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Open Thread: Happy New Year!
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I wish my readers the best of spirits and great success in 2021!

 
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  1. This is the current Open Thread, where anything goes – within reason.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

    Commenting rules. Please note that anonymous comments are not allowed.

  2. melanf says:

    Happy New Year! St. Petersburg now :

    And this is my town:

  3. Happy New Year AK and all the regular commentors, who make this blog such a wonderful gathering place. You guys were a genuine bright spot for me in an otherwise dismal year.

  4. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Or you can go to the one at the local zoo (the above attraction is at the fairgrounds)

    You don’t even need to drop any acid to get some “colorful effects” during the New Year celebration. 🙂

  5. Speaking of New Year’s decorations –

    • Thanks: BenB
    • Replies: @Octavian
    , @RadicalCenter
  6. @Blinky Bill

    One learns a lot from the many knowledgeable commenters on this blog, especially due to how many different countries the commenters hail from (Balkans, China, Russia etc). Diversity is a strength in some cases it seems!

    Hopefully the coming year sees the lockdown end. On one hand it was nice working/studying from home but on the other it was quite dreary.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill, Mark G., Tor597
  7. This in just now from the future Russian Mars colony!

    Happy New Year everyone!

    С Новым Годом. С новым счастьем!

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill, Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @TGD
  8. Octavian says: • Website

    Happy New Year everyone! С новым годом!

    God bless and keep you all. May your fortunes and circumstances improve regardless of whatever interesting developments will occur in 2021.

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  9. Octavian says: • Website
    @Anatoly Karlin

    That’s very beautiful. Looks like a grand time.

    Are you going to find an excuse to wander that direction? It’s about an hour out from the city center, yes?

  10. AP says:

    Best wishes to everyone in the New Year, may the next year be better for everyone.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Thanks: Bashibuzuk
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  11. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumcision_of_Jesus#:~:text=The%20circumcision%20of%20Jesus%20is,birth%20(traditionally%20January%201).&text=A%20number%20of%20relics%20claiming,foreskin%20of%20Jesus%2C%20have%20surfaced.

    May you have a wonderful time worshipping holy prepuce

    The circumcision of Jesus is an event from the life of Jesus, according to the Gospel of Luke chapter 2, which states in verse 21 that Jesus was circumcised eight days after his birth (traditionally January 1).

    The event is celebrated as the Feast of the Circumcision in the Eastern Orthodox Church on January 1 in whichever calendar is used, and is also celebrated on the same day by many Anglicans. It is celebrated by Roman Catholics as the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus, in recent years on January 3 as an Optional Memorial, though it was for long celebrated on January 1, as some other churches still do. A number of relics claiming to be the Holy Prepuce, the foreskin of Jesus, have surfaced

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Prepuce

    Various miraculous powers have been ascribed to it.

    • LOL: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
  12. @Anatoly Karlin

    Yet another item to add to our list of experiences when we finally get to russia. Beautiful.

    • Agree: Bashibuzuk
  13. @AP

    As they say in Los Angeles, equalmente.

    • Thanks: AP
    • Replies: @Cato
  14. Happy New Year to all, whenever you celebrate it! This New Year is Christian. Chinese celebrate New Year on a different date, and so do Muslims, and Jews, and likely many others. However, good wishes are good wishes, regardless of the calendar.

    • Thanks: Bashibuzuk
    • Replies: @Jazman
  15. Happy New Year, Anatoly!

  16. Jazman says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Thank you
    Happy New year to you and your family

  17. Dreadilk says:

    Happy new year everyone!

  18. Max Payne says:

    https://www.rt.com/news/511261-canada-minister-resigns-lockdown/

    The hypocrisy of it all. Everyone went on vacation during this “crisis”. Vacations are, after all, essential travel. The internet needs to regress back to 2005 days. Its empowering plebs to stay in full-retard mode.

  19. Yevardian says:
    @Kent Nationalist

    It feels to me there’s a recurrent pattern of Indians online insulting Europeans and championing their supposed superiority, only to get extremely angry and butthurt when they’re inevitably destroyed by FACTS and LOGIC.
    It’s odd, because you don’t see Chinese, Turks or even the Arab world so obsessively engaging in such aggressive online behaviour, presumably because they have or had real achievements. When was the last genuinely indigenous significant Indian civilisation? The Guptas? The Cholas? Practically in antiquity anyway.

    Все равно, с новым годом

  20. @Kent Nationalist

    Enjoy your rituals involving holy prepuce and negrolatry

    Link broken boomer it’s called Ashwamedha and your ancestors did it too.

    Enjoy your ritual cannibalism and degrading European ancestors while being a ‘white nationalist’

    Among the anthropologically defined 356 contemporary societies of Euro-Asia and Africa, there is a large and significant negative correlation between Christianization (for at least 500 years) and the absence of clans and lineages; (race)

    Idk why you’re offended by western universalism being attacked. The Pagans get to poke fun at Holy Prepuce, the Christcucks can feast on it. 🤷‍♀️

    Everyone gets a stronger identity instead of this soft globohomo bs.

    Read: https://akarlin.com/2009/09/struggle-europe-mankind/

    • Troll: Mr. Hack
  21. @Yevardian

    What am I butt hurt about & it’s funny how you make Dharmic V Abrahamic into Indian V European.

    Can genetic white trash only see things in racial terms?

    Anyway, you’re Armenian you genocided your Hindus in the name of Christ god now he rebukes you।।

    https://vajrin.wordpress.com/2014/06/01/for-the-ashes-of-their-fathers-and-the-temples-of-their-gods-the-hindus-of-armenia/

  22. @Yevardian

    It’s odd, because you don’t see Chinese, Turks or even the Arab world so obsessively engaging in such aggressive online behaviour

    Did you miss out on the KARA BOĞA meme?

    Arabs merely wish for death upon Europe, while crying about Islamophobia and burning French goods (after they have paid money for them) in protest.

    The Chinese are nicely sequestered behind their Great Wall.

  23. EldnahYm says:
    @Yevardian

    Indians are more argumentative than those other groups. It’s not an entirely bad quality, though people are often annoyed by it.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
  24. Beckow says:
    @Yevardian

    Indians don’t like themselves or India. They are angry about who they are, where they live, and the fact that nothing can ever change it. (There is some injustice in it if you want to be open-minded.) It is like the unfairness of some people being smart, others stupid, some tall, others short, ugly or good-looking – those are unfair, in a sense that they are true and permanent.

    The condition of being an Indian is also permanent. Indians know that they can push their way into the West, learn the language and mores, and yet they are still Indian, they will not shake that. It drives them berserk with anger, and when you push an Indian it comes out. They are living in a state of permanent suppressed hatred towards anything white, Christian or European. One wonders who were the geniuses in the West who thought that mass migration from South Asia was just the thing the already wobbly Western civilisation needed. I think it’s too late now.

    Happy 2021 !!!!
    (The first full post-collapse year. Now for the consequences.)

    • Disagree: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Jatt Aryaa
    , @Yevardian
  25. Tor597 says:

    Happy New Years everybody!

    Even though everyone fights in these threads, I enjoy interacting and learning from people I would have otherwise never come across.

    @Anatoly Karlin major props to you. I spent a lot of time thinking you were a shill. But I’ve come to respect your writing. You are always relevant and interesting.

  26. Meanwhile in Ussuri Kray, Russian far east.

    • Replies: @melanf
  27. Cato says:
    @Yevardian

    Actually, the most recent significant Indian civilization was “co-produced” (an Elinor-Ostrom-ism) with us Anglos: Silicon Valley. Who is the CEO of Alphabet? of Microsoft? Who, in every engineering school in the US, is considered to have their shit most together? From which country does the largest stream of H-visa holders come to usurp our jobs? Admire or resent, you must admit that Indians are having a major impact, and a positive one, measured in quality of output produced.

    • Troll: Tor597
    • Replies: @EldnahYm
    , @Tor597
    , @Yevardian
  28. They hate us for our Freedom

    [MORE]

  29. @Beckow

    https://www.sikhiwiki.org/index.php/Chardi_Kala

    Lol we’re always in Chardi Kala high spirits.

    Where do you come up with these projections?

    You look like every Juan, Tyrone or Ahmed with a blue jeans and fade.

    Literally a woman with a trimmed Moustache & exposed jaw!

    Meanwhile, our Libaas (look) is Nyara (unique)

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

  30. TGD says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    С Новым Годом. С новым счастьем!

    I am curious as to why the New Year’s greeting in Russian is С Новым Годом! That is in the instrumental case and means literally “with New Year?” You’ve added С новым счастьем! That is also in the instrumental case and translates as “with new happiness.”

    Why can’t the Russians put those two wishes together in one greeting?

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
    , @Yevardian
  31. Great Bifurcation, press Agree

    • Agree: Shortsword
    • Disagree: Thulean Friend
  32. The glaxy brain take to end all galaxy brain takes:

  33. Can’t relate to the debbie downer rhetoric. Nobody in my family was injured or harmed by COVID-19, my financial situation got better and we had no lockdowns here so life continued with far fewer restrictions compared to elsewhere. 2020 was a good year for me.

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  34. melanf says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    Exemplary redneck

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  35. EU signs €145 billion declaration to develop next-gen processors and 2 nm technology

    The Netherlands already has ASML – the premier litography tool maker in the world. They make the EUV machines TSMC and Samsung need to get under 7 nm. The talent and capacity always existed in Europe, what was lacking was the political will. Until now.

    The processors will be a mix of ARM and RISC-V. Legacy x86 µarch now on its final legs.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  36. I’ve noticed that conspiracy theories seem to be a mainly an “Anglo” thing, stemming from a uniquely Anglo distrust and contempt for their ruling elites and authorities.

    I would say at least 90% of major conspiracy theories circulating at any one time have originated in Anglo countries.

    • Replies: @EldnahYm
  37. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    I don’t know why a certain type of white nationalist supports China, they are no friends of whitey and it’s not just the British they hate either. Xi, the big man himself, has publicly stated that the “unequal treaties” with Russia are a humiliation for the Chinese people and will be dealt with in due course.

    Hong Kong is not the end of settling the score with the white devil, it’s just the beginning. Russians and white nationalists who think they’re going to ride on China’s coattails have got another thing coming.

    • Agree: Bashibuzuk
    • Disagree: Dreadilk
  38. @TGD

    Interesting question. I am not a linguist, but my guess would be that in the ancient times people greeted each other when they met during New Year celebrations by announcing that they “came with a New Year, [bringing] new happiness with them“. Just my 2 cents.

  39. @melanf

    He’s an actor parodying the populist politicians. It’s a satire, they have a long playlist of short videos on YouTube.

  40. @Europe Europa

    Yeah, I agree Han Chinese are a threat to Whitey.

    But you Brits have other problems on your plate.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EqmfDBTXIAAFXWU?format=jpg&

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Eqod8FqXAAI9h0a?format=jpg&

    No more United Kingdom soon?

    Lower the Union Jack, rise the new and improved Flag of England.

    https://www.change.org/p/the-government-of-the-uk-change-the-english-flag

    And Happy New Year!

    • Replies: @Tor597
  41. AaronB says:

    I’ve recently started reading novels again, and am very much enjoying the experience.

    I too was briefly caught up in the unintelligent shift to “functionality” in all aspects of our culture, where you’re only supposed to be reading books that help you achieve some (lame) purpose or other, never for pure pleasure or to deepen your experience of life.

    I’m reading Wolf Solent by John Cowper Powys, sometimes called the Dorset Proust. I’ve been meaning to read since I was a teenager but never got around to it. Its a very enjoyable read, with strands of nature mysticism, and somewhat strange, wild, and exuberant.

    Early on the protagonist leaves London for the English countryside and says how he has no desire to accomplish anything or leave any mark behind, but lives for particular sensations. I can relate to that! A sadly lost sensibility in our dull modern times.

    I’m also reading The Broken Sword by Poul Anderson, a dark fantasy tale in Norse setting, very Tolkinesque. Its a classic from the 50s I think. I agree with C.S Lewis that the North is magical in a strange, irresistible, mystical way. When I was young, I only enjoyed northern landscapes. Tibetan believe that their mystical traditions come from a primordial North (I think this is believed by Buddhists in India too), so there does seem to be something mystical about the North, buried today under an oppressive crust of technology and organization. Its funny though that today, one of my favorite landscapes is also the desert – perhaps my favorite – which I find more mystical and moving than any other.

    I’m also reading Ballad Of A Small Player, by Lawrence Osborne. A surreal tale of an English gambler in Macau who gradually sinks into the realm of “hungry ghosts” as his fortunes sink. Osborne is fast becoming one of my favorite modern writers.

    Well, the year is at an end, and I hope to be travelling out to the glorious West sometime at the end of next week, for a month of glorious aimless wandering through sublime and wild landscapes, doing nothing much of anything and just as the whim takes me, camping, hiking, sleeping outside, sleeping in my car, sleeping in hotels, a nomad.

    And I hope to repeat the experience after a few months. Life isn’t so bad after all.

  42. 128 says:
    @Europe Europa

    The enemy of my enemy is my friend?

  43. I find it interesting how ideas about politeness vary so much from country to country. Like at one extreme you have Japan with their almost ritualistic politeness, but it’s not very sincere either.

    At the other end of the spectrum you have maybe Russia/Eastern Europe, who are typically seen as having little in the way of regimented politeness. A common stereotype is that Russians are “rude” and rarely smile, but I think it’s more that they would only smile as a genuine expression, not as an insincere social convention/expectation as seems to be common in many countries.

    I’ve often heard the English stereotyped as having insincere politeness conventions and as saying “Please” and “Thank you” too much, although that sounds quite a dated impression to me. I find that the English these days are quite abrupt and not particularly concerned about being polite, they’ve moved more towards German style norms of social interaction I think.

  44. 128 says:

    I think what Karlin has to note is, with the exception, how many of the floomers he pointed out try to portray themselves has an everyman strongman personality type of leader? But then it seems that this blog is not fond of psychoanalysis? Basically a strongman that your blue collar Walmart, truck driver, or factory worker be comfortably have a few beers at the local pub with?

  45. EldnahYm says:
    @Cato

    Silicon Valley was almost entirely created by old stock Americans from the British Isles. The next important group are Jews then Germans, with a smattering of other whites.

    Indians aren’t being hired in Silicon Valley because they are competent. They are being hired 1. as a weapon to get rid of older, more expensive workers 2. because scamming Indians want to hire their co-ethnics. While there are many competent Indians, the amount of Indians working in Silicon Valley is not a measure of Indian competence. The common idea people have that much of what Silicon Valley does is useful is also wrong.

    The most useful large scale newish work in engineering in the United States would have to be in the field of petroleum engineering. Not that many Indians in that field.

    Indians are having a disastrous impact on the United States.

    • Disagree: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @utu
  46. EldnahYm says:
    @Europe Europa

    Not really true. Italians, Arabs, Greeks, and Turks all LOVE conspiracy theories.

    • Agree: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Europe Europa
  47. 128 says:

    About IQ, Bolsonaro actually strikes me as someone who is pretty intelligent, based on his military record, at least in the US military paratroopers tend to come from the upper quintile of the US military, while Obrador strikes me as someone who has the same intellectual caliber as Maduro.

  48. @EldnahYm

    Although the Arab/Muslim conspiracy theories tend to be the same sort of Zionist, anti-Western NWO type ones that originate in Anglo countries, and are directing the criticism at Israel/the West rather than their own countries. I don’t know about the Italian and Greeks, but I suspect it’s largely a similar story.

    Anglo countries seem to be the only countries that has conspiracy theories emerging as a result of their own introspective criticism of their elites/country as a whole.

    • Replies: @Tor597
    , @Daniel Chieh
    , @Bill
  49. @Thulean Friend

    The processors will be a mix of ARM and RISC-V. Legacy x86 µarch now on its final legs.

    Or ARM could be doomed outside of Apple and whatever other legacy license arrangements allow it to continue if the world’s antitrust authorities allow nVidia to buy Arm Holdings from Softbank, I would be ignoring it for one of my new projects if it wasn’t for Apple’s move to it for macOS systems and Raspberry Pi. RISC-V is still totally unproven beyond small-ish embedded systems, and might suffer terribly from having too many ISA options. It’s also New Jersey/Worse is Better/let’s make it easy for students style, see the lack of overflow etc. reporting in the base architecture, there’s no CPU flag register. Perhaps OK for C/C++ and Java which they use to excuse this, not for languages that care about correctness, or large integer math for cryptography etc.

    x86-64 is doing OK with AMD but it’s in their corporate DNA to quickly wreck whatever successes they achieve, this time by buying a huge FPGA company. x86-64 is OK at 14+++++++++ nm from Intel but they can’t make enough chips, and Intel is overall in the long term dooming it or at least themselves by diversity. They’ve lost their very most important advantage for decades, they can’t transition to smaller nodes let alone do that ahead of their competition.

    Their all 193 nm UV lithography 10 nm node which is between TSMC’s initial all UV 7nm node and TSMC’s increment on that starting to use EUV is a total commerical failure, and now Intel’s lots of EUV 7nm node is failing. Samsung is also reported to be having some yield problems, but at this time there’s no reason to believe they won’t be able to fix them.

    Intel’s problem is a very big deal for the whole world, you can’t subtract that much high end logic AKA CPU production capacity from the world’s total without a lot of knock on effects, especially given how long it would take Samsung and TSMC to increase production to cover for that.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  50. Pericles says:
    @Europe Europa

    Probably a form of envy. Just like Israel, another oddly beloved country in some circles, the Chinese seem to have their stuff together while we are run by malicious idiots intent on ruining us and our people. At least they don’t have that.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  51. Mr. Hack says:
    @AaronB

    Happy New Years Aaron! Wandering aimlessly can be a treat in itself, but may I suggest that you really treat yourself to seeing the most spectacular desert vistas imaginable while in Arizona? All you need is at least 6 hours of time and a car to visit the incomparable “Apache Trail” that lies on the eastern edges of the Phoenix area. If you really enjoy desert landscapes, there’s no better place to see so much beauty in so little time than driving through the trail. The inveterate world traveler Teddy Rooselvelt once said that he thought that the Apache Trail was the most scenic roadway in all of the US (and he drove on a lot of roads):

    The Apache Trail combines the grandeur of the Alps, the glory of the Rockies, the magnificence of the Grand Canyon, and then adds an indefinable something that none of the others have. To me, it is the most awe-inspiring and most sublimely beautiful.”

    Whenever I visit it and take the day trip, for some reason I feel that I’m visiting the Khyber Pass area, Afghanistan/Pakistan, even though I’ve never been there (I’ve read about it though). Some of the canyon vistas are so very inspiring to see!

    A useful map:

    Let us know what you think?

    • Thanks: AP, Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @AaronB
  52. A123 says:

    Humor for the Open Thread.

    PEACE 😇
     

  53. Tor597 says:
    @Cato

    This is laughable.

    Indians can’t lol claim Silicon Valley. Sure Indians contributed, but so did lots of other people.

    The biggest contribution of Indians to Silicon Valley is cheap Indian programmers who’s primary value is cheapness.

    Indian CEOs in tech are sometimes chosen after a company has matured and the founder does not want to dick around with micromanaging the company.

    Indians are servile and know their place in a caste system.

  54. Tor597 says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    Seeing the UK atomized into many different countries is the best prospect the world has for world peace.

  55. @Tor597

    If the UK balkanises it will be the first of many countries to do so.

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  56. Tor597 says:
    @Europe Europa

    You seem to be saying the Brittish are uniquely able to spot conspiracies due to some advanced level of introspection instead of the obvious.

    The British love to talk about conspiracy theories because its elites are so utterly corrupt and without morals.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
  57. @Europe Europa

    Interestingly, I agree with both you and Tor597.

    1) UK should fracture
    2) It is not the last country to do so
    3) A well-thought and managed separation, secession is a good move towards a peaceful coexistence.
    4) In the best possible outcome, Sinotriumph will eventually organize different Barbarian minority groups into a functional planetary whole.
    5) If the outcome is negative, then the world will be fractured between a functional Sinosphere and a dysfunctional conglomerate of Barbarian tribes speaking some dialdctal English-style creole.

    We’ll live, we’ll see…

  58. @Tor597

    Not quite, more that I find that the common people in many other countries feel closer to their elites and more inclined to believe that they are acting in their interests and have more of a sentiment attachment to them.

    Whereas in Britain, and I think the US and most other Anglo countries, the elites are seen as very distant and almost alien to the common people. I would say that perhaps Anglos are better at spotting conspiracies in the sense that they usually have no sentimental attachment to their elites so are less blinkered in their assessment of their actions.

  59. Meanwhile, the New Year’s festivities in Portland were as entertaining as usual:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EqqGWtwXcAEWYwP?format=jpg&

    https://www.cascadianow.org/articles/just-in-time-for-pride-first-ever-cascadia-rainbow-flags

    https://patchpatrol.com/patches/cascadia-black-lives-matter/

    Long live the multiracial and gender-neutral Cascadia People ‘s Commune.

    Might 2021 be the year when Cascadia would become free from Washington’s oppressive influence!

  60. Dmitry says:
    @Pericles

    This perception is likely a byproduct of the fact Israel and China are two examples of developing transition countries, while most of Western Europe (except some regions like the Balkans) and North America (except Mexico) are already very developed countries.

    The sense that countries which are transitioning to the first world, might be “doing better” than countries which are already hyper-developed, is likely mainly created by people comparing across countries in different historical stages.

    On the ground, the atmosphere in the earlier transitioning historical stage is more exciting than in countries which developed generations past. We can see similar excitement, if we look at the post-war years in European countries which were bouncing back from war. In the 1960s, countries like Italy would have had a similar “exciting atmosphere” of economic ascendance, that we see in China or Israel in this decade.

    Politics can also seem more sensible at a earlier development stage, partly because a smaller proportion of the population has been soaked in affluenza.

    For example, in this forum, we see privileged bourgeois Americans commentators complaining that they shouldn’t have lockdown to protect against pandemics, because this would mean cancelling evening classes and social life for their children.

    If such privileged Westerners were sent to few years living in a desert in Africa, perhaps their children’s violin classes would be placed in a wider perspective.

    But if there would further development in East Asia and the Middle East, then more and more rednecks will convert to hipsters in the populations with each generation. Style of politics will change in a predictable direction, which is not to say that “Scandinavian politics” will ever become common in the Middle East. However, Middle Eastern politics would probably become more like “Scandinavian politics” than it currently is.

    • Replies: @Passer by
  61. @Tor597

    You know, you could just say that you hate Whites in general, instead of appealing to this Eternal Anglo meme.

    Familiarity breeds contempt I guess, and letting ethnic outsiders into (formerly) White countries like America doesn’t engender gratitude from the immigrants, but rather hatred for the native/founding stock.

    • Replies: @Tor597
  62. @Europe Europa

    I don’t know why a certain type of white nationalist supports China, they are no friends of whitey and it’s not just the British they hate either. Xi, the big man himself, has publicly stated that the “unequal treaties” with Russia are a humiliation for the Chinese people and will be dealt with in due course.

    One…

    https://imgs.aixifan.com/FpwLaAVJJCAiWtNG1mr6l68DYMeu

    Or the other; I think the choice is clear:


    http://www.cnn.com/travel/amp/fake-paris-china/index.html

    In addition to the wholesale replication of Hallstatt, countless other facsimile cities and monuments have popped up across China — and more are in the works. Replica British towns near Shanghai and Chengdu, for example, feature Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian architecture complete with quaint market squares and signature red telephone booths. Likewise, a Bauhaus “German Town” near Shanghai designed by Albert Speer, son of the Third Reich’s chief architect, boasts bronze statues of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller.

    China is also home to several charming Dutch villages, at least two of the world’s largest Eiffel Tower replicas, and an opulent copy of the 17th-century Château de Maisons-Laffitte (constructed using the original blueprints and imported French Chantilly stone). More eerily, perhaps, a full-scale, no-expense-spared replica of the White House stands outside Hangzhou, while less exacting copies of the U.S. Capitol, the Arc de Triomphe, and the Sydney Opera House can be found in the village of Huaxi in Jiangsu province and elsewhere. And a long-term project is under way to create a vast financial center at Yujiapu in the municipality of Tianjin based explicitly on Manhattan. The plans even include a Rockefeller Center and twin towers to be built by the Chinese arm of Tishman, the contractor for the original World Trade Center towers in New York.

    […]

    The “Western Palaces” provide some cultural context for the current surfeit of replicas in the People’s Republic. Today, 21st-century industrialist Zhang Yue entertains at his own version of Versailles near Changsha in the province of Hunan (where his company compound, Broad Town, also features an Egyptian pyramid), and a state-owned firm in the northeastern city of Harbin occupies another imitation Versailles.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2012/11/29/chinas-copycat-cities/

    The ruling cliques of present China are flawed and at times exasperating, but compared to American insanity, there is no equivocation.

  63. Dmitry says:
    @Hyperborean

    Americans can’t laugh too much at the Chinese, considering they started the fashion in Las Vegas.

    Needless to say, conflict between China and the West in the 21st century, to the extent there might be one, will not be an ideological conflict like between the USA and USSR in the 20th century.

    Places like London can be considered quite insured, as whatever the economic future will be, Chinese elites have as much or more love for them than American elites.

    For a lot of places which are beloved by both sides like London (maybe even parts of North America like Vancouver?), the diplomatic preference will be to try to reduce conflict between USA and China.

  64. songbird says:
    @Tor597

    I don’t think that London or Birmingham are willing to cut themselves off. Too afraid that they’d be starved out. Really, the problem of globalism in a nutshell. Cities are leading the cultural and political rot, but they are population sinks. The problem would start to solve itself, except people in cities don’t want to be circumscribed. They want to control and subjugate wider areas.

    If London was cut out, I think it would soon pop like a zit, under its own internal contradictions.

    BTW, it is not clear to me that any other division of the UK would help nationalists.

  65. Dmitry says:

    If people want to know an example of the world’s most protected industries – New Year’s night television in Russia.

    The circle of “celebrities” is so small and protected in Russia, and their selection are cycled more infrequently.

    Most celebrities the same people unchanged (except with extra lines and grey hair) for 2021, as can be remembered in years like 2005 (and even earlier).
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lP54tzqrboc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2VmpnVzi20

  66. @Hyperborean

    Chinese want to see the beautiful European cities without the danger of being mugged or worse, I don’t blame them,

    Air China in-flight magazine advises against travelling to black and Asian areas in London

  67. Passer by says:
    @Dmitry

    Liberalism has greater effects due to the Western Empire (which possess half the global economy and two thirds of science production) than due to demographics. Its like communism and it spreads by similar means (propaganda), you kill it by killing the source.

    Before the propaganda was targetting the poor and causing cultural revolutions via them, not it is targeting minorities, women or LGBT.

    No one cares about the poor today because the USSR is dead. In the same way, no one would care about liberalism if the West is dead.

    • Agree: sher singh
  68. @Hyperborean

    I realised the American image didn’t quite show:

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    , @128
  69. Yevardian says:
    @Beckow

    I’ve noticed this to some degree too, there’s a sort of schizophrenic love/hate attitude towards their own country, I guess it’s because India really isn’t a united nation, but really a collection of mutually antagonistic castes, religions and ethnic groups (but especially the first), that, except in the far south, have been ruled over by foreigners for many hundreds of years.
    Probably the best book I ever read on Indian culture and their mentality was from a Trinidadian-born Indian, V.S. Naipaul, in his trilogy of visits to that benighted country: “An Area of Darkness”, “A Wounded Civilisation”, “A Million Mutinies Now”.

  70. Yevardian says:
    @Cato

    This is not a particularly major achievement considering such people are being drawn from a pool of 1 Billion+ people, also such people invariably become managers and enforcers of existing systems on behalf of others, never inventors themselves. Non-Western countries that actually have effective governments or high-trust societies (China, Japan, even Vietnam) don’t lose the cream of the human capital at such massive rates of brain-drain. It’s rather shocking for example how many Indian doctors practice in the UK for example, when you consider the prevalence of preventable disease in India, or it’s shameful infant mortality rate.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  71. Yevardian says:
    @TGD

    Sometimes old case forms are preserved in set greetings or phrases, for example “на новый год” would imply instrumental case, but instead uses the genitive for some reason. Or В снегу, which uses the partitive, I guess.

    C рождеством (happy birthday) uses the instrumental case, I guess because it’s a far more recent phenomenon, whilst с рождения (Christmas) instead uses the genitive, I guess, although с + genitive, is relatively common for many sentence structures as well.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
  72. @Hyperborean

    I have been to a few of these places in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area, they are frequently like outdoor malls, mainly food and European and American (and pseudo-European) fashion boutiques.

    The former concession areas have also been converted; some of it into corporate offices, others into very touristy places.

    While they were nice to get away from the overall (in my opinion, dull) modernist style* that is very common in China, they had a certain air of stale artificiality. In this sense, as a foreigner, I preferred the novelty of the reconstruction of historical native imperial styles.

    Some reconstructions are situated more individually into the rest of the urban scenery, in downtown Tianjin there is a copy of the Pont Alexandre IIIème (the taxis often cross it on the way to the railway station) and what looks suspiciously like the Grande Arche at La Défense.

    The newly (from a historical perspective) constructed churches I saw in exurban or rural areas were more interesting than the shopping areas. From afar they looked like they could be spatially displaced from Great Britain or Central Europe. They had a bit of English or Latin on them and classically inspired images of European and Chinese saints (Chinese sages?). They did give off the impression of European-culture-as-interpreted-by-Chinese that was slightly unusual in a religious sense, but overall very cultured for peasant areas.

    Oh, to finish, practically all commercials feature pale-skinned Chinese (unless it is a cameo by some famous person who has darker skin) or Europeans. Though when I visited Xinjiang there were a mixture of Chinese, European and Uyghur models (with old-fashioned pre-Revolution Iranian aesthetics) for those commercials made by Uyghurs.

    *With the caveat that certain types of modernism can be acceptable when done expensively, otherwise traditional-style is much better.

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  73. @Yevardian

    I’ve noticed this to some degree too, there’s a sort of schizophrenic love/hate attitude towards their own country, I guess it’s because India really isn’t a united nation, but really a collection of mutually antagonistic castes, religions and ethnic groups (but especially the first),

    From David Reich’s Who We Are and How We Got Here

    What the data were showing us was that the genetic distinctions among jati groups within India were in many cases real, thanks to the long-standing history of endogamy in the subcontinent. People tend to think of India, with its more than 1.3 billion people, as having a tremendously large population, and indeed many Indians as well as foreigners see it this way. But genetically, this is an incorrect way to view the situation. The Han Chinese are truly a large population. They have been mixing freely for thousands of years. In contrast, there are few if any Indian groups that are demographically very large, and the degree of genetic differentiation among Indian jati groups living side by side in the same village is typically two to three times higher than the genetic differentiation between northern and southern Europeans. The truth is that India is composed of a large number of small populations.

    Just imagine that, a Swede and a Sicilian have more in common with each other genetically than than two different castes living in the same village have with each other.

    • Agree: AnonFromTN
    • LOL: sher singh
  74. @Cato

    Thanks, amigo — in my defense, my Spanglish is mostly from just interacting with people, overhearing, and asking questions.

  75. @AnonFromTN

    Jari Jones is an American actress, filmmaker, model, and LGBTQ rights activist. Jones was a cast member, script consultant, acting coach, and producer of Port Authority. She was the first Black trans woman producer of a film competing at the Cannes Film Festival. In 2020, Jones was one of the nine faces in Calvin Klein’s 2020 Pride campaign. Apart from acting, Jones advocates for trans rights and is part of the Black Lives Matter movement. Jones has modeled for other brands including Dove in their “Goodbye Judgement, Hello Underarms” campaign and Elizabeth Suzann’s “Clothing is Political” campaign. She participated in The Real Catwalk in New York City in 2019.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  76. @Yevardian

    I always wondered if you were fluent Russian speaker. Do you consider yourself to be?

    Yevardian do you know much about the Armenian community in Iran? If you do, does this statement seem right to you?

    The Armenian language used in Iran holds a unique position in the usage of Armenian in the world, as most Armenians in the Diaspora use Western Armenian. However, Iranian Armenians speak an Eastern Armenian dialect that is very close to that used in Armenia, Georgia, and Russia. Iranian Armenians speak this dialect due in part to the fact that in 1604 much of the Armenian population in the Lake Van area, which used the eastern dialect, was displaced and sent to Isfahan by Shah Abbas. This also allowed for an older version to be preserved which uses classical Armenian orthography known as “Mashtotsian orthography” and spelling, whereas almost all other Eastern Armenian users (especially in the former Soviet Union) have adopted the reformed Armenian orthography which was applied in Soviet Armenia in the 1920s and continues in the present Republic of Armenia. This makes the Armenian language used in Iran and in the Armenian-Iranian media and publications unique, applying elements of both major Armenian language branches (pronunciation, grammar and language structure of Eastern Armenian and the spelling system of Western Armenian).

    Where do they fall in the “ian” vs “yan” divide?

    I know you’re not from Iran. So if you’re uncertain that’s cool. 😀

  77. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Thanks for the info! So, this is not a “she”, but more like an “it”. It is not just fat and ugly, but also evil and insane. Well-rounded individual: crap on every side.

    • Replies: @songbird
  78. @Blinky Bill

    I always wondered if you were fluent Russian speaker. Do you consider yourself to be?

    I am eagerly waiting for his answer.

    Not that I really need it, now that I read his reply to TGD.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  79. songbird says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Anyone seen one of these tranny commercials outside the US?

    One of the most remarkable trends in the US this year was the attempt to mainstream trannies, by major corporations in their advertisements. Facebook, Old Navy, I guess Calvin Klein. Others, maybe. I haven’t been paying close attention. I think they were all black.

    It is interesting to consider Calvin Klein. They did that controversial commercial with Brook Shields, I think in 1980, when she was 15. So, they were already pushing the boundaries of sex back then, where else could they go 40 years later? But to the most extreme freaks and deviants.

    It is hard for me to imagine that we couldn’t be at peak woke now, but I never would have predicted any of this.

  80. dfordoom says: • Website
    @AaronB

    I’m also reading The Broken Sword by Poul Anderson, a dark fantasy tale in Norse setting, very Tolkinesque.

    It’s kind of like Tolkien, but more nihilistic and much more pessimistic. Maybe fatalistic is a better word. I suspect Anderson captured the Norse flavour more effectively than Tolkien.

    Anderson also did some translations (or really they’re more like novelisations) of Norse sagas such as Hrolf Kraki’s Saga. They’re also worth reading.

    • Replies: @songbird
    , @AaronB
  81. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Blinky Bill

    On the subject of Armenians:

    https://www.rt.com/sport/511041-kristina-karapetyan-instagram-photos/

    As is similarly true with other countries, she’s a Kazakh, as in a citizen of Kazakhstan, but not an ethnic Kazakh, who typically have (for lack of a better word) Oriental features. Surname and look indicates an Armenian background and likely a mix (for lack of a better word) of something else. If so, likely Slav, as there’ve been a good number of them (Russians, Ukrainians, Belarusians and Poles) in Kazakhstan. Sure enough, a Google search of her name shows individuals with a southern California locale, where there’re numerous people of Armenian background, like the Kardashians.

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  82. Mikhail says: • Website

    Cute bike review:

    I’ve the non-Stagger version of the bike:

    Bought it back in September, with the idea of another possible NY metro area lock down, cutting out the gym and pool. Your typical stationary gym bike offers greater pedaling resistance for a better per capita time wise workout IMO. At the same time, it’s good to get out and about with as few cars as possible along the way.

    If we can get by Jan 15 with no lock down, I figure we’re in the clear from that happening thereafter.

    A pointed shot with the new year in mind:

    https://irrussianality.wordpress.com/2020/12/30/looking-back-at-2020/#comment-35624

    HAPPY NEW YEAR!

    • Thanks: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
  83. songbird says:
    @dfordoom

    It’s kind of like Tolkien, but more nihilistic and much more pessimistic.

    This is sort of the feeling I got from Tale of the Heike. Fascinating that you made this connection – I was wondering what made the story appeal to AaronB.

    I may be atypical, but I got a different feeling from The Broken Sword. I felt like it had hidden themes which are made more significant today. Themes about identity and nature. About family, foundlings, and community. About witches. On a certain level, I felt like it was also a Christian story. Note how humans, despite their shortcomings, were the only ones that showed the ability for romantic love.

    If LotR can be seen as a based allegory, Broken Sword is a based allegory x10.

    It is a tragic story, but I wouldn’t say that makes it nihilistic. It’s a page turner, too, by itself that practically makes it the opposite.

  84. @That Would Be Telling

    RISC-V’s major advantage is that it is open-source, which for the Chinese carries enormous significance. Even ARM, which was supposed to be more open than x86 and all the legacy IP it carries with it, could be blocked from Huawei.

    For this reason alone, I would not count out RISC-V. It’s quite recent (2010) but it stands on the shoulders of many iterations. David Patterson of Google was the PhD adviser for the guys who invented it at Google. Patterson himself was involved in the original creation of RISC in the 1980s. He’s also the guy who invented RAID. We shall see, I suppose. I’m quite optimistic about it.

    As for ARM, it’s even making a big push into servers, something which was traditional x86 territory. Anandtech has a very interestingAmpere Altra review which floored me. I did not know the gap had shrunk that much.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  85. @Mikhail

    Bought it back in September, with the idea of another possible NY metro area lock down, cutting out the gym and pool. Your typical stationary gym bike offers greater pedaling resistance for a better per capita time wise workout IMO. At the same time, it’s good to get out and about with as few cars as possible along the way.

    You’re a man of refined tastes. The car cucks must never be allowed to come back. This is ultimately a political decision, and one that we must grasp.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  86. On China, why are people surprised that white nationalists like Spirit of Enoch Powell would like them? They have the same enemies as he has.

    Those who say that China isn’t necessarily friends of Europeans are correct – but the Chinese aren’t enemies either. They have mercenary instincts. They will deal with whoever is in power. They are the ultimate pragmatists.

    I dislike China’s political system and I think they are making a mistake by closing off the country to foreigners, but I don’t get worked up about supporting Western attempts to engineer regime-change.

    A much bigger issue are the plutocrats in the West who use identity politics to divide people on the basis of race, religion, gender or sexuality, as a means to divert their attention from the fact that they are getting scammed and robbed.

    This is why the “Red China” scare is so cynical. As if it matters to the average Westerner. Yet idiots fall for it. Including some people here.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  87. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Thulean Friend

    It’s counterproductive to bicycle alongside car fumes. That said, I’m a bit of a car guy. Sorry. My auto tastes are “refined” to having bought new, four cars with a stick shift.

  88. Yevardian says:
    @Blinky Bill

    I always wondered if you were fluent Russian speaker. Do you consider yourself to be?

    It’s not even my 3rd language actually (my parents came from the small but quite old minority in Romania), and no, not really in speaking, it’s something I learned myself, my paternal grandfather knew it, but I never met him.

    About Armenian orthography, I’m not really the person to ask, I rarely use it these days, and neither me nor my parents are exactly keen on the Armenian emigrant community in the west, such milieus are often back-biting, jingoistic and incestuous, like ethnic clusters of small nations abroad generally.

    The classical or Church spelling is -Եան, yes. Modern spelling uses -Յան. In Latin characters ian/yan is interchangeable, although the Western dialect pronounces Յ like ‘h’ at the start of words.

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  89. Yevardian says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    Not that I really need it, now that I read his reply to TGD.

    What was so off, exactly?

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  90. @Yevardian

    Рождество is Christmas, not birthday. Birthday is день рождения.

    Much respect for learning the language. I know a couple of non-native speakers who did, but most abandoned when they got to cases/declination.

    AFAIK among the major living Indo-European languages, Russian is the one that kept the highest number of cases/declinations, it is quite precise but also quite complex. Add to this the prefixes and suffixes modifying the root of the words and it becomes the closest living language to Sanskrit in the grammatical sense.

    IRC the ancient Slavonic had one more case/declination. An Ukrainian-speaker told me once that they still have it, perhaps it’s true.

    BTW, any cases/declination in Armenian?

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    , @AnonFromTN
    , @AP
  91. Happy new year everyone!!!

    May 2021 bring you all better fortunes.

  92. I find it laughable how most anti-lock down types in the UK are lefty pro-EU types, considering lock downs in most EU countries are much tougher and more restrictive than they are here.

  93. Yevardian says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    Рождество is Christmas, not birthday. Birthday is день рождения.

    Akh, that was actually a typo, я просто думал вы говроите это потому, что я говорил что “на новый год” используется родительный падеж, а не именителньый, я не был именно уверен.

    From what I’ve read, the IE language that retains the most grammatical inflection is Lithuanian, along with many other archic features. Yes, Armenian has 7 cases, although 2 of them are practically the same. Romanian uniquely among Romance languages has 4, although since nominative/accusative and dative/genitive share the same word-forms, only 2 in practice.

    • Thanks: Bashibuzuk
  94. Looks like a very cool warplane

  95. @Mikhail

    Yes, the majority of White Russian Immigrants he described were not ethnic Russian but either Ukrainian or Baltic Germans (Остзейские Немцы).

    Rosenberg of cause was one of these.

    Other than that, he is absolutely right about the Bolshevik Revolution being perceived as the triumph of the international Jewry upon the Romanovs and the Orthodox Russian people that this international Jewry despised and loathed for the pale of settlement and other forms of anti-Jewish discrimination. Hence the Judeo Bolshevism description used for the early 1920ies Russian communism by some White Russian immigrants.

    After Stalin’s Great Purges the proportion of Jews in the higher ranks of the Soviet regime lowered considerably, while the proportion of the Russians and other nationalities increased. The marginalization of the Soviet Jewish communists increased after the creation of the State of Israel, which after receiving much help from Stalinist USSR decided to side up unambiguously with the Anglosphere/USA during the Cold War.

    During Hitlers rise to power, the majority of the Jewish diaspora worldwide were mainly positive about the Soviet regime which propulsed their Ashkenazim cousins from the pale of settlement stettles to the heights of power in Soviet Union. Therefore Rosenberg and Hitler were both justified in equating Bolshevism and the Jewish Question. Just like those who equate Neocons with the Jewish Question nowadays also completely justified. The early Neocon are basically the converted Trotskyists from among the Jewish NY intelligentsia.

    Jews have no permanent left-wing or right-wing bias. Jews are pragmatic, they would use any ideology that ensures them the maximum benefit (as measured by their maximized access to the wealth and power in any given country). So if Communism puts them closer to power than capitalism, they would side with Communism and vice versa.

    The opposition in modern day Russia is disproportionately Jewish, and still these same opposition people supported Yeltsin who placed Putin at the helm. Interestingly enough, the majority of these liberal opposition types have Jewish ancestors among the ranks of the early Bolshevik Nomenklatura and Cheka/NKVD. Their ancestors supported Lenin/Trotsky and early Stalin, but become dissidents when Israel was created and they were pushed away from the Soviet regime’s Nomenklatura. There were no Jewish dissidents in USSR before the early 50ies, Soviet Jews were exemplary Soviet citizens prior to Israel inception.

    See the very amusing exchange below:

    https://imgprx.livejournal.net/c1bdb3d9a30d1357e249b415eadd76cd77761a7f/L6kMZn9AnB7PBfvViY3ZihB4mm2JQlnjmRF9AFGxood2jNIv1KNwOG_Uz06ju1PO

    Venedictov’s radio is financed by Gazprom Bank…

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Blinky Bill
    , @Dmitry
  96. James Palmer claims in The Bloody White Baron that

    Ungern almost certainly read it; one of his letters includes a brief precis of how ‘the principles of Talmud, preaching the tolerance of all and any means for the attainment of the goal afford the Jews a plan and method of activities in the destruction of nations and states’, ideas straight from the ‘Protocols’. Their popularity received a considerable boost when the news came that Tsarina Alexandra had been reading a book by the anti Semitic apocalyptic writer Sergius Nilus, which included the ‘Protocols’, while in captivity. She had also etched a swastika, already recognised as an anti Semitic symbol, on her window. This came as a ‘testament from on high’ to many Whites.

    If the Tsaritsa really was aware of the identity of her persecutors, then there is a further symbolic depth to the orchestration of the murder of the Imperial family by Goloshchyokin, Yurovsky, Sverdlov and Lenin.

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  97. @Bashibuzuk

    Bashibuzuk do you know who one of my favorite commenters was?

    [MORE]

    Ano4, I wonder where he went? Why he stopped posting? I’m sure he has his reasons, they are good enough for me.

    Tanquam ex ungue leonem.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • LOL: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
    , @Yevardian
  98. Anon 2 says:

    It’s still Christmas time in the Christendom, so I don’t think it’s too late
    for my annual sermonette. I’m happy to say that I’ve fallen in love back
    last spring, and I’ve been filled with irrational exuberance ever since!
    From time to time I do descend from the clouds to see how the earthlings
    are doing, and I noticed that there is some sort of pandemic going on
    down on the ground. Is it over yet?

    But seriously folks, when I was in college I took a two-semester course in the
    History of Western Philosophy, one of the most enjoyable classes I’ve ever
    taken that was far from my rather technical major. In the second semester
    each century was accompanied by a book of readings from the original sources.
    The 18th century was the Age of Reason; 19th – Age of Progress; and 20th – Age of
    Anxiety. What should we call the 21st century? I think the Age of Disillusionment
    would be an apt description, as in the saying “Life is about discovering that
    there is no Santa Claus on a higher and higher level.” In the 18th century the
    elites started to reject religion as our salvation, and began to put their hope
    in science and technology as our new Savior. Fast forward to the 21st century.
    We’re now beginning to realize that science and technology, far from being
    our savior, are actively trying to kill us. It’s no wonder that so many people
    are resisting vaccinations. Modernity, with its irrational faith in science,
    came crashing down in the 1940s-1960s with the development of the nuclear
    weapons, DDT, napalm, plastics (cf. the famous scene in the Graduate), etc.
    We’re now moving gingerly through Postmodernity, defined by Lyotard
    as skepticism toward the metanarratives, e.g., progress through
    science. In the 21st century, with the development of the biological weapons,
    skepticism and even hostility toward science only got stronger. I’m always
    bemused when I see East Indians, Chinese, and even Russians coming to the
    U.S., getting STEM Ph.D.’s from prestigious places, and expecting to be admired.
    They never got the memo that far from being admired, scientists are increasingly
    regarded with hostility as whores to the military industrial complex or Silicon
    Valley (which is even worse because what is Silicon Valley if not an attempt
    to destroy us from within rather than from without?).

    A recent paper, employing a modified Drake equation, resolved the Fermi paradox
    in a rather gruesome fashion. It showed that the reason why we haven’t encountered
    any credible ET’s is because even though our Galaxy may be home to alien
    civilizations there is a strong likelihood that most of them self-annihilated
    through progress in science and technology, a very postmodern conclusion.

    Thus we have rejected religion as our salvation, and we’re becoming
    disillusioned about science and technology. Other than falling in love, is there
    anything left to give us hope?

    (to be continued)

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
    , @Anon 2
  99. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    writes posts on how Indians aren’t a single population,
    proceeds to write about Indians as a single population.

    People in villages interact with & work together far more than a Sicilian or Swede.

    I understand maintaining white self-esteem (on the internet) is paramount to your worldview.

    Carry on just remember we’re laughing for a variety of reasons.
    Once you lose your racial filter you’ll understand.

    Liberalism has greater effects due to the Western Empire. Its like communism and it spreads by similar means (propaganda), you kill it by killing the source.

    No one cares about the poor today because the USSR is dead. In the same way, no one would care about liberalism if the West is dead.

  100. @Hyperborean

    Von Ungern did nothing wrong.

  101. @Thulean Friend

    RISC-V’s major advantage is that it is open-source, which for the Chinese carries enormous significance. Even ARM, which was supposed to be more open than x86 and all the legacy IP it carries with it, could be blocked from Huawei.

    Isn’t Huawei’s biggest problem being blocked from getting their chips fabricated by TSMC (or Samsung)? The latest or even recent low power process nodes are really important for competitiveness in mobile space, no Moore’s Law for batteries, whereas switching to SMIC fabricated RISC-V CPUs for the infamous base stations would be much easier.

    (Infamous because they’re a hardware company and characteristically awful at software but turned up to 11, they don’t have to insert back doors in their dog’s breakfast of base station software to make them easy to break into. See the U.K. audit report for a lot of terrible details.)

  102. @Anon 2

    A recent paper, employing a modified Drake equation, resolved the Fermi paradox
    in a rather gruesome fashion. It showed that the reason why we haven’t encountered
    any credible ET’s is because even though our Galaxy may be home to alien
    civilizations there is a strong likelihood that most of them self-annihilated
    through progress in science and technology, a very postmodern conclusion

    Perhaps some more advanced fellow aliens helped them to prevent the simulation overload ?

    Although the potential energy of the Quantum Field being infinite, it would have been much simple for any well advanced civilization to just shut down any novel habitable versions of the Universes spawned by the Multiverse before they develop sentient life.

    This might be done by manipulating the cosmological constraints to avoid the window of possible Anthropic Principle.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  103. 128 says:

    An interesting thought experiment, if White people could have a benevolent dictator that would rule in their interest in a fiduciary role, what would it look like, what would his or her policies be? On another note, many people here do not like shrinks, but psychoanalysis can be a valuable tool in figuring out the conscious and subconscious motivations behind a person’s actions, or posts in a public forum for that matter. Such as how would x person’s life experiences affect his views and his posts in a blog, how much would his or her posts be affected by motivated reasoning?

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
  104. 128 says:

    I guess people can counter that there is no way to safeguard against bad decisions of a dictatorship, but then there does not seem to be a way to safeguard against the bad decisions in a representative democracy either, and direct democracy is equally unworkable also in anything other than a small town.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  105. 128 says:

    I suppose coronavirus spreading from China to the West, is akin to smallpox spreading among Native Americans, and their social structures, wth similar consequences?

    • Agree: Bashibuzuk
  106. @128

    I guess people can counter that there is no way to safeguard against bad decisions of a dictatorship, but then there does not seem to be a way to safeguard against the bad decisions in a representative democracy….

    But it has feedback systems that a dictatorship lacks, from public pressure to voting. It’s a bad system I grant you, but as long as it’s not subverted could be the least worst system. Some people say monarchies are better because the royal family will be thinking about future generations of it, but that can fail, and it’s still subject to the succession problem.

    • Replies: @128
    , @dfordoom
  107. Anon 2 says:
    @Anon 2

    We must reject all Utopias based on materialistic principles.
    This includes Marxist, Nazi or SJW utopias. The latter is the
    latest foolish attempt to build Paradise on Earth. Marxism, for example,
    was doomed from the start. Marx stupidly claimed to understand
    how societies work in the 1840s (Communist Manifesto was published
    in 1848 when Marx was 30), more than 10 years before the publication
    of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species in 1859. Between science and
    ideology choose science. Neodarwinism has eventually taught us that
    we are part of the animal kingdom, we’re essentially smart chimps, or more
    precisely weapon-making predatory primates. Built into our nature are
    tribalism, aggressiveness, revengefulness, lustfulness, territorialism, and
    status-seeking (i.e., desire to dominate others). This is hardly conducive
    to building utopias, Marxist, SJW, or any other.

    If you want to build a utopia here on earth, a more optimistic starting
    point might be Stewart Brand’s statement in the Whole Earth Catalog (1968):
    “We are as gods and might as well get good at it,” except I’d modify it
    slightly to read “We are gods and goddesses in training,” or even more
    optimistically, “We are divine beings having a human experience” (hence
    we’re not very good at it yet). Being divine we are so powerful we create
    our own reality, although mostly not on the conscious level. This has
    consequences that some may find disagreeable, namely there is no
    such thing as victimhood: the circumstances of your life are entirely
    your own creation. This puts the burden of responsibility entirely on
    us but also gives us the power to change our circumstances. You get out
    of life exactly what you put into it, on the conscious and unconscious level.
    If there is chaos within your mind, there will be chaos all around you.
    Chaos within produces chaos without.

    If you find these claims to be outrageously anti-empirical, let me
    undermine your empiricism (and materialism) a little bit. I recommend
    a recent book called “The Case against Reality: Why Evolution Hid
    the Truth from Our Eyes,” and written by Donald Hoffman who is
    a professor at UC Irvine. He basically claims that for good
    evolutionary reasons “what you see is not what you get,” that the
    world of time and space we see with our own eyes is an illusion.
    This is not unlike the claim made by many Eastern religions.
    In fact, even physics is beginning to see time and space as
    emergent, i.e., not our fundamental reality. Thus deception is
    built into the fabric of time and space, and into the world of
    matter, incl. our bodies. This reduces our bodies to mere avatars.
    They are merely learning devices our Higher Selves use to
    navigate the artificial world of time and space, as if in a video
    game. This undermines many LGBT claims – they take our
    bodies way too seriously.

    Many such ideas underlie what I have called here Christianity 2.0,
    that is a new and improved form of Christianity that combines
    the best of the West with the best of the East.

    Well, this completes my sermonette 🙂 Happy New Year everybody!

    • Replies: @utu
  108. @Thulean Friend

    I dislike China’s political system and I think they are making a mistake by closing off the country to foreigners, but I don’t get worked up about supporting Western attempts to engineer regime-change.

    Agree. I am no fan of China. But if certifiable scum like Soros is against it, there must be something good in it.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  109. @Mikhail

    I agree with your comments there. I would have written something along the same lines. This is of course only natural for anyone remotely aware of the unfortunate events that have unfolded in Petrograd in 1917 and the subsequent destruction of the Tsarist Russia. I would perhaps have added something about the financing of the early Nazis and the rebuilding of the Reich military industrial complex by some financial interests that have also contributed to the funding of the Soviet revolution.

    [MORE]

    https://books.google.com/books/about/Wall_Street_and_the_Bolshevik_Revolution.html?hl=fr&id=vc9EDwAAQBAJ

    If they are looking for the roots of both the Judeo-Bolshevism and Nazism they better follow the money trail of the Anglo financial interests.

  110. @Bashibuzuk

    AFAIK among the major living Indo-European languages, Russian is the one that kept the highest number of cases/declinations,

    Russian has six cases, like classical Latin. Ukrainian has these six plus one more: calling case. I know only one thing where most Russians are wrong and Ukrainian nationalists are right: Ukrainian is a distinct Slavic language. Although it is closest to Russian, it is not just a dialect of Russian. It is grossly underdeveloped because nobody bothered to support its development: self-proclaimed Ukrainian “patriots” only used their primeval tribal nationalism as a fig leaf to cover rampant thievery of “Ukrainian” elites (that have very few Ukrainians, BTW, but lots of Ukies).

  111. @Yevardian

    I was curious, have you been to India? You seem to have a special animus towards that country that goes beyond /pol/ jokes.

  112. @128

    many people here do not like shrinks

    Most shrinks are quacks, as was their “father” Freud. There likely is something real in psychology, but it’s buried deep by layers of BS and quackery.

  113. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Yes, India is unique in that respect.

    Incidentally, I am quite satisfied that my basic take on India from 2012 continues to be borne out: https://www.unz.com/akarlin/the-puzzle-of-indian-iq-a-country-of-gypsies-and-jews/

  114. AP says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    IRC the ancient Slavonic had one more case/declination. An Ukrainian-speaker told me once that they still have it, perhaps it’s true.

    Correct, Ukrainian has a seventh case that Russian has lost, the vocative case. In Russian it is preserved as expressions (“Bozhe!” “Gospode!”) (God! Good Lord!) but in Ukrainian it has remained as part of the standard grammar. (in Russian it is sort of slang to drop the last syllable when calling someone by name but this isn’t a vocative case)

  115. AaronB says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Thank you very much for that suggestion, Mr Hack!

    There is an excellent chance I will be in Southern AZ, (possibly on my way to Big Bend NP), and I will make sure not to miss this amazing route. It will be a detour, but still on the way and seemingly well worth it! As a lover of desert scenery, a new chunk of great desert is always worth exploring. The few times I’ve been to Phoenix I thought the surrounding area was beautiful.

    I will surely let you know what I think.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  116. AaronB says:
    @dfordoom

    Yes, Tolkien wasn’t quite as grim as the Norse Sagas can be, although I haven’t read too much in them. Tolkien’s books are really very English in many ways, softer than the Norse.

    Anderson also did some translations (or really they’re more like novelisations) of Norse sagas such as Hrolf Kraki’s Saga. They’re also worth reading.

    Thanks for this, will definitely look into them.

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
  117. Mr. Hack says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    So, Ano4 ended up taking a trip in a “wayback machine” to old Czernowitz? He must be having fun (how could he not?). Here’s another photo of Chernivtsi, way back in the day, when it was affectionately referred to as the “Little Vienna” of the East.

    Any signs of Thorfinnsson? Poor fellow, his world is crumbling down about him as another one of his projects is about to disappear. 🙁

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  118. 128 says:
    @That Would Be Telling

    Well, the last 60 years have shown that those feedback mechanisms are useless right? The as long as it is not subverted argument sounds like the old communism does not work because true communism has not been tried yet argument.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  119. @Kent Nationalist

    Its an ancient Indo-European/Aryan ritual, and theres no sex with horse, only ritualistic imitation of such, or do you drink mans blood in a church?

  120. @Anatoly Karlin

    I think he may have just had the misfortune of having to deal with Indians online, they are everywhere nowadays. This is due to the massive roll-out of cheap 4G, the country has the cheapest data in the world. This has caused a huge flood of low IQ types derailing normal conversation, although this blog has thankfully been spared this. Usually there is this double-think going on. We have this superiority complex going on where some of them boast about micro-victories like so and so American MNC’s CEO being an Indian but on the other hand they do have this deep insecurity about why there are no Indian Googles or Apples, like China has Baidu and Huawei. The reason the country is so mocked online is because of the gap between the image low IQ nationalistic Indians have in their mind about India and reality, this abuse was wholly a result of Indian online troll provocations. One can only wonder if this mockery will make them come to their sense?

    India’s Superpower Delusions

    Delusions of the Dwindling Indian Middle Class

    It is an interesting country nonetheless. I had a few good Indian and Pakistani friends back in high school (I live near Birmingham, quite a lot of them here) and they seemed to be fairly intelligent, of course selective immigration and better environment is likely the cause of this, but still, it is hard to reconcile with how much of a dump India is, the world is often fooled by its smart fraction, but overall the country is Sub-Saharan African tier, but with ICBMs and accompanying nuclear weapons.

    Overall, looking at the squalor of India compared with its once glorious past, one can’t help but feel disgust. I would say if there are any countries really worth sanctioning, they are places like India. The government there are truly criminal, for spending so much money on vanity projects like half a billion dollar mega statues and moon shots. They have reverted back to their petty tribalism after Britain left, truly a sad sight to behold.*

    Anyway, there are quite a few good Indian commenters on this site, Malla is a good one, as well as Thulean Friend (😉)

    * – Although not related to India, Africa Addio is a good documentary on the unseen side of African decolonisation.

    • Agree: Jatt Aryaa
  121. @Yevardian

    If Mughals dont count, because of Islam, then the Marathas in the 18th century?

    But are then Christian civilizations of Europe genuinely European? Islam has longer history in Pakistan than Christianity has in Nordic countries.

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  122. Tor597 says:
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    lol.

    I don’t hate white people. But consider the following, people criticize Jews all the time here and no one says these people must hate all white people.

    And people also criticize China a lot here. Does that mean they hate all Asians?

    So why should we treat Anglos as some protected class that is beyond criticism.

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
  123. So why should we treat Anglos as some protected class that is beyond criticism.

    You were talking about Britain, the fact is Britain has not been a major player in quite some time, balkanising it would do nothing except fulfil the revenge fantasies of former colonial subjects (or rather the descendants of said subjects)

    And people also criticize China a lot here. Does that mean they hate all Asians?

    Many do, depends on the criticism, if they are proposing the breakup of China, chances are they have some deeper feelings about China which they are unwilling to reveal fully.

  124. @AnonFromTN

    Agree. I am no fan of China. But if certifiable scum like Soros is against it, there must be something good in it.

    If it’s only an ability to see that scum like Soros are scum and must be countered wherever its important, then enlightened self-interest is sufficient. We probably only see this as notable because we’re under the thumb of an hostile ruling elite including Soros which blatantly wants to destroy us and has been making a lot of progress on that project for decades. It doesn’t even mean the CCP is all that good for their subjects, just that they’re not dedicated to their destruction (of course not counting minority ethnic and/or religious populations, especially the ones implacably hostile to everyone else in the world).

  125. @AaronB

    Tibetan believe that their mystical traditions come from a primordial North

    The Tagzig Olmo Lung Ring is in the West, not in the North. The fabled land of Bön teachings. Ancient Tibetan texts have a very negative view of the North, that its the direction of iron and cold, where the nomads wage eternal wars.

    In Buddhism there is a concept of Ultima Thule/Hyperborea, its called Uttarakuru, but it doesnt have any special significance to us unlike the southern subcontinent of Jambudvipa or India.

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  126. @Tor597

    I don’t hate white people. But consider the following, people criticize Jews all the time here and no one says these people must hate all white people.

    If people believe that is the case then you have only your own expansive rhetoric to blame for it. If you don’t mean what you say, perhaps it would be better to engage in introspection than expression. Or you can cut it short and just tell us what your ethnicity is.

    “You have that perspective because you are white.”

    “By the way, it still is a winner take all world for white people. It’s just that it’s not for all white people. Only the whites at the very top benefit, while the poor non elite whites get harvested like everyone else.”

    “If anything, what defines white people us this path of winner takes all where there is an elite that makes out but everyone else gets exploited.”

    [MORE]

    That is an arbitrary point to argue. Post WW2 was not like an age of enlightenment for white people or anything.

    During this stage white people still brutally colonized the rest of the world. See the Korean war, Vietnam War, Iraq War, assasinations, etc etc. This is actually a worse period for the rest of the world because it is when the west established itself as the most powerful, and used its power to establish hegemony throughout the world.

    This was definitely not the period of the rule of law or some other nonsense.

    By the way, it still is a winner take all world for white people. It’s just that it’s not for all white people. Only the whites at the very top benefit, while the poor non elite whites get harvested like everyone else.

    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/no-weapon-left-behind-the-american-hybrid-war-on-china/#comment-3738900

    Your perspective is heavily biased.

    Basically, white people are high minded people trying to institute the rule of law and Asians are sneaky bastards trying to conceive their way through life. You have that perspective because you are white.

    You say it worked for a very long time, but worked for whom? It didn’t work for black people who were enslaved, nor for red people who were wiped out, nor for yellow people who were colonized, nor for poor white people who were also enslaved and genocides.

    The people at the top, white Anglos in America, did well for awhile. But that does not make it moral.

    If anything, what defines white people us this path of winner takes all where there is an elite that makes out but everyone else gets exploited.

    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/no-weapon-left-behind-the-american-hybrid-war-on-china/#comment-3738591

    The west rules bases system is breaking down because it was never legit to begin with.

    From the beginning it was not universal. There were people it applied to and people it did not apply to.

    In modern times, the west can only blame themselves for the collapse. The wests voracious appetite to have something for nothing is breaking down because it is running out of people to colonize and stronger countries like China, Russia, and Iran are fighting back.

    https://www.unz.com/pescobar/no-weapon-left-behind-the-american-hybrid-war-on-china/#comment-3738187

  127. @128

    Well, the last 60 years have shown that those feedback mechanisms are useless right?

    That’s because I didn’t go into the details of the limitations of republics, in this case how any representative form of government fails hard in multicultural states. See also how they don’t last once a people become immoral enough to vote themselves the government’s treasury (fisc).

    The as long as it is not subverted argument sounds like the old communism does not work because true communism has not been tried yet argument.

    Can you not see the minor problem in your thinking here? What about the prior years, before a couple of minority ethnic factions gained decisive control over enough of the society to commence a long march through all its institutions?

    Even then, it’s hardly been hopeless for their targets thanks to the federalism of the USA. A lot of geographic sorting is happening, creating modern versions of free and slave states; a good touchstone is their gun control policies. To counter what seems to be inevitable nitpicking, yes, that too carries the seeds of destruction into free states, although massive immigration from outside the country being used by one faction can’t be neglected as a factor.

    • Replies: @128
    , @128
  128. Mr. Hack says:
    @AaronB

    Happy Trails, Cowboy! 🙂

    • Thanks: AaronB
  129. @Hyperborean

    Also this ridiculous blood libel against Whites. Surely he must have known about the most ‘racist’ (and most willing to use violence) group in America?

    John Derbyshire: East-Asian Americans Under Attack. But Who Are the Attackers?

    • Replies: @Tor597
  130. @AaronB

    AaronB, perhaps you would enjoy the works of Kyoto School of Philosophy?

    https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/kyoto-school/

    I encountered them while reacquainting myself with the related 1940s “Overcoming Modernity” Symposium and thought their spiritual-philosophical doctrines might prove interesting for you.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  131. @Mr. Hack

    That’s White Russian Harbin on the picture I shared with Blinky Bill.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    , @Mr. Hack
  132. Dmitry says:
    @Yevardian

    Indians are starting to contribute quite a lot as a nationality to computer science in net terms (although not relative to population – the same true of Chinese).

    For example, in distributed computing, a few Indian names . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dijkstra_Prize

    such people invariably become managers and enforcers of existing systems on behalf of others, never inventors themselves

    Not all inventors are introverted eccentrics – there are some people who like management work and which also like inventing.

    Also there are some introverted people who are socially really strange, but which like managing and controlling things. Zuckerberg is the paradigm of that. He is an extremely inventive personality, that was creating music tasting apps in his first year at university – he is also very unsocial, and loves to be manager and to control people.

    It’s rather shocking for example how many Indian doctors practice in the UK

    Instead of having any significant Jews in the UK (except a lot of Haredim in London) – United Kingdom has Indians playing the stereotypical roles of Jews, or “good minority”.

    If you look at the most elite university in Western Europe, it’s flooded with Indians and Chinese in professional courses.

    With an exception of Japan, 20th century power was completely dominated by nationalities of Northern European ancestry or race.

    So it was possible to imagine (for simple minded observers) that there must be intractable problems with “primitive but increasingly numerous races” like Indians, Chinese, Latinos, Africans, Arabs, and that their weakness might be because they are “incapable of learning”, etc.

    However, 21st century, the most elite Northern European university, is flooded with people of Indian and Chinese origin. There’s sometimes Africans starting to enter the post-graduates courses in topics like computer science.

    The fact that these nationalities have undeveloped home countries across the last century and first half of this century, and yet they can flood the elite universities in the West.

    It’s clear that the problem of their countries is not some “intractable” racial inability to study – rather much more complicated and contingent result of the many factors which historians had traditionally studied.

    • Disagree: Yevardian
    • Replies: @128
    , @128
    , @Thulean Friend
  133. @Bashibuzuk

    Some more for anybody interested.

    [MORE]

  134. @Yevardian

    have been ruled over by foreigners for many hundreds of years.

    Just like Armenia!

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  135. Mr. Hack says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    I kind of figured that it actually wasn’t old Czernowitz, as the Chinese script and the gas pump belie its more exotic locale (but the architecture, at least in both photos looks very similar). So, the question arises as to why you’d include a photo of Harbin when answering Blinky Bill’s query regarding Anon4?

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    , @Bashibuzuk
  136. @Mr. Hack

    So, the question arises as to why you’d include a photo of Harbin when answering Blinky Bill’s query regarding Anon4?

    Blinky Bill’s family used to be White Russian Harbinites.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  137. Mr. Hack says:

    Ano4, I wonder where he went? Why he stopped posting? I’m sure he has his reasons, they are good enough for me.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • LOL: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk

    What’s up Anatoly? Wasn’t Ano4 one of your favorite commenters here, like he was for Blinky Blink and myself? Certainly, he had more to offer you than I, in many ways. AP, I think, found his banter here to be quite engaging. Do you know anything about his sudden departure?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @AP
  138. 128 says:
    @Dmitry

    Looking at the way the UK managed coronavirus, are you sure its really of elite quality? Seems like it is full of grade AAA morons. Or maybe the surplus of India’s best and brightest working for London has something to do with that? Interesting that Fauci is being criticized for being too alarmist here, if he were working in China, he would have been dismissed by Beijing for being too relaxed and slow about the entire thing, although if he were in Japan, he would also get sidelined for being too alarmist.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  139. Dmitry says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Regular clients never seem to leave this forum, but rather just re-incarnate with different names for whatever reason. Thulean was previously Polish Perspective, Kent Nationalist was DPH (I can’t remember the letters exactly), Ano4 changed to Bashibuzuk presumably because everyone mixed with Ano2.

    Well, for us oldtimers: we can remember people did leave without re-incarnating: Talha, Greasy.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
  140. 128 says:
    @That Would Be Telling

    Which happened when the US was still 90 percent white, maybe that was something to do with White guilt over the Holocaust?

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  141. 128 says:
    @Dmitry

    As early as the early 80s, Vancouver was barely 2/3s white, with the balance being made of up of East Asians and South Asians. As for Jews, in the US Ivy Leagues, their numbers were capped at around 10 percent of the student population until the 60s. And Big Law in the US before WW2 was dominated by the New York white-shoe law firms, which kept Jews, hence the familiar complaint about how great grandfather was prohibited from joining the country club by those snotty WASPs.

  142. Dmitry says:
    @128

    Well society’s response to pandemics is not a very generalizable behaviour to other situations.

    Neither does it show any “eternal” qualities of the nationality being considered. In the USSR times, there was excellent state capacity for managing epidemics, considered the strongest in the world, yet only 3 decades later – in Russia, one of the lowest state capacities for stopping or managing the epidemic. Here is how contingent and fast changing such things can be.

    In terms of eternal qualities of nationalities. By any historical standards, anglosaxon would be considered the “master-race” of modern history which created Darwin, Newton, Turing, et al. Their historical architecture looks like it was designed by magical elves. They conquered half the world with a few thousand soldiers, and created the world’s most successful colonies by sending there their criminals and orphans (i.e. Australia). As late as the 20th century, they could even create “trustworthy” business environment full of Chinese (i.e. Hong Kong, Singapore).

    Here typical scene of the demographics in elite universities of the the 21st century. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBDucVGdfV8.

    Two thirds can be the anglosaxon “master-race” which created Darwin, Newton, Turing, et al.

    Yet by the second decade of the the 21st century, youth of the most dominant and elite anglosaxon nationality, seem to study fine along with modern history’s underachieving races like Indians and Chinese, which couldn’t produce a Newton in previous centuries, and could pathetically be conquered by a few thousand soldiers in the past.

    There’s clearly no racial “inability to study” which has determined the power of nationalities in modern history – rather quite a more complicated story, which historians have written about since Thucydides.

    When Tacitus met Germans in the first century, and considered them “noble savages”, he could not imagine they would become one of most intellectual people of modern history, or that those primitive unthinking 1st century blonde people idolizing to trees, would have in the 18th and 19th centuries special inclination to writing pedantic abstract master texts like “Critique of Pure Reason” and “World as Will and Representation”, or vast musical symphonies in the way of Bruckner’s 8th. The latter traits were result of cultural and historical development, rather than anything in hardware.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack, Thulean Friend
  143. Mr. Hack says:
    @Dmitry

    I’m glad to see that he’s back! I was wondering where Bazhibuzuk reincarnated from?


    A bashi-bazouk (Ottoman Turkish: باشی بوزوق‎ başıbozuk, IPA: [baʃɯboˈzuk], lit. ‘one whose head is turned, damaged head, crazy-head’ Proving that Russians and their descendants in Oregon/Washington really are POC. 🙂

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  144. @Mr. Hack

    Because Harbin was one of the last refuges of the good Russian people who survived the overtake of their motherland by the bloodthirsty Bolshevik hordes. The story of the White Russians that escaped the Soviets through the Far East is less known, although possibly even more fascinating than the story of those who directly moved to Western Europe or North America. These were strong, intelligent and courageous folks who deserve all our respect. May we keep their memories alive.

    [MORE]

    As for Ano4, his nickname was kinda lame, but I agree that some of his contributions (mostly of humorous nature as he was clearly rarely serious) were somewhat interesting. I think you both shared a common interest in music.

    This song is a great manner of commemorating Ano4’s contribution (if any) to this forum.

    😄

    • Agree: AP
    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  145. @Hyperborean

    Yes Желтороссия was an interesting place.

    https://humus.livejournal.com/2649377.html

    Also:

    [MORE]

    🙂

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  146. Dmitry says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    Lol… it is not “co-incidence” or radical change of profession.

    Venediktov is one of the least “undercover” pseudoopposition “journalists”. In a managed democracy, being pseudoopposition is one of the most privileged positions, with very good job security in his case.

    He partly has to do a little “acting” to accentuated his anti-ratings and dislikeability, but it fits to his natural personality.

    At the same, he has much more freedom than a normal journalist. As in the court, the jester can criticize the king, and has privileged position, although they have to remain in their role.

    Notice that in interviews with foreign leaders like Avigdor Lieberman or Lukashenko are talking to Venediktov, they talk to him like he a representative of the state. Actually the way they are talking to him, is like they are allowed to talk informally to a medium level of diplomat.

    • Agree: Bashibuzuk
    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  147. 128 says:
    @That Would Be Telling

    To illustrate just how far the Overton Window has shifted, Mississippi just voted to delete the Confederate battle flag from its flag by a vote of 77 to 23 percent, 77 to 23 in the deepest of the deep southern states, such a thing winning in the deep south, by such a margin, would have been unthinkable just 10 or even 5 years ago. The film Gods and Generals was made not 20 years ago, it was produced by Ted Turner, the much-derided “liberal” who established CNN, and included such big-time names as Robert Duvall, Stephen Lang, and Jeff Daniels. I still struggle to comprehend how a big time liberal like Ted Turner could produced films like Gettysburg (which starred Martin Sheen, also another big tie liberal) or Gods and Generals.

    • Replies: @EldnahYm
  148. @128

    Which happened when the US was still 90 percent white, maybe that was something to do with White guilt over the Holocaust?

    Started with our allowing mass immigration from ethnocentric groups from outside the Hajnal line, with the Irish. Much, much later the Holocaust became a thought terminating cliche, but the balance of power had shifted by the time Charles Lindbergh was canceled.

    Not even sure how much “guilt” any sane Americans have felt over the Holocaust, seeing as how our role in it was to help end it.

  149. Yevardian says:
    @Blinky Bill

    He was a middle-aged regular middle-aged Russian with family, regularly shitposting on the asylum that Ron Unz has so generously provided us probably isn’t at the top of his priorities.

  150. Mr. Hack says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    Now that you’ve emptied yourself completely, don’t hesitate to fill yourself with the Holy Spirit:

    Sublimely beautiful and visionary music.

    https://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/richard_souther/illumination.p/buy/

    • Thanks: Bashibuzuk
  151. Yevardian says:
    @AltanBakshi

    Sure, but a few million versus 1.5 billion I think you’d agree there’s a rather significant population difference. Anyway, I don’t have delusions of grandeur about Armenia, it has it’s own ancient Church, literature, language and script, it’s a sovereign entity (for better or worse), it is enough. Unlike say, Serbs, people are generally reconciled to the realities of being a small country, the still unfolding Pashinyan fiasco notwithstanding. Nearly everyone hates Turks regardless, so I don’t have to argue the nation’s case much.

  152. Yevardian says:
    @Dmitry

    Ah I forgot about that Greasy guy, I only recall he was amusingly demented. Glossy was also a good longtime commenter, although exactly what later provoked his corrosive hatred of AK I’m not quite sure, his points of criticism weren’t that different from mine, but he got extremely angry about it.

  153. @Dmitry

    Dmitry, in your opinion what are we to make of the latest Chubais appointment?

    I gather his job would be to mend the fences with the “Western partners “.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  154. @Mr. Hack

    This portrait would be more of a Zenj mamluk, a Bashibuzuk was a Janissary shock troops soldier sent in the first lines of the Ottoman army. The meaning is thus the Turkish equivalent to Berserker.

    A fitting representation would be:

    But my nickname is just a credit to one of Hergé’s captain Haddock’s favorite cursing expressions that I have remembered since reading Tintin as a kid.

    https://tintin.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_Captain_Haddock%27s_Curses

    Although we might have some Turkic origins due to our family name also sometimes being found among the Tatar. This is of course somewhat common in Russia.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  155. To the commenters who are interested in religious and philosophical matters I would like to recommend Sino-Theology and the Philosophy of History: A Collection of Essays by Liu Xiaofeng, translated by Leopold Leeb.

    The main part covers sections of his book Sino-Theology and the Philosophy of History, wherein he discusses Hegel’s statement that things spiritual are “very far away” from Chinese, the philological problem of “national-historical languages” in relation to the universal divine revelation of Christ, the distinction between pre-Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment European thought and how Chinese thinkers have been exposed the latter but not the former (which he deplores), the development of Christian theological studies in post-1949 Chinese academia and cultural Christianity, et al.

    Also included are prefaces to other books and short essays on the introduction of Straussian thought in then-contemporary China (its possibilities and why foreign liberalists are so concerned about it) and his analysis of Hobbes’ Leviathan and Hobbes’ radical attack on God and Christianity.

    He often shows the influence of German intellectuals. Liu’s thoughts are often rather heterodox but interesting (not included here but, among other translation projects, he has led the translation of classical Christian and Carl Schmitt’s œuvres into Mandarin as well as made textbooks for the teaching of classical languages).

    It has an high academic price-range (so very expensive) but it can be downloaded at LibGen:

    http://libgen.rs/scimag/10.1163%2F9789004292826

    • Thanks: Daniel Chieh, AaronB, EldnahYm
  156. @128

    It was also mentioned by Roko and there were multiple ads of that type.

  157. @Europe Europa

    No, I think a good number if not a majority of their “conspiracy theories” mostly concern themselves, for example, the Gulenist conspiracy which may or may not have had foreign help but was significantly domestic.

    My understanding from people who have worked with them is that conspiracies are indeed rife, partly due to the belief in the prevalence of conspiracy theory that they have, and therefore individuals believe that it is a good idea therefore to get into the bandwagon and start their own conspiracies. So belief mimics reality, reality is born from their beliefs.

    Arguably its a source of a lot of dysfunction as conspiracy theorizing and execution lead to a great amount of inefficiency.

  158. @Yevardian

    Chinese were ruled for hundreds of years by foreigners, same with the people of the fallen Western Roman Empire, and its not like the Muslim rulers of Deccan or Bengal were more foreign to India than Franks of Charlemagne.

    Armenians are a small people that punch way above their size, there is no shame in the history of Armenia. At least you have survived as a people and faith, there was once a time when majority of your neighbours were Christians following similar forms of Christianity, all the way down to Basra and Sudan.

  159. AP says:
    @Mr. Hack

    I’m guessing a winter holiday. Are ski resorts open in France?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  160. Mr. Hack says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    I recently was exposed to my first Tintin animated film, and I was very impressed, especially with the graphics. Your Captain Haddock is in this one too. Have you seen it, or watched it through the guise of your kids?

    Thorfinnsson first turned me on to Tintin, and I ended up buying one of his comic books, the one where he visits Turkey (naturally). 🙂
    An interesting short article about “SLIGHTLY SLANTED EYES? UKRAINIANS, TURKS, AND TATARS” http://www.onyschuk.com/wordpresstugg/?p=495

    Mine are slightly slanted, how about yours? 🙂

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  161. Dmitry says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    I didn’t read anything about Chubais – I successfully avoided reading about politics this week.

    I thought “this is enough internet for me” after reading about Lavrov’s family last month.

    But as you posted the topic about a certain “journalist” arguing with a liberal, claiming her father worked in intelligence.

    Probably, she should defer to his knowledge. After all it, may be the particular “journalist”, is no amateur about unofficial, or not so unofficial networking lol

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CC_rfndDd9B

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CDGBHz-D4IF

    https://www.instagram.com/p/-RngMnF50O

    https://www.instagram.com/p/B7u7aOSg-Tn

    Although I admire that old man still has apparently enough healthy testosterone he wants to “fuck anything”

    https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzidf9QARBG

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  162. utu says:
    @Anon 2

    Where does the evolution come from in Donald Hoffman world? If the reality is obscured to us how come the theory of evolution was revealed to be invariant in all versions of reality?

  163. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    If you read above, you’ll find out that Ano4 has now reincarnated himself into Bashibuzuk. Be sure to inform Dr. Preobrezhansky of this new development. Maybe its time for me to reinvent myself too? 🙂

    🙂

  164. Mr. Hack says:
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Any ideas? Be nice to me..

    Maybe “Heart of a Dog”? Although something similar has been used in the past.

  165. @Bashibuzuk

    Perhaps some more advanced fellow aliens helped them to prevent the simulation overload ?

    Its all aliens, all the way down.

  166. @Dmitry

    Although I admire that old man still has apparently enough healthy testosterone he wants to “fuck anything”

    [MORE]
    • Replies: @Dmitry
  167. @Mr. Hack

    Something related to esoteric Ukrainian history perhaps?

    • Agree: Bashibuzuk
  168. AaronB says:
    @Hyperborean

    I’ve heard about the Kyoto School, but have not read them.

    These days, my general sense is that Buddhist philosophy is a ladder one discards after it has served its purpose. Its more like a therapeutic technique that deconstructs acquired mental habits – mental cramps – that cause needless suffering. But it isn’t a phisophy or set of ideas one is meant to settle down in (of course, some people do just that their whole lives).

    I also think the most profound religious philosopher of the last century, Alan Watts, is the last word Buddhism – but he can only be truly appreciated by very few people, although he can be enjoyed on the popular level. His message is as radical as it gets, but the mainstream has neutralized him by declaring him “frivolous” – which he knew would happen, and which is necessary. Something so radically undermining of mainstream notions of life and society must go into hiding and remain esoteric.

    Nevertheless, I am always happy to see Buddhism from a new perspective, and to see further elucidation of the concept of Nothingness- which I understand is the main theme of the Kyoto School. There may be something of genuine value in there. So thanks for bringing this to my attention, and I think I’ll check them out.

  169. Dmitry says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    Lol it is a luxury of his privileged position, that a government employee can decorate his office with attractive young (although the job requirement that they are also crazy and dislikeable) women.

    But when you start behaving to “informal colleagues”: I guess that the old man still has healthy testosterone levels, and desperation.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    , @Bashibuzuk
  170. Dmitry says:
    @Dmitry

    Because Instagram doesn’t embed here at the moment, I’ll embed here.
    I was just joking about his social life as go-between.

    His best friend and vacation partner- i.e. retired General of the external intelligence service.

    And other comedy he likes posting, like when you are talking with Ksenia Sobchak at her wedding party, and she tells you to pretend you are arguing with colleagues

  171. dfordoom says: • Website
    @That Would Be Telling

    But it has feedback systems that a dictatorship lacks, from public pressure to voting. It’s a bad system I grant you, but as long as it’s not subverted could be the least worst system. Some people say monarchies are better because the royal family will be thinking about future generations of it, but that can fail, and it’s still subject to the succession problem.

    Didn’t feudalism have feedback systems? I’m no medievalist so maybe my understanding of feudalism is simplistic but wasn’t it a system in which no-one has unlimited power? The king had power, the nobility had power, the Church had power, but in all cases their power was limited.

    And wealth was based on land. But land without someone to work it is useless so even the peasants had some indirect power. If you let your peasants starve, or if you drove them to revolt, your wealth disappeared. There was an incentive to look after your peasants.

    There were rights but there were also duties.

    You could argue that monarchy became unstable when either the king gained too much power (absolutist monarchy) or lost too much power (as happened in England with the Civil War and the Glorious Revolution). You could also argue that the Reformation destabilised the system, especially in England where the landed gentry and aristocracy became too wealthy (from looting the Church).

  172. @Mr. Hack

    the one where he visits Turkey

    I am not aware of a Tintin comic book where he travels to Turkey. I read a lot of them when young and of course also recommended them to my children. The movie is good and I liked it but I like the old French cartoons more.

    [MORE]

    Yes I have slightly slanted eyes and so do my children even though they are 50% Western European (mainly Celtic) through their mother. The epicanthal fold is a well known dominant phenotypic characteristic.

    BTW, the Lipka Tatars have also intermixed with the Polish Szlachta just like the Sluzhivye Tatary intermixed with the Russian Dety Boyarskie and the Cossacks.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipka_Tatars

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serving_Tatars

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%94%D0%B5%D1%82%D0%B8_%D0%B1%D0%BE%D1%8F%D1%80%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%B5

    And of course the Rurikid themselves married Cuman princesses even prior to the Mongolian conquest. In fact the Turkic admixture is probably less present in the Great Russian peasantry than it was among the petty and even higher aristocracy and the professional military class (Cossacks included).

    As a curiosity: I read somewhere that Dzerzhinsky was of Lipka Tatar descent. Don’t know if this is true but he seems to have a little admixture.

    And Charles Bronson was the son of a Lipka Tatar immigrant.

    I personally look like a mix of these two fine gentlemen (just kidding).

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  173. @Mr. Hack

    reincarnated himself into

    Strictly speaking, the mindstream does not reincarnate…

  174. @Dmitry

    crazy and dislikeable

    Perhaps he likes them that way.

    Anyway, as long as everyone’s happy and no one is hurt.

  175. @Dmitry

    Instead of having any significant Jews in the UK (except a lot of Haredim in London) – United Kingdom has Indians playing the stereotypical roles of Jews, or “good minority”.

    The Chinese outperform all other ethnic groups on A-levels.

    It would be interesting to see the Jewish fraction broken out. My understanding is that UK Jewry is significantly more Orthodox than in America or Sweden, and thus there is less intermarriage, so you probably get a clearer picture of underlying capability.

    It’s clear that the problem of their countries is not some “intractable” racial inability to study – rather much more complicated and contingent result of the many factors which historians had traditionally studied.

    That is too sophisticated for most pol-memers here to accept. I’ve long battled perceptions that Indians are stupid. It’s not just the elite Brahmin class that is capable of being successful. Most Indians in Singapore came from a lowly background up until 1990, yet were earning close to ethnic Chinese levels. If you look at TIMSS scores for places like Mauritius, it has a huge range, with their 90th percentile on par with OECD and their 10th percentile on par with sub-Saharan Africa. Mauritius has a very large Indian population.

    By the same token, white sub-standard achievement in many areas today, meth addictions etc are self-inflicted wounds. But racists are too proud to admit that so they seek external targets or engage in futile attempts to downplay their predicament. You see the same reflex in attacking China to deflect from a poor Western response. Sad!

    • Agree: AaronB
  176. Germany’s Energiwende keeps proving itself as a roaring success. For the first time, renewable energy forms a majority of Germany’s 2020 electricity generation:

    Source. Coal as a fraction of total output keeps declining, and has plummeted in recent years. So much for the nonsense propaganda that the phase-out of nuclear would lead to an explosion of coal generation.

    When will reactionaries learn?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  177. The magisterial Dan Wang has a new annual letter out, where he discusses everything from Chinese institutional strengths; biking in Beijing; Proust and technology as a means to avoiding decadence.

    https://danwang.co/2020-letter/

    Read it.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
  178. EldnahYm says:
    @128

    The vote was for approval of the new flag. Voters were not given the choice to keep the old flag. The decision to remove the old flag was already made by the Mississippi legislature. The last time a referendum occurred which had the option of keeping the old Mississippi flag design was in 2001, when 64.39% voted in favor of keeping the flag. Considering Mississippi was about a third black, that is a decisive defeat.

  179. @Thulean Friend

    So will Ericsson actually do this or are they just bluffing?

    [MORE]

    Börje Ekholm, CEO of telecom equipment maker, Ericsson recently started lobbying against the Swedish government and his text message to a Swedish media revealed that “If the ban on Huawei still exists, Ericsson can leave Sweden”.

    Regarding this matter, Swedish daily news pointed out that there’s a reason behind the Ericsson CEO remark. According to the information, Sweden plans to ban Huawei from participating in the country’s 5G construction business.

    Sweden’s Daily News discloses the text of Borje to Anna Hallberg, Swedish Minister of Commerce, which reads that Ericsson would leave Sweden unless the Sweden government remove the ban on Huawei and ZTE.

    Ericsson is particularly strong in mobile communications in China, with nearly half the market for mobile systems. With respect to fixed networks, the company’s market share is about ten percent. So, Huawei’s ban in Sweden may create a similar situation for the company in China.

    In reply to Borje’s statement, Halberg replies that the Sweden government cannot remove the Huawei ban because the decision is taken on the recommendation of the security department by the Post and Telecommunication Administration interim secretary.

    On this matter Borje says, Ericsson and three other major operators filing a lawsuit against the ban to support Huawei. On the other hand, he said “Although we have talked with several Swedish law firms, no one is willing to help Huawei. There are many cowards here.”

  180. Dmitry says:
    @Thulean Friend

    United Kingdom has significant numbers of immigrants from exotic brown and yellow races, whose countries until recently were viewed as “backwards”; and yet at least some children representatives of the “backwards” nationalities can be on average more successful in the education system, than the native youth.

    So I don’t see how it could be “racial academic inability” (that some people had imagined in the 20th century) that was responsible for the distribution of development levels between countries of the first, second and third worlds at any particular decade or century that we would use for comparison.

    If you look in any group of students in England. Most university students are native anglosaxons – but the significant other nationalities will be Indian/Chinese/Malaysian, etc, i.e. youth from recently primitive family backgrounds who a few generations ago would have believed that the trains invented by the ancestors of their anglosaxon classmates, were powered by dragons.

    . I’ve long battled perceptions that Indians are stupid.

    Well it’s difficult to be a famous scientist, if you were born into a jungle in the Brazilian rainforest, or a family of beggars living in the Delhi streets.

    Until two countries are at a similar historical development level – with the same proportion of the population entering educated professions, then I don’t see how you try to derive the populations’ “intrinsic” academic abilities. And I’m not sure such an attempt would make sense.

    For example, if you wanted to know population’s numeracy, you would look at the proportion of workers who need to know numeracy for their jobs in that society. i.e. the academic ability and training level of a population, will usually be some uninteresting result of what kind of labour is required for its economy.

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Coconuts
    , @songbird
  181. China’s South vs North divide is widening:

    The North was recipient of largesse under the previous industrial planning phase, but China has been shifting to services over the past decade. And it’s the south which has the greatest concentration of talent and industries for that.

    What is shocking is that Beijing is the only Northern city to be in the top 10 of economic size in China this year. 9 out of 10 are in the South.

    With China’s emphasis on innovation-led growth, this divide will surely grow starker, with Beijing again being the outlier. Perhaps Xiong’an can be part of a new trend to reverse this decline. Isn’t Blinky Bill based in Tianjin? Or was it Harbin? Perhaps he can give a ground-level perspective on this trend. Tianjin, for the record, just lost their place in the top ten this year. They were the last remaining Northern city except Beijing.

    • Replies: @128
    , @Anatoly Karlin
  182. Dmitry says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Great Britain is going with building the largest offshore wind farms in the world.

    Perhaps perceptions of these projects, are coloured by romanticism – as they seem like the most unrealistic childhood dreams, not least in terms of scale.

    The newest propeller turbines are each going to the size of an Eiffel Tower, and hundreds are placed over the sea.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Thanks: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    , @g2k
    , @A123
  183. Car cucks often claim that public transportation cannot replace cars, but this merely proves they haven’t thought deeply about the subject. Or perhaps any subject.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQY6WGOoYis

    • Thanks: Rattus Norwegius
  184. Yevardian says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Fortunately, one does not need to have visited India, the great land of spiritual enlightenment, to enjoy the benefits of Dravidian or Indo-AryVn culture, their unique culinary tradition (because who else has spicy food?), their uniquely close familial relations, their coding acumen, their enchanting popular music, their ancient sport of cricket, their lofty religion, or their servant-like manner, always with a refreshing undertone of spice.
    I can only say have worked with them a lot. I also resided in Singapore for a while where they are a plurality, although it was clear that the Chinese were holding them back from their full potential.

    • LOL: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @sher singh
  185. Yevardian says:
    @AltanBakshi

    Well, the Mughals conquered India out from Afghanistan, and were Turko-Persian, and consciously maintained that identity until they finally dwindled away. As happened repeatedly in earlier occasions with the Delhi Sultanate, the Ghaznavids, so on and so forth. Marathas barely lasted a century before the British conquered the whole subcontinent anyway.

    Admittedly, I’m biased by personal experiences, so I probably can’t talk about the topic objectively. I forgot to mention, there’s never a wrong time to take a lengthy (and extremely loud) overseas phonecall for them. Passenger next you? No problem. Work meeting in 2 minutes? No problem. Serving at a restaurant? No problem. Receiving a Medical patient? Again, no problem.

  186. @Thulean Friend

    The British education system is typically the go to example for leftists who want proof that the natives are outperformed by immigrants. I think the GCSE stats are even worse, with even blacks outperforming whites at that level.

    I suppose the A Level stats are a bit better because they’re non-compulsory, so they’re only taking into account the more academic whites, but the British system does seem to have levelled the differences between the races much more so than many other countries, particularly the US.

  187. @Dmitry

    Windfarms are built offshore in Britain because they’re considered ugly eyesores that no one wants spoiling their view, and if there was an attempt to build one on land the objections would be huge.

    I get the impression that Germans don’t find wind turbines as ugly and don’t mind them as a feature of the landscape. Maybe it’s because Germans being stereotypically engineering minded appreciate the engineering aspect of them more than British people do and find more beauty in them?

  188. g2k says:
    @Dmitry

    There’s no nimbys in the middle of the sea, probably makes it cheaper and quicker than to build them on land one delays and legal bills are factored in.
    Edit: looks like someone else beat me to it to make the point.

  189. g2k says:
    @Thulean Friend

    Class stratification amongst native English is absolutely massive, almost at Indian levels though less formal. GCSEs are not hard; you don’t don’t need to be all that smart to get a respectable grade, just to pay at least some attention to the teacher in most lessons and do at least some work. The white underclass does not do that naturally, schools have become increasingly spineless about coercing them to and parents less supportive when, on rate occasions, they do.

  190. @g2k

    If I remember correctly, GCSEs are not standardised like A-levels and pupils have the option of taking an easier level, one which involves more coursework, hence why we see blacks outperforming whites in GCSE but not in A-levels.

    The problem with the white underclass is not lack of intelligence, but lack of discipline. It is actually very similar to those all-black schools in America where there are regular fights and acts of insolence towards the teachers, not to mention the rampant drug use (albeit outside of school).

    What makes it worse is how the authority of teachers has been eroded away in favour of authority of the parents. I personally witnessed beefy dads coming into school to shout about how their son has been mistreated by the teachers (“mistreatment” actually meant being disciplined)

    Abolishing grammar schools was a huge mistake, another one of Labour’s legacies of pushing this nation towards mediocrity, not that the Tories are any better.

    • Agree: Coconuts
  191. Coconuts says:
    @Dmitry

    So I don’t see how it could be “racial academic inability” (that some people had imagined in the 20th century) that was responsible for the distribution of development levels between countries of the first, second and third worlds at any particular decade or century that we would use for comparison.

    But who made this kind of argument?

  192. Mr. Hack says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    It’s almost scary how similar my 88 year old roommate resembles Charles Bronson (no kidding). He went to visit his “wife” in Denver, so he’s been out of the house for close to two months now, giving me some time to throw out all of the junk that he’s managed to collect for the last few years. He’s a hoarder, and collects the craziest things. He’ll never miss anything that I’ve thrown out, because he wont remember what he’s collected. Mostly newspapers, advertisements etc; etc. Why do I tell you this? Because somewhere in the house is the Tintin comic book that I once purchased, but haven’t run across it yet (I collect books and music CD’s, that’s it, that’s enough). I did a quick google and could not find a Tintin in Turkey comic, although there’s a chapter in one of Herge’s books called “Tintin’s journey in Turkey”. The comic book that I purchased, was most likely “King Ottokar’s Sceptre”that took plac in “Syldavia”, a mythical country in the Balkans. I remember the exotic looking minarets depicted in the book, hence Turkey came to mind – close, as they say, but no cigar.

    I recall that you seem to be quite fluent in French, therefore I’m assuming that you read these adventures in the original? It’s a shame that I wasn’t exposed to Tintin when I was a child. I was a big comic book fan as a kid, but mostly read the superhero variety. My sister, however, was good enough to present me with many “Classic Comics” my only exposure to “high brow” comic books.

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  193. @Yevardian

    So Mallus & Tamils..

    v

    There was a colony of Indians on the upper Euphrates in Armenia as early as second century BC and temples were raised in honour of Krishna

    Two princes from Ujjain, India had founded a large kingdom in Armenia in 165 BC and they established 22 cities covering most of modern Armenia including two Hindu temples dedicated to Gisane and Demetr. According to the account of Zenob Glak,[10] one of the first disciples of Gregory the Illuminator, the temples were destroyed and the priests killed along with 1038 defenders of the raid that was ordered by Gregory.

    Under the pagan rulers, the Hindu cities flourished until the dawn of Christianity in Armenia in 301 A.D.

  194. @Yevardian

    Do you play Paradox Interactive games by any chance?

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  195. @Mr. Hack

    I was a big comic book fan as a kid, but mostly read the superhero variety. My sister, however, was good enough to present me with many “Classic Comics” my only exposure to “high brow” comic books.

    Many great graphic novel series have been produced in French.

    [MORE]

    They are quite numerous and I am not up to date, so just a few notable examples that I remember enjoying when young:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Incal

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thorgal

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blueberry_(comics)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventures_of_Alix

    French-speaking Belgians, such as Hergé, were very active in this genre.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Franquin

    These comics are very different from the American superhero genre and the Japanese manga.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  196. Mr. Hack says:
    @Bashibuzuk

    I used to occasionally frequent Comic book stores, before this plague became our daily companion. I still gravitate towards the silver age Marvel Comics that I loved and cherished in my youth. If you’re familiar with these heroes, they’re the ones that Marvel made a bundle on recreating on the silver screen (Spiderman, Fantastic Four, Avengers, X-men) . The comic book artists were as important as the writers (mostly Stan Lee), like Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko and Jim Steranko (the last two were of Ukrainian ethnicity, so I took pride in knowing that some of my fellow co-ethnics were supremely cool).

    I am aware of and do leaf through some of the graphic novels in the stores, being mostly drawn to the black and white noir variety, that mimics my taste in a lot of films too. I’ll keep my eye out for some of these French ones that you’ve recommended.

  197. AP says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Another great book. Have you read it? Have you gotten to Master and Margarita?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  198. 128 says:
    @Thulean Friend

    I suppose China still needs buses, trains, cars, ships, steel, and aluminum? Those things are not going to go out of style. Plus I do not think Beijing wants the political consequences and mass unemployment and urban decay in the North like what happened in the US rust belt. Like say, even if you have 5G devices and machine learning programs, you still need planes and vehicles that will use those devices right? And which part of China manufactures those things? And if you need turbines for your power plants, which parts of Chiina will make those things, I do not think China can just afford to let everything North of the Huai just slowly rot and turning it into Camden.

    • Replies: @songbird
  199. 128 says:

    Or maybe Beijing decided that the North is too cold and wants to empty it out? In which I hope Moscow notices that the trans Siberian route can become a lot shorter if it just goes straight through Harbin.

  200. Mr. Hack says:
    @AP

    No, I’m disappointed to say that I haven’t yet. I’ll make it my first New Year’s resolution to do so. I’m currently getting ready to go to back to work, in a real office environment, so I’ve been trying to ditch the “Bohemian lifestyle” for something more mainstream. It’s kind of scary, I think about getting Covid and leaving this world through a crematorium, like they show on the tube 24/7. 🙁

    Luckily, my boss knows that I’m not just out of college and have some apprehensions, so no start date has yet been carved into stone. Do you know of any ways that I could speed up the process of getting vaccinated?

  201. songbird says:
    @128

    IMO, a lot of urban decay in the US is due to the Great Migration, or later population movements. De-industrialization just served as a convenient excuse.

  202. songbird says:
    @Dmitry

    Blank-slatism cannot explain the past 60 years of America. Or why Nigerians are rioting in Ireland.

    Meanwhile, smart fraction seems to cover all the bases.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  203. A123 says:
    @Dmitry

    How long before the Environmentalism Movement decides that the noise created by these off shore mega turbines is harmful to whales and other sea life?

    Are the blades recyclable? Or, will they have to be landfilled?
    ___

    Has anyone else noticed the 100% failure rate getting rid of fossil fuels in favour of “green” energy sources? The people of Germany are now in strong opposition to land based bird choppers. (1)

    In Bavaria, there is the so-called 10H-rule, where, “The Bavaria’s constitutional court backed the ruling that the minimum distance between a wind turbine and the nearest buildings must be ten times the height of the turbine.”

    Wind expansion in Bavaria has virtually stopped since the 10H-rule was implemented in 2014.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://ddears.com/2019/07/12/germans-rebelling-against-wind-farms/
     

  204. Dmitry says:
    @songbird

    “Blank state” idea between populations is a radical claim and seems intuitively implausible. Why would there be “blank state”, as opposed to there being different ratios of people with certain genetic inclinations in different populations?

    We would assume also that there will likely be genetic predisposition for different nationalities to have different ratios of people who are inclined by nerds, than others. For example, it seems intuitive that traits like attention span, or extroversion/introversion, also have different rates in different populations, partly for genetic reasons.

    But our comparison between nationalities, is mainly perceiving effects of being separated by centuries of history, vast economic differences, and radically different lifestyles. When we compare a street cleaner in Delhi, with an art historian in Oxford – it’s not their genetic components which will control for the main difference of their thinking. You cannot easily compare people from such different worlds.

    In terms of the Indians and Chinese, flooding the elite universities of the West.

    In the 21st century, the children of the world’s first or second scientifically talented nationality in modern history (which would English, if not Germans), who have produced Darwin, Newton, Turing, et al – can receive worse average scores in schools than genetic descendants of third world nationalities, which have no intellectual achievements in modern history (India, China). (To ignore Srinivasa Ramanujan who achieved results while in the UK).

    Intuitively, it would feel like historical “low academic achievement” of populations like India and China of past centuries, is likely to be mainly result of contingent and arbitrary vicissitudes of their historical and economic development. i.e. the latter are the controlling factors, above whatever will be the ratio of people with genetic inclinations to become nerds in those populations.

    Or why Nigerians are rioting in Ireland.

    But representatives of the Nigerians seem disproportionate among students in certain elite universities – there are certainly some nerds among this nationality.

    The fact there have been no historically famous nerds from Nigeria, is not the result of a genetic barrier. Rather, Nigeria’s economic and historical development level has many centuries behind, which will be the main reasons for the low education of the country, rather than the other direction of causation. Without a type of civilization and widespread literacy, then there is no exhibition of intellectuals.

    Even if you were one of the (let’s imagine minority) of Nigerians with a genetic inclination to be a nerd, how would you express that if you are born in a third world country?

    • Replies: @songbird
    , @Coconuts
  205. Does South Korea have the worlds most fucked demographics? They just started losing population last year but the shape of their population pyramid is reversed and with an especially steep angle. From 6 fertility rate to 0.84 in 60 years.

    On the upside they do still have a large population aged 20-45 so there is a potential to reverse the population decline.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  206. Beckow says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    I have been to India. But more importantly I have been to Heathrow…oh, boy…seeing Heathrow and London is all one needs to see about Indians and how they are transforming the West. If you with the Gypsy-Jews analogy think it is for the better, well, to each his own.

    It is not about IQ, it has never been, it is your blind spot. It is about culture and who we are. India, as Naipaul wrote in Wounded Civilisation is a failed post-civilisation. Bringing it into our societies is simply madness. That they can be clever, witty and smart-alecky changes nothing. What happened to South Asia will happen to all places overrun by Indian migrants. Gypsies are still Gypsies after 500 years in Europe…

    • Agree: Bashibuzuk
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  207. songbird says:
    @Dmitry

    When we compare a street cleaner in Delhi, with an art historian in Oxford – it’s not their genetic components which will control for the main difference of their thinking. You cannot easily compare people from such different worlds.

    India is like a couple of countries living side by side.

    In a way, I think India might be considered like a supra-supra China. That is, China had a certain historical dysfunction based on its massive scale, which could only be circumvented by modern technology. India has the same scale but the added problem of diversity, which adds dysfunction. I don’t think it would be reasonable to suppose that they would develop at the same rate, even if their leaders had made the same economic reforms, at the same time, or if they had the same human capital.

    But caste seems to be real. It seems that there are different proportion of abilities between castes. Even in the developed world, where we have few indigenous groups similar to castes, Ex: the Burakumin or Irish travellers.

    Even if you were one of the (let’s imagine minority) of Nigerians with a genetic inclination to be a nerd, how would you express that if you are born in a third world country?

    In the US, it is often said that blacks would be picked on, by other blacks, if they were seen carrying books. Derided for “acting white.”

    I’m not sure what the infrastructure situation in Africa is, but I imagine that in 2021, this scenario can be circumvented a bit by technology. That, in technological terms, Africans have the advantage over Russians living in Soviet times. I believe in Russia, in 1979, a calculator cost three months salary for an engineer. Some years later, it went down to one month’s salary. Compared to the US: in 1977, a liquid crystal display calculator known as the Teal LC811 sold regularly for $24.95, with a sale price of $19.95. (which, to be fair, was a lot more money back then, but nowhere near a month’s salary.)

    Of course, that leaves off the question of, is the internet a boon or a distraction? And it leaves off institutional considerations, or real life interactions.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  208. Wouldn’t worry, that’s 70 soldiers ready to die.
    More to come, 👍⚔️

  209. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Shortsword

    Does South Korea have the worlds most fucked demographics? They just started losing population last year but the shape of their population pyramid is reversed and with an especially steep angle. From 6 fertility rate to 0.84 in 60 years.

    Give it another few decades and Best Korea will be Only Korea.

    East Asia’s demographic collapse is alarming for many reasons but mostly because it proves that race and immigration are not the causes. There’s no easy fix for the problem.

  210. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    There certainly are a lot of Indians immigrating that end up in the Western US. I haven’t had much contact with this group myself, but can say that on the whole they are perceived to be quite intelligent and have risen to the top of the socio/economic latter by being competent professional sorts. You wont see many Indians as checkout clerks at the grocery store or even as truck drivers.

    They have, of course, a reputation for being extremely clannish and don’t mix a lot outside of their own community. Also, they seem to have taken over the mantle from the Scots when it comes to being perceived as “thrifty” (tight more like it). I would once help put on workshops for folks who were interested in finding out strategies to help put their teenagers into good colleges in the least expensive manner. The seminar would last for an hour and we’d review some of the strategies involved, not going into all of the details and paperwork that would eventually need to be completed. Afterwards, interested people would sign up for a more detailed one on one meeting to find out more about our services and costs. Although quite a few Indians showed up for the free workshop, all taking copious notes regarding what they heard, not a one ever signed up for the second personal consultation. They were often referred to as “plate lickers”, those that came for the free goodies, but never venturing out any further when it would cost them some funds. Probably this was a sign of their high IQ and preference for “do it yourself ” projects where they could save some money.

    • Replies: @Beckow
  211. Tor597 says:
    @Hyperborean

    What exactly does this prove?

    That if you are critical of white people you must hate them?

    That must mean all the white people here must hate all blacks, Asians, and others races right?

    This is a lame comeback.

  212. Tor597 says:
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Its not blood libel and I stand by what I said.

    You might want me to blame blacks for everything. But don’t white nationalists like you blame the Jews for much of black malfeasance?

  213. @Tor597

    Its not blood libel and I stand by what I said.

    One other commenter, of East Asian heritage (could have been a Korean, although he was using the name of the Virginia Tech shooter as his screen name) pointed out that one of the Asians attacked was attacked by a Hispanic. The truth is Whites simply do not go around bashing immigrants there days, this trend is so ’70s, nowadays it is nonwhites (mostly black and Muslim) forming gangs to bash Whites and East Asians.

    You might want me to blame blacks for everything. But don’t white nationalists like you blame the Jews for much of black malfeasance?

    It is natural for blacks to behave like that, but Jewish lobbying has ensured that Whites pay for this, ever since de-segregation. Even Asians would be safer were it not for Jewish ethnic activism, who exactly was it that was looting Asian stores in L.A. 1992? Who were these fine gentlemen defending their stores from?

    Blacks easily fall for media propaganda and turn it into real life action, another reader here commented how after 9/11, the only instance of racism motivated by that attack he saw in public was a black woman verbally abusing a Muslim woman.

  214. Dmitry says:
    @songbird

    proportion of abilities between castes

    Isn’t caste in India supposed to (at least this is a stereotype I read) inversely correlated with skin colour?

    But Indians which flood elite universities in Western Europe, often seem to have blacker skin than Africans.

    So I would assume these people are not descendants of some high caste descended from Aryans that invaded India from the North. To have such black skin as the Indians which study in the UK, you have to be people whose ancestors are native to very low latitudes for many generations.

    is often said that blacks would be picked on, by other blacks, if they were seen carrying books. Derided for “acting white.”

    Even the beginning of the 20th century in the Russian Empire, 3/4 of the population were still illiterate. If you are born in the illiterate family in the 19th century (as most people you meet), how would you express that you are a nerd? As a precondition for being a nerd, you would need to be one of the minority of people born into a literate family.

    A certain development level of a country is a precondition, before we can even understand things like ratio of nerds in different populations.

    Obviously, China has reached universal literacy by the 1990s, but India still today even has 1/4 of its population being illiterate. And there exist countries in Africa (like Congo) which are currently 3 times poorer than India in per capita terms.

  215. @Dmitry

    If you are born in the illiterate family in the 19th century (as most people you meet), how would you express that you are a nerd?

    Yes, but:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitirim_Sorokin

    Some people just have it in them. A Brahmin is who he is even though he was born in a Chudra Varna family. That’s the problem with the Caste system; it stiffens the social mobility and prevents meritocracy. That’s why India is still lagging behind China.

    • Replies: @Jatt Aryaa
  216. Yevardian says:
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Years ago now, I only really got into EU3 and EU4, until that Scottish guy ruined it.
    I preferred Civilisation IV though, especially the modding scene, although again, Civ V was trash, and stopped following the franchise. When I did play vidya, it was overwhelmingly RTS though.

    Why do you ask? Obscure historical references, assumed age = paradox player?

  217. @Yevardian

    Unlike say, Serbs, people are generally reconciled to the realities of being a small country

    Care to explain what exactly you mean by this?

    My opinion is that Serbs would ideally have super-high birth rates and TFR’s at African tier levels so Serb population at least triples, if not more. High birth rates and TFR would be beneficial in not just demographic and existential survival, but also in the struggle for returning stolen and occupied ancient Serb lands from hostile “neighbors”.

    A bigger problem though is that Serbia (and Serbs as a nation) is rife with 5th columnists of all sorts and in differing forms (they mostly take the form of some sort of Croatness/Croatophilia, somewhat similar to Jewish subversion and sabotage, but in a Croat-associated nature/manner), so a raw power metric like population size doesn’t matter much when a powerful elite of 5th columnists has infiltrated itself into your nation and is devastating it from within. These 5th columnists are mostly a product of the SFRY and fortunately Vucic/SNS (not that these guys are perfect, for instance I feel like they could’ve done more to block migrants, but there’s no better alternative than them) have managed to mostly remove 5th columnists from Serbia’s military institutions and kicked them out from the political scene by now (although scum like Zdravko Ponos and Dragan Djilas still publicly howl and screech hysterically despite having lost their positions of power, refusing to just hurry the fuck up and die already). There’s still a lot of work and a long way to go to fully purge 5th columnists from Serbia’s economy, media, cultural-social scene and in many other realms, so that Serbia can successfully recover (in some areas completely from scratch) from the disastrous 20th century …

  218. @Yevardian

    until that Scottish guy ruined it.

    Think I know who you mean lmao.

    I was going to post his picture but don’t want to mention him by name because “incriminating” random, ordinary, “normal life” people by mentioning them anywhere on Unz Review isn’t fair to them at all. Although posting this guy’s picture might be even worse in that sense (which I’ve decided not to do unless you really want to see it, just so we’re on the same page there) …

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  219. Coconuts says:
    @Dmitry

    Intuitively, it would feel like historical “low academic achievement” of populations like India and China of past centuries, is likely to be mainly result of contingent and arbitrary vicissitudes of their historical and economic development. i.e. the latter are the controlling factors, above whatever will be the ratio of people with genetic inclinations to become nerds in those populations.

    It could the wrong way of looking at this problem. It seems probable that until the late 17th century the Mughal Empire and probably China were still the two foremost world civilisations and didn’t demonstrate any obvious academic backwardness in relation to Europe. Possibly the heights reached under the Mughals were part of the reason for the subsequent decline and conquest by the British.

    Then, the fruits of some unusual and relatively exceptional phenomena began to appear in Europe, initially mostly in Western and Central Europe, and the standards for academic achievement were significantly redefined. This was at a time when much of the population of European countries was still living in 3rd world conditions, and conversely, parts of the population of India and China had a quality of life not that distant from the better off Europeans.

    The interesting thing is what was behind the unusual burst of creativity and innovation in Europe, whose effects are probably wearing off now; c.f. the idea that the population of Britain has been losing one IQ point per decade since the 1850s.

    Nigeria seems to have been behind India, China, Europe, the Middle East in the development of its civilisation, (no nerdy Nigeria appears to have invented a system of writing, AFAIK). I would be surprised if this doesn’t have some environmental and then genetic causes which militated against Nigeria developing a European style scientific civilisation autonomously.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  220. Coconuts says:
    @Dmitry

    So I would assume these people are not descendants of some high caste descended from Aryans that invaded India from the North. To have such black skin as the Indians which study in the UK, you have to be people whose ancestors are native to very low latitudes for many generations.

    In the British Indian Army the Madras Sappers and Miners regiment was maintained in existence because people from the South, although they were quite short and small in stature, also had a reputation for conscientiousness and industriousness; it suggests there were always high intelligence parts of the South Indian population. I guess they had there own high castes that were not the same as the Northern ones in Bengal. The growth in the size of the population of India will have increased the number of them.

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
  221. @Coconuts

    The Dravidian people created the Indus Civilization. They certainly didn’t lack in intelligence back then.

    Also:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamil_Sangams

    They had (and still have) a significant smart fraction.

  222. Dmitry says:
    @Coconuts

    I agree with your first two paragraphs – of course, this is the typical view of historians.

    China and India had quite internally sophisticated cultures at least among their elites, and yet (after Europe’s Scientific Revolution), they could be defeated more easily than Zulus.

    This was mainly because of technology differences created by the Scientific Revolution in Europe, created a far larger disparity of power, rather than mere higher organizational levels (which had differentiated e.g. Romans from Gauls in the Ancient World).

    surprised if this doesn’t have some environmental and then genetic causes which militated against Nigeria

    I haven’t travelled in these countries, but I like watching walking videos on YouTube.

    India feels like travelling a few centuries into the past. I assume parts of Africa are like travelling thousand years to the past. Nigeria might be five centuries behind.

    On the other hand, I have seen people with Nigerian or other African names, studying for PhDs in university departments like computer science. These third world countries already start to produce some numbers of nerdy people (I see with my own eyes) despite their the backward level of the countries themselves. If those countries became developed in a century or two, I’m not sure I would predict their proportion of nerdy people in the population would be greatly lower than we in countries of other continents at the same stage of development.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  223. Mr. Hack says:
    @Dmitry

    I think that this development could be much sooner if certain positive environmental factors were to become more prevalent. A nutritious diet, including plenty of protein and fruits and vegetables with a high vitamin content can do wonders for the improvement of overall intelligence. A stable family and community life where books and learning are part of the everyday environment also would help to promote IQ intelligence. Of course, whether and when these obstacles can be overcome is another story…….

  224. songbird says:
    @Dmitry

    The martial supremacy of the PIEs might have only meant having a barbarian or horse culture. I wouldn’t necessarily say that they were definitely smarter than the Dravidians, and there are certainly many high caste Indians with dark skin, and I believe they had cities before the invasion.

    [MORE]

    But I think there is something weird that has gone on in India, over the centuries causing this genetic stratification. Some of it seems to be artificial depression – some of the smaller jatis are probably too inbred. The rest of it is an interesting mystery.

    Perhaps, these caste barriers prevented downward mobility from increasing intelligence. Or maybe, before modern times, the natural environment of India was so full of risks that it was analogous to tropical Africa, but selection for increased intelligence was still possible in narrow niches, among the higher castes.

    If those countries became developed in a century or two, I’m not sure I would predict their proportion of nerdy people in the population would be greatly lower than we in countries of other continents at the same stage of development.

    I think you are too optimistic here. I’m not sure if you would feel the same way, if you grew up in the US.

    Latin America was more developed than Africa for a long time, but it does not have much of an intellectual culture compared to Europe or the US.

  225. Yevardian says:
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    I think we both know who we’re talking about. Anyway, he seems like a perfectly decent guy, but that doesn’t preclude someone from being a terrible game director, I think many people celebrated the day he ‘resigned’ from Paradox, after several poorly-received cash-grabbing DLCs, increasingly broken AI, and terrible balance patches.
    Paradox is also funny because they’re clearly an uber-cuck company, but attract a lot of edgy fans.

    I heard after much-tweaking, Stellaris is actually an excellent game now, but I just find the setting bland. Although Sid Meir’s Alpha Centauri had a similar premise, but I felt it was much more compelling.

    • Thanks: TheTotallyAnonymous
  226. @Yevardian

    Why do you ask? Obscure historical references, assumed age = paradox player?

    Yes! Most people with such wide knowledge seem to be CK or EU players.

    Paradox games seem to be a great learning tool, perhaps university history courses should enter into an agreement with the studio to provide institutional access?

    • Replies: @Yevardian
  227. @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Is Serbia still really a traditional Christian society or has it too been Westernised? How nationalistic are the youth?

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  228. @Yevardian

    In one of the Gurdjieff transcripts somebody asked him about yoga and he dismissed all yoga and all Indian product–the British have utterly destroyed that once-great country and there is nothing of any value left in it whatsoever. (not an exact quote; it has been awhile since I read it and large swaths of his alcohol inspired monologues got written down so I am not sure how heartily he subscribed to it.)

  229. Beckow says:
    @Mr. Hack

    Indians don’t do actual work. Your shallow observation of them in professions misses the sad reality that Indians don’t work, don’t actually produce anything really worthwhile in the societies they move to. They are a parasitic group – clannish and self-serving. They will spend enormous effort on gaming the system on how to get their kids to universities. But as a general rule, nothing useful comes out of what they do – as all parasites they simply use the larger body to get all they can.

    With Kamala moving close to White House, I think this Indian way of gaming the world is coming closer to the center of power. It will be quite ugly.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    , @Dmitry
  230. Mr. Hack says:
    @Beckow

    If you consider computer programming and statistical analysis (fields where Indians thrive) to not be “anything worthwhile” then perhaps you’re right. I suspect that they abound in the biological sciences too, however, I may be wrong. AP and Professor Tennessee would be better qualified to make judgements about that. I know that in Arizona, there are many MD’s that are of Indian background. Many are considered to be quite good too.

  231. Yevardian says:
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Eh, I think it’s more a factor of kids being interested in history to begin, who then want to play such games. Actually, past a certain point, any vidya will severely distort, hamper and warp your understanding of history, if you’re not much of a reader. I imagine many teenagers thinking the Holy Roman Empire was a serious political force until the 1800s, or that the Manchus were steppe-nomads, if they only got their info from EU4. But yeah, it’s very good for remembering mountains of trivial state entities.
    So nah.

  232. EldnahYm says:
    @Thulean Friend

    It would be interesting to see the Jewish fraction broken out. My understanding is that UK Jewry is significantly more Orthodox than in America or Sweden, and thus there is less intermarriage, so you probably get a clearer picture of underlying capability.

    More likely, intelligent people are less likely to remain Orthodox, and differences in IQ between Orthodox and non-Orthodox will not give a clearer picture of underlying capability.

    That is too sophisticated for most pol-memers here to accept. I’ve long battled perceptions that Indians are stupid. It’s not just the elite Brahmin class that is capable of being successful. Most Indians in Singapore came from a lowly background up until 1990, yet were earning close to ethnic Chinese levels. If you look at TIMSS scores for places like Mauritius, it has a huge range, with their 90th percentile on par with OECD and their 10th percentile on par with sub-Saharan Africa. Mauritius has a very large Indian population.

    The numbers I have seen for the correlation between income and IQ aren’t that high, under .4, which means there is no need for complicated explanations to explain Indian incomes in Singapore, because Indian incomes in Singapore are not inconsistent with data about IQ and income. Even if we assume Indians in Singapore have the exact same average ability as Indians in India, which is just an assumption.

    TIMSS scores aren’t particularly predictive of underlying ability either. You’re just picking measures which only weakly correlate with IQ.

    Indians on average are dumb compared to northeast Asians or Europeans, and probably some other groups as well, but since there are a large number of them, there are likely a large number of smart Indians. Nothing complicated here.

    No one has ever shown any good evidence that elite Brahmins(who are quite heterogeneous) are anything special. Looking at the state of India, I wouldn’t be surprised if “elite Brahmins” are even dumber and more corrupt than the castizos who run Latin America. Regional differences may complicate the picture.

  233. @Dmitry

    I really doubt Thulean Friend is Polish Perspective, though it’s admittedly slightly less wildly implausible than him being an Indian.

    Kent Nationalist = DFH theory is interesting but doubt it too.

    Bashibuzuk on the other hand is most certainly Ano4, I would be flabbergasted if that wasn’t the case.

    Greasy did indeed vanish, hope his IRS problems worked out. Talha just stopped commenting on this blog in particular, he’s active at Anepigone and I think Steve Sailer’s.

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
    , @Dmitry
  234. @Thulean Friend

    Since the early 2010s the GDPcc in Dongbei has barely budged, meanwhile the rest of the country has doubled give or take. Pretty remarkable. (I knew this was happening ofc but surprised at just how sharp the divergence has been).

  235. Regarding the Indian Question – one thing we should bear in mind is that given the observed differences between castes, making assessments about Indians on the basis of one or two of them is no less legitimate than making common assessments about Europeans on the basis of Swedes or Greeks.

  236. @Anatoly Karlin

    Bashibuzuk on the other hand is most certainly Ano4

    I confirm. I just decided to change my previous unimaginative pseudonym to something more catchy.

  237. Mr. Hack says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Your assessment about the inadvisability of generalizing about Indians is of course correct. However, I think that it might be possible to do so about Indian immigrants to North America, as they all seem to represent a higher “caste” that are remarkably well educated and represent professional types. I still stand bye my observations about them above, especially that “You wont see many Indians as checkout clerks at the grocery store or even as truck drivers.”

    Beckow may be right about their abilities to “game the system” in their own favor, as the intelligent ones seem to be overrepresented in those that make it to the West, but his remarks regarding their “parasitic” nature, is over the top. Good earners, although fully capable of taking advantage of tax laws that minimize their taxable income, still end up paying large taxes to the government. I think that his problem with Indians and their culture is that he probably suffers from an incurable heartburn condition, after eating some spicy curry. 🙂

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  238. @Anatoly Karlin

    Regarding the Indian Question – one thing we should bear in mind is that given the observed differences between castes, making assessments about Indians on the basis of one or two of them is no less legitimate than making common assessments about Europeans on the basis of Swedes or Greeks.

    And layer on top of that the 30-40,000 endogamous jāti, Americans might be aware of how the Gujarat Patels own and/or operate a huge fraction of our motels, and your modeling also has to take into account 30-40,000 bell curves.

    So I can say with absolute confidence I’ve worked with three sharp Indian programmers, although two of them simply could not “get” the why of what they were assigned to do, while believing the multitude of reliable first hand accounts I’ve heard of others. Often groups nepotistically recruited based on those jāti ties of loyalty, who royally screw over their US employers in many ways. Also once was given some code developed in India for a then Fortune 50 company, its demise however was only partly mediated by Indians who foiled its saving throw, and it was absolutely worthless. Had to rewrite it from scratch, which has been true for only one other code base I encountered in my career.

    Also see how tottering giant Intel is now on death ground, reputedly in large part because the Indian who they put in charge of moving to their 10 nm node’s only skill was in, shall I say, “managing upwards.” And now for reasons I don’t know the details of, they can’t reorganize sufficiently to make their 7 nm node work (“their node” because their two competitors are succeeding at the same thing, but call them smaller nodes).

    This is a very big thing with worldwide consequences, losing a huge fraction the world’s capacity for fast, state of the art logic (CPU) manufacturing, server, workstation, and mobile above smartphones. No way will Samsung and TSMC be able to take up the slack any time soon, thus limiting for example AMD’s near term CPU gains, perhaps one reason they’re again pulling a dumb stunt like buying another huge but essentially unrelated fabless chip company.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
  239. @That Would Be Telling

    thus limiting for example AMD’s near term CPU gains, perhaps one reason they’re again pulling a dumb stunt like buying another huge but essentially unrelated fabless chip company.

    The Oriental broad in charge of AMD has pulled off what no one had thought possible – catch up with Intel in terms of CPU speed while making money despite its products selling at a discount. Maybe her success is bottled lightning – the product of non-replicable serendipity. We’ll see soon enough.

  240. @Anatoly Karlin

    The Oriental broad in charge of AMD has pulled off what no one had thought possible – catch up with Intel in terms of CPU speed while making money despite its products selling at a discount. Maybe her success is bottled lightning – the product of non-replicable serendipity.

    There’s one major thing we can credit Lisa Su with, not screwing up since getting the top job in 2014. That’s an integral part of AMD’s cultural DNA, it was for example noted the last time they were successful that in their entire history they had never made money for a buy and hold stock owner.

    Of course, while almost none realize it, not screwing up is pretty hard in technology, was for a long time one of the “secrets” to Microsoft’s success, they maintained their ability to crank out software that basically worked while for example their early PC industry competitors all lost that except for Borland. And she preceded Jim Keller’s return to AMD by seven months, although it’s not clear her remit at that time would have involved him (and BTW, note his leaving Intel in June 2020, another very bad sign for Intel).

    So getting Keller back was probably serendipity for her, but the biggest dose of it comes from Intel screwing up catastrophically and unrecoverablely so far (watch for real news about their 7 nm node). Their fabrication technology was for a very long time 1-2 generations ahead of their competition, which at worst case covered for a multitude of sins or simply mediocre design and execution like Netburst. Thus AMD’s spinoff of their fab lines to GlobalFoundries wasn’t ultimately fatal as predicted, they were able to switch to TSMC and the inefficiencies in working with an external foundry beats just not being able to make competitive chips.

    Their acquisition of Xilinx a few months ago is very significant in one or more ways. It is the industry inventor and overwhelming leader in FPGAs, but I see no synergy possible except that it also uses TSMC (unless AMD has somehow obtained software chops). It’s an all stock purchase, but the huge opportunity cost and the long term distractions from it imply AMD doesn’t see greater attention on and investment in CPUs as being decisive in their near to medium term.

    That could mostly be beyond Su’s control, it’s a good bet AMD is limited by what capacity they can get from TSMC, especially on its smaller nodes where for example smartphone companies like Apple can totally outbid them, including with upfront investment in TSMC. Ah, another bit of serendipity unless and until Biden reverses the sanctions on Huawei and/or the market otherwise adjusts, AMD was able to buy Huawei’s TSMC capacity when it was banned from getting fabricated by them.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
  241. @Mr. Hack

    True, though “higher castes” can mean both Brahmins and Kshatriyas – the former are more intelligent, but I found I got along better with the latter, they’re the closest to Europeans in mentality. But a disproportionate share of Indian intellectual accomplishment accrues to Brahmins, I would guess they’re genotypically smarter than any European nation.

    The scummy stereotypes I think mostly accrue to Vaisya (merchants).

    I imagine the semi-literate comments polluting many India related threats on the Internet are mostly generated by Shudras. But you can’t expect much from peasants.

    The US is special in that indeed a large percentage of Indian immigrants there are Brahmins and Kshatriyas. The Indians have a lower reputation in Britain, and indeed more of them there are from lower castes.

    Geographic origin as well as subcastes are also very important considerations. But I’m not well informed on such specifics.

  242. @That Would Be Telling

    There’s one major thing we can credit Lisa Su with, not screwing up since getting the top job in 2014. That’s an integral part of AMD’s cultural DNA, it was for example noted the last time they were successful that in their entire history they had never made money for a buy and hold stock owner.

    I gotta wonder whether Otellini, the first non-technical guy to take the reins at Intel, was the guy who set the company on the path to decline.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Otellini

    In 2006, he oversaw the largest round of layoffs in Intel history when 10,500 (or 10% of the corporate workforce) employees were laid-off.[11] Job cuts in manufacturing, product design, and other redundancies, were made in an effort to save $3 billion/year in cost by 2008. Of the 10,500 jobs, 1,000 layoffs were at the management level.[12] In 2006, Otellini was named Haas Business Leader of the Year.[3]

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
  243. g2k says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    A lot of the the UK’s long term Indian population originated in Africa; they were brought there in the nineteenth century to staff the colonel bureaucracies then expelled by Idi Amin types in the mid c20.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  244. @Anatoly Karlin

    When I lived in India, I sometimes saw Brahmins who were lowly manual workers like rickshaw drivers. Often the most prosperous and educated immigrants to the west belong to mercantile Gujarati castes. Many Thakkurs or members of Northern warrior castes are quite poor and so on, the India is not as simple place as you think.

    Uttar Pradesh is a horribly poor state with a population of over 200 million, about 10% of states population is Brahmins.

    Wealthier southern states have a small population of Brahmins, Tamil Nadu has almost none. They had strong and old anti-brahminic movement there, which succeeded taking power from Brahmins and even sometimes expelling them from the state.

    • Agree: Jatt Aryaa
    • Thanks: Bashibuzuk
  245. @Anatoly Karlin

    The Indians have a lower reputation in Britain, and indeed more of them there are from lower castes.

    Indians in the UK actually have a decent reputation, they are mostly Punjabi and Gujarati, the rest being north Indian mostly and a lot of them are Sikhs who are seen as a model minority. I would say Indians in the US have a worse reputation due to the whole H-1B thing and the fact that a lot of Indians in America are from Andhra Pradesh, which is a southern Indian state. You can read about this on Quora, the Indian recruiters actually not only discriminate against non-Indians, but against people who are not from their state as well as caste.

  246. @AltanBakshi

    Wealthier southern states have a small population of Brahmins, Tamil Nadu has almost none. They had strong and old anti-brahminic movement there, which succeeded taking power from Brahmins and even sometimes expelling them from the state.

    Brahmins are the Jews of India, Karlin did a post on this, he noted how the Indian version of the Manhattan Project was staffed heavily by Brahmins, but at the same time their caste nepotism and tendencies to make money from speculating rather than creating is ruinous.

    The state of the subcontinent is the opposite of what racialists would expect, the darkest skinned Sri Lankans are comparably prosperous and have a good environment, while the further north you go up India, the worse of a place it becomes.

    • Agree: Bashibuzuk
  247. @AltanBakshi

    I think I have already mentioned that Indus civilization was most probably built by the Dravidian populations. I have met several Southern Indians who worked in complex R&D projects and were quite good at what they were doing. One of them actually became a good acquaintance of mine. A very nice and outstandingly intelligent fellow.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
  248. @Bashibuzuk

    I believe that there was a reverse situation in India one thousand to three thousand years ago. That the North was more prosperous, wealthy and South was more tribal and poor, with only some few civilizational centres.

    The very reason for backwardness is Islamic and British rule, theres a correlation with that. The wealthiest state, for a long time has been Kerala, most of Kerala has always been ruled by native Hindu kings. Did you know that outside of few coastal settlements, British rule was longest in Bihar, Bengal and Orissa, which are now oddly the poorest and most backward places in whole subcontinent, even though Bengal and Bihar were known for their prosperity during the Mughal rule, some historians even claim that there was some kind of development of proto industrialization in Bengal. So my claim is that long Muslim rule, continued with a long British rule, correlates with backwardness. Actually this difference can be seen between Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, one has endured centuries under Hyderabad Muslim Sultans, another has had only a short period under Muslims, but there is quite a big difference between education and quality of life between those two states, even though culturally and linguistically they are very similar. This same pattern repeats again and again everywhere in India, Punjab and Rajasthan are wealthier than neighbouring Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh, though the climate for agriculture is better in UP and MP, but Hindu Rajputs have ruled vast areadsof Rajasthan for a very long time, in Punjab Sikhs repelled the Muslim yoke already 300 years ago. Still both areas have been longer under Islam than Tamil Nadu and Kerala.

    Some time ago I read some Persian history, I feel so bad for ancient Persians, even in 10th century some of them tried to change tides of time and stop the Islamicization of Iran. How bad those Iranians must have felt, when they lost their faith, culture and lands…

    In my understanding the builders of Indus civilization had genetic connection to people of BMAC and possibly to Iranian plateau, they were quite different from modern Dravidas. Still Dravidas must be quite capable, even the glorious Sun of Dharma, Arya Nagarjuna was probably from the area of Krishna river valley, nowadays Andra Pradesh. Likewise the unsurpassable master of logic Dignaga was from the Tamil lands.

    • Agree: Jatt Aryaa
  249. @Johann Ricke

    I gotta wonder whether Otellini, the first non-technical guy to take the reins at Intel, was the guy who set the company on the path to decline.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Otellini

    In 2006, he oversaw the largest round of layoffs in Intel history when 10,500 (or 10% of the corporate workforce) employees were laid-off.[11] Job cuts in manufacturing, product design, and other redundancies, were made in an effort to save $3 billion/year in cost by 2008. Of the 10,500 jobs, 1,000 layoffs were at the management level.

    You would need to find out who started using stack ranking and the firing of people who lost in that inherently political process, I can’t remember when it was said to have been started. Getting rid of 10% plus or minus of the company each single year was said to be SOP, but perhaps the above extreme was taken to be a norm, or maybe it was on top of the normal stack ranking firings for manufactures cause vs. layoffs.

    That wasn’t a great time for Intel, the Netburst (for example Pentium 4) microarchitecture was failing hard because Dennard scaling had broken down and they couldn’t get their CPUs to the externally and/or internally promised 5 to 10 GHz. Plus even with the move back to the P6 (for example Pentium Pro) microarchitecture Intel was still fixated on a single front side bus interface to a single memory system, a nasty bottleneck.

    It took Intel another two years to ship their their “QuickPath Interconnect” like AMD’s 2003 HyperTransport style layout of each chip having its own memory with fast interconnections between them. AMD had also captured a lead in 64 bit computing by defining a fairly x86 compatible and fast instruction set architecture (ISA), while Intel’s Itanium failed hard because of the lack of suitably smart compilers and emulating x86 slowly. Intel had to license that ISA from AMD, which must have stung, they took several tries before settling on their own name for it.

    So he was at the helm when Intel got its act back together, but that doesn’t mean he didn’t plant lethal seeds of failure in the long term. But I don’t see anyone trying to figure out why Intel has perhaps irretrivebly lost it in the last decade blaming him, it’s generally later management, especially the people obsessed with diversity helped by legal actions against the company.

    One general comment to make, Intel has made a lot of very stupid technical mistakes for decades, starting prior to this century which included a couple of million part recalls, one of motherboards Dell was about to ship in 2000, the other would have been around then. He started in the company in 1974 but per Wikipedia didn’t obtain a high position until 1998, not sure if he had any role in the mistakes, but he wouldn’t have been in a position to use technical knowledge to help correct that terrible highest level engineering management unless he’d learned a lot on the job, which is possible.

    One of the things that helped Intel survive during that period, including when AMD started eating their lunch and supper was their superior process technology, and the key thing to figure out about Intel today is how they appear to have completely lost the plot in this most fundamental of foundations for a chip company. Although searching now I see claims they’re going to be making a lot of 10 nm chips including server ones this year, could be a sufficiently different process they got to work in that general range of density. Or they’re lying, perhaps in part to themselves, a great deal of lying about 10 nm is one of the distinguishing aspects of Intel as of late.

  250. Wasbappin banned from twitter. Is Putler to blame?

  251. Buddhas opinion on the caste system:

    But thereby, Ambaṭṭha, the Kshatriya would have fallen into the deepest degradation, shaven as to his head, cut dead with the ash-basket, banished from land and township. So that, even when a Kshatriya has fallen into the deepest degradation, still it holds good that the Kshatriyas are higher, and the Brahmans inferior.

    ‘Moreover it was one of the Brahmā gods, Sanaṃ-kumāra, who uttered this stanza:

    “The Kshatriya is the best of those among this folk
    who put their trust in lineage.
    But he who is perfect in wisdom and righteousness,
    he is the best among gods and men.”

    ‘Now this stanza, Ambaṭṭha, was well sung and not ill sung by the Brahmā Sanaṃ-kumāra, well said and not ill said, full of meaning and not void thereof. And I too approve it; I also, Ambaṭṭha, say:

    “The Kshatriya is the best of those among this folk
    who put their trust in lineage.
    But he who is perfect in wisdom and righteousness,
    he is the best among gods and men.”

    • Thanks: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Replies: @Jatt Aryaa
  252. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Is Serbia still really a traditional Christian society or has it too been Westernised?

    Serbia stopped being a traditional Christian society in 1944 when the Communists took power in Serbia after conquering Belgrade and then massacring tens of thousands of Serbs, targeting the worthwhile old national elite (or at least what remained of it by 1944) in particular. From 1945 onward, policies of forced industrialization, urbanization, de-ruralization, de-racination and etc. have taken a very heavy toll (demographic situation became so bad that in the 1980’s literally 80% of all Serb babies were aborted!) strongly felt even to this day …

    Still, currently the national and public atmosphere is somewhat becoming increasingly more “based” with public talk, at least by the government and Serbian Orthodox Church (among others), revolving around open discussion of nationalist priorities like higher birthrates, defense of Serb national interests in Serbia’s neighborhood, handling geopolitics as best as possible (big problems are likely coming from USA under Biden with Republika Srpska, a Serb ethno-state/entity in Bosnia-Herzegovina, being especially in danger) and etc.

    How nationalistic are the youth?

    That’s a definite and undoubtable upside to Serbia’s present situation which looks bleak in many other ways, at least on a surface level. The statistics (saw them a few months ago, but don’t have a ready-made link available which I could find if you’re really interested) clearly prove the youth are more nationalistic than their cuck Yugo-boomer parents. The parents of current Serb youth/young adults grew up under circumstances where Serb nationalism was openly suppressed by the state, SFRY (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia), and a criminal offense worthy of imprisonment at minimum (at least until Slobodan Milosevic came to power in 1987, after which Serb nationalism was more “frowned upon”, although socially acceptable, and no, Milosevic is not a “Serb Hitler” lol), so in that sense it’s not surprising that Serb youth are more nationalistic than their parents when freed of such constraints (forget nationalism, even literally celebrating Eastern Orthodox Christmas was a criminal offense in the SFRY!).

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/serbia-is-down-but-not-out/

    Above is the simplest summary I could find (including appropriate comments, like mine there of course).

    Personally though, simply being aware of things like these (just a small sample) have more than enough of a potent impact to make any Serb with a functional brain and soul nationalistic (leading to the question of wtf is wrong with such a significant minority):

    Crimes Against Serbs:

    http://zlocininadsrbima.com/EN/Crime.aspx?Naslov=Crimes-in-Bosanski-Brod,-1992

    The crime in Bosanski brod 1992 refers to murders of Serbian civilians from March until October, 1992 committed by Croatian military forces in Bosanski Brod (at the north of Bosnia and Herzegovina) together with members of muslim paramilitary units and later, the muslim army of BiH.

    The monstrosity of this crime against Serbian civilians makes it one of the most terrific scenes seen on the war-affected areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina during 1990s.

    On March 3, 1992, Croatian-muslim military forces together with 108. Brigade of the Croatian National Guard took over Bosanski Brod, which was in state of occupation and local Serbian people were intimidated, physically abused and systematically plundered in their private homes. Dozens of Serbs from Bosanski Brod municipality were taken to camps in Croatia and Bosanski Brod itself was transformed into a camp.

    On the bridge which connected Bosanski Brod i Slavonski Brod there was inscription from the beginning of March, 1992, that “Serbs and dogs are forbidden to cross over”. Orthodox churches found themselves under the attack of joint Croatian-muslim forces. The Orthodox gravery was devastated and The Church of Holy Mary (built in 1890) was completely destroyed and the church property was plundered.

    Croatian military units crossed the river Sava on March 26, 1992 and together with there Croatian-muslim forces committed crimes against Serbian civilians in Sijekovac near Brod. In the village Sijekovac within only one hour, 9 people including children of Serbian families Zecevic, Radanovic, Milosevic i Trivic were killed. Some corpses were taken by a refrigerator car and thrown into the river, and 15 houses were burnt and destroyed.

    In the next few days Croatian and muslim military forces killed 51 Serbs in Sijekovac, and in total 70 Serbs were killed and 9 are still missing. Croatian military forces first entered the house of Zecevic family. They immediately killed Jovan Zecevic (72) and his sons Milan, Vasa and Petar. They then killed Luka Milosevic and his sons Zeljko i Dragan (17), and then Vid Radanovic. They even killed immobile old man, Sreto Trivic.

    … there are indications that organs were taken from [Serb] children before liquidation which were then sold across Europe on black market, especially in Germany. Association that searches for missing persons from Brod holds information that 500 Serbs were killed during Croatian eight months long occupation …

    http://zlocininadsrbima.com/EN/Crime.aspx?Naslov=The-crime-in-Kupres-1992

    The crime in Kupres 1992 is organized ethnic cleansing of Serbs at the beginning of April of 1992, in Kupres municipality (Bosnia) conducted by leading members of HDZ Kupres. Members of HOS and the regular army of the Republic of Croatia attacked villages around Kupres and the town of Kupres itself, and killed Serbian civilians.

    Only on April 8, 1992 did the Federal Army of Yugoslavia (JNA) units led by colonel Slavko Lisica arrive, having liberated Kupres area and investigated war crimes committed by Croatian military and paramilitary forces within five days.

    The most of these crimes couldn’t be imagined to happen, lest to describe.

    In the morning of April 3, 1992 detonations and shooting from firearms could be heard from the village Malovan which is located 12 km from Kupres. Members of Croatian forces of HVO and HOS entered Serbian villages in Kupres and killed some Serbian civilians and some took to camps: Lora, Ljubuski, Zadar, burning Serbian houses and business premises.

    Those local Serbs who failed to escaped were killed in their homes. On that day, 20 Serbs were killed in Donji Malovan.

    At the beginning of November 1994, joint Croatian and Muslim forces (HVO and the army of B&H) in the operation “Cincar” attacked Kupres again and seized it. Serbian people were expelled or killed. After the Dayton Agreement 1995, Kupres became part of Muslim-Croatian Federation. Today, a few Serbs have returned to Kupres and nearby villages. The majority is scattered throughout the world, far from their homeland.

    It is still unknown what happened to 14 Serbs who were taken to camps: Lora, Zadar and Ljubuski.

    http://zlocininadsrbima.com/EN/Crime.aspx?Naslov=The-massacre-of-soldiers-of-the-Srpska-Republic-Army-in-Boderiste,-1993

    The crime in Boderiste is one of the most horrific crimes committed during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1990s.

    This monstruos crime was committed by members of 108th Brigade of the Croatian Defence Council on March 8, 1993. At first, they captured 15 members of the Republika Srpska Army in the region of Grbavica town and then took them to Bodoriste at Northeast of Bosnia, where they killed them in unimaginable way.

    Corpses of Serbian soldiers were so massacred that the team of forensics specialists from the Military Medical Academy from Belgrade hardly managed to conduct obduction the day later.

    On the hill, Croatian and muslim forces received back up, and after that they surrounded Serbian soldiers capturing 15 soldiers of VRS (the Army of Srpska Republic) and taking them to the village Boderiste where Croats lived as majority population.

    These soldiers of Srpska Republic were subjected to dreadful torture with slaughterers having beaten them with blunt tools, and then cut parts of their bodies, and to some of them even their heads.

    … On March 9, 1993 the Army of Srpska Republic tried to make exchange, but Croatian beasts only sent corpses of soldiers in a van. The bodies were so massacred that even their families could hardly recognize them. Blood was leaping from the van.

    http://zlocininadsrbima.com/EN/Crime.aspx?Naslov=Medak-Pocket-1993

    The criminal operation Medak pocket or “Bloody September in Lika” was the third attack of Croatian military and police forces on the territory of the Republic of Srpska Krajina (RSK) at the time when the RSK area was under protection of UNPROFOR.

    This genocidal operation started on September 9, 1993 with a sudden attack of the Croatian Army on Serbian villages in the area of “Medak Pocket” near small town Gospic, which were for 18 months under the UN protection. Within 7 days, Serbian villages of Medak pocket: Pocitelj, Citluk and Divoselo were looted and razed.

    During the action Croatian joint forces killed 46 soldiers of SVK, 6 RSK policemen and 36 Serbian civilians. Among civilians 26 people were over the age of 60, and 17 of them were women. In total, 88 Serbs were killed. In this criminal action of the Croatian Army there were no wounded persons on Serbian side.

    The UNPROFOR troops brought out 18 bodies from direct combat with most of them having been mutilated and burned. Two bodies were found later, and one corpse was found by soldiers of RSK in 1994. Only in 2000, 11 more (16) corpses were found hidden in a septic tank in the former Serbian part of the (eastern) Gospic. Of 11 bodies, 6 have been identified by the method of DNA. From a total of 88 missing, 84 were found with 8 corpses not yet identified.

    http://zlocininadsrbima.com/EN/Crime.aspx?Naslov=Murder-of-Serbian-children-in-Kosovo-and-Metohia

    The crime in Gorazdevac refers to the murder of two Serbian boys: Ivan Jovovic and Pantelija Dakic and four other children having received serious wounds: Dragana Srbljak, Djordje Ugrenovic, Bogdan Bukmirovic and Marko Bogicevic. This crime was committed by members of former Albanian terrorist group, so called the Liberation Army of Kosovo (KLA). Their aim was to threaten Serbian people and conduct ethnic cleansing of this part of Kosovo.

    This crime happened on August 13, 2003 at the coast of river Bistrica near Serbian village Gorazdevac in the vicinity of town Pec in the western part of Metohija.

    On August 13 around 1:20pm six children who lived in the village of Gorazdevac came to the coast of river Bistrica to swim and play games. They didn’t suspect that it could be fatal. Gorazdevac is the largest Serbian village in Metohija where after 2000. around 2.000 residents returned to their houses after the war, which was negatively received among their neighbours from Albanian villages.

    In nearby bush the group of well armed terrorists from former KLA hid, having fired 90 bullets in direction where six children were playing: Pantelija Dakic (12) and Ivan Jovovic died immediately while Dragana Srbljak (13), Djordje Ugrenovic (20), Bogdan Bukmirovic (14) and Marko Bogicevic (12) were seriously wounded. Deadly bullets were fired from the direction of Albanian village Zahac.

    Bogdan Bukmiric was wounded with 7 bullets and his spleen was damaged. His neighbours took him to the ambulance in Gorazdevac where bleeding was stopped, but that was not enough. He needed better treatment. Two neighbours took him to the hospital in Pec. When they came to the town, near the market, the car suddenly stopped which was noticed by passing by Albanians who attacked them and destroyed the car. Two patrols of KFOR accidently came and took them to the hospital. The patients of Albanian nationality rejoiced for their misfortune and made derogatory comments. Thanks to the engagement of doctor Milena Cvetkovic, Bogdan was sent to Belgrade via Kosovska Mitrovica, where he had 4 serious interventions at the Military Medical Academy. On August 19, he woke up from coma. Today he lives in Belgrade.

    After this cruel crime Serbian residents began to leave Gorazdevac. On August 17, 2003 the fire on Serbian children repeated, but without consequences. Today only 700 people remained.

    And so on so forth …

  253. Wielgus says:
    @g2k

    Indians and perhaps Pakistanis were a significant part of the commercial class in Uganda, especially the capital Kampala, and Amin scapegoated them. He gave their businesses to cronies, which contributed to economic collapse.

  254. A123 says:

    Humor from The Babylon Bee

    https://babylonbee.com/news/absolute-legend-trump-walks-away-from-republican-party-without-even-looking-back-at-explosion/
     

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—In an awesome display of action movie MAGA-greatness, Trump walked away from the exploding Republican Party like an absolute legend, without looking back or even flinching. Witnesses say they saw Trump power-walking in slow motion away from the massive explosion as smoldering wreckage and shrieking Republicans rained down around him.

    Mitch McConnell tried his best to escape, but he was too slow due to being a turtle. The force of the blast tipped him over on his back and he lay there with his arms flailing helplessly.

    Libertarian Party officials raised their hands and offered to take in anyone orphaned by the blast, but everyone threw spitballs at them and then stuffed them in a locker.

    😎 TRUMP 2024 😎

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
  255. @Bashibuzuk

    https://counter-currents.com/2017/06/the-genetic-limits-of-social-mobility/

    You’re repeating racist colonial myths

    UP has the most Brahmin is it rich?

  256. @Jatt Aryaa

    I have hair on my head, but I dont let it grow long like Sikhs, why do you ask?

    • Replies: @Jatt Aryaa
    , @sher singh
  257. What does everyone think of this idea?

    NATO, dominated by the United States, versus the Warsaw Pact, dominated by the Soviet Union, did not comprise the two poles of a bi-polar power structure. Rather, they were both parts of the same system. As long as both stood, the system was stable, much like the system of Oceania, Eurasia and East Asia in Orwell’s 1984. When the Soviet Union collapsed, however, the whole system became unstable. It became harder and harder to justify maintaining NATO when there was no longer any potential threat.

    This drew the United States government to increasingly overplay its hand. Serbia as a threat requiring the intervention of NATO was ludicrous. The organized hysteria generated by the false flag attack in New York City in 2001 worked better, for a while, but the elements of that narrative never added up. Afghanistan and Iraq as a viable threat to Europe and the United States? Ridiculous.

    We appear to be in the end-stage of the collapse of the old world order that began 30 years ago. May heaven forbid that a new world order rise in its place!

  258. @AltanBakshi

    Buddha Ji says a shaved head is sign of low class lol.

    Shaving head is universal insult lel.

  259. @AltanBakshi

    Tibetan monks shave head right?

    Could this be reason, act of bodily renunciation?

    Around the early medieval days the brahmins dissuaded an important ‘zazmans’ who was bent upon self immolation at the altar of Devi or Bhairav and informed them that if the zazman shaved the hair of his body that act also amounted to self immolation.

    http://www.punjabmonitor.com/2013/04/was-guru-nanak-cleanshaven.html

    • Replies: @AltanB
  260. AltanB says:
    @sher singh

    Buddhist monks always shave their heads, its an act of renunciation, ones hair is after all a sign of pride.

    Even Buddha was probably shaved, but because he is a Mahapurusa, he is depicted with hair.

  261. Dmitry says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    It’s just the same users and I continued the same conversations with them after their name changes.

    differences between castes, making assessments about Indians on the basis of one or two of them

    Populations don’t exist in some stateless vacuum, so I’m not sure the idea about “making assessments about Indians” from their situation in developed countries. Most Indians are determined by the current situation in India, not by the lecture theatres in Western Europe.

    But it’s difficult not to notice that among the United Kingdom’s students, that will be the bourgeoisie or professional class of the next generation – a large number from third world nationalities.

    These are not just including standard brown nationalities, but also many Indians that are black. Considering the large amount of black skin Indians, it’s probably not result of high caste or a special local status of their families within India. I wouldn’t be surprised that plenty of grandchildren of third world peasants, are becoming the Tesla-buying doctors and lawyers in Western Europe.

  262. Dmitry says:
    @AltanBakshi

    Uttar Pradesh.. about 10% of states population is Brahmins.

    Sounds Indian version of Poland, where a majority of the population claim to be themselves (or at least descended from) aristocrats.

    • LOL: Jatt Aryaa
  263. Dmitry says:
    @Beckow

    I’ve had a funny situation with having an Indian colleague in the past

    He was hard working.but he had some secret skills for avoiding work, which I was jealous about.

    For example, a tactic (which probably I should not share as a trade secret) was to be extremely punctual for meetings, and to pretend to be care about peoples’ punctuality.

    If you are hyper concerned about punctuality; this means that you have an excuse to cancel meetings if another person arrives 5 minutes late, and then you can go home early and it’s not your responsibility.

    Unfortunately, this tactic requires a certain amount of bravery, as you have to pretend it’s the other person’s responsibility for the cancellation, when you are smiling inside at the same time.

    I’m too polite to use that kind of tactic. I can usually arrive to the room ten minutes early. and sometimes wait for 20 minutes even for late people, and there is some hardwired internal resistance which would prevent me from pretending to be annoyed or sending them out.

  264. More Youtube purges in the future?

  265. Poland ended up with 74k excess deaths, or about 18% increased mortality. Basically all the excess deaths was in the last 3 months of the year.

  266. TASS headlines today:

    Lukashenko considers Putin friend, fellow team player

    Integration of Russia, Belarus should be boosted, Belarusian leader says

    All Russian citizens are brothers for Belarusians, Lukashenko says

    LOL. I hope Russia realizes that betting only on Lukashenko isn’t smart. Don’t let the entire Belarusian opposition be anti-Russian.

  267. Oil price is basically back to low 2019 levels.

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