )

    Replies: @Wokechoke, @Yevardian

    Who runs the Mutter Museum? HMMMMMMM? : )

    Our Benevolent Overlord? (PBUH)

    So I finally took time to listen to Peter Zeihan, the man is certainly seems like an unapologetic American imperialist, but he’s quite affable, makes a good case, and most importantly, doesn’t seem to be a hypocrite or intentionally dishonest. I might even try reading one of his triumphalist books

    This second interview is also decent, though the host is apparently some crypto-troglodyte, his questions can be safely skipped in the final quarter.

    • Replies: @utu
    @Yevardian

    Peter Zeihan? Very impressive very effective, very persuasive and so on but I am skeptical. He might be right on some issues but I am growing very suspicious of him. I doubt that his graphs on demographics and sustainable energy are that meaningful that his conclusion form them have good scientific basis. They are props for his spiel and performance. It all has a strong whiff of charlatanry.

    He comes from George Friedman's stable and even if he is independent of him he retains George Friedman style including charm and charisma. How good analyst and forecaster was George Friedman? In 1991 he and his wife wrote "The Coming War with Japan"


    Friedman and LeBard predicted that a series of trade wars between the US and Japan would lead to a final rupture between the two countries. The authors also expressed the view that, as with Imperial Japan in the 1930s and 40s, Japan would seek to take control of sources of raw materials and force the US out of the western Pacific. The authors saw the only alternative to a hot war between the US and Japan as being a "long, miserable cold war".

    The original book jacket of the book stated that "conflict will escalate in the next two decades to include the possibility—indeed probability—of an armed conflict, a second US–Japanese war in the Pacific". Later editions replaced this statement with positive reviews. - Wiki
     

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  236. @Mikhail
    @Yevardian


    The past month’s events have been an icy cold shower for anyone with personal or professional connections to Russia who hasn’t been deliberately burying their hand in the sand.
     
    Overlooking Kiev regime fault lines is neither ethical nor accurate.

    Replies: @Yevardian

    Ipse dixit. You’d have to be more specific. From my vantage point (which includes many pro-Russian commentators, Yuri Podolyaka, Starikov, etc), seeing such fault lines where there were in fact none, is probably the number one mistake Russian made in getting into this war.

    I mean, Russia’s initial plan seems to have been to re-instate Yanukovich from exile, you would think they would have picked someone less divisive if someone else was available. I thought Medvechuk would be more competent at least, but now the Ukrainians have taken their former MP as a POW, while he was hiding incognito as a common soldier, no less.

    But I’m all ears if you have any real facts you think people should know about.

    • Disagree: Mikhail
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Yevardian


    Ipse dixit. You’d have to be more specific. From my vantage point (which includes many pro-Russian commentators, Yuri Podolyaka, Starikov, etc), seeing such fault lines where there were in fact none, is probably the number one mistake Russian made in getting into this war.

    I mean, Russia’s initial plan seems to have been to re-instate Yanukovich from exile, you would think they would have picked someone less divisive if someone else was available. I thought Medvechuk would be more competent at least, but now the Ukrainians have taken their former MP as a POW, while he was hiding incognito as a common soldier, no less.

    But I’m all ears if you have any real facts you think people should know about.

     

    What proof of such for Yanukovych? According to at least one Western source, the Russian government favored someone else you didn't mention. That claim seems absurd given that person (whose name escapes me) is quite inconsequential and (upon further review) not on good terms with the Russian government.

    To borrow from you: But I’m all ears if you have any real facts you think people should know about.
    , @siberiancat
    @Yevardian

    The only person from the Ukrainian pre-Maidan politicians who is playing any role on the Russian side is Oleg Tsarev. Not that the role is large.

    Yanukovich was and is invisible.

  237. @Yevardian
    @Mikhail

    Ipse dixit. You'd have to be more specific. From my vantage point (which includes many pro-Russian commentators, Yuri Podolyaka, Starikov, etc), seeing such fault lines where there were in fact none, is probably the number one mistake Russian made in getting into this war.

    I mean, Russia's initial plan seems to have been to re-instate Yanukovich from exile, you would think they would have picked someone less divisive if someone else was available. I thought Medvechuk would be more competent at least, but now the Ukrainians have taken their former MP as a POW, while he was hiding incognito as a common soldier, no less.

    But I'm all ears if you have any real facts you think people should know about.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @siberiancat

    Ipse dixit. You’d have to be more specific. From my vantage point (which includes many pro-Russian commentators, Yuri Podolyaka, Starikov, etc), seeing such fault lines where there were in fact none, is probably the number one mistake Russian made in getting into this war.

    I mean, Russia’s initial plan seems to have been to re-instate Yanukovich from exile, you would think they would have picked someone less divisive if someone else was available. I thought Medvechuk would be more competent at least, but now the Ukrainians have taken their former MP as a POW, while he was hiding incognito as a common soldier, no less.

    But I’m all ears if you have any real facts you think people should know about.

    What proof of such for Yanukovych? According to at least one Western source, the Russian government favored someone else you didn’t mention. That claim seems absurd given that person (whose name escapes me) is quite inconsequential and (upon further review) not on good terms with the Russian government.

    To borrow from you: But I’m all ears if you have any real facts you think people should know about.

  238. @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    How many times did I tell you and your sidekick AP (to my recollection in no uncertain terms) that I am guilty as charged?
    Anyway it is not for Romania to unite with 'Moldavia', but the other way round. It is not 'Moldavia' which is the 'core Romanian land'. Moldova is a 'Romanian land' but it is at the external margin of the 'core' of Romanian lands towards the Scythian/Sarmatian/Khazar/Cossack 'Barbaricum'. The 'spine' of the Romanian lands is the Danube and its affluent rivers from north and south. The core of Romania is the ancient Kingdom of Dacia, the Roman Provinces of Dacia, Moesia, Scythia Minor. Romania is called 'Romania' because it was always part of the 'Imperium Romanorum'/Byzantine Commonwealth, to which the 'Rus' adhered forever when the savage Varangians have would been illuminated by their baptism in the waters of the Dnieper and became the fiercest 'Guard of the Empire', the 'Katehon' that ''holds back the coming into the world of the antichrist."
    Do you really think that 'pride parades' are what would keep the Russians at bay? Plying piano with the dick (reason why Elenski was bombarded as president) in front of guffawing audiences who wouldn't cover their faces in shame?

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Mr. Hack

    Romania is not even able to unite with Moldavia, certainly a core Romanian land, thanks to Russian duplicity, that you seem Okay with. You’re a Romanian Russophile right?

    How many times did I tell you and your sidekick AP (to my recollection in no uncertain terms) that I am guilty as charged?

    Tbh, I myself find it pretty hard to reconcile these two things. Certainly a Bulgarian, Serbian, Christian Caucasian, Greek or pre-2014-Ukrainian Russophile is easily explicable, I could even see a creative case made for a Balt (without Russian rule, Balts and their language would have been assimilated as Swedes, Germans or Danes), but from my pov, Romania went from the only civilised Balkan country (or at least government) to having probably the worst Communist regime in all of Europe except Albania.

    I suppose it could be argued Romania owes its independence from the Turks to Russia, and cultural similarities. But from my wide experience of Romanians, they’re the most anti-Russia people in all of Europe, excepting Balts and Poles.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Yevardian

    He very much seems to exhibit schizophrenic traits when it comes to this Romanian/Russian duality. :-)

    Replies: @sudden death

    , @Seraphim
    @Yevardian

    It certainly depends to whom you were talking in your 'wide experience' of Romanians. I guess that they were the 'westernized' category which believes that being anti-Russian is the ticket to be 'accepted' by 'Europe' (and get 'European funds'). But this attitude has deep seated roots in the relentless 'Western' anti-Orthodox propaganda in all its disguises Catholic, Protestant, progressive, liberal, revolutionary, LGBT, Open Society, you name it).

  239. @Yevardian
    @Emil Nikola Richard


    Who runs the Mutter Museum? HMMMMMMM? : )
     
    Our Benevolent Overlord? (PBUH)

    So I finally took time to listen to Peter Zeihan, the man is certainly seems like an unapologetic American imperialist, but he's quite affable, makes a good case, and most importantly, doesn't seem to be a hypocrite or intentionally dishonest. I might even try reading one of his triumphalist books

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2C42p_8XfI

    This second interview is also decent, though the host is apparently some crypto-troglodyte, his questions can be safely skipped in the final quarter.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2C42p_8XfI

    Replies: @utu

    Peter Zeihan? Very impressive very effective, very persuasive and so on but I am skeptical. He might be right on some issues but I am growing very suspicious of him. I doubt that his graphs on demographics and sustainable energy are that meaningful that his conclusion form them have good scientific basis. They are props for his spiel and performance. It all has a strong whiff of charlatanry.

    He comes from George Friedman’s stable and even if he is independent of him he retains George Friedman style including charm and charisma. How good analyst and forecaster was George Friedman? In 1991 he and his wife wrote “The Coming War with Japan”

    Friedman and LeBard predicted that a series of trade wars between the US and Japan would lead to a final rupture between the two countries. The authors also expressed the view that, as with Imperial Japan in the 1930s and 40s, Japan would seek to take control of sources of raw materials and force the US out of the western Pacific. The authors saw the only alternative to a hot war between the US and Japan as being a “long, miserable cold war”.

    The original book jacket of the book stated that “conflict will escalate in the next two decades to include the possibility—indeed probability—of an armed conflict, a second US–Japanese war in the Pacific”. Later editions replaced this statement with positive reviews. – Wiki

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @utu

    Probably the same playbook was transposed to China, because Japan remains an American vassal where most of its political class find advantages to toe the American line. In which case it is largely fulfilling before our own eyes.

  240. Turkish Lira up almost ten percent against the Japanese Yen in the past month, look at the Yen gold price too.

  241. I’m familiar with George Friedman, I think in the context of an argument with an extreme svidomist Ukrainian fan of his nearly a decade ago (back then I had no doubts whatsoever that all Ukraine’s problems with Russia were its own fault), I recall throwing that book title like a rock at him and our adolescent ‘debate’ descending to puerile racialisms from that point onwards.
    I still wonder if he was in earnest publishing that thing or he simply knew it would make good sales. Karlin’s blog was somewhat similar (believe or not, I’d followed his blogging since 2010.. perhaps his best output was his article ‘Simmered to the Edge of World’, it could be satirical), Dmitri put it best with ‘dadaesque performance art’.

    I doubt that his graphs on demographics and sustainable energy are that meaningful that his conclusion form them have good scientific basis. They are props for his spiel and performance. It all has a strong whiff of charlatanry.

    Yes, this is the problem with charming people, it often takes reading rather than listening to them to see their thinking at its real value. Certainly pointing out that China and Russia have disastrous demographics requires no great insight. Zeihan’s claim that the US could be fighting an Afghanistan-style insurgency with drug cartels in North-Mexico in a near-future also sounded quite ‘War with Japan’ attention-grabbing tier.

    I recall Chomsky saying ‘I’m a boring speaker, and I like it that way’, since he’d rather his arguments stand on their own. Certainly his books have similarly turgid prose. Yuri Podolyaka also speaks in a similar style on his videos, just montonously drones through his content with zero jokes or rhetoric.
    But I suppose it’s possible to be a charismatic speaker and not be Jordan Peterson or Slavoj Zizek (can it be a coincidence all their books are unreadable?) superhuman level of fraud, Vaclav Smil’s books stand on their own merits, I think.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Yevardian


    But I suppose it’s possible to be a charismatic speaker and not be Jordan Peterson or Slavoj Zizek (can it be a coincidence all their books are unreadable?) superhuman level of fraud, Vaclav Smil’s books stand on their own merits, I think.
     
    Stephen Flowers. (If you overlook the minor detail he is Satanist.)

    Neil Stephenson is a pretty good speaker if he isn't being interviewed by Lex Fridman and he is a really great writer if you skim over the 30% garbage!

    , @utu
    @Yevardian

    Friedman knew what was needed when he wrote his book about the coming war with Japan. He was just wrong about the target. How to deal with the despair in America caused by the end of the Cold War? Francis Fukuyama book came the following year and it seemed as if America lost its purpose and certainly the MIC was getting very nervous. President George H. Bush was really sincere about the peace dividends and shutting down military bases. But Friedman who like his pupil Peter Zeihan is materialist could see causes only in the material world and totally neglected the world of ideas that ideas often are the real movers. It was Samuel Huntingon who got it right in his 1992 lecture at the American Enterprise Institute on The Clash of Civilizations that he followed with 1996 book "The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order" by pointing our next enemy. It would be hard to find material causes for the need of war against the world of Islam unless you invoked the security of Israel and its Yinon Plan but this could not have been done so instead the causes were found in the realm of ideas and ideologies.

    When writing my comment to S above I recalled two pieces of observation of apparent synchronicities when the war against Iraq in 2003 was about to begin that as if they were trying to reveal to us what was the true cause of that war. First it was the shuttle Columbia disaster with an Israeli astronaut on board that fell apart above Texas and a lot of debris was found in little town Palestine, Texas which was mention a lot of times in news then. And then when attack on Iraq began there was the story of American soldier Jessica Lynch who was turned into American heroine by media who however in the end did not want to go along with it. Jessica Lynch was form Palestine, West Virginia. She'd rather return to Palestine, WV than be a celebrity. The two Palestines bracketed the coverage of Iraq war. So when I wrote that comment to S I knew where he was coming from and how it feels to discover something and give it a meaning that probably nobody else sees. But I also know not to hold to it. I made my discovery because Palestine, Israel and Israel lobby and Yinon plan were on my mind when war with Iraq project was lunched and its marketing began at the end of Summer 2002. I had no illusion about the true reasons for the war against Iraq.

    Replies: @Dmitry

  242. @Seraphim
    @Mr. Hack

    How many times did I tell you and your sidekick AP (to my recollection in no uncertain terms) that I am guilty as charged?
    Anyway it is not for Romania to unite with 'Moldavia', but the other way round. It is not 'Moldavia' which is the 'core Romanian land'. Moldova is a 'Romanian land' but it is at the external margin of the 'core' of Romanian lands towards the Scythian/Sarmatian/Khazar/Cossack 'Barbaricum'. The 'spine' of the Romanian lands is the Danube and its affluent rivers from north and south. The core of Romania is the ancient Kingdom of Dacia, the Roman Provinces of Dacia, Moesia, Scythia Minor. Romania is called 'Romania' because it was always part of the 'Imperium Romanorum'/Byzantine Commonwealth, to which the 'Rus' adhered forever when the savage Varangians have would been illuminated by their baptism in the waters of the Dnieper and became the fiercest 'Guard of the Empire', the 'Katehon' that ''holds back the coming into the world of the antichrist."
    Do you really think that 'pride parades' are what would keep the Russians at bay? Plying piano with the dick (reason why Elenski was bombarded as president) in front of guffawing audiences who wouldn't cover their faces in shame?

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Mr. Hack

    So, you try to distance yourself from Moldavia by claiming some sort of half truth about its “external margin of the “core” of the Romanian land”, and have concocted some tragic-comedy outcry about wanting a ‘regathering’ of the Romanian lands. Their liberation from the Ukrainian yoke.”

    The only lands that have really been under any sort of dispute between Ukraine and Romania have been in Bukovina. So Moldova is an “external margin” according to your revisionist jargon, yet Bukovina, it seems, is in need of liberation from the Ukrainian yoke? Your arguments are weak indeed for you seem to forget that Bukovina was at one time wholly a part of Moldova. Do you want to try again?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    The same crew who after 4 presidents and trillions of dollars replaced the Taliban with The Taliban. Lol. That’s you that is.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  243. @Mr. Hack
    @Seraphim

    So, you try to distance yourself from Moldavia by claiming some sort of half truth about its "external margin of the "core" of the Romanian land", and have concocted some tragic-comedy outcry about wanting a ‘regathering’ of the Romanian lands. Their liberation from the Ukrainian yoke."

    The only lands that have really been under any sort of dispute between Ukraine and Romania have been in Bukovina. So Moldova is an "external margin" according to your revisionist jargon, yet Bukovina, it seems, is in need of liberation from the Ukrainian yoke? Your arguments are weak indeed for you seem to forget that Bukovina was at one time wholly a part of Moldova. Do you want to try again?

    Replies: @Wokechoke

    The same crew who after 4 presidents and trillions of dollars replaced the Taliban with The Taliban. Lol. That’s you that is.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    What are you blabbering about? I can't seem to put together your comment with mine towards Seraphim?

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

  244. @Yevardian
    @Seraphim


    Romania is not even able to unite with Moldavia, certainly a core Romanian land, thanks to Russian duplicity, that you seem Okay with. You’re a Romanian Russophile right?
     

    How many times did I tell you and your sidekick AP (to my recollection in no uncertain terms) that I am guilty as charged?
     
    Tbh, I myself find it pretty hard to reconcile these two things. Certainly a Bulgarian, Serbian, Christian Caucasian, Greek or pre-2014-Ukrainian Russophile is easily explicable, I could even see a creative case made for a Balt (without Russian rule, Balts and their language would have been assimilated as Swedes, Germans or Danes), but from my pov, Romania went from the only civilised Balkan country (or at least government) to having probably the worst Communist regime in all of Europe except Albania.

    I suppose it could be argued Romania owes its independence from the Turks to Russia, and cultural similarities. But from my wide experience of Romanians, they're the most anti-Russia people in all of Europe, excepting Balts and Poles.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Seraphim

    He very much seems to exhibit schizophrenic traits when it comes to this Romanian/Russian duality. 🙂

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @Mr. Hack

    Or he is just a RF-ian of any nationality cosplaying a native Westerner like some are doing ;)

  245. @Wokechoke
    @Mr. Hack

    The same crew who after 4 presidents and trillions of dollars replaced the Taliban with The Taliban. Lol. That’s you that is.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    What are you blabbering about? I can’t seem to put together your comment with mine towards Seraphim?

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Mr. Hack

    Moldova should have been reintegrated into Romania, but Transnistria was only made a "part" of Moldova under the Soviets in a similar ploy to grab Finland with the Karelo-Finnish SSR. It always has had a Slavic majority, so Moldova should be ready to let go of it, whatever it would do to itself (it will align with Russia) or Russia/Ukraine would do to it.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  246. @Yevardian
    I'm familiar with George Friedman, I think in the context of an argument with an extreme svidomist Ukrainian fan of his nearly a decade ago (back then I had no doubts whatsoever that all Ukraine's problems with Russia were its own fault), I recall throwing that book title like a rock at him and our adolescent 'debate' descending to puerile racialisms from that point onwards.
    I still wonder if he was in earnest publishing that thing or he simply knew it would make good sales. Karlin's blog was somewhat similar (believe or not, I'd followed his blogging since 2010.. perhaps his best output was his article 'Simmered to the Edge of World', it could be satirical), Dmitri put it best with 'dadaesque performance art'.

    I doubt that his graphs on demographics and sustainable energy are that meaningful that his conclusion form them have good scientific basis. They are props for his spiel and performance. It all has a strong whiff of charlatanry.
     
    Yes, this is the problem with charming people, it often takes reading rather than listening to them to see their thinking at its real value. Certainly pointing out that China and Russia have disastrous demographics requires no great insight. Zeihan's claim that the US could be fighting an Afghanistan-style insurgency with drug cartels in North-Mexico in a near-future also sounded quite 'War with Japan' attention-grabbing tier.

    I recall Chomsky saying 'I'm a boring speaker, and I like it that way', since he'd rather his arguments stand on their own. Certainly his books have similarly turgid prose. Yuri Podolyaka also speaks in a similar style on his videos, just montonously drones through his content with zero jokes or rhetoric.
    But I suppose it's possible to be a charismatic speaker and not be Jordan Peterson or Slavoj Zizek (can it be a coincidence all their books are unreadable?) superhuman level of fraud, Vaclav Smil's books stand on their own merits, I think.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @utu

    But I suppose it’s possible to be a charismatic speaker and not be Jordan Peterson or Slavoj Zizek (can it be a coincidence all their books are unreadable?) superhuman level of fraud, Vaclav Smil’s books stand on their own merits, I think.

    Stephen Flowers. (If you overlook the minor detail he is Satanist.)

    Neil Stephenson is a pretty good speaker if he isn’t being interviewed by Lex Fridman and he is a really great writer if you skim over the 30% garbage!

  247. @Yevardian
    I'm familiar with George Friedman, I think in the context of an argument with an extreme svidomist Ukrainian fan of his nearly a decade ago (back then I had no doubts whatsoever that all Ukraine's problems with Russia were its own fault), I recall throwing that book title like a rock at him and our adolescent 'debate' descending to puerile racialisms from that point onwards.
    I still wonder if he was in earnest publishing that thing or he simply knew it would make good sales. Karlin's blog was somewhat similar (believe or not, I'd followed his blogging since 2010.. perhaps his best output was his article 'Simmered to the Edge of World', it could be satirical), Dmitri put it best with 'dadaesque performance art'.

    I doubt that his graphs on demographics and sustainable energy are that meaningful that his conclusion form them have good scientific basis. They are props for his spiel and performance. It all has a strong whiff of charlatanry.
     
    Yes, this is the problem with charming people, it often takes reading rather than listening to them to see their thinking at its real value. Certainly pointing out that China and Russia have disastrous demographics requires no great insight. Zeihan's claim that the US could be fighting an Afghanistan-style insurgency with drug cartels in North-Mexico in a near-future also sounded quite 'War with Japan' attention-grabbing tier.

    I recall Chomsky saying 'I'm a boring speaker, and I like it that way', since he'd rather his arguments stand on their own. Certainly his books have similarly turgid prose. Yuri Podolyaka also speaks in a similar style on his videos, just montonously drones through his content with zero jokes or rhetoric.
    But I suppose it's possible to be a charismatic speaker and not be Jordan Peterson or Slavoj Zizek (can it be a coincidence all their books are unreadable?) superhuman level of fraud, Vaclav Smil's books stand on their own merits, I think.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @utu

    Friedman knew what was needed when he wrote his book about the coming war with Japan. He was just wrong about the target. How to deal with the despair in America caused by the end of the Cold War? Francis Fukuyama book came the following year and it seemed as if America lost its purpose and certainly the MIC was getting very nervous. President George H. Bush was really sincere about the peace dividends and shutting down military bases. But Friedman who like his pupil Peter Zeihan is materialist could see causes only in the material world and totally neglected the world of ideas that ideas often are the real movers. It was Samuel Huntingon who got it right in his 1992 lecture at the American Enterprise Institute on The Clash of Civilizations that he followed with 1996 book “The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order” by pointing our next enemy. It would be hard to find material causes for the need of war against the world of Islam unless you invoked the security of Israel and its Yinon Plan but this could not have been done so instead the causes were found in the realm of ideas and ideologies.

    When writing my comment to S above I recalled two pieces of observation of apparent synchronicities when the war against Iraq in 2003 was about to begin that as if they were trying to reveal to us what was the true cause of that war. First it was the shuttle Columbia disaster with an Israeli astronaut on board that fell apart above Texas and a lot of debris was found in little town Palestine, Texas which was mention a lot of times in news then. And then when attack on Iraq began there was the story of American soldier Jessica Lynch who was turned into American heroine by media who however in the end did not want to go along with it. Jessica Lynch was form Palestine, West Virginia. She’d rather return to Palestine, WV than be a celebrity. The two Palestines bracketed the coverage of Iraq war. So when I wrote that comment to S I knew where he was coming from and how it feels to discover something and give it a meaning that probably nobody else sees. But I also know not to hold to it. I made my discovery because Palestine, Israel and Israel lobby and Yinon plan were on my mind when war with Iraq project was lunched and its marketing began at the end of Summer 2002. I had no illusion about the true reasons for the war against Iraq.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @utu


    war with Japan.. to deal with the despair in America caused by the end of the Cold War
     
    I would guess because with end of the Cold War in 1991 (then Yeltsin was more peaceful to the West during the first term 1991-1995), there is a reduction of the motive for military funding in the USA.

    If you remove USSR as a threat, Japan was the second largest economy in 1991 (today it is only third largest, multiple times smaller than China), and China's economy was smaller than Spain.* If you wanted funding for conventional weapons like navy boats, only Japan has a significant enough budget in that time.

    Someone in the military-industry or thinktank in the USA, will need to write about how Japan is the greatest threat to America (probably someone was also writing about Germany).

    Otherwise, there is no barrier to people that would say "let's reduce the military budget and invest the funding to helping homeless people in our streets or solving cancer".

    After all, those military industry and thinktank professionals, need to pay bills. In Washington DC, probably expensive schools for their children. If someone was going to write "maybe we should reduce the budget, reduce funding for thinktanks, invest the money into healthcare and infrastructure", it might be so popular.

    It's the same reason Western media and experts, hype the Russian military and write about how dangerous, without anyone explaining there is no electronics building capability in Russia, so how would there be such a modernized equipment (excluding what electronics can be imported or what other technological advantage has been inherited from the superpower USSR, such as jet engines)? Western experts write all these articles about how T-14 Armata tank will be a threat in 2015. But T-14 Armata tank in 2015, was only a mock for the parade.

    Interesting, that Western experts, are probably one of the reasons in Russia, politicians believe they had a stronger military, as there is information opacity especially for them within Russia, and the local media is designed like "Western expert says Russia's military is the strongest in the world". (I don't think Chinese will be so vulnerable for this trap, one reason as their culture is not such a reflection from the Western one.)

    *
    https://i.imgur.com/JRj3oNh.jpg

    Replies: @songbird

  248. @Mr. Hack
    @Wokechoke

    What are you blabbering about? I can't seem to put together your comment with mine towards Seraphim?

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    Moldova should have been reintegrated into Romania, but Transnistria was only made a “part” of Moldova under the Soviets in a similar ploy to grab Finland with the Karelo-Finnish SSR. It always has had a Slavic majority, so Moldova should be ready to let go of it, whatever it would do to itself (it will align with Russia) or Russia/Ukraine would do to it.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Yellowface Anon

    This has nothing to do with trying to understand Seraphim's strange mix of nationalist sympathies, that both Yevardian and I were trying to do...

  249. @Mr. Hack
    @Yevardian

    He very much seems to exhibit schizophrenic traits when it comes to this Romanian/Russian duality. :-)

    Replies: @sudden death

    Or he is just a RF-ian of any nationality cosplaying a native Westerner like some are doing 😉

  250. @Yellowface Anon
    @Mr. Hack

    Moldova should have been reintegrated into Romania, but Transnistria was only made a "part" of Moldova under the Soviets in a similar ploy to grab Finland with the Karelo-Finnish SSR. It always has had a Slavic majority, so Moldova should be ready to let go of it, whatever it would do to itself (it will align with Russia) or Russia/Ukraine would do to it.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    This has nothing to do with trying to understand Seraphim’s strange mix of nationalist sympathies, that both Yevardian and I were trying to do…

    • Thanks: Yellowface Anon
  251. @utu
    @Yevardian

    Peter Zeihan? Very impressive very effective, very persuasive and so on but I am skeptical. He might be right on some issues but I am growing very suspicious of him. I doubt that his graphs on demographics and sustainable energy are that meaningful that his conclusion form them have good scientific basis. They are props for his spiel and performance. It all has a strong whiff of charlatanry.

    He comes from George Friedman's stable and even if he is independent of him he retains George Friedman style including charm and charisma. How good analyst and forecaster was George Friedman? In 1991 he and his wife wrote "The Coming War with Japan"


    Friedman and LeBard predicted that a series of trade wars between the US and Japan would lead to a final rupture between the two countries. The authors also expressed the view that, as with Imperial Japan in the 1930s and 40s, Japan would seek to take control of sources of raw materials and force the US out of the western Pacific. The authors saw the only alternative to a hot war between the US and Japan as being a "long, miserable cold war".

    The original book jacket of the book stated that "conflict will escalate in the next two decades to include the possibility—indeed probability—of an armed conflict, a second US–Japanese war in the Pacific". Later editions replaced this statement with positive reviews. - Wiki
     

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    Probably the same playbook was transposed to China, because Japan remains an American vassal where most of its political class find advantages to toe the American line. In which case it is largely fulfilling before our own eyes.

  252. Russia has deployed S-400 and TOR close to the border with the Kharkov Oblast, according to Ukrainian military public briefings. No confirmation yet from Russia, but it seems congruent with the heavy increase in attacks against the city. If Russia tries to seriously take it, then it will make the Mariupol disaster look like a walk in the park in terms of civilian casualties. It’s simply part of urban warfare that civilians get into the line of fire.

    It doesn’t help that public infrastructure, including train and bus lines, are severely degraded today compared to the beginning of the conflict. Those who didn’t flee yet will find it much harder this time than they’d have ~6 weeks ago.

    With the sinking of the Moskva battleship, Russia’s naval support bombardment capacities are curtailed to a significant extent. There was speculation that perhaps Nikolayev would have been spared with the Russians going straight for Odessa (I was skeptical, but at least a case could’ve been made). This is now all but impossible, essentially forcing Russia to take Nikolayev before potentially going further.

    The only real constraint for Russia is the external price it pays + how Russophilic the local population is. As I mentioned before the invasion, Russia can easily roll Ukraine militarily. The Ukrainians are fighting bravely, but their military is simply no match.

    A full annexation of Ukraine is technically possible, but it would be a catastrophic error since the restive population would make life extremely hard. Not to mention constant smuggling across the border to fuel an insurgency. China is also showing less enthusiastic signs of support. A few days ago, the CASS cut off all contact with their Russian academic counter-parts. Huawei is not re-supplying Russia’s telecom network (as of writing). The MIR payment system was also removed recently from Huawei’s HarmonyOS.

    The military victories is the easy part. The hard part comes after.

    • Thanks: Yellowface Anon
    • Replies: @A123
    @Thulean Friend


    The military victories is the easy part. The hard part comes after.
     
    This is the point I have made several times before. In Iraq the U.S. Won the War the Lost the Peace. Russia can provide solid reconstruction in a limited area as a technique to Win the Peace. Taking more than they can reconstruct is non-viable.

    It comes back to, "What deal can Zelensky make?" If both sides fund irregulars and proxies this could drag on for years. If an armistice can be achieved, the sides will separate more or less fully.

    PEACE 😇
  253. Poor fool. A life dedicated to slave labor awaits him.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Aedib

    They are fools, but Russia will exchange them, they don't matter. West is focused on PR, emotional "winning" and gestures. See Laxa's rambling nonsense above for an example on how they are trained to describe losing as a "win". It takes some work but means nothing in the real world.

    Once you begin a gesture it can be fatal not to go through with it. West now has to go all the way, and that could turn a podunk provincial border-language dispute into a global disaster. I think it already has. But the "damn Russkies" will not speak Russian!!! that couldn't be allowed, as Mr. Hack is praying for so earnestly. There are a lot of fools around.

    Replies: @Aedib, @Mr. Hack

    , @Triteleia Laxa
    @Aedib

    1. Aiden Aslin fits no definition of "mercenary." He is a regular uniformed member of the Ukrainian military. Anyone who states otherwise is a liar or completely ignorant. Either way, they have no credibility.

    2. The interviewer, Graham Phillips, got his start as a brothel reviewer. This is the type of person of extremely low character that Russia has to depend on. It is also why none of their Ukrainian quislings turned out for them.

    3. Aiden Aslin is handcuffed and barely responsive. He is clearly under substantial duress. He does almost laugh a bit after the Mitchell and Webb reference, but he has the same general affect as those confessing their "guilt" in the Stalinist show trials.

    4. In another video, he is clearly reading from a teleprompter. He is therefore obviously being forced to say specific lies.

    5. In that other video, the Russians have dressed him in an Azov t-shirt. Aiden was never a member of Azov. Again, this proves that Russia is spinning an entirely fake story with a broken and tortured prisoner of war as their mouthpiece. This is sick.

    Your posts tend to show a deeply antisocial personality. They have the ringing of secondary psychopathy to them. Nowadays this is normally comorbid with some degree of narcissism, that protects the individual from recognising the darkness in themselves, so they tend to revel in putting it onto others. My greatest wish for you is that you one day see yourself clearly, in the mirror, and, I mean this genuinely, because I do wish the best for you, I also wish that you somehow survive that encounter with who you truly are.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Yevardian, @Aedib

  254. A123 says: • Website

    The contrast is remarkable between :

    — China — Unchecked Elite CCP rule
    — U.S. — Elite WEF rule checked by a Judiciary

    Shanghai remains locked down in search of WUHAN-19 total elimination. (1)

    Tucker Carlson gave a summary explanation of the horrors in Shanghai, China. The city of 25 million residents has been locked down by the Chinese Communist Party as an outcome of their zero COVID policy.

    Desperate people are running out of food and have been locked in their homes from the outside by regional authorities. The pets, including cats and dogs of residents who tested positive to the COVID-19 virus, have been confiscated and killed by the government. The scenes and sounds from the area are very troubling as thousands of people scream into the night begging for help and mercy.

    The U.S. is increasingly free of mask mandates: (2)

    Following a federal judge vacating the federal mask mandate on transportation, the TSA responded, “TSA (Transportation Security Administration) will not enforce its Security Directives and Emergency Amendment requiring mask use on public transportation and transportation hubs at this time.”

    Within hours, various airlines began notifying customers the mask mandate is gone:

    ♦ American Airlines
    ♦ Southwest Airlines
    ♦ Delta Airlines
    ♦ Alaska Airlines
    ♦ United Airlines

    Various videos show airline employees in a state of jubilation cheering the announcements

    Which country would you rather live in?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/04/11/tucker-carlson-recaps-the-ongoing-horrors-in-shanghai-china/

    (2) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/04/18/the-madness-is-over-following-tsa-response-airlines-begin-announcing-they-are-dropping-mask-mandates/

     


    Video Link

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @A123

    This is why every government that has ever adopted lockdowns are properly accelerationist, as with the general Build Back Better platform, starting strategically important wars, etc.

    The more things happen the more the likes of S will turn out to be right, because Land said something about liberal capitalism that lies at the core of every totalizing and centralizing conspiracy theory ever.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @A123

  255. @Aedib
    Poor fool. A life dedicated to slave labor awaits him.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNizGwjZbo0

    Replies: @Beckow, @Triteleia Laxa

    They are fools, but Russia will exchange them, they don’t matter. West is focused on PR, emotional “winning” and gestures. See Laxa’s rambling nonsense above for an example on how they are trained to describe losing as a “win“. It takes some work but means nothing in the real world.

    Once you begin a gesture it can be fatal not to go through with it. West now has to go all the way, and that could turn a podunk provincial border-language dispute into a global disaster. I think it already has. But the “damn Russkies” will not speak Russian!!! that couldn’t be allowed, as Mr. Hack is praying for so earnestly. There are a lot of fools around.

    • Replies: @Aedib
    @Beckow

    Thins go darker. This girl has something to tell about the abduction of Gonzalo Lira by Ukronazis. I´m afraid that he may be death right now, just as other journalists like Oles Busina that were killed by the regime.

    https://twitter.com/FierroFortis/status/1516365295912374280

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Beckow

    Mr. Hack is praying earnestly for peace in Ukraine, especially during Orthodox Holy Week. We recently held a joint prayer meeting with our Protestant, Catholic and Jewish friends at the spacious Central Methodist Church in Phoenix.


    But the “damn Russkies” will not speak Russian!!! that couldn’t be allowed, as Mr. Hack is praying for so earnestly
     
    This is a pretty dumb statement to try and ascribe to me. Equally dumb would be to ascribe something like this to you, but I wont:

    But the “damn Russkies” will not kill enough Ukies!!! that couldn’t be allowed, as Mr. Beckow is praying for so earnestly. There are a lot of fools around.
     
    But then again, as you point out, there are plenty of fools around...

    Replies: @Beckow, @silviosilver

  256. @A123
    The contrast is remarkable between :

    -- China -- Unchecked Elite CCP rule
    -- U.S. -- Elite WEF rule checked by a Judiciary

    Shanghai remains locked down in search of WUHAN-19 total elimination. (1)


    Tucker Carlson gave a summary explanation of the horrors in Shanghai, China. The city of 25 million residents has been locked down by the Chinese Communist Party as an outcome of their zero COVID policy.

    Desperate people are running out of food and have been locked in their homes from the outside by regional authorities. The pets, including cats and dogs of residents who tested positive to the COVID-19 virus, have been confiscated and killed by the government. The scenes and sounds from the area are very troubling as thousands of people scream into the night begging for help and mercy.
     

    The U.S. is increasingly free of mask mandates: (2)

    Following a federal judge vacating the federal mask mandate on transportation, the TSA responded, “TSA (Transportation Security Administration) will not enforce its Security Directives and Emergency Amendment requiring mask use on public transportation and transportation hubs at this time.”

    Within hours, various airlines began notifying customers the mask mandate is gone:

    ♦ American Airlines
    ♦ Southwest Airlines
    ♦ Delta Airlines
    ♦ Alaska Airlines
    ♦ United Airlines

    Various videos show airline employees in a state of jubilation cheering the announcements
     

    Which country would you rather live in?

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/04/11/tucker-carlson-recaps-the-ongoing-horrors-in-shanghai-china/

    (2) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/04/18/the-madness-is-over-following-tsa-response-airlines-begin-announcing-they-are-dropping-mask-mandates/

     
    https://rumble.com/embed/vy1dwf/

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    This is why every government that has ever adopted lockdowns are properly accelerationist, as with the general Build Back Better platform, starting strategically important wars, etc.

    The more things happen the more the likes of S will turn out to be right, because Land said something about liberal capitalism that lies at the core of every totalizing and centralizing conspiracy theory ever.

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @Yellowface Anon

    Nick Land lives in Shangai because he cannot get a job in the UK. He is sour grape poster child even though it has been decades since he technically was a child.

    Quite a feat. That he is correct about us all being fascists now is merely a statement of the obvious. Just think: a trivial twist of fate would have turned Nick Land into Gonzo Luria and vice versa!

    , @A123
    @Yellowface Anon


    This is why every government that has ever adopted lockdowns are properly accelerationist, as with the general Build Back Better platform
     
    The BBB platform is all about maximizing social intervention. It has little to nothing to do with infrastructure. You are correct that this is a good fit to the CCP platform. FYI: BBB is dead in the U.S. as the SJW/DNC have alienated their own party members Manchin and Sinema.

    So the CCP is accelerationist? What are they accelerating to... Total dystopian dysfunctionality? The CCP is clearly headed to a negative outcome at a precipitous rate of speed.
    ____

    You missed a golden opportunity to tout the CCP lockdowns as cure to property valuation woes. If people move out of Shanghai to more remote locations, that may save property developers. Or, at least make their liquidation less painful.

    PEACE 😇
  257. A123 says: • Website
    @Thulean Friend
    Russia has deployed S-400 and TOR close to the border with the Kharkov Oblast, according to Ukrainian military public briefings. No confirmation yet from Russia, but it seems congruent with the heavy increase in attacks against the city. If Russia tries to seriously take it, then it will make the Mariupol disaster look like a walk in the park in terms of civilian casualties. It's simply part of urban warfare that civilians get into the line of fire.

    It doesn't help that public infrastructure, including train and bus lines, are severely degraded today compared to the beginning of the conflict. Those who didn't flee yet will find it much harder this time than they'd have ~6 weeks ago.

    ---

    With the sinking of the Moskva battleship, Russia's naval support bombardment capacities are curtailed to a significant extent. There was speculation that perhaps Nikolayev would have been spared with the Russians going straight for Odessa (I was skeptical, but at least a case could've been made). This is now all but impossible, essentially forcing Russia to take Nikolayev before potentially going further.

    The only real constraint for Russia is the external price it pays + how Russophilic the local population is. As I mentioned before the invasion, Russia can easily roll Ukraine militarily. The Ukrainians are fighting bravely, but their military is simply no match.

    A full annexation of Ukraine is technically possible, but it would be a catastrophic error since the restive population would make life extremely hard. Not to mention constant smuggling across the border to fuel an insurgency. China is also showing less enthusiastic signs of support. A few days ago, the CASS cut off all contact with their Russian academic counter-parts. Huawei is not re-supplying Russia's telecom network (as of writing). The MIR payment system was also removed recently from Huawei's HarmonyOS.

    The military victories is the easy part. The hard part comes after.

    Replies: @A123

    The military victories is the easy part. The hard part comes after.

    This is the point I have made several times before. In Iraq the U.S. Won the War the Lost the Peace. Russia can provide solid reconstruction in a limited area as a technique to Win the Peace. Taking more than they can reconstruct is non-viable.

    It comes back to, “What deal can Zelensky make?” If both sides fund irregulars and proxies this could drag on for years. If an armistice can be achieved, the sides will separate more or less fully.

    PEACE 😇

  258. @AP
    @sher singh

    I saw lots of Sikhs in a Sikh aid organization at the Polish-Ukrainian border, making free food for incoming refugees. Thanks guys!

    Replies: @sher singh

    No credit to me only those Sevadars (volunteers) and the Guru.
    It’s called Langar btw,

    Degh Tegh Fateh or the Victory to Cauldron & Sword – references protection & alms to the poor.
    It is the Sikh spiritual-political slogan of universal rule||

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ

  259. ISIS calls for more attacks in Israel, Europe
    https://www.jpost.com/arab-israeli-conflict/article-704472

    Is Putin via his buddy Naftali Bennett trying to help Marine Le Pen? Or is it because narcissistic Israel needs more attention as everybody is talking about Ukraine?

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @utu

    That we have moved beyond Qanon to Uanon brings a tear to my eye. We could use a soundtrack.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BY0gY_Jju2E

    , @sudden death
    @utu

    Maybe a coincidence, but Salman&Putin had a conversation several days ago too:


    Russian President Vladimir Putin and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman gave a "positive assessment" to their cooperation on the OPEC+ producers group to stabilize the world oil market, the Kremlin said in statement.
    Saturday's phone conversation, the leaders' second since Russia's February 24 invasion of Ukraine, came at the initiative of Saudi Arabia, the Kremlin said.

    The two also discussed the crises in Ukraine and Yemen, the Kremlin said, without providing details. Saudi Arabia said in a brief statement that the Crown Prince "received a phone call" from Putin but didn't mention OPEC+ or energy cooperation specifically.

    "They discussed bilateral relations that bring the two countries together and ways to enhance them in various fields," according to the Saudi readout.
     
    https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/vladimir-putin-saudi-crown-prince-discussed-opec-oil-production-ukraine-war-on-phone-2897557

    Replies: @sudden death

    , @Yevardian
    @utu

    I remember predicting Naftali Bennet as Israel's next PM as soon as I first heard about him in the late 2000s, such a living, fleshly anti-semitic trope could not not become the country's leader one day.
    I do not see how his relationship with Putin would be anything special. Probably Bennet's friendship with Biden would be closer, if the latter could remember his name.

    Replies: @A123

  260. @Yellowface Anon
    @A123

    This is why every government that has ever adopted lockdowns are properly accelerationist, as with the general Build Back Better platform, starting strategically important wars, etc.

    The more things happen the more the likes of S will turn out to be right, because Land said something about liberal capitalism that lies at the core of every totalizing and centralizing conspiracy theory ever.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @A123

    Nick Land lives in Shangai because he cannot get a job in the UK. He is sour grape poster child even though it has been decades since he technically was a child.

    Quite a feat. That he is correct about us all being fascists now is merely a statement of the obvious. Just think: a trivial twist of fate would have turned Nick Land into Gonzo Luria and vice versa!

  261. @utu
    ISIS calls for more attacks in Israel, Europe
    https://www.jpost.com/arab-israeli-conflict/article-704472

    Is Putin via his buddy Naftali Bennett trying to help Marine Le Pen? Or is it because narcissistic Israel needs more attention as everybody is talking about Ukraine?

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @sudden death, @Yevardian

    That we have moved beyond Qanon to Uanon brings a tear to my eye. We could use a soundtrack.

  262. A123 says: • Website
    @Yellowface Anon
    @A123

    This is why every government that has ever adopted lockdowns are properly accelerationist, as with the general Build Back Better platform, starting strategically important wars, etc.

    The more things happen the more the likes of S will turn out to be right, because Land said something about liberal capitalism that lies at the core of every totalizing and centralizing conspiracy theory ever.

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @A123

    This is why every government that has ever adopted lockdowns are properly accelerationist, as with the general Build Back Better platform

    The BBB platform is all about maximizing social intervention. It has little to nothing to do with infrastructure. You are correct that this is a good fit to the CCP platform. FYI: BBB is dead in the U.S. as the SJW/DNC have alienated their own party members Manchin and Sinema.

    So the CCP is accelerationist? What are they accelerating to… Total dystopian dysfunctionality? The CCP is clearly headed to a negative outcome at a precipitous rate of speed.
    ____

    You missed a golden opportunity to tout the CCP lockdowns as cure to property valuation woes. If people move out of Shanghai to more remote locations, that may save property developers. Or, at least make their liquidation less painful.

    PEACE 😇

  263. A123 says: • Website

    The number of countries sending arms to Ukraine continues to shrink: (1)

    After providing Kyiv with rifles and portable rocket launchers, Greece will not send more military equipment to Ukraine, Greek Defence Minister Nikos Panagiotopoulos said, quoted by the portal Euractiv. “The defence equipment we sent to Ukraine came from our stocks. There is no issue of sending more,” Panagiotopoulos said, adding that Greece defence should not be weakened, particularly on islands.

    Depleting ones own stockpiles to defend Ukraine has sharp limits. Zelensky will soon be facing a number of leaders who respond, “We would like to help, but we cannot.” Goodwill only goes so far.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.ansa.it/nuova_europa/en/news/sections/news/2022/04/14/ukraine-greece-no-more-weapons-to-kyiv_4e58e9f2-0816-4980-ad7f-f698601885f4.html

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @A123

    IslamoPutin is very proud of your ability to select news headlines and the sources ;)


    18.04.2022
    Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi has announced the unanimous support of the Italian parliament for the supply of weapons to Ukraine and the prospects of strengthening sanctions on Russia.

    "The decision to send weapons was taken in parliament almost unanimously ... Sanctions are necessary to weaken the aggressor, but they cannot stop the troops in the short term. For that we need to help the Ukrainians directly, what we are doing. Not to do so would be tantamount to telling them to surrender, accept slavery and submission - this goes against our European values of solidarity. Instead, we want to let Ukrainians defend themselves," Draghi told Italy's Corriere della Sera.

    The Italian prime minister called the Ukrainian resistance heroic and noted that "there is no sign that the Ukrainian people will put up with the Russian occupation."
     
    https://ua.interfax.com.ua/news/general/825217.html

    Replies: @A123

  264. Midwits denying the primacy of economics are about to find out just how wrong they are.

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @Thulean Friend

    Ukraine is about right (from an even lower base) and Russia's drop should be twice as much. Whatever it is, your point stands.

  265. @A123
    The number of countries sending arms to Ukraine continues to shrink: (1)

    After providing Kyiv with rifles and portable rocket launchers, Greece will not send more military equipment to Ukraine, Greek Defence Minister Nikos Panagiotopoulos said, quoted by the portal Euractiv. "The defence equipment we sent to Ukraine came from our stocks. There is no issue of sending more," Panagiotopoulos said, adding that Greece defence should not be weakened, particularly on islands.
     
    Depleting ones own stockpiles to defend Ukraine has sharp limits. Zelensky will soon be facing a number of leaders who respond, "We would like to help, but we cannot." Goodwill only goes so far.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.ansa.it/nuova_europa/en/news/sections/news/2022/04/14/ukraine-greece-no-more-weapons-to-kyiv_4e58e9f2-0816-4980-ad7f-f698601885f4.html

    Replies: @sudden death

    IslamoPutin is very proud of your ability to select news headlines and the sources 😉

    18.04.2022
    Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi has announced the unanimous support of the Italian parliament for the supply of weapons to Ukraine and the prospects of strengthening sanctions on Russia.

    “The decision to send weapons was taken in parliament almost unanimously … Sanctions are necessary to weaken the aggressor, but they cannot stop the troops in the short term. For that we need to help the Ukrainians directly, what we are doing. Not to do so would be tantamount to telling them to surrender, accept slavery and submission – this goes against our European values of solidarity. Instead, we want to let Ukrainians defend themselves,” Draghi told Italy’s Corriere della Sera.

    The Italian prime minister called the Ukrainian resistance heroic and noted that “there is no sign that the Ukrainian people will put up with the Russian occupation.”

    https://ua.interfax.com.ua/news/general/825217.html

    • Replies: @A123
    @sudden death


    IslamoPutin is very proud of your ability
     
    It us unsurprising that you back your IslamoPope.

    Why are you 100% WEF Muslim all the time? Muhammad the Settler Prophet must be proud of your Colonial ambition.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @sudden death

  266. @utu
    ISIS calls for more attacks in Israel, Europe
    https://www.jpost.com/arab-israeli-conflict/article-704472

    Is Putin via his buddy Naftali Bennett trying to help Marine Le Pen? Or is it because narcissistic Israel needs more attention as everybody is talking about Ukraine?

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @sudden death, @Yevardian

    Maybe a coincidence, but Salman&Putin had a conversation several days ago too:

    Russian President Vladimir Putin and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman gave a “positive assessment” to their cooperation on the OPEC+ producers group to stabilize the world oil market, the Kremlin said in statement.
    Saturday’s phone conversation, the leaders’ second since Russia’s February 24 invasion of Ukraine, came at the initiative of Saudi Arabia, the Kremlin said.

    The two also discussed the crises in Ukraine and Yemen, the Kremlin said, without providing details. Saudi Arabia said in a brief statement that the Crown Prince “received a phone call” from Putin but didn’t mention OPEC+ or energy cooperation specifically.

    “They discussed bilateral relations that bring the two countries together and ways to enhance them in various fields,” according to the Saudi readout.

    https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/vladimir-putin-saudi-crown-prince-discussed-opec-oil-production-ukraine-war-on-phone-2897557

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @sudden death

    My prediction - sooner or later we will see some civilian plane downed and it will be claimed to be done with anti-aircraft weapons from UA war theatre zone in order to discredit Western weapon supplies as much as possible.

    Maybe even before French presidential elections.

    Replies: @Mikel

  267. @Beckow
    @Aedib

    They are fools, but Russia will exchange them, they don't matter. West is focused on PR, emotional "winning" and gestures. See Laxa's rambling nonsense above for an example on how they are trained to describe losing as a "win". It takes some work but means nothing in the real world.

    Once you begin a gesture it can be fatal not to go through with it. West now has to go all the way, and that could turn a podunk provincial border-language dispute into a global disaster. I think it already has. But the "damn Russkies" will not speak Russian!!! that couldn't be allowed, as Mr. Hack is praying for so earnestly. There are a lot of fools around.

    Replies: @Aedib, @Mr. Hack

    Thins go darker. This girl has something to tell about the abduction of Gonzalo Lira by Ukronazis. I´m afraid that he may be death right now, just as other journalists like Oles Busina that were killed by the regime.

  268. @sudden death
    @A123

    IslamoPutin is very proud of your ability to select news headlines and the sources ;)


    18.04.2022
    Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi has announced the unanimous support of the Italian parliament for the supply of weapons to Ukraine and the prospects of strengthening sanctions on Russia.

    "The decision to send weapons was taken in parliament almost unanimously ... Sanctions are necessary to weaken the aggressor, but they cannot stop the troops in the short term. For that we need to help the Ukrainians directly, what we are doing. Not to do so would be tantamount to telling them to surrender, accept slavery and submission - this goes against our European values of solidarity. Instead, we want to let Ukrainians defend themselves," Draghi told Italy's Corriere della Sera.

    The Italian prime minister called the Ukrainian resistance heroic and noted that "there is no sign that the Ukrainian people will put up with the Russian occupation."
     
    https://ua.interfax.com.ua/news/general/825217.html

    Replies: @A123

    IslamoPutin is very proud of your ability

    It us unsurprising that you back your IslamoPope.

    Why are you 100% WEF Muslim all the time? Muhammad the Settler Prophet must be proud of your Colonial ambition.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @A123

    Klaus Schwab and IslamoPutin at WEF in Davos:

    https://i0.wp.com/moguldom.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/915.The-WEF-Great-Reset-Conspiracy-Theory-What-Is-It_-.jpg?w=915&ssl=1

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @A123

  269. @A123
    @sudden death


    IslamoPutin is very proud of your ability
     
    It us unsurprising that you back your IslamoPope.

    Why are you 100% WEF Muslim all the time? Muhammad the Settler Prophet must be proud of your Colonial ambition.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @sudden death

    Klaus Schwab and IslamoPutin at WEF in Davos:

    • Replies: @Yellowface Anon
    @sudden death

    Very funny how A123 is mixing every boogeyman of his Judeo-Americana worldview into an amorphous mixture with a thousand limbs.

    As I said, properly accelerationist.

    Replies: @A123

    , @A123
    @sudden death

    Your IslamoPope at Davos WEF:

     
    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/1zazBaA9l1c/maxresdefault.jpg
     

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/01/the-pope-s-announcement-to-wef18/

    https://www.vaticannews.va/en/pope/news/2020-01/pope-francis-world-economic-forum-davos-development-human-person.html

    2015, 2018, and 2020...

    PEACE 😇

  270. @Thulean Friend
    Midwits denying the primacy of economics are about to find out just how wrong they are.

    https://twitter.com/ndtv/status/1516405436534116353

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon

    Ukraine is about right (from an even lower base) and Russia’s drop should be twice as much. Whatever it is, your point stands.

  271. @sudden death
    @A123

    Klaus Schwab and IslamoPutin at WEF in Davos:

    https://i0.wp.com/moguldom.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/915.The-WEF-Great-Reset-Conspiracy-Theory-What-Is-It_-.jpg?w=915&ssl=1

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @A123

    Very funny how A123 is mixing every boogeyman of his Judeo-Americana worldview into an amorphous mixture with a thousand limbs.

    As I said, properly accelerationist.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Yellowface Anon

    Its much more humor than seriousness.

    Somehow SD come up with the bizarre association "IslamoPutin". I am simply matching his absurdity with something equally over the top. The "IslamoPope" as an avid backer of SD's Ukraine policy.

    If SD stops, I will too...
    ____

    Pope Francis is behaving shamefully and needs to be replaced by someone who will defend Christianity. That being said, I do not think that he has actually converted to Islam.

    PEACE 😇

  272. The Ukrainian regime is now threatening Patrick Lancaster. Better for him to stay with the Donbass militia. His frontline notes are amazing.

  273. @sudden death
    @utu

    Maybe a coincidence, but Salman&Putin had a conversation several days ago too:


    Russian President Vladimir Putin and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman gave a "positive assessment" to their cooperation on the OPEC+ producers group to stabilize the world oil market, the Kremlin said in statement.
    Saturday's phone conversation, the leaders' second since Russia's February 24 invasion of Ukraine, came at the initiative of Saudi Arabia, the Kremlin said.

    The two also discussed the crises in Ukraine and Yemen, the Kremlin said, without providing details. Saudi Arabia said in a brief statement that the Crown Prince "received a phone call" from Putin but didn't mention OPEC+ or energy cooperation specifically.

    "They discussed bilateral relations that bring the two countries together and ways to enhance them in various fields," according to the Saudi readout.
     
    https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/vladimir-putin-saudi-crown-prince-discussed-opec-oil-production-ukraine-war-on-phone-2897557

    Replies: @sudden death

    My prediction – sooner or later we will see some civilian plane downed and it will be claimed to be done with anti-aircraft weapons from UA war theatre zone in order to discredit Western weapon supplies as much as possible.

    Maybe even before French presidential elections.

    • Replies: @Mikel
    @sudden death

    That's a very strange prediction you're making.

    I think we both agree that Russia's performance in the criminal war they started has been embarrassing. But we must live in very different realities if you think that someone claiming that Ukraine has downed a civilian plane will get any airtime in the West at all, even if this time (unlike with MH17) they were indeed the culprits.

    As we speak, the Azov neonazis (who of course have not been banned from Twitter and, unlike unbiased observers, are free to post there what they want) are claiming to have lots of civilians holed up with them in their last Mariupol redoubt. In other words, they are openly claiming to be using civilians as a shield. There is zero reason for those civilians not to be evacuated from there immediately, whoever they are, while hundreds of soldiers are managing to surrender to the Russians from those same positions and stay alive, eg the two British captives. However, and this really beggars belief, the CNN is spinning that situation as proof of another Russian atrocity.

    I do agree that as this war goes on, we are almost guaranteed to see new massacres and f*ckups. They always happen in these situations, without the need of any false flag, and they seem to be even more common when the Russians are involved.

    Replies: @sudden death, @Wokechoke, @AP

  274. @Aedib
    Poor fool. A life dedicated to slave labor awaits him.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNizGwjZbo0

    Replies: @Beckow, @Triteleia Laxa

    1. Aiden Aslin fits no definition of “mercenary.” He is a regular uniformed member of the Ukrainian military. Anyone who states otherwise is a liar or completely ignorant. Either way, they have no credibility.

    2. The interviewer, Graham Phillips, got his start as a brothel reviewer. This is the type of person of extremely low character that Russia has to depend on. It is also why none of their Ukrainian quislings turned out for them.

    3. Aiden Aslin is handcuffed and barely responsive. He is clearly under substantial duress. He does almost laugh a bit after the Mitchell and Webb reference, but he has the same general affect as those confessing their “guilt” in the Stalinist show trials.

    4. In another video, he is clearly reading from a teleprompter. He is therefore obviously being forced to say specific lies.

    5. In that other video, the Russians have dressed him in an Azov t-shirt. Aiden was never a member of Azov. Again, this proves that Russia is spinning an entirely fake story with a broken and tortured prisoner of war as their mouthpiece. This is sick.

    Your posts tend to show a deeply antisocial personality. They have the ringing of secondary psychopathy to them. Nowadays this is normally comorbid with some degree of narcissism, that protects the individual from recognising the darkness in themselves, so they tend to revel in putting it onto others. My greatest wish for you is that you one day see yourself clearly, in the mirror, and, I mean this genuinely, because I do wish the best for you, I also wish that you somehow survive that encounter with who you truly are.

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Aiden Aslin fits no definition of “mercenary.”
     
    Thou protest too much. The definition of a mercenary is: a professional soldier hired to serve in a foreign army. Aiden looks very frumpy, so I am not sure about calling him a "professional" in any context, but other than that he is an Englishman fighting in a foreign war for money. A mercenary.

    I watched the video and Aiden looks scared, but speaks freely and there are no signs of coercion. He is trying to ingratiate himself, but that comes with the situation he is in - no reason to generalize and project that the "evil" Russians made him do it.

    If it was reversed, I suspect you would be the first one screaming that "see, even the Russian says it", and you would deny that any coercion is even possible when it comes to the West or Kiev. Obviously in your mind. Try to be more even-handed, the breathless tribalism that you display here is embarrassing.

    Regarding the "brothel reviewer", wow...do you know that Zelensky played piano on TV with his dick? You know the saying about people in glass houses...

    , @Yevardian
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Aiden Aslin fits no definition of “mercenary.”
     
    He's fighting for the military of a foreign country, probably in a special unit, as I doubt he speaks Ukrainian. Are the Foreign Legion mercenaries? Is Blackwater? Were the kids fighting for the Taliban mercenaries? Was Orwell in Spain? Inherently slippery term.

    The interviewer, Graham Phillips, got his start as a brothel reviewer. This is the type of person of extremely low character that Russia has to depend on. It is also why none of their Ukrainian quislings turned out for them.
     
    Nice. Apparently 'The Exile' had a similar schtick, though I've yet to delve into this literary genre.

    In that other video, the Russians have dressed him in an Azov t-shirt. Aiden was never a member of Azov. Again, this proves that Russia is spinning an entirely fake story with a broken and tortured prisoner of war as their mouthpiece. This is sick.
     
    G_d save Ukrainian POW's from such atrocities like being forced to wear an Azov Battalion t-shirt against their will. The Most Moral Army in the World (TM) would never stoop to such things. Putin should learn from Operation Cast Lead or Operation Grapes of Wrath for lessons in humane peacekeeping. Not engage in whataboutism here, just pointing out your blatant hypocrisy.

    No doubt there have been enough atrocities in Z-War already, jury is out on who did what.

    Your posts tend to show a deeply antisocial personality. They have the ringing of secondary psychopathy to them.
     
    He's just some 'deplorable' troll who enjoys posting gore and fantasising about slave labour, I doubt your armchair analysis will have any effect on such people. Save your hasbara for actual humans like Mikhail or Beckow.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    , @Aedib
    @Triteleia Laxa

    If “he is a regular uniformed member of the Ukrainian military”, why is he begging to Boris Johnson for rescue? He should ask the coca-addict. Anyway, he would be a nice slave to reconstruct some schools in Donetsk.

  275. Will Kamala seek revenge on the Saudis for airing a skit, where a man in drag portrays her? Or will the defense contractors keep her in the dark about it?

  276. @Beckow
    @Aedib

    They are fools, but Russia will exchange them, they don't matter. West is focused on PR, emotional "winning" and gestures. See Laxa's rambling nonsense above for an example on how they are trained to describe losing as a "win". It takes some work but means nothing in the real world.

    Once you begin a gesture it can be fatal not to go through with it. West now has to go all the way, and that could turn a podunk provincial border-language dispute into a global disaster. I think it already has. But the "damn Russkies" will not speak Russian!!! that couldn't be allowed, as Mr. Hack is praying for so earnestly. There are a lot of fools around.

    Replies: @Aedib, @Mr. Hack

    Mr. Hack is praying earnestly for peace in Ukraine, especially during Orthodox Holy Week. We recently held a joint prayer meeting with our Protestant, Catholic and Jewish friends at the spacious Central Methodist Church in Phoenix.

    But the “damn Russkies” will not speak Russian!!! that couldn’t be allowed, as Mr. Hack is praying for so earnestly

    This is a pretty dumb statement to try and ascribe to me. Equally dumb would be to ascribe something like this to you, but I wont:

    But the “damn Russkies” will not kill enough Ukies!!! that couldn’t be allowed, as Mr. Beckow is praying for so earnestly. There are a lot of fools around.

    But then again, as you point out, there are plenty of fools around…

    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Mr. Hack

    My point is that the war in Donbas is basically about what language will the currently Russian speaking people allowed to use in the future. If Kiev wins it will be Ukrainian, if Russia they will be speaking Russian. It is pretty dumb to blow up Donbas, Europe, or the world over that issue. Why the fanatic resistance by Kiev to allow Russians a local autonomy? Language rights and killing are very different, so your attempt at analogy falls flat. It is not even remotely the same thing.

    Speaking of prayers in Phoenix, I once had a great oven-made pizza in Grimaldi's and just as we were ready to embrace the pleasant Scottsdale ambiance an open "party girls bus" with very drunk and violently screaming women slowly rode by...I have a strong stomach, but it was beyond good and evil, insanely sick as if evolution went haywire. The service worker cholas suddenly looked better to me - they were still short and chunky, but somehow more human. (See, I can grow as a person.)

    Other than that I wish you good ecumenical prayers, maybe it will even work. But maybe just letting those poor Russian speakers be who they are would be a better solution. That simple step and no Nato or bust idiocy in Kiev could have saved a lot of lives.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    , @silviosilver
    @Mr. Hack


    Mr. Hack is praying earnestly for peace in Ukraine, especially during Orthodox Holy Week. We recently held a joint prayer meeting with our Protestant, Catholic and Jewish friends at the spacious Central Methodist Church in Phoenix.
     
    I wonder how this works, in God's "mind."

    Was he completely neutral on the Ukraine war and planning on going with whichever side prays better or harder? The most interested parties in this affair would presumably be Ukrainians and Russians themselves, so I'm sure God, being a fair sort of guy, would make it "per capita prayer" otherwise the Russians could win on numbers alone. Then I guess a joint prayer session probably gets a "multifaith multiplier bonus," otherwise it's merely a case of adding more numbers to your side, which might even have the perverse effect of diluting your per capita prayer strength.

    And all of that is assuming God was originally neutral on the war. But would he really be? We're usually told that "God has a plan," typically meaning that God has a plan for each one of us, which obviously implies he has a plan for each Russian and each Ukrainian. If you combine all those individual plans, surely what results is an indirect "net plan," with obvious implications for the war itself. So now is the idea that if you pray hard or skillfully enough you can get God to change his plans? Like God wasn't really planning on intervening on your side, but with all this praying you've somehow twisted his arm? And what's the significance of Holy Week with respect to prayer? Is God more susceptible to prayer during this week, such that you'd really want to save your most difficult prayer requests for this week - some prayers that would never otherwise stand a chance actually have a shot at being answered this week?

    Replies: @Beckow, @Mr. Hack, @Coconuts

  277. “May you be cursed to forget your mother tongue” is the insult

  278. @Mr. Hack
    @Beckow

    Mr. Hack is praying earnestly for peace in Ukraine, especially during Orthodox Holy Week. We recently held a joint prayer meeting with our Protestant, Catholic and Jewish friends at the spacious Central Methodist Church in Phoenix.


    But the “damn Russkies” will not speak Russian!!! that couldn’t be allowed, as Mr. Hack is praying for so earnestly
     
    This is a pretty dumb statement to try and ascribe to me. Equally dumb would be to ascribe something like this to you, but I wont:

    But the “damn Russkies” will not kill enough Ukies!!! that couldn’t be allowed, as Mr. Beckow is praying for so earnestly. There are a lot of fools around.
     
    But then again, as you point out, there are plenty of fools around...

    Replies: @Beckow, @silviosilver

    My point is that the war in Donbas is basically about what language will the currently Russian speaking people allowed to use in the future. If Kiev wins it will be Ukrainian, if Russia they will be speaking Russian. It is pretty dumb to blow up Donbas, Europe, or the world over that issue. Why the fanatic resistance by Kiev to allow Russians a local autonomy? Language rights and killing are very different, so your attempt at analogy falls flat. It is not even remotely the same thing.

    Speaking of prayers in Phoenix, I once had a great oven-made pizza in Grimaldi’s and just as we were ready to embrace the pleasant Scottsdale ambiance an open “party girls bus” with very drunk and violently screaming women slowly rode by…I have a strong stomach, but it was beyond good and evil, insanely sick as if evolution went haywire. The service worker cholas suddenly looked better to me – they were still short and chunky, but somehow more human. (See, I can grow as a person.)

    Other than that I wish you good ecumenical prayers, maybe it will even work. But maybe just letting those poor Russian speakers be who they are would be a better solution. That simple step and no Nato or bust idiocy in Kiev could have saved a lot of lives.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Beckow

    You must have been a nightmare for your divorce lawyers.

    Beckow: "No, tell the judge that she is at fault for having her face punched in and being beaten and put into hospital."

    Lawyer: "But you're on camera punching her."

    Beckow: "She provoked me!"

    Lawyer: "Did she hit you first or hold a gun up to your head?"

    Beckow: "No, she insisted that official conversations with her sister not be in a foreign language, even though her sister prefers it."

    Lawyer: looks at other lawyer and rolls eyes.

    Beckow: "you lawyers are all the same, you are are controlled by your emotions and so degenerate and so hysterical and you always lose and you don't know anything about anything real or anything about winning."

    Judge: "Beckow, your ex-wife gets the freedom of her divorce and will keep the house."

    Beckow (but many years later, while drowning in whisky and misery): "If only Putin will win and show those damn slut Westerners and the puerile Ukrainians that I was right all along."

    Ukrainian war sitrep: Russia has less territory than it did 3 weeks ago. Has still not yet taken a Ukrainian city opposed. Has lost its Black Sea flagship. Is substantially degraded and is facing a Ukrainian force that gets stronger by the day. Meanwhile, the Russian economy will fall by at least 10% this year, the Chinese are bored of their bungling and Western support for Ukraine is only getting going. Now that Putin has guaranteed Macron's re-election, Germany will start buying tremendous amounts of arms for Ukraine. Beckow's hopes for a Ukraine reduced to a landlocked country are already beyond reasonable imagination. He can only hope that a fair judge comes in and allows Russia to keep as much as Beckow did in his divorce, which won't be his dignity or most of his soul, but it might be what he started with.

    As for your characterisation of the sexual predator Graham Phillip's interview of the uniformed servicemen "CossackGundi", you admit that it is sick propaganda probably taken under torture in the second part of your reply. You see how your consciousness is fragmented? You make the classic cluster B argument that "I didn't do it, and she deserved it." You have a defective personality. Don't worry though, you can change it.

    Replies: @Beckow

  279. @sudden death
    @A123

    Klaus Schwab and IslamoPutin at WEF in Davos:

    https://i0.wp.com/moguldom.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/915.The-WEF-Great-Reset-Conspiracy-Theory-What-Is-It_-.jpg?w=915&ssl=1

    Replies: @Yellowface Anon, @A123

  280. @Yellowface Anon
    @sudden death

    Very funny how A123 is mixing every boogeyman of his Judeo-Americana worldview into an amorphous mixture with a thousand limbs.

    As I said, properly accelerationist.

    Replies: @A123

    Its much more humor than seriousness.

    Somehow SD come up with the bizarre association “IslamoPutin”. I am simply matching his absurdity with something equally over the top. The “IslamoPope” as an avid backer of SD’s Ukraine policy.

    If SD stops, I will too…
    ____

    Pope Francis is behaving shamefully and needs to be replaced by someone who will defend Christianity. That being said, I do not think that he has actually converted to Islam.

    PEACE 😇

  281. @utu
    ISIS calls for more attacks in Israel, Europe
    https://www.jpost.com/arab-israeli-conflict/article-704472

    Is Putin via his buddy Naftali Bennett trying to help Marine Le Pen? Or is it because narcissistic Israel needs more attention as everybody is talking about Ukraine?

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @sudden death, @Yevardian

    I remember predicting Naftali Bennet as Israel’s next PM as soon as I first heard about him in the late 2000s, such a living, fleshly anti-semitic trope could not not become the country’s leader one day.
    I do not see how his relationship with Putin would be anything special. Probably Bennet’s friendship with Biden would be closer, if the latter could remember his name.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Yevardian


    I remember predicting Naftali Bennet as Israel’s next PM as soon as I first heard about him in the late 2000s,
     
    His coalition's sole purpose seems to be "anyone but Netanyahu". Has it achieved anything beyond the ministerial (e.g. passing a budget)?

    Including the Muslim Ra'am Party was necessary to meet the 61 seat threshold. However, it made the entire situation unstable. Search on the phrase "Bennett coalition crisis" and something seems to pop up every week. It could fall apart at any moment, requiring new elections.

    I do not see how his relationship with Putin would be anything special. Probably Bennett's’s friendship with Biden would be closer, if the latter could remember his name.
     
    Not-The-President Biden's stance on Iran has probably degraded any relationship with Bennett. While JCPOA2, thankfully, appears to be finally dead. The White House occupant tried to keep it alive.

    It is hard to score anyone's relationship with Putin. Bennett did seem to serve as a credible intermediary for potential Ukr/Rus negotiations.

    PEACE 😇
  282. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Aedib

    1. Aiden Aslin fits no definition of "mercenary." He is a regular uniformed member of the Ukrainian military. Anyone who states otherwise is a liar or completely ignorant. Either way, they have no credibility.

    2. The interviewer, Graham Phillips, got his start as a brothel reviewer. This is the type of person of extremely low character that Russia has to depend on. It is also why none of their Ukrainian quislings turned out for them.

    3. Aiden Aslin is handcuffed and barely responsive. He is clearly under substantial duress. He does almost laugh a bit after the Mitchell and Webb reference, but he has the same general affect as those confessing their "guilt" in the Stalinist show trials.

    4. In another video, he is clearly reading from a teleprompter. He is therefore obviously being forced to say specific lies.

    5. In that other video, the Russians have dressed him in an Azov t-shirt. Aiden was never a member of Azov. Again, this proves that Russia is spinning an entirely fake story with a broken and tortured prisoner of war as their mouthpiece. This is sick.

    Your posts tend to show a deeply antisocial personality. They have the ringing of secondary psychopathy to them. Nowadays this is normally comorbid with some degree of narcissism, that protects the individual from recognising the darkness in themselves, so they tend to revel in putting it onto others. My greatest wish for you is that you one day see yourself clearly, in the mirror, and, I mean this genuinely, because I do wish the best for you, I also wish that you somehow survive that encounter with who you truly are.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Yevardian, @Aedib

    Aiden Aslin fits no definition of “mercenary.”

    Thou protest too much. The definition of a mercenary is: a professional soldier hired to serve in a foreign army. Aiden looks very frumpy, so I am not sure about calling him a “professional” in any context, but other than that he is an Englishman fighting in a foreign war for money. A mercenary.

    I watched the video and Aiden looks scared, but speaks freely and there are no signs of coercion. He is trying to ingratiate himself, but that comes with the situation he is in – no reason to generalize and project that the “evil” Russians made him do it.

    If it was reversed, I suspect you would be the first one screaming that “see, even the Russian says it“, and you would deny that any coercion is even possible when it comes to the West or Kiev. Obviously in your mind. Try to be more even-handed, the breathless tribalism that you display here is embarrassing.

    Regarding the “brothel reviewer”, wow…do you know that Zelensky played piano on TV with his dick? You know the saying about people in glass houses…

  283. @Beckow
    @Mr. Hack

    My point is that the war in Donbas is basically about what language will the currently Russian speaking people allowed to use in the future. If Kiev wins it will be Ukrainian, if Russia they will be speaking Russian. It is pretty dumb to blow up Donbas, Europe, or the world over that issue. Why the fanatic resistance by Kiev to allow Russians a local autonomy? Language rights and killing are very different, so your attempt at analogy falls flat. It is not even remotely the same thing.

    Speaking of prayers in Phoenix, I once had a great oven-made pizza in Grimaldi's and just as we were ready to embrace the pleasant Scottsdale ambiance an open "party girls bus" with very drunk and violently screaming women slowly rode by...I have a strong stomach, but it was beyond good and evil, insanely sick as if evolution went haywire. The service worker cholas suddenly looked better to me - they were still short and chunky, but somehow more human. (See, I can grow as a person.)

    Other than that I wish you good ecumenical prayers, maybe it will even work. But maybe just letting those poor Russian speakers be who they are would be a better solution. That simple step and no Nato or bust idiocy in Kiev could have saved a lot of lives.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    You must have been a nightmare for your divorce lawyers.

    Beckow: “No, tell the judge that she is at fault for having her face punched in and being beaten and put into hospital.”

    Lawyer: “But you’re on camera punching her.”

    Beckow: “She provoked me!”

    Lawyer: “Did she hit you first or hold a gun up to your head?”

    Beckow: “No, she insisted that official conversations with her sister not be in a foreign language, even though her sister prefers it.”

    Lawyer: looks at other lawyer and rolls eyes.

    Beckow: “you lawyers are all the same, you are are controlled by your emotions and so degenerate and so hysterical and you always lose and you don’t know anything about anything real or anything about winning.”

    Judge: “Beckow, your ex-wife gets the freedom of her divorce and will keep the house.”

    Beckow (but many years later, while drowning in whisky and misery): “If only Putin will win and show those damn slut Westerners and the puerile Ukrainians that I was right all along.”

    Ukrainian war sitrep: Russia has less territory than it did 3 weeks ago. Has still not yet taken a Ukrainian city opposed. Has lost its Black Sea flagship. Is substantially degraded and is facing a Ukrainian force that gets stronger by the day. Meanwhile, the Russian economy will fall by at least 10% this year, the Chinese are bored of their bungling and Western support for Ukraine is only getting going. Now that Putin has guaranteed Macron’s re-election, Germany will start buying tremendous amounts of arms for Ukraine. Beckow’s hopes for a Ukraine reduced to a landlocked country are already beyond reasonable imagination. He can only hope that a fair judge comes in and allows Russia to keep as much as Beckow did in his divorce, which won’t be his dignity or most of his soul, but it might be what he started with.

    As for your characterisation of the sexual predator Graham Phillip’s interview of the uniformed servicemen “CossackGundi”, you admit that it is sick propaganda probably taken under torture in the second part of your reply. You see how your consciousness is fragmented? You make the classic cluster B argument that “I didn’t do it, and she deserved it.” You have a defective personality. Don’t worry though, you can change it.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Beckow
    @Triteleia Laxa


    ...Has still not yet taken a Ukrainian city opposed.
     
    Mariupol?

    Ukrainian force that gets stronger by the day.
     
    In the last few days around 3k Ukie soldiers surrendered. Their material is getting blown up day after day. Stronger? Let's see what they will do with that "strength", you think they may take Donetsk or march on Moscow?

    One more time: Russia is controlling Black See and the coast, they pushed even a thought of Nato out of Ukraine. They are winning. When it's over, you will hide.

    It is the West that is getting bored with it, they have minimal ability to suffer and without cheap resources from Russia they will live worse. 10% down economy in Russia? That's it? That is a rounding error given how squishy the so-called "GNP" numbers are when you look at them closely.

    You are way off with your silly and badly written dialogue on "divorce". Way off. It shows that your liberalism infected mind can only think in predictable channels - cliche stuff that your saw in movies or videos, the shallow generalities that the Western under-educated class feeds to each other.

    Are you still defending Nato bombers as "meaning well"? Do you realize what the rest of the world is thinking about the sudden Western hysteria about the "horrors of war"? After the likes of Blair and Obama, Clintons and Bush were celebrated for "humanitarian bombing"? Or whatever cacamonie excuse the media was feeding you. 80% of the world is watching the Western mental collapse and wondering how low can they go. How low can hypocrisy go? And where are you going to hide once the war is over and Russia controls the Black See coast?

    Replies: @Sean, @Wokechoke

  284. @Yevardian
    @Seraphim


    Romania is not even able to unite with Moldavia, certainly a core Romanian land, thanks to Russian duplicity, that you seem Okay with. You’re a Romanian Russophile right?
     

    How many times did I tell you and your sidekick AP (to my recollection in no uncertain terms) that I am guilty as charged?
     
    Tbh, I myself find it pretty hard to reconcile these two things. Certainly a Bulgarian, Serbian, Christian Caucasian, Greek or pre-2014-Ukrainian Russophile is easily explicable, I could even see a creative case made for a Balt (without Russian rule, Balts and their language would have been assimilated as Swedes, Germans or Danes), but from my pov, Romania went from the only civilised Balkan country (or at least government) to having probably the worst Communist regime in all of Europe except Albania.

    I suppose it could be argued Romania owes its independence from the Turks to Russia, and cultural similarities. But from my wide experience of Romanians, they're the most anti-Russia people in all of Europe, excepting Balts and Poles.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Seraphim

    It certainly depends to whom you were talking in your ‘wide experience’ of Romanians. I guess that they were the ‘westernized’ category which believes that being anti-Russian is the ticket to be ‘accepted’ by ‘Europe’ (and get ‘European funds’). But this attitude has deep seated roots in the relentless ‘Western’ anti-Orthodox propaganda in all its disguises Catholic, Protestant, progressive, liberal, revolutionary, LGBT, Open Society, you name it).

  285. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Aedib

    1. Aiden Aslin fits no definition of "mercenary." He is a regular uniformed member of the Ukrainian military. Anyone who states otherwise is a liar or completely ignorant. Either way, they have no credibility.

    2. The interviewer, Graham Phillips, got his start as a brothel reviewer. This is the type of person of extremely low character that Russia has to depend on. It is also why none of their Ukrainian quislings turned out for them.

    3. Aiden Aslin is handcuffed and barely responsive. He is clearly under substantial duress. He does almost laugh a bit after the Mitchell and Webb reference, but he has the same general affect as those confessing their "guilt" in the Stalinist show trials.

    4. In another video, he is clearly reading from a teleprompter. He is therefore obviously being forced to say specific lies.

    5. In that other video, the Russians have dressed him in an Azov t-shirt. Aiden was never a member of Azov. Again, this proves that Russia is spinning an entirely fake story with a broken and tortured prisoner of war as their mouthpiece. This is sick.

    Your posts tend to show a deeply antisocial personality. They have the ringing of secondary psychopathy to them. Nowadays this is normally comorbid with some degree of narcissism, that protects the individual from recognising the darkness in themselves, so they tend to revel in putting it onto others. My greatest wish for you is that you one day see yourself clearly, in the mirror, and, I mean this genuinely, because I do wish the best for you, I also wish that you somehow survive that encounter with who you truly are.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Yevardian, @Aedib

    Aiden Aslin fits no definition of “mercenary.”

    He’s fighting for the military of a foreign country, probably in a special unit, as I doubt he speaks Ukrainian. Are the Foreign Legion mercenaries? Is Blackwater? Were the kids fighting for the Taliban mercenaries? Was Orwell in Spain? Inherently slippery term.

    The interviewer, Graham Phillips, got his start as a brothel reviewer. This is the type of person of extremely low character that Russia has to depend on. It is also why none of their Ukrainian quislings turned out for them.

    Nice. Apparently ‘The Exile’ had a similar schtick, though I’ve yet to delve into this literary genre.

    In that other video, the Russians have dressed him in an Azov t-shirt. Aiden was never a member of Azov. Again, this proves that Russia is spinning an entirely fake story with a broken and tortured prisoner of war as their mouthpiece. This is sick.

    G_d save Ukrainian POW’s from such atrocities like being forced to wear an Azov Battalion t-shirt against their will. The Most Moral Army in the World (TM) would never stoop to such things. Putin should learn from Operation Cast Lead or Operation Grapes of Wrath for lessons in humane peacekeeping. Not engage in whataboutism here, just pointing out your blatant hypocrisy.

    No doubt there have been enough atrocities in Z-War already, jury is out on who did what.

    Your posts tend to show a deeply antisocial personality. They have the ringing of secondary psychopathy to them.

    He’s just some ‘deplorable’ troll who enjoys posting gore and fantasising about slave labour, I doubt your armchair analysis will have any effect on such people. Save your hasbara for actual humans like Mikhail or Beckow.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Yevardian


    He’s fighting for the military of a foreign country, probably in a special unit, as I doubt he speaks Ukrainian. Are the Foreign Legion mercenaries? Is Blackwater? Were the kids fighting for the Taliban mercenaries? Was Orwell in Spain? Inherently slippery term.
     
    No, your answer is "inherently slippery" or perhaps just plain ignorant. He is a Ukrainian citizen, with a Ukrainian citizen wife, serving in the regular uniformed Ukrainian forces.

    Nice.
     
    Graham Phillip's whole affect is repulsive. Maybe it isn't obvious to non-Brits like you, or maybe you are similarly pure slime. What do you think?

    G_d save Ukrainian POW’s from such atrocities like being forced to wear an Azov Battalion t-shirt against their will. The Most Moral Army in the World (TM) would never stoop to such things. Putin should learn from Operation Cast Lead or Operation Grapes of Wrath for lessons in humane peacekeeping. Not engage in whataboutism here, just pointing out your blatant hypocrisy.
     
    You are engaging in whataboutism and there's no hypocrisy on my part. I'm not Israeli nor Jewish.

    It is just that if, on this website, you don't consider Israel the epitome of evil, then you are supposedly Israeli.

    I think Israel is pretty reasonable for a Middle Eastern country and is a moderate regional power. It isn't particularly important, except as an aspect of US foreign policy, or as a channel for the derangement of internet anti-Semites.

    I've generally much preferred the Israelis I have met to the other Middle Easterners, but they are no Azov or Ukrainian marines defending their homes against a nuclear former superpower. They are muddling along in a troubled part of the world, not heroes for all of time.

    I also don't have suggestions for how the Israelis could go about their business better given their situation in the world, but I cannot say the same thing for Russia, which further explains the difference. Russia should just withdraw, while I have no idea how Israel could untangle its knot.

    I also feel much more affectionately for European peoples, am much more concerned with European peace and unashamed to admit it. Do you have a problem with that? I don't. It doesn't mean I wish anyone harm. It just means that I am not a universal God, undivided.

    He’s just some ‘deplorable’ troll who enjoys posting gore and fantasising about slave labour, I doubt your armchair analysis will have any effect on such people. Save your hasbara for actual humans like Mikhail or Beckow.
     
    You're right that he is sacrificing his humanity. It pains me to see it. It should pain you, at least a little. But he isn't a "deplorable." He is an ASPD child.

    Replies: @Yevardian

  286. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Aedib

    1. Aiden Aslin fits no definition of "mercenary." He is a regular uniformed member of the Ukrainian military. Anyone who states otherwise is a liar or completely ignorant. Either way, they have no credibility.

    2. The interviewer, Graham Phillips, got his start as a brothel reviewer. This is the type of person of extremely low character that Russia has to depend on. It is also why none of their Ukrainian quislings turned out for them.

    3. Aiden Aslin is handcuffed and barely responsive. He is clearly under substantial duress. He does almost laugh a bit after the Mitchell and Webb reference, but he has the same general affect as those confessing their "guilt" in the Stalinist show trials.

    4. In another video, he is clearly reading from a teleprompter. He is therefore obviously being forced to say specific lies.

    5. In that other video, the Russians have dressed him in an Azov t-shirt. Aiden was never a member of Azov. Again, this proves that Russia is spinning an entirely fake story with a broken and tortured prisoner of war as their mouthpiece. This is sick.

    Your posts tend to show a deeply antisocial personality. They have the ringing of secondary psychopathy to them. Nowadays this is normally comorbid with some degree of narcissism, that protects the individual from recognising the darkness in themselves, so they tend to revel in putting it onto others. My greatest wish for you is that you one day see yourself clearly, in the mirror, and, I mean this genuinely, because I do wish the best for you, I also wish that you somehow survive that encounter with who you truly are.

    Replies: @Beckow, @Yevardian, @Aedib

    If “he is a regular uniformed member of the Ukrainian military”, why is he begging to Boris Johnson for rescue? He should ask the coca-addict. Anyway, he would be a nice slave to reconstruct some schools in Donetsk.

  287. @Yevardian
    @utu

    I remember predicting Naftali Bennet as Israel's next PM as soon as I first heard about him in the late 2000s, such a living, fleshly anti-semitic trope could not not become the country's leader one day.
    I do not see how his relationship with Putin would be anything special. Probably Bennet's friendship with Biden would be closer, if the latter could remember his name.

    Replies: @A123

    I remember predicting Naftali Bennet as Israel’s next PM as soon as I first heard about him in the late 2000s,

    His coalition’s sole purpose seems to be “anyone but Netanyahu”. Has it achieved anything beyond the ministerial (e.g. passing a budget)?

    Including the Muslim Ra’am Party was necessary to meet the 61 seat threshold. However, it made the entire situation unstable. Search on the phrase “Bennett coalition crisis” and something seems to pop up every week. It could fall apart at any moment, requiring new elections.

    I do not see how his relationship with Putin would be anything special. Probably Bennett’s’s friendship with Biden would be closer, if the latter could remember his name.

    Not-The-President Biden’s stance on Iran has probably degraded any relationship with Bennett. While JCPOA2, thankfully, appears to be finally dead. The White House occupant tried to keep it alive.

    It is hard to score anyone’s relationship with Putin. Bennett did seem to serve as a credible intermediary for potential Ukr/Rus negotiations.

    PEACE 😇

  288. So the true Donbass Offensive is beginning. Do or die time for ‘Special Operation Ukraine’. I suppose by Victory Day we’ll all see whether Scott Ritter, Karlin, Islamic Revert Mike Whitney and Our Benevolent Overlord were right in their hunches or analysis.

    • Agree: sher singh
    • Replies: @Mikel
    @Yevardian


    So the true Donbass Offensive is beginning.
     
    The latest assesment I've read from the Pentagon is that the really true one has not yet begun and the Russians are just testing the enemy lines.