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Krasnaya Presnya Park, Moscow.

This week’s Open Thread.

 
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  1. This is the current Open Thread, where anything goes – within reason.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

    Commenting rules. Please note that anonymous comments are not allowed.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Anatoly, I have a question for you: Just how efficient is it to govern Russia's distant eastern regions from Moscow? I mean, Yes, they have their own governors, but doesn't Russia's federal government have a lot of say in how things are run throughout the entire country? I'm just wondering if it's prudent to be governed in large part by people who live thousands of miles away, quite literally on the other end of the Earth.

  2. • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Blinky Bill


    https://flagpolefarm.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/belarus-flag-2.jpg

    http://static2.businessinsider.com/image/53171f4cecad049c1d39bd8a-1200-800/rtr3g10m.jpg

    , @Korenchkin
    @Blinky Bill

    That emblem is so lame

  3. Russia banned from Tokyo Olympics and 2022 World Cup after Cas ruling

    Most Russophobic act since Operation Barbarossa.

    Westerners cannot handle doped Russian men of steel.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell


    https://live.staticflickr.com/3173/3007508478_81ea0e3b3c_n.jpg

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    , @g2k
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Given that most of the west will probably still be under covid lockdowns by then, I wouldn't get too upset about it, or even count on them going ahead at all.

    , @Mikhail
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Anti-Russian Bigotry

    Penalizing a whole group of people based on their ethnic and/or national background is condemned as bigoted when applied to some groups. Russia under another designation will have a large Olympic delegation. Why are all these Russians allowed to compete, but not formally as Russians? The simple answer has to do with them not being guilty, while nevertheless having their national origin wrongly disgraced.

    The likes of Sebastian Coe, Travis Tygart, the CAS panel at issue and WADA, have endorsed a hypocritical PC bigotry.

    Related, this site caters to such drivel:

    https://www.insidethegames.biz/

  4. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    Russia banned from Tokyo Olympics and 2022 World Cup after Cas ruling

    Most Russophobic act since Operation Barbarossa.

    Westerners cannot handle doped Russian men of steel.

    https://pyxis.nymag.com/v1/imgs/308/04d/d596f4c0693744cca6d05cf9665fa59d11-16-dolph-lundgren-rocky.h467.w700.jpg

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @g2k, @Mikhail

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Blinky Bill

    Everybody does it, but only Russians are punished, what could be the reason for this if not virulent Russophobia?

  5. banning Russia from Olympic activities for TWO cycles is TOTAL BULLSHIT. i fucking hate this.

    the US just wants one of their main competitors out of the way and that’s all there is to it. this is very clearly a political hit on Russia because the left hates them. there was nothing like this during the COLD WAR for fucks sake.

    • Replies: @128
    @prime noticer

    If that is really the case, why is not China banned, when was the last time Russia came anywhere close to the total US tally?

    Replies: @Shortsword

  6. @Blinky Bill
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell


    https://live.staticflickr.com/3173/3007508478_81ea0e3b3c_n.jpg

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Everybody does it, but only Russians are punished, what could be the reason for this if not virulent Russophobia?

  7. @prime noticer
    banning Russia from Olympic activities for TWO cycles is TOTAL BULLSHIT. i fucking hate this.

    the US just wants one of their main competitors out of the way and that's all there is to it. this is very clearly a political hit on Russia because the left hates them. there was nothing like this during the COLD WAR for fucks sake.

    Replies: @128

    If that is really the case, why is not China banned, when was the last time Russia came anywhere close to the total US tally?

    • Replies: @Shortsword
    @128

    Western relations with China soured several years after they did with Russia. It's very likely that we'll start seeing similar doping accusations against China soon. But it will be significantly harder to ban China outright.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

  8. @Blinky Bill
    https://res.cloudinary.com/teepublic/image/private/s--j5PIsbLk--/c_fit,g_north_west,h_920,w_920/co_ffffff,e_outline:41/co_ffffff,e_outline:inner_fill:1/co_bbbbbb,e_outline:3:1000/c_mpad,g_center,h_1260,w_1260/b_rgb:eeeeee/c_limit,f_jpg,h_630,q_90,w_630/v1566171055/production/designs/5651901_0.jpg

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell, @Korenchkin

    [MORE]

  9. South Korea, Denmark, and Uruguay, all praised for their “good contact tracing” re: COVID all now have COVID cases spiking out of control. Meanwhile, Thailand, Vietnam, New Zealand, Australia, and China all bask in the sun. Clearly shows that on the virus, elimination>containment. Meanwhile, America has one Wuhan every 2 days.

    Are the Tokyo Olympics still going to take place in 2021, even though the pandemic still hasn’t been contained?

    • Replies: @128
    @E. Harding

    Two of those are island countries, and 2 of the others have the political tools that the containment countries do not have.

    , @Europe Europa
    @E. Harding

    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus without a vaccine or continuous lock downs and economic damage.

    To my mind China's (and others) relatively short pandemic and rapid recovery is a huge elephant in the room that no one seems to want to mention.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @A123, @E. Harding, @AaronB, @AnonFromTN

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    @E. Harding

    +1,000 cases & 20 deaths per day / 52M people isn't "out of control" I would say.

    Replies: @128

    , @Tor597
    @E. Harding

    South Korea has had spikes before, the point is that they have shown the ability to contain and manage their outbreaks.

    They are better prepared to contain now than they were earlier in the year.

    Replies: @E. Harding

  10. @E. Harding
    South Korea, Denmark, and Uruguay, all praised for their "good contact tracing" re: COVID all now have COVID cases spiking out of control. Meanwhile, Thailand, Vietnam, New Zealand, Australia, and China all bask in the sun. Clearly shows that on the virus, elimination>containment. Meanwhile, America has one Wuhan every 2 days.

    Are the Tokyo Olympics still going to take place in 2021, even though the pandemic still hasn't been contained?

    Replies: @128, @Europe Europa, @Anatoly Karlin, @Tor597

    Two of those are island countries, and 2 of the others have the political tools that the containment countries do not have.

  11. @E. Harding
    South Korea, Denmark, and Uruguay, all praised for their "good contact tracing" re: COVID all now have COVID cases spiking out of control. Meanwhile, Thailand, Vietnam, New Zealand, Australia, and China all bask in the sun. Clearly shows that on the virus, elimination>containment. Meanwhile, America has one Wuhan every 2 days.

    Are the Tokyo Olympics still going to take place in 2021, even though the pandemic still hasn't been contained?

    Replies: @128, @Europe Europa, @Anatoly Karlin, @Tor597

    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus without a vaccine or continuous lock downs and economic damage.

    To my mind China’s (and others) relatively short pandemic and rapid recovery is a huge elephant in the room that no one seems to want to mention.

    • Disagree: Yevardian
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @Europe Europa

    It's almost as if centralized quarantine and universal mask wearing work.

    Replies: @g2k

    , @A123
    @Europe Europa


    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus
     
    They did not "eradicate" it. They correctly deemed it non-threatening and stopped testing for it. It is not that the disease is gone. There is simply no histrionic over reporting and panic mongering.

    It does hammer those who are both:
    -- Aged
    -- Have relevant pre-existing conditions

    WUHAN-19 is actually *less dangerous* to the young than typical flu. Only 2 deaths in this sample at less than 50 years old.
     

    https://i.redd.it/9te2zki8pom41.png
     

    A rational response would concentrate on protecting the population at risk. Not create a panic over a virtually non-existent risk to general public.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Demografie

    , @E. Harding
    @Europe Europa

    China's strategy to contain the virus was discussed here by an NYT reporter:

    https://twitter.com/MikeIsaac/status/1238604080571772928

    and here by one of China's top virologists here:

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/05/house-was-fire-top-chinese-virologist-how-china-and-us-have-met-pandemic

    Vietnam and Thailand followed similar policies (though I'm still impressed Thailand had so few cases despite being such a tourism hotspot from China and Europe). The policies described are not new -they were used in China during the Manchurian plague of 1911, and were just forgotten in the West, while remembered in China:

    https://archive.org/details/reportofinternatinte/page/250/mode/1up

    Australia did not use centralized quarantine, but was just as aggressive in its travel restrictions as China and Thailand, including banning outbound travel from apartment complexes (considered the stereotypical example of Chinese tyranny in Murica).

    @A123 .

    "In Tianjin, health workers have collected more than 2.2 million samples for testing from residents in the Binhai new district, after five locally transmitted cases were discovered there last week.

    In Manzhouli, a city of more than 200,000 people, local health authorities are testing all residents after two cases were reported on Saturday. They also shut down all schools and public venues and banned public gatherings such as banquets."

    Singapore allows mainland Chinese to enter the country without quarantine for a reason.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @AaronB
    @Europe Europa

    One can't trust anything out of China these days.

    Anyone familiar with how societies like China, Vietnam, and Thailand work, would know that they are "image" cultures - as long as the public image is good, rules and regulations are regularly broken. Westerners view this as corrupt and dishonest, but its actually just a different system with different priorities. If everyone knows what's going on, it isn't dishonest, its just a different communication style.

    Personally, I think its an extremely effective way to manage conflicting human desires, and an extremely strict and conservative public life is balanced by an extremely lax, permissive, and debauched private life. Peoples need for the security of rules and need to let free are both catered to.

    On anything that relates to image, such countries cannot be trusted. And I personally know the level of anarchy and disorganization in Vietnam abd Thailand are not compatible with any efficient centralized response lol.

    That being said, I do not see any problem with admitting that an efficient centralized system would be better at dealing with a pandemic than an anarchic democratic one, regardless of whether China did so or not.

    People should be quite clear on the benefits and drawbacks of any system they adopt. You cant have all good things in one bucket.

    You want creativity and dynamism? You have to allow a certain amount of anarchy and inefficiency. That's just the price you pay


    You want extreme efficiency and control? You won't have creativity and dynamism.

    Everything is a tradeoff, and we should be clear on exactly how. People of course can change their decisions over time, etc, and nations balance priorities differently.

    Sometimes, I feel these discussions are puerile, about which system is "better". Better for what? People have a hard time accepting there can be genuine differences in values and priorities. Instead its always a pissing contest.

    Replies: @E. Harding, @Another German Reader

    , @AnonFromTN
    @Europe Europa


    To my mind China’s (and others) relatively short pandemic and rapid recovery is a huge elephant in the room that no one seems to want to mention.
     
    This is the most politically incorrect question. Reeducation camp for you!

    Doing what the “bad guys” do would have eradicated the virus. At the same time, it would have prevented “mail voting”, the most effective tool of election fraud, thereby making the “win” by the “correct” candidate impossible. What’s more, it would deprive big Pharma of billions fleeced from the sheeple for “vaccines”. On balance, that would be a bad thing for the Deep State. Therefore, it won’t happen. Case closed.
  12. Light Humor for the Open Thread

    PEACE 😇
     

    • LOL: Voltarde
  13. @E. Harding
    South Korea, Denmark, and Uruguay, all praised for their "good contact tracing" re: COVID all now have COVID cases spiking out of control. Meanwhile, Thailand, Vietnam, New Zealand, Australia, and China all bask in the sun. Clearly shows that on the virus, elimination>containment. Meanwhile, America has one Wuhan every 2 days.

    Are the Tokyo Olympics still going to take place in 2021, even though the pandemic still hasn't been contained?

    Replies: @128, @Europe Europa, @Anatoly Karlin, @Tor597

    +1,000 cases & 20 deaths per day / 52M people isn’t “out of control” I would say.

    • Replies: @128
    @Anatoly Karlin

    It is relative to their neighbors like China. Of course compared to the manner in which your countries are running things it is still fine. But then that is like calling a turtle fast in relation to a snail.

  14. @Europe Europa
    @E. Harding

    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus without a vaccine or continuous lock downs and economic damage.

    To my mind China's (and others) relatively short pandemic and rapid recovery is a huge elephant in the room that no one seems to want to mention.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @A123, @E. Harding, @AaronB, @AnonFromTN

    It’s almost as if centralized quarantine and universal mask wearing work.

    • Replies: @g2k
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The centralised quarantine will certainly massively magnify other measures, but it was never allowed to become endemic there which seems to have made all the difference; nowhere where cases were absolutely out of control in March had successfully controlled it. As for masks; most of Europe has had the most Draconian mask laws for months and they've not stopped cases ballooning in wintertime. I wouldn't use anything less than an FFP3 (n99) to sand old paint or cut up drywall with power tools etc and, given that most of the winter spread is from aerosols, not droplets, those blue things are likely to be worse than useless. Look at this guide for spray painting safety; they're recommending an air-fed helmet to deal with dangerous aerosol particles you can't smell.

    https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/paint-safety.htm

    They could've dispensed with nonsense like outdoor mask mandates and focussed on supplying at least n95/ffp3 level masks to people inside, but that would require a level of imagination they lack. Or, once it was obvious how widespread this had become, they could've (like most other places outside Europe and blue America) focused on striking a balance between protecting lives of the vulnerable and ruining everyone elses' for months on end.

    Replies: @Max Payne

  15. @Europe Europa
    @E. Harding

    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus without a vaccine or continuous lock downs and economic damage.

    To my mind China's (and others) relatively short pandemic and rapid recovery is a huge elephant in the room that no one seems to want to mention.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @A123, @E. Harding, @AaronB, @AnonFromTN

    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus

    They did not “eradicate” it. They correctly deemed it non-threatening and stopped testing for it. It is not that the disease is gone. There is simply no histrionic over reporting and panic mongering.

    It does hammer those who are both:
    — Aged
    — Have relevant pre-existing conditions

    WUHAN-19 is actually *less dangerous* to the young than typical flu. Only 2 deaths in this sample at less than 50 years old.
     
     

    A rational response would concentrate on protecting the population at risk. Not create a panic over a virtually non-existent risk to general public.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Demografie
    @A123

    Powerful take.

  16. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    Russia banned from Tokyo Olympics and 2022 World Cup after Cas ruling

    Most Russophobic act since Operation Barbarossa.

    Westerners cannot handle doped Russian men of steel.

    https://pyxis.nymag.com/v1/imgs/308/04d/d596f4c0693744cca6d05cf9665fa59d11-16-dolph-lundgren-rocky.h467.w700.jpg

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @g2k, @Mikhail

    Given that most of the west will probably still be under covid lockdowns by then, I wouldn’t get too upset about it, or even count on them going ahead at all.

  17. @Anatoly Karlin
    @E. Harding

    +1,000 cases & 20 deaths per day / 52M people isn't "out of control" I would say.

    Replies: @128

    It is relative to their neighbors like China. Of course compared to the manner in which your countries are running things it is still fine. But then that is like calling a turtle fast in relation to a snail.

  18. @128
    @prime noticer

    If that is really the case, why is not China banned, when was the last time Russia came anywhere close to the total US tally?

    Replies: @Shortsword

    Western relations with China soured several years after they did with Russia. It’s very likely that we’ll start seeing similar doping accusations against China soon. But it will be significantly harder to ban China outright.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
    @Shortsword

    Highly doubtful as the Chinese will have their first crop of genetically engineered athletes soon. They won’t need to dope, and the neocon establishment will likely try to get them banned for that reason.

  19. @Europe Europa
    @E. Harding

    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus without a vaccine or continuous lock downs and economic damage.

    To my mind China's (and others) relatively short pandemic and rapid recovery is a huge elephant in the room that no one seems to want to mention.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @A123, @E. Harding, @AaronB, @AnonFromTN

    China’s strategy to contain the virus was discussed here by an NYT reporter:

    and here by one of China’s top virologists here:

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/05/house-was-fire-top-chinese-virologist-how-china-and-us-have-met-pandemic

    Vietnam and Thailand followed similar policies (though I’m still impressed Thailand had so few cases despite being such a tourism hotspot from China and Europe). The policies described are not new -they were used in China during the Manchurian plague of 1911, and were just forgotten in the West, while remembered in China:

    https://archive.org/details/reportofinternatinte/page/250/mode/1up

    Australia did not use centralized quarantine, but was just as aggressive in its travel restrictions as China and Thailand, including banning outbound travel from apartment complexes (considered the stereotypical example of Chinese tyranny in Murica).

    .

    “In Tianjin, health workers have collected more than 2.2 million samples for testing from residents in the Binhai new district, after five locally transmitted cases were discovered there last week.

    In Manzhouli, a city of more than 200,000 people, local health authorities are testing all residents after two cases were reported on Saturday. They also shut down all schools and public venues and banned public gatherings such as banquets.”

    Singapore allows mainland Chinese to enter the country without quarantine for a reason.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @E. Harding

    So - what do you do with all of this? Donal McNeil's insights - what would it take to realize them in WEstern societies? - To change the law in the first place? - The our mentality. And how long would that take?
    The Swiss and the Swedes chose a different path and are doing not so bad up until this day. It is clearly a dangerous and adventurous trip they are on though. I'm still thrilled by their actions - and their fate, really.

    Hail has a very informed look at the actual situation in Sweden:

    https://hailtoyou.wordpress.com/2020/11/29/against-the-corona-panic-part-xix-wuhan-corona-vs-previous-flu-waves-sweden-quantified-on-near-final-data-for-2020/#comment-47231

  20. based

    • Agree: AltanBakshi, Not Raul
    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Shortsword

    Chen Weihua is based indeed.

    Replies: @128

  21. I am really hoping that this is a joke…. And, suspicious that it is not.

    PEACE 😇
     

  22. @Anatoly Karlin
    @Europe Europa

    It's almost as if centralized quarantine and universal mask wearing work.

    Replies: @g2k

    The centralised quarantine will certainly massively magnify other measures, but it was never allowed to become endemic there which seems to have made all the difference; nowhere where cases were absolutely out of control in March had successfully controlled it. As for masks; most of Europe has had the most Draconian mask laws for months and they’ve not stopped cases ballooning in wintertime. I wouldn’t use anything less than an FFP3 (n99) to sand old paint or cut up drywall with power tools etc and, given that most of the winter spread is from aerosols, not droplets, those blue things are likely to be worse than useless. Look at this guide for spray painting safety; they’re recommending an air-fed helmet to deal with dangerous aerosol particles you can’t smell.

    https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/paint-safety.htm

    They could’ve dispensed with nonsense like outdoor mask mandates and focussed on supplying at least n95/ffp3 level masks to people inside, but that would require a level of imagination they lack. Or, once it was obvious how widespread this had become, they could’ve (like most other places outside Europe and blue America) focused on striking a balance between protecting lives of the vulnerable and ruining everyone elses’ for months on end.

    • Replies: @Max Payne
    @g2k

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-lYEdtv4FyTE/X9zwCd7o6tI/AAAAAAAAHFE/jNWL-95u0IgqCUw_VjSuaglOPKKlTePyACLcBGAsYHQ/s16000/maskmeme.jpg

  23. @Shortsword
    https://twitter.com/chenweihua/status/1339485742981115906

    based

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Chen Weihua is based indeed.

    • Replies: @128
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    I think it will be beneath the US State Department to show footage and pictures of the Sino Japanese war but ymmv.

  24. https://sialmirzagoraya.medium.com/sangat-and-society-the-sikh-remaking-of-the-north-indian-public-sphere-c655ad7c72fa

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @sher singh

    When Singhs are gonna stop larping and make Khalsa real deal again?

    I am still waiting for militaristic Sikh theocracy in Hindustan waging eternal war against Mlecchas and Turks.

    Replies: @sher singh

  25. @Shortsword
    @128

    Western relations with China soured several years after they did with Russia. It's very likely that we'll start seeing similar doping accusations against China soon. But it will be significantly harder to ban China outright.

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

    Highly doubtful as the Chinese will have their first crop of genetically engineered athletes soon. They won’t need to dope, and the neocon establishment will likely try to get them banned for that reason.

  26. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Shortsword

    Chen Weihua is based indeed.

    Replies: @128

    I think it will be beneath the US State Department to show footage and pictures of the Sino Japanese war but ymmv.

  27. @Europe Europa
    @E. Harding

    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus without a vaccine or continuous lock downs and economic damage.

    To my mind China's (and others) relatively short pandemic and rapid recovery is a huge elephant in the room that no one seems to want to mention.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @A123, @E. Harding, @AaronB, @AnonFromTN

    One can’t trust anything out of China these days.

    Anyone familiar with how societies like China, Vietnam, and Thailand work, would know that they are “image” cultures – as long as the public image is good, rules and regulations are regularly broken. Westerners view this as corrupt and dishonest, but its actually just a different system with different priorities. If everyone knows what’s going on, it isn’t dishonest, its just a different communication style.

    Personally, I think its an extremely effective way to manage conflicting human desires, and an extremely strict and conservative public life is balanced by an extremely lax, permissive, and debauched private life. Peoples need for the security of rules and need to let free are both catered to.

    On anything that relates to image, such countries cannot be trusted. And I personally know the level of anarchy and disorganization in Vietnam abd Thailand are not compatible with any efficient centralized response lol.

    That being said, I do not see any problem with admitting that an efficient centralized system would be better at dealing with a pandemic than an anarchic democratic one, regardless of whether China did so or not.

    People should be quite clear on the benefits and drawbacks of any system they adopt. You cant have all good things in one bucket.

    You want creativity and dynamism? You have to allow a certain amount of anarchy and inefficiency. That’s just the price you pay

    You want extreme efficiency and control? You won’t have creativity and dynamism.

    Everything is a tradeoff, and we should be clear on exactly how. People of course can change their decisions over time, etc, and nations balance priorities differently.

    Sometimes, I feel these discussions are puerile, about which system is “better”. Better for what? People have a hard time accepting there can be genuine differences in values and priorities. Instead its always a pissing contest.

    • Replies: @E. Harding
    @AaronB

    Again, why does Singapore allow Chinese and Vietnamese in without quarantine? And why is Thailand so extremely careful (far more than Cuba) about opening up to the world?

    Replies: @AaronB

    , @Another German Reader
    @AaronB

    Biden did not win and Western strategy towards the pandemic is not working.

    Deal with it!

  28. @sher singh
    https://sialmirzagoraya.medium.com/sangat-and-society-the-sikh-remaking-of-the-north-indian-public-sphere-c655ad7c72fa

    https://twitter.com/amaanbali/status/1312014888546443266

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    When Singhs are gonna stop larping and make Khalsa real deal again?

    I am still waiting for militaristic Sikh theocracy in Hindustan waging eternal war against Mlecchas and Turks.

    • Troll: sher singh
    • Replies: @sher singh
    @AltanBakshi

    Do u want to get stabbed?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  29. Has Russian considered partnering with the Chinese in HSR or Maglev production?

  30. The game of YouTube Challenge “Get Joe Biden to nuke something” that i described a while ago is progressing on schedule. Currently, Russia is the winning “something”, as predicted.

    That SolarWinds hack is being spun as “virtual declaration of war by Russia on the US”. And its a bipartisan affair, from Durbin, Illinois Democrat, to Nikki Haley, Republican.

    They did same with Russiagate, but Democrats must be seen as tougher on Russia than Trump for domestic narrative purposes, I think escalation will be substantial and reckless – we don’t have senile President by chance. Russia may want to keep those Bulava tests going, to cool the hot heads, just in case.

  31. @g2k
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The centralised quarantine will certainly massively magnify other measures, but it was never allowed to become endemic there which seems to have made all the difference; nowhere where cases were absolutely out of control in March had successfully controlled it. As for masks; most of Europe has had the most Draconian mask laws for months and they've not stopped cases ballooning in wintertime. I wouldn't use anything less than an FFP3 (n99) to sand old paint or cut up drywall with power tools etc and, given that most of the winter spread is from aerosols, not droplets, those blue things are likely to be worse than useless. Look at this guide for spray painting safety; they're recommending an air-fed helmet to deal with dangerous aerosol particles you can't smell.

    https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/paint-safety.htm

    They could've dispensed with nonsense like outdoor mask mandates and focussed on supplying at least n95/ffp3 level masks to people inside, but that would require a level of imagination they lack. Or, once it was obvious how widespread this had become, they could've (like most other places outside Europe and blue America) focused on striking a balance between protecting lives of the vulnerable and ruining everyone elses' for months on end.

    Replies: @Max Payne

  32. @Europe Europa
    @E. Harding

    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus without a vaccine or continuous lock downs and economic damage.

    To my mind China's (and others) relatively short pandemic and rapid recovery is a huge elephant in the room that no one seems to want to mention.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @A123, @E. Harding, @AaronB, @AnonFromTN

    To my mind China’s (and others) relatively short pandemic and rapid recovery is a huge elephant in the room that no one seems to want to mention.

    This is the most politically incorrect question. Reeducation camp for you!

    Doing what the “bad guys” do would have eradicated the virus. At the same time, it would have prevented “mail voting”, the most effective tool of election fraud, thereby making the “win” by the “correct” candidate impossible. What’s more, it would deprive big Pharma of billions fleeced from the sheeple for “vaccines”. On balance, that would be a bad thing for the Deep State. Therefore, it won’t happen. Case closed.

  33. When it comes to engineering, for some reason males and females tend to have a 1:1 ratio in chemical engineering, compared to mechanical engineering or computer science.

    • Replies: @mal
    @Znzn

    Chicks like chemistry.

    Replies: @Znzn

    , @AP
    @Znzn

    Chemistry is like cooking. My wife is not a chemist but she loves to cook; chemistry was her favourite science and the one she was best at.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

  34. At this point – with there being a cornucopia of tranny-focused holiday ads, overflowing with Africans with miscegenated parents and grandparents – unleashing an anti-woke AI would be worth the risks, IMO.

  35. @AaronB
    @Europe Europa

    One can't trust anything out of China these days.

    Anyone familiar with how societies like China, Vietnam, and Thailand work, would know that they are "image" cultures - as long as the public image is good, rules and regulations are regularly broken. Westerners view this as corrupt and dishonest, but its actually just a different system with different priorities. If everyone knows what's going on, it isn't dishonest, its just a different communication style.

    Personally, I think its an extremely effective way to manage conflicting human desires, and an extremely strict and conservative public life is balanced by an extremely lax, permissive, and debauched private life. Peoples need for the security of rules and need to let free are both catered to.

    On anything that relates to image, such countries cannot be trusted. And I personally know the level of anarchy and disorganization in Vietnam abd Thailand are not compatible with any efficient centralized response lol.

    That being said, I do not see any problem with admitting that an efficient centralized system would be better at dealing with a pandemic than an anarchic democratic one, regardless of whether China did so or not.

    People should be quite clear on the benefits and drawbacks of any system they adopt. You cant have all good things in one bucket.

    You want creativity and dynamism? You have to allow a certain amount of anarchy and inefficiency. That's just the price you pay


    You want extreme efficiency and control? You won't have creativity and dynamism.

    Everything is a tradeoff, and we should be clear on exactly how. People of course can change their decisions over time, etc, and nations balance priorities differently.

    Sometimes, I feel these discussions are puerile, about which system is "better". Better for what? People have a hard time accepting there can be genuine differences in values and priorities. Instead its always a pissing contest.

    Replies: @E. Harding, @Another German Reader

    Again, why does Singapore allow Chinese and Vietnamese in without quarantine? And why is Thailand so extremely careful (far more than Cuba) about opening up to the world?

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @E. Harding

    I have no clue.

    I think much of what's being done here is for show across the board. I suspect Singapore is willing to participate in whatever the global standard is without rocking the boat.

    Currently, that means trusting the numbers coming out of each nation. Certainly, Singapore isn't sending investogatin teams to other countries to verify anything.

    But I should say I'm not really invested in the idea that these countries are fudging numbers. Personally, having been to all three, I can only smile. But I too don't care to rock the system on this. The sooner a feeling of security is manufactured in the unthinking masses the sooner I can travel. However the elites choose to do this is immaterial to me.

    I think the more interesting point is about the choice of systems, positives, tradeoffs, etc

  36. @E. Harding
    South Korea, Denmark, and Uruguay, all praised for their "good contact tracing" re: COVID all now have COVID cases spiking out of control. Meanwhile, Thailand, Vietnam, New Zealand, Australia, and China all bask in the sun. Clearly shows that on the virus, elimination>containment. Meanwhile, America has one Wuhan every 2 days.

    Are the Tokyo Olympics still going to take place in 2021, even though the pandemic still hasn't been contained?

    Replies: @128, @Europe Europa, @Anatoly Karlin, @Tor597

    South Korea has had spikes before, the point is that they have shown the ability to contain and manage their outbreaks.

    They are better prepared to contain now than they were earlier in the year.

    • Replies: @E. Harding
    @Tor597

    Not the case; the previous spikes were short and were always correlated with some easily identifiable events. This wave has been going on for more than a month and has been increasingly decentralized in households around the capital city. This makes the current outbreak a lot more difficult to contain than any earlier in the year. There is a way to contain this outbreak -travel restrictions around neighborhoods with virus spikes, testing everyone in those neighborhoods, and only opening them up when cases in them get to zero -but South Korea hasn't done internal travel restrictions at any point during the COVID epidemic, and universal testing in neighborhoods seems too ambitious for it. It seems content to become the next Germany. Ultimately, however, vaccines will save it, anyway, much as they will Russia and the United States.

    Replies: @Tor597

  37. @Znzn
    When it comes to engineering, for some reason males and females tend to have a 1:1 ratio in chemical engineering, compared to mechanical engineering or computer science.

    Replies: @mal, @AP

    Chicks like chemistry.

    • Replies: @Znzn
    @mal

    I actually find basic chemistry less intuitive than basic physics, since you can see physics in action in front of you.

    Replies: @mal

  38. Heard an interesting theory the other day about Indians and spicy food:

    [MORE]

    They are so used to eating rotten food that they are genetically adapted to it, and their sense of taste has been dialed down accordingly, so they need stronger flavors to enjoy food.

    Honestly, I am a bit skeptical of it. I believe that many socio-historical theories, including this one about Indians and rotten food, are too influenced by modern life – in this case, the fact that refrigeration is common today, and we have difficulty believing in such things as extended-kin networks.

    Personally, I don’t believe that Indians would kill a goat and then eat it, over the coarse of a few days, while it rotted – I don’t think that makes sense. I think they might have killed a goat, cut in in half, then given the other half to their brother’s family, with the expectation that he would respond in kind on the right feast day.

    Though, having said that, I think it would be interesting to delve into the genetics of Untouchables, and see whether they have any special adaptations for living in sewage-filled gutters and consuming refuse.

    • Troll: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    Oky, I get it. I too enjoy a simple dish of herring and boiled potatoes with a bit of melted butter and dill chipped finely on top. But why this incessant rant against spicy, hot foods? Did you perhaps get your tongue burned off one time in a Thai restaurant? :-)

    Replies: @songbird

    , @Svevlad
    @songbird

    nah it's just that people love to put stuff in our food and indians had the most stuff to put in it

    , @utu
    @songbird


    theory the other day about Indians and spicy food
     
    Food bacteria-spice survey shows why some cultures like it hot
    https://news.cornell.edu/stories/1998/03/food-bacteria-spice-survey-shows-why-some-cultures-it-hot

    Capsicums are not high on the list on the antimicrobial properties. They would no have a role in making eating spoiled food safer. Blocking bad taste and smell is dubious.

    There is no explanation why not everywhere in Central American or tropical South America capsicums are used. Nicaragua has as bland cuisine as Norway. Why not everywhere in South East Asia? So the the high temperature theory of the cooling effect by sweating is dubious.

    Capsicums area relatively recent addition to India, Thai and Sichuan cuisines. They did not have anything that hot before. Why did they get hooked on it? Hooked might be a right term as there is the addiction factor.

    The masochistic pleasure from eating hot capsicums is not considered in the article. How to maximize the effect of endorphin release to have the highest high of the longest duration by eating hot capsicums in the meal?

    Mexicans (chiefly males) like taking a small bites of fresh hot jalapeno during a meal (not with every bite) to get occasional spikes and rushes of endorphins and to get the psychological boost from the display of their machismo. The pleasure of oscillatory stimulus might be greater than from a constants stimulus at saturation level.

    Machismo element was the chief factor behind the trend that began in the US among young males population to like hot sauces and Mexican food. The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary.

    Thais while eating very hot meals sometimes have uncontrollable release of tears that may give a sense of catharsis. This is similar to the fictional scene of eating raw onions by Germans to induce tears to have a sense of the act of contrition for their sins in Gunter Grass novel.

    The spectrum between good and bad chefs and foods in hot spicy cuisine is narrow and thus more egalitarian which appeals to hoi polloi.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @songbird

    , @Thulean Friend
    @songbird


    Heard an interesting theory the other day about Indians and spicy food:

    They are so used to eating rotten food that they are genetically adapted to it, and their sense of taste has been dialed down accordingly, so they need stronger flavors to enjoy food.
     

    I think it has more to do with broader cultural preferences. You can see it in music or even in social interactions. Brown people tend to be louder, more aggressive. This is reflected in everything from food to how loud they are when talking or music choices.

    I think of these cultures as 'extroverted' whereas North-Western and North-Eastern cultures tend to be "introverted" and have more mellow cultural mores, with a greater emphasis on humility and toned down social codes. Law of Jante didn't come out of nowhere.

    The extroverted cultures are more interesting on a surface level, they draw your attention whether you like it or not whereas the introverted cultures requires a finer-grained appreciation of the more sophisticated matters in life, where subtle cues and what is often not said can matter as much as to what is.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @sher singh
    @songbird

    Indians won't even eat breakfast leftovers for lunch, Europoors stay trollin cuz their food sucks||

    Replies: @Another German Reader, @songbird

  39. @E. Harding
    @AaronB

    Again, why does Singapore allow Chinese and Vietnamese in without quarantine? And why is Thailand so extremely careful (far more than Cuba) about opening up to the world?

    Replies: @AaronB

    I have no clue.

    I think much of what’s being done here is for show across the board. I suspect Singapore is willing to participate in whatever the global standard is without rocking the boat.

    Currently, that means trusting the numbers coming out of each nation. Certainly, Singapore isn’t sending investogatin teams to other countries to verify anything.

    But I should say I’m not really invested in the idea that these countries are fudging numbers. Personally, having been to all three, I can only smile. But I too don’t care to rock the system on this. The sooner a feeling of security is manufactured in the unthinking masses the sooner I can travel. However the elites choose to do this is immaterial to me.

    I think the more interesting point is about the choice of systems, positives, tradeoffs, etc

  40. @Tor597
    @E. Harding

    South Korea has had spikes before, the point is that they have shown the ability to contain and manage their outbreaks.

    They are better prepared to contain now than they were earlier in the year.

    Replies: @E. Harding

    Not the case; the previous spikes were short and were always correlated with some easily identifiable events. This wave has been going on for more than a month and has been increasingly decentralized in households around the capital city. This makes the current outbreak a lot more difficult to contain than any earlier in the year. There is a way to contain this outbreak -travel restrictions around neighborhoods with virus spikes, testing everyone in those neighborhoods, and only opening them up when cases in them get to zero -but South Korea hasn’t done internal travel restrictions at any point during the COVID epidemic, and universal testing in neighborhoods seems too ambitious for it. It seems content to become the next Germany. Ultimately, however, vaccines will save it, anyway, much as they will Russia and the United States.

    • Replies: @Tor597
    @E. Harding

    At this phase, it will be harder for all countries to contain the virus because we are still in the early part of winter as opposed to March when it was just starting to warm up.

    Plus S. Korea is stupidly is letting people in from Anglo countries who don't care to wear masks.

    Aside from spikes here and there I fully expect them to be able to contain the outbreak.

  41. The vaccine is probably intended to genocide whites, the claim that blacks and other non-whites are more vulnerable and will be prioritised for the vaccine, in the UK at least, is reverse psychology I think intended to one, make whites believe that the vaccine ISN’T targeted specifically at them, and two, make whites feel lucky when they’re offered the vaccine and therefore more likely to accept it.

    This ongoing pandemic has really summed up the state of white countries, especially Britain. Native British people have fallen hook, line and sinker for such obvious nonsense, it really is no wonder that they also fell hook, line and sinker for mass immigration and agendas like race mixing. Native British people are so far gone that I’m convinced a significant percentage of them would walk into the death camps willingly if they were told that it was for the good of (non-white) humanity.

    Most whites, especially native British, happily accept blacks screaming hatred at them and literally calling for them to be killed and genocided and don’t react at all, yet would be horrified if a white said even 10% of what they usually do back. Such a weak, passive and spiritless people like that are inevitably going to be slaughtered.

    Britain and other Northern European whites are in an especially precarious situation, because they still retain a lot of “old money” that the “globalists” and non-whites want to get their hands on, but are too passive and weak to defend it and themselves and are so cucked that they see importing non-whites who hate them as a virtue, or at least see it as totally unacceptable to openly oppose it.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Europe Europa

    My cold and spiteful reason is saying to me that you Anglos deserve your fate, after all you forced lots of this modernist bs upon other civilizations, but my heart is sad for your present state.

    I think my heart is winning, I cant feel petty joy for your defeat, even though you made all that Russia would stagnate in the 19th century, and that Ottomans could rule for little longer Christians of the Balkans.
    (And the downfall of Qing China, actually thats quite bad crime...)

    I sincerely hope that one day merry old England of your fathers will return! But this time without any smug mission to civilize others! At least you have more hope than Americans! Because there old majority will be minority in 2040~, but in England only in about 2060 or something, so you still have time.

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @songbird

  42. @Europe Europa
    The vaccine is probably intended to genocide whites, the claim that blacks and other non-whites are more vulnerable and will be prioritised for the vaccine, in the UK at least, is reverse psychology I think intended to one, make whites believe that the vaccine ISN'T targeted specifically at them, and two, make whites feel lucky when they're offered the vaccine and therefore more likely to accept it.

    This ongoing pandemic has really summed up the state of white countries, especially Britain. Native British people have fallen hook, line and sinker for such obvious nonsense, it really is no wonder that they also fell hook, line and sinker for mass immigration and agendas like race mixing. Native British people are so far gone that I'm convinced a significant percentage of them would walk into the death camps willingly if they were told that it was for the good of (non-white) humanity.

    Most whites, especially native British, happily accept blacks screaming hatred at them and literally calling for them to be killed and genocided and don't react at all, yet would be horrified if a white said even 10% of what they usually do back. Such a weak, passive and spiritless people like that are inevitably going to be slaughtered.

    Britain and other Northern European whites are in an especially precarious situation, because they still retain a lot of "old money" that the "globalists" and non-whites want to get their hands on, but are too passive and weak to defend it and themselves and are so cucked that they see importing non-whites who hate them as a virtue, or at least see it as totally unacceptable to openly oppose it.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    My cold and spiteful reason is saying to me that you Anglos deserve your fate, after all you forced lots of this modernist bs upon other civilizations, but my heart is sad for your present state.

    I think my heart is winning, I cant feel petty joy for your defeat, even though you made all that Russia would stagnate in the 19th century, and that Ottomans could rule for little longer Christians of the Balkans.
    (And the downfall of Qing China, actually thats quite bad crime…)

    I sincerely hope that one day merry old England of your fathers will return! But this time without any smug mission to civilize others! At least you have more hope than Americans! Because there old majority will be minority in 2040~, but in England only in about 2060 or something, so you still have time.

    • Agree: Tor597
    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    The sort of sentiment to be expected from a demon-worshipper.

    , @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I think all this Anglo stuff is pretty overblown. For one thing, a lot of the push for British Empire, a lot of the top leadership, came from Scotland. Of course, the Scottish are related, but these political decisions came from the elite, who are distant from the common people. It does not seem to be a question of ethnicity, in this case, but one of political gangsterism.

    So, where does this conception of "Anglos" that people have come from? Well, I'll answer. Britain was the first state to industrialize. And it was an island, so it carried a lot of trade. That made London the largest city in the world. Today, because of this heritage, it is one of the world's leading financial centers.

    And as we all know, cities and wealthy places are bastions of corruption. (and banking generally) Probably, nobody understands all the dynamics at play, but America's decline seems to have clearly been led by urbanites. Probably, blacks started to vote Democrat, after their smarter elite began to move into Northern cities, and were recruited to be small parts of machine coalitions.

    Replies: @AltanB, @Coconuts, @Europe Europa

  43. Interesting physiognomy on the soldier in the foreground.

    • Replies: @melanf
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    In mass armies, you can find any types. Here the Soviet officer the same time

    https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/vazhskiy/14498672/16264/16264_640.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Europe Europa, @Znzn, @Mr. Hack

    , @Mr. Hack
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    The fellow in the foreground looks like every village's Schmulik, but the officer in the background looks like Sergey Lavrov. But it couldn't be him right, for the photo looks like WWII vintage and the photo below is current date?:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/%28Sergey_Lavrov%29_2019_Comprehensive_Test-Ban_Treaty_Article_XIV_Conference_%2848832045357%29_%28cropped%29.jpg/220px-%28Sergey_Lavrov%29_2019_Comprehensive_Test-Ban_Treaty_Article_XIV_Conference_%2848832045357%29_%28cropped%29.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/FWn2NzC/Wehrmacht.jpg
    They're both even wearing wire rim glasses? :-)

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

  44. Nobody here phased or interested at all in U.S. State department claims that Russian hackers have once again launched another, larger and scarier cyber attack aimed at other countries too besides the US? The talking heads can’t seem to stop talking about it over all of the news outlets here. Business as usual, as far as I can see. 🙂

    • Replies: @mal
    @Mr. Hack

    Hey, what am I, chopped liver? :)

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @Shortsword
    @Mr. Hack

    They're pushing this one pretty hard like it's something big. But Russia has been accused of committing cyber crimes and hacking constantly for the last few years so why should people care especially much this time? Russia is apparently also assassinating American soldiers in Afghanistan and using top secret microwave guns to fry the brains of CIA agents. Is another Russian hacking even worth putting on the news?

    These stories come and go really fast. There's been so much crying wolf that each of these stories have very short lasting impact so they need to come up with new bizarre accusations constantly.

  45. @Mr. Hack
    Nobody here phased or interested at all in U.S. State department claims that Russian hackers have once again launched another, larger and scarier cyber attack aimed at other countries too besides the US? The talking heads can't seem to stop talking about it over all of the news outlets here. Business as usual, as far as I can see. :-)

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59096f36c14b3c606c107b66/master/pass/100510_r19603_p646.jpg

    Replies: @mal, @Shortsword

    Hey, what am I, chopped liver? 🙂

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @mal

    "Solar Winds hack"? Sounds like a family member of mine too. How embarrassing. Beside, chopped liver is good once in a while. Just saying, don't project and label me a Zionist though. :-)

  46. @songbird
    Heard an interesting theory the other day about Indians and spicy food:

    They are so used to eating rotten food that they are genetically adapted to it, and their sense of taste has been dialed down accordingly, so they need stronger flavors to enjoy food.

    Honestly, I am a bit skeptical of it. I believe that many socio-historical theories, including this one about Indians and rotten food, are too influenced by modern life - in this case, the fact that refrigeration is common today, and we have difficulty believing in such things as extended-kin networks.

    Personally, I don't believe that Indians would kill a goat and then eat it, over the coarse of a few days, while it rotted - I don't think that makes sense. I think they might have killed a goat, cut in in half, then given the other half to their brother's family, with the expectation that he would respond in kind on the right feast day.

    Though, having said that, I think it would be interesting to delve into the genetics of Untouchables, and see whether they have any special adaptations for living in sewage-filled gutters and consuming refuse.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Svevlad, @utu, @Thulean Friend, @sher singh

    Oky, I get it. I too enjoy a simple dish of herring and boiled potatoes with a bit of melted butter and dill chipped finely on top. But why this incessant rant against spicy, hot foods? Did you perhaps get your tongue burned off one time in a Thai restaurant? 🙂

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Mr. Hack

    Have only eaten in a Thai restaurant once. Wasn't a great restaurant, to be honest, so I feel I can't judge the food nationally, on one experience. Don't know about Thai food in general, but what I ordered wasn't spicy. Though, to be honest - I don't like spicy food.

    I consider HBD discussions of food to be legitimate and highly appropriate to this forum. We know that the gut is just about the #1 thing that varies genetically between different people, since many of the adaptions we know about are in this area.

    Regarding rotten food: I guess if you cook it thoroughly that would kill the bacteria in it and leave you only with the chemicals that resulted from molecular breakdown. Maybe, that makes it a lot safer to eat, even though it would taste terrible? And, of course, in some climates, things go bad quite quickly.

    Regarding the Untouchables - as we know, some are tasked with removing human waste. This can be a very up close experience - I've heard of them scraping it off the ground with short tools, like flattened tin cans. I don't think it is inconceivable that if they did this for hundreds of years, it might have affected their DNA. And, maybe, made them more resistant to certain diseases.

    Chinese and Japanese seem to eat a lot of weird things, BTW, without necessarily being in a tropical environment. Actually, Mongolians eat some pretty weird stuff - don't they?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  47. @mal
    @Mr. Hack

    Hey, what am I, chopped liver? :)

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    “Solar Winds hack”? Sounds like a family member of mine too. How embarrassing. Beside, chopped liver is good once in a while. Just saying, don’t project and label me a Zionist though. 🙂

  48. @Mr. Hack
    Nobody here phased or interested at all in U.S. State department claims that Russian hackers have once again launched another, larger and scarier cyber attack aimed at other countries too besides the US? The talking heads can't seem to stop talking about it over all of the news outlets here. Business as usual, as far as I can see. :-)

    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/59096f36c14b3c606c107b66/master/pass/100510_r19603_p646.jpg

    Replies: @mal, @Shortsword

    They’re pushing this one pretty hard like it’s something big. But Russia has been accused of committing cyber crimes and hacking constantly for the last few years so why should people care especially much this time? Russia is apparently also assassinating American soldiers in Afghanistan and using top secret microwave guns to fry the brains of CIA agents. Is another Russian hacking even worth putting on the news?

    These stories come and go really fast. There’s been so much crying wolf that each of these stories have very short lasting impact so they need to come up with new bizarre accusations constantly.

  49. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    https://i.ibb.co/FWn2NzC/Wehrmacht.jpg

    Interesting physiognomy on the soldier in the foreground.

    Replies: @melanf, @Mr. Hack

    In mass armies, you can find any types. Here the Soviet officer the same time

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @melanf

    Sorry to nitpick, but that man has epaulettes, which were introduced to Red Army after the start of the great Patriotic war, in the 20s and 30s they were cursed symbol of Czarist armies.

    Therefore there is a greater chance that your man is heroic defender of the Motherland and that those two other army guys are part of the system that oppresses the enemies of the "proletariat."

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    , @Europe Europa
    @melanf

    I recall reading that the first waves of Soviet soldiers to arrive in Berlin and take control of parts of the city were largely ethnic Slavs, and on the whole didn't treat German civilians that badly. Apparently it was the later waves of troops from more far-flung parts of the Soviet Union, a high percentage of whom were non-white, who committed the Rape of Berlin, encouraged by rabidly anti-white Jewish commanders and politicians.

    No idea if there's any truth to that, or whether that is just white nationalist-style revisionism.

    Replies: @melanf, @Gerard.Gerard

    , @Znzn
    @melanf

    Sebastian Vettel?

    Replies: @A123

    , @Mr. Hack
    @melanf

    A photo of Thorfinnsson perhaps? He reappeared for a short juncture in November, just in time for the presidential elections, and then disappeared again. Personally, I think that he had a short relapse and then went back into his 10 step program at his local Karlinaholics Anonymous chapter? :-)

  50. @melanf
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    In mass armies, you can find any types. Here the Soviet officer the same time

    https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/vazhskiy/14498672/16264/16264_640.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Europe Europa, @Znzn, @Mr. Hack

    Sorry to nitpick, but that man has epaulettes, which were introduced to Red Army after the start of the great Patriotic war, in the 20s and 30s they were cursed symbol of Czarist armies.

    Therefore there is a greater chance that your man is heroic defender of the Motherland and that those two other army guys are part of the system that oppresses the enemies of the “proletariat.”

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @AltanBakshi

    Stalin brought back epaulettes during the war, as you said, and that uniform is very '40s era Soviet. Do you believe all the square-jawed blondes were murdered and just reappeared in the '90s?

  51. Great news in science! Cosmic Crisis gets worse! (its a good thing).

    https://www.quantamagazine.org/astronomers-get-their-wish-and-the-hubble-crisis-gets-worse-20201217

    Another measurement for Hubble Constant (the thing that tells you how fast the universe is expanding) is in and it is… 73.2 km/s/megaparsec. Older predicted value is 67. The more measurements we take the more statistical validity higher values gain (they are all clustering around low 70’s rather than high 60’s).

    We care about that because that’s how we know the age of the universe. The higher the value of acceleration rate the younger the universe. Just like when you drive the car from point A to point B, the harder you accelerate the shorter amount time it will take you to complete the trip.

    Hubble Constant value of 67 corresponds to about 14 billion year old universe. Hubble Constant value of 73 is more like 12-13 billion years old universe.

    This matters because we are also refining our ability to measure the age of the stars. And there are stars (Methuselah) nearby that are 14+ billion years old, and our statistical confidence in that number is increasing as well.

    So either we don’t understand how local spacetime works and how stars can time travel in our neighborhood, or we don’t understand how stellar fusion physics works and how elements are created, and at what rates.

    Either way, if we figure this out, it will be a scientific revolution the likes of which we haven’t seen before. It will be either pocket fusion reactors for everybody, or DeLorean style time travel machines and warp drives. Either way, it is going to be huge.

    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    • Thanks: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Menschmaschine
    @mal

    Actually, these observational problems are not particularly remarkable in comparison to others that have been known for a long time. This gives me a splendid excuse to reuse a text I wrote some time ago in response to an article (https://www.unz.com/estriker/jewish-brilliance-synthetic-like-zirconia/):

    The continuing dominance of GR is a huge problem for physics, since the relativistic conceptual base of both special and general relativity is almost certainly a fundamentally wrong model of physical reality.

    Let’s take a look at the development of relativity: The assumption in the 19th century was that light is a wave that is traveling through a hypothetical ether, analogous to sound waves through a medium like air or water. The famous Michelson-Morey experiment tested this assumption by comparing the time needed for light to propagate a certain distance both in the direction of the movement of the earth around the sun and that perpendicular to it. The expectation was that the times would be different, since in the direction of the movement the rate of the movement would be either added or subtracted to the speed of the light. In fact, however, the times were identical. The solution proposed by Lorentz was the assumption that the measurement apparatus did undergo a small compensating length contraction in the direction of the movement. Later experiments like that by Rayleigh and Brace made it clear that in addition also clocks would need to run slower.


    In 1905 Einstein proposed his own alternative Theory of Special Relativity. He took the principle of relativity found by Lorentz (with some help by Poincare) and instead of deriving it as a result made it the point of departure for his own theory. Mathematically, both theories are identical and so can’t be distinguished experimentally. But the metaphysical picture is very different: The Lorentzian Ether Theory still assumes an absolute 3-dimensional space with an absolute time, which is filled with the ether.

    In contrast, Special Relativity postulates that time and space (or spacetime as it is called in relativistic jargon) themselves are changing, i.e. that not objects, but space itself shrinks or expands and that time itself really runs faster or slower, not only physical processes. The principle of relativity leads to such headscratchers like the famous twin paradoxon, where the sibling that travels close to light speed is younger when returning than the one that stays at home, but no intuitive reason why this should be so - if everything is relative, why wouldn’t it be equally valid to consider the first twin as immobile? No such issues exist under Lorentzian Ether Theory, since there is an absolute frame of reference and so it is always clear which one of the two is changing his speed in relation to the ether.

    A common criticism against the Lorentz Ether Theory was the assertion that it is quite a coincidence that the length shrinks by exactly the value required to make a movement through the ether undetectable. However, it is not difficult to understand why such effects as length contraction and time dilation should happen, but not be detectable locally, if one does not assume, like early ether theories, that matter is something separate from the ether but instead that it is a part of it - like defects in the lattice structure of a crystal. It is naturally difficult to detect something you and your measurement apparatus are part of. Lorentz was also able to show that at least for electromagnetism both effects could be derived from the Maxwell equations that had been found earlier.

    But then Einstein came out in 1915 with the General Theory of Relativity, which sealed the triumph of relativity by providing a supposedly highly successful description of gravity. Whereas in Special Relativity spacetime had been considered as uniform, General Relativity now introduced gravity in the form of distortions in the spacetime fabric. However, this only works up to a certain scale - as soon as we go beyond galactic dimensions, General Relativity does not work anymore at all, the movement of galaxies is very different to that predicted by General Relativity. To correct for this, vast amounts of mysterious “Dark matter” have to be hypothesized. Despite much effort, any attempt to actually detect any of this hypothetical “Dark Matter” has failed.

    Another issue is the expansion of the universe; it was discovered in 1998 that, contrary to General Relativity, the universe does not only expand, but that this expansion is accelerating. For this another Ad Hoc hypothesis, the even more mysterious “Dark Energy” had to be made up. It is of course always possible to immunize a theory with enough Ad Hoc crutches, but when this “Dark Energy” is supposed to be 68% and “Dark Matter” 27% of the universe with only 5% left for actually observable matter it gets rather implausible.

    There are other highly problematic issues like the emergence of singularities as a consequence of the collapse of large stars, with all the seemingly intractable problems like information loss that this entails. Some scientists therefore see the appearance of singularities as a mathematical artefact and don’t think that it really happens in reality; interestingly this included Einstein himself, who thought that general relativity was an incomplete theory, which would be superseded by a singularity-free unified field theory. Of course, he never succeeded in delivering this theory. Furthermore, at least in principle, closed causal loops and time travel and therefore violations of causality are entirely valid solutions of General Relativity.

    The possibility of time flowing backwards - and not the supposedly nondeterministic nature of Quantum Theory (“God doesn’t play dices”) - is the real reason why Einstein was so hostile to it. There is, as Einstein knew very well, no intrinsic reason that Quantum Theory needs to be nondeterministic if one accepts nonlocality, as demonstrated by the De Broglie/Bohm interpretation of Quantum Theory. However, nonlocality – i.e. influences faster than the speed of light – mean in the context of the relativistic framework nothing less than time travel into the past. That was the reason why Einstein was so scandalized by the “spooky action at a distance” of quantum entanglement and why it took so long to be accepted by the scientific community. Even if we currently cannot use quantum entanglement to actually transmit information, the simple fact that faster than light influences exist is highly problematic for relativity.

    The most fundamental issue however is the fact, that it seems to be simply impossible to proceed further with the relativistic paradigm. In the late 1920s the two cutting edge theories to explain the basic fabric of our universe were General Relativity and Quantum Theory: General Relativity describes gravity, the force effective at long distances; Quantum Theory in contrast describes the forces effective at shorter ranges, e.g. electromagnetism and the weak and the strong interaction.

    Now, nearly a century later, we are essentially still in the same position. All work that has been done since then has been filling out details, but there has been no fundamental progress. Despite much effort, all attempts to reconcile General Relativity with Quantum Theory to create a unified theory have come to nothing. The great hope String Theory is now more or less admitted to be a failure and other approaches like Loop Quantum Gravity don’t look any better; fundamental physics has largely stagnated for many decades.

    The key reason for the failure to unify General Relativity with Quantum Theory is precisely the revolutionary new relativistic model of time and space for which Einstein is hailed. All efforts to graft it onto Quantum Theory have been an abject failure: Quantum Theory simply needs a fixed spatial background and absolute time to work. Given this – and the fact that Quantum Theory, in sharp contrast to General Relativity, has an entirely unblemished record when it comes to experimental verification – it is quite clear that it is relativity and not Quantum Theory that has to go. Einstein shunted physics on a fundamentally wrong track back in 1905.

    The description of the problem above indicates quite clearly the most promising direction to proceed: return to a preferred frame (i.e. ether) paradigm with absolute time and space and create a theory of gravity that is a counterpart to General Relativity in the same way as the Lorentzian Ether Theory relates to Special Relativity. This theory would then describe the general case of an ether with a varying “density” indicating gravitational distortions, whereas the Lorentzian Ether Theory, the analogon to Special Relativity, deals with the simplified border case of a homogenous ether. There is actually a bit of work going on along these lines, even though the frowned upon word “ether” is usually avoided - “condensed matter model/interpretation” is a dog whistle that is sometimes used instead (See, for instance https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10701-008-9262-9). However, due to the still unbroken blind faith in General Relativity such attempts have received hardly any attention.i

    It remains to be seen for how much longer progress will be blocked - the lack of success in the long running quest to detect the elusive “Dark Matter” seems to be causing some disquietude at long last. Perhaps there will also be some new piece of empirical evidence that finally tilts the mood against General Relativity. There are indications that certain properties of gravity waves might be used to distinguish between General Relativity and alternative theories. But in any case, the sheer length of time that ethnic hero worship of Einstein was able to inoculate an obviously highly flawed theory against any criticism is nothing short of astounding.

    Replies: @utu, @Bill

    , @utu
    @mal

    That the stellar parallax is measured in microarcseconds range is mind-blowing when you think what does it take to maintain angle accuracy on satellite or Earth as it is orbiting the Sun.

  52. @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    Oky, I get it. I too enjoy a simple dish of herring and boiled potatoes with a bit of melted butter and dill chipped finely on top. But why this incessant rant against spicy, hot foods? Did you perhaps get your tongue burned off one time in a Thai restaurant? :-)

    Replies: @songbird

    Have only eaten in a Thai restaurant once. Wasn’t a great restaurant, to be honest, so I feel I can’t judge the food nationally, on one experience. Don’t know about Thai food in general, but what I ordered wasn’t spicy. Though, to be honest – I don’t like spicy food.

    I consider HBD discussions of food to be legitimate and highly appropriate to this forum. We know that the gut is just about the #1 thing that varies genetically between different people, since many of the adaptions we know about are in this area.

    Regarding rotten food: I guess if you cook it thoroughly that would kill the bacteria in it and leave you only with the chemicals that resulted from molecular breakdown. Maybe, that makes it a lot safer to eat, even though it would taste terrible? And, of course, in some climates, things go bad quite quickly.

    Regarding the Untouchables – as we know, some are tasked with removing human waste. This can be a very up close experience – I’ve heard of them scraping it off the ground with short tools, like flattened tin cans. I don’t think it is inconceivable that if they did this for hundreds of years, it might have affected their DNA. And, maybe, made them more resistant to certain diseases.

    Chinese and Japanese seem to eat a lot of weird things, BTW, without necessarily being in a tropical environment. Actually, Mongolians eat some pretty weird stuff – don’t they?

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @songbird

    Mongols just eat meat, organs, dairy products, blood, and traditionally no seafood, I dont understand how its weird stuff? You can find stranger stuff in European cuisine.

    I like variety with cuisine, but I dont like South Indian or Japanese food at all, its totally unedible stuff.

    Probably strangest dish is Mongolian kitchen is Tarbagan marmot but its more like rare specialty.

    Replies: @songbird, @AltanBakshi

  53. @melanf
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    In mass armies, you can find any types. Here the Soviet officer the same time

    https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/vazhskiy/14498672/16264/16264_640.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Europe Europa, @Znzn, @Mr. Hack

    I recall reading that the first waves of Soviet soldiers to arrive in Berlin and take control of parts of the city were largely ethnic Slavs, and on the whole didn’t treat German civilians that badly. Apparently it was the later waves of troops from more far-flung parts of the Soviet Union, a high percentage of whom were non-white, who committed the Rape of Berlin, encouraged by rabidly anti-white Jewish commanders and politicians.

    No idea if there’s any truth to that, or whether that is just white nationalist-style revisionism.

    • Replies: @melanf
    @Europe Europa


    I recall reading that the first waves of Soviet soldiers to arrive in Berlin and take control of parts of the city were largely ethnic Slavs, and on the whole didn’t treat German
     
    It seems to me that this is a legend, as well as the whole"rape of Berlin". Of course there were rapes, but the propaganda picture from the works of Anglo-American authors is fake. A "laboratory-clean example" of how such fakes are fabricated is the town of Nemmersdorf. It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape ("one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably"). The Anglo-American authors were not satisfied with such conclusions. As Beevor, Hastings, etc. can tell, all the remaining "sixty-two women and young girls raped and murdered by Soviet soldiers" in Nemmersdorf, " not a single civilian escaped death at the hands of Russian soldiers. Women were crucified on the doors of sheds and overturned carts or, after being raped, crushed under the tracks of tanks. Their children were also brutally murdered ." The legend was created in several waves - in Germany, under the supervision of the Americans, one after another, another campaign was held to expose the Soviet atrocities in Nemmersdorf (films, radio programs, etc.), after which new "witnesses" of these atrocities appeared, which allowed to launch a new campaign of revelations, etc. At the same time, evidence did not fit into the narrative (Feldwebel Helmut Hoffmann about the killed civilians : "It seemed strange that there were no exit holes on the corpses: small entrance and lack of blood. It was more like shots fired from a distance than shots fired at close range") they were simply ignored, but the deliberate lies that were convenient for propaganda purposes were replicated in every possible way. This is a chemically pure example of how the legend of the rape of Germany was created - when real cases were falsified creating a fake picture. With Berlin, the same story, with the caveat that there was no SS commission in Berlin, and it is impossible to verify post-war fictions

    Replies: @Demografie, @utu, @Coconuts

    , @Gerard.Gerard
    @Europe Europa

    FFS.... can you at least show me just ONE German kid born in 1946/47 with Slavic, Buryat, Kyrgyz, Gruzian or whatever facial features, that could support this "mass rape" BS. It is a simple, idiotic lie done to try ( and fail) to slander some of the greatest men to have ever walked on this planet. Just attempt some common sense.

    Vietnam is full of 1000s of children born from definite rapes by American white and Negro soldiers, and those abandoned but born from normal relations.


  54. The percentage and areas of Buddhists in the Russian Empire in the year 1897. Please remember that Tuva was not then part of Russia. There is a small minority of Buddhists in Altay republic, which is not visible on this map, where locals are Turkic peoples who are closely related to Mongols, but most of them follow Burkhanism, which is Shamanism thats been heavily influenced by Buddhism.

    Burkhan or Бурхан is just Buddha in Mongolic or Turkic.

  55. @songbird
    @Mr. Hack

    Have only eaten in a Thai restaurant once. Wasn't a great restaurant, to be honest, so I feel I can't judge the food nationally, on one experience. Don't know about Thai food in general, but what I ordered wasn't spicy. Though, to be honest - I don't like spicy food.

    I consider HBD discussions of food to be legitimate and highly appropriate to this forum. We know that the gut is just about the #1 thing that varies genetically between different people, since many of the adaptions we know about are in this area.

    Regarding rotten food: I guess if you cook it thoroughly that would kill the bacteria in it and leave you only with the chemicals that resulted from molecular breakdown. Maybe, that makes it a lot safer to eat, even though it would taste terrible? And, of course, in some climates, things go bad quite quickly.

    Regarding the Untouchables - as we know, some are tasked with removing human waste. This can be a very up close experience - I've heard of them scraping it off the ground with short tools, like flattened tin cans. I don't think it is inconceivable that if they did this for hundreds of years, it might have affected their DNA. And, maybe, made them more resistant to certain diseases.

    Chinese and Japanese seem to eat a lot of weird things, BTW, without necessarily being in a tropical environment. Actually, Mongolians eat some pretty weird stuff - don't they?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Mongols just eat meat, organs, dairy products, blood, and traditionally no seafood, I dont understand how its weird stuff? You can find stranger stuff in European cuisine.

    I like variety with cuisine, but I dont like South Indian or Japanese food at all, its totally unedible stuff.

    Probably strangest dish is Mongolian kitchen is Tarbagan marmot but its more like rare specialty.

    • Agree: sher singh
    • Replies: @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I wouldn't say that European food, as a whole, is weird. I think it is not very weird in a global context, but only in a more bourgeoisie American one. My own grandfather was absolutely revolted at the idea that anyone would eat rabbit - one of the filthiest animals, as he conceived it. Which is quite funny, considering the isolated valleys where his folks came from.

    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally - a food many of my relatives like - black pudding - I don't know about the taste - but it is revolting to see it made.

    As to Mongolian food, have you ever seen that drink they make with a sheep's eyeball in carrot juice?

    Incidentally, that reminds me, of a thought I had the other day: I don't know if any history written by a Westerner who is a vegetarian is really believable.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Saucier, @Saucier, @Saucier, @EldnahYm

    , @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi

    This is the most common dish among all Mongolic people, Buuz or Buuza, steamed meat filled dumplings, and they are very taste, unlike Chinese baozi, which are made with yeast dough.
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ee/9f/da/ee9fdac4be7449f30c65793b9c969838.jpg
    More basic Mongolian staple food is hard to find.

    Then there is khuushuur which is fried meat pastry.

    https://kafedari.ru/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/hushuur-s-rublenoi-govyadinoi-2.jpg
    Tasty and fatty! Also very popular and common food.

    Then there are different kind simple meat noodle soups, but unlike with other Asians, Mongolians noodles are always homemade and very broad

    https://avatars.mds.yandex.net/get-zen_doc/1538903/pub_5ce3bb1e83178c00b33609ad_5ce3bb2d856cd5031a70b24b/scale_1200

    But most common or traditional Mongolian food is just boiling lamb meat with bones and eating it with hands and drinking it with bouillon, after all frying is only suitable for gays, it makes the meat lose all is precious juices and vitamins, so no hard core survivalist warrior would spoil his meat in such way. After good boiling you can eat all tendons and fat, mm tasty!

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @AltanBakshi, @Jayce, @wei

  56. @AltanBakshi
    @Europe Europa

    My cold and spiteful reason is saying to me that you Anglos deserve your fate, after all you forced lots of this modernist bs upon other civilizations, but my heart is sad for your present state.

    I think my heart is winning, I cant feel petty joy for your defeat, even though you made all that Russia would stagnate in the 19th century, and that Ottomans could rule for little longer Christians of the Balkans.
    (And the downfall of Qing China, actually thats quite bad crime...)

    I sincerely hope that one day merry old England of your fathers will return! But this time without any smug mission to civilize others! At least you have more hope than Americans! Because there old majority will be minority in 2040~, but in England only in about 2060 or something, so you still have time.

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @songbird

    The sort of sentiment to be expected from a demon-worshipper.

  57. @songbird
    Heard an interesting theory the other day about Indians and spicy food:

    They are so used to eating rotten food that they are genetically adapted to it, and their sense of taste has been dialed down accordingly, so they need stronger flavors to enjoy food.

    Honestly, I am a bit skeptical of it. I believe that many socio-historical theories, including this one about Indians and rotten food, are too influenced by modern life - in this case, the fact that refrigeration is common today, and we have difficulty believing in such things as extended-kin networks.

    Personally, I don't believe that Indians would kill a goat and then eat it, over the coarse of a few days, while it rotted - I don't think that makes sense. I think they might have killed a goat, cut in in half, then given the other half to their brother's family, with the expectation that he would respond in kind on the right feast day.

    Though, having said that, I think it would be interesting to delve into the genetics of Untouchables, and see whether they have any special adaptations for living in sewage-filled gutters and consuming refuse.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Svevlad, @utu, @Thulean Friend, @sher singh

    nah it’s just that people love to put stuff in our food and indians had the most stuff to put in it

  58. @Znzn
    When it comes to engineering, for some reason males and females tend to have a 1:1 ratio in chemical engineering, compared to mechanical engineering or computer science.

    Replies: @mal, @AP

    Chemistry is like cooking. My wife is not a chemist but she loves to cook; chemistry was her favourite science and the one she was best at.

    • Agree: mal
    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    Ditto for my own mom! It's hard to find a decent job (more than $50,000-$60,000 a year) as a chemist, though. At least based on my own family's experience--even with a Master's Degree in Chemistry from a top Russian university! :(

    Replies: @A123

  59. @E. Harding
    @Tor597

    Not the case; the previous spikes were short and were always correlated with some easily identifiable events. This wave has been going on for more than a month and has been increasingly decentralized in households around the capital city. This makes the current outbreak a lot more difficult to contain than any earlier in the year. There is a way to contain this outbreak -travel restrictions around neighborhoods with virus spikes, testing everyone in those neighborhoods, and only opening them up when cases in them get to zero -but South Korea hasn't done internal travel restrictions at any point during the COVID epidemic, and universal testing in neighborhoods seems too ambitious for it. It seems content to become the next Germany. Ultimately, however, vaccines will save it, anyway, much as they will Russia and the United States.

    Replies: @Tor597

    At this phase, it will be harder for all countries to contain the virus because we are still in the early part of winter as opposed to March when it was just starting to warm up.

    Plus S. Korea is stupidly is letting people in from Anglo countries who don’t care to wear masks.

    Aside from spikes here and there I fully expect them to be able to contain the outbreak.

  60. @AltanBakshi
    @songbird

    Mongols just eat meat, organs, dairy products, blood, and traditionally no seafood, I dont understand how its weird stuff? You can find stranger stuff in European cuisine.

    I like variety with cuisine, but I dont like South Indian or Japanese food at all, its totally unedible stuff.

    Probably strangest dish is Mongolian kitchen is Tarbagan marmot but its more like rare specialty.

    Replies: @songbird, @AltanBakshi

    I wouldn’t say that European food, as a whole, is weird. I think it is not very weird in a global context, but only in a more bourgeoisie American one. My own grandfather was absolutely revolted at the idea that anyone would eat rabbit – one of the filthiest animals, as he conceived it. Which is quite funny, considering the isolated valleys where his folks came from.

    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally – a food many of my relatives like – black pudding – I don’t know about the taste – but it is revolting to see it made.

    As to Mongolian food, have you ever seen that drink they make with a sheep’s eyeball in carrot juice?

    Incidentally, that reminds me, of a thought I had the other day: I don’t know if any history written by a Westerner who is a vegetarian is really believable.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @songbird

    Ive never heard of such food, I think its some internet joke, carrot juice in Mongolia? All sources are from anglo media, seems that some one has pranked you guys.

    And your grandpa was Jew then, they think that rabbit is horribly dirty animal. Yes its a traditional Jewish belief that rabbit is unclean and unedible, no European Christian has thought so ever, really man!

    Black pudding, yes its very tasty, I enjoy it and also I like sausages made from blood. European long matured or moldy cheeses are very horrible for most Asians, but then Im myself half European and love good blue cheese. I remember when I encouraged my Bhutanese friends to try some Blue cheese and when I told that the cheese is moldy they were like, "am I okay in the head, why anyone eats such rotten and smelly food, it cant be healthy."

    , @Saucier
    @songbird

    I've never heard of rabbit being a filthy animal. As far as coprophagia goes, pigs do it and pork is the best kind of meat along with beef.

    Rabbit is a common and popular dish in France and elsewhere in Europe. It's also been a trendy dish in restaurants recently.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/dining/rabbit-recipe.html


    It remains a mystery to me why a delicious rabbit dinner, a habit in France, is such a hard sell in the United States, a meal many Americans would shy away from. This is not to say that you can’t buy rabbit here, but you don’t see it on a daily basis in butcher shops or at the supermarket.

    When I lived in Paris about 10 years ago, rabbit was always in the weekly dinner rotation. Every butcher shop has rabbits, fetchingly displayed belly-side up, so shoppers can see how fresh, pink and pristine they are.
     
    I find pigeon much less appetizing than rabbit, although that might be due to the pigeon's association with large cities and streets.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xq8tj1uy1Gk

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @songbird

    , @Saucier
    @songbird


    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally – a food many of my relatives like – black pudding – I don’t know about the taste – but it is revolting to see it made.
     
    Organ meat was the main protein source for most people along with dairy until recently with factory farming which made muscle protein cheaply available. See Derbyshire's comment here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/everybody-hates-david-brooks-sandwich-story/#comment-1931053

    Huge change from my 1950s prole English childhood then. It was offal all the way down, except for Sunday dinner (=lunch). Liver & onions … deviled kidneys … tripe … sweetbreads (pancreas, I think) … stuffed sheep’s heart … One of my aunts used to serve us brains on toast.
     
    , @Saucier
    @songbird


    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally – a food many of my relatives like – black pudding – I don’t know about the taste – but it is revolting to see it made.
     
    Organ meat was the main protein source for most people along with dairy until recently with factory farming which made muscle protein cheaply available. See Derbyshire's comment here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/everybody-hates-david-brooks-sandwich-story/#comment-1931053

    Huge change from my 1950s prole English childhood then. It was offal all the way down, except for Sunday dinner (=lunch). Liver & onions … deviled kidneys … tripe … sweetbreads (pancreas, I think) … stuffed sheep’s heart … One of my aunts used to serve us brains on toast.
     
    , @EldnahYm
    @songbird

    Eating animal organs used to be very common. Most people's grandparents ate lots of them(my grandmother apparently used to make sausages herself with intestines). Today it's out of fashion. Where I come from in the south it's not that uncommon to eat fried chicken livers or gizzards. But liver or chicken gizzards is about it. Intestines, tripe, kidney, pancreas, brains, lungs, etc. are not popular to say the least. Feet or tongues aren't popular either(though you can find pickled pigs feet in the grocery store).

    You're lucky to have relatives who eat blood pudding. Blood is delicious.

  61. @AltanBakshi
    @songbird

    Mongols just eat meat, organs, dairy products, blood, and traditionally no seafood, I dont understand how its weird stuff? You can find stranger stuff in European cuisine.

    I like variety with cuisine, but I dont like South Indian or Japanese food at all, its totally unedible stuff.

    Probably strangest dish is Mongolian kitchen is Tarbagan marmot but its more like rare specialty.

    Replies: @songbird, @AltanBakshi

    This is the most common dish among all Mongolic people, Buuz or Buuza, steamed meat filled dumplings, and they are very taste, unlike Chinese baozi, which are made with yeast dough.More basic Mongolian staple food is hard to find.

    Then there is khuushuur which is fried meat pastry.
    Tasty and fatty! Also very popular and common food.

    Then there are different kind simple meat noodle soups, but unlike with other Asians, Mongolians noodles are always homemade and very broad

    https://avatars.mds.yandex.net/get-zen_doc/1538903/pub_5ce3bb1e83178c00b33609ad_5ce3bb2d856cd5031a70b24b/scale_1200

    But most common or traditional Mongolian food is just boiling lamb meat with bones and eating it with hands and drinking it with bouillon, after all frying is only suitable for gays, it makes the meat lose all is precious juices and vitamins, so no hard core survivalist warrior would spoil his meat in such way. After good boiling you can eat all tendons and fat, mm tasty!

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @AltanBakshi

    How many different ways to call manty!

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/map-dumplings-pelmeni.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Demografie

    , @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi


    But most common or traditional Mongolian food is just boiling lamb meat with bones and eating it with hands and drinking it with bouillon, after all grilling is only suitable for gays, it makes the meat lose all is precious juices and vitamins, so no hard core survivalist warrior would spoil his meat in such way. After good boiling you can eat all tendons and fat, mm tasty!
     
    Fixed a typo!
    , @Jayce
    @AltanBakshi

    Those things are great. I had them a few times at this little place in the basement of the Datsan Gunzechoinei in St Petersburg where they'd sell them with some milk tea for super cheap after the khurals.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    , @wei
    @AltanBakshi

    That's just baozi and hezi with some phonetic corruption.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  62. @AltanBakshi
    @Europe Europa

    My cold and spiteful reason is saying to me that you Anglos deserve your fate, after all you forced lots of this modernist bs upon other civilizations, but my heart is sad for your present state.

    I think my heart is winning, I cant feel petty joy for your defeat, even though you made all that Russia would stagnate in the 19th century, and that Ottomans could rule for little longer Christians of the Balkans.
    (And the downfall of Qing China, actually thats quite bad crime...)

    I sincerely hope that one day merry old England of your fathers will return! But this time without any smug mission to civilize others! At least you have more hope than Americans! Because there old majority will be minority in 2040~, but in England only in about 2060 or something, so you still have time.

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @songbird

    I think all this Anglo stuff is pretty overblown. For one thing, a lot of the push for British Empire, a lot of the top leadership, came from Scotland. Of course, the Scottish are related, but these political decisions came from the elite, who are distant from the common people. It does not seem to be a question of ethnicity, in this case, but one of political gangsterism.

    So, where does this conception of “Anglos” that people have come from? Well, I’ll answer. Britain was the first state to industrialize. And it was an island, so it carried a lot of trade. That made London the largest city in the world. Today, because of this heritage, it is one of the world’s leading financial centers.

    And as we all know, cities and wealthy places are bastions of corruption. (and banking generally) Probably, nobody understands all the dynamics at play, but America’s decline seems to have clearly been led by urbanites. Probably, blacks started to vote Democrat, after their smarter elite began to move into Northern cities, and were recruited to be small parts of machine coalitions.

    • Replies: @AltanB
    @songbird

    Dutch kept them segregated, you made them equal and welcomed them to the governing caste, so it was you who let the beast out from the cage.

    It all started after you killed your rightful king, and your Glorious Revolution was the sealing of the blood pact with demons. Im of course speaking in the way of metaphors...


    Im not going to write more about this topic.

    Replies: @AltanB, @songbird

    , @Coconuts
    @songbird

    There's a fair bit of truth in that.

    The 2016 Brexit vote and aftermath led the British political analyst David Goodhart to divide the UK electorate into three parts:

    'Somewheres', 'Anywheres' and 'In-betweens'. 'Somewheres' are the British people who still have a rooted regional or national identity that means something to them, they are about half of the population. Nearly all of the white British working class, middle class people who live in smaller towns and the regions, also old aristocrats and high Tories. 'Anywheres' are the urban middle and upper middle classes, some of the ethnic minorities, some of the globalist upper class and big business people. They have an international/global identity based on qualifications, education and personal achievement/wealth. About 30% of the population. The in-betweens are a mix and include another part of the ethnic minorities.

    The most cucked and woke part of the population is obviously the 'anywhere' one, this has also been politically and culturally the most powerful and influential for some time. Brexit challenged and disorientated them and they are still recovering but they are discovering new ways to go on the offensive against the 'somewheres', in ways bordering on derangement, like all of the woke and open borders stuff.

    It's possible that they have undergone cognitive decline and some kind of degeneration, maybe due to spiteful mutants as Michael Woodley has suggested and they will now do things that completely undermine their own nation, or they have some plan to escape via marrying Indians or intelligent Africans, then their mixed children can safely inherit their wealth and status.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    , @Europe Europa
    @songbird

    I find the term "Anglo" to mean "globalist ruling elites" quite odd because as you say the ruling elite of the British Empire/Britain has always been disproportionately Scottish, in addition to Norman, Jewish, continental European, etc. Take the last few British PMs for example, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron, were all of Scottish descent as can be seen by their surnames, and Boris Johnson who is a Turkish, Jewish, Russian, German mongrel.

    The reality is the actual real native English people are far removed from the British power structure and on the contrary are despised by the elites, something that has its roots in the Norman conquest of 1066 when the old English elites were murdered or escaped to Byzantium. English landowners had their land stolen from them and any area that resisted devastated, such as during the "Harrying of the North".

    In my opinion insisting on calling the ruling elites of British Empire/Britain "Anglos" is at least akin to insisting on calling the ruling elites of the Soviet Union "Russian" exclusively.

  63. @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi

    This is the most common dish among all Mongolic people, Buuz or Buuza, steamed meat filled dumplings, and they are very taste, unlike Chinese baozi, which are made with yeast dough.
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ee/9f/da/ee9fdac4be7449f30c65793b9c969838.jpg
    More basic Mongolian staple food is hard to find.

    Then there is khuushuur which is fried meat pastry.

    https://kafedari.ru/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/hushuur-s-rublenoi-govyadinoi-2.jpg
    Tasty and fatty! Also very popular and common food.

    Then there are different kind simple meat noodle soups, but unlike with other Asians, Mongolians noodles are always homemade and very broad

    https://avatars.mds.yandex.net/get-zen_doc/1538903/pub_5ce3bb1e83178c00b33609ad_5ce3bb2d856cd5031a70b24b/scale_1200

    But most common or traditional Mongolian food is just boiling lamb meat with bones and eating it with hands and drinking it with bouillon, after all frying is only suitable for gays, it makes the meat lose all is precious juices and vitamins, so no hard core survivalist warrior would spoil his meat in such way. After good boiling you can eat all tendons and fat, mm tasty!

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @AltanBakshi, @Jayce, @wei

    How many different ways to call manty!

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Anatoly Karlin

    If you ever want to try good Buuza and Buryatia is too far, then you can visit Buuza Room in St Petersburg.

    https://m.vk.com/buuzaroom
    They have excellent Buuza, which I heartily recommend and other traditional Buryatian foods. Its close to Sadovaya or Sennaya Ploschad Metro.

    Ps. Manty have different taste, Buuza is much better, they are more similar to Tibetan Momos. Its so simple, but so good, I have probably eaten tens of thousands of them, easily...

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @Demografie
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Well, I have eaten dumplings here west of wienna just this week. Map is wrong.

  64. @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I wouldn't say that European food, as a whole, is weird. I think it is not very weird in a global context, but only in a more bourgeoisie American one. My own grandfather was absolutely revolted at the idea that anyone would eat rabbit - one of the filthiest animals, as he conceived it. Which is quite funny, considering the isolated valleys where his folks came from.

    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally - a food many of my relatives like - black pudding - I don't know about the taste - but it is revolting to see it made.

    As to Mongolian food, have you ever seen that drink they make with a sheep's eyeball in carrot juice?

    Incidentally, that reminds me, of a thought I had the other day: I don't know if any history written by a Westerner who is a vegetarian is really believable.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Saucier, @Saucier, @Saucier, @EldnahYm

    Ive never heard of such food, I think its some internet joke, carrot juice in Mongolia? All sources are from anglo media, seems that some one has pranked you guys.

    And your grandpa was Jew then, they think that rabbit is horribly dirty animal. Yes its a traditional Jewish belief that rabbit is unclean and unedible, no European Christian has thought so ever, really man!

    Black pudding, yes its very tasty, I enjoy it and also I like sausages made from blood. European long matured or moldy cheeses are very horrible for most Asians, but then Im myself half European and love good blue cheese. I remember when I encouraged my Bhutanese friends to try some Blue cheese and when I told that the cheese is moldy they were like, “am I okay in the head, why anyone eats such rotten and smelly food, it cant be healthy.”

  65. Why do most (Western) whites take such a dim view on white racial consciousness? Black nationalists could literally scream anti-white racial epithets and call for genocide of white people and still most whites would be more offended by a white responding back with similar violent, racist language than they would be by the black racists.

    The obvious answer is anti-white media brainwashing, but surely white people with an average IQ of 100 can clearly see the hypocrisy and double standards? I’m surprised that the propaganda is still so effective in a time when black nationalists violently rant and antagonise against whites on an almost daily basis in the US and to a certain extent the UK.

    It seems to me that this aversion to white racial consciousness is going on on a deeper level than simply propaganda, it seems to be a deeply culturally ingrained, almost pathological belief, and so ingrained that it is resistant to logic and common sense in the way religious beliefs are.

    Pretty much all non-white groups in Western countries are very racially conscious, often overtly and aggressively so, you would think whites would observe this and think “maybe we need to do the same”, but in general that’s not what happens. Non-white racism towards whites seems to only increase the resolve of most whites to have no racial consciousness.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
    @Europe Europa


    It seems to me that this aversion to white racial consciousness is going on on a deeper level than simply propaganda, it seems to be a deeply culturally ingrained, almost pathological belief, and so ingrained that it is resistant to logic and common sense in the way religious beliefs are.

    Pretty much all non-white groups in Western countries are very racially conscious, often overtly and aggressively so, you would think whites would observe this and think “maybe we need to do the same”, but in general that’s not what happens. Non-white racism towards whites seems to only increase the resolve of most whites to have no racial consciousness.
     
    I see that some white British people seem to have acquired an intense, almost fanatical aversion to white racial consciousness, but it seems to be centred on certain age groups and probably certain social classes. I live in a kind of provincial small town in the North, this sort of thing is much weaker here, people are still basically more reasonable.

    A potentially sinister aspect of it is that it has been reported that one of the only lasting effects of unconscious bias and anti-racist (TM) training is that is causes wealthy whites to look down on and be judgemental about poorer whites, and I can imagine a bizarre spin off of it being that nations in Eastern Europe which are both vast majority white and overall poorer than Western ones are seen as inherently sinister and fascistic, just for being what they naturally are.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @128, @Sinotibetan

  66. @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I think all this Anglo stuff is pretty overblown. For one thing, a lot of the push for British Empire, a lot of the top leadership, came from Scotland. Of course, the Scottish are related, but these political decisions came from the elite, who are distant from the common people. It does not seem to be a question of ethnicity, in this case, but one of political gangsterism.

    So, where does this conception of "Anglos" that people have come from? Well, I'll answer. Britain was the first state to industrialize. And it was an island, so it carried a lot of trade. That made London the largest city in the world. Today, because of this heritage, it is one of the world's leading financial centers.

    And as we all know, cities and wealthy places are bastions of corruption. (and banking generally) Probably, nobody understands all the dynamics at play, but America's decline seems to have clearly been led by urbanites. Probably, blacks started to vote Democrat, after their smarter elite began to move into Northern cities, and were recruited to be small parts of machine coalitions.

    Replies: @AltanB, @Coconuts, @Europe Europa

    Dutch kept them segregated, you made them equal and welcomed them to the governing caste, so it was you who let the beast out from the cage.

    It all started after you killed your rightful king, and your Glorious Revolution was the sealing of the blood pact with demons. Im of course speaking in the way of metaphors…

    Im not going to write more about this topic.

    • Replies: @AltanB
    @AltanB

    Those damn Papists, you should kept them under control.

    , @songbird
    @AltanB


    And your grandpa was Jew then, they think that rabbit is horribly dirty animal. Yes its a traditional Jewish belief that rabbit is unclean and unedible, no European Christian has thought so ever, really man!
     
    I'm not so sure. Rabbits practice coprophagia. Dogs do too, and no European would ever eat a dog. On top of their coprophagia, they are also quite soft and gentle animals. Rabbit is the one Jewish food prohibition I have sympathy for - not that I would institute it.

    Of course, there are many Europeans that eat rabbits, but it is also true that there are lots of Europeans folktales where a rabbit ruins a feast by coming unto the table and dirtying it. Probably Europeans only ate rabbits, out of hardship, and being prevented from hunting by the nobility.

    Dutch kept them segregated, you made them equal and welcomed them to the governing caste, so it was you who let the beast out from the cage...It all started after you killed your rightful king, and your Glorious Revolution was the sealing of the blood pact with demons...Those damn Papists, you should kept them under control.
     
    Just for the record, I am a Taige. Though curiously, I believe you are the third person to accuse me of being an Anglo, on this forum.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  67. @mal
    @Znzn

    Chicks like chemistry.

    Replies: @Znzn

    I actually find basic chemistry less intuitive than basic physics, since you can see physics in action in front of you.

    • Replies: @mal
    @Znzn

    Yea there is some of that. I'm a chemical engineer and wife is a chemist. For example, I run reactors where you have to keep raising the pH going to reactor in order to lower the pH in the reactor. (Has to do with various solubility parameters and several reaction mechanisms competing). If you actually succeed in raising the pH by mistake reactor will detonate (not good). Go figure that one out.

    But yea, like AP said, it's a lot like cooking, just with more existential dread. Add ingredients, mix, cool, heat, yell at people when pipes clog up. Chicks like that sort of thing.

  68. @AltanB
    @songbird

    Dutch kept them segregated, you made them equal and welcomed them to the governing caste, so it was you who let the beast out from the cage.

    It all started after you killed your rightful king, and your Glorious Revolution was the sealing of the blood pact with demons. Im of course speaking in the way of metaphors...


    Im not going to write more about this topic.

    Replies: @AltanB, @songbird

    Those damn Papists, you should kept them under control.

  69. @melanf
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    In mass armies, you can find any types. Here the Soviet officer the same time

    https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/vazhskiy/14498672/16264/16264_640.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Europe Europa, @Znzn, @Mr. Hack

    Sebastian Vettel?

    • Replies: @A123
    @Znzn


    Sebastian Vettel?
     
    Why is "Seb" such a fast name?

    Sebastian Bourdais -- F1, IndyCar
    Sebastian Loeb -- WRC
    Sebastian Vettel -- F1
    Sebastian Morris -- DPi
    Sebastian Saavedra -- IndyCar

    PEACE 😇
     

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/21/1e/1c/211e1cabe89612a39d52b9f37932567d.jpg

    Replies: @Mikhail

  70. @Anatoly Karlin
    @AltanBakshi

    How many different ways to call manty!

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/map-dumplings-pelmeni.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Demografie

    If you ever want to try good Buuza and Buryatia is too far, then you can visit Buuza Room in St Petersburg.

    https://m.vk.com/buuzaroom
    They have excellent Buuza, which I heartily recommend and other traditional Buryatian foods. Its close to Sadovaya or Sennaya Ploschad Metro.

    Ps. Manty have different taste, Buuza is much better, they are more similar to Tibetan Momos. Its so simple, but so good, I have probably eaten tens of thousands of them, easily…

    • Thanks: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    Looks like a good, fun restaurant to go to. Too bad there's not a menu, so that one could see if there's more variety in the kitchen to choose from though?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  71. @AltanBakshi
    @melanf

    Sorry to nitpick, but that man has epaulettes, which were introduced to Red Army after the start of the great Patriotic war, in the 20s and 30s they were cursed symbol of Czarist armies.

    Therefore there is a greater chance that your man is heroic defender of the Motherland and that those two other army guys are part of the system that oppresses the enemies of the "proletariat."

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    Stalin brought back epaulettes during the war, as you said, and that uniform is very ’40s era Soviet. Do you believe all the square-jawed blondes were murdered and just reappeared in the ’90s?

  72. @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I think all this Anglo stuff is pretty overblown. For one thing, a lot of the push for British Empire, a lot of the top leadership, came from Scotland. Of course, the Scottish are related, but these political decisions came from the elite, who are distant from the common people. It does not seem to be a question of ethnicity, in this case, but one of political gangsterism.

    So, where does this conception of "Anglos" that people have come from? Well, I'll answer. Britain was the first state to industrialize. And it was an island, so it carried a lot of trade. That made London the largest city in the world. Today, because of this heritage, it is one of the world's leading financial centers.

    And as we all know, cities and wealthy places are bastions of corruption. (and banking generally) Probably, nobody understands all the dynamics at play, but America's decline seems to have clearly been led by urbanites. Probably, blacks started to vote Democrat, after their smarter elite began to move into Northern cities, and were recruited to be small parts of machine coalitions.

    Replies: @AltanB, @Coconuts, @Europe Europa

    There’s a fair bit of truth in that.

    The 2016 Brexit vote and aftermath led the British political analyst David Goodhart to divide the UK electorate into three parts:

    ‘Somewheres’, ‘Anywheres’ and ‘In-betweens’. ‘Somewheres’ are the British people who still have a rooted regional or national identity that means something to them, they are about half of the population. Nearly all of the white British working class, middle class people who live in smaller towns and the regions, also old aristocrats and high Tories. ‘Anywheres’ are the urban middle and upper middle classes, some of the ethnic minorities, some of the globalist upper class and big business people. They have an international/global identity based on qualifications, education and personal achievement/wealth. About 30% of the population. The in-betweens are a mix and include another part of the ethnic minorities.

    The most cucked and woke part of the population is obviously the ‘anywhere’ one, this has also been politically and culturally the most powerful and influential for some time. Brexit challenged and disorientated them and they are still recovering but they are discovering new ways to go on the offensive against the ‘somewheres’, in ways bordering on derangement, like all of the woke and open borders stuff.

    It’s possible that they have undergone cognitive decline and some kind of degeneration, maybe due to spiteful mutants as Michael Woodley has suggested and they will now do things that completely undermine their own nation, or they have some plan to escape via marrying Indians or intelligent Africans, then their mixed children can safely inherit their wealth and status.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Coconuts

    I agree that Northerners in particular have a stronger sense of "place", like they're generally proud to be "Northerers", or "Mancs, "Geordies" or what ever, whereas Southerners generally don't have that same sense of place, especially the "educated" middle classes. Northerners generally seem very proud of "their city", "their area", but to Southerners that sort of thing generally means very little. I suspect Southerners are also more likely to move areas too.

    Although that doesn't mean Northerners are any more racially conscious though, often their sense of place is completely deracinated, in that they would regard a black or Muslim "Northerner" as having more in common with them than a white Southerner. So in that sense it's a civic/cultural sense of place, not a racial one.

  73. @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I think all this Anglo stuff is pretty overblown. For one thing, a lot of the push for British Empire, a lot of the top leadership, came from Scotland. Of course, the Scottish are related, but these political decisions came from the elite, who are distant from the common people. It does not seem to be a question of ethnicity, in this case, but one of political gangsterism.

    So, where does this conception of "Anglos" that people have come from? Well, I'll answer. Britain was the first state to industrialize. And it was an island, so it carried a lot of trade. That made London the largest city in the world. Today, because of this heritage, it is one of the world's leading financial centers.

    And as we all know, cities and wealthy places are bastions of corruption. (and banking generally) Probably, nobody understands all the dynamics at play, but America's decline seems to have clearly been led by urbanites. Probably, blacks started to vote Democrat, after their smarter elite began to move into Northern cities, and were recruited to be small parts of machine coalitions.

    Replies: @AltanB, @Coconuts, @Europe Europa

    I find the term “Anglo” to mean “globalist ruling elites” quite odd because as you say the ruling elite of the British Empire/Britain has always been disproportionately Scottish, in addition to Norman, Jewish, continental European, etc. Take the last few British PMs for example, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron, were all of Scottish descent as can be seen by their surnames, and Boris Johnson who is a Turkish, Jewish, Russian, German mongrel.

    The reality is the actual real native English people are far removed from the British power structure and on the contrary are despised by the elites, something that has its roots in the Norman conquest of 1066 when the old English elites were murdered or escaped to Byzantium. English landowners had their land stolen from them and any area that resisted devastated, such as during the “Harrying of the North”.

    In my opinion insisting on calling the ruling elites of British Empire/Britain “Anglos” is at least akin to insisting on calling the ruling elites of the Soviet Union “Russian” exclusively.

  74. @Znzn
    @melanf

    Sebastian Vettel?

    Replies: @A123

    Sebastian Vettel?

    Why is “Seb” such a fast name?

    Sebastian Bourdais — F1, IndyCar
    Sebastian Loeb — WRC
    Sebastian Vettel — F1
    Sebastian Morris — DPi
    Sebastian Saavedra — IndyCar

    PEACE 😇
     

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @A123

    Sebastian Coe.

    Replies: @Dr. Charles Fhandrich

  75. @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi

    This is the most common dish among all Mongolic people, Buuz or Buuza, steamed meat filled dumplings, and they are very taste, unlike Chinese baozi, which are made with yeast dough.
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ee/9f/da/ee9fdac4be7449f30c65793b9c969838.jpg
    More basic Mongolian staple food is hard to find.

    Then there is khuushuur which is fried meat pastry.

    https://kafedari.ru/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/hushuur-s-rublenoi-govyadinoi-2.jpg
    Tasty and fatty! Also very popular and common food.

    Then there are different kind simple meat noodle soups, but unlike with other Asians, Mongolians noodles are always homemade and very broad

    https://avatars.mds.yandex.net/get-zen_doc/1538903/pub_5ce3bb1e83178c00b33609ad_5ce3bb2d856cd5031a70b24b/scale_1200

    But most common or traditional Mongolian food is just boiling lamb meat with bones and eating it with hands and drinking it with bouillon, after all frying is only suitable for gays, it makes the meat lose all is precious juices and vitamins, so no hard core survivalist warrior would spoil his meat in such way. After good boiling you can eat all tendons and fat, mm tasty!

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @AltanBakshi, @Jayce, @wei

    But most common or traditional Mongolian food is just boiling lamb meat with bones and eating it with hands and drinking it with bouillon, after all grilling is only suitable for gays, it makes the meat lose all is precious juices and vitamins, so no hard core survivalist warrior would spoil his meat in such way. After good boiling you can eat all tendons and fat, mm tasty!

    Fixed a typo!

  76. @Blinky Bill
    https://res.cloudinary.com/teepublic/image/private/s--j5PIsbLk--/c_fit,g_north_west,h_920,w_920/co_ffffff,e_outline:41/co_ffffff,e_outline:inner_fill:1/co_bbbbbb,e_outline:3:1000/c_mpad,g_center,h_1260,w_1260/b_rgb:eeeeee/c_limit,f_jpg,h_630,q_90,w_630/v1566171055/production/designs/5651901_0.jpg

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell, @Korenchkin

    That emblem is so lame

    • Agree: AltanBakshi
  77. @Europe Europa
    Why do most (Western) whites take such a dim view on white racial consciousness? Black nationalists could literally scream anti-white racial epithets and call for genocide of white people and still most whites would be more offended by a white responding back with similar violent, racist language than they would be by the black racists.

    The obvious answer is anti-white media brainwashing, but surely white people with an average IQ of 100 can clearly see the hypocrisy and double standards? I'm surprised that the propaganda is still so effective in a time when black nationalists violently rant and antagonise against whites on an almost daily basis in the US and to a certain extent the UK.

    It seems to me that this aversion to white racial consciousness is going on on a deeper level than simply propaganda, it seems to be a deeply culturally ingrained, almost pathological belief, and so ingrained that it is resistant to logic and common sense in the way religious beliefs are.

    Pretty much all non-white groups in Western countries are very racially conscious, often overtly and aggressively so, you would think whites would observe this and think "maybe we need to do the same", but in general that's not what happens. Non-white racism towards whites seems to only increase the resolve of most whites to have no racial consciousness.

    Replies: @Coconuts

    It seems to me that this aversion to white racial consciousness is going on on a deeper level than simply propaganda, it seems to be a deeply culturally ingrained, almost pathological belief, and so ingrained that it is resistant to logic and common sense in the way religious beliefs are.

    Pretty much all non-white groups in Western countries are very racially conscious, often overtly and aggressively so, you would think whites would observe this and think “maybe we need to do the same”, but in general that’s not what happens. Non-white racism towards whites seems to only increase the resolve of most whites to have no racial consciousness.

    I see that some white British people seem to have acquired an intense, almost fanatical aversion to white racial consciousness, but it seems to be centred on certain age groups and probably certain social classes. I live in a kind of provincial small town in the North, this sort of thing is much weaker here, people are still basically more reasonable.

    A potentially sinister aspect of it is that it has been reported that one of the only lasting effects of unconscious bias and anti-racist (TM) training is that is causes wealthy whites to look down on and be judgemental about poorer whites, and I can imagine a bizarre spin off of it being that nations in Eastern Europe which are both vast majority white and overall poorer than Western ones are seen as inherently sinister and fascistic, just for being what they naturally are.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Coconuts

    To be honest I don't think wealthy white leftists/liberals in Britain judge poorer Eastern European countries by the same "standards" that they do poorer native British people. I think they tend to rationalise Eastern European nationalism and racial awareness in the same way that they do for non-whites.

    Often the British media lump Poles, etc, in with non-whites and portray them as just as much victims of working class British racism.

    , @128
    @Coconuts

    It is ironic how this blog worships IQ until those with high IQ do not have the same political beliefs as them?

    , @Sinotibetan
    @Coconuts

    Actually being race conscious is a natural and human trait. It's racial supremacism( and contrary to what Regressives keep telling, is not the monopoly of whites - blacks, Chinese, Indians, Pakistanis etc have their own racial supremacists) that we should be against. However, don't think only whites from wealthy nations are targeted for racial self-hate by the Regressives(which would be a more apt name for "Progressives"), nowadays they include any "fair-skined" race like Northeast Asians too(Japanese, Koreans, Chinese etc.) . For example this group of East Asians living in the West who are having identity crisis and trying to fit in with the current Regressive garbage so in vogue in the West:-
    https://youtu.be/ez-LlT1nEN8
    Most of the commentators of the video - black, white, asian or mixed, came up with the same conclusion : the Japanese who did not accept the mixed black + Japanese "Miss Japan" are 'bad people'.
    "Anti-racist" training is a misnomer : it is just anti-white and pro-black, I would say, black supremacism . And perhaps pro-dark skinned and any culture far less advanced than European culture( eg Islamic cultures ?).
    I think the major enablers of Regressivism are whites themselves : I wonder why?- one could be this kowtowing to blacks assuage their 'white guilt' (of their ancestors during colonial times involved in the black slavery "trade"), or perhaps, in a perverted form of racial pride, they are proud to be the first to "discover" this "higher morality" - racial self-hate and uplifting races that are culturally inferior or formerly oppressed as slaves? Hence, I think it's a kind of perverted racial supremacism , they take pride as being the "first" and White, to come up with this "revolutionary" idea. And the irony is, like the European colonialists of old, they want to mold the world to fit this "higher morality". Actually both White Regressivists and Neo- Nazi white supremacists are similar - both take pride in their sense of superiority in every way except white regressives consider blacks as the superior race ( in a perverted sense perhaps?) whilst the neo-nazis consider whites(and some only "Aryan blonds"?) as the superior race. Whereas neo-nazi type ideology has historical precedents , regressive hate of the own race but idolizing another more backward race is indeed unprecedented ,hence 'novel'.
    Regressive ideology is now considered the ideology and "higher morality" of current Western civilization - embraced by majority of the political elites( including many so-called "conservatives"), intelligentsia , academia and the entertainment industry. So, poor whites or Eastern European whites who are more race conscious are considered "less civilized" : in the eyes of Regressives, they need to be "civilized " to this new higher civilization deemed 'more moral' than previous Western culture.
    In fact, one reason for Western "Russophobia " is perhaps because Russians are generally deemed(by Western white regressives) more race conscious than Western whites - thus "less civilized"? I think the current regime in Russia is seen as a hindrance to this "civilizing" process .Hence, the ceaseless "regime change activities" by Washington and the EU. Of course there are other reasons such as continuation of Western imperialism under American hegemony but I think this is one reason why Democrats (being a Regressive hot bed) are especially rabid Russia haters. It's with a religious zeal that they must convert all whites to this "better civilization" before they do the same to non-Whites like Japanese, Koreans etc.
    Regressives have a strange or perverted ideal in which they idolize those groups(race or religious/cultural) they think are underprivileged or wronged by groups they deem "privileged". Hence they celebrate the less civilized , the ugly, the primitive, etc and attribute these groups poor social standing as wholly the faults of "privileged groups". East Asians , especially the Chinese(and extended to other Sinosphere nations like Japan etc) with their so called improvement in quality of life, and technological advancement , have " graduated" from the underprivileged "people of colour" group to the privileged group and must be taught to hate their own race , just like whites.
    "Underprivileged" groups would be blacks, Muslims, Latinos, LBGTQ , for example.
    "privileged groups " include whites, East Asians , heterosexuals for example.
    Of course, I am describing the "true " Regressive idealists and their blind followers(sadly , I think it's the majority of the youth in the West and more developed areas in Asia ). I don't think the political elites truly believe these ideals but with this type of thinking now so predominant , they will use it to stay in power or else have to toe in the line to remain in or attain power. I wonder how these regressive ideals became so entrenched in the West.
    My two cents.

    Replies: @sher singh

  78. @Coconuts
    @Europe Europa


    It seems to me that this aversion to white racial consciousness is going on on a deeper level than simply propaganda, it seems to be a deeply culturally ingrained, almost pathological belief, and so ingrained that it is resistant to logic and common sense in the way religious beliefs are.

    Pretty much all non-white groups in Western countries are very racially conscious, often overtly and aggressively so, you would think whites would observe this and think “maybe we need to do the same”, but in general that’s not what happens. Non-white racism towards whites seems to only increase the resolve of most whites to have no racial consciousness.
     
    I see that some white British people seem to have acquired an intense, almost fanatical aversion to white racial consciousness, but it seems to be centred on certain age groups and probably certain social classes. I live in a kind of provincial small town in the North, this sort of thing is much weaker here, people are still basically more reasonable.

    A potentially sinister aspect of it is that it has been reported that one of the only lasting effects of unconscious bias and anti-racist (TM) training is that is causes wealthy whites to look down on and be judgemental about poorer whites, and I can imagine a bizarre spin off of it being that nations in Eastern Europe which are both vast majority white and overall poorer than Western ones are seen as inherently sinister and fascistic, just for being what they naturally are.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @128, @Sinotibetan

    To be honest I don’t think wealthy white leftists/liberals in Britain judge poorer Eastern European countries by the same “standards” that they do poorer native British people. I think they tend to rationalise Eastern European nationalism and racial awareness in the same way that they do for non-whites.

    Often the British media lump Poles, etc, in with non-whites and portray them as just as much victims of working class British racism.

  79. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    https://i.ibb.co/FWn2NzC/Wehrmacht.jpg

    Interesting physiognomy on the soldier in the foreground.

    Replies: @melanf, @Mr. Hack

    The fellow in the foreground looks like every village’s Schmulik, but the officer in the background looks like Sergey Lavrov. But it couldn’t be him right, for the photo looks like WWII vintage and the photo below is current date?:

    They’re both even wearing wire rim glasses? 🙂

    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Mr. Hack


    but the officer in the background looks like Sergey Lavrov. But it couldn’t be him right, for the photo looks like WWII vintage and the photo below is current date?:
     
    Looks like Jeffrey Epstein as well.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  80. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    Russia banned from Tokyo Olympics and 2022 World Cup after Cas ruling

    Most Russophobic act since Operation Barbarossa.

    Westerners cannot handle doped Russian men of steel.

    https://pyxis.nymag.com/v1/imgs/308/04d/d596f4c0693744cca6d05cf9665fa59d11-16-dolph-lundgren-rocky.h467.w700.jpg

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @g2k, @Mikhail

    Anti-Russian Bigotry

    Penalizing a whole group of people based on their ethnic and/or national background is condemned as bigoted when applied to some groups. Russia under another designation will have a large Olympic delegation. Why are all these Russians allowed to compete, but not formally as Russians? The simple answer has to do with them not being guilty, while nevertheless having their national origin wrongly disgraced.

    The likes of Sebastian Coe, Travis Tygart, the CAS panel at issue and WADA, have endorsed a hypocritical PC bigotry.

    Related, this site caters to such drivel:

    https://www.insidethegames.biz/

  81. @A123
    @Znzn


    Sebastian Vettel?
     
    Why is "Seb" such a fast name?

    Sebastian Bourdais -- F1, IndyCar
    Sebastian Loeb -- WRC
    Sebastian Vettel -- F1
    Sebastian Morris -- DPi
    Sebastian Saavedra -- IndyCar

    PEACE 😇
     

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/21/1e/1c/211e1cabe89612a39d52b9f37932567d.jpg

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Sebastian Coe.

    • Replies: @Dr. Charles Fhandrich
    @Mikhail

    Yes. One of the many sports whites waste their time on while their nation is falling down all around them.

  82. @AltanBakshi
    @Anatoly Karlin

    If you ever want to try good Buuza and Buryatia is too far, then you can visit Buuza Room in St Petersburg.

    https://m.vk.com/buuzaroom
    They have excellent Buuza, which I heartily recommend and other traditional Buryatian foods. Its close to Sadovaya or Sennaya Ploschad Metro.

    Ps. Manty have different taste, Buuza is much better, they are more similar to Tibetan Momos. Its so simple, but so good, I have probably eaten tens of thousands of them, easily...

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Looks like a good, fun restaurant to go to. Too bad there’s not a menu, so that one could see if there’s more variety in the kitchen to choose from though?

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    https://assets.allcafe.ru/user-uploads/6/2015/02/19/68960ba31dc2cc7d924d6606bacd8d20_XL.jpeg

    https://assets.allcafe.ru/user-uploads/6/2015/02/19/b084fa6c766ac187544a223525f149e4_XL.jpeg

    I think that they have better looking menus nowadays, but the dishes have stayed more or less same.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  83. @AltanB
    @songbird

    Dutch kept them segregated, you made them equal and welcomed them to the governing caste, so it was you who let the beast out from the cage.

    It all started after you killed your rightful king, and your Glorious Revolution was the sealing of the blood pact with demons. Im of course speaking in the way of metaphors...


    Im not going to write more about this topic.

    Replies: @AltanB, @songbird

    And your grandpa was Jew then, they think that rabbit is horribly dirty animal. Yes its a traditional Jewish belief that rabbit is unclean and unedible, no European Christian has thought so ever, really man!

    I’m not so sure. Rabbits practice coprophagia. Dogs do too, and no European would ever eat a dog. On top of their coprophagia, they are also quite soft and gentle animals. Rabbit is the one Jewish food prohibition I have sympathy for – not that I would institute it.

    Of course, there are many Europeans that eat rabbits, but it is also true that there are lots of Europeans folktales where a rabbit ruins a feast by coming unto the table and dirtying it. Probably Europeans only ate rabbits, out of hardship, and being prevented from hunting by the nobility.

    Dutch kept them segregated, you made them equal and welcomed them to the governing caste, so it was you who let the beast out from the cage…It all started after you killed your rightful king, and your Glorious Revolution was the sealing of the blood pact with demons…Those damn Papists, you should kept them under control.

    Just for the record, I am a Taige. Though curiously, I believe you are the third person to accuse me of being an Anglo, on this forum.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @songbird

    Taige? You mean Irish? The stuff about Papists was a joke.

    I know that most westerners are very removed from nature, so this sounds strange to you, but there is huge hygiene difference between dung of carnivores and herbivores. Cow and yak dung can be dried and used as heating fuel, and there is no bad smell, or chance of infections. Also I dont believe that hares are as dirty as rabbits, they are quite different in behaviour and how they nest. Hare is excellent for stews.

  84. @mal
    Great news in science! Cosmic Crisis gets worse! (its a good thing).

    https://www.quantamagazine.org/astronomers-get-their-wish-and-the-hubble-crisis-gets-worse-20201217

    Another measurement for Hubble Constant (the thing that tells you how fast the universe is expanding) is in and it is... 73.2 km/s/megaparsec. Older predicted value is 67. The more measurements we take the more statistical validity higher values gain (they are all clustering around low 70's rather than high 60's).

    We care about that because that's how we know the age of the universe. The higher the value of acceleration rate the younger the universe. Just like when you drive the car from point A to point B, the harder you accelerate the shorter amount time it will take you to complete the trip.

    Hubble Constant value of 67 corresponds to about 14 billion year old universe. Hubble Constant value of 73 is more like 12-13 billion years old universe.

    This matters because we are also refining our ability to measure the age of the stars. And there are stars (Methuselah) nearby that are 14+ billion years old, and our statistical confidence in that number is increasing as well.

    So either we don't understand how local spacetime works and how stars can time travel in our neighborhood, or we don't understand how stellar fusion physics works and how elements are created, and at what rates.

    Either way, if we figure this out, it will be a scientific revolution the likes of which we haven't seen before. It will be either pocket fusion reactors for everybody, or DeLorean style time travel machines and warp drives. Either way, it is going to be huge.

    Replies: @Menschmaschine, @utu

    Actually, these observational problems are not particularly remarkable in comparison to others that have been known for a long time. This gives me a splendid excuse to reuse a text I wrote some time ago in response to an article (https://www.unz.com/estriker/jewish-brilliance-synthetic-like-zirconia/):

    The continuing dominance of GR is a huge problem for physics, since the relativistic conceptual base of both special and general relativity is almost certainly a fundamentally wrong model of physical reality.

    Let’s take a look at the development of relativity: The assumption in the 19th century was that light is a wave that is traveling through a hypothetical ether, analogous to sound waves through a medium like air or water. The famous Michelson-Morey experiment tested this assumption by comparing the time needed for light to propagate a certain distance both in the direction of the movement of the earth around the sun and that perpendicular to it. The expectation was that the times would be different, since in the direction of the movement the rate of the movement would be either added or subtracted to the speed of the light. In fact, however, the times were identical. The solution proposed by Lorentz was the assumption that the measurement apparatus did undergo a small compensating length contraction in the direction of the movement. Later experiments like that by Rayleigh and Brace made it clear that in addition also clocks would need to run slower.

    [MORE]

    In 1905 Einstein proposed his own alternative Theory of Special Relativity. He took the principle of relativity found by Lorentz (with some help by Poincare) and instead of deriving it as a result made it the point of departure for his own theory. Mathematically, both theories are identical and so can’t be distinguished experimentally. But the metaphysical picture is very different: The Lorentzian Ether Theory still assumes an absolute 3-dimensional space with an absolute time, which is filled with the ether.

    In contrast, Special Relativity postulates that time and space (or spacetime as it is called in relativistic jargon) themselves are changing, i.e. that not objects, but space itself shrinks or expands and that time itself really runs faster or slower, not only physical processes. The principle of relativity leads to such headscratchers like the famous twin paradoxon, where the sibling that travels close to light speed is younger when returning than the one that stays at home, but no intuitive reason why this should be so – if everything is relative, why wouldn’t it be equally valid to consider the first twin as immobile? No such issues exist under Lorentzian Ether Theory, since there is an absolute frame of reference and so it is always clear which one of the two is changing his speed in relation to the ether.

    A common criticism against the Lorentz Ether Theory was the assertion that it is quite a coincidence that the length shrinks by exactly the value required to make a movement through the ether undetectable. However, it is not difficult to understand why such effects as length contraction and time dilation should happen, but not be detectable locally, if one does not assume, like early ether theories, that matter is something separate from the ether but instead that it is a part of it – like defects in the lattice structure of a crystal. It is naturally difficult to detect something you and your measurement apparatus are part of. Lorentz was also able to show that at least for electromagnetism both effects could be derived from the Maxwell equations that had been found earlier.

    But then Einstein came out in 1915 with the General Theory of Relativity, which sealed the triumph of relativity by providing a supposedly highly successful description of gravity. Whereas in Special Relativity spacetime had been considered as uniform, General Relativity now introduced gravity in the form of distortions in the spacetime fabric. However, this only works up to a certain scale – as soon as we go beyond galactic dimensions, General Relativity does not work anymore at all, the movement of galaxies is very different to that predicted by General Relativity. To correct for this, vast amounts of mysterious “Dark matter” have to be hypothesized. Despite much effort, any attempt to actually detect any of this hypothetical “Dark Matter” has failed.

    Another issue is the expansion of the universe; it was discovered in 1998 that, contrary to General Relativity, the universe does not only expand, but that this expansion is accelerating. For this another Ad Hoc hypothesis, the even more mysterious “Dark Energy” had to be made up. It is of course always possible to immunize a theory with enough Ad Hoc crutches, but when this “Dark Energy” is supposed to be 68% and “Dark Matter” 27% of the universe with only 5% left for actually observable matter it gets rather implausible.

    There are other highly problematic issues like the emergence of singularities as a consequence of the collapse of large stars, with all the seemingly intractable problems like information loss that this entails. Some scientists therefore see the appearance of singularities as a mathematical artefact and don’t think that it really happens in reality; interestingly this included Einstein himself, who thought that general relativity was an incomplete theory, which would be superseded by a singularity-free unified field theory. Of course, he never succeeded in delivering this theory. Furthermore, at least in principle, closed causal loops and time travel and therefore violations of causality are entirely valid solutions of General Relativity.

    The possibility of time flowing backwards – and not the supposedly nondeterministic nature of Quantum Theory (“God doesn’t play dices”) – is the real reason why Einstein was so hostile to it. There is, as Einstein knew very well, no intrinsic reason that Quantum Theory needs to be nondeterministic if one accepts nonlocality, as demonstrated by the De Broglie/Bohm interpretation of Quantum Theory. However, nonlocality – i.e. influences faster than the speed of light – mean in the context of the relativistic framework nothing less than time travel into the past. That was the reason why Einstein was so scandalized by the “spooky action at a distance” of quantum entanglement and why it took so long to be accepted by the scientific community. Even if we currently cannot use quantum entanglement to actually transmit information, the simple fact that faster than light influences exist is highly problematic for relativity.

    The most fundamental issue however is the fact, that it seems to be simply impossible to proceed further with the relativistic paradigm. In the late 1920s the two cutting edge theories to explain the basic fabric of our universe were General Relativity and Quantum Theory: General Relativity describes gravity, the force effective at long distances; Quantum Theory in contrast describes the forces effective at shorter ranges, e.g. electromagnetism and the weak and the strong interaction.

    Now, nearly a century later, we are essentially still in the same position. All work that has been done since then has been filling out details, but there has been no fundamental progress. Despite much effort, all attempts to reconcile General Relativity with Quantum Theory to create a unified theory have come to nothing. The great hope String Theory is now more or less admitted to be a failure and other approaches like Loop Quantum Gravity don’t look any better; fundamental physics has largely stagnated for many decades.

    The key reason for the failure to unify General Relativity with Quantum Theory is precisely the revolutionary new relativistic model of time and space for which Einstein is hailed. All efforts to graft it onto Quantum Theory have been an abject failure: Quantum Theory simply needs a fixed spatial background and absolute time to work. Given this – and the fact that Quantum Theory, in sharp contrast to General Relativity, has an entirely unblemished record when it comes to experimental verification – it is quite clear that it is relativity and not Quantum Theory that has to go. Einstein shunted physics on a fundamentally wrong track back in 1905.

    The description of the problem above indicates quite clearly the most promising direction to proceed: return to a preferred frame (i.e. ether) paradigm with absolute time and space and create a theory of gravity that is a counterpart to General Relativity in the same way as the Lorentzian Ether Theory relates to Special Relativity. This theory would then describe the general case of an ether with a varying “density” indicating gravitational distortions, whereas the Lorentzian Ether Theory, the analogon to Special Relativity, deals with the simplified border case of a homogenous ether. There is actually a bit of work going on along these lines, even though the frowned upon word “ether” is usually avoided – “condensed matter model/interpretation” is a dog whistle that is sometimes used instead (See, for instance https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10701-008-9262-9). However, due to the still unbroken blind faith in General Relativity such attempts have received hardly any attention.i

    It remains to be seen for how much longer progress will be blocked – the lack of success in the long running quest to detect the elusive “Dark Matter” seems to be causing some disquietude at long last. Perhaps there will also be some new piece of empirical evidence that finally tilts the mood against General Relativity. There are indications that certain properties of gravity waves might be used to distinguish between General Relativity and alternative theories. But in any case, the sheer length of time that ethnic hero worship of Einstein was able to inoculate an obviously highly flawed theory against any criticism is nothing short of astounding.

    • Thanks: mal, Marco de Wit
    • Replies: @utu
    @Menschmaschine

    I do not think you can do away with the Lorentz transform. It is here to stay. Lorentz and Galileo transforms are the only physical solutions based on symmetry assumptions among bilinear transforms. No relativity postulate of Poincare or Einstein postulate of speed of light invariance are invoked in the derivation. Vladimir Ignatowski in 1910 seems to be the first who did this derivation though it was Poincare who first observed that the transform must be an algebraic group. The parameter c is not determined at this stage.

    Then one easily demonstrates that only Lorentz transform makes Maxwell equation invariant in uniform linear motion so the Galileo transform has to be rejected. And also the parameter c is determined to be the speed of light and the Lorentz transform implies its invariance rendering Einstein postulate unnecessary. So the speed of light being constant is not something that Einstein had to postulate but a consequence of basic symmetries.

    Poincare realized that Newton 2nd law of dynamic is not invariant in Lorentz transform while it was invariant in Galileo transform. A hard decision had to be made: do you preserve Maxwell or Newton. This decision for good reasons was easy for Lorenz and Poincare who realized that mass in Newton equation must be velocity depended and so they introduced what was first called Lorentz mass, then Lorentz-Einstein mass and then relativistic mass.

    Since the Special Theory of Relativity (STR) is mathematically equivalent to stating that Lorentz transform is valid then STR is here to stay. Whether one do STR and still talk about ether there is no difference because as long as Lorentz transform is used all results and predictions are the same.

    As far the the General Theory of Relativity and gravity there is more room for change but because it is associated with Einstein who acquired a status of a secular saint life for those who want to challenge it can be hard. New phenomena and observations discovered be astronomers are quickly pronounced as confirming Einstein's GTR while not much energy and resources are spent to test the alternative theories.

    Should we be concerned about the Group Think effect surrounding GTR? While astronomy played a great role in the development of physics its impact on discoveries on technological inventions was small. The impact of STR and GTR outside the genre of Sci-Fi literature is nil. No practical invention hinges on STR. Much touted importance of Einstein's two theories of relativity in GPS is nil. The GPS was an engineering project designed with many redundancy that self-correct all possible drifts and thus the explicit formulas for time shifts as predicted by STR and GTR were not necessary. Despite of what they keep saying you can have GPS w/o Einstein.

    , @Bill
    @Menschmaschine


    Despite much effort, any attempt to actually detect any of this hypothetical “Dark Matter” has failed.
     
    You are referring to failures to detect dark matter directly in laboratories? But hasn't dark matter been detected via gravitational lensing and in the places predicted by the odd behavior of galaxy-scale objects?
  85. @melanf
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    In mass armies, you can find any types. Here the Soviet officer the same time

    https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/vazhskiy/14498672/16264/16264_640.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Europe Europa, @Znzn, @Mr. Hack

    A photo of Thorfinnsson perhaps? He reappeared for a short juncture in November, just in time for the presidential elections, and then disappeared again. Personally, I think that he had a short relapse and then went back into his 10 step program at his local Karlinaholics Anonymous chapter? 🙂

  86. @Mr. Hack
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    The fellow in the foreground looks like every village's Schmulik, but the officer in the background looks like Sergey Lavrov. But it couldn't be him right, for the photo looks like WWII vintage and the photo below is current date?:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/%28Sergey_Lavrov%29_2019_Comprehensive_Test-Ban_Treaty_Article_XIV_Conference_%2848832045357%29_%28cropped%29.jpg/220px-%28Sergey_Lavrov%29_2019_Comprehensive_Test-Ban_Treaty_Article_XIV_Conference_%2848832045357%29_%28cropped%29.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/FWn2NzC/Wehrmacht.jpg
    They're both even wearing wire rim glasses? :-)

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    but the officer in the background looks like Sergey Lavrov. But it couldn’t be him right, for the photo looks like WWII vintage and the photo below is current date?:

    Looks like Jeffrey Epstein as well.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Jeffrey Epstein? Nah, he's a dead ringer for Lavrov.

    Who is he anyway?

  87. Let us revive the spirit of Yalta and Nuremberg in this happy time of year. Merrie Yule to all!
    _____________

    Via Sputnik:

    Nürnberg — Casus pacis
    The Nuremberg Project

    https://en.nuremberg.media/
    “The Tribunal was an absolute innovation in history as it created the very procedural norms it observed.”

    Soviet Prosecution Sets Guidelines for Press to Cover Nuremberg Trial
    16 December, 00:01
    The Soviet Prosecution at Nuremberg demands journalists follow censorship rules.
    https://en.nuremberg.media/hronotop/20201216/69126/Soviet-Prosecution-Sets-Guidelines-for-Press-to-Cover-Nuremberg-Trial.html

  88. People have criticized Mr. Sailer before here, but, whatever his shortcomings might be (I leave them to others), I would award him a gold metal for popularizing (coining?) the word “fishcegenation”, which I think might be the greatest comedic word of all time. Or at least, contextual to the modern zeitgeist.

    I believe my previous favorite comedic word was “thunder snow.” But it requires hearing the deadpan delivery by a TV meteorologist to make it funny.
    ———–
    I wonder how many people have somehow been incapacitated – tied up by robbers, had a stroke, or a fall – and to add to their misery, autoplay results in hours of Jordan B. Peterson being played to them, while they whimper.

    Probably at least dozens, right at this moment.

  89. A bad type of geopolitical comedy perhaps:

    17. TASS: Nezavisimaya Gazeta: White House plans to reconcile Armenia and Azerbaijan while bypassing Russia.
    18. Jamestown Foundation: Paul Goble, Baku’s Success in Using Turkish Drones Raises Question: Could Ukraine Use Them Against Russia in Crimea?

    Or just flat out idiotic. What the establishment props nowadays.

  90. I have a profound moral obligation to reproduce this post:

    One of my anglo friends and I exchange joke e-mails between ourselves – him taking the p*ss out of Russia, me ridiculing Britain.

    He sends me this link :

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8949907/Ex-wife-Yorkshire-Ripper-Peter-Sutcliffe-marital-home-night-died.html

    This is an article about the wife “Sonia” of the UK’s apparently biggest ever serial killer, some freak called Sutcliffe referred to as the “Yorkshire ripper”-

    1.She STILL lives in the home that they lived in together when he was doing the murders 40+ years before
    2.This evil swine did not even divorce him until over a decade later
    3.Supposed to still be good friends with him
    4. He was supposedly a schizophrenic nutjob, “Sonia” is supposed to have had no idea (lol, BS) about what he was doing

    Now this is the text in the article that made my pal link it to me:

    The daughter of Ukrainian and Polish refugees

    This is sensational…..let me repeat

    The daughter of Ukrainian and Polish refugees

    Are you reading Karlin??

    The daughter of Ukrainian and Polish refugees

    Is it registering in your brain??

    THE DAUGHTER OF UKRAINIAN AND POLISH REFUGEES

    This is MI6 codetalk for “Nazi Galician Banderetard” – Nazi Galician useless, subroma, subhuman, evil , vile scum smuggled out of eastern Europe by British/American intelligence ….and so physical and intellectual property of british intelligence.

    There are no “refugees” in those circumstances, as they could easily have just referred to this bitch’s scumbag family as European Volunteer Worker, but they say in the article “refugee” – which is code and omission for sadist, war criminal.

    This only means one thing……..that the biggest serial killer in British history is “made in Galicia” ( well, something had to be LOL) and that the implausible failure to stop him, despite being questioned and arrested by Police several times is because from his wife, he was under protection of UK secret services or ( remember we are dealing with sicklow lowlife people here) he was directly following some UK intelligence game.

    Y

    ou can’t link his crimes to his wife or the fact she’s Galician

    OF COURSE you can you fools. I can feel it’s the truth- which is more than sufficient scientific and moral reason. It cant be a coincidence this Bandera connection.

    My friend assures me that only now has it ever been revealed this Ukrainian “refugee” BS. Before then she was referred to as being a Czechoslovakian is what he promises me has been reprinted since the time of his imprisonment. This omission doesn’t happen deliberately and only get revealed so long after the murders unless Anglo-press were deliberately under instructions. Of course her Banderetard parents could have been committing their crimes in Slovakia, which is how they could continue printing this misdirection on ethnicity.

    I knew it in my soul that for the most serious crimes commited in the west then a Galician retard would be involved.

    BTW further searching shows that “Sonia”‘s real name is actually………Oksana, Oksana Szurma ( probable anglo translation of Shurma, born 1950/51)

    F**k relative non-issues like Missile-Defence or new START Treaty – this is what should be the main subject of Putin’s next phone call with the American President.
    His big press conference tomorrow – he should get off his a** and answer about this Ukrop nutjob and British intelligence

    • LOL: Ray P
    • Replies: @Svevlad
    @Gerard-Mandela

    uuuh just say "transcarpathian Croat"

  91. @songbird
    Heard an interesting theory the other day about Indians and spicy food:

    They are so used to eating rotten food that they are genetically adapted to it, and their sense of taste has been dialed down accordingly, so they need stronger flavors to enjoy food.

    Honestly, I am a bit skeptical of it. I believe that many socio-historical theories, including this one about Indians and rotten food, are too influenced by modern life - in this case, the fact that refrigeration is common today, and we have difficulty believing in such things as extended-kin networks.

    Personally, I don't believe that Indians would kill a goat and then eat it, over the coarse of a few days, while it rotted - I don't think that makes sense. I think they might have killed a goat, cut in in half, then given the other half to their brother's family, with the expectation that he would respond in kind on the right feast day.

    Though, having said that, I think it would be interesting to delve into the genetics of Untouchables, and see whether they have any special adaptations for living in sewage-filled gutters and consuming refuse.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Svevlad, @utu, @Thulean Friend, @sher singh

    theory the other day about Indians and spicy food

    Food bacteria-spice survey shows why some cultures like it hot
    https://news.cornell.edu/stories/1998/03/food-bacteria-spice-survey-shows-why-some-cultures-it-hot

    Capsicums are not high on the list on the antimicrobial properties. They would no have a role in making eating spoiled food safer. Blocking bad taste and smell is dubious.

    There is no explanation why not everywhere in Central American or tropical South America capsicums are used. Nicaragua has as bland cuisine as Norway. Why not everywhere in South East Asia? So the the high temperature theory of the cooling effect by sweating is dubious.

    Capsicums area relatively recent addition to India, Thai and Sichuan cuisines. They did not have anything that hot before. Why did they get hooked on it? Hooked might be a right term as there is the addiction factor.

    The masochistic pleasure from eating hot capsicums is not considered in the article. How to maximize the effect of endorphin release to have the highest high of the longest duration by eating hot capsicums in the meal?

    Mexicans (chiefly males) like taking a small bites of fresh hot jalapeno during a meal (not with every bite) to get occasional spikes and rushes of endorphins and to get the psychological boost from the display of their machismo. The pleasure of oscillatory stimulus might be greater than from a constants stimulus at saturation level.

    Machismo element was the chief factor behind the trend that began in the US among young males population to like hot sauces and Mexican food. The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary.

    Thais while eating very hot meals sometimes have uncontrollable release of tears that may give a sense of catharsis. This is similar to the fictional scene of eating raw onions by Germans to induce tears to have a sense of the act of contrition for their sins in Gunter Grass novel.

    The spectrum between good and bad chefs and foods in hot spicy cuisine is narrow and thus more egalitarian which appeals to hoi polloi.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack, Svevlad
    • Troll: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @utu


    The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary
     
    This is one of the mot ridiculous things that I've ever read. Is this your own theory or did you pick it up somewhere second hand?

    Did you read this one, Anatoly? You may be attracted to having sex with horses and donkeys, because you like to ratchet it up once in a while with a ghost or scorpion pepper. I know an Orthodox Bishop who grows these kinds of peppers in his back yard. 🌶️🌶️🌶️. :-) :-) :-)

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @utu

    , @songbird
    @utu

    The theory of antimicrobial properties has to certainly be pure bunk. No way someone is going to eat enough to benefit and if they did it would probably upset their native gut flora.

    Many ancient references seem to list medical uses. Perhaps, there is a placebo effect for tasting something strong.


    Capsicums area relatively recent addition to India, Thai and Sichuan cuisines.
     
    This is true, but they also had native spices like peppercorns, so they probably had strong flavored-food, before the Columbian exchange.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  92. Yet more proof that Trump won Michigan. Multiple ballots with identical voter signatures.

    All Team SJWastika has is train wreck after train wreck. Every piece of evidence is against them.

    They dodged SCOTUS once over “Standing”, but there will be more suits filed with SCOTUS before Inauguration Day. Will the Justices:

    — Permanently discredit SCOTUS?
    — Or, will they be shamed into taking a case?

    Once SCOTUS takes a case, they will not be able to constrain it to an ultra narrow issue.

    #StopTheSteal

    PEACE 😇

  93. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Mr. Hack


    but the officer in the background looks like Sergey Lavrov. But it couldn’t be him right, for the photo looks like WWII vintage and the photo below is current date?:
     
    Looks like Jeffrey Epstein as well.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Jeffrey Epstein? Nah, he’s a dead ringer for Lavrov.

    Who is he anyway?

  94. @Coconuts
    @Europe Europa


    It seems to me that this aversion to white racial consciousness is going on on a deeper level than simply propaganda, it seems to be a deeply culturally ingrained, almost pathological belief, and so ingrained that it is resistant to logic and common sense in the way religious beliefs are.

    Pretty much all non-white groups in Western countries are very racially conscious, often overtly and aggressively so, you would think whites would observe this and think “maybe we need to do the same”, but in general that’s not what happens. Non-white racism towards whites seems to only increase the resolve of most whites to have no racial consciousness.
     
    I see that some white British people seem to have acquired an intense, almost fanatical aversion to white racial consciousness, but it seems to be centred on certain age groups and probably certain social classes. I live in a kind of provincial small town in the North, this sort of thing is much weaker here, people are still basically more reasonable.

    A potentially sinister aspect of it is that it has been reported that one of the only lasting effects of unconscious bias and anti-racist (TM) training is that is causes wealthy whites to look down on and be judgemental about poorer whites, and I can imagine a bizarre spin off of it being that nations in Eastern Europe which are both vast majority white and overall poorer than Western ones are seen as inherently sinister and fascistic, just for being what they naturally are.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @128, @Sinotibetan

    It is ironic how this blog worships IQ until those with high IQ do not have the same political beliefs as them?

  95. @utu
    @songbird


    theory the other day about Indians and spicy food
     
    Food bacteria-spice survey shows why some cultures like it hot
    https://news.cornell.edu/stories/1998/03/food-bacteria-spice-survey-shows-why-some-cultures-it-hot

    Capsicums are not high on the list on the antimicrobial properties. They would no have a role in making eating spoiled food safer. Blocking bad taste and smell is dubious.

    There is no explanation why not everywhere in Central American or tropical South America capsicums are used. Nicaragua has as bland cuisine as Norway. Why not everywhere in South East Asia? So the the high temperature theory of the cooling effect by sweating is dubious.

    Capsicums area relatively recent addition to India, Thai and Sichuan cuisines. They did not have anything that hot before. Why did they get hooked on it? Hooked might be a right term as there is the addiction factor.

    The masochistic pleasure from eating hot capsicums is not considered in the article. How to maximize the effect of endorphin release to have the highest high of the longest duration by eating hot capsicums in the meal?

    Mexicans (chiefly males) like taking a small bites of fresh hot jalapeno during a meal (not with every bite) to get occasional spikes and rushes of endorphins and to get the psychological boost from the display of their machismo. The pleasure of oscillatory stimulus might be greater than from a constants stimulus at saturation level.

    Machismo element was the chief factor behind the trend that began in the US among young males population to like hot sauces and Mexican food. The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary.

    Thais while eating very hot meals sometimes have uncontrollable release of tears that may give a sense of catharsis. This is similar to the fictional scene of eating raw onions by Germans to induce tears to have a sense of the act of contrition for their sins in Gunter Grass novel.

    The spectrum between good and bad chefs and foods in hot spicy cuisine is narrow and thus more egalitarian which appeals to hoi polloi.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @songbird

    The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary

    This is one of the mot ridiculous things that I’ve ever read. Is this your own theory or did you pick it up somewhere second hand?

    Did you read this one, Anatoly? You may be attracted to having sex with horses and donkeys, because you like to ratchet it up once in a while with a ghost or scorpion pepper. I know an Orthodox Bishop who grows these kinds of peppers in his back yard. 🌶️🌶️🌶️. 🙂 🙂 🙂

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @Mr. Hack

    A powerful take.

    , @utu
    @Mr. Hack

    "Orthodox Bishop who grows these kinds of peppers in his back yard" knows very well not to touch himself after handling the peppers. Though it has been recorded that some women like the extra stimulation from a chilly marinade. Men no so much. Women's equipment is more robust.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  96. @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi

    This is the most common dish among all Mongolic people, Buuz or Buuza, steamed meat filled dumplings, and they are very taste, unlike Chinese baozi, which are made with yeast dough.
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ee/9f/da/ee9fdac4be7449f30c65793b9c969838.jpg
    More basic Mongolian staple food is hard to find.

    Then there is khuushuur which is fried meat pastry.

    https://kafedari.ru/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/hushuur-s-rublenoi-govyadinoi-2.jpg
    Tasty and fatty! Also very popular and common food.

    Then there are different kind simple meat noodle soups, but unlike with other Asians, Mongolians noodles are always homemade and very broad

    https://avatars.mds.yandex.net/get-zen_doc/1538903/pub_5ce3bb1e83178c00b33609ad_5ce3bb2d856cd5031a70b24b/scale_1200

    But most common or traditional Mongolian food is just boiling lamb meat with bones and eating it with hands and drinking it with bouillon, after all frying is only suitable for gays, it makes the meat lose all is precious juices and vitamins, so no hard core survivalist warrior would spoil his meat in such way. After good boiling you can eat all tendons and fat, mm tasty!

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @AltanBakshi, @Jayce, @wei

    Those things are great. I had them a few times at this little place in the basement of the Datsan Gunzechoinei in St Petersburg where they’d sell them with some milk tea for super cheap after the khurals.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Jayce

    Yes, actually buuzas are much better in our Datsan, but there is only two different dishes there, meat lapsha soup and buuzas, okay you can also buy dark bread and simple salad. I was thinking if Karlin wants some variety.

    Its so absurd that in western Buddhist circles the meat is quite verboten, and almost never eaten if there is some kind of Buddhist gathering, but then in our historical and authentic Buddhist temples you can eat non veg food, and there isnt even a choice to eat vegetarian.

    Okay in the temples of Chinese tradition they are very strict with the vegetarianism, but most westerners dont follow Chinese traditions in Europe, in America its different case with all the (japanese pseudo-)Zen there.

  97. I do not think the EU as a European superstate would be a bad idea, provided it was not anti-white, basically an EU based on the idea of preserving European whites, while promoting free movement of finance, labor, and trade within Europe in order to decrease transaction costs within Europe, would be a good idea, if you look at a country like the Czech Republic, Slovakia, or Slovenia, it has too small a talent pool, based on its own native population only, to fully develop its economy, and so would benefit from more open European borders, in terms of accessing a wider talent pool, like an influx of German rocket scientists.

  98. @Europe Europa
    @melanf

    I recall reading that the first waves of Soviet soldiers to arrive in Berlin and take control of parts of the city were largely ethnic Slavs, and on the whole didn't treat German civilians that badly. Apparently it was the later waves of troops from more far-flung parts of the Soviet Union, a high percentage of whom were non-white, who committed the Rape of Berlin, encouraged by rabidly anti-white Jewish commanders and politicians.

    No idea if there's any truth to that, or whether that is just white nationalist-style revisionism.

    Replies: @melanf, @Gerard.Gerard

    I recall reading that the first waves of Soviet soldiers to arrive in Berlin and take control of parts of the city were largely ethnic Slavs, and on the whole didn’t treat German

    It seems to me that this is a legend, as well as the whole”rape of Berlin”. Of course there were rapes, but the propaganda picture from the works of Anglo-American authors is fake. A “laboratory-clean example” of how such fakes are fabricated is the town of Nemmersdorf. It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape (“one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably”). The Anglo-American authors were not satisfied with such conclusions. As Beevor, Hastings, etc. can tell, all the remaining “sixty-two women and young girls raped and murdered by Soviet soldiers” in Nemmersdorf, ” not a single civilian escaped death at the hands of Russian soldiers. Women were crucified on the doors of sheds and overturned carts or, after being raped, crushed under the tracks of tanks. Their children were also brutally murdered .” The legend was created in several waves – in Germany, under the supervision of the Americans, one after another, another campaign was held to expose the Soviet atrocities in Nemmersdorf (films, radio programs, etc.), after which new “witnesses” of these atrocities appeared, which allowed to launch a new campaign of revelations, etc. At the same time, evidence did not fit into the narrative (Feldwebel Helmut Hoffmann about the killed civilians : “It seemed strange that there were no exit holes on the corpses: small entrance and lack of blood. It was more like shots fired from a distance than shots fired at close range”) they were simply ignored, but the deliberate lies that were convenient for propaganda purposes were replicated in every possible way. This is a chemically pure example of how the legend of the rape of Germany was created – when real cases were falsified creating a fake picture. With Berlin, the same story, with the caveat that there was no SS commission in Berlin, and it is impossible to verify post-war fictions

    • Agree: mal, AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Demografie
    @melanf

    I read somewhere that Russian generals were pressured to win hearts and minds of Germans. NKVD did have several waves of investigation and killing of responsible soldiers and commanders. Yes, there were antrocities, but not on large scale and it wasn't encouraged by Soviet leadership. If Soviets were to kill and rape Germans, after WWII East Germany would look different.
    It is one of the mythology of WWII. Another one is Soviet mistreatment of German soldiers which were captured. You have higher chance to survive war as German captured by Soviets then vice versa. There were petitions of captured Soviets soldiers begging Germans rather to be shot then left die of hunger and frostbite. so far for European humanity.

    , @utu
    @melanf


    A “laboratory-clean example” of how such fakes are fabricated is the town of Nemmersdorf. It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape (“one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably”).
     
    Nemmersdorf is not an example I would pick if I were you. The Red Army unit that captured it was more into the kinky stuff. Rape was just a foreplay for them. They were more into torture and slow killing like nailing women to barn door. The event is unquestionable. It was exploited and embellish by Nazi propaganda but most of it was true.

    Replies: @melanf, @German_reader

    , @Coconuts
    @melanf


    It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape (“one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably”). The Anglo-American authors were not satisfied with such conclusions.
     
    I thought the Nemmersdorf thing was a Nazi propaganda operation, the film was made by Goebbels' propaganda machine in 1944 to inspire German fighting spirit.

    Replies: @melanf

  99. @Znzn
    @mal

    I actually find basic chemistry less intuitive than basic physics, since you can see physics in action in front of you.

    Replies: @mal

    Yea there is some of that. I’m a chemical engineer and wife is a chemist. For example, I run reactors where you have to keep raising the pH going to reactor in order to lower the pH in the reactor. (Has to do with various solubility parameters and several reaction mechanisms competing). If you actually succeed in raising the pH by mistake reactor will detonate (not good). Go figure that one out.

    But yea, like AP said, it’s a lot like cooking, just with more existential dread. Add ingredients, mix, cool, heat, yell at people when pipes clog up. Chicks like that sort of thing.

  100. How are house prices in good large Russian cities relative to income, what is say, the price of a 2 to 3 bedroom apartment in a good middle class to upper middle class area of St. Petersburg?

    • Replies: @melanf
    @128

    What was first found in the search engine: 10 500 000 ₽ 4-room. apartment, 102.8 m2, 1st floor.
    https://www.domofond.ru/4-komnatnaya-kvartira-na-prodazhu-sankt_peterburg-3084639841

    Kurortny district of St. Petersburg, this place looks
    https://cdn.ostrovok.ru/t/1024x768/second/b7/e1/b7e1129674ac38eb93cca50c1f06755c08687726.jpeg

    Replies: @128

  101. @songbird
    @AltanB


    And your grandpa was Jew then, they think that rabbit is horribly dirty animal. Yes its a traditional Jewish belief that rabbit is unclean and unedible, no European Christian has thought so ever, really man!
     
    I'm not so sure. Rabbits practice coprophagia. Dogs do too, and no European would ever eat a dog. On top of their coprophagia, they are also quite soft and gentle animals. Rabbit is the one Jewish food prohibition I have sympathy for - not that I would institute it.

    Of course, there are many Europeans that eat rabbits, but it is also true that there are lots of Europeans folktales where a rabbit ruins a feast by coming unto the table and dirtying it. Probably Europeans only ate rabbits, out of hardship, and being prevented from hunting by the nobility.

    Dutch kept them segregated, you made them equal and welcomed them to the governing caste, so it was you who let the beast out from the cage...It all started after you killed your rightful king, and your Glorious Revolution was the sealing of the blood pact with demons...Those damn Papists, you should kept them under control.
     
    Just for the record, I am a Taige. Though curiously, I believe you are the third person to accuse me of being an Anglo, on this forum.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Taige? You mean Irish? The stuff about Papists was a joke.

    I know that most westerners are very removed from nature, so this sounds strange to you, but there is huge hygiene difference between dung of carnivores and herbivores. Cow and yak dung can be dried and used as heating fuel, and there is no bad smell, or chance of infections. Also I dont believe that hares are as dirty as rabbits, they are quite different in behaviour and how they nest. Hare is excellent for stews.

  102. @128
    How are house prices in good large Russian cities relative to income, what is say, the price of a 2 to 3 bedroom apartment in a good middle class to upper middle class area of St. Petersburg?

    Replies: @melanf

    What was first found in the search engine: 10 500 000 ₽ 4-room. apartment, 102.8 m2, 1st floor.
    https://www.domofond.ru/4-komnatnaya-kvartira-na-prodazhu-sankt_peterburg-3084639841

    Kurortny district of St. Petersburg, this place looks

    • Replies: @128
    @melanf

    That is very cheap for a country with a standard of living like Russia in a Tier 1 city, condos in upper middle class and middle class in good areas in Manila, Jakarta, or Bangkok sell for a lot more expensive than that, I guess for a foreign buyer, the concern is if Russia gets expelled from SWIFT, since a foreign buyer will be transferring funds from his country to a Russian bank.

  103. @Jayce
    @AltanBakshi

    Those things are great. I had them a few times at this little place in the basement of the Datsan Gunzechoinei in St Petersburg where they'd sell them with some milk tea for super cheap after the khurals.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Yes, actually buuzas are much better in our Datsan, but there is only two different dishes there, meat lapsha soup and buuzas, okay you can also buy dark bread and simple salad. I was thinking if Karlin wants some variety.

    Its so absurd that in western Buddhist circles the meat is quite verboten, and almost never eaten if there is some kind of Buddhist gathering, but then in our historical and authentic Buddhist temples you can eat non veg food, and there isnt even a choice to eat vegetarian.

    Okay in the temples of Chinese tradition they are very strict with the vegetarianism, but most westerners dont follow Chinese traditions in Europe, in America its different case with all the (japanese pseudo-)Zen there.

  104. @songbird
    Heard an interesting theory the other day about Indians and spicy food:

    They are so used to eating rotten food that they are genetically adapted to it, and their sense of taste has been dialed down accordingly, so they need stronger flavors to enjoy food.

    Honestly, I am a bit skeptical of it. I believe that many socio-historical theories, including this one about Indians and rotten food, are too influenced by modern life - in this case, the fact that refrigeration is common today, and we have difficulty believing in such things as extended-kin networks.

    Personally, I don't believe that Indians would kill a goat and then eat it, over the coarse of a few days, while it rotted - I don't think that makes sense. I think they might have killed a goat, cut in in half, then given the other half to their brother's family, with the expectation that he would respond in kind on the right feast day.

    Though, having said that, I think it would be interesting to delve into the genetics of Untouchables, and see whether they have any special adaptations for living in sewage-filled gutters and consuming refuse.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Svevlad, @utu, @Thulean Friend, @sher singh

    Heard an interesting theory the other day about Indians and spicy food:

    They are so used to eating rotten food that they are genetically adapted to it, and their sense of taste has been dialed down accordingly, so they need stronger flavors to enjoy food.

    I think it has more to do with broader cultural preferences. You can see it in music or even in social interactions. Brown people tend to be louder, more aggressive. This is reflected in everything from food to how loud they are when talking or music choices.

    I think of these cultures as ‘extroverted’ whereas North-Western and North-Eastern cultures tend to be “introverted” and have more mellow cultural mores, with a greater emphasis on humility and toned down social codes. Law of Jante didn’t come out of nowhere.

    The extroverted cultures are more interesting on a surface level, they draw your attention whether you like it or not whereas the introverted cultures requires a finer-grained appreciation of the more sophisticated matters in life, where subtle cues and what is often not said can matter as much as to what is.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Thulean Friend

    I've been considering the possibility that spices are linked to social factors. When I see white Americans using Tabasco I take I as a sign of extraversion.

    But it is harder to say what it is in a cultural context. Japanese have some very strong flavors, don't they? Fermented stuff. Yet they seem a very diffident people. I've noted before how they seem to excel at depicting shy characters, in contrast to Hollywood.

    Maybe, it has something to do with rice-based cuisine or a largely vegetarian diet?

    Replies: @Svevlad

  105. A few writers I find worthy of keeping an eye on.

    https://lukecapital.substack.com/ – VC living in Taiwan of Chinese-American background. Focuses a lot on China.

    https://jack-clark.net/ – OpenAI’s comms director who does a useful news sweep of AI-related news.

    Studio Ghibli’s Toshio Suzuki on four decades of anime magic

    Vinay Sitapati on Vajpayee, Advani and the success of the Hindu nationalist movement

    From Steve Sailer’s blog: New York City Will Change Many Selective Schools to Address Segregation. The war on meritocracy strikes me as a uniquely American obsession. Michael’s Sandel recent book The Tyranny of Merit is an excellent example of that.

    Given the huge cultural influence that the US has over its subcolonial entities in Europe, I expect this to come to here sooner rather than later.

    There’s already a raging debate about our school choice system. Sweden has the most liberal school choice system of all OECD countries – even Chile. Some of the criticisms are fair, such as “skimming the cream” and leaving the public schools saddled with the worst students despite all schools getting the same funding. This means that the best students cost less for privately-owned schools and the extra differential can be taken out as net profit and distributed to shareholders. Almost all private schools are run as corporations with a few mega-rich owners but the funding is mostly coming from the tax-payers.

    Still, nobody is really questioning the basic purpose of the system. Nor is there any debate on abolishing the importance of test scores or grades. The NYC method of a simple lottery is pure lunacy. The fastest way to enrich private corporations is making sure the public school system cannot accomodate and grow the most gifted. Nobody wants to be stuck with the rabble.

    • Replies: @128
    @Thulean Friend

    It has merit if the accusation is that they are focusing on test scores too much in the expense of other personality attributes.

    , @128
    @Thulean Friend

    Has anybody has what exactly are test scores testing? And grouping all weak students in a single group is dumb, in the military you tend to distribute veterans among the green units in order to give the green units some experienced leadership, the same should apply terms of distributing stronger students among the weaker among the weaker ones in order to improve their performance. Just because people like you are obsessed with IQ does not mean that IQ or test scores are all that matters, have you even tried to step into the real world?

    , @AltanBakshi
    @Thulean Friend

    Actually everywhere in India Buddhists had already lost the political power to Hindus centuries before Islamic invasions, so thats another nail to your stupid thesis that Buddhism made people unable to stand against Islam.


    There was one Buddhist state that endured centuries in the Highlands of Afghanistan resisting Muslims, The Ghurs or Ghurids. But everywhere in India, except Kashmir and Himalayas, Buddhists had lost all political power, we have lots of anecdotal evidence from 8th century Chinese pilgrims telling how the Buddhism was losing ground to Hinduism in India, though the process was gradual and there was huge regional variation.


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ad/Abbasid_Caliphate_891-892.png
    The situation for Ghurids in 892 AD.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6c/Map_of_the_Samanid_amirate_at_the_death_of_Nasr_II%2C_943.svg/1603px-Map_of_the_Samanid_amirate_at_the_death_of_Nasr_II%2C_943.svg.png
    The situation in 943 AD.

    The Ghurids endured till 1011 AD, they lost after 4 centuries of resistance and struggle against the Islamic hordes.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @g2k
    @Thulean Friend


    The war on meritocracy strikes me as a uniquely American obsession.
     
    I think it's probably an Anglo thing. The grammar school debate in the UK mirrors this, only there's no racial aspect to it, or there wasn't in the 1970s when most of the damage was done (by Shirley Williams; a minor aristocrat turned liberal politician). Any time any suggestion is made that public money should be spent on educating talented kids above a very low minimum standard, these types will complain that it doesn't help the "most disadvantaged".

    Replies: @Europe Europa

  106. @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I wouldn't say that European food, as a whole, is weird. I think it is not very weird in a global context, but only in a more bourgeoisie American one. My own grandfather was absolutely revolted at the idea that anyone would eat rabbit - one of the filthiest animals, as he conceived it. Which is quite funny, considering the isolated valleys where his folks came from.

    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally - a food many of my relatives like - black pudding - I don't know about the taste - but it is revolting to see it made.

    As to Mongolian food, have you ever seen that drink they make with a sheep's eyeball in carrot juice?

    Incidentally, that reminds me, of a thought I had the other day: I don't know if any history written by a Westerner who is a vegetarian is really believable.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Saucier, @Saucier, @Saucier, @EldnahYm

    I’ve never heard of rabbit being a filthy animal. As far as coprophagia goes, pigs do it and pork is the best kind of meat along with beef.

    Rabbit is a common and popular dish in France and elsewhere in Europe. It’s also been a trendy dish in restaurants recently.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/dining/rabbit-recipe.html

    It remains a mystery to me why a delicious rabbit dinner, a habit in France, is such a hard sell in the United States, a meal many Americans would shy away from. This is not to say that you can’t buy rabbit here, but you don’t see it on a daily basis in butcher shops or at the supermarket.

    When I lived in Paris about 10 years ago, rabbit was always in the weekly dinner rotation. Every butcher shop has rabbits, fetchingly displayed belly-side up, so shoppers can see how fresh, pink and pristine they are.

    I find pigeon much less appetizing than rabbit, although that might be due to the pigeon’s association with large cities and streets.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Saucier

    After watching a bit of that cooking video made by the English Heritage, I started to imagine how cool it would be if England would become völkisch/folkish fascist state, with some juche thinking. At least English telly would become interesting again!

    Though I havent watched TV for almost 20 years, I must say that when I did watch it, I always enjoyed more British broadcasts than American. British TV shows seemed more authentic and more down to earth.

    , @songbird
    @Saucier


    As far as coprophagia goes, pigs do it
     
    I recall a reference to this in the novel Lucifer's Hammer. I assumed that they only do it under constrained circumstances though, as they seem to have a reputation for being very clean animals - other than the mud.
  107. @Thulean Friend
    A few writers I find worthy of keeping an eye on.

    https://lukecapital.substack.com/ - VC living in Taiwan of Chinese-American background. Focuses a lot on China.

    https://jack-clark.net/ - OpenAI's comms director who does a useful news sweep of AI-related news.

    ---

    Studio Ghibli’s Toshio Suzuki on four decades of anime magic

    Vinay Sitapati on Vajpayee, Advani and the success of the Hindu nationalist movement

    ---

    From Steve Sailer's blog: New York City Will Change Many Selective Schools to Address Segregation. The war on meritocracy strikes me as a uniquely American obsession. Michael's Sandel recent book The Tyranny of Merit is an excellent example of that.

    Given the huge cultural influence that the US has over its subcolonial entities in Europe, I expect this to come to here sooner rather than later.

    There's already a raging debate about our school choice system. Sweden has the most liberal school choice system of all OECD countries - even Chile. Some of the criticisms are fair, such as "skimming the cream" and leaving the public schools saddled with the worst students despite all schools getting the same funding. This means that the best students cost less for privately-owned schools and the extra differential can be taken out as net profit and distributed to shareholders. Almost all private schools are run as corporations with a few mega-rich owners but the funding is mostly coming from the tax-payers.

    Still, nobody is really questioning the basic purpose of the system. Nor is there any debate on abolishing the importance of test scores or grades. The NYC method of a simple lottery is pure lunacy. The fastest way to enrich private corporations is making sure the public school system cannot accomodate and grow the most gifted. Nobody wants to be stuck with the rabble.

    Replies: @128, @128, @AltanBakshi, @g2k

    It has merit if the accusation is that they are focusing on test scores too much in the expense of other personality attributes.

  108. @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I wouldn't say that European food, as a whole, is weird. I think it is not very weird in a global context, but only in a more bourgeoisie American one. My own grandfather was absolutely revolted at the idea that anyone would eat rabbit - one of the filthiest animals, as he conceived it. Which is quite funny, considering the isolated valleys where his folks came from.

    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally - a food many of my relatives like - black pudding - I don't know about the taste - but it is revolting to see it made.

    As to Mongolian food, have you ever seen that drink they make with a sheep's eyeball in carrot juice?

    Incidentally, that reminds me, of a thought I had the other day: I don't know if any history written by a Westerner who is a vegetarian is really believable.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Saucier, @Saucier, @Saucier, @EldnahYm

    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally – a food many of my relatives like – black pudding – I don’t know about the taste – but it is revolting to see it made.

    Organ meat was the main protein source for most people along with dairy until recently with factory farming which made muscle protein cheaply available. See Derbyshire’s comment here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/everybody-hates-david-brooks-sandwich-story/#comment-1931053

    Huge change from my 1950s prole English childhood then. It was offal all the way down, except for Sunday dinner (=lunch). Liver & onions … deviled kidneys … tripe … sweetbreads (pancreas, I think) … stuffed sheep’s heart … One of my aunts used to serve us brains on toast.

    • Thanks: songbird
  109. @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I wouldn't say that European food, as a whole, is weird. I think it is not very weird in a global context, but only in a more bourgeoisie American one. My own grandfather was absolutely revolted at the idea that anyone would eat rabbit - one of the filthiest animals, as he conceived it. Which is quite funny, considering the isolated valleys where his folks came from.

    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally - a food many of my relatives like - black pudding - I don't know about the taste - but it is revolting to see it made.

    As to Mongolian food, have you ever seen that drink they make with a sheep's eyeball in carrot juice?

    Incidentally, that reminds me, of a thought I had the other day: I don't know if any history written by a Westerner who is a vegetarian is really believable.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Saucier, @Saucier, @Saucier, @EldnahYm

    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally – a food many of my relatives like – black pudding – I don’t know about the taste – but it is revolting to see it made.

    Organ meat was the main protein source for most people along with dairy until recently with factory farming which made muscle protein cheaply available. See Derbyshire’s comment here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/everybody-hates-david-brooks-sandwich-story/#comment-1931053

    Huge change from my 1950s prole English childhood then. It was offal all the way down, except for Sunday dinner (=lunch). Liver & onions … deviled kidneys … tripe … sweetbreads (pancreas, I think) … stuffed sheep’s heart … One of my aunts used to serve us brains on toast.

  110. Ukrainian Salo is tasty, especially in Hungarian style with peppers and garlic, but its nothing compared to Arbin or Mongolian style raw horse liver with salt. Fat has a simple taste, but liver has rich and delicate taste. One is good for peasants and another for warriors. I am comparing it to Salo because its also often frozen and eaten cold like Salo and its usually, but not always mixed with horses fat.

    https://i1.wp.com/budaev.org/wp-content/uploads/arbin-3.jpg?fit=660%2C494&ssl=1

    https://budaev.org/elgentey/amp/

    Mongolian food is simple and good, it and Tibetan cuisine dont have anything common with Chinese, except broad noodles and using lots of dough like Northern Chinese do.

    • Replies: @Tor597
    @AltanBakshi

    Hmm, interesting.

    How good are Mongolian Desserts?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  111. @AltanBakshi
    @sher singh

    When Singhs are gonna stop larping and make Khalsa real deal again?

    I am still waiting for militaristic Sikh theocracy in Hindustan waging eternal war against Mlecchas and Turks.

    Replies: @sher singh

    Do u want to get stabbed?

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @sher singh

    I would like wrestling more, never been a knife fighter guy...

  112. @Thulean Friend
    A few writers I find worthy of keeping an eye on.

    https://lukecapital.substack.com/ - VC living in Taiwan of Chinese-American background. Focuses a lot on China.

    https://jack-clark.net/ - OpenAI's comms director who does a useful news sweep of AI-related news.

    ---

    Studio Ghibli’s Toshio Suzuki on four decades of anime magic

    Vinay Sitapati on Vajpayee, Advani and the success of the Hindu nationalist movement

    ---

    From Steve Sailer's blog: New York City Will Change Many Selective Schools to Address Segregation. The war on meritocracy strikes me as a uniquely American obsession. Michael's Sandel recent book The Tyranny of Merit is an excellent example of that.

    Given the huge cultural influence that the US has over its subcolonial entities in Europe, I expect this to come to here sooner rather than later.

    There's already a raging debate about our school choice system. Sweden has the most liberal school choice system of all OECD countries - even Chile. Some of the criticisms are fair, such as "skimming the cream" and leaving the public schools saddled with the worst students despite all schools getting the same funding. This means that the best students cost less for privately-owned schools and the extra differential can be taken out as net profit and distributed to shareholders. Almost all private schools are run as corporations with a few mega-rich owners but the funding is mostly coming from the tax-payers.

    Still, nobody is really questioning the basic purpose of the system. Nor is there any debate on abolishing the importance of test scores or grades. The NYC method of a simple lottery is pure lunacy. The fastest way to enrich private corporations is making sure the public school system cannot accomodate and grow the most gifted. Nobody wants to be stuck with the rabble.

    Replies: @128, @128, @AltanBakshi, @g2k

    Has anybody has what exactly are test scores testing? And grouping all weak students in a single group is dumb, in the military you tend to distribute veterans among the green units in order to give the green units some experienced leadership, the same should apply terms of distributing stronger students among the weaker among the weaker ones in order to improve their performance. Just because people like you are obsessed with IQ does not mean that IQ or test scores are all that matters, have you even tried to step into the real world?

    • Disagree: Blinky Bill
  113. @songbird
    Heard an interesting theory the other day about Indians and spicy food:

    They are so used to eating rotten food that they are genetically adapted to it, and their sense of taste has been dialed down accordingly, so they need stronger flavors to enjoy food.

    Honestly, I am a bit skeptical of it. I believe that many socio-historical theories, including this one about Indians and rotten food, are too influenced by modern life - in this case, the fact that refrigeration is common today, and we have difficulty believing in such things as extended-kin networks.

    Personally, I don't believe that Indians would kill a goat and then eat it, over the coarse of a few days, while it rotted - I don't think that makes sense. I think they might have killed a goat, cut in in half, then given the other half to their brother's family, with the expectation that he would respond in kind on the right feast day.

    Though, having said that, I think it would be interesting to delve into the genetics of Untouchables, and see whether they have any special adaptations for living in sewage-filled gutters and consuming refuse.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Svevlad, @utu, @Thulean Friend, @sher singh

    Indians won’t even eat breakfast leftovers for lunch, Europoors stay trollin cuz their food sucks||

    • Replies: @Another German Reader
    @sher singh

    I don't know but aren't the Indian men the ones with the weakest grip-strenght?

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    , @songbird
    @sher singh


    Europoors stay trollin cuz their food sucks
     
    Beef is the ambrosia of the gods.

    It is the source of the genius of European man, and the reason that he has fallen is because of those cucked fiends eating impossible burgers, and promoting African foods like crickets.

    In 1965, when Wally Schirra smuggled a sandwich aboard Gemini to John Young, it was beef. Both men later went to the moon. Coincidence? I think not!

    Replies: @Jatt Aryaa

  114. @Thulean Friend
    A few writers I find worthy of keeping an eye on.

    https://lukecapital.substack.com/ - VC living in Taiwan of Chinese-American background. Focuses a lot on China.

    https://jack-clark.net/ - OpenAI's comms director who does a useful news sweep of AI-related news.

    ---

    Studio Ghibli’s Toshio Suzuki on four decades of anime magic

    Vinay Sitapati on Vajpayee, Advani and the success of the Hindu nationalist movement

    ---

    From Steve Sailer's blog: New York City Will Change Many Selective Schools to Address Segregation. The war on meritocracy strikes me as a uniquely American obsession. Michael's Sandel recent book The Tyranny of Merit is an excellent example of that.

    Given the huge cultural influence that the US has over its subcolonial entities in Europe, I expect this to come to here sooner rather than later.

    There's already a raging debate about our school choice system. Sweden has the most liberal school choice system of all OECD countries - even Chile. Some of the criticisms are fair, such as "skimming the cream" and leaving the public schools saddled with the worst students despite all schools getting the same funding. This means that the best students cost less for privately-owned schools and the extra differential can be taken out as net profit and distributed to shareholders. Almost all private schools are run as corporations with a few mega-rich owners but the funding is mostly coming from the tax-payers.

    Still, nobody is really questioning the basic purpose of the system. Nor is there any debate on abolishing the importance of test scores or grades. The NYC method of a simple lottery is pure lunacy. The fastest way to enrich private corporations is making sure the public school system cannot accomodate and grow the most gifted. Nobody wants to be stuck with the rabble.

    Replies: @128, @128, @AltanBakshi, @g2k

    Actually everywhere in India Buddhists had already lost the political power to Hindus centuries before Islamic invasions, so thats another nail to your stupid thesis that Buddhism made people unable to stand against Islam.

    There was one Buddhist state that endured centuries in the Highlands of Afghanistan resisting Muslims, The Ghurs or Ghurids. But everywhere in India, except Kashmir and Himalayas, Buddhists had lost all political power, we have lots of anecdotal evidence from 8th century Chinese pilgrims telling how the Buddhism was losing ground to Hinduism in India, though the process was gradual and there was huge regional variation.

    The situation for Ghurids in 892 AD.
    The situation in 943 AD.

    The Ghurids endured till 1011 AD, they lost after 4 centuries of resistance and struggle against the Islamic hordes.

    • LOL: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @AltanBakshi

    Buddhism losing adherents to Hinduism isn't that strange. As you yourself have acknowledged, Hindus and Buddhists are like brothers. Converting from one to the other is not a big deal. Islam is definitely not like them. So one would expect militant resistance. Hinduism succeeded, albeit heavily damaged. Buddhism completely failed and faded from the Central Asian map.


    they lost after 4 centuries of resistance and struggle against the Islamic hordes.
     
    Amazing. Meanwhile, India was invaded more than 8 centuries ago by the moslem hordes and it is still standing, while shielding the weaker buddhists further to the east. It's pretty clear which of these two is the stronger religion. Cope more.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  115. @sher singh
    @AltanBakshi

    Do u want to get stabbed?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    I would like wrestling more, never been a knife fighter guy…

  116. And really what affects real world performance outside of a basement is both IQ (with different types of IQ) and personality attributes, with both being equal, and in some professions like sales, arguably the latter are somewhat more important, people here should stop being one dimensional autists with regards to these issues.

  117. @Saucier
    @songbird

    I've never heard of rabbit being a filthy animal. As far as coprophagia goes, pigs do it and pork is the best kind of meat along with beef.

    Rabbit is a common and popular dish in France and elsewhere in Europe. It's also been a trendy dish in restaurants recently.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/dining/rabbit-recipe.html


    It remains a mystery to me why a delicious rabbit dinner, a habit in France, is such a hard sell in the United States, a meal many Americans would shy away from. This is not to say that you can’t buy rabbit here, but you don’t see it on a daily basis in butcher shops or at the supermarket.

    When I lived in Paris about 10 years ago, rabbit was always in the weekly dinner rotation. Every butcher shop has rabbits, fetchingly displayed belly-side up, so shoppers can see how fresh, pink and pristine they are.
     
    I find pigeon much less appetizing than rabbit, although that might be due to the pigeon's association with large cities and streets.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xq8tj1uy1Gk

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @songbird

    After watching a bit of that cooking video made by the English Heritage, I started to imagine how cool it would be if England would become völkisch/folkish fascist state, with some juche thinking. At least English telly would become interesting again!

    Though I havent watched TV for almost 20 years, I must say that when I did watch it, I always enjoyed more British broadcasts than American. British TV shows seemed more authentic and more down to earth.

  118. @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    Looks like a good, fun restaurant to go to. Too bad there's not a menu, so that one could see if there's more variety in the kitchen to choose from though?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    I think that they have better looking menus nowadays, but the dishes have stayed more or less same.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    Thanks for the introduction here to the world of Mongolian gastronomic delights. I'm presenting you the following as they say "just for your information". It's certainly not meant to impress you, and I hope that you have a sense of humor that might help you "stomach it". There are many "Mongolian style" restaurants state side, but from what you've presented here they don't even merit being called "McMongolian". The only way I can explain them to you is to compare them Japanese teppanyaki or hibachi style grills. Typically these one dimensional restaurants offer their clients a large bowl that they can then use while traversing through a buffet of fresh meats and vegetables, that once are filled up are then cooked on a flat metal plate by a cook who adds various sauces and spices, all the while slicing and dicing the ingredients to the desired consistency. For what it is, it can be a tasty affair, and it does seem to have developed a loyal customer base, but Mongolian style? Far from it I think? For one, I don't think that the Mongolian kitchen includes some of the vegetables that they use (carrots, spinach, bean sprouts, zucchini) nor any seafood (shrimp). This is basically it, not any of the interesting dumpling or other Mongolian dishes that you've written about here. There are more of these type of "Mongolian restaurants "out there than you might think. Anyway, I'm curious to hear what you think? 🎭

    https://youtu.be/lE8w0xBNPx4

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  119. @AltanBakshi
    @Thulean Friend

    Actually everywhere in India Buddhists had already lost the political power to Hindus centuries before Islamic invasions, so thats another nail to your stupid thesis that Buddhism made people unable to stand against Islam.


    There was one Buddhist state that endured centuries in the Highlands of Afghanistan resisting Muslims, The Ghurs or Ghurids. But everywhere in India, except Kashmir and Himalayas, Buddhists had lost all political power, we have lots of anecdotal evidence from 8th century Chinese pilgrims telling how the Buddhism was losing ground to Hinduism in India, though the process was gradual and there was huge regional variation.


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ad/Abbasid_Caliphate_891-892.png
    The situation for Ghurids in 892 AD.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6c/Map_of_the_Samanid_amirate_at_the_death_of_Nasr_II%2C_943.svg/1603px-Map_of_the_Samanid_amirate_at_the_death_of_Nasr_II%2C_943.svg.png
    The situation in 943 AD.

    The Ghurids endured till 1011 AD, they lost after 4 centuries of resistance and struggle against the Islamic hordes.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    Buddhism losing adherents to Hinduism isn’t that strange. As you yourself have acknowledged, Hindus and Buddhists are like brothers. Converting from one to the other is not a big deal. Islam is definitely not like them. So one would expect militant resistance. Hinduism succeeded, albeit heavily damaged. Buddhism completely failed and faded from the Central Asian map.

    they lost after 4 centuries of resistance and struggle against the Islamic hordes.

    Amazing. Meanwhile, India was invaded more than 8 centuries ago by the moslem hordes and it is still standing, while shielding the weaker buddhists further to the east. It’s pretty clear which of these two is the stronger religion. Cope more.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Thulean Friend

    It seems that you know very little of Medieval Indian history, there was a process of disappearance of highly developed and urbanized economy in the Northern India, that had started centuries before Islamic invasions, but there is a clear connection with decay of Buddhism and disintegration of large and centralised empires in Northern India. Ghurids are not at all relevant in regards of this discussion, I just brought them up as an interesting
    sidetopic, but their situation was more hopeless than the Hindu states of India, because their Kshatriyas could always retreat to the mountains of Himalayas, or Jungles of south or to wastelands of Rajasthan.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @sher singh

  120. @Coconuts
    @songbird

    There's a fair bit of truth in that.

    The 2016 Brexit vote and aftermath led the British political analyst David Goodhart to divide the UK electorate into three parts:

    'Somewheres', 'Anywheres' and 'In-betweens'. 'Somewheres' are the British people who still have a rooted regional or national identity that means something to them, they are about half of the population. Nearly all of the white British working class, middle class people who live in smaller towns and the regions, also old aristocrats and high Tories. 'Anywheres' are the urban middle and upper middle classes, some of the ethnic minorities, some of the globalist upper class and big business people. They have an international/global identity based on qualifications, education and personal achievement/wealth. About 30% of the population. The in-betweens are a mix and include another part of the ethnic minorities.

    The most cucked and woke part of the population is obviously the 'anywhere' one, this has also been politically and culturally the most powerful and influential for some time. Brexit challenged and disorientated them and they are still recovering but they are discovering new ways to go on the offensive against the 'somewheres', in ways bordering on derangement, like all of the woke and open borders stuff.

    It's possible that they have undergone cognitive decline and some kind of degeneration, maybe due to spiteful mutants as Michael Woodley has suggested and they will now do things that completely undermine their own nation, or they have some plan to escape via marrying Indians or intelligent Africans, then their mixed children can safely inherit their wealth and status.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    I agree that Northerners in particular have a stronger sense of “place”, like they’re generally proud to be “Northerers”, or “Mancs, “Geordies” or what ever, whereas Southerners generally don’t have that same sense of place, especially the “educated” middle classes. Northerners generally seem very proud of “their city”, “their area”, but to Southerners that sort of thing generally means very little. I suspect Southerners are also more likely to move areas too.

    Although that doesn’t mean Northerners are any more racially conscious though, often their sense of place is completely deracinated, in that they would regard a black or Muslim “Northerner” as having more in common with them than a white Southerner. So in that sense it’s a civic/cultural sense of place, not a racial one.

  121. @Thulean Friend
    @AltanBakshi

    Buddhism losing adherents to Hinduism isn't that strange. As you yourself have acknowledged, Hindus and Buddhists are like brothers. Converting from one to the other is not a big deal. Islam is definitely not like them. So one would expect militant resistance. Hinduism succeeded, albeit heavily damaged. Buddhism completely failed and faded from the Central Asian map.


    they lost after 4 centuries of resistance and struggle against the Islamic hordes.
     
    Amazing. Meanwhile, India was invaded more than 8 centuries ago by the moslem hordes and it is still standing, while shielding the weaker buddhists further to the east. It's pretty clear which of these two is the stronger religion. Cope more.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    It seems that you know very little of Medieval Indian history, there was a process of disappearance of highly developed and urbanized economy in the Northern India, that had started centuries before Islamic invasions, but there is a clear connection with decay of Buddhism and disintegration of large and centralised empires in Northern India. Ghurids are not at all relevant in regards of this discussion, I just brought them up as an interesting
    sidetopic, but their situation was more hopeless than the Hindu states of India, because their Kshatriyas could always retreat to the mountains of Himalayas, or Jungles of south or to wastelands of Rajasthan.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @AltanBakshi

    Your preferred excuse changes over time, yet the historical fact is constant: Buddhists failed whereas Hindus stood fast. I want to emphasise that I do not hate Buddhists and if all the world's abrahamics would be converted to your religion, I would view it as a net plus. This does not change the historical record, despite your endless excuses/protestations.

    India's rejuvenation process itself is far from complete. It has merely paused its subjugation, not overcome it. Yet it still has a chance to realise the dreams of Bhārat Mata by overcoming the imposed colonial borders and recoverting the abrahamics in the historical lands. Such dreams, while romantic, are hard yet doable given enough patience, time and persistence. One cannot say that about the former vanquished territories of the Buddhists, who folded so easily and are now condemned to be outsiders forever to their own lands in Central Asia. You must face up to this historic failure.

    Replies: @sher singh

    , @sher singh
    @AltanBakshi

    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1161393087584899072?s=20

    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1280565190128525313?s=20

    Look what happened later, Shramanics (Jain and Buddha) still have concept of Rajan Dharma a King wouldnt act like a pussy.

    Thulean is just trolling, he's a loser.

    You've convinced me on the western bit, could you give your opinion on this?

    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/the-ruins-of-lost-world-bengals.html
    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/when-hammer-falls-bengals-downfall-2.html

    Tldr he claims Hindu elites converted to Buddhism to avoid upkeep on large Temples and employing Brahmins. The ensuing social vacuum provided Islam an opening, not really much to say.


    see these for own interest

    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/from-indias-milan-to-her-thessalonika.html
    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/indias-thessalonika.html

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  122. @E. Harding
    @Europe Europa

    China's strategy to contain the virus was discussed here by an NYT reporter:

    https://twitter.com/MikeIsaac/status/1238604080571772928

    and here by one of China's top virologists here:

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/05/house-was-fire-top-chinese-virologist-how-china-and-us-have-met-pandemic

    Vietnam and Thailand followed similar policies (though I'm still impressed Thailand had so few cases despite being such a tourism hotspot from China and Europe). The policies described are not new -they were used in China during the Manchurian plague of 1911, and were just forgotten in the West, while remembered in China:

    https://archive.org/details/reportofinternatinte/page/250/mode/1up

    Australia did not use centralized quarantine, but was just as aggressive in its travel restrictions as China and Thailand, including banning outbound travel from apartment complexes (considered the stereotypical example of Chinese tyranny in Murica).

    @A123 .

    "In Tianjin, health workers have collected more than 2.2 million samples for testing from residents in the Binhai new district, after five locally transmitted cases were discovered there last week.

    In Manzhouli, a city of more than 200,000 people, local health authorities are testing all residents after two cases were reported on Saturday. They also shut down all schools and public venues and banned public gatherings such as banquets."

    Singapore allows mainland Chinese to enter the country without quarantine for a reason.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    So – what do you do with all of this? Donal McNeil’s insights – what would it take to realize them in WEstern societies? – To change the law in the first place? – The our mentality. And how long would that take?
    The Swiss and the Swedes chose a different path and are doing not so bad up until this day. It is clearly a dangerous and adventurous trip they are on though. I’m still thrilled by their actions – and their fate, really.

    Hail has a very informed look at the actual situation in Sweden:

    https://hailtoyou.wordpress.com/2020/11/29/against-the-corona-panic-part-xix-wuhan-corona-vs-previous-flu-waves-sweden-quantified-on-near-final-data-for-2020/#comment-47231

  123. @AltanBakshi
    @Thulean Friend

    It seems that you know very little of Medieval Indian history, there was a process of disappearance of highly developed and urbanized economy in the Northern India, that had started centuries before Islamic invasions, but there is a clear connection with decay of Buddhism and disintegration of large and centralised empires in Northern India. Ghurids are not at all relevant in regards of this discussion, I just brought them up as an interesting
    sidetopic, but their situation was more hopeless than the Hindu states of India, because their Kshatriyas could always retreat to the mountains of Himalayas, or Jungles of south or to wastelands of Rajasthan.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @sher singh

    Your preferred excuse changes over time, yet the historical fact is constant: Buddhists failed whereas Hindus stood fast. I want to emphasise that I do not hate Buddhists and if all the world’s abrahamics would be converted to your religion, I would view it as a net plus. This does not change the historical record, despite your endless excuses/protestations.

    India’s rejuvenation process itself is far from complete. It has merely paused its subjugation, not overcome it. Yet it still has a chance to realise the dreams of Bhārat Mata by overcoming the imposed colonial borders and recoverting the abrahamics in the historical lands. Such dreams, while romantic, are hard yet doable given enough patience, time and persistence. One cannot say that about the former vanquished territories of the Buddhists, who folded so easily and are now condemned to be outsiders forever to their own lands in Central Asia. You must face up to this historic failure.

    • Replies: @sher singh
    @Thulean Friend

    You're neither, stop trying to divide us||

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

  124. @Thulean Friend
    A few writers I find worthy of keeping an eye on.

    https://lukecapital.substack.com/ - VC living in Taiwan of Chinese-American background. Focuses a lot on China.

    https://jack-clark.net/ - OpenAI's comms director who does a useful news sweep of AI-related news.

    ---

    Studio Ghibli’s Toshio Suzuki on four decades of anime magic

    Vinay Sitapati on Vajpayee, Advani and the success of the Hindu nationalist movement

    ---

    From Steve Sailer's blog: New York City Will Change Many Selective Schools to Address Segregation. The war on meritocracy strikes me as a uniquely American obsession. Michael's Sandel recent book The Tyranny of Merit is an excellent example of that.

    Given the huge cultural influence that the US has over its subcolonial entities in Europe, I expect this to come to here sooner rather than later.

    There's already a raging debate about our school choice system. Sweden has the most liberal school choice system of all OECD countries - even Chile. Some of the criticisms are fair, such as "skimming the cream" and leaving the public schools saddled with the worst students despite all schools getting the same funding. This means that the best students cost less for privately-owned schools and the extra differential can be taken out as net profit and distributed to shareholders. Almost all private schools are run as corporations with a few mega-rich owners but the funding is mostly coming from the tax-payers.

    Still, nobody is really questioning the basic purpose of the system. Nor is there any debate on abolishing the importance of test scores or grades. The NYC method of a simple lottery is pure lunacy. The fastest way to enrich private corporations is making sure the public school system cannot accomodate and grow the most gifted. Nobody wants to be stuck with the rabble.

    Replies: @128, @128, @AltanBakshi, @g2k

    The war on meritocracy strikes me as a uniquely American obsession.

    I think it’s probably an Anglo thing. The grammar school debate in the UK mirrors this, only there’s no racial aspect to it, or there wasn’t in the 1970s when most of the damage was done (by Shirley Williams; a minor aristocrat turned liberal politician). Any time any suggestion is made that public money should be spent on educating talented kids above a very low minimum standard, these types will complain that it doesn’t help the “most disadvantaged”.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @g2k

    The grammar school debate was originally a "class war" issue, but if it was going on today grammar schools would be seen as representing "white privilege" and the "disadvantaged" would be blacks and Muslims, not working class people generally.

    Although this just reflects how the lefts' position has shifted generally, class war is obsolete, it's now a race war. All white British people are seen as equally privileged relative to non-whites whether they're aristocrats or live on a Northern council estate.

  125. @Thulean Friend
    @AltanBakshi

    Your preferred excuse changes over time, yet the historical fact is constant: Buddhists failed whereas Hindus stood fast. I want to emphasise that I do not hate Buddhists and if all the world's abrahamics would be converted to your religion, I would view it as a net plus. This does not change the historical record, despite your endless excuses/protestations.

    India's rejuvenation process itself is far from complete. It has merely paused its subjugation, not overcome it. Yet it still has a chance to realise the dreams of Bhārat Mata by overcoming the imposed colonial borders and recoverting the abrahamics in the historical lands. Such dreams, while romantic, are hard yet doable given enough patience, time and persistence. One cannot say that about the former vanquished territories of the Buddhists, who folded so easily and are now condemned to be outsiders forever to their own lands in Central Asia. You must face up to this historic failure.

    Replies: @sher singh

    You’re neither, stop trying to divide us||

    • Agree: AltanBakshi
    • LOL: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @sher singh

    Us? Lol, you're neither hindu nor buddhist.
    I have never understood why Sikhs LARP together with poonjabi pakistanis against hindus, it seems your memory is so short.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WQtUYv1_-s

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  126. @AltanBakshi
    @Thulean Friend

    It seems that you know very little of Medieval Indian history, there was a process of disappearance of highly developed and urbanized economy in the Northern India, that had started centuries before Islamic invasions, but there is a clear connection with decay of Buddhism and disintegration of large and centralised empires in Northern India. Ghurids are not at all relevant in regards of this discussion, I just brought them up as an interesting
    sidetopic, but their situation was more hopeless than the Hindu states of India, because their Kshatriyas could always retreat to the mountains of Himalayas, or Jungles of south or to wastelands of Rajasthan.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @sher singh

    Look what happened later, Shramanics (Jain and Buddha) still have concept of Rajan Dharma a King wouldnt act like a pussy.

    Thulean is just trolling, he’s a loser.

    You’ve convinced me on the western bit, could you give your opinion on this?

    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/the-ruins-of-lost-world-bengals.html
    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/when-hammer-falls-bengals-downfall-2.html

    Tldr he claims Hindu elites converted to Buddhism to avoid upkeep on large Temples and employing Brahmins. The ensuing social vacuum provided Islam an opening, not really much to say.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @sher singh

    Sher Singh sorry if you thought that I was trolling about the Khalistan. Without any hint of irony I would be happy if I could live in the militaristic Sikh Dharmic state, even if beef eating would be punishable by death in such country.

    Its very hard to say what really happened in Northern India little before coming of Islam. Its a hard fact that old empires like Palas of Bengal or Gurjara-Pratiharas of Central India were crumbling and Advaintins were ascendant and defeating in debates old mainstream schools of Hindu- and Buddhadharma. It seems that there was also some kind of economic collapse ongoing at the same time, and Kshatriyas were becoming weaker, but Brahmin class was getting more powerful, Brahmins really loved Advaita. But I really cant give a definite answer why India fell before Islamic hordes, the time period is so chaotic and most records are lost, probably just destroyed by Muslims.


    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/the-ruins-of-lost-world-bengals.html?m=1
    This article had everything wrong, Palas were Buddhist and they werent even last great Dharmic rulers of Bengal, but after them Hindu Sena dynasty ruled Bengal. Also there wasnt such competition between Buddhism and Hinduism, traditional Buddhism believes that there are gods, just that Buddha is greater guide than any god, but some gods are Buddhas or awakened beings according to the Buddhism, so its little bit more complicated. So there really wasnt such conflict between Hindu and Buddhadharma, its just that some Indians have internalised old Britisher colonial misconceptions or attitudes regarding of Buddhism, so they stupidly think that Buddhism denies gods. I will read other articles later when I have time.

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/62/5e/f2/625ef25d1c3257caa0f0d5c7542cfe9b.jpg
    Here is India in 900 ad, Sindh and Multan were already in hands of Muslims, but they werent the problem, because their Muslims were not expansionist unlike the Muslims of Afghanistan and Central Asia. In around year 1000 ad Kabul Shahis/Hindus fell and and the door was open for Islamic hordes.

    I dont know if I have written about this before but Guru Nanak is seen as an enlightened man in Buddhism, though he is called by the name of Guru Maharaj in Buddhism, there are some holy Buddhist places in Himalayas that are conneced to Guru Nanaks life.

    Replies: @Jatt Aryaa

  127. @g2k
    @Thulean Friend


    The war on meritocracy strikes me as a uniquely American obsession.
     
    I think it's probably an Anglo thing. The grammar school debate in the UK mirrors this, only there's no racial aspect to it, or there wasn't in the 1970s when most of the damage was done (by Shirley Williams; a minor aristocrat turned liberal politician). Any time any suggestion is made that public money should be spent on educating talented kids above a very low minimum standard, these types will complain that it doesn't help the "most disadvantaged".

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    The grammar school debate was originally a “class war” issue, but if it was going on today grammar schools would be seen as representing “white privilege” and the “disadvantaged” would be blacks and Muslims, not working class people generally.

    Although this just reflects how the lefts’ position has shifted generally, class war is obsolete, it’s now a race war. All white British people are seen as equally privileged relative to non-whites whether they’re aristocrats or live on a Northern council estate.

  128. @sher singh
    @Thulean Friend

    You're neither, stop trying to divide us||

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    Us? Lol, you’re neither hindu nor buddhist.
    I have never understood why Sikhs LARP together with poonjabi pakistanis against hindus, it seems your memory is so short.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WQtUYv1_-s

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Thulean Friend

    Are you a Hindu?

    Sikhs are a part of Dharmic fold, they're the Shield and Khanda of Aryavarta!

    Hindustan Zindabad! Pakistan Murdabad!

    Replies: @Bashibuzuk

  129. Whites are probably about 10% of the world’s population, maybe less depending on how strict ones’ definition of “white” is and getting less every year.

    That considered, is preserving white racial purity even a viable aim? Especially when the world seems to be heading full steam towards one world government and NWO where there probably will be no immigration rules and people will be just be seen as labour and strategic tools and relocated at will, as they were in the Soviet Union to a large extent.

    Whites are particularly vulnerable because despite being a small minority of the world population, they still retain a large percentage of the “old wealth” that the globalists and non-whites would very much like to get their hands on.

  130. @sher singh
    @AltanBakshi

    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1161393087584899072?s=20

    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1280565190128525313?s=20

    Look what happened later, Shramanics (Jain and Buddha) still have concept of Rajan Dharma a King wouldnt act like a pussy.

    Thulean is just trolling, he's a loser.

    You've convinced me on the western bit, could you give your opinion on this?

    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/the-ruins-of-lost-world-bengals.html
    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/when-hammer-falls-bengals-downfall-2.html

    Tldr he claims Hindu elites converted to Buddhism to avoid upkeep on large Temples and employing Brahmins. The ensuing social vacuum provided Islam an opening, not really much to say.


    see these for own interest

    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/from-indias-milan-to-her-thessalonika.html
    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/indias-thessalonika.html

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Sher Singh sorry if you thought that I was trolling about the Khalistan. Without any hint of irony I would be happy if I could live in the militaristic Sikh Dharmic state, even if beef eating would be punishable by death in such country.

    Its very hard to say what really happened in Northern India little before coming of Islam. Its a hard fact that old empires like Palas of Bengal or Gurjara-Pratiharas of Central India were crumbling and Advaintins were ascendant and defeating in debates old mainstream schools of Hindu- and Buddhadharma. It seems that there was also some kind of economic collapse ongoing at the same time, and Kshatriyas were becoming weaker, but Brahmin class was getting more powerful, Brahmins really loved Advaita. But I really cant give a definite answer why India fell before Islamic hordes, the time period is so chaotic and most records are lost, probably just destroyed by Muslims.

    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/the-ruins-of-lost-world-bengals.html?m=1
    This article had everything wrong, Palas were Buddhist and they werent even last great Dharmic rulers of Bengal, but after them Hindu Sena dynasty ruled Bengal. Also there wasnt such competition between Buddhism and Hinduism, traditional Buddhism believes that there are gods, just that Buddha is greater guide than any god, but some gods are Buddhas or awakened beings according to the Buddhism, so its little bit more complicated. So there really wasnt such conflict between Hindu and Buddhadharma, its just that some Indians have internalised old Britisher colonial misconceptions or attitudes regarding of Buddhism, so they stupidly think that Buddhism denies gods. I will read other articles later when I have time.


    Here is India in 900 ad, Sindh and Multan were already in hands of Muslims, but they werent the problem, because their Muslims were not expansionist unlike the Muslims of Afghanistan and Central Asia. In around year 1000 ad Kabul Shahis/Hindus fell and and the door was open for Islamic hordes.

    I dont know if I have written about this before but Guru Nanak is seen as an enlightened man in Buddhism, though he is called by the name of Guru Maharaj in Buddhism, there are some holy Buddhist places in Himalayas that are conneced to Guru Nanaks life.

    • Thanks: sher singh
    • Replies: @Jatt Aryaa
    @AltanBakshi

    Only cow slaughter is banned।।

    https://youtu.be/TSNEh57qfY8

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  131. @Thulean Friend
    @sher singh

    Us? Lol, you're neither hindu nor buddhist.
    I have never understood why Sikhs LARP together with poonjabi pakistanis against hindus, it seems your memory is so short.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WQtUYv1_-s

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Are you a Hindu?

    Sikhs are a part of Dharmic fold, they’re the Shield and Khanda of Aryavarta!

    Hindustan Zindabad! Pakistan Murdabad!

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
    @AltanBakshi


    Hindustan Zindabad! Pakistan Murdabad!
     
    You should practice detachment.

    https://youtu.be/HK9u7Jz-vNA

    This should help.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  132. @Mr. Hack
    @utu


    The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary
     
    This is one of the mot ridiculous things that I've ever read. Is this your own theory or did you pick it up somewhere second hand?

    Did you read this one, Anatoly? You may be attracted to having sex with horses and donkeys, because you like to ratchet it up once in a while with a ghost or scorpion pepper. I know an Orthodox Bishop who grows these kinds of peppers in his back yard. 🌶️🌶️🌶️. :-) :-) :-)

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @utu

    A powerful take.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
  133. @A123
    @Europe Europa


    I find it strange why no one is asking how China and other East and South East Asian nations have managed to almost completely eradicate the virus
     
    They did not "eradicate" it. They correctly deemed it non-threatening and stopped testing for it. It is not that the disease is gone. There is simply no histrionic over reporting and panic mongering.

    It does hammer those who are both:
    -- Aged
    -- Have relevant pre-existing conditions

    WUHAN-19 is actually *less dangerous* to the young than typical flu. Only 2 deaths in this sample at less than 50 years old.
     

    https://i.redd.it/9te2zki8pom41.png
     

    A rational response would concentrate on protecting the population at risk. Not create a panic over a virtually non-existent risk to general public.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Demografie

    Powerful take.

  134. @Anatoly Karlin
    @AltanBakshi

    How many different ways to call manty!

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/map-dumplings-pelmeni.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Demografie

    Well, I have eaten dumplings here west of wienna just this week. Map is wrong.

  135. @melanf
    @Europe Europa


    I recall reading that the first waves of Soviet soldiers to arrive in Berlin and take control of parts of the city were largely ethnic Slavs, and on the whole didn’t treat German
     
    It seems to me that this is a legend, as well as the whole"rape of Berlin". Of course there were rapes, but the propaganda picture from the works of Anglo-American authors is fake. A "laboratory-clean example" of how such fakes are fabricated is the town of Nemmersdorf. It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape ("one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably"). The Anglo-American authors were not satisfied with such conclusions. As Beevor, Hastings, etc. can tell, all the remaining "sixty-two women and young girls raped and murdered by Soviet soldiers" in Nemmersdorf, " not a single civilian escaped death at the hands of Russian soldiers. Women were crucified on the doors of sheds and overturned carts or, after being raped, crushed under the tracks of tanks. Their children were also brutally murdered ." The legend was created in several waves - in Germany, under the supervision of the Americans, one after another, another campaign was held to expose the Soviet atrocities in Nemmersdorf (films, radio programs, etc.), after which new "witnesses" of these atrocities appeared, which allowed to launch a new campaign of revelations, etc. At the same time, evidence did not fit into the narrative (Feldwebel Helmut Hoffmann about the killed civilians : "It seemed strange that there were no exit holes on the corpses: small entrance and lack of blood. It was more like shots fired from a distance than shots fired at close range") they were simply ignored, but the deliberate lies that were convenient for propaganda purposes were replicated in every possible way. This is a chemically pure example of how the legend of the rape of Germany was created - when real cases were falsified creating a fake picture. With Berlin, the same story, with the caveat that there was no SS commission in Berlin, and it is impossible to verify post-war fictions

    Replies: @Demografie, @utu, @Coconuts

    I read somewhere that Russian generals were pressured to win hearts and minds of Germans. NKVD did have several waves of investigation and killing of responsible soldiers and commanders. Yes, there were antrocities, but not on large scale and it wasn’t encouraged by Soviet leadership. If Soviets were to kill and rape Germans, after WWII East Germany would look different.
    It is one of the mythology of WWII. Another one is Soviet mistreatment of German soldiers which were captured. You have higher chance to survive war as German captured by Soviets then vice versa. There were petitions of captured Soviets soldiers begging Germans rather to be shot then left die of hunger and frostbite. so far for European humanity.

  136. @melanf
    @128

    What was first found in the search engine: 10 500 000 ₽ 4-room. apartment, 102.8 m2, 1st floor.
    https://www.domofond.ru/4-komnatnaya-kvartira-na-prodazhu-sankt_peterburg-3084639841

    Kurortny district of St. Petersburg, this place looks
    https://cdn.ostrovok.ru/t/1024x768/second/b7/e1/b7e1129674ac38eb93cca50c1f06755c08687726.jpeg

    Replies: @128

    That is very cheap for a country with a standard of living like Russia in a Tier 1 city, condos in upper middle class and middle class in good areas in Manila, Jakarta, or Bangkok sell for a lot more expensive than that, I guess for a foreign buyer, the concern is if Russia gets expelled from SWIFT, since a foreign buyer will be transferring funds from his country to a Russian bank.

  137. @AaronB
    @Europe Europa

    One can't trust anything out of China these days.

    Anyone familiar with how societies like China, Vietnam, and Thailand work, would know that they are "image" cultures - as long as the public image is good, rules and regulations are regularly broken. Westerners view this as corrupt and dishonest, but its actually just a different system with different priorities. If everyone knows what's going on, it isn't dishonest, its just a different communication style.

    Personally, I think its an extremely effective way to manage conflicting human desires, and an extremely strict and conservative public life is balanced by an extremely lax, permissive, and debauched private life. Peoples need for the security of rules and need to let free are both catered to.

    On anything that relates to image, such countries cannot be trusted. And I personally know the level of anarchy and disorganization in Vietnam abd Thailand are not compatible with any efficient centralized response lol.

    That being said, I do not see any problem with admitting that an efficient centralized system would be better at dealing with a pandemic than an anarchic democratic one, regardless of whether China did so or not.

    People should be quite clear on the benefits and drawbacks of any system they adopt. You cant have all good things in one bucket.

    You want creativity and dynamism? You have to allow a certain amount of anarchy and inefficiency. That's just the price you pay


    You want extreme efficiency and control? You won't have creativity and dynamism.

    Everything is a tradeoff, and we should be clear on exactly how. People of course can change their decisions over time, etc, and nations balance priorities differently.

    Sometimes, I feel these discussions are puerile, about which system is "better". Better for what? People have a hard time accepting there can be genuine differences in values and priorities. Instead its always a pissing contest.

    Replies: @E. Harding, @Another German Reader

    Biden did not win and Western strategy towards the pandemic is not working.

    Deal with it!

  138. Especially considering the median salary in Jakarta, Bangkok, and Manila compared to Saint Petersburg, I guess being a pariah in the West has its fringe benefits?

  139. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird


    Heard an interesting theory the other day about Indians and spicy food:

    They are so used to eating rotten food that they are genetically adapted to it, and their sense of taste has been dialed down accordingly, so they need stronger flavors to enjoy food.
     

    I think it has more to do with broader cultural preferences. You can see it in music or even in social interactions. Brown people tend to be louder, more aggressive. This is reflected in everything from food to how loud they are when talking or music choices.

    I think of these cultures as 'extroverted' whereas North-Western and North-Eastern cultures tend to be "introverted" and have more mellow cultural mores, with a greater emphasis on humility and toned down social codes. Law of Jante didn't come out of nowhere.

    The extroverted cultures are more interesting on a surface level, they draw your attention whether you like it or not whereas the introverted cultures requires a finer-grained appreciation of the more sophisticated matters in life, where subtle cues and what is often not said can matter as much as to what is.

    Replies: @songbird

    I’ve been considering the possibility that spices are linked to social factors. When I see white Americans using Tabasco I take I as a sign of extraversion.

    But it is harder to say what it is in a cultural context. Japanese have some very strong flavors, don’t they? Fermented stuff. Yet they seem a very diffident people. I’ve noted before how they seem to excel at depicting shy characters, in contrast to Hollywood.

    Maybe, it has something to do with rice-based cuisine or a largely vegetarian diet?

    • Replies: @Svevlad
    @songbird

    Or perhaps they became introverted over time. Japanese until recent times seem to strike me as an ultra-violent sort of people. All this violence results in their ridiculously obtuse social practices, which due to power relations end up selecting for being a limp-dick little wimp, effectively they cucked themselves, and their spicier parts of the cuisine are just remnants of this state

  140. @AltanBakshi
    @Thulean Friend

    Are you a Hindu?

    Sikhs are a part of Dharmic fold, they're the Shield and Khanda of Aryavarta!

    Hindustan Zindabad! Pakistan Murdabad!

    Replies: @Bashibuzuk

    Hindustan Zindabad! Pakistan Murdabad!

    You should practice detachment.

    This should help.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Bashibuzuk

    Do you really think that Vajracchedika Sutra encourages to be detached? Where from people like you spawn?

    No one, literally no practitioner of Mahayana starts right away from Vajracchedika Sutra, first you must understand Buddhist basics, like Four Noble Truths, Eightfold path, the path of Shravaka, take refugee in the three Jewels, know the Paramitas and so on. The problem with you people is that you jump right away to Prajna-Paramita, Vajracchedika and Tantric stuff and start blabbering bs about it. The archetypical problem of western "internet buddhists."

    Now you think that I am asshole, yes I am when some one tries to violate and twist Dharma and say that it encourages detachment. And before you blabber some bullshit about detachment, please learn something about such concepts as Bodhisattva and Bodhicitta, which are central to Mahayana, and whom the Mahayana sutras are addressed to.

    I am bored to repeat myself, but if you want understand little bit better the Buddhist context of Vajracchedika sutra, please read my comment 138# in previous thread.
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-131/

    Bodhisattvas are anything else than detached, they are in process of purifying their mindstreams and they are extremely attached to salvation and liberation of all sentient beings from the sufferings of Samsara.

    So you random internet meathead, if you really want to criticize me from a Mahayana basis, then you would have said that its ultimately wrong to claim that happiness of Indians is more important than Pakistanis, or its not noble behaviour to wish bad outcomes for some nation etc, or to agitate people etc, but no it always needs to be some detachment or being one with everything?

    Even concept one is dependent on others to exist, like concept of two or plurality, there is no reality where all is one, not at least for us, and if there would be then that reality is not accessible to us. Non sense and humbug! Why do I rant so? Because I need to fill the cracks in the dam and make sure it stands, meaning Im preemptively countering your possibly idiotic counter arguments.

    Renunciation or ascetic living is good for all Buddhists, as is also detachment from materialistic desires, but detachment towards the people is extremely bad.
    There is no rule that laypersons should be detached from politics.

    Replies: @Bashibuzuk

  141. @sher singh
    @songbird

    Indians won't even eat breakfast leftovers for lunch, Europoors stay trollin cuz their food sucks||

    Replies: @Another German Reader, @songbird

    I don’t know but aren’t the Indian men the ones with the weakest grip-strenght?

    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Another German Reader

    The (Physical) Strength of Nations

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/physical-strength-countries.png

    Replies: @Shortsword, @Tor597

  142. The goal of the NWO will be the destruction of Swedish people’s scourge on mankind – Surströmming.

    After that mankind will be able to ascend to a galatic civilzation.

    • LOL: Svevlad, AltanBakshi
  143. @Bashibuzuk
    @AltanBakshi


    Hindustan Zindabad! Pakistan Murdabad!
     
    You should practice detachment.

    https://youtu.be/HK9u7Jz-vNA

    This should help.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Do you really think that Vajracchedika Sutra encourages to be detached? Where from people like you spawn?

    No one, literally no practitioner of Mahayana starts right away from Vajracchedika Sutra, first you must understand Buddhist basics, like Four Noble Truths, Eightfold path, the path of Shravaka, take refugee in the three Jewels, know the Paramitas and so on. The problem with you people is that you jump right away to Prajna-Paramita, Vajracchedika and Tantric stuff and start blabbering bs about it. The archetypical problem of western “internet buddhists.”

    [MORE]

    Now you think that I am asshole, yes I am when some one tries to violate and twist Dharma and say that it encourages detachment. And before you blabber some bullshit about detachment, please learn something about such concepts as Bodhisattva and Bodhicitta, which are central to Mahayana, and whom the Mahayana sutras are addressed to.

    I am bored to repeat myself, but if you want understand little bit better the Buddhist context of Vajracchedika sutra, please read my comment 138# in previous thread.
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-131/

    Bodhisattvas are anything else than detached, they are in process of purifying their mindstreams and they are extremely attached to salvation and liberation of all sentient beings from the sufferings of Samsara.

    So you random internet meathead, if you really want to criticize me from a Mahayana basis, then you would have said that its ultimately wrong to claim that happiness of Indians is more important than Pakistanis, or its not noble behaviour to wish bad outcomes for some nation etc, or to agitate people etc, but no it always needs to be some detachment or being one with everything?

    Even concept one is dependent on others to exist, like concept of two or plurality, there is no reality where all is one, not at least for us, and if there would be then that reality is not accessible to us. Non sense and humbug! Why do I rant so? Because I need to fill the cracks in the dam and make sure it stands, meaning Im preemptively countering your possibly idiotic counter arguments.

    Renunciation or ascetic living is good for all Buddhists, as is also detachment from materialistic desires, but detachment towards the people is extremely bad.
    There is no rule that laypersons should be detached from politics.

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
    @AltanBakshi

    You clearly would benefit from practicing detachment.

    Your anger is getting the better of you.



    221. One should give up anger, renounce pride, and overcome all fetters. Suffering never befalls him who clings not to mind and body and is detached.

    222. He who checks rising anger as a charioteer checks a rolling chariot, him I call a true charioteer. Others only hold the reins.

    223. Overcome the angry by non-anger; overcome the wicked by goodness; overcome the miser by generosity; overcome the liar by truth.

    224. Speak the truth; yield not to anger; when asked, give even if you only have a little. By these three means can one reach the presence of the gods.

    225. Those sages who are inoffensive and ever restrained in body, go to the Deathless State, where, having gone, they grieve no more.

    226. Those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, and are ever intent upon Nibbana -- their defilements fade away
     
    http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/buddhism/dp17.htm

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Thulean Friend

  144. @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    https://assets.allcafe.ru/user-uploads/6/2015/02/19/68960ba31dc2cc7d924d6606bacd8d20_XL.jpeg

    https://assets.allcafe.ru/user-uploads/6/2015/02/19/b084fa6c766ac187544a223525f149e4_XL.jpeg

    I think that they have better looking menus nowadays, but the dishes have stayed more or less same.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Thanks for the introduction here to the world of Mongolian gastronomic delights. I’m presenting you the following as they say “just for your information”. It’s certainly not meant to impress you, and I hope that you have a sense of humor that might help you “stomach it”. There are many “Mongolian style” restaurants state side, but from what you’ve presented here they don’t even merit being called “McMongolian”. The only way I can explain them to you is to compare them Japanese teppanyaki or hibachi style grills. Typically these one dimensional restaurants offer their clients a large bowl that they can then use while traversing through a buffet of fresh meats and vegetables, that once are filled up are then cooked on a flat metal plate by a cook who adds various sauces and spices, all the while slicing and dicing the ingredients to the desired consistency. For what it is, it can be a tasty affair, and it does seem to have developed a loyal customer base, but Mongolian style? Far from it I think? For one, I don’t think that the Mongolian kitchen includes some of the vegetables that they use (carrots, spinach, bean sprouts, zucchini) nor any seafood (shrimp). This is basically it, not any of the interesting dumpling or other Mongolian dishes that you’ve written about here. There are more of these type of “Mongolian restaurants “out there than you might think. Anyway, I’m curious to hear what you think? 🎭

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    I have heard of this "Mongolian Barbecue or stir fry" from my friends who have been in USA. It does not have anything common with Mongolian food and was actually invented in Taiwan.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_barbecue

    For me its a non matter, even name Genghis is not a Mongolian name, so they can do what they want.

    Carrots by the way are sometimes used in modern Mongolian cooking, they grow quite well in some parts of Southern Siberia and Mongolia, as do cucumbers, potatoes and onions. In Mongolian cooking all is either boiled or steamed, but never fried or grilled, except sweet and crispy dough that is made for desert, its often fried. Then there is one special way to cook those marmots, by heating stones in a fire and stuffing marmot with them.

    Sorry that I disparaged salo, its tasty, and Ukrainian cuisine overall has much richer variety of dishes, and once again there is no soup better than Borsch.

  145. @Another German Reader
    @sher singh

    I don't know but aren't the Indian men the ones with the weakest grip-strenght?

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    • Replies: @Shortsword
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Pakistan being significantly lower than India is suspicious.

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    , @Tor597
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    What are we supposed to make of the M-F gap between different countries?

    India seems to have the smallest gap between male and female strength while Sweeden has the largest.

  146. @AltanBakshi
    @Bashibuzuk

    Do you really think that Vajracchedika Sutra encourages to be detached? Where from people like you spawn?

    No one, literally no practitioner of Mahayana starts right away from Vajracchedika Sutra, first you must understand Buddhist basics, like Four Noble Truths, Eightfold path, the path of Shravaka, take refugee in the three Jewels, know the Paramitas and so on. The problem with you people is that you jump right away to Prajna-Paramita, Vajracchedika and Tantric stuff and start blabbering bs about it. The archetypical problem of western "internet buddhists."

    Now you think that I am asshole, yes I am when some one tries to violate and twist Dharma and say that it encourages detachment. And before you blabber some bullshit about detachment, please learn something about such concepts as Bodhisattva and Bodhicitta, which are central to Mahayana, and whom the Mahayana sutras are addressed to.

    I am bored to repeat myself, but if you want understand little bit better the Buddhist context of Vajracchedika sutra, please read my comment 138# in previous thread.
    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-131/

    Bodhisattvas are anything else than detached, they are in process of purifying their mindstreams and they are extremely attached to salvation and liberation of all sentient beings from the sufferings of Samsara.

    So you random internet meathead, if you really want to criticize me from a Mahayana basis, then you would have said that its ultimately wrong to claim that happiness of Indians is more important than Pakistanis, or its not noble behaviour to wish bad outcomes for some nation etc, or to agitate people etc, but no it always needs to be some detachment or being one with everything?

    Even concept one is dependent on others to exist, like concept of two or plurality, there is no reality where all is one, not at least for us, and if there would be then that reality is not accessible to us. Non sense and humbug! Why do I rant so? Because I need to fill the cracks in the dam and make sure it stands, meaning Im preemptively countering your possibly idiotic counter arguments.

    Renunciation or ascetic living is good for all Buddhists, as is also detachment from materialistic desires, but detachment towards the people is extremely bad.
    There is no rule that laypersons should be detached from politics.

    Replies: @Bashibuzuk

    You clearly would benefit from practicing detachment.

    Your anger is getting the better of you.

    221. One should give up anger, renounce pride, and overcome all fetters. Suffering never befalls him who clings not to mind and body and is detached.

    222. He who checks rising anger as a charioteer checks a rolling chariot, him I call a true charioteer. Others only hold the reins.

    223. Overcome the angry by non-anger; overcome the wicked by goodness; overcome the miser by generosity; overcome the liar by truth.

    224. Speak the truth; yield not to anger; when asked, give even if you only have a little. By these three means can one reach the presence of the gods.

    225. Those sages who are inoffensive and ever restrained in body, go to the Deathless State, where, having gone, they grieve no more.

    226. Those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, and are ever intent upon Nibbana — their defilements fade away

    http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/buddhism/dp17.htm

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Bashibuzuk

    First being irritated is not same as being angry, second Dhammapada is not part of our canon, its a Theravada book.

    But yes its quite good book and I should read it again, and all its advice is good and beneficial. Thank you friend!

    Replies: @Bashibuzuk, @haarunbeg

    , @Thulean Friend
    @Bashibuzuk


    You clearly would benefit from practicing detachment.

    Your anger is getting the better of you.
     
    Be kind to Altan. He's our resident hapa chud, a clearly psychologically troubled individual, who is using Buddhism to cope. But at least he is trying. He could have become the next Elliot Rodger instead. Show some patience and empathy.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Bashibuzuk

  147. @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    Thanks for the introduction here to the world of Mongolian gastronomic delights. I'm presenting you the following as they say "just for your information". It's certainly not meant to impress you, and I hope that you have a sense of humor that might help you "stomach it". There are many "Mongolian style" restaurants state side, but from what you've presented here they don't even merit being called "McMongolian". The only way I can explain them to you is to compare them Japanese teppanyaki or hibachi style grills. Typically these one dimensional restaurants offer their clients a large bowl that they can then use while traversing through a buffet of fresh meats and vegetables, that once are filled up are then cooked on a flat metal plate by a cook who adds various sauces and spices, all the while slicing and dicing the ingredients to the desired consistency. For what it is, it can be a tasty affair, and it does seem to have developed a loyal customer base, but Mongolian style? Far from it I think? For one, I don't think that the Mongolian kitchen includes some of the vegetables that they use (carrots, spinach, bean sprouts, zucchini) nor any seafood (shrimp). This is basically it, not any of the interesting dumpling or other Mongolian dishes that you've written about here. There are more of these type of "Mongolian restaurants "out there than you might think. Anyway, I'm curious to hear what you think? 🎭

    https://youtu.be/lE8w0xBNPx4

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    I have heard of this “Mongolian Barbecue or stir fry” from my friends who have been in USA. It does not have anything common with Mongolian food and was actually invented in Taiwan.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_barbecue

    For me its a non matter, even name Genghis is not a Mongolian name, so they can do what they want.

    Carrots by the way are sometimes used in modern Mongolian cooking, they grow quite well in some parts of Southern Siberia and Mongolia, as do cucumbers, potatoes and onions. In Mongolian cooking all is either boiled or steamed, but never fried or grilled, except sweet and crispy dough that is made for desert, its often fried. Then there is one special way to cook those marmots, by heating stones in a fire and stuffing marmot with them.

    Sorry that I disparaged salo, its tasty, and Ukrainian cuisine overall has much richer variety of dishes, and once again there is no soup better than Borsch.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
  148. @Gerard-Mandela
    I have a profound moral obligation to reproduce this post:

    One of my anglo friends and I exchange joke e-mails between ourselves – him taking the p*ss out of Russia, me ridiculing Britain.

    He sends me this link :

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8949907/Ex-wife-Yorkshire-Ripper-Peter-Sutcliffe-marital-home-night-died.html

    This is an article about the wife “Sonia” of the UK’s apparently biggest ever serial killer, some freak called Sutcliffe referred to as the “Yorkshire ripper”-

    1.She STILL lives in the home that they lived in together when he was doing the murders 40+ years before
    2.This evil swine did not even divorce him until over a decade later
    3.Supposed to still be good friends with him
    4. He was supposedly a schizophrenic nutjob, “Sonia” is supposed to have had no idea (lol, BS) about what he was doing

    Now this is the text in the article that made my pal link it to me:

    The daughter of Ukrainian and Polish refugees
     
    This is sensational…..let me repeat

    The daughter of Ukrainian and Polish refugees
     
    Are you reading Karlin??

    The daughter of Ukrainian and Polish refugees

     

    Is it registering in your brain??

    THE DAUGHTER OF UKRAINIAN AND POLISH REFUGEES

    This is MI6 codetalk for “Nazi Galician Banderetard” – Nazi Galician useless, subroma, subhuman, evil , vile scum smuggled out of eastern Europe by British/American intelligence ….and so physical and intellectual property of british intelligence.

    There are no “refugees” in those circumstances, as they could easily have just referred to this bitch’s scumbag family as European Volunteer Worker, but they say in the article "refugee" – which is code and omission for sadist, war criminal.

    This only means one thing……..that the biggest serial killer in British history is “made in Galicia” ( well, something had to be LOL) and that the implausible failure to stop him, despite being questioned and arrested by Police several times is because from his wife, he was under protection of UK secret services or ( remember we are dealing with sicklow lowlife people here) he was directly following some UK intelligence game.

    Y

    ou can’t link his crimes to his wife or the fact she’s Galician

     

    OF COURSE you can you fools. I can feel it’s the truth- which is more than sufficient scientific and moral reason. It cant be a coincidence this Bandera connection.

    My friend assures me that only now has it ever been revealed this Ukrainian “refugee” BS. Before then she was referred to as being a Czechoslovakian is what he promises me has been reprinted since the time of his imprisonment. This omission doesn’t happen deliberately and only get revealed so long after the murders unless Anglo-press were deliberately under instructions. Of course her Banderetard parents could have been committing their crimes in Slovakia, which is how they could continue printing this misdirection on ethnicity.

    I knew it in my soul that for the most serious crimes commited in the west then a Galician retard would be involved.

    BTW further searching shows that “Sonia”‘s real name is actually………Oksana, Oksana Szurma ( probable anglo translation of Shurma, born 1950/51)

    F**k relative non-issues like Missile-Defence or new START Treaty – this is what should be the main subject of Putin’s next phone call with the American President.
    His big press conference tomorrow – he should get off his a** and answer about this Ukrop nutjob and British intelligence

    Replies: @Svevlad

    uuuh just say “transcarpathian Croat”

  149. @Bashibuzuk
    @AltanBakshi

    You clearly would benefit from practicing detachment.

    Your anger is getting the better of you.



    221. One should give up anger, renounce pride, and overcome all fetters. Suffering never befalls him who clings not to mind and body and is detached.

    222. He who checks rising anger as a charioteer checks a rolling chariot, him I call a true charioteer. Others only hold the reins.

    223. Overcome the angry by non-anger; overcome the wicked by goodness; overcome the miser by generosity; overcome the liar by truth.

    224. Speak the truth; yield not to anger; when asked, give even if you only have a little. By these three means can one reach the presence of the gods.

    225. Those sages who are inoffensive and ever restrained in body, go to the Deathless State, where, having gone, they grieve no more.

    226. Those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, and are ever intent upon Nibbana -- their defilements fade away
     
    http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/buddhism/dp17.htm

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Thulean Friend

    First being irritated is not same as being angry, second Dhammapada is not part of our canon, its a Theravada book.

    But yes its quite good book and I should read it again, and all its advice is good and beneficial. Thank you friend!

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
    @AltanBakshi

    You are quite welcome.

    Be well!

    , @haarunbeg
    @AltanBakshi

    'Bashibuzuk' is one of AaronBs sockpuppets. Look at his posting history. Almost nothing. Plus hes the only one who ever talks about your 'anger issues.' Aaron has a number of duplicate accounts. 'American Citizen 2.0' is one. Easy to tell by tech ways too.

  150. @songbird
    @Thulean Friend

    I've been considering the possibility that spices are linked to social factors. When I see white Americans using Tabasco I take I as a sign of extraversion.

    But it is harder to say what it is in a cultural context. Japanese have some very strong flavors, don't they? Fermented stuff. Yet they seem a very diffident people. I've noted before how they seem to excel at depicting shy characters, in contrast to Hollywood.

    Maybe, it has something to do with rice-based cuisine or a largely vegetarian diet?

    Replies: @Svevlad

    Or perhaps they became introverted over time. Japanese until recent times seem to strike me as an ultra-violent sort of people. All this violence results in their ridiculously obtuse social practices, which due to power relations end up selecting for being a limp-dick little wimp, effectively they cucked themselves, and their spicier parts of the cuisine are just remnants of this state

  151. @AltanBakshi
    @Bashibuzuk

    First being irritated is not same as being angry, second Dhammapada is not part of our canon, its a Theravada book.

    But yes its quite good book and I should read it again, and all its advice is good and beneficial. Thank you friend!

    Replies: @Bashibuzuk, @haarunbeg

    You are quite welcome.

    Be well!

  152. @melanf
    @Europe Europa


    I recall reading that the first waves of Soviet soldiers to arrive in Berlin and take control of parts of the city were largely ethnic Slavs, and on the whole didn’t treat German
     
    It seems to me that this is a legend, as well as the whole"rape of Berlin". Of course there were rapes, but the propaganda picture from the works of Anglo-American authors is fake. A "laboratory-clean example" of how such fakes are fabricated is the town of Nemmersdorf. It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape ("one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably"). The Anglo-American authors were not satisfied with such conclusions. As Beevor, Hastings, etc. can tell, all the remaining "sixty-two women and young girls raped and murdered by Soviet soldiers" in Nemmersdorf, " not a single civilian escaped death at the hands of Russian soldiers. Women were crucified on the doors of sheds and overturned carts or, after being raped, crushed under the tracks of tanks. Their children were also brutally murdered ." The legend was created in several waves - in Germany, under the supervision of the Americans, one after another, another campaign was held to expose the Soviet atrocities in Nemmersdorf (films, radio programs, etc.), after which new "witnesses" of these atrocities appeared, which allowed to launch a new campaign of revelations, etc. At the same time, evidence did not fit into the narrative (Feldwebel Helmut Hoffmann about the killed civilians : "It seemed strange that there were no exit holes on the corpses: small entrance and lack of blood. It was more like shots fired from a distance than shots fired at close range") they were simply ignored, but the deliberate lies that were convenient for propaganda purposes were replicated in every possible way. This is a chemically pure example of how the legend of the rape of Germany was created - when real cases were falsified creating a fake picture. With Berlin, the same story, with the caveat that there was no SS commission in Berlin, and it is impossible to verify post-war fictions

    Replies: @Demografie, @utu, @Coconuts

    A “laboratory-clean example” of how such fakes are fabricated is the town of Nemmersdorf. It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape (“one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably”).

    Nemmersdorf is not an example I would pick if I were you. The Red Army unit that captured it was more into the kinky stuff. Rape was just a foreplay for them. They were more into torture and slow killing like nailing women to barn door. The event is unquestionable. It was exploited and embellish by Nazi propaganda but most of it was true.

    • Replies: @melanf
    @utu


    Nemmersdorf is not an example
     
    Nemmersdorf is an exemplary example of how a fake was formed, since in this case it is possible to compare the testimony of "eyewitnesses" (processed by propagandists) with the results of the investigation of the SS commission. If two cases of rape recorded by the SS commission turned (for American propagandists) into " all women from 12 to 80 were raped and then painfully killed" - then this is more than indicative

    I would pick if I were you. The Red Army unit that captured it was more into the kinky stuff. Rape was just a foreplay for them. They were more into torture and slow killing like nailing women to barn door.
     
    "26 people died in Nemmersdorf. This is confirmed by the Hinrichs report (SS Commission report) and even by a photograph of the cross over the temporary grave....It is impossible not to emphasize the following. Despite the fact that Nemmersdorf was first taken by Soviet troops, then recaptured by German troops, that the battles for the village went on for a day and a half, that the village was repeatedly bombed, shelled with cannons and mortars, according to German data, not a single civilian was injured during the fighting... The situation when soldiers are killed by bombs, shells and stray bullets, while civilians remain unharmed, is simply incredible.
    Yes, in German documents, attention is focused on "shots at point-blank range" and "in the head", but it is difficult to expect them to be purely objective. For example, many eyewitnesses mention two women and a small child who died not far from the bridge. "Felkischer Beobachter" wrote about rape and murder with a bayonet and shots to the head, but the witness Helmut Hoffmann did not see any signs of rape, and it seemed to him that the shots were long-range. Harry Turk did believe that the victims "came under fire" (perhaps it happened on the morning of the 21st, when the village was taken, when there was a heavy fog).
    When were the photos taken? Harry Turk says that almost immediately after the capture of the village, the soldiers were instructed to collect the corpses of civilians. lieutenant seidat, who arrived in nemmersdorf a day later, saw the bodies already in the cemetery. Major Hinrichs, who arrived a day later, wrote that 24 bodies had been buried and were in an open grave. He ordered them to be taken out so that the forensic doctor could make conclusions about the causes of death. The same day, October 25, apparently, the photos are dated (see prev. Hinrichs ' report). It is quite difficult to assume that the soldiers buried German women with their hems pulled up, their underwear pulled down and their shameless places uncovered. This means that the half-naked women in the "photographs from Nemmersdorf" are a deliberate manipulation, committed and used for propaganda purposes
    ."

    slow killing like nailing women to barn door
     
    There is no mention of the men or women crucified (on barn doors, or another way) in Nemmersdorf in the Hinrichs reports (SS commission reports).

    It was exploited and embellish by Nazi propaganda .
     
    No, not really. This is a fake created by Anglo-American propaganda and its German servants

    most of it was true.
     
    Really? That is, when one rape, and another alleged case of rape turn (through the efforts of propagandists) into "all women from 12 to 80 were raped and then painfully killed" - is this mostly true?
    When the absolute majority of the inhabitants of Nemmersdorf remained alive , but American propagandists write about them that almost the entire civilian population was deliberately killed in slow and painful ways - "most of it was true"?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    , @German_reader
    @utu

    Nemmersdorf is controversial, total certainty is probably unachievable. Current state of research (unlikely to be superseded) is that several war crimes did happen there. An internal report from the Geheime Feldpolizei, dated 25th October 1944, indicates that Red Army soldiers shot about two dozen civilians (mostly old people over 60 and several children). A 19-year old woman had apparently been raped before being shot (it also mentions a witness statement by a 20-year old woman who said she had been raped by two Red Army soldiers):
    https://www.zfo-online.de/portal/index.php/zfo/article/view/8692/8691
    The report seems free of any propagandistic intent, it's quite matter of fact, and reports mixed behaviour by Red Army soldiers (some behaving correctly and even taking steps to protect German civilians from shelling, while others looted and raped).
    One problem is that there were several high-ranking NSDAP and SS members in the village shortly after the Soviet withdrawal. What exactly they did there, is unknown, but presumably they made preparations for the propagandistic exploitation of events. Maybe they manipulated or staged corpses (e.g. to play up the rape aspect). So people who want to believe that it was all made up can cling to that uncertainty.
    Higher victim numbers than about two dozen seem to have no factual basis, as do the more extreme claims about sadistic torture (the bit about women supposedly being nailed to barn doors apparently goes back to the "testimony" of a certain Karl Potrek in the early 1950s, but in all probability Potrek had never even been in Nemmersdorf. Nothing of the kind is mentioned in the Geheime Feldpolizei report which was written immediately after the events).

    Replies: @utu, @melanf

  153. @Mikhail
    @A123

    Sebastian Coe.

    Replies: @Dr. Charles Fhandrich

    Yes. One of the many sports whites waste their time on while their nation is falling down all around them.


  154. Average brain size map, but does brain size matter at all and why it varies so much? I dont know, thats why Im asking, especially when there are so many intelligent HBD guys here.

    If it matters then the Uralic-Mongolic-Eskimos are the real master race, lol!

    But to me it seems that it doesnt matter much, especially when Japanese and Italians have comparatively small brains.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @AltanBakshi

    I would be very surprised if Ethiopian highland peoples actually had smaller brains than jungle pygmies; but the large brain sizes of Yukaghirs and other arctic peoples seems very credible to me.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  155. @Mr. Hack
    @utu


    The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary
     
    This is one of the mot ridiculous things that I've ever read. Is this your own theory or did you pick it up somewhere second hand?

    Did you read this one, Anatoly? You may be attracted to having sex with horses and donkeys, because you like to ratchet it up once in a while with a ghost or scorpion pepper. I know an Orthodox Bishop who grows these kinds of peppers in his back yard. 🌶️🌶️🌶️. :-) :-) :-)

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @utu

    “Orthodox Bishop who grows these kinds of peppers in his back yard” knows very well not to touch himself after handling the peppers. Though it has been recorded that some women like the extra stimulation from a chilly marinade. Men no so much. Women’s equipment is more robust.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @utu

    Anyone who eats or cooks with hot peppers knows to wash ones hands after dealing with them, and certainly not rub their eyes afterwards. For the record, I've never tried or desired to try ghost or scorpion peppers and feel quite content to stay at or under the "cayenne pepper" level and usually eat peppers in the jalapeno - serrano range. I quite enjoy bell peppers too (with no appreciable "hot kick") and often add them into my daily salad (they're quite good pickled "Hungarian" style too), jam packed with vitamin C. My friend the Bishop is a completely chaste person (he's a monk) and any innuendos of men eating them to improve their sexual stimulatory effects is another one of your ridiculous observations. He first dries out his ghost or scorpion peppers and then crushes them finely and uses them very sparingly to add some "zest" to his strictly vegetarian diet (he's vegan). This chart should help you in your abilities to discern the relative hotness of different peppers:

    https://www.myspicer.com/wp-content/uploads/scoville.jpg

    Capsaicin, the hot ingredient within peppers, is great for keeping your blood vessels clear and can help in reversing an impending heart attack or stroke.

    Replies: @utu, @AltanBakshi

  156. @mal
    Great news in science! Cosmic Crisis gets worse! (its a good thing).

    https://www.quantamagazine.org/astronomers-get-their-wish-and-the-hubble-crisis-gets-worse-20201217

    Another measurement for Hubble Constant (the thing that tells you how fast the universe is expanding) is in and it is... 73.2 km/s/megaparsec. Older predicted value is 67. The more measurements we take the more statistical validity higher values gain (they are all clustering around low 70's rather than high 60's).

    We care about that because that's how we know the age of the universe. The higher the value of acceleration rate the younger the universe. Just like when you drive the car from point A to point B, the harder you accelerate the shorter amount time it will take you to complete the trip.

    Hubble Constant value of 67 corresponds to about 14 billion year old universe. Hubble Constant value of 73 is more like 12-13 billion years old universe.

    This matters because we are also refining our ability to measure the age of the stars. And there are stars (Methuselah) nearby that are 14+ billion years old, and our statistical confidence in that number is increasing as well.

    So either we don't understand how local spacetime works and how stars can time travel in our neighborhood, or we don't understand how stellar fusion physics works and how elements are created, and at what rates.

    Either way, if we figure this out, it will be a scientific revolution the likes of which we haven't seen before. It will be either pocket fusion reactors for everybody, or DeLorean style time travel machines and warp drives. Either way, it is going to be huge.

    Replies: @Menschmaschine, @utu

    That the stellar parallax is measured in microarcseconds range is mind-blowing when you think what does it take to maintain angle accuracy on satellite or Earth as it is orbiting the Sun.

  157. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Another German Reader

    The (Physical) Strength of Nations

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/physical-strength-countries.png

    Replies: @Shortsword, @Tor597

    Pakistan being significantly lower than India is suspicious.

    • Agree: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Shortsword


    Pakistan being significantly lower than India is suspicious.
     
    Yes, that is odd, I think the samples from India and Pakistan will vary considerably, given how multi-ethnic the two countries are (India more so than Pakistan). It is similar to the IQ data of these sorts of countries where you get widely disparate results depending on the region you take the sample from. But overall, South Asians are physically the weakest group. This chimes with real life experience, there are hardly any South Asian athletes in power lifting or other strength intensive competitions.

    Replies: @Tor597

  158. @AltanBakshi
    Ukrainian Salo is tasty, especially in Hungarian style with peppers and garlic, but its nothing compared to Arbin or Mongolian style raw horse liver with salt. Fat has a simple taste, but liver has rich and delicate taste. One is good for peasants and another for warriors. I am comparing it to Salo because its also often frozen and eaten cold like Salo and its usually, but not always mixed with horses fat.

    https://prospekt-desires.ru/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/%D0%9A%D0%BE%D0%BD%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B0%D1%8F-%D0%BF%D0%B5%D1%87%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%8C.jpg

    https://i2.wp.com/budaev.org/wp-content/uploads/arbin-4.jpg?ssl=1

    https://i1.wp.com/budaev.org/wp-content/uploads/arbin-3.jpg?fit=660%2C494&ssl=1

    https://budaev.org/elgentey/amp/

    Mongolian food is simple and good, it and Tibetan cuisine dont have anything common with Chinese, except broad noodles and using lots of dough like Northern Chinese do.

    Replies: @Tor597

    Hmm, interesting.

    How good are Mongolian Desserts?

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Tor597

    Theres candies made from milk and fried dough sweetened with condensed milk and powdered sugar, sometimes dough is made more crispy sometimes more fluffy.

    https://i.mycdn.me/i?r=AyH4iRPQ2q0otWIFepML2LxRCT_4yZ3bOxOZnL8x-CPTFA

    https://livetraveling.ru/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/buuza-03.jpg

    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/_3xRXVDAXhQ2d-raEv9NVFybrTH9SXESqMC7TDH5rYN8F6yRpmc66pDlsnnQZ8_kiCEGgQmiHeDq_iA1hstIXAnnUyGM9g1yIw1sLucPeKBAIk5_7At5NM0tJD5pVwAWQFvA

    Their taste is quite similar with freshly fried doughnuts.

    Then there is clotted cream desert Öröm or өрөм

    https://www.altaaskitchen.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/12552883_663721410436294_3109558438425715614_n.jpg

    https://updown.mn/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/orom.jpg

    Its very tasty, resembles little bit creme caramel or creme brule, but still very different from them, the taste is more rich, creamy and milky. More natural I would say.

    So it can be said than Mongolian cuisine is totally from another planet that the food made by other Asians.

  159. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Another German Reader

    The (Physical) Strength of Nations

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/physical-strength-countries.png

    Replies: @Shortsword, @Tor597

    What are we supposed to make of the M-F gap between different countries?

    India seems to have the smallest gap between male and female strength while Sweeden has the largest.

  160. @Menschmaschine
    @mal

    Actually, these observational problems are not particularly remarkable in comparison to others that have been known for a long time. This gives me a splendid excuse to reuse a text I wrote some time ago in response to an article (https://www.unz.com/estriker/jewish-brilliance-synthetic-like-zirconia/):

    The continuing dominance of GR is a huge problem for physics, since the relativistic conceptual base of both special and general relativity is almost certainly a fundamentally wrong model of physical reality.

    Let’s take a look at the development of relativity: The assumption in the 19th century was that light is a wave that is traveling through a hypothetical ether, analogous to sound waves through a medium like air or water. The famous Michelson-Morey experiment tested this assumption by comparing the time needed for light to propagate a certain distance both in the direction of the movement of the earth around the sun and that perpendicular to it. The expectation was that the times would be different, since in the direction of the movement the rate of the movement would be either added or subtracted to the speed of the light. In fact, however, the times were identical. The solution proposed by Lorentz was the assumption that the measurement apparatus did undergo a small compensating length contraction in the direction of the movement. Later experiments like that by Rayleigh and Brace made it clear that in addition also clocks would need to run slower.


    In 1905 Einstein proposed his own alternative Theory of Special Relativity. He took the principle of relativity found by Lorentz (with some help by Poincare) and instead of deriving it as a result made it the point of departure for his own theory. Mathematically, both theories are identical and so can’t be distinguished experimentally. But the metaphysical picture is very different: The Lorentzian Ether Theory still assumes an absolute 3-dimensional space with an absolute time, which is filled with the ether.

    In contrast, Special Relativity postulates that time and space (or spacetime as it is called in relativistic jargon) themselves are changing, i.e. that not objects, but space itself shrinks or expands and that time itself really runs faster or slower, not only physical processes. The principle of relativity leads to such headscratchers like the famous twin paradoxon, where the sibling that travels close to light speed is younger when returning than the one that stays at home, but no intuitive reason why this should be so - if everything is relative, why wouldn’t it be equally valid to consider the first twin as immobile? No such issues exist under Lorentzian Ether Theory, since there is an absolute frame of reference and so it is always clear which one of the two is changing his speed in relation to the ether.

    A common criticism against the Lorentz Ether Theory was the assertion that it is quite a coincidence that the length shrinks by exactly the value required to make a movement through the ether undetectable. However, it is not difficult to understand why such effects as length contraction and time dilation should happen, but not be detectable locally, if one does not assume, like early ether theories, that matter is something separate from the ether but instead that it is a part of it - like defects in the lattice structure of a crystal. It is naturally difficult to detect something you and your measurement apparatus are part of. Lorentz was also able to show that at least for electromagnetism both effects could be derived from the Maxwell equations that had been found earlier.

    But then Einstein came out in 1915 with the General Theory of Relativity, which sealed the triumph of relativity by providing a supposedly highly successful description of gravity. Whereas in Special Relativity spacetime had been considered as uniform, General Relativity now introduced gravity in the form of distortions in the spacetime fabric. However, this only works up to a certain scale - as soon as we go beyond galactic dimensions, General Relativity does not work anymore at all, the movement of galaxies is very different to that predicted by General Relativity. To correct for this, vast amounts of mysterious “Dark matter” have to be hypothesized. Despite much effort, any attempt to actually detect any of this hypothetical “Dark Matter” has failed.

    Another issue is the expansion of the universe; it was discovered in 1998 that, contrary to General Relativity, the universe does not only expand, but that this expansion is accelerating. For this another Ad Hoc hypothesis, the even more mysterious “Dark Energy” had to be made up. It is of course always possible to immunize a theory with enough Ad Hoc crutches, but when this “Dark Energy” is supposed to be 68% and “Dark Matter” 27% of the universe with only 5% left for actually observable matter it gets rather implausible.

    There are other highly problematic issues like the emergence of singularities as a consequence of the collapse of large stars, with all the seemingly intractable problems like information loss that this entails. Some scientists therefore see the appearance of singularities as a mathematical artefact and don’t think that it really happens in reality; interestingly this included Einstein himself, who thought that general relativity was an incomplete theory, which would be superseded by a singularity-free unified field theory. Of course, he never succeeded in delivering this theory. Furthermore, at least in principle, closed causal loops and time travel and therefore violations of causality are entirely valid solutions of General Relativity.

    The possibility of time flowing backwards - and not the supposedly nondeterministic nature of Quantum Theory (“God doesn’t play dices”) - is the real reason why Einstein was so hostile to it. There is, as Einstein knew very well, no intrinsic reason that Quantum Theory needs to be nondeterministic if one accepts nonlocality, as demonstrated by the De Broglie/Bohm interpretation of Quantum Theory. However, nonlocality – i.e. influences faster than the speed of light – mean in the context of the relativistic framework nothing less than time travel into the past. That was the reason why Einstein was so scandalized by the “spooky action at a distance” of quantum entanglement and why it took so long to be accepted by the scientific community. Even if we currently cannot use quantum entanglement to actually transmit information, the simple fact that faster than light influences exist is highly problematic for relativity.

    The most fundamental issue however is the fact, that it seems to be simply impossible to proceed further with the relativistic paradigm. In the late 1920s the two cutting edge theories to explain the basic fabric of our universe were General Relativity and Quantum Theory: General Relativity describes gravity, the force effective at long distances; Quantum Theory in contrast describes the forces effective at shorter ranges, e.g. electromagnetism and the weak and the strong interaction.

    Now, nearly a century later, we are essentially still in the same position. All work that has been done since then has been filling out details, but there has been no fundamental progress. Despite much effort, all attempts to reconcile General Relativity with Quantum Theory to create a unified theory have come to nothing. The great hope String Theory is now more or less admitted to be a failure and other approaches like Loop Quantum Gravity don’t look any better; fundamental physics has largely stagnated for many decades.

    The key reason for the failure to unify General Relativity with Quantum Theory is precisely the revolutionary new relativistic model of time and space for which Einstein is hailed. All efforts to graft it onto Quantum Theory have been an abject failure: Quantum Theory simply needs a fixed spatial background and absolute time to work. Given this – and the fact that Quantum Theory, in sharp contrast to General Relativity, has an entirely unblemished record when it comes to experimental verification – it is quite clear that it is relativity and not Quantum Theory that has to go. Einstein shunted physics on a fundamentally wrong track back in 1905.

    The description of the problem above indicates quite clearly the most promising direction to proceed: return to a preferred frame (i.e. ether) paradigm with absolute time and space and create a theory of gravity that is a counterpart to General Relativity in the same way as the Lorentzian Ether Theory relates to Special Relativity. This theory would then describe the general case of an ether with a varying “density” indicating gravitational distortions, whereas the Lorentzian Ether Theory, the analogon to Special Relativity, deals with the simplified border case of a homogenous ether. There is actually a bit of work going on along these lines, even though the frowned upon word “ether” is usually avoided - “condensed matter model/interpretation” is a dog whistle that is sometimes used instead (See, for instance https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10701-008-9262-9). However, due to the still unbroken blind faith in General Relativity such attempts have received hardly any attention.i

    It remains to be seen for how much longer progress will be blocked - the lack of success in the long running quest to detect the elusive “Dark Matter” seems to be causing some disquietude at long last. Perhaps there will also be some new piece of empirical evidence that finally tilts the mood against General Relativity. There are indications that certain properties of gravity waves might be used to distinguish between General Relativity and alternative theories. But in any case, the sheer length of time that ethnic hero worship of Einstein was able to inoculate an obviously highly flawed theory against any criticism is nothing short of astounding.

    Replies: @utu, @Bill

    I do not think you can do away with the Lorentz transform. It is here to stay. Lorentz and Galileo transforms are the only physical solutions based on symmetry assumptions among bilinear transforms. No relativity postulate of Poincare or Einstein postulate of speed of light invariance are invoked in the derivation. Vladimir Ignatowski in 1910 seems to be the first who did this derivation though it was Poincare who first observed that the transform must be an algebraic group. The parameter c is not determined at this stage.

    Then one easily demonstrates that only Lorentz transform makes Maxwell equation invariant in uniform linear motion so the Galileo transform has to be rejected. And also the parameter c is determined to be the speed of light and the Lorentz transform implies its invariance rendering Einstein postulate unnecessary. So the speed of light being constant is not something that Einstein had to postulate but a consequence of basic symmetries.

    Poincare realized that Newton 2nd law of dynamic is not invariant in Lorentz transform while it was invariant in Galileo transform. A hard decision had to be made: do you preserve Maxwell or Newton. This decision for good reasons was easy for Lorenz and Poincare who realized that mass in Newton equation must be velocity depended and so they introduced what was first called Lorentz mass, then Lorentz-Einstein mass and then relativistic mass.

    Since the Special Theory of Relativity (STR) is mathematically equivalent to stating that Lorentz transform is valid then STR is here to stay. Whether one do STR and still talk about ether there is no difference because as long as Lorentz transform is used all results and predictions are the same.

    As far the the General Theory of Relativity and gravity there is more room for change but because it is associated with Einstein who acquired a status of a secular saint life for those who want to challenge it can be hard. New phenomena and observations discovered be astronomers are quickly pronounced as confirming Einstein’s GTR while not much energy and resources are spent to test the alternative theories.

    Should we be concerned about the Group Think effect surrounding GTR? While astronomy played a great role in the development of physics its impact on discoveries on technological inventions was small. The impact of STR and GTR outside the genre of Sci-Fi literature is nil. No practical invention hinges on STR. Much touted importance of Einstein’s two theories of relativity in GPS is nil. The GPS was an engineering project designed with many redundancy that self-correct all possible drifts and thus the explicit formulas for time shifts as predicted by STR and GTR were not necessary. Despite of what they keep saying you can have GPS w/o Einstein.

  161. @Tor597
    @AltanBakshi

    Hmm, interesting.

    How good are Mongolian Desserts?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Theres candies made from milk and fried dough sweetened with condensed milk and powdered sugar, sometimes dough is made more crispy sometimes more fluffy.

    https://i.mycdn.me/i?r=AyH4iRPQ2q0otWIFepML2LxRCT_4yZ3bOxOZnL8x-CPTFA

    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/_3xRXVDAXhQ2d-raEv9NVFybrTH9SXESqMC7TDH5rYN8F6yRpmc66pDlsnnQZ8_kiCEGgQmiHeDq_iA1hstIXAnnUyGM9g1yIw1sLucPeKBAIk5_7At5NM0tJD5pVwAWQFvA

    Their taste is quite similar with freshly fried doughnuts.

    Then there is clotted cream desert Öröm or өрөм

    Its very tasty, resembles little bit creme caramel or creme brule, but still very different from them, the taste is more rich, creamy and milky. More natural I would say.

    So it can be said than Mongolian cuisine is totally from another planet that the food made by other Asians.

    • Thanks: Tor597
  162. @utu
    @Mr. Hack

    "Orthodox Bishop who grows these kinds of peppers in his back yard" knows very well not to touch himself after handling the peppers. Though it has been recorded that some women like the extra stimulation from a chilly marinade. Men no so much. Women's equipment is more robust.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Anyone who eats or cooks with hot peppers knows to wash ones hands after dealing with them, and certainly not rub their eyes afterwards. For the record, I’ve never tried or desired to try ghost or scorpion peppers and feel quite content to stay at or under the “cayenne pepper” level and usually eat peppers in the jalapeno – serrano range. I quite enjoy bell peppers too (with no appreciable “hot kick”) and often add them into my daily salad (they’re quite good pickled “Hungarian” style too), jam packed with vitamin C. My friend the Bishop is a completely chaste person (he’s a monk) and any innuendos of men eating them to improve their sexual stimulatory effects is another one of your ridiculous observations. He first dries out his ghost or scorpion peppers and then crushes them finely and uses them very sparingly to add some “zest” to his strictly vegetarian diet (he’s vegan). This chart should help you in your abilities to discern the relative hotness of different peppers:

    Capsaicin, the hot ingredient within peppers, is great for keeping your blood vessels clear and can help in reversing an impending heart attack or stroke.

    • Replies: @utu
    @Mr. Hack

    You misread my first comment. There was no innuendos and there was nothing about sexual stimulation.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    My favorite is the Thai pepper.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  163. @Mr. Hack
    @utu

    Anyone who eats or cooks with hot peppers knows to wash ones hands after dealing with them, and certainly not rub their eyes afterwards. For the record, I've never tried or desired to try ghost or scorpion peppers and feel quite content to stay at or under the "cayenne pepper" level and usually eat peppers in the jalapeno - serrano range. I quite enjoy bell peppers too (with no appreciable "hot kick") and often add them into my daily salad (they're quite good pickled "Hungarian" style too), jam packed with vitamin C. My friend the Bishop is a completely chaste person (he's a monk) and any innuendos of men eating them to improve their sexual stimulatory effects is another one of your ridiculous observations. He first dries out his ghost or scorpion peppers and then crushes them finely and uses them very sparingly to add some "zest" to his strictly vegetarian diet (he's vegan). This chart should help you in your abilities to discern the relative hotness of different peppers:

    https://www.myspicer.com/wp-content/uploads/scoville.jpg

    Capsaicin, the hot ingredient within peppers, is great for keeping your blood vessels clear and can help in reversing an impending heart attack or stroke.

    Replies: @utu, @AltanBakshi

    You misread my first comment. There was no innuendos and there was nothing about sexual stimulation.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @utu


    The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary.
     
    Still, a rather bizarre analogy to make regarding those that achieve an endorphin high through eating chili peppers? :-)

    Replies: @utu

  164. @utu
    @songbird


    theory the other day about Indians and spicy food
     
    Food bacteria-spice survey shows why some cultures like it hot
    https://news.cornell.edu/stories/1998/03/food-bacteria-spice-survey-shows-why-some-cultures-it-hot

    Capsicums are not high on the list on the antimicrobial properties. They would no have a role in making eating spoiled food safer. Blocking bad taste and smell is dubious.

    There is no explanation why not everywhere in Central American or tropical South America capsicums are used. Nicaragua has as bland cuisine as Norway. Why not everywhere in South East Asia? So the the high temperature theory of the cooling effect by sweating is dubious.

    Capsicums area relatively recent addition to India, Thai and Sichuan cuisines. They did not have anything that hot before. Why did they get hooked on it? Hooked might be a right term as there is the addiction factor.

    The masochistic pleasure from eating hot capsicums is not considered in the article. How to maximize the effect of endorphin release to have the highest high of the longest duration by eating hot capsicums in the meal?

    Mexicans (chiefly males) like taking a small bites of fresh hot jalapeno during a meal (not with every bite) to get occasional spikes and rushes of endorphins and to get the psychological boost from the display of their machismo. The pleasure of oscillatory stimulus might be greater than from a constants stimulus at saturation level.

    Machismo element was the chief factor behind the trend that began in the US among young males population to like hot sauces and Mexican food. The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary.

    Thais while eating very hot meals sometimes have uncontrollable release of tears that may give a sense of catharsis. This is similar to the fictional scene of eating raw onions by Germans to induce tears to have a sense of the act of contrition for their sins in Gunter Grass novel.

    The spectrum between good and bad chefs and foods in hot spicy cuisine is narrow and thus more egalitarian which appeals to hoi polloi.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @songbird

    The theory of antimicrobial properties has to certainly be pure bunk. No way someone is going to eat enough to benefit and if they did it would probably upset their native gut flora.

    Many ancient references seem to list medical uses. Perhaps, there is a placebo effect for tasting something strong.

    Capsicums area relatively recent addition to India, Thai and Sichuan cuisines.

    This is true, but they also had native spices like peppercorns, so they probably had strong flavored-food, before the Columbian exchange.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    No "placebo effect":


    People who ate chili peppers regularly had less mortality over a median 8.2 years compared to peers who didn't eat them or only rarely did so. This was observed after adjustment for age, sex, and caloric intake:

    All-cause mortality: HR 0.77 (95% CI 0.66-0.90)
    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality: HR 0.66 (95% CI 0.50-0.86)
    Ischemic heart disease mortality: HR 0.56 (95% CI 0.35-0.87)
    Cerebrovascular death: HR 0.39 (95% 0.20-0.75)

     

    https://www.medpagetoday.com/primarycare/dietnutrition/83929

    Replies: @Shortsword, @songbird

  165. @Mr. Hack
    @utu

    Anyone who eats or cooks with hot peppers knows to wash ones hands after dealing with them, and certainly not rub their eyes afterwards. For the record, I've never tried or desired to try ghost or scorpion peppers and feel quite content to stay at or under the "cayenne pepper" level and usually eat peppers in the jalapeno - serrano range. I quite enjoy bell peppers too (with no appreciable "hot kick") and often add them into my daily salad (they're quite good pickled "Hungarian" style too), jam packed with vitamin C. My friend the Bishop is a completely chaste person (he's a monk) and any innuendos of men eating them to improve their sexual stimulatory effects is another one of your ridiculous observations. He first dries out his ghost or scorpion peppers and then crushes them finely and uses them very sparingly to add some "zest" to his strictly vegetarian diet (he's vegan). This chart should help you in your abilities to discern the relative hotness of different peppers:

    https://www.myspicer.com/wp-content/uploads/scoville.jpg

    Capsaicin, the hot ingredient within peppers, is great for keeping your blood vessels clear and can help in reversing an impending heart attack or stroke.

    Replies: @utu, @AltanBakshi

    My favorite is the Thai pepper.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    My favorite for the last couple of years has been the peppadew pepper, grown in South Africa. They're really not very hot, just little bit of heat, but naturally sweet too. I like them more than candy and they're highly addictive. I would recommend them to our friend AP who shies away from peppers, I think that he just might like these little picuante honeys! They're not to be confused with cherry peppers.
    https://i2.wp.com/chilipeppermadness.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Peppadew-Peppers.jpg

    YUM!

  166. @Saucier
    @songbird

    I've never heard of rabbit being a filthy animal. As far as coprophagia goes, pigs do it and pork is the best kind of meat along with beef.

    Rabbit is a common and popular dish in France and elsewhere in Europe. It's also been a trendy dish in restaurants recently.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/dining/rabbit-recipe.html


    It remains a mystery to me why a delicious rabbit dinner, a habit in France, is such a hard sell in the United States, a meal many Americans would shy away from. This is not to say that you can’t buy rabbit here, but you don’t see it on a daily basis in butcher shops or at the supermarket.

    When I lived in Paris about 10 years ago, rabbit was always in the weekly dinner rotation. Every butcher shop has rabbits, fetchingly displayed belly-side up, so shoppers can see how fresh, pink and pristine they are.
     
    I find pigeon much less appetizing than rabbit, although that might be due to the pigeon's association with large cities and streets.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xq8tj1uy1Gk

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @songbird

    As far as coprophagia goes, pigs do it

    I recall a reference to this in the novel Lucifer’s Hammer. I assumed that they only do it under constrained circumstances though, as they seem to have a reputation for being very clean animals – other than the mud.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
  167. @songbird
    @utu

    The theory of antimicrobial properties has to certainly be pure bunk. No way someone is going to eat enough to benefit and if they did it would probably upset their native gut flora.

    Many ancient references seem to list medical uses. Perhaps, there is a placebo effect for tasting something strong.


    Capsicums area relatively recent addition to India, Thai and Sichuan cuisines.
     
    This is true, but they also had native spices like peppercorns, so they probably had strong flavored-food, before the Columbian exchange.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    No “placebo effect”:

    People who ate chili peppers regularly had less mortality over a median 8.2 years compared to peers who didn’t eat them or only rarely did so. This was observed after adjustment for age, sex, and caloric intake:

    All-cause mortality: HR 0.77 (95% CI 0.66-0.90)
    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality: HR 0.66 (95% CI 0.50-0.86)
    Ischemic heart disease mortality: HR 0.56 (95% CI 0.35-0.87)
    Cerebrovascular death: HR 0.39 (95% 0.20-0.75)

    https://www.medpagetoday.com/primarycare/dietnutrition/83929

    • Replies: @Shortsword
    @Mr. Hack

    8.2 years is an incredible difference. How much research has there been into this?

    , @songbird
    @Mr. Hack

    What theory do you subscribe to? Antioxidants?

    Honestly, I'm skeptical about a lot of these food studies. They often seem to be financed by special interests. Sometimes, their findings are dramatically reversed. In the above one, they take no account of race, which is frankly insane, based on what we already know.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  168. @utu
    @Mr. Hack

    You misread my first comment. There was no innuendos and there was nothing about sexual stimulation.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary.

    Still, a rather bizarre analogy to make regarding those that achieve an endorphin high through eating chili peppers? 🙂

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @utu
    @Mr. Hack

    Yes, a bit crude because the analogy overshadowed the case. I should have refined it.

  169. @Shortsword
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Pakistan being significantly lower than India is suspicious.

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Pakistan being significantly lower than India is suspicious.

    Yes, that is odd, I think the samples from India and Pakistan will vary considerably, given how multi-ethnic the two countries are (India more so than Pakistan). It is similar to the IQ data of these sorts of countries where you get widely disparate results depending on the region you take the sample from. But overall, South Asians are physically the weakest group. This chimes with real life experience, there are hardly any South Asian athletes in power lifting or other strength intensive competitions.

    • Replies: @Tor597
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Not only are Indians physically the weakest, but they are also the least athletic people on the planet overall.

    India only has 9 gold medals and only 1 since the 1980 Olympics.

    Eight of those medals are in field hockey which were won a long time ago when they were probably the only ones playing the sport and 1 gold medal was in shooting.

    Replies: @songbird, @Thulean Friend

  170. @sher singh
    @songbird

    Indians won't even eat breakfast leftovers for lunch, Europoors stay trollin cuz their food sucks||

    Replies: @Another German Reader, @songbird

    Europoors stay trollin cuz their food sucks

    Beef is the ambrosia of the gods.

    It is the source of the genius of European man, and the reason that he has fallen is because of those cucked fiends eating impossible burgers, and promoting African foods like crickets.

    In 1965, when Wally Schirra smuggled a sandwich aboard Gemini to John Young, it was beef. Both men later went to the moon. Coincidence? I think not!

    • Replies: @Jatt Aryaa
    @songbird

    Black women took you to the moon।।

  171. @Europe Europa
    @melanf

    I recall reading that the first waves of Soviet soldiers to arrive in Berlin and take control of parts of the city were largely ethnic Slavs, and on the whole didn't treat German civilians that badly. Apparently it was the later waves of troops from more far-flung parts of the Soviet Union, a high percentage of whom were non-white, who committed the Rape of Berlin, encouraged by rabidly anti-white Jewish commanders and politicians.

    No idea if there's any truth to that, or whether that is just white nationalist-style revisionism.

    Replies: @melanf, @Gerard.Gerard

    FFS…. can you at least show me just ONE German kid born in 1946/47 with Slavic, Buryat, Kyrgyz, Gruzian or whatever facial features, that could support this “mass rape” BS. It is a simple, idiotic lie done to try ( and fail) to slander some of the greatest men to have ever walked on this planet. Just attempt some common sense.

    Vietnam is full of 1000s of children born from definite rapes by American white and Negro soldiers, and those abandoned but born from normal relations.

  172. @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    No "placebo effect":


    People who ate chili peppers regularly had less mortality over a median 8.2 years compared to peers who didn't eat them or only rarely did so. This was observed after adjustment for age, sex, and caloric intake:

    All-cause mortality: HR 0.77 (95% CI 0.66-0.90)
    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality: HR 0.66 (95% CI 0.50-0.86)
    Ischemic heart disease mortality: HR 0.56 (95% CI 0.35-0.87)
    Cerebrovascular death: HR 0.39 (95% 0.20-0.75)

     

    https://www.medpagetoday.com/primarycare/dietnutrition/83929

    Replies: @Shortsword, @songbird

    8.2 years is an incredible difference. How much research has there been into this?

  173. @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    No "placebo effect":


    People who ate chili peppers regularly had less mortality over a median 8.2 years compared to peers who didn't eat them or only rarely did so. This was observed after adjustment for age, sex, and caloric intake:

    All-cause mortality: HR 0.77 (95% CI 0.66-0.90)
    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality: HR 0.66 (95% CI 0.50-0.86)
    Ischemic heart disease mortality: HR 0.56 (95% CI 0.35-0.87)
    Cerebrovascular death: HR 0.39 (95% 0.20-0.75)

     

    https://www.medpagetoday.com/primarycare/dietnutrition/83929

    Replies: @Shortsword, @songbird

    What theory do you subscribe to? Antioxidants?

    Honestly, I’m skeptical about a lot of these food studies. They often seem to be financed by special interests. Sometimes, their findings are dramatically reversed. In the above one, they take no account of race, which is frankly insane, based on what we already know.

    • Agree: utu
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @songbird

    The main ingredient within chili peppers that helps promote good heart heath is "capsaicin". There have been numerous studies that point to its effectiveness. Here's an article from Harvard that cites an important study printed within the Dec. 24, 2019 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. There are plenty more if you care to look. I first got interested in the subject when I saw a 91 year old Greek friend of mine pull out a small container of chili powder from his pocket, sprinkle some on the side of his hand, and then he quickly licked it. He does this several times a day, to keep in good form. His father lived to be 106 (I can't say with certainly that he was into the peppers, but my friend told me that he enjoyed a good shot of brandy and a weekly cigar). :-)

    As far as race goes, I think that different races may indeed be influenced differently to different nutrients, but generally all vitamins etc. are needed for the human body to function properly. Vitamin C is good for everyone, right?

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/chili-peppers-the-spice-of-a-longer-life


  174. [MORE]

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    What percentage of China's smart fraction is exported, in particular to "The West"?. And what percentage of the World's smart fraction is imported to the US? Those with >130 IQ's. Any body have the numbers?

  175. The Navarro report is a collection of objective truths about fraud in the U.S. Presidential election that is undeniable. Every swing state had multiple, severe, problems of different types.

    Here is the summary of the evidence showing that Biden will never be a legitimate President. I will place detailed graphics below the MORE tag.
     
     

    There is an incredibly important quote that bears repeating:
    “You are entitled to your own opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts.” — 1983, U.S Senator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D)

    The undeniable fact is that Trump won. You can have an opinion about that fact:
    — You can like Trump’s overwhelming victory. I obviously do.
    — You can dislike Trump’s win.
    However, denying Objective Truth about Trump’s victory is definitely unwise and border line irrational.

    Open the MORE Tag for additional detail.

    PEACE 😇
     

    [MORE]

     

    Theft By A Thousand Cuts’ Report Conclusive On Election Fraud, Slams Media Cover Up
     

    https://thenationalpulse.com/news/navarro-report-conclusive-slams-media/

     
    OUTRIGHT VOTER FRAUD IN THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

     
    BALLOT MISHANDLING IN THE BATTLEGROUND STATES

     
    CONTESTABLE PROCESS FOULS IN THE BATTLEGROUND STATES

     
    EQUAL PROTECTION CLAUSE VIOLATIONS IN THE SIX BATTLEGROUND STATES

     
    2020 VOTING MACHINE IRREGULARITIES

     
    STATISTICAL ANOMALIES IN THE BATTLEGROUND STATES

     

  176. @songbird
    @Mr. Hack

    What theory do you subscribe to? Antioxidants?

    Honestly, I'm skeptical about a lot of these food studies. They often seem to be financed by special interests. Sometimes, their findings are dramatically reversed. In the above one, they take no account of race, which is frankly insane, based on what we already know.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    The main ingredient within chili peppers that helps promote good heart heath is “capsaicin”. There have been numerous studies that point to its effectiveness. Here’s an article from Harvard that cites an important study printed within the Dec. 24, 2019 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. There are plenty more if you care to look. I first got interested in the subject when I saw a 91 year old Greek friend of mine pull out a small container of chili powder from his pocket, sprinkle some on the side of his hand, and then he quickly licked it. He does this several times a day, to keep in good form. His father lived to be 106 (I can’t say with certainly that he was into the peppers, but my friend told me that he enjoyed a good shot of brandy and a weekly cigar). 🙂

    As far as race goes, I think that different races may indeed be influenced differently to different nutrients, but generally all vitamins etc. are needed for the human body to function properly. Vitamin C is good for everyone, right?

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/chili-peppers-the-spice-of-a-longer-life

  177. @Mr. Hack
    @utu


    The mechanism could be similar to liking pornography with males having large penises that has escalatory trajectory towards fisting and sex with donkeys and horses. It is a performance art where a male play a macho role in front of imaginary audience. It is a social act even if solitary.
     
    Still, a rather bizarre analogy to make regarding those that achieve an endorphin high through eating chili peppers? :-)

    Replies: @utu

    Yes, a bit crude because the analogy overshadowed the case. I should have refined it.

  178. Altan you’d like this blog post/thread:

    🙏⚔️

    • Thanks: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @AP
    @Jatt Aryaa

    Is today a Sikh holiday? I saw two cars with orange Sikh flags hanging out of them today.

    Replies: @Jatt Aryaa

  179. @melanf
    @Europe Europa


    I recall reading that the first waves of Soviet soldiers to arrive in Berlin and take control of parts of the city were largely ethnic Slavs, and on the whole didn’t treat German
     
    It seems to me that this is a legend, as well as the whole"rape of Berlin". Of course there were rapes, but the propaganda picture from the works of Anglo-American authors is fake. A "laboratory-clean example" of how such fakes are fabricated is the town of Nemmersdorf. It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape ("one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably"). The Anglo-American authors were not satisfied with such conclusions. As Beevor, Hastings, etc. can tell, all the remaining "sixty-two women and young girls raped and murdered by Soviet soldiers" in Nemmersdorf, " not a single civilian escaped death at the hands of Russian soldiers. Women were crucified on the doors of sheds and overturned carts or, after being raped, crushed under the tracks of tanks. Their children were also brutally murdered ." The legend was created in several waves - in Germany, under the supervision of the Americans, one after another, another campaign was held to expose the Soviet atrocities in Nemmersdorf (films, radio programs, etc.), after which new "witnesses" of these atrocities appeared, which allowed to launch a new campaign of revelations, etc. At the same time, evidence did not fit into the narrative (Feldwebel Helmut Hoffmann about the killed civilians : "It seemed strange that there were no exit holes on the corpses: small entrance and lack of blood. It was more like shots fired from a distance than shots fired at close range") they were simply ignored, but the deliberate lies that were convenient for propaganda purposes were replicated in every possible way. This is a chemically pure example of how the legend of the rape of Germany was created - when real cases were falsified creating a fake picture. With Berlin, the same story, with the caveat that there was no SS commission in Berlin, and it is impossible to verify post-war fictions

    Replies: @Demografie, @utu, @Coconuts

    It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape (“one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably”). The Anglo-American authors were not satisfied with such conclusions.

    I thought the Nemmersdorf thing was a Nazi propaganda operation, the film was made by Goebbels’ propaganda machine in 1944 to inspire German fighting spirit.

    • Replies: @melanf
    @Coconuts


    I thought the Nemmersdorf thing was a Nazi propaganda operation, the film was made by Goebbels’ propaganda machine in 1944 to inspire German fighting spirit.
     
    Oddly enough, this is not the case. Nazi propaganda used this case, but the main legend was created in the post-war period by American propagandists
  180. @Jatt Aryaa
    Altan you'd like this blog post/thread:

    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1340353436521476106?s=20

    🙏⚔️

    Replies: @AP

    Is today a Sikh holiday? I saw two cars with orange Sikh flags hanging out of them today.

    • Replies: @Jatt Aryaa
    @AP

    https://www.sikhiwiki.org/index.php/Martyrdom_of_Guru_Tegh_Bahadur

    https://www.sikh24.com/2011/11/23/martyrdom-of-guru-teg-bahadur-jee-sahib-and-three-gursikhs/

  181. @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    My favorite is the Thai pepper.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    My favorite for the last couple of years has been the peppadew pepper, grown in South Africa. They’re really not very hot, just little bit of heat, but naturally sweet too. I like them more than candy and they’re highly addictive. I would recommend them to our friend AP who shies away from peppers, I think that he just might like these little picuante honeys! They’re not to be confused with cherry peppers.
    YUM!

  182. @AltanBakshi
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e4/Brain_Size_Map.png
    Average brain size map, but does brain size matter at all and why it varies so much? I dont know, thats why Im asking, especially when there are so many intelligent HBD guys here.

    If it matters then the Uralic-Mongolic-Eskimos are the real master race, lol!

    But to me it seems that it doesnt matter much, especially when Japanese and Italians have comparatively small brains.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    I would be very surprised if Ethiopian highland peoples actually had smaller brains than jungle pygmies; but the large brain sizes of Yukaghirs and other arctic peoples seems very credible to me.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Not Raul

    Ethiopian Highlands is to north, the area of smallest brains is in Uganda according that map or at southernmost Ethiopia, where tribal people live, who are very different from Ethiopian highlander Amharas and Tigreys.

    Replies: @Not Raul

  183. South Korea has reported yet another record high coronavirus case count, and on a weekend, no less. With an absolutely pathetic under 60K tests per day, there’s no way they’re going to be able to take control of this thing. Ultimately, vaccines are going to save them, anyway.

  184. Impressions of different countries by how extroverted/introverted they might be? (Obviously with regional differences: e.g. People in Northern Spain are generally more introverted, while Southern Spain more extroverted).
    Not sure about the impression of the USA?

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Dmitry

    This gels with my personal experiences. One thing I never understood is why the Irish are so gregarious, compared to the dour British. The Irish with the Spanish are among my favourite people in Europe. The US' extroversion is extremely obvious for anyone who has ever visited that place. Even in very white settings, the social warmth is night and day compared to similar populations in Europe. Same people yet wildly different social outcomes. Culture is obviously different but what is it about the US specifically that makes it so much extroverted (and frankly, friendlier).

    Replies: @Tor597, @songbird, @Europe Europa

    , @Gerard.Gerard
    @Dmitry

    Sweden is surprising to see listed as introvert. Swedes en masse speak excellent English and appear to be a part of every globohomo cause/initiative - both features seem to me typical of extrovert people. I would say that equal or maybe even more Swedes are able and happy to speak in English.... than Finns are to speaking Russian to us (which is a large number). I know that alot of Scandinavians are very weird, but it's unfair to group Swedes with the considerably more introvert Finns..... and particularly with the very introvert, disdainful and hierarchical Japanese society, which is if course more monoculture than Swedes are for the last 30 years.

    Spain, US, Brazil, Ireland I, and I'm sure many others can confirm, are definitely highly extrovert societies. As are Australia, South Africa - which goes with my theory that in Anglo empire they have this extrovert/introvert neighbour dynamic with Australia /NZ, South Africa/Zimbabwe ( well, the white section)..... and of course US/Canada.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Thulean Friend

    , @songbird
    @Dmitry

    I'm skeptical that Sweden would virtually be neck-and-neck with Finland. Ethnic Swedes in Finland are significantly more extroverted. Maybe, they are not representative? But Finns definitely have a harsher climate.

    Some people have the idea that if you live in a really harsh climate that makes people quieter so they get along when they are locked together over wintertime.

    Replies: @Dmitry

  185. Thailand has also reported a daily record of more than 500 cases. I suspect they’ll control it better than the Koreans, since they use travel restrictions:

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/12/19/thailand-reports-daily-covid-record-of-more-than-500-cases

  186. Interesting lecture about the Northern Sea Route.

    However, speaker argues for a more deflationary or pessimist point of view – he thinks that it will only be a second-tier route (mainly for specifically time-sensitive cargo) in the next 40 years.

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Dmitry


    https://twitter.com/HighNorthNews/status/1336227695143903234?s=20

    , @Shortsword
    @Dmitry

    Northern Sea Route has something like 3% of the tonnage compared to the Suez Canal. The tonnage by year is growing fast but most of it is arctic oil and gas being shipped away. Only a few percent of the tonnage is full transits. But it does have the potential for shipping goods in the future.

  187. Any of you guys followed the China and Australia trade war?

    Australia somehow put the squeeze on the iron ore market, making back all their losses from the previous Chinese bans. The Chinese just issued the coal ban in response. And are building huge ports and ships to import iron ore from Brazil and rest of the world in the near future.

    Australia is gonna get fucked. This was very interesting, China seems to be out for blood in regards to Australia.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Astuteobservor II


    Australia is gonna get fucked. This was very interesting, China seems to be out for blood in regards to Australia.
     
    I agree. And we deserve it. We have now conclusively proved that we are the dumbest nation on the planet.
    , @Shortsword
    @Astuteobservor II

    A large part of Australia's growth the last two decades has been because of natural resource exports to China. It will be interesting to see what happens.

    , @Tor597
    @Astuteobservor II

    Interesting link on the use of scrap steel in the Chinese market.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/timtreadgold/2020/12/02/chinese-junk-could-sink-the-profits-of-big-iron-ore-miners/

    With China not needing to build as much moving forward because their economy has matured, plus recycling more scrap steel, plus getting mines open from Africa I can see Australia's iron ore industry crashing mid decade.

    Replies: @A123

    , @sb
    @Astuteobservor II

    Yep , China is certainly out for Australia's blood

    But somehow I think Australia will end up doing OK . Trading partners will come and go as they always have .
    Even now the large increase in the iron ore price has more than made up for the losses in coal, beef, wine, timber, seafood, ,barley, ( have I left anything out ? )- although that's still bad news for the suppliers of those commodities of course
    The world is getting both more populous and richer after all

    Just for the record I'm much more concerned about America's future

  188. @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi

    This is the most common dish among all Mongolic people, Buuz or Buuza, steamed meat filled dumplings, and they are very taste, unlike Chinese baozi, which are made with yeast dough.
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ee/9f/da/ee9fdac4be7449f30c65793b9c969838.jpg
    More basic Mongolian staple food is hard to find.

    Then there is khuushuur which is fried meat pastry.

    https://kafedari.ru/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/hushuur-s-rublenoi-govyadinoi-2.jpg
    Tasty and fatty! Also very popular and common food.

    Then there are different kind simple meat noodle soups, but unlike with other Asians, Mongolians noodles are always homemade and very broad

    https://avatars.mds.yandex.net/get-zen_doc/1538903/pub_5ce3bb1e83178c00b33609ad_5ce3bb2d856cd5031a70b24b/scale_1200

    But most common or traditional Mongolian food is just boiling lamb meat with bones and eating it with hands and drinking it with bouillon, after all frying is only suitable for gays, it makes the meat lose all is precious juices and vitamins, so no hard core survivalist warrior would spoil his meat in such way. After good boiling you can eat all tendons and fat, mm tasty!

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @AltanBakshi, @Jayce, @wei

    That’s just baozi and hezi with some phonetic corruption.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @wei

    Chinese use totally different dough, it has yeast, or is leavened, unlike Mongolian dough, its texture and taste is completely different, very sticky and rawlike compared to Mongolian buuz, how do I know? I have eaten baozis everywhere from Lanzhou to Beijing.

    Hezi I have not tried, but it looks totally different and has different fillings.

    Baozi is not tasty, sorry but Chinese leavened dough isnt tasty at all.

  189. @utu
    @melanf


    A “laboratory-clean example” of how such fakes are fabricated is the town of Nemmersdorf. It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape (“one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably”).
     
    Nemmersdorf is not an example I would pick if I were you. The Red Army unit that captured it was more into the kinky stuff. Rape was just a foreplay for them. They were more into torture and slow killing like nailing women to barn door. The event is unquestionable. It was exploited and embellish by Nazi propaganda but most of it was true.

    Replies: @melanf, @German_reader

    Nemmersdorf is not an example

    Nemmersdorf is an exemplary example of how a fake was formed, since in this case it is possible to compare the testimony of “eyewitnesses” (processed by propagandists) with the results of the investigation of the SS commission. If two cases of rape recorded by the SS commission turned (for American propagandists) into ” all women from 12 to 80 were raped and then painfully killed” – then this is more than indicative

    I would pick if I were you. The Red Army unit that captured it was more into the kinky stuff. Rape was just a foreplay for them. They were more into torture and slow killing like nailing women to barn door.

    26 people died in Nemmersdorf. This is confirmed by the Hinrichs report (SS Commission report) and even by a photograph of the cross over the temporary grave….It is impossible not to emphasize the following. Despite the fact that Nemmersdorf was first taken by Soviet troops, then recaptured by German troops, that the battles for the village went on for a day and a half, that the village was repeatedly bombed, shelled with cannons and mortars, according to German data, not a single civilian was injured during the fighting… The situation when soldiers are killed by bombs, shells and stray bullets, while civilians remain unharmed, is simply incredible.
    Yes, in German documents, attention is focused on “shots at point-blank range” and “in the head”, but it is difficult to expect them to be purely objective. For example, many eyewitnesses mention two women and a small child who died not far from the bridge. “Felkischer Beobachter” wrote about rape and murder with a bayonet and shots to the head, but the witness Helmut Hoffmann did not see any signs of rape, and it seemed to him that the shots were long-range. Harry Turk did believe that the victims “came under fire” (perhaps it happened on the morning of the 21st, when the village was taken, when there was a heavy fog).
    When were the photos taken? Harry Turk says that almost immediately after the capture of the village, the soldiers were instructed to collect the corpses of civilians. lieutenant seidat, who arrived in nemmersdorf a day later, saw the bodies already in the cemetery. Major Hinrichs, who arrived a day later, wrote that 24 bodies had been buried and were in an open grave. He ordered them to be taken out so that the forensic doctor could make conclusions about the causes of death. The same day, October 25, apparently, the photos are dated (see prev. Hinrichs ‘ report). It is quite difficult to assume that the soldiers buried German women with their hems pulled up, their underwear pulled down and their shameless places uncovered. This means that the half-naked women in the “photographs from Nemmersdorf” are a deliberate manipulation, committed and used for propaganda purposes
    .”

    slow killing like nailing women to barn door

    There is no mention of the men or women crucified (on barn doors, or another way) in Nemmersdorf in the Hinrichs reports (SS commission reports).

    It was exploited and embellish by Nazi propaganda .

    No, not really. This is a fake created by Anglo-American propaganda and its German servants

    most of it was true.

    Really? That is, when one rape, and another alleged case of rape turn (through the efforts of propagandists) into “all women from 12 to 80 were raped and then painfully killed” – is this mostly true?
    When the absolute majority of the inhabitants of Nemmersdorf remained alive , but American propagandists write about them that almost the entire civilian population was deliberately killed in slow and painful ways – “most of it was true”?

    • Thanks: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @melanf

    https://i.imgur.com/Mv5nrG6.jpg

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

  190. @Coconuts
    @melanf


    It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape (“one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably”). The Anglo-American authors were not satisfied with such conclusions.
     
    I thought the Nemmersdorf thing was a Nazi propaganda operation, the film was made by Goebbels' propaganda machine in 1944 to inspire German fighting spirit.

    Replies: @melanf

    I thought the Nemmersdorf thing was a Nazi propaganda operation, the film was made by Goebbels’ propaganda machine in 1944 to inspire German fighting spirit.

    Oddly enough, this is not the case. Nazi propaganda used this case, but the main legend was created in the post-war period by American propagandists

  191. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    https://i.ibb.co/x54h6kq/IQ-Ratio-Bar-Chart.png

    https://i.ibb.co/0sNxdrb/China-Red-USA-Blue-IQ-Distributions.png

    https://i.ibb.co/CvKyP47/IQ-Ratios.png

    https://i.ibb.co/TkZptp3/ChinaIQ.png

    https://i.ibb.co/y8VMMCn/American-IQ.png

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    What percentage of China’s smart fraction is exported, in particular to “The West”?. And what percentage of the World’s smart fraction is imported to the US? Those with >130 IQ’s. Any body have the numbers?

  192. @songbird
    @sher singh


    Europoors stay trollin cuz their food sucks
     
    Beef is the ambrosia of the gods.

    It is the source of the genius of European man, and the reason that he has fallen is because of those cucked fiends eating impossible burgers, and promoting African foods like crickets.

    In 1965, when Wally Schirra smuggled a sandwich aboard Gemini to John Young, it was beef. Both men later went to the moon. Coincidence? I think not!

    Replies: @Jatt Aryaa

    Black women took you to the moon।।

    • LOL: songbird
  193. @AltanBakshi
    @sher singh

    Sher Singh sorry if you thought that I was trolling about the Khalistan. Without any hint of irony I would be happy if I could live in the militaristic Sikh Dharmic state, even if beef eating would be punishable by death in such country.

    Its very hard to say what really happened in Northern India little before coming of Islam. Its a hard fact that old empires like Palas of Bengal or Gurjara-Pratiharas of Central India were crumbling and Advaintins were ascendant and defeating in debates old mainstream schools of Hindu- and Buddhadharma. It seems that there was also some kind of economic collapse ongoing at the same time, and Kshatriyas were becoming weaker, but Brahmin class was getting more powerful, Brahmins really loved Advaita. But I really cant give a definite answer why India fell before Islamic hordes, the time period is so chaotic and most records are lost, probably just destroyed by Muslims.


    https://reawakening2074.blogspot.com/2018/10/the-ruins-of-lost-world-bengals.html?m=1
    This article had everything wrong, Palas were Buddhist and they werent even last great Dharmic rulers of Bengal, but after them Hindu Sena dynasty ruled Bengal. Also there wasnt such competition between Buddhism and Hinduism, traditional Buddhism believes that there are gods, just that Buddha is greater guide than any god, but some gods are Buddhas or awakened beings according to the Buddhism, so its little bit more complicated. So there really wasnt such conflict between Hindu and Buddhadharma, its just that some Indians have internalised old Britisher colonial misconceptions or attitudes regarding of Buddhism, so they stupidly think that Buddhism denies gods. I will read other articles later when I have time.

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/62/5e/f2/625ef25d1c3257caa0f0d5c7542cfe9b.jpg
    Here is India in 900 ad, Sindh and Multan were already in hands of Muslims, but they werent the problem, because their Muslims were not expansionist unlike the Muslims of Afghanistan and Central Asia. In around year 1000 ad Kabul Shahis/Hindus fell and and the door was open for Islamic hordes.

    I dont know if I have written about this before but Guru Nanak is seen as an enlightened man in Buddhism, though he is called by the name of Guru Maharaj in Buddhism, there are some holy Buddhist places in Himalayas that are conneced to Guru Nanaks life.

    Replies: @Jatt Aryaa

    Only cow slaughter is banned।।

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Jatt Aryaa

    Jatt Aryaa - you mean to say what - that they are - efficient soldiers? - what do you mean saying that only cow slaughter was banned? - Would you mind to elaborate - about the video too. It sounds (and looks) interesting (not very peaceful, of course), I get that.

    Replies: @sher singh

  194. @Astuteobservor II
    Any of you guys followed the China and Australia trade war?

    Australia somehow put the squeeze on the iron ore market, making back all their losses from the previous Chinese bans. The Chinese just issued the coal ban in response. And are building huge ports and ships to import iron ore from Brazil and rest of the world in the near future.

    Australia is gonna get fucked. This was very interesting, China seems to be out for blood in regards to Australia.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Shortsword, @Tor597, @sb

    Australia is gonna get fucked. This was very interesting, China seems to be out for blood in regards to Australia.

    I agree. And we deserve it. We have now conclusively proved that we are the dumbest nation on the planet.

  195. @Menschmaschine
    @mal

    Actually, these observational problems are not particularly remarkable in comparison to others that have been known for a long time. This gives me a splendid excuse to reuse a text I wrote some time ago in response to an article (https://www.unz.com/estriker/jewish-brilliance-synthetic-like-zirconia/):

    The continuing dominance of GR is a huge problem for physics, since the relativistic conceptual base of both special and general relativity is almost certainly a fundamentally wrong model of physical reality.

    Let’s take a look at the development of relativity: The assumption in the 19th century was that light is a wave that is traveling through a hypothetical ether, analogous to sound waves through a medium like air or water. The famous Michelson-Morey experiment tested this assumption by comparing the time needed for light to propagate a certain distance both in the direction of the movement of the earth around the sun and that perpendicular to it. The expectation was that the times would be different, since in the direction of the movement the rate of the movement would be either added or subtracted to the speed of the light. In fact, however, the times were identical. The solution proposed by Lorentz was the assumption that the measurement apparatus did undergo a small compensating length contraction in the direction of the movement. Later experiments like that by Rayleigh and Brace made it clear that in addition also clocks would need to run slower.


    In 1905 Einstein proposed his own alternative Theory of Special Relativity. He took the principle of relativity found by Lorentz (with some help by Poincare) and instead of deriving it as a result made it the point of departure for his own theory. Mathematically, both theories are identical and so can’t be distinguished experimentally. But the metaphysical picture is very different: The Lorentzian Ether Theory still assumes an absolute 3-dimensional space with an absolute time, which is filled with the ether.

    In contrast, Special Relativity postulates that time and space (or spacetime as it is called in relativistic jargon) themselves are changing, i.e. that not objects, but space itself shrinks or expands and that time itself really runs faster or slower, not only physical processes. The principle of relativity leads to such headscratchers like the famous twin paradoxon, where the sibling that travels close to light speed is younger when returning than the one that stays at home, but no intuitive reason why this should be so - if everything is relative, why wouldn’t it be equally valid to consider the first twin as immobile? No such issues exist under Lorentzian Ether Theory, since there is an absolute frame of reference and so it is always clear which one of the two is changing his speed in relation to the ether.

    A common criticism against the Lorentz Ether Theory was the assertion that it is quite a coincidence that the length shrinks by exactly the value required to make a movement through the ether undetectable. However, it is not difficult to understand why such effects as length contraction and time dilation should happen, but not be detectable locally, if one does not assume, like early ether theories, that matter is something separate from the ether but instead that it is a part of it - like defects in the lattice structure of a crystal. It is naturally difficult to detect something you and your measurement apparatus are part of. Lorentz was also able to show that at least for electromagnetism both effects could be derived from the Maxwell equations that had been found earlier.

    But then Einstein came out in 1915 with the General Theory of Relativity, which sealed the triumph of relativity by providing a supposedly highly successful description of gravity. Whereas in Special Relativity spacetime had been considered as uniform, General Relativity now introduced gravity in the form of distortions in the spacetime fabric. However, this only works up to a certain scale - as soon as we go beyond galactic dimensions, General Relativity does not work anymore at all, the movement of galaxies is very different to that predicted by General Relativity. To correct for this, vast amounts of mysterious “Dark matter” have to be hypothesized. Despite much effort, any attempt to actually detect any of this hypothetical “Dark Matter” has failed.

    Another issue is the expansion of the universe; it was discovered in 1998 that, contrary to General Relativity, the universe does not only expand, but that this expansion is accelerating. For this another Ad Hoc hypothesis, the even more mysterious “Dark Energy” had to be made up. It is of course always possible to immunize a theory with enough Ad Hoc crutches, but when this “Dark Energy” is supposed to be 68% and “Dark Matter” 27% of the universe with only 5% left for actually observable matter it gets rather implausible.

    There are other highly problematic issues like the emergence of singularities as a consequence of the collapse of large stars, with all the seemingly intractable problems like information loss that this entails. Some scientists therefore see the appearance of singularities as a mathematical artefact and don’t think that it really happens in reality; interestingly this included Einstein himself, who thought that general relativity was an incomplete theory, which would be superseded by a singularity-free unified field theory. Of course, he never succeeded in delivering this theory. Furthermore, at least in principle, closed causal loops and time travel and therefore violations of causality are entirely valid solutions of General Relativity.

    The possibility of time flowing backwards - and not the supposedly nondeterministic nature of Quantum Theory (“God doesn’t play dices”) - is the real reason why Einstein was so hostile to it. There is, as Einstein knew very well, no intrinsic reason that Quantum Theory needs to be nondeterministic if one accepts nonlocality, as demonstrated by the De Broglie/Bohm interpretation of Quantum Theory. However, nonlocality – i.e. influences faster than the speed of light – mean in the context of the relativistic framework nothing less than time travel into the past. That was the reason why Einstein was so scandalized by the “spooky action at a distance” of quantum entanglement and why it took so long to be accepted by the scientific community. Even if we currently cannot use quantum entanglement to actually transmit information, the simple fact that faster than light influences exist is highly problematic for relativity.

    The most fundamental issue however is the fact, that it seems to be simply impossible to proceed further with the relativistic paradigm. In the late 1920s the two cutting edge theories to explain the basic fabric of our universe were General Relativity and Quantum Theory: General Relativity describes gravity, the force effective at long distances; Quantum Theory in contrast describes the forces effective at shorter ranges, e.g. electromagnetism and the weak and the strong interaction.

    Now, nearly a century later, we are essentially still in the same position. All work that has been done since then has been filling out details, but there has been no fundamental progress. Despite much effort, all attempts to reconcile General Relativity with Quantum Theory to create a unified theory have come to nothing. The great hope String Theory is now more or less admitted to be a failure and other approaches like Loop Quantum Gravity don’t look any better; fundamental physics has largely stagnated for many decades.

    The key reason for the failure to unify General Relativity with Quantum Theory is precisely the revolutionary new relativistic model of time and space for which Einstein is hailed. All efforts to graft it onto Quantum Theory have been an abject failure: Quantum Theory simply needs a fixed spatial background and absolute time to work. Given this – and the fact that Quantum Theory, in sharp contrast to General Relativity, has an entirely unblemished record when it comes to experimental verification – it is quite clear that it is relativity and not Quantum Theory that has to go. Einstein shunted physics on a fundamentally wrong track back in 1905.

    The description of the problem above indicates quite clearly the most promising direction to proceed: return to a preferred frame (i.e. ether) paradigm with absolute time and space and create a theory of gravity that is a counterpart to General Relativity in the same way as the Lorentzian Ether Theory relates to Special Relativity. This theory would then describe the general case of an ether with a varying “density” indicating gravitational distortions, whereas the Lorentzian Ether Theory, the analogon to Special Relativity, deals with the simplified border case of a homogenous ether. There is actually a bit of work going on along these lines, even though the frowned upon word “ether” is usually avoided - “condensed matter model/interpretation” is a dog whistle that is sometimes used instead (See, for instance https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10701-008-9262-9). However, due to the still unbroken blind faith in General Relativity such attempts have received hardly any attention.i

    It remains to be seen for how much longer progress will be blocked - the lack of success in the long running quest to detect the elusive “Dark Matter” seems to be causing some disquietude at long last. Perhaps there will also be some new piece of empirical evidence that finally tilts the mood against General Relativity. There are indications that certain properties of gravity waves might be used to distinguish between General Relativity and alternative theories. But in any case, the sheer length of time that ethnic hero worship of Einstein was able to inoculate an obviously highly flawed theory against any criticism is nothing short of astounding.

    Replies: @utu, @Bill

    Despite much effort, any attempt to actually detect any of this hypothetical “Dark Matter” has failed.

    You are referring to failures to detect dark matter directly in laboratories? But hasn’t dark matter been detected via gravitational lensing and in the places predicted by the odd behavior of galaxy-scale objects?

  196. @melanf
    @utu


    Nemmersdorf is not an example
     
    Nemmersdorf is an exemplary example of how a fake was formed, since in this case it is possible to compare the testimony of "eyewitnesses" (processed by propagandists) with the results of the investigation of the SS commission. If two cases of rape recorded by the SS commission turned (for American propagandists) into " all women from 12 to 80 were raped and then painfully killed" - then this is more than indicative

    I would pick if I were you. The Red Army unit that captured it was more into the kinky stuff. Rape was just a foreplay for them. They were more into torture and slow killing like nailing women to barn door.
     
    "26 people died in Nemmersdorf. This is confirmed by the Hinrichs report (SS Commission report) and even by a photograph of the cross over the temporary grave....It is impossible not to emphasize the following. Despite the fact that Nemmersdorf was first taken by Soviet troops, then recaptured by German troops, that the battles for the village went on for a day and a half, that the village was repeatedly bombed, shelled with cannons and mortars, according to German data, not a single civilian was injured during the fighting... The situation when soldiers are killed by bombs, shells and stray bullets, while civilians remain unharmed, is simply incredible.
    Yes, in German documents, attention is focused on "shots at point-blank range" and "in the head", but it is difficult to expect them to be purely objective. For example, many eyewitnesses mention two women and a small child who died not far from the bridge. "Felkischer Beobachter" wrote about rape and murder with a bayonet and shots to the head, but the witness Helmut Hoffmann did not see any signs of rape, and it seemed to him that the shots were long-range. Harry Turk did believe that the victims "came under fire" (perhaps it happened on the morning of the 21st, when the village was taken, when there was a heavy fog).
    When were the photos taken? Harry Turk says that almost immediately after the capture of the village, the soldiers were instructed to collect the corpses of civilians. lieutenant seidat, who arrived in nemmersdorf a day later, saw the bodies already in the cemetery. Major Hinrichs, who arrived a day later, wrote that 24 bodies had been buried and were in an open grave. He ordered them to be taken out so that the forensic doctor could make conclusions about the causes of death. The same day, October 25, apparently, the photos are dated (see prev. Hinrichs ' report). It is quite difficult to assume that the soldiers buried German women with their hems pulled up, their underwear pulled down and their shameless places uncovered. This means that the half-naked women in the "photographs from Nemmersdorf" are a deliberate manipulation, committed and used for propaganda purposes
    ."

    slow killing like nailing women to barn door
     
    There is no mention of the men or women crucified (on barn doors, or another way) in Nemmersdorf in the Hinrichs reports (SS commission reports).

    It was exploited and embellish by Nazi propaganda .
     
    No, not really. This is a fake created by Anglo-American propaganda and its German servants

    most of it was true.
     
    Really? That is, when one rape, and another alleged case of rape turn (through the efforts of propagandists) into "all women from 12 to 80 were raped and then painfully killed" - is this mostly true?
    When the absolute majority of the inhabitants of Nemmersdorf remained alive , but American propagandists write about them that almost the entire civilian population was deliberately killed in slow and painful ways - "most of it was true"?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Blinky Bill

    https://twitter.com/27khv/status/1339291309346058240

    They do this every year?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @A123

  197. @Dmitry
    Interesting lecture about the Northern Sea Route.

    However, speaker argues for a more deflationary or pessimist point of view - he thinks that it will only be a second-tier route (mainly for specifically time-sensitive cargo) in the next 40 years.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02AMvBOhGK0

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Shortsword

    [MORE]

  198. @wei
    @AltanBakshi

    That's just baozi and hezi with some phonetic corruption.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Chinese use totally different dough, it has yeast, or is leavened, unlike Mongolian dough, its texture and taste is completely different, very sticky and rawlike compared to Mongolian buuz, how do I know? I have eaten baozis everywhere from Lanzhou to Beijing.

    Hezi I have not tried, but it looks totally different and has different fillings.

    Baozi is not tasty, sorry but Chinese leavened dough isnt tasty at all.

  199. @Not Raul
    @AltanBakshi

    I would be very surprised if Ethiopian highland peoples actually had smaller brains than jungle pygmies; but the large brain sizes of Yukaghirs and other arctic peoples seems very credible to me.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Ethiopian Highlands is to north, the area of smallest brains is in Uganda according that map or at southernmost Ethiopia, where tribal people live, who are very different from Ethiopian highlander Amharas and Tigreys.

    • Thanks: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @AltanBakshi

    Ah . . . I see.

    It was hard to tell on the map.

    Thanks.

  200. German_reader says:
    @utu
    @melanf


    A “laboratory-clean example” of how such fakes are fabricated is the town of Nemmersdorf. It was captured by the Red Army in October 44, then the Wehrmacht recaptured this town. the ss commission conducted an investigation into atrocities against civilians and found one indubitable rape and one alleged rape (“one woman has forced sexual intercourse, the other — probably”).
     
    Nemmersdorf is not an example I would pick if I were you. The Red Army unit that captured it was more into the kinky stuff. Rape was just a foreplay for them. They were more into torture and slow killing like nailing women to barn door. The event is unquestionable. It was exploited and embellish by Nazi propaganda but most of it was true.

    Replies: @melanf, @German_reader

    Nemmersdorf is controversial, total certainty is probably unachievable. Current state of research (unlikely to be superseded) is that several war crimes did happen there. An internal report from the Geheime Feldpolizei, dated 25th October 1944, indicates that Red Army soldiers shot about two dozen civilians (mostly old people over 60 and several children). A 19-year old woman had apparently been raped before being shot (it also mentions a witness statement by a 20-year old woman who said she had been raped by two Red Army soldiers):
    https://www.zfo-online.de/portal/index.php/zfo/article/view/8692/8691
    The report seems free of any propagandistic intent, it’s quite matter of fact, and reports mixed behaviour by Red Army soldiers (some behaving correctly and even taking steps to protect German civilians from shelling, while others looted and raped).
    One problem is that there were several high-ranking NSDAP and SS members in the village shortly after the Soviet withdrawal. What exactly they did there, is unknown, but presumably they made preparations for the propagandistic exploitation of events. Maybe they manipulated or staged corpses (e.g. to play up the rape aspect). So people who want to believe that it was all made up can cling to that uncertainty.
    Higher victim numbers than about two dozen seem to have no factual basis, as do the more extreme claims about sadistic torture (the bit about women supposedly being nailed to barn doors apparently goes back to the “testimony” of a certain Karl Potrek in the early 1950s, but in all probability Potrek had never even been in Nemmersdorf. Nothing of the kind is mentioned in the Geheime Feldpolizei report which was written immediately after the events).

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill, AltanBakshi, utu
    • Replies: @utu
    @German_reader

    Harry Thürk who returned to the village with first troops claimed to see a women hang on the barn door.

    , @melanf
    @German_reader


    Higher victim numbers than about two dozen seem to have no factual basis
     
    The number of civilians killed is not in doubt, the question is who of this number was killed intentionally. The assault on the town took place in the fog, so the shots from close range are not absolute proof of intentional murder (the soldiers in the fog probably shot at everything that moves). There are eyewitness accounts that some of the civilians killed were killed from a long distance. again, if we assume that all civilians were killed intentionally, it turns out that during a fierce battle in town among civilians there were no accidental losses at all, which is "statistically" unlikely.

    However, these are all details. The bottom line is that propagandists controlled from Washington falsified history (rapes and murders committed by the Red army were fantastically exaggerated, but rapes and murders committed by Western allies were hushed up). And they did it not out of love for Germany, but to make it easier to manipulate Germany (in their own interests).

    Replies: @German_reader

  201. Is there any statistics on the percent of homicides in Russia that are solved? It would be interesting to see how this number has developed. Also, are there numbers on how many the police shoots and or kills each year?

    • Replies: @Gerard.Gerard
    @Shortsword

    You would need to subtract from the general number, those killed from law enforcement operations, not military, against terrorists/bandits in the North Caucasus which occurs every year.

    Even with that, the rate of police killing terrorists in North Caucasus is far lower than police killing general population in the US..... and this is with police in Dagestan, Ingushettia etc. at a much higher threat of danger and frequently getting terrorist attempts on them.

    In Russia one police officer 1 or 2 years beforr asked to see some Tajik or Uzbek guys documents at platform of Moscow Metro.... and got shot dead, only 23. The dog who did this was just some alcoholic lowlife. There was unfortunately no mass retribution against illegal uzbeks or Tajiks by police.

    Here you can at least sympathise with the American method of disproportionately shooting dead criminals (or temporarily assumed criminals) for every one police officer killed or even just mildly injured.

  202. @Astuteobservor II
    Any of you guys followed the China and Australia trade war?

    Australia somehow put the squeeze on the iron ore market, making back all their losses from the previous Chinese bans. The Chinese just issued the coal ban in response. And are building huge ports and ships to import iron ore from Brazil and rest of the world in the near future.

    Australia is gonna get fucked. This was very interesting, China seems to be out for blood in regards to Australia.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Shortsword, @Tor597, @sb

    A large part of Australia’s growth the last two decades has been because of natural resource exports to China. It will be interesting to see what happens.

  203. @Shortsword
    Is there any statistics on the percent of homicides in Russia that are solved? It would be interesting to see how this number has developed. Also, are there numbers on how many the police shoots and or kills each year?

    Replies: @Gerard.Gerard

    You would need to subtract from the general number, those killed from law enforcement operations, not military, against terrorists/bandits in the North Caucasus which occurs every year.

    Even with that, the rate of police killing terrorists in North Caucasus is far lower than police killing general population in the US….. and this is with police in Dagestan, Ingushettia etc. at a much higher threat of danger and frequently getting terrorist attempts on them.

    In Russia one police officer 1 or 2 years beforr asked to see some Tajik or Uzbek guys documents at platform of Moscow Metro…. and got shot dead, only 23. The dog who did this was just some alcoholic lowlife. There was unfortunately no mass retribution against illegal uzbeks or Tajiks by police.

    Here you can at least sympathise with the American method of disproportionately shooting dead criminals (or temporarily assumed criminals) for every one police officer killed or even just mildly injured.

  204. @Dmitry
    Impressions of different countries by how extroverted/introverted they might be? (Obviously with regional differences: e.g. People in Northern Spain are generally more introverted, while Southern Spain more extroverted).

    https://i.imgur.com/7fmriNj.jpg
    Not sure about the impression of the USA?

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Gerard.Gerard, @songbird

    This gels with my personal experiences. One thing I never understood is why the Irish are so gregarious, compared to the dour British. The Irish with the Spanish are among my favourite people in Europe. The US’ extroversion is extremely obvious for anyone who has ever visited that place. Even in very white settings, the social warmth is night and day compared to similar populations in Europe. Same people yet wildly different social outcomes. Culture is obviously different but what is it about the US specifically that makes it so much extroverted (and frankly, friendlier).

    • Replies: @Tor597
    @Thulean Friend

    The US has, or had at least, a middle class.

    Europeans, especially Anglos, are much more likely to live in places with rich and poor populations with a middling middle class.

    , @songbird
    @Thulean Friend


    This gels with my personal experiences. One thing I never understood is why the Irish are so gregarious, compared to the dour British.
     
    I can think of a lot of possible explanations.

    In the case of Finland, it seems to at least partly be about climate. Well, Ireland has a milder climate than England due to the Gulf Stream. There's a difference between English oak and Irish oak.

    Also, Irish culture is more egalitarian than in England. The native Irish gentry were practically completely destroyed - at one point, only 3% of Irish land was owned by Catholics. Under the penal laws, natives were banned from trades, so practically everyone was a tenant farmer or a laborer. If you owned practically anything, like a boat, it could be seized by the landlord, if you were in arrears. The schools were called "hedge schools" - quite a different conception than ivory towers. And before that - even though it had an aristocratic elite - clan society is still probably more egalitarian.

    Also, the Irish language is arguably more loquacious than English. It still effects patterns of speech, even though it is not spoken, by many anymore - people are still offended by short answers. For example, traditionally, it is not possible to give a simple "no" reply.

    Of course, I think the main explanation is that it was a fairly homogeneous, traditional and rural society, until recently. Very few cities. Until recently, not really much that would be considered suburbs. People used to have big families, which helped train people to talk. And going to church helped unite communities - Ireland was one of the last religious holdouts in Western Europe - but no more.

    I don't think the friendliness will survive the invasion. I don't think it can.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @EldnahYm

    , @Europe Europa
    @Thulean Friend

    Are British people really more "dour" than the Irish? Give some examples of what you mean. It seems both have fundamentally identical cultures to me, revolving around the pub and following sports mainly. They're probably less noticeably different than Catalans and the rest of Spain.

    The idea that British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically like tired old anti-British stereotyping to me, like the bad teeth and bad food nonsense. You probably think Ireland has better food than Britain as well, despite Irish and British food being 99% identical.

    Also, it doesn't seem plausible to me that the British would be naturally highly introverted when its two main culturally descendants, the US and Australia, are typically thought of as highly extroverted countries.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Tor597, @Dmitry

  205. @Jatt Aryaa
    @AltanBakshi

    Only cow slaughter is banned।।

    https://youtu.be/TSNEh57qfY8

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Jatt Aryaa – you mean to say what – that they are – efficient soldiers? – what do you mean saying that only cow slaughter was banned? – Would you mind to elaborate – about the video too. It sounds (and looks) interesting (not very peaceful, of course), I get that.

    • Replies: @sher singh
    @Dieter Kief

    https://twitter.com/Aryan_warlord/status/1331558747294973952?s=20

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  206. @Dmitry
    Interesting lecture about the Northern Sea Route.

    However, speaker argues for a more deflationary or pessimist point of view - he thinks that it will only be a second-tier route (mainly for specifically time-sensitive cargo) in the next 40 years.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02AMvBOhGK0

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Shortsword

    Northern Sea Route has something like 3% of the tonnage compared to the Suez Canal. The tonnage by year is growing fast but most of it is arctic oil and gas being shipped away. Only a few percent of the tonnage is full transits. But it does have the potential for shipping goods in the future.

  207. @Blinky Bill
    @melanf

    https://i.imgur.com/Mv5nrG6.jpg

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    They do this every year?

    • LOL: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    To be fair, they need to also try and promulgate similar laws against communism too.

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    , @A123
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    It is not about Russia, it is about the U.N.

    The U.N. is "Helpless, Hapless, Hopeless". Openly mocking and humiliating pathetic groups like UNGA just adds to the ridicule that the failed U.N. has earned for its track record of starting wars and degrading the human condition.

    Pushing the debauched U.N. to collapse and dissolve is a highly logical strategy in the effort to save lives and protect the weak. This works well with the other U.S. strategies. For example, cutting funding to the failed U.N. whenever they lash out in a deliberate attempt to blame victims.

    The only correct actions towards UNGA are pointing and laughing. Taking it seriously is not something that can be done by those of sound mind.

    PEACE 😇

  208. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Blinky Bill

    https://twitter.com/27khv/status/1339291309346058240

    They do this every year?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @A123

    To be fair, they need to also try and promulgate similar laws against communism too.

    • Disagree: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Mr. Hack

    Communism was pretty wholesome to be honest

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLcc19mt4eA

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  209. @Mr. Hack
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    To be fair, they need to also try and promulgate similar laws against communism too.

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Communism was pretty wholesome to be honest

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    So why were so many members of my own family starved to death there, especially during the great famine of 1932? Why were guards placed at the borders between Ukraine and Russia at that time, turning back starving people, putting the lie to a "union of fraternal nations"? :-(

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell, @AltanBakshi

  210. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Mr. Hack

    Communism was pretty wholesome to be honest

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLcc19mt4eA

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    So why were so many members of my own family starved to death there, especially during the great famine of 1932? Why were guards placed at the borders between Ukraine and Russia at that time, turning back starving people, putting the lie to a “union of fraternal nations”? 🙁

    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Mr. Hack

    You nevertheless have to admit the USSR achieved a lot under Communism, including gaining a lot of prestige.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack

    , @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    Many of my relatives died in Soviet camps or during revolution, still I dont whine about it like a ***.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack

  211. Is the UK variant the same as the Danish mink variant? I remember Denmark as having the “most valuable” passport in the world, so this should be another rank list destroyed by COVID reality. Everyone needs to stop all flights and close borders to these two countries right now. For good measure, the USA should be quarantined from the world. It also has mink farms with rapid COVID spread but the government and industry will never be responsible enough to stop it. This is not solely a Trump thing. In the US it is profits uber alles, which don’t produce the best results.

    Also the Pfizer vaccine which has barely scratched the surface of herd immunity is having thousands of adverse reactions. Is Sputnik V having these problems? People in the US will never be allowed to receive that one, but at least UK has admitted defeat and decided to work with Russia to fix the Oxford one.

  212. @Mr. Hack
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    So why were so many members of my own family starved to death there, especially during the great famine of 1932? Why were guards placed at the borders between Ukraine and Russia at that time, turning back starving people, putting the lie to a "union of fraternal nations"? :-(

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell, @AltanBakshi

    You nevertheless have to admit the USSR achieved a lot under Communism, including gaining a lot of prestige.

    • Replies: @AP
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    USSR was an effective tool for killing Eastern Slavs and squandering their early 20th century advantages.

    , @Mr. Hack
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Whatever benefits that you're thinking about were not worth the expenditures of millions of lives. Besides, these same benefits were achieved earlier in countries of Western Europe, showing that communism on the whole was a menacing system that had nothing to offer the world that couldn't be achieved without it.

  213. @Mr. Hack
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    So why were so many members of my own family starved to death there, especially during the great famine of 1932? Why were guards placed at the borders between Ukraine and Russia at that time, turning back starving people, putting the lie to a "union of fraternal nations"? :-(

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell, @AltanBakshi

    Many of my relatives died in Soviet camps or during revolution, still I dont whine about it like a ***.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @AltanBakshi

    I had some as well. Not like Russians were eating Fillet Mignon at the expense of non-Russians en masse. Have no problems accurately noting Soviet wrongs.

    Somewhat related, I take issue with what Katie Halper said during the below linked show about Russians and Ukrainians owing Jews. Somewhat akin to the kind of tripe spouted by the likes of Julia Ioffe. In Ioffe's case, she would probably leave Ukrainians out of that equation in line with neocon/neolib conformity. Not into collective guilt. BTW, some highlight that the mostly Russian inhabited USSR saved the Jews from extermination. Have come across numerous individuals of Jewish and Russian Orthodox Christian backgrounds, who're against Russian and Jew bashing.

    https://twitter.com/aaronjmate/status/1340392287851999237

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    It's not my fault that you've developed a blind spot in your head for communism that was developed for decades by government sponsored incessant propaganda. I was fortunate to have not been brought up in such a system and was able to make up m own mind about the merits of communism in an environment less amenable to such brainwashing.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  214. Interesting how only 50 or so years ago, America was the world’s fittest and most educated nation, but all that went down the drain in a short period of time.

  215. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Blinky Bill

    https://twitter.com/27khv/status/1339291309346058240

    They do this every year?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @A123

    It is not about Russia, it is about the U.N.

    The U.N. is “Helpless, Hapless, Hopeless”. Openly mocking and humiliating pathetic groups like UNGA just adds to the ridicule that the failed U.N. has earned for its track record of starting wars and degrading the human condition.

    Pushing the debauched U.N. to collapse and dissolve is a highly logical strategy in the effort to save lives and protect the weak. This works well with the other U.S. strategies. For example, cutting funding to the failed U.N. whenever they lash out in a deliberate attempt to blame victims.

    The only correct actions towards UNGA are pointing and laughing. Taking it seriously is not something that can be done by those of sound mind.

    PEACE 😇

  216. Is this Russia, Canada, or elsewhere?

    PEACE 😇
     

  217. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Shortsword


    Pakistan being significantly lower than India is suspicious.
     
    Yes, that is odd, I think the samples from India and Pakistan will vary considerably, given how multi-ethnic the two countries are (India more so than Pakistan). It is similar to the IQ data of these sorts of countries where you get widely disparate results depending on the region you take the sample from. But overall, South Asians are physically the weakest group. This chimes with real life experience, there are hardly any South Asian athletes in power lifting or other strength intensive competitions.

    Replies: @Tor597

    Not only are Indians physically the weakest, but they are also the least athletic people on the planet overall.

    India only has 9 gold medals and only 1 since the 1980 Olympics.

    Eight of those medals are in field hockey which were won a long time ago when they were probably the only ones playing the sport and 1 gold medal was in shooting.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Tor597

    Why should India devote resources to international sport, when it has become about the worship of blacks?

    Replies: @sudden death, @sb

    , @Thulean Friend
    @Tor597


    Not only are Indians physically the weakest, but they are also the least athletic people on the planet overall.
     
    India end Cologne Boxing World Cup campaign with 9 medals including 3 gold

    Replies: @Tor597

  218. @Thulean Friend
    @Dmitry

    This gels with my personal experiences. One thing I never understood is why the Irish are so gregarious, compared to the dour British. The Irish with the Spanish are among my favourite people in Europe. The US' extroversion is extremely obvious for anyone who has ever visited that place. Even in very white settings, the social warmth is night and day compared to similar populations in Europe. Same people yet wildly different social outcomes. Culture is obviously different but what is it about the US specifically that makes it so much extroverted (and frankly, friendlier).

    Replies: @Tor597, @songbird, @Europe Europa

    The US has, or had at least, a middle class.

    Europeans, especially Anglos, are much more likely to live in places with rich and poor populations with a middling middle class.

  219. @Astuteobservor II
    Any of you guys followed the China and Australia trade war?

    Australia somehow put the squeeze on the iron ore market, making back all their losses from the previous Chinese bans. The Chinese just issued the coal ban in response. And are building huge ports and ships to import iron ore from Brazil and rest of the world in the near future.

    Australia is gonna get fucked. This was very interesting, China seems to be out for blood in regards to Australia.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Shortsword, @Tor597, @sb

    Interesting link on the use of scrap steel in the Chinese market.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/timtreadgold/2020/12/02/chinese-junk-could-sink-the-profits-of-big-iron-ore-miners/

    With China not needing to build as much moving forward because their economy has matured, plus recycling more scrap steel, plus getting mines open from Africa I can see Australia’s iron ore industry crashing mid decade.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Tor597


    With China not needing to build as much moving forward because their economy has matured, plus recycling more scrap steel, plus getting mines open from Africa I can see Australia’s iron ore industry crashing mid decade.
     
    If CCP Elites use Chinese taxpayer money to successfully develop African iron mines, there are two inevitable results:

    -1- Low cost Australian ore will find other markets.
    -2- Higher cost Chinese iron mines will go under, punishing Chinese workers with unemployment.
    _____

    Every time the Elite CCP lashes out at Australia, they make things worse for the Chinese people. For example: (1)

    Millions of Chinese residents have been left without heating in the middle of winter as cities ration electricity amid a blockade on Australian coal.

    Australia provided 57 per cent of China's thermal coal imports in 2019, which is used to generate electricity in power stations.

    But last month, Beijing blocked Australian coal imports, which has resulted in 80 ships carrying more than $1.1 billion in blacklisted cargo being stranded off the Chinese coast.
     
    It took less than 30 days for the disingenuous and capricious CCP Elites to break RCEP. This was supposed to be the deal that enabling Asia to "Challenge The West".
     

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/zq82d1lmin4/hqdefault.jpg
     
    Mission Failed -- RCEP Wasted

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9063943/Chinas-trade-war-Australia-backfires-country-plagued-blackouts-cold-winter.html


     

    https://www.guerillastocktrading.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/china-free-trade-meme.jpg

    Replies: @Tor597

  220. @German_reader
    @utu

    Nemmersdorf is controversial, total certainty is probably unachievable. Current state of research (unlikely to be superseded) is that several war crimes did happen there. An internal report from the Geheime Feldpolizei, dated 25th October 1944, indicates that Red Army soldiers shot about two dozen civilians (mostly old people over 60 and several children). A 19-year old woman had apparently been raped before being shot (it also mentions a witness statement by a 20-year old woman who said she had been raped by two Red Army soldiers):
    https://www.zfo-online.de/portal/index.php/zfo/article/view/8692/8691
    The report seems free of any propagandistic intent, it's quite matter of fact, and reports mixed behaviour by Red Army soldiers (some behaving correctly and even taking steps to protect German civilians from shelling, while others looted and raped).
    One problem is that there were several high-ranking NSDAP and SS members in the village shortly after the Soviet withdrawal. What exactly they did there, is unknown, but presumably they made preparations for the propagandistic exploitation of events. Maybe they manipulated or staged corpses (e.g. to play up the rape aspect). So people who want to believe that it was all made up can cling to that uncertainty.
    Higher victim numbers than about two dozen seem to have no factual basis, as do the more extreme claims about sadistic torture (the bit about women supposedly being nailed to barn doors apparently goes back to the "testimony" of a certain Karl Potrek in the early 1950s, but in all probability Potrek had never even been in Nemmersdorf. Nothing of the kind is mentioned in the Geheime Feldpolizei report which was written immediately after the events).

    Replies: @utu, @melanf

    Harry Thürk who returned to the village with first troops claimed to see a women hang on the barn door.

  221. @Dmitry
    Impressions of different countries by how extroverted/introverted they might be? (Obviously with regional differences: e.g. People in Northern Spain are generally more introverted, while Southern Spain more extroverted).

    https://i.imgur.com/7fmriNj.jpg
    Not sure about the impression of the USA?

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Gerard.Gerard, @songbird

    Sweden is surprising to see listed as introvert. Swedes en masse speak excellent English and appear to be a part of every globohomo cause/initiative – both features seem to me typical of extrovert people. I would say that equal or maybe even more Swedes are able and happy to speak in English…. than Finns are to speaking Russian to us (which is a large number). I know that alot of Scandinavians are very weird, but it’s unfair to group Swedes with the considerably more introvert Finns….. and particularly with the very introvert, disdainful and hierarchical Japanese society, which is if course more monoculture than Swedes are for the last 30 years.

    Spain, US, Brazil, Ireland I, and I’m sure many others can confirm, are definitely highly extrovert societies. As are Australia, South Africa – which goes with my theory that in Anglo empire they have this extrovert/introvert neighbour dynamic with Australia /NZ, South Africa/Zimbabwe ( well, the white section)….. and of course US/Canada.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Gerard.Gerard

    Lol although please don't take it seriously. This is just me doodling for a couple minutes of selfentertainment on Paint. It's just for entertainment doodling on paint purposes only - not related to any data, except personal impressions. Feel free to draw you own version.

    I wonder if it makes more sense with another trait of agreeable/disagreeable? Japan is less confusing with the extra trait (people seem very habituated to be agreeable at the same time as mostly acting introverted).

    https://i.imgur.com/6Qow06g.jpeg

    , @Thulean Friend
    @Gerard.Gerard


    Sweden is surprising to see listed as introvert. Swedes en masse speak excellent English and appear to be a part of every globohomo cause/initiative – both features seem to me typical of extrovert people
     
    This is simply Sweden being extremely quick to take up new trends. In the 1930s, we were leading 'race science' with research centers such as Rasbiologiska institutet at Uppsala University.

    Fredrik Lindström has spoken about this a lot in his TV special Världens Modernaste Land. You can probably figure out what it means without knowing the language. Swedes are simply obsessed with new trends, socially or technologically, and are highly conformist. That meant out-Nazi the Nazis in the 1920s and 30s and now it means out-liberal the liberals in the US.

    Replies: @joniel, @Anatoly Karlin

  222. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Mr. Hack

    You nevertheless have to admit the USSR achieved a lot under Communism, including gaining a lot of prestige.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack

    USSR was an effective tool for killing Eastern Slavs and squandering their early 20th century advantages.

  223. @Tor597
    @Astuteobservor II

    Interesting link on the use of scrap steel in the Chinese market.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/timtreadgold/2020/12/02/chinese-junk-could-sink-the-profits-of-big-iron-ore-miners/

    With China not needing to build as much moving forward because their economy has matured, plus recycling more scrap steel, plus getting mines open from Africa I can see Australia's iron ore industry crashing mid decade.

    Replies: @A123

    With China not needing to build as much moving forward because their economy has matured, plus recycling more scrap steel, plus getting mines open from Africa I can see Australia’s iron ore industry crashing mid decade.

    If CCP Elites use Chinese taxpayer money to successfully develop African iron mines, there are two inevitable results:

    -1- Low cost Australian ore will find other markets.
    -2- Higher cost Chinese iron mines will go under, punishing Chinese workers with unemployment.
    _____

    Every time the Elite CCP lashes out at Australia, they make things worse for the Chinese people. For example: (1)

    Millions of Chinese residents have been left without heating in the middle of winter as cities ration electricity amid a blockade on Australian coal.

    Australia provided 57 per cent of China’s thermal coal imports in 2019, which is used to generate electricity in power stations.

    But last month, Beijing blocked Australian coal imports, which has resulted in 80 ships carrying more than $1.1 billion in blacklisted cargo being stranded off the Chinese coast.

    It took less than 30 days for the disingenuous and capricious CCP Elites to break RCEP. This was supposed to be the deal that enabling Asia to “Challenge The West”.
     


     
    Mission Failed — RCEP Wasted

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9063943/Chinas-trade-war-Australia-backfires-country-plagued-blackouts-cold-winter.html

    [MORE]

     

    • Replies: @Tor597
    @A123

    So, when Americans and Australians boycott Chinese 5G that is ok but when China wants to boycott Iron Ore all of a sudden you are concerned about the Chinese consumer?

    You obviously didn't read the Forbes article. China has an undeveloped scrap steel market that once it gets to Japan levels of efficiency will greatly reduce their demand for Iron Ore.

    - Australia, has engaged in cartel like pricing to try and squeeze China into paying more than the commodity is worth.

    - Australia is hostile to China in its own backyard.

    - The African Ore is higher quality than Australia.

    - So it makes perfect sense that China is diversifying their supply of a crucial commodity.

    Australia on the other hand made a really bad decision to piss off their largest customer. There is only another 5 years or so before Iron ore prices collapse. If Australia were smart they wouldn't have shut themselves out of the largest market.

    I see Australia collapsing in a decade.

    Replies: @A123, @dfordoom

  224. I need some advice re Christmas dinner, people.

    Beef rib roast is on sale for a good price, but I’ve never cooked one before. What do you do with it? Also, does it get tough if cooked to medium-wellish? I don’t like raw meat, and it’s still expensive even on sale, so I should probably just skip it if everyone’s just gonna be like…

    Please advise.

    • Troll: Jatt Aryaa
  225. @Tor597
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Not only are Indians physically the weakest, but they are also the least athletic people on the planet overall.

    India only has 9 gold medals and only 1 since the 1980 Olympics.

    Eight of those medals are in field hockey which were won a long time ago when they were probably the only ones playing the sport and 1 gold medal was in shooting.

    Replies: @songbird, @Thulean Friend

    Why should India devote resources to international sport, when it has become about the worship of blacks?

    • Replies: @sudden death
    @songbird

    Except swimming ;)

    Replies: @songbird

    , @sb
    @songbird

    To be fair measuring a country's supposed athleticism by Olympic results is not really on . Only the Communist world ever took this measure seriously .
    Pick individual sports and particularly low hanging fruit and you can collect lotsa medals especially with ,er, chemical enhancement
    (Actually you don't have to be a Commo to know this - look at Britain and track cycling )
    Was East Germany more athletic or sporty than West Germany ?
    East Germany certainly "won" more medals while West Germany won more soccer World Cups - much more significant to the majority of the world
    Also I'd say average West Germans were far healthier and athletic

    India would rather have the world's #1 cricket team than win a bagful of Olympic medals . The Olympics are 2 weeks every 4 years - the Big International Team Sports -which aren't particularly a feature of American life - are a 365 day a year interest

  226. @A123
    @Tor597


    With China not needing to build as much moving forward because their economy has matured, plus recycling more scrap steel, plus getting mines open from Africa I can see Australia’s iron ore industry crashing mid decade.
     
    If CCP Elites use Chinese taxpayer money to successfully develop African iron mines, there are two inevitable results:

    -1- Low cost Australian ore will find other markets.
    -2- Higher cost Chinese iron mines will go under, punishing Chinese workers with unemployment.
    _____

    Every time the Elite CCP lashes out at Australia, they make things worse for the Chinese people. For example: (1)

    Millions of Chinese residents have been left without heating in the middle of winter as cities ration electricity amid a blockade on Australian coal.

    Australia provided 57 per cent of China's thermal coal imports in 2019, which is used to generate electricity in power stations.

    But last month, Beijing blocked Australian coal imports, which has resulted in 80 ships carrying more than $1.1 billion in blacklisted cargo being stranded off the Chinese coast.
     
    It took less than 30 days for the disingenuous and capricious CCP Elites to break RCEP. This was supposed to be the deal that enabling Asia to "Challenge The West".
     

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/zq82d1lmin4/hqdefault.jpg
     
    Mission Failed -- RCEP Wasted

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9063943/Chinas-trade-war-Australia-backfires-country-plagued-blackouts-cold-winter.html


     

    https://www.guerillastocktrading.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/china-free-trade-meme.jpg

    Replies: @Tor597

    So, when Americans and Australians boycott Chinese 5G that is ok but when China wants to boycott Iron Ore all of a sudden you are concerned about the Chinese consumer?

    You obviously didn’t read the Forbes article. China has an undeveloped scrap steel market that once it gets to Japan levels of efficiency will greatly reduce their demand for Iron Ore.

    – Australia, has engaged in cartel like pricing to try and squeeze China into paying more than the commodity is worth.

    – Australia is hostile to China in its own backyard.

    – The African Ore is higher quality than Australia.

    – So it makes perfect sense that China is diversifying their supply of a crucial commodity.

    Australia on the other hand made a really bad decision to piss off their largest customer. There is only another 5 years or so before Iron ore prices collapse. If Australia were smart they wouldn’t have shut themselves out of the largest market.

    I see Australia collapsing in a decade.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Tor597


    So, when Americans and Australians boycott Chinese 5G that is ok but when China wants to boycott Iron Ore all of a sudden you are concerned about the Chinese consumer?
     
    CCP Elites sabotaged 5G equipment with espionage tech. Not accepting insecure equipment is the right thing for all consumers. And, it is bad for everyone (including Chinese workers).

    Why do apologists for Elite CCP abuses always try to blame other countries?

    Here is a breathtaking idea that Globalist Xi should consider.... Taking responsibility for Elite CCP mistakes. Of course, we know that will never happen.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Tor597

    , @dfordoom
    @Tor597


    Australia on the other hand made a really bad decision to piss off their largest customer. There is only another 5 years or so before Iron ore prices collapse. If Australia were smart they wouldn’t have shut themselves out of the largest market.

    I see Australia collapsing in a decade.
     
    I agree. The question is did Australia make this monumentally bad decision or was it made for us in Washington? Or are we so pathetic that we don't even need to be told what to do - like a well-trained dog do we anticipate our master's wishes?

    So, when Americans and Australians boycott Chinese 5G that is ok but when China wants to boycott Iron Ore all of a sudden you are concerned about the Chinese consumer?
     
    Boycotts are bad and evil when bad evil countries do them. Any country that the US doesn't like is bad and evil.
  227. @Tor597
    @A123

    So, when Americans and Australians boycott Chinese 5G that is ok but when China wants to boycott Iron Ore all of a sudden you are concerned about the Chinese consumer?

    You obviously didn't read the Forbes article. China has an undeveloped scrap steel market that once it gets to Japan levels of efficiency will greatly reduce their demand for Iron Ore.

    - Australia, has engaged in cartel like pricing to try and squeeze China into paying more than the commodity is worth.

    - Australia is hostile to China in its own backyard.

    - The African Ore is higher quality than Australia.

    - So it makes perfect sense that China is diversifying their supply of a crucial commodity.

    Australia on the other hand made a really bad decision to piss off their largest customer. There is only another 5 years or so before Iron ore prices collapse. If Australia were smart they wouldn't have shut themselves out of the largest market.

    I see Australia collapsing in a decade.

    Replies: @A123, @dfordoom

    So, when Americans and Australians boycott Chinese 5G that is ok but when China wants to boycott Iron Ore all of a sudden you are concerned about the Chinese consumer?

    CCP Elites sabotaged 5G equipment with espionage tech. Not accepting insecure equipment is the right thing for all consumers. And, it is bad for everyone (including Chinese workers).

    Why do apologists for Elite CCP abuses always try to blame other countries?

    Here is a breathtaking idea that Globalist Xi should consider…. Taking responsibility for Elite CCP mistakes. Of course, we know that will never happen.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Tor597
    @A123

    Well maybe the Australian Elites have sabotaged Iron Ore with germ warfare.

    So it makes perfect sense to ban Australian goods.

    Replies: @A123

  228. @Thulean Friend
    @Dmitry

    This gels with my personal experiences. One thing I never understood is why the Irish are so gregarious, compared to the dour British. The Irish with the Spanish are among my favourite people in Europe. The US' extroversion is extremely obvious for anyone who has ever visited that place. Even in very white settings, the social warmth is night and day compared to similar populations in Europe. Same people yet wildly different social outcomes. Culture is obviously different but what is it about the US specifically that makes it so much extroverted (and frankly, friendlier).

    Replies: @Tor597, @songbird, @Europe Europa

    This gels with my personal experiences. One thing I never understood is why the Irish are so gregarious, compared to the dour British.

    I can think of a lot of possible explanations.

    [MORE]

    In the case of Finland, it seems to at least partly be about climate. Well, Ireland has a milder climate than England due to the Gulf Stream. There’s a difference between English oak and Irish oak.

    Also, Irish culture is more egalitarian than in England. The native Irish gentry were practically completely destroyed – at one point, only 3% of Irish land was owned by Catholics. Under the penal laws, natives were banned from trades, so practically everyone was a tenant farmer or a laborer. If you owned practically anything, like a boat, it could be seized by the landlord, if you were in arrears. The schools were called “hedge schools” – quite a different conception than ivory towers. And before that – even though it had an aristocratic elite – clan society is still probably more egalitarian.

    Also, the Irish language is arguably more loquacious than English. It still effects patterns of speech, even though it is not spoken, by many anymore – people are still offended by short answers. For example, traditionally, it is not possible to give a simple “no” reply.

    Of course, I think the main explanation is that it was a fairly homogeneous, traditional and rural society, until recently. Very few cities. Until recently, not really much that would be considered suburbs. People used to have big families, which helped train people to talk. And going to church helped unite communities – Ireland was one of the last religious holdouts in Western Europe – but no more.

    I don’t think the friendliness will survive the invasion. I don’t think it can.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Sweden has traditionally been quite egalitarian, too. We were among the earliest societies to have given formal representation to farmers and peasants through fyrståndsriksdagen. The first three populations - priests, nobles and burghers - were not any different but the fourth - farmers - was pretty revolutionary for its time.

    In 1866, most formal noble privileges were abolished. Literacy was promoted to the less advantaged sections of society early on.

    Yet all this egalitarianism didn't make Swedes particularly gregarious or sociable. So, I am somewhat skeptical about your egalitarian hypothesis. Swedes also used to have big families until recently, yet it did not seem to make much difference there either.

    I think your comments about climate is more plausible. If you look at the latitude of US cities over Europe, you realise how much further north most of Europe is (and why it gets far less sunshine). Warmer, sunnier climate affects our hormonal levels. There are even "light therapy" studios in Scandinavia to combat winter depression. But while climate/geology may play one role, there should probably be more factors at work.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @EldnahYm
    @songbird

    Maybe the personality differences between Irish and English are because of more Germanic ancestry in the English. In any case, it seems comparisons of the Welsh and Scots to English and Irish would be helpful.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @songbird

  229. @A123
    @Tor597


    So, when Americans and Australians boycott Chinese 5G that is ok but when China wants to boycott Iron Ore all of a sudden you are concerned about the Chinese consumer?
     
    CCP Elites sabotaged 5G equipment with espionage tech. Not accepting insecure equipment is the right thing for all consumers. And, it is bad for everyone (including Chinese workers).

    Why do apologists for Elite CCP abuses always try to blame other countries?

    Here is a breathtaking idea that Globalist Xi should consider.... Taking responsibility for Elite CCP mistakes. Of course, we know that will never happen.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Tor597

    Well maybe the Australian Elites have sabotaged Iron Ore with germ warfare.

    So it makes perfect sense to ban Australian goods.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Tor597


    Well maybe the Australian Elites have sabotaged Iron Ore with germ warfare.

    So it makes perfect sense to ban Australian goods.
     
    So all it takes to save native citizens and jobs from CCP Elite rapaciousness is a little bit of ore tampering.

    Cool Beans! I am forwarding this over to the CIA right now so they can maneuver the CCP Elites into total isolationism. It doesn't get much better than that...

    *Many Thanks*

    PEACE 😇
  230. @Dmitry
    Impressions of different countries by how extroverted/introverted they might be? (Obviously with regional differences: e.g. People in Northern Spain are generally more introverted, while Southern Spain more extroverted).

    https://i.imgur.com/7fmriNj.jpg
    Not sure about the impression of the USA?

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Gerard.Gerard, @songbird

    I’m skeptical that Sweden would virtually be neck-and-neck with Finland. Ethnic Swedes in Finland are significantly more extroverted. Maybe, they are not representative? But Finns definitely have a harsher climate.

    Some people have the idea that if you live in a really harsh climate that makes people quieter so they get along when they are locked together over wintertime.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @songbird


    quieter so they get along when they are locked together

     

    This theory wouldn't be explanatory for Ireland though, as Ireland is raining a lot, which makes people stay indoors close together.

    Yet culture in in Ireland seems very extroverted, with general culture of talking addicts (like Southern European countries).

    I’m skeptical that Sweden would virtually be neck-and-neck with Finland.
     

    Lol sorry this was just me doodling on Paint for fun. It only represents my personal impressions. Feel free to draw your own version.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @songbird

  231. Trump announces January 6 Rally in Washington D.C. (1)

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1340362336390004737?s=20

    What day will VP Pence count and announce the Electoral College winner?

    Could it be January 6? Yes! Yes, it is January 6.

    PEACE 😇
    __________

    (1) https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-wild-protests-planned-day-of-electoral-college-vote-count-2020-12

     

    [MORE]

     

  232. @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    Many of my relatives died in Soviet camps or during revolution, still I dont whine about it like a ***.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack

    I had some as well. Not like Russians were eating Fillet Mignon at the expense of non-Russians en masse. Have no problems accurately noting Soviet wrongs.

    Somewhat related, I take issue with what Katie Halper said during the below linked show about Russians and Ukrainians owing Jews. Somewhat akin to the kind of tripe spouted by the likes of Julia Ioffe. In Ioffe’s case, she would probably leave Ukrainians out of that equation in line with neocon/neolib conformity. Not into collective guilt. BTW, some highlight that the mostly Russian inhabited USSR saved the Jews from extermination. Have come across numerous individuals of Jewish and Russian Orthodox Christian backgrounds, who’re against Russian and Jew bashing.

  233. @Gerard.Gerard
    @Dmitry

    Sweden is surprising to see listed as introvert. Swedes en masse speak excellent English and appear to be a part of every globohomo cause/initiative - both features seem to me typical of extrovert people. I would say that equal or maybe even more Swedes are able and happy to speak in English.... than Finns are to speaking Russian to us (which is a large number). I know that alot of Scandinavians are very weird, but it's unfair to group Swedes with the considerably more introvert Finns..... and particularly with the very introvert, disdainful and hierarchical Japanese society, which is if course more monoculture than Swedes are for the last 30 years.

    Spain, US, Brazil, Ireland I, and I'm sure many others can confirm, are definitely highly extrovert societies. As are Australia, South Africa - which goes with my theory that in Anglo empire they have this extrovert/introvert neighbour dynamic with Australia /NZ, South Africa/Zimbabwe ( well, the white section)..... and of course US/Canada.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Thulean Friend

    Lol although please don’t take it seriously. This is just me doodling for a couple minutes of selfentertainment on Paint. It’s just for entertainment doodling on paint purposes only – not related to any data, except personal impressions. Feel free to draw you own version.

    I wonder if it makes more sense with another trait of agreeable/disagreeable? Japan is less confusing with the extra trait (people seem very habituated to be agreeable at the same time as mostly acting introverted).

    • Agree: Gerard-Mandela
  234. @German_reader
    @utu

    Nemmersdorf is controversial, total certainty is probably unachievable. Current state of research (unlikely to be superseded) is that several war crimes did happen there. An internal report from the Geheime Feldpolizei, dated 25th October 1944, indicates that Red Army soldiers shot about two dozen civilians (mostly old people over 60 and several children). A 19-year old woman had apparently been raped before being shot (it also mentions a witness statement by a 20-year old woman who said she had been raped by two Red Army soldiers):
    https://www.zfo-online.de/portal/index.php/zfo/article/view/8692/8691
    The report seems free of any propagandistic intent, it's quite matter of fact, and reports mixed behaviour by Red Army soldiers (some behaving correctly and even taking steps to protect German civilians from shelling, while others looted and raped).
    One problem is that there were several high-ranking NSDAP and SS members in the village shortly after the Soviet withdrawal. What exactly they did there, is unknown, but presumably they made preparations for the propagandistic exploitation of events. Maybe they manipulated or staged corpses (e.g. to play up the rape aspect). So people who want to believe that it was all made up can cling to that uncertainty.
    Higher victim numbers than about two dozen seem to have no factual basis, as do the more extreme claims about sadistic torture (the bit about women supposedly being nailed to barn doors apparently goes back to the "testimony" of a certain Karl Potrek in the early 1950s, but in all probability Potrek had never even been in Nemmersdorf. Nothing of the kind is mentioned in the Geheime Feldpolizei report which was written immediately after the events).

    Replies: @utu, @melanf

    Higher victim numbers than about two dozen seem to have no factual basis

    The number of civilians killed is not in doubt, the question is who of this number was killed intentionally. The assault on the town took place in the fog, so the shots from close range are not absolute proof of intentional murder (the soldiers in the fog probably shot at everything that moves). There are eyewitness accounts that some of the civilians killed were killed from a long distance. again, if we assume that all civilians were killed intentionally, it turns out that during a fierce battle in town among civilians there were no accidental losses at all, which is “statistically” unlikely.

    However, these are all details. The bottom line is that propagandists controlled from Washington falsified history (rapes and murders committed by the Red army were fantastically exaggerated, but rapes and murders committed by Western allies were hushed up). And they did it not out of love for Germany, but to make it easier to manipulate Germany (in their own interests).

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @melanf


    There are eyewitness accounts that some of the civilians killed were killed from a long distance.
     
    That's certainly possible in some cases. The main incident however seems to have been the deliberate shooting (from a short distance) of about a dozen civilians who had hidden in a provisory bunker. A woman called Gerda Meczulat apparently survived this and wrote about it after WW2 (her testimony seems to be accepted by Bernhard Fisch who researched the Nemmersdorf issue in the 1990s and demolished many of the prior myths). So it's about as certain as possible given the circumstances that some deliberate killings of civilians happened, even if the exact circumstances will remain unknown.
    More generally there can be little doubt imo that Red Army units committed many war crimes in the first few months of 1945, until steps were taken to establish stricter discipline. Yes, some of it was undoubtedly exaggerated by Nazi and later Cold War propaganda. And it would be wrong to denigrate the entire Red Army based on that, or to forget that Germany had invaded the Soviet Union and that German forces had committed many atrocities there, which was the background to the events of early 1945. But the "revisionist" stance currently promoted by Russia that nothing at all happened in 1945 is just not credible imo.

    The bottom line is that propagandists controlled from Washington falsified history
     
    I very much doubt that there was a coordinated American programme to that end (and how would you know it, if there had been?). The exaggerations in post-war West Germany are probably more to be traced back to unreconstructed Nazis and organizations of expellees from Germany's lost Eastern territories. No offense, but this "The Americans manufactured it all" sounds like nothing more than Soviet Cold war propaganda to me.

    Replies: @Shortsword, @melanf

  235. @songbird
    @Dmitry

    I'm skeptical that Sweden would virtually be neck-and-neck with Finland. Ethnic Swedes in Finland are significantly more extroverted. Maybe, they are not representative? But Finns definitely have a harsher climate.

    Some people have the idea that if you live in a really harsh climate that makes people quieter so they get along when they are locked together over wintertime.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    quieter so they get along when they are locked together

    This theory wouldn’t be explanatory for Ireland though, as Ireland is raining a lot, which makes people stay indoors close together.

    Yet culture in in Ireland seems very extroverted, with general culture of talking addicts (like Southern European countries).

    I’m skeptical that Sweden would virtually be neck-and-neck with Finland.

    Lol sorry this was just me doodling on Paint for fun. It only represents my personal impressions. Feel free to draw your own version.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Dmitry

    I would guess France somewhere like there:

    https://i.imgur.com/d5sAInN.jpg

    , @songbird
    @Dmitry


    This theory wouldn’t be explanatory for Ireland though, as Ireland is raining a lot, which makes people stay indoors close together.
     
    It's certainly no fun to get wet in winter. You can probably get hypothermia pretty easily, but I think that that snow is a different level. It makes travel very difficult. If you are exiled in snow, you will probably die. If it is raining, maybe you can make it to another cabin a few miles away.

    Of course, it does snow in Ireland, and sometimes a lot, but it is not especially common. I've known teenagers from there who have never seen snow.

    Replies: @Dmitry

  236. Based Chen at it again.

    • Replies: @Shortsword
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    The people acting like this are the same that cheered for the virus early 2020.

    , @A123
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Cringe & Blue Pilled -- CCP Chen brutally crushed by Based & Red Pilled Farage.

    https://twitter.com/andrewbostom/status/1319234463008698370?s=20

    Proven fact -- If you are not sick, wearing a mask will not protect you. This study shows no degree of effectiveness in mask-wearing against the spread of COVID-19. (1)

    Known liar CCP Chen has been busted (again).

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.theblaze.com/op-ed/horowitz-danish-newspaper-reveals-largest-study-masks-rejected

    , @AaronB
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Actually, this illustrates something very nicely.

    Farage says something with substance. Chinese dude makes terse reply that is pure mockery, no substance. Farage replies with substance, Chinese dude repeats - again no thought, no substance.

    The Chinese guy wins. In a power struggle, never make reasonable points. Reasonableness presupposes willingness to be proved wrong. Power is not willing to be proved wrong. Power is stupid, like a bulldog. It mocks.

    The two are coming from a different universe of discourse.

    China is not positioning itself as the next Athens, but the next Rome. Stupid, large, and without culture, but efficient and known primarily for large engineering works.

    Nothing could be more wrong than to think China will be the new Athens. The Chinese themselves are positioning themselves as the new Rome. Athens - intelligence- will remain in the West. Large engineering works will be China's enduring contribution, not thought, not intelligence.

    Its not that there aren't people capable of creating an Athens in China, but they've been discredited for the time being, and the stupid, powerful, engineering types are having their moment.

    Of course China won't even be a new Rome, but it will be more like that than Athens.

  237. Is there anything more than cheap populism to Russia putting on temporary export taxes on food?

  238. @Tor597
    @A123

    Well maybe the Australian Elites have sabotaged Iron Ore with germ warfare.

    So it makes perfect sense to ban Australian goods.

    Replies: @A123

    Well maybe the Australian Elites have sabotaged Iron Ore with germ warfare.

    So it makes perfect sense to ban Australian goods.

    So all it takes to save native citizens and jobs from CCP Elite rapaciousness is a little bit of ore tampering.

    Cool Beans! I am forwarding this over to the CIA right now so they can maneuver the CCP Elites into total isolationism. It doesn’t get much better than that…

    *Many Thanks*

    PEACE 😇

  239. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    Based Chen at it again.

    https://twitter.com/chenweihua/status/1340588229309952000

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1340639648876523520

    Replies: @Shortsword, @A123, @AaronB

    The people acting like this are the same that cheered for the virus early 2020.

  240. German_reader says:
    @melanf
    @German_reader


    Higher victim numbers than about two dozen seem to have no factual basis
     
    The number of civilians killed is not in doubt, the question is who of this number was killed intentionally. The assault on the town took place in the fog, so the shots from close range are not absolute proof of intentional murder (the soldiers in the fog probably shot at everything that moves). There are eyewitness accounts that some of the civilians killed were killed from a long distance. again, if we assume that all civilians were killed intentionally, it turns out that during a fierce battle in town among civilians there were no accidental losses at all, which is "statistically" unlikely.

    However, these are all details. The bottom line is that propagandists controlled from Washington falsified history (rapes and murders committed by the Red army were fantastically exaggerated, but rapes and murders committed by Western allies were hushed up). And they did it not out of love for Germany, but to make it easier to manipulate Germany (in their own interests).

    Replies: @German_reader

    There are eyewitness accounts that some of the civilians killed were killed from a long distance.

    That’s certainly possible in some cases. The main incident however seems to have been the deliberate shooting (from a short distance) of about a dozen civilians who had hidden in a provisory bunker. A woman called Gerda Meczulat apparently survived this and wrote about it after WW2 (her testimony seems to be accepted by Bernhard Fisch who researched the Nemmersdorf issue in the 1990s and demolished many of the prior myths). So it’s about as certain as possible given the circumstances that some deliberate killings of civilians happened, even if the exact circumstances will remain unknown.
    More generally there can be little doubt imo that Red Army units committed many war crimes in the first few months of 1945, until steps were taken to establish stricter discipline. Yes, some of it was undoubtedly exaggerated by Nazi and later Cold War propaganda. And it would be wrong to denigrate the entire Red Army based on that, or to forget that Germany had invaded the Soviet Union and that German forces had committed many atrocities there, which was the background to the events of early 1945. But the “revisionist” stance currently promoted by Russia that nothing at all happened in 1945 is just not credible imo.

    The bottom line is that propagandists controlled from Washington falsified history

    I very much doubt that there was a coordinated American programme to that end (and how would you know it, if there had been?). The exaggerations in post-war West Germany are probably more to be traced back to unreconstructed Nazis and organizations of expellees from Germany’s lost Eastern territories. No offense, but this “The Americans manufactured it all” sounds like nothing more than Soviet Cold war propaganda to me.

    • Replies: @Shortsword
    @German_reader

    It's manufactured in the sense of giving attention to something insignificant. How many Westerners know of any Nazi massacre committed against Russians? The large amounts of deaths in Soviet Union is usually attributed to using cannon fodder human waves tactics or something like that. You can joke about it.

    I'd argue that you hear more about Russians committing atrocities against Germans than the opposite. Being a Nazi victim is heavily monopolized by Jews.

    Replies: @German_reader, @Europe Europa

    , @melanf
    @German_reader


    I very much doubt that there was a coordinated American programme to that end (and how would you know it, if there had been?).
     
    And what is there to doubt? For example Karl Potrek without a doubt invented his testimony (and it is elementary to verify). if Karl Potrek had made up the same story about american troops, he would have been instantly exposed, and the population of germany would never have known the story he told. But since Potrek's story served the purposes of propaganda well, it formed the basis of the English-language (and probably german-language) history of Nemmersdorf "for the masses". if not for the go-ahead from washington, this story would exist on a par with the" jewish conspiracy " somewhere in the marginal segments of the noosphere
  241. @Dmitry
    @songbird


    quieter so they get along when they are locked together

     

    This theory wouldn't be explanatory for Ireland though, as Ireland is raining a lot, which makes people stay indoors close together.

    Yet culture in in Ireland seems very extroverted, with general culture of talking addicts (like Southern European countries).

    I’m skeptical that Sweden would virtually be neck-and-neck with Finland.
     

    Lol sorry this was just me doodling on Paint for fun. It only represents my personal impressions. Feel free to draw your own version.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @songbird

    I would guess France somewhere like there:

  242. @Dmitry
    @songbird


    quieter so they get along when they are locked together

     

    This theory wouldn't be explanatory for Ireland though, as Ireland is raining a lot, which makes people stay indoors close together.

    Yet culture in in Ireland seems very extroverted, with general culture of talking addicts (like Southern European countries).

    I’m skeptical that Sweden would virtually be neck-and-neck with Finland.
     

    Lol sorry this was just me doodling on Paint for fun. It only represents my personal impressions. Feel free to draw your own version.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @songbird

    This theory wouldn’t be explanatory for Ireland though, as Ireland is raining a lot, which makes people stay indoors close together.

    It’s certainly no fun to get wet in winter. You can probably get hypothermia pretty easily, but I think that that snow is a different level. It makes travel very difficult. If you are exiled in snow, you will probably die. If it is raining, maybe you can make it to another cabin a few miles away.

    Of course, it does snow in Ireland, and sometimes a lot, but it is not especially common. I’ve known teenagers from there who have never seen snow.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @songbird

    There's not a climate explanation for why people in Ireland are more friendly and talking addicts, than in the United Kingdom, though.

    In most populated parts of the Kingdom (South England), the winter is a little colder than in Ireland, but differences are not that much.

    On other hand, there is a significant personality difference. In Ireland, the friendliness and responsiveness of people seems almost more being in Spain or Italy.

    People are also quite friendly in England, but it is in a different way. I would say that culture in England values being "agreeable".


    does snow in Ireland, and sometimes a lot, but it is not especially common

     

    I've worked in Ireland. It snows for a few days, but it doesn't seem to enjoy settling on the ground. You'll definitely feel cold in the winter there though - because of the inadequate heating of the buildings, despite it being relatively mild winters.

    Replies: @songbird, @songbird

  243. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    Based Chen at it again.

    https://twitter.com/chenweihua/status/1340588229309952000

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1340639648876523520

    Replies: @Shortsword, @A123, @AaronB

    Cringe & Blue Pilled — CCP Chen brutally crushed by Based & Red Pilled Farage.

    Proven fact — If you are not sick, wearing a mask will not protect you. This study shows no degree of effectiveness in mask-wearing against the spread of COVID-19. (1)

    Known liar CCP Chen has been busted (again).

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.theblaze.com/op-ed/horowitz-danish-newspaper-reveals-largest-study-masks-rejected

  244. @songbird
    @Dmitry


    This theory wouldn’t be explanatory for Ireland though, as Ireland is raining a lot, which makes people stay indoors close together.
     
    It's certainly no fun to get wet in winter. You can probably get hypothermia pretty easily, but I think that that snow is a different level. It makes travel very difficult. If you are exiled in snow, you will probably die. If it is raining, maybe you can make it to another cabin a few miles away.

    Of course, it does snow in Ireland, and sometimes a lot, but it is not especially common. I've known teenagers from there who have never seen snow.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    There’s not a climate explanation for why people in Ireland are more friendly and talking addicts, than in the United Kingdom, though.

    In most populated parts of the Kingdom (South England), the winter is a little colder than in Ireland, but differences are not that much.

    On other hand, there is a significant personality difference. In Ireland, the friendliness and responsiveness of people seems almost more being in Spain or Italy.

    People are also quite friendly in England, but it is in a different way. I would say that culture in England values being “agreeable”.

    does snow in Ireland, and sometimes a lot, but it is not especially common

    I’ve worked in Ireland. It snows for a few days, but it doesn’t seem to enjoy settling on the ground. You’ll definitely feel cold in the winter there though – because of the inadequate heating of the buildings, despite it being relatively mild winters.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Dmitry

    My main theory to explain the English vs. Irish stereotype would be industrialization.

    The Irish (natives) were mainly subsistence farmers until recently, so everyone was pretty equal, except for the land-owning class which were seen as being alien. For countless decades, Ireland was a country of emigration because the economy was pretty undeveloped. Even the people in Dublin now, a lot of them are children or grandchildren of farmers.

    In contrast, the Industrial Revolution basically started in England or Wales. It created a lot of division of labor, class, and wealth stratification, perhaps adding to the earlier aristocratic distinctions. I think the lower classes had the ambition to be like the aristocrats - to gain relative status. And, of course, I think multiculturalism, which has been in place for longer in England, has damaged social trust more than in Ireland, where it is a very recent phenomenon.

    Germany was another country to industrialize early, and I think they had the largest aristocratic class.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Coconuts

    , @songbird
    @Dmitry

    In a certain sense, I think that impressions of England and France are dominated by their biggest cities, London and Paris. These would be the centers of wealth, status-seeking, and social exclusion.

  245. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    Based Chen at it again.

    https://twitter.com/chenweihua/status/1340588229309952000

    https://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage/status/1340639648876523520

    Replies: @Shortsword, @A123, @AaronB

    Actually, this illustrates something very nicely.

    Farage says something with substance. Chinese dude makes terse reply that is pure mockery, no substance. Farage replies with substance, Chinese dude repeats – again no thought, no substance.

    The Chinese guy wins. In a power struggle, never make reasonable points. Reasonableness presupposes willingness to be proved wrong. Power is not willing to be proved wrong. Power is stupid, like a bulldog. It mocks.

    The two are coming from a different universe of discourse.

    China is not positioning itself as the next Athens, but the next Rome. Stupid, large, and without culture, but efficient and known primarily for large engineering works.

    Nothing could be more wrong than to think China will be the new Athens. The Chinese themselves are positioning themselves as the new Rome. Athens – intelligence- will remain in the West. Large engineering works will be China’s enduring contribution, not thought, not intelligence.

    Its not that there aren’t people capable of creating an Athens in China, but they’ve been discredited for the time being, and the stupid, powerful, engineering types are having their moment.

    Of course China won’t even be a new Rome, but it will be more like that than Athens.

  246. @German_reader
    @melanf


    There are eyewitness accounts that some of the civilians killed were killed from a long distance.
     
    That's certainly possible in some cases. The main incident however seems to have been the deliberate shooting (from a short distance) of about a dozen civilians who had hidden in a provisory bunker. A woman called Gerda Meczulat apparently survived this and wrote about it after WW2 (her testimony seems to be accepted by Bernhard Fisch who researched the Nemmersdorf issue in the 1990s and demolished many of the prior myths). So it's about as certain as possible given the circumstances that some deliberate killings of civilians happened, even if the exact circumstances will remain unknown.
    More generally there can be little doubt imo that Red Army units committed many war crimes in the first few months of 1945, until steps were taken to establish stricter discipline. Yes, some of it was undoubtedly exaggerated by Nazi and later Cold War propaganda. And it would be wrong to denigrate the entire Red Army based on that, or to forget that Germany had invaded the Soviet Union and that German forces had committed many atrocities there, which was the background to the events of early 1945. But the "revisionist" stance currently promoted by Russia that nothing at all happened in 1945 is just not credible imo.

    The bottom line is that propagandists controlled from Washington falsified history
     
    I very much doubt that there was a coordinated American programme to that end (and how would you know it, if there had been?). The exaggerations in post-war West Germany are probably more to be traced back to unreconstructed Nazis and organizations of expellees from Germany's lost Eastern territories. No offense, but this "The Americans manufactured it all" sounds like nothing more than Soviet Cold war propaganda to me.

    Replies: @Shortsword, @melanf

    It’s manufactured in the sense of giving attention to something insignificant. How many Westerners know of any Nazi massacre committed against Russians? The large amounts of deaths in Soviet Union is usually attributed to using cannon fodder human waves tactics or something like that. You can joke about it.

    I’d argue that you hear more about Russians committing atrocities against Germans than the opposite. Being a Nazi victim is heavily monopolized by Jews.

    • Replies: @German_reader
    @Shortsword


    to something insignificant. How many Westerners know of any Nazi massacre committed against Russians?
     
    I don't think it was "insignificant", though you may have a point that Russian suffering in WW2 is not always sufficiently acknowledged in Western countries.
    Anyway, I don't have much interest in further discussion of the issue (can't really contribute much meaningful anyway, everything including libraries here is locked down because of Corona, so I can't look up anything even if I wanted to).
    , @Europe Europa
    @Shortsword

    I don't think that much is made of it by WW2 historians, if anything I'd say Soviet war crimes, especially against civilians, is one of the most taboo and least talked about subjects of WW2 history.

    I hear the bombings of Hamburg and Dresden mentioned much more often by historians as a war crime than the Rape of Berlin, which is hardly ever mentioned by mainstream historians.

    The most serious discussions of Soviet war crimes I've seen have been by non-mainstream historical revisionist types, often with a pro-Nazi bias.

  247. @Dmitry
    @songbird

    There's not a climate explanation for why people in Ireland are more friendly and talking addicts, than in the United Kingdom, though.

    In most populated parts of the Kingdom (South England), the winter is a little colder than in Ireland, but differences are not that much.

    On other hand, there is a significant personality difference. In Ireland, the friendliness and responsiveness of people seems almost more being in Spain or Italy.

    People are also quite friendly in England, but it is in a different way. I would say that culture in England values being "agreeable".


    does snow in Ireland, and sometimes a lot, but it is not especially common

     

    I've worked in Ireland. It snows for a few days, but it doesn't seem to enjoy settling on the ground. You'll definitely feel cold in the winter there though - because of the inadequate heating of the buildings, despite it being relatively mild winters.

    Replies: @songbird, @songbird

    My main theory to explain the English vs. Irish stereotype would be industrialization.

    The Irish (natives) were mainly subsistence farmers until recently, so everyone was pretty equal, except for the land-owning class which were seen as being alien. For countless decades, Ireland was a country of emigration because the economy was pretty undeveloped. Even the people in Dublin now, a lot of them are children or grandchildren of farmers.

    In contrast, the Industrial Revolution basically started in England or Wales. It created a lot of division of labor, class, and wealth stratification, perhaps adding to the earlier aristocratic distinctions. I think the lower classes had the ambition to be like the aristocrats – to gain relative status. And, of course, I think multiculturalism, which has been in place for longer in England, has damaged social trust more than in Ireland, where it is a very recent phenomenon.

    Germany was another country to industrialize early, and I think they had the largest aristocratic class.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @songbird


    English vs. Irish stereotype would be industrialization.
     
    Irish almost seem more like Southern Europeans in their personality though. Maybe their Southern style of extraversion, is related the history of Catholicism? (Although equally Catholics Poles on average seem much more socially awkward).

    England, has damaged social trust
     
    In England, there is very high social trust in the bourgeois areas where the population seems the most introverted and quiet. The elite areas of England, are a kind of utopia of introverted nerdy people, who display their vast book collections from the windows of the front rooms of their house. And where the streets go almost silent after 8pm.

    Proletarian areas might be the more noisy and extroverted culture for England.


    impressions of England and France are dominated by their biggest cities, London and Paris. These would be the centers of wealth, status-seeking, and social exclusion.
     
    I think in France, people in the countryside can be the most disagreeable. I remember (my family) were being shouted at by old French women we rented a house from, once when we visited the French countryside. Also I remember visiting cathedral in the provincial France, and people shouting at us for talking.

    My impression is that in Paris it's perhaps slightly more friendly, or they are a little less rude to foreigners (also there are so many Arabs in Paris - those Arab hotel staff of Paris seemed friendly in my memory).

    From Germany, I had an almost opposite memory, of being shouted at in France. I remember in a shop in Berlin, these very nice assistants (old women) said to us after we bought something "we like you, you are attractive young people". There is some sense of awkward directness of Germany, but I don't remember anyone being unfriendly.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @songbird, @Anatoly Karlin

    , @Coconuts
    @songbird

    I get the impression that the English reserve is somehow connected with Protestant ideas about sobriety of conduct and dress. Some other Northern European Protestant countries seem to be similar in being undemonstrative and relatively formal, the lowland Scots, Dutch, North Germans, Danish.

    On the other hand Catholicism was connected with drinking, carousing, suspiciously sensuous and colourful religious ceremonies/superstitions and rural or peasant life. It is still perceptible that in rural areas of Northern England people are often more extrovert than in urban areas. Something notable about the culture of the British working class in industrial areas is that it can be quite extroverted and, so my wife says, degenerate, especially when drinking is involved.

    Nowadays though, as heavy industry has disappeared and shared religion/social activities have died out everyone seems to be becoming in general more introverted, even the bad or outrageous behaviour when drunk seems to be diminishing.

    Replies: @songbird

  248. German_reader says:
    @Shortsword
    @German_reader

    It's manufactured in the sense of giving attention to something insignificant. How many Westerners know of any Nazi massacre committed against Russians? The large amounts of deaths in Soviet Union is usually attributed to using cannon fodder human waves tactics or something like that. You can joke about it.

    I'd argue that you hear more about Russians committing atrocities against Germans than the opposite. Being a Nazi victim is heavily monopolized by Jews.

    Replies: @German_reader, @Europe Europa

    to something insignificant. How many Westerners know of any Nazi massacre committed against Russians?

    I don’t think it was “insignificant”, though you may have a point that Russian suffering in WW2 is not always sufficiently acknowledged in Western countries.
    Anyway, I don’t have much interest in further discussion of the issue (can’t really contribute much meaningful anyway, everything including libraries here is locked down because of Corona, so I can’t look up anything even if I wanted to).

  249. @Dmitry
    @songbird

    There's not a climate explanation for why people in Ireland are more friendly and talking addicts, than in the United Kingdom, though.

    In most populated parts of the Kingdom (South England), the winter is a little colder than in Ireland, but differences are not that much.

    On other hand, there is a significant personality difference. In Ireland, the friendliness and responsiveness of people seems almost more being in Spain or Italy.

    People are also quite friendly in England, but it is in a different way. I would say that culture in England values being "agreeable".


    does snow in Ireland, and sometimes a lot, but it is not especially common

     

    I've worked in Ireland. It snows for a few days, but it doesn't seem to enjoy settling on the ground. You'll definitely feel cold in the winter there though - because of the inadequate heating of the buildings, despite it being relatively mild winters.

    Replies: @songbird, @songbird

    In a certain sense, I think that impressions of England and France are dominated by their biggest cities, London and Paris. These would be the centers of wealth, status-seeking, and social exclusion.

  250. @songbird
    @Tor597

    Why should India devote resources to international sport, when it has become about the worship of blacks?

    Replies: @sudden death, @sb

    Except swimming 😉

    • Replies: @songbird
    @sudden death

    Swimming seems to be dominated by mutant reefers like Phelps. And aren't they allowing some trannies this time? IMO, all sports should be national-ethnic sports. The only international competitions should be martial.

  251. @sudden death
    @songbird

    Except swimming ;)

    Replies: @songbird

    Swimming seems to be dominated by mutant reefers like Phelps. And aren’t they allowing some trannies this time? IMO, all sports should be national-ethnic sports. The only international competitions should be martial.

  252. @songbird
    @Dmitry

    My main theory to explain the English vs. Irish stereotype would be industrialization.

    The Irish (natives) were mainly subsistence farmers until recently, so everyone was pretty equal, except for the land-owning class which were seen as being alien. For countless decades, Ireland was a country of emigration because the economy was pretty undeveloped. Even the people in Dublin now, a lot of them are children or grandchildren of farmers.

    In contrast, the Industrial Revolution basically started in England or Wales. It created a lot of division of labor, class, and wealth stratification, perhaps adding to the earlier aristocratic distinctions. I think the lower classes had the ambition to be like the aristocrats - to gain relative status. And, of course, I think multiculturalism, which has been in place for longer in England, has damaged social trust more than in Ireland, where it is a very recent phenomenon.

    Germany was another country to industrialize early, and I think they had the largest aristocratic class.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Coconuts

    English vs. Irish stereotype would be industrialization.

    Irish almost seem more like Southern Europeans in their personality though. Maybe their Southern style of extraversion, is related the history of Catholicism? (Although equally Catholics Poles on average seem much more socially awkward).

    England, has damaged social trust

    In England, there is very high social trust in the bourgeois areas where the population seems the most introverted and quiet. The elite areas of England, are a kind of utopia of introverted nerdy people, who display their vast book collections from the windows of the front rooms of their house. And where the streets go almost silent after 8pm.

    Proletarian areas might be the more noisy and extroverted culture for England.

    impressions of England and France are dominated by their biggest cities, London and Paris. These would be the centers of wealth, status-seeking, and social exclusion.

    I think in France, people in the countryside can be the most disagreeable. I remember (my family) were being shouted at by old French women we rented a house from, once when we visited the French countryside. Also I remember visiting cathedral in the provincial France, and people shouting at us for talking.

    My impression is that in Paris it’s perhaps slightly more friendly, or they are a little less rude to foreigners (also there are so many Arabs in Paris – those Arab hotel staff of Paris seemed friendly in my memory).

    From Germany, I had an almost opposite memory, of being shouted at in France. I remember in a shop in Berlin, these very nice assistants (old women) said to us after we bought something “we like you, you are attractive young people”. There is some sense of awkward directness of Germany, but I don’t remember anyone being unfriendly.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
    @Dmitry


    I think in France, people in the countryside can be the most disagreeable.
     
    This seems to be known by the urban French themselves.

    The Portuguese are another example of a very Catholic country that is still very introverted. I would say more so than the English, especially the northern Portuguese. The difference between the Portuguese and the Spanish was striking.
    , @songbird
    @Dmitry


    Maybe their Southern style of extraversion, is related the history of Catholicism?
     
    This is an interesting theory. Some say that Protestants were the original SJWs. Maybe that would cause people to clam up before strangers.

    But I have been in Northern Germany before, and the drinking culture seemed very lax compared to America. For instance, kids could drink at their school at night. The police would even see them and not care. In America, this would be like profaning a church. The police hunt kids down in the woods here.

    said to us after we bought something “we like you, you are attractive young people”
     
    Very curious. Prototypically, un-German, I believe? In America, you will often hear strangers give you compliments, but I believe Germans consider this behavior to be bizarre. (Or at least in my conception of them, which may or may not be accurate)

    My impression is that in Paris it’s perhaps slightly more friendly, or they are a little less rude to foreigners
     
    I've never been to Paris, but in America, there's a stereotype that Parisians are very rude to Americans. I believe there is a scene to that effect in National Lampoon's European Vacation (1985).

    Replies: @Dmitry

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    @Dmitry

    Uriah had some curious speculations about the Irish in his various threads: https://twitter.com/crimkadid/status/1278677731635494913

  253. @AltanBakshi
    @Bashibuzuk

    First being irritated is not same as being angry, second Dhammapada is not part of our canon, its a Theravada book.

    But yes its quite good book and I should read it again, and all its advice is good and beneficial. Thank you friend!

    Replies: @Bashibuzuk, @haarunbeg

    ‘Bashibuzuk’ is one of AaronBs sockpuppets. Look at his posting history. Almost nothing. Plus hes the only one who ever talks about your ‘anger issues.’ Aaron has a number of duplicate accounts. ‘American Citizen 2.0’ is one. Easy to tell by tech ways too.

  254. The Pro-Russian party in Ukraine isn’t far off being the most popular. But that doesn’t mean too much. It gets about 20% in polls while Zelensky’s party gets 25% (down from about 50% a year ago).

  255. I was watching a walking video in Tokyo – noticed still almost all people outdoor mask wearing. Probably outdoor mask wearing is irrelevant to preventing the spread of virus (as most spread is occurring indoors), but it implies a high compliance with hygiene measures indoors as well.

    Coronavirus cases are rising now in Japan, but government in Japan could never enforce lockdown, and despite lack of lockdown at least the high compliance of the population has probably helped to avoid the average European intensity of the pandemic there.

  256. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Mr. Hack

    You nevertheless have to admit the USSR achieved a lot under Communism, including gaining a lot of prestige.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack

    Whatever benefits that you’re thinking about were not worth the expenditures of millions of lives. Besides, these same benefits were achieved earlier in countries of Western Europe, showing that communism on the whole was a menacing system that had nothing to offer the world that couldn’t be achieved without it.

  257. @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    Many of my relatives died in Soviet camps or during revolution, still I dont whine about it like a ***.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack

    It’s not my fault that you’ve developed a blind spot in your head for communism that was developed for decades by government sponsored incessant propaganda. I was fortunate to have not been brought up in such a system and was able to make up m own mind about the merits of communism in an environment less amenable to such brainwashing.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    I didnt grew up in Soviet Union or Russia, though I visited the place in 1991 little before the fall, and as you probably remember, I have lived for over 8 years in Russia, actually if I add all my travels and visits to relatives, I have probably spend something like a one decade of my life in Russia.

    Its strange that you have such memory loss, because I have already written about this topic before? The school system that I did go through is thought to be much better than Americas, much, much better.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  258. @songbird
    @Dmitry

    My main theory to explain the English vs. Irish stereotype would be industrialization.

    The Irish (natives) were mainly subsistence farmers until recently, so everyone was pretty equal, except for the land-owning class which were seen as being alien. For countless decades, Ireland was a country of emigration because the economy was pretty undeveloped. Even the people in Dublin now, a lot of them are children or grandchildren of farmers.

    In contrast, the Industrial Revolution basically started in England or Wales. It created a lot of division of labor, class, and wealth stratification, perhaps adding to the earlier aristocratic distinctions. I think the lower classes had the ambition to be like the aristocrats - to gain relative status. And, of course, I think multiculturalism, which has been in place for longer in England, has damaged social trust more than in Ireland, where it is a very recent phenomenon.

    Germany was another country to industrialize early, and I think they had the largest aristocratic class.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Coconuts

    I get the impression that the English reserve is somehow connected with Protestant ideas about sobriety of conduct and dress. Some other Northern European Protestant countries seem to be similar in being undemonstrative and relatively formal, the lowland Scots, Dutch, North Germans, Danish.

    On the other hand Catholicism was connected with drinking, carousing, suspiciously sensuous and colourful religious ceremonies/superstitions and rural or peasant life. It is still perceptible that in rural areas of Northern England people are often more extrovert than in urban areas. Something notable about the culture of the British working class in industrial areas is that it can be quite extroverted and, so my wife says, degenerate, especially when drinking is involved.

    Nowadays though, as heavy industry has disappeared and shared religion/social activities have died out everyone seems to be becoming in general more introverted, even the bad or outrageous behaviour when drunk seems to be diminishing.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Coconuts


    Some other Northern European Protestant countries seem to be similar in being undemonstrative and relatively formal
     
    I've heard this Protestant vs. Catholic distinction before. But putting aside the case of Ireland, I wonder how much of it simply Northern and Southern Europeans meeting in America and being confounded on religious grounds. Curiously, at one time, some used to think that the Irish were more closely related to Southern Europeans.

    It is still perceptible that in rural areas of Northern England people are often more extrovert than in urban areas.
     
    According to my theory, this is because the most status-seeking ones left to go to London. Perhaps, it is also linked to intelligence, and people closer to the mean are less autistic? (And the smartest left for London.)

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @Coconuts

  259. @Dmitry
    @songbird


    English vs. Irish stereotype would be industrialization.
     
    Irish almost seem more like Southern Europeans in their personality though. Maybe their Southern style of extraversion, is related the history of Catholicism? (Although equally Catholics Poles on average seem much more socially awkward).

    England, has damaged social trust
     
    In England, there is very high social trust in the bourgeois areas where the population seems the most introverted and quiet. The elite areas of England, are a kind of utopia of introverted nerdy people, who display their vast book collections from the windows of the front rooms of their house. And where the streets go almost silent after 8pm.

    Proletarian areas might be the more noisy and extroverted culture for England.


    impressions of England and France are dominated by their biggest cities, London and Paris. These would be the centers of wealth, status-seeking, and social exclusion.
     
    I think in France, people in the countryside can be the most disagreeable. I remember (my family) were being shouted at by old French women we rented a house from, once when we visited the French countryside. Also I remember visiting cathedral in the provincial France, and people shouting at us for talking.

    My impression is that in Paris it's perhaps slightly more friendly, or they are a little less rude to foreigners (also there are so many Arabs in Paris - those Arab hotel staff of Paris seemed friendly in my memory).

    From Germany, I had an almost opposite memory, of being shouted at in France. I remember in a shop in Berlin, these very nice assistants (old women) said to us after we bought something "we like you, you are attractive young people". There is some sense of awkward directness of Germany, but I don't remember anyone being unfriendly.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @songbird, @Anatoly Karlin

    I think in France, people in the countryside can be the most disagreeable.

    This seems to be known by the urban French themselves.

    The Portuguese are another example of a very Catholic country that is still very introverted. I would say more so than the English, especially the northern Portuguese. The difference between the Portuguese and the Spanish was striking.

  260. @Dmitry
    @songbird


    English vs. Irish stereotype would be industrialization.
     
    Irish almost seem more like Southern Europeans in their personality though. Maybe their Southern style of extraversion, is related the history of Catholicism? (Although equally Catholics Poles on average seem much more socially awkward).

    England, has damaged social trust
     
    In England, there is very high social trust in the bourgeois areas where the population seems the most introverted and quiet. The elite areas of England, are a kind of utopia of introverted nerdy people, who display their vast book collections from the windows of the front rooms of their house. And where the streets go almost silent after 8pm.

    Proletarian areas might be the more noisy and extroverted culture for England.


    impressions of England and France are dominated by their biggest cities, London and Paris. These would be the centers of wealth, status-seeking, and social exclusion.
     
    I think in France, people in the countryside can be the most disagreeable. I remember (my family) were being shouted at by old French women we rented a house from, once when we visited the French countryside. Also I remember visiting cathedral in the provincial France, and people shouting at us for talking.

    My impression is that in Paris it's perhaps slightly more friendly, or they are a little less rude to foreigners (also there are so many Arabs in Paris - those Arab hotel staff of Paris seemed friendly in my memory).

    From Germany, I had an almost opposite memory, of being shouted at in France. I remember in a shop in Berlin, these very nice assistants (old women) said to us after we bought something "we like you, you are attractive young people". There is some sense of awkward directness of Germany, but I don't remember anyone being unfriendly.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @songbird, @Anatoly Karlin

    Maybe their Southern style of extraversion, is related the history of Catholicism?

    This is an interesting theory. Some say that Protestants were the original SJWs. Maybe that would cause people to clam up before strangers.

    But I have been in Northern Germany before, and the drinking culture seemed very lax compared to America. For instance, kids could drink at their school at night. The police would even see them and not care. In America, this would be like profaning a church. The police hunt kids down in the woods here.

    said to us after we bought something “we like you, you are attractive young people”

    Very curious. Prototypically, un-German, I believe? In America, you will often hear strangers give you compliments, but I believe Germans consider this behavior to be bizarre. (Or at least in my conception of them, which may or may not be accurate)

    My impression is that in Paris it’s perhaps slightly more friendly, or they are a little less rude to foreigners

    I’ve never been to Paris, but in America, there’s a stereotype that Parisians are very rude to Americans. I believe there is a scene to that effect in National Lampoon’s European Vacation (1985).

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @songbird


    kids could drink at their school at night.

     

    Lol and we have previous discussions with AP about this American attitude on alcohol.

    Paris, but in America, there’s a stereotype that Parisians are very rude to Americans.
     
    Perhaps more in the 1980s? Nowadays, surely a lot of people which tourists will interact with in Paris (i.e. hotel staff), are Arabs, Africans or Poles. And I feel like such hotel workers have a culture of trying to be friendly to tourists - at least they seem to be somewhat aware we tourists are the goose that lays the golden eggs for the hospitality industry.

    Service workers in Paris have nowadays a high proportion of Arabs. When there was a terrorist attack in Paris November 2015, I was looking on the map, and trying to remember the area of Paris where the attacks were. I realize I know these areas of Paris which were attacked, quite well from staying in it during vacation, and at the time I thought such areas of Paris have a lot of Arabs. So even those quite central areas of Paris which terrorists were attacking, will be quite Arabian in terms of the workers there.

  261. @Coconuts
    @songbird

    I get the impression that the English reserve is somehow connected with Protestant ideas about sobriety of conduct and dress. Some other Northern European Protestant countries seem to be similar in being undemonstrative and relatively formal, the lowland Scots, Dutch, North Germans, Danish.

    On the other hand Catholicism was connected with drinking, carousing, suspiciously sensuous and colourful religious ceremonies/superstitions and rural or peasant life. It is still perceptible that in rural areas of Northern England people are often more extrovert than in urban areas. Something notable about the culture of the British working class in industrial areas is that it can be quite extroverted and, so my wife says, degenerate, especially when drinking is involved.

    Nowadays though, as heavy industry has disappeared and shared religion/social activities have died out everyone seems to be becoming in general more introverted, even the bad or outrageous behaviour when drunk seems to be diminishing.

    Replies: @songbird

    Some other Northern European Protestant countries seem to be similar in being undemonstrative and relatively formal

    I’ve heard this Protestant vs. Catholic distinction before. But putting aside the case of Ireland, I wonder how much of it simply Northern and Southern Europeans meeting in America and being confounded on religious grounds. Curiously, at one time, some used to think that the Irish were more closely related to Southern Europeans.

    It is still perceptible that in rural areas of Northern England people are often more extrovert than in urban areas.

    According to my theory, this is because the most status-seeking ones left to go to London. Perhaps, it is also linked to intelligence, and people closer to the mean are less autistic? (And the smartest left for London.)

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @songbird


    According to my theory, this is because the most status-seeking ones left to go to London. Perhaps, it is also linked to intelligence, and people closer to the mean are less autistic? (And the smartest left for London.)
     
    So intelligent rural Northerners only go to work in London, and not Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield, Newcastle, Liverpool, and the other large Northern towns and cities? The reality is the North of England is probably less rural than the South overall, it is heavily urbanised.

    You make it sound like London is the only city in England, which sounds like more clueless foreign stereotyping to me, that England is just London and nothing else. Maybe it's the only one you've heard of.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @Coconuts
    @songbird


    I’ve heard this Protestant vs. Catholic distinction before. But putting aside the case of Ireland, I wonder how much of it simply Northern and Southern Europeans meeting in America and being confounded on religious grounds. Curiously, at one time, some used to think that the Irish were more closely related to Southern Europeans.
     
    It could be, it would be useful to know about the differences other Northern Europeans perceive between Catholics and Protestants, in Germany/Austria and in the Netherlands/Belgium in this respect.

    I've always seen a connection between the Irish and the Southern Europeans myself, it seems to me it's related to the influence of Catholicism, from the time when Catholicism was a much bigger feature of people's lives and the Irish Catholic Church was naturally orientated to influences from France, Italy, Spain. (Also these countries were where many of the Irish Catholic nobles had gone as far as I remember). Then there is the much greater weight of the rural and agricultural side of things, which was also typical of Southern Europe.

    There is an Irish guy who has been living in Belarus for some years (I think he is the only one), he has some interesting ideas about similarities between Ireland and Belarus; it wouldn't surprise me if they were strongest in the Catholic part of Northern Western Belarus.
  262. @German_reader
    @melanf


    There are eyewitness accounts that some of the civilians killed were killed from a long distance.
     
    That's certainly possible in some cases. The main incident however seems to have been the deliberate shooting (from a short distance) of about a dozen civilians who had hidden in a provisory bunker. A woman called Gerda Meczulat apparently survived this and wrote about it after WW2 (her testimony seems to be accepted by Bernhard Fisch who researched the Nemmersdorf issue in the 1990s and demolished many of the prior myths). So it's about as certain as possible given the circumstances that some deliberate killings of civilians happened, even if the exact circumstances will remain unknown.
    More generally there can be little doubt imo that Red Army units committed many war crimes in the first few months of 1945, until steps were taken to establish stricter discipline. Yes, some of it was undoubtedly exaggerated by Nazi and later Cold War propaganda. And it would be wrong to denigrate the entire Red Army based on that, or to forget that Germany had invaded the Soviet Union and that German forces had committed many atrocities there, which was the background to the events of early 1945. But the "revisionist" stance currently promoted by Russia that nothing at all happened in 1945 is just not credible imo.

    The bottom line is that propagandists controlled from Washington falsified history
     
    I very much doubt that there was a coordinated American programme to that end (and how would you know it, if there had been?). The exaggerations in post-war West Germany are probably more to be traced back to unreconstructed Nazis and organizations of expellees from Germany's lost Eastern territories. No offense, but this "The Americans manufactured it all" sounds like nothing more than Soviet Cold war propaganda to me.

    Replies: @Shortsword, @melanf

    I very much doubt that there was a coordinated American programme to that end (and how would you know it, if there had been?).

    And what is there to doubt? For example Karl Potrek without a doubt invented his testimony (and it is elementary to verify). if Karl Potrek had made up the same story about american troops, he would have been instantly exposed, and the population of germany would never have known the story he told. But since Potrek’s story served the purposes of propaganda well, it formed the basis of the English-language (and probably german-language) history of Nemmersdorf “for the masses”. if not for the go-ahead from washington, this story would exist on a par with the” jewish conspiracy ” somewhere in the marginal segments of the noosphere

  263. @Tor597
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Not only are Indians physically the weakest, but they are also the least athletic people on the planet overall.

    India only has 9 gold medals and only 1 since the 1980 Olympics.

    Eight of those medals are in field hockey which were won a long time ago when they were probably the only ones playing the sport and 1 gold medal was in shooting.

    Replies: @songbird, @Thulean Friend

    Not only are Indians physically the weakest, but they are also the least athletic people on the planet overall.

    India end Cologne Boxing World Cup campaign with 9 medals including 3 gold

    • Replies: @Tor597
    @Thulean Friend

    Yup, 2 out of 3 gold medals were women boxers lol.

    That alludes to the chart showing Indian women near as strong as Indian men.

    And let's not pretend that the Boxing World Cup is anything like the Olympics.

  264. @songbird
    @Thulean Friend


    This gels with my personal experiences. One thing I never understood is why the Irish are so gregarious, compared to the dour British.
     
    I can think of a lot of possible explanations.

    In the case of Finland, it seems to at least partly be about climate. Well, Ireland has a milder climate than England due to the Gulf Stream. There's a difference between English oak and Irish oak.

    Also, Irish culture is more egalitarian than in England. The native Irish gentry were practically completely destroyed - at one point, only 3% of Irish land was owned by Catholics. Under the penal laws, natives were banned from trades, so practically everyone was a tenant farmer or a laborer. If you owned practically anything, like a boat, it could be seized by the landlord, if you were in arrears. The schools were called "hedge schools" - quite a different conception than ivory towers. And before that - even though it had an aristocratic elite - clan society is still probably more egalitarian.

    Also, the Irish language is arguably more loquacious than English. It still effects patterns of speech, even though it is not spoken, by many anymore - people are still offended by short answers. For example, traditionally, it is not possible to give a simple "no" reply.

    Of course, I think the main explanation is that it was a fairly homogeneous, traditional and rural society, until recently. Very few cities. Until recently, not really much that would be considered suburbs. People used to have big families, which helped train people to talk. And going to church helped unite communities - Ireland was one of the last religious holdouts in Western Europe - but no more.

    I don't think the friendliness will survive the invasion. I don't think it can.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @EldnahYm

    Sweden has traditionally been quite egalitarian, too. We were among the earliest societies to have given formal representation to farmers and peasants through fyrståndsriksdagen. The first three populations – priests, nobles and burghers – were not any different but the fourth – farmers – was pretty revolutionary for its time.

    In 1866, most formal noble privileges were abolished. Literacy was promoted to the less advantaged sections of society early on.

    Yet all this egalitarianism didn’t make Swedes particularly gregarious or sociable. So, I am somewhat skeptical about your egalitarian hypothesis. Swedes also used to have big families until recently, yet it did not seem to make much difference there either.

    I think your comments about climate is more plausible. If you look at the latitude of US cities over Europe, you realise how much further north most of Europe is (and why it gets far less sunshine). Warmer, sunnier climate affects our hormonal levels. There are even “light therapy” studios in Scandinavia to combat winter depression. But while climate/geology may play one role, there should probably be more factors at work.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Thulean Friend

    Sunlight is an interesting theory. I could see how it might be a factor in winter, and maybe some of that would carry over, to a year-round culture. Though, on the other hand, Ireland is quite a cloudy country. And wouldn't redheads absorb more of this light? And be more extroverted? Personally, I've never noticed, if they are.

    I find it curious that you would characterize Sweden as introverted. I have brought it up before in this thread, the ethnic Swedes in Finland are considered very extroverted. Maybe, they are not represenatative? Isn't there a subgroup of Finns in Finland who were pioneers who expanded into uninhabited or thinly populated territory, and are known for being more extroverted?

    Perhaps, America would have an effect from being descended from immigrants and pioneers.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

  265. @Bashibuzuk
    @AltanBakshi

    You clearly would benefit from practicing detachment.

    Your anger is getting the better of you.



    221. One should give up anger, renounce pride, and overcome all fetters. Suffering never befalls him who clings not to mind and body and is detached.

    222. He who checks rising anger as a charioteer checks a rolling chariot, him I call a true charioteer. Others only hold the reins.

    223. Overcome the angry by non-anger; overcome the wicked by goodness; overcome the miser by generosity; overcome the liar by truth.

    224. Speak the truth; yield not to anger; when asked, give even if you only have a little. By these three means can one reach the presence of the gods.

    225. Those sages who are inoffensive and ever restrained in body, go to the Deathless State, where, having gone, they grieve no more.

    226. Those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, and are ever intent upon Nibbana -- their defilements fade away
     
    http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/buddhism/dp17.htm

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Thulean Friend

    You clearly would benefit from practicing detachment.

    Your anger is getting the better of you.

    Be kind to Altan. He’s our resident hapa chud, a clearly psychologically troubled individual, who is using Buddhism to cope. But at least he is trying. He could have become the next Elliot Rodger instead. Show some patience and empathy.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Thulean Friend

    Do you have anything substantial to say? Other than being a hypocritical progressive with huge double standards?

    It seems to me that you are always something else that you claim to be and that you dont really have any deeply held values.

    Maybe this illustration illustrates something truly deep about you?
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EhQCXEcXsAE_nDj.jpg

    , @Bashibuzuk
    @Thulean Friend

    I believe you might benefit from reading the following:



    "Abandoning false speech, he abstains from false speech. He speaks the truth, holds to the truth, is firm, reliable, no deceiver of the world. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    "Abandoning divisive speech he abstains from divisive speech. What he has heard here he does not tell there to break those people apart from these people here. What he has heard there he does not tell here to break these people apart from those people there. Thus reconciling those who have broken apart or cementing those who are united, he loves concord, delights in concord, enjoys concord, speaks things that create concord. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    "Abandoning abusive speech, he abstains from abusive speech. He speaks words that are soothing to the ear, that are affectionate, that go to the heart, that are polite, appealing and pleasing to people at large. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    "Abandoning idle chatter, he abstains from idle chatter. He speaks in season, speaks what is factual, what is in accordance with the goal, the Dhamma, and the Vinaya. He speaks words worth treasuring, seasonable, reasonable, circumscribed, connected with the goal. This, too, is part of his virtue.

     

    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.11.0.than.html

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  266. @Tor597
    @A123

    So, when Americans and Australians boycott Chinese 5G that is ok but when China wants to boycott Iron Ore all of a sudden you are concerned about the Chinese consumer?

    You obviously didn't read the Forbes article. China has an undeveloped scrap steel market that once it gets to Japan levels of efficiency will greatly reduce their demand for Iron Ore.

    - Australia, has engaged in cartel like pricing to try and squeeze China into paying more than the commodity is worth.

    - Australia is hostile to China in its own backyard.

    - The African Ore is higher quality than Australia.

    - So it makes perfect sense that China is diversifying their supply of a crucial commodity.

    Australia on the other hand made a really bad decision to piss off their largest customer. There is only another 5 years or so before Iron ore prices collapse. If Australia were smart they wouldn't have shut themselves out of the largest market.

    I see Australia collapsing in a decade.

    Replies: @A123, @dfordoom

    Australia on the other hand made a really bad decision to piss off their largest customer. There is only another 5 years or so before Iron ore prices collapse. If Australia were smart they wouldn’t have shut themselves out of the largest market.

    I see Australia collapsing in a decade.

    I agree. The question is did Australia make this monumentally bad decision or was it made for us in Washington? Or are we so pathetic that we don’t even need to be told what to do – like a well-trained dog do we anticipate our master’s wishes?

    So, when Americans and Australians boycott Chinese 5G that is ok but when China wants to boycott Iron Ore all of a sudden you are concerned about the Chinese consumer?

    Boycotts are bad and evil when bad evil countries do them. Any country that the US doesn’t like is bad and evil.

  267. @Thulean Friend
    @Tor597


    Not only are Indians physically the weakest, but they are also the least athletic people on the planet overall.
     
    India end Cologne Boxing World Cup campaign with 9 medals including 3 gold

    Replies: @Tor597

    Yup, 2 out of 3 gold medals were women boxers lol.

    That alludes to the chart showing Indian women near as strong as Indian men.

    And let’s not pretend that the Boxing World Cup is anything like the Olympics.

  268. @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    It's not my fault that you've developed a blind spot in your head for communism that was developed for decades by government sponsored incessant propaganda. I was fortunate to have not been brought up in such a system and was able to make up m own mind about the merits of communism in an environment less amenable to such brainwashing.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    I didnt grew up in Soviet Union or Russia, though I visited the place in 1991 little before the fall, and as you probably remember, I have lived for over 8 years in Russia, actually if I add all my travels and visits to relatives, I have probably spend something like a one decade of my life in Russia.

    Its strange that you have such memory loss, because I have already written about this topic before? The school system that I did go through is thought to be much better than Americas, much, much better.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    I'm sorry if I made you recount a part of your life and in particular your schooling. You write a lot here and often at great length so perhaps I somehow skipped that part. I'm interested to know what school you attended and why it was so very much better than the ones in America? I assume that you eventually finished a higher school too with an emphasis in some sort of a profession? I have a bachelors degree in history and a Masters degree in Business Administration. What did you do for eight years in Russia?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  269. @Thulean Friend
    @Bashibuzuk


    You clearly would benefit from practicing detachment.

    Your anger is getting the better of you.
     
    Be kind to Altan. He's our resident hapa chud, a clearly psychologically troubled individual, who is using Buddhism to cope. But at least he is trying. He could have become the next Elliot Rodger instead. Show some patience and empathy.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Bashibuzuk

    Do you have anything substantial to say? Other than being a hypocritical progressive with huge double standards?

    It seems to me that you are always something else that you claim to be and that you dont really have any deeply held values.

    Maybe this illustration illustrates something truly deep about you?

  270. @Thulean Friend
    @Dmitry

    This gels with my personal experiences. One thing I never understood is why the Irish are so gregarious, compared to the dour British. The Irish with the Spanish are among my favourite people in Europe. The US' extroversion is extremely obvious for anyone who has ever visited that place. Even in very white settings, the social warmth is night and day compared to similar populations in Europe. Same people yet wildly different social outcomes. Culture is obviously different but what is it about the US specifically that makes it so much extroverted (and frankly, friendlier).

    Replies: @Tor597, @songbird, @Europe Europa

    Are British people really more “dour” than the Irish? Give some examples of what you mean. It seems both have fundamentally identical cultures to me, revolving around the pub and following sports mainly. They’re probably less noticeably different than Catalans and the rest of Spain.

    The idea that British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically like tired old anti-British stereotyping to me, like the bad teeth and bad food nonsense. You probably think Ireland has better food than Britain as well, despite Irish and British food being 99% identical.

    Also, it doesn’t seem plausible to me that the British would be naturally highly introverted when its two main culturally descendants, the US and Australia, are typically thought of as highly extroverted countries.

    • Agree: AltanBakshi, utu
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Europe Europa


    Are British people really more “dour” than the Irish?
     
    Yes. Without doxxing myself, let's just say I have visited Britain a significant number of times for personal reasons, and I've crossed into Ireland on a minority of those trips. There is a distinct difference.

    British humor is widely appreciated in Scandinavia, where the sarcastic and ironic sense of humor (á la Monty Python etc) is a natural hit. I've always been a bit of an outlier in preferring the Irish, who are more jocular and flamboyant. But the flipside of that is that Brits are just more dour and debbie downers.

    The idea that British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically like tired old anti-British stereotyping to me, like the bad teeth and bad food nonsense.
     
    Reminder that these are 10/10 in bongland :)

    https://i.imgur.com/XwPQqqK.jpg

    But seriously speaking, some of those stereotypes are absolutely true (e.g. food). Bad British teeth were also true at one point, because the UK didn't invest in making dental care cheap for much of its proles the way it was in Scandinavia. The UK has always been more of a class-based society than us, with less willingless of its well-off to help the downtrodden. One exemplification of that was bad teeth (though that has changed, stereotypes are hard to kill...).

    Also, it doesn’t seem plausible to me that the British would be naturally highly introverted when its two main culturally descendants, the US and Australia, are typically thought of as highly extroverted countries.
     
    This is an excellent point, and one which I grappled with in my OP. I have never been to Australia myself, but people who did have told me that there is far more extroversion there. Another feather in the cap for the geographic/weather hypothesis? Australia is very sunny and warm, which may lend itself to produce a different social climate?

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Daniel Chieh

    , @Tor597
    @Europe Europa

    Yes, the British are more dour than the Irish. This is obvious to anyone that has been to both countries.

    I think the biggest difference is that the British are driven by elites, they have the British Royal Family for instance, while the Irish people just seem like regular folk.

    Also, the Irish are not hell bent on taking over the world and forcing other countries into multiculturalism like the British are.

    Replies: @Coconuts

    , @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa

    Average people in Ireland seem more extroverted, while in England more introverted.

    It's a difficulty for a climate explanation of extraversion, as Ireland is Northern Europe, yet extroversion of people is more like you would expect in Southern Europe.


    British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically
     
    Extraversion or introversion of nationalities, is neither something "better or worse". But it is a significant difference.

    You don't have to be so paranoid, and think there is antianglosaxonism in all our comments. Besides, that anglophiles are usually more attracted by the majority introverted nerd culture of the English people, rather than the small minority of noisy football hooligans that also live in that island.

  271. @songbird
    @Coconuts


    Some other Northern European Protestant countries seem to be similar in being undemonstrative and relatively formal
     
    I've heard this Protestant vs. Catholic distinction before. But putting aside the case of Ireland, I wonder how much of it simply Northern and Southern Europeans meeting in America and being confounded on religious grounds. Curiously, at one time, some used to think that the Irish were more closely related to Southern Europeans.

    It is still perceptible that in rural areas of Northern England people are often more extrovert than in urban areas.
     
    According to my theory, this is because the most status-seeking ones left to go to London. Perhaps, it is also linked to intelligence, and people closer to the mean are less autistic? (And the smartest left for London.)

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @Coconuts

    According to my theory, this is because the most status-seeking ones left to go to London. Perhaps, it is also linked to intelligence, and people closer to the mean are less autistic? (And the smartest left for London.)

    So intelligent rural Northerners only go to work in London, and not Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield, Newcastle, Liverpool, and the other large Northern towns and cities? The reality is the North of England is probably less rural than the South overall, it is heavily urbanised.

    You make it sound like London is the only city in England, which sounds like more clueless foreign stereotyping to me, that England is just London and nothing else. Maybe it’s the only one you’ve heard of.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Europe Europa


    You make it sound like London is the only city in England, which sounds like more clueless foreign stereotyping to me
     
    London's brain-drain on England proper is a well-understood historical phenomenon. Quite easy to read the biographical info of eminent men, see where they were born and where they moved.

    I prefer smaller cities myself, but I think the time to boost English cities is past, as they are all filled with non-whites.
  272. @songbird
    @Coconuts


    Some other Northern European Protestant countries seem to be similar in being undemonstrative and relatively formal
     
    I've heard this Protestant vs. Catholic distinction before. But putting aside the case of Ireland, I wonder how much of it simply Northern and Southern Europeans meeting in America and being confounded on religious grounds. Curiously, at one time, some used to think that the Irish were more closely related to Southern Europeans.

    It is still perceptible that in rural areas of Northern England people are often more extrovert than in urban areas.
     
    According to my theory, this is because the most status-seeking ones left to go to London. Perhaps, it is also linked to intelligence, and people closer to the mean are less autistic? (And the smartest left for London.)

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @Coconuts

    I’ve heard this Protestant vs. Catholic distinction before. But putting aside the case of Ireland, I wonder how much of it simply Northern and Southern Europeans meeting in America and being confounded on religious grounds. Curiously, at one time, some used to think that the Irish were more closely related to Southern Europeans.

    It could be, it would be useful to know about the differences other Northern Europeans perceive between Catholics and Protestants, in Germany/Austria and in the Netherlands/Belgium in this respect.

    I’ve always seen a connection between the Irish and the Southern Europeans myself, it seems to me it’s related to the influence of Catholicism, from the time when Catholicism was a much bigger feature of people’s lives and the Irish Catholic Church was naturally orientated to influences from France, Italy, Spain. (Also these countries were where many of the Irish Catholic nobles had gone as far as I remember). Then there is the much greater weight of the rural and agricultural side of things, which was also typical of Southern Europe.

    There is an Irish guy who has been living in Belarus for some years (I think he is the only one), he has some interesting ideas about similarities between Ireland and Belarus; it wouldn’t surprise me if they were strongest in the Catholic part of Northern Western Belarus.

  273. @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    I didnt grew up in Soviet Union or Russia, though I visited the place in 1991 little before the fall, and as you probably remember, I have lived for over 8 years in Russia, actually if I add all my travels and visits to relatives, I have probably spend something like a one decade of my life in Russia.

    Its strange that you have such memory loss, because I have already written about this topic before? The school system that I did go through is thought to be much better than Americas, much, much better.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I’m sorry if I made you recount a part of your life and in particular your schooling. You write a lot here and often at great length so perhaps I somehow skipped that part. I’m interested to know what school you attended and why it was so very much better than the ones in America? I assume that you eventually finished a higher school too with an emphasis in some sort of a profession? I have a bachelors degree in history and a Masters degree in Business Administration. What did you do for eight years in Russia?

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack


    I’m interested to know what school you attended and why it was so very much better than the ones in America?
     
    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought?

    Not going to disclose more about my life, especially when we were debating about whose narrative is less biased and sensational in regards of the Soviet Union, or is it now about my schooling? MBA, how inspirational!

    Mr. Hack in a debate it does not matter if one of us is a Nobelist, only thing what matters is how solid and well established our arguments are.

    Your agenda is old and false, an agenda of victimization, a poor Ukraine as an unique victim of Soviet Union, that evil country driven by Great Russian chauvinism. There are couple words that I would like to utter, they are about victimization, but nay, better that Im silent, Ill just say that its not worthy of a man to play a victim, maybe there are people who like such plays, yes America is full of them, but I am not one of them.

    Russians and Ukrainians suffered horribly in the hands of communists, but there were many small peoples that suffered even more, proportionally speaking... like Crimean Tatars, Kalmyks, Russian Koreans and Germans etc...

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell, @AP, @Mr. Hack

  274. @Thulean Friend
    @Bashibuzuk


    You clearly would benefit from practicing detachment.

    Your anger is getting the better of you.
     
    Be kind to Altan. He's our resident hapa chud, a clearly psychologically troubled individual, who is using Buddhism to cope. But at least he is trying. He could have become the next Elliot Rodger instead. Show some patience and empathy.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Bashibuzuk

    I believe you might benefit from reading the following:

    “Abandoning false speech, he abstains from false speech. He speaks the truth, holds to the truth, is firm, reliable, no deceiver of the world. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    “Abandoning divisive speech he abstains from divisive speech. What he has heard here he does not tell there to break those people apart from these people here. What he has heard there he does not tell here to break these people apart from those people there. Thus reconciling those who have broken apart or cementing those who are united, he loves concord, delights in concord, enjoys concord, speaks things that create concord. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    “Abandoning abusive speech, he abstains from abusive speech. He speaks words that are soothing to the ear, that are affectionate, that go to the heart, that are polite, appealing and pleasing to people at large. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    “Abandoning idle chatter, he abstains from idle chatter. He speaks in season, speaks what is factual, what is in accordance with the goal, the Dhamma, and the Vinaya. He speaks words worth treasuring, seasonable, reasonable, circumscribed, connected with the goal. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.11.0.than.html

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Bashibuzuk

    Yes what you post is very good and educational, but I would like to remind you that most Theravada texts are addressed to those who are ordained. There is a special list of monastic rules or Vinaya where it is said what modes of behaviour are prohibited, like idle chatter, abusive speech, how to eat properly, when to eat and so on. Theravada monks have given vows that they will follow Vinaya. Its wonderful if laypersons follow such codes of conduct, but its not like laypersons need to follow them. In Mahayana its even more complicated matter, we think much less literally and abusive speech for us is if someone truly has an inner motivation to harm others by his words etc.... we are much less literalist and strict with the rules and again those rules do not concern laypersons. For us Pratimoksha and Samaya vows are more important than minor Vinaya rules.

    Replies: @Bashibuzuk, @sher singh

  275. Great Britain has the most Anglo IMO team out of the Anglo nation.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    The Romanian team look like the type of guys I use to hang out with in Highschool. 😂😂😂😂



    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ0w75q4qvzhYczHCXqg5xQm_VpyqoViFIawQ&usqp.jpg

    , @Dmitry
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    UK instead of having Jews - has Indians and Chinese in the same niches.

    Indians especially seem to be successful in the UK. For example, in the elite university in United Kingdom - it looks usually like maybe 1/6 of the students are brown people.

    Indians are only 2% of the Kingdom's population, so there is clearly many times overrepresentation of Indian youth in the elite universities of England, relative to their proportion of the country.

    -

    I think Indians and Chinese are going to be the main groups assimilating into a nerdy anglosaxon middle class.

    For example, video of student population in a stereotypical English university. If you add Indians and Chinese together, it is like 1/4 of students. In addition, Indians will be more predominant in the professional courses.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBDucVGdfV8

  276. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    Great Britain has the most Anglo IMO team out of the Anglo nation.

    https://i.ibb.co/w4hDxxQ/84b1b3469aa3295113a4535f0889491b766608bb7d88124ae346abb3ec450a55.jpg

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Dmitry

    The Romanian team look like the type of guys I use to hang out with in Highschool. 😂😂😂😂

    [MORE]

  277. @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    I'm sorry if I made you recount a part of your life and in particular your schooling. You write a lot here and often at great length so perhaps I somehow skipped that part. I'm interested to know what school you attended and why it was so very much better than the ones in America? I assume that you eventually finished a higher school too with an emphasis in some sort of a profession? I have a bachelors degree in history and a Masters degree in Business Administration. What did you do for eight years in Russia?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    I’m interested to know what school you attended and why it was so very much better than the ones in America?

    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought?

    Not going to disclose more about my life, especially when we were debating about whose narrative is less biased and sensational in regards of the Soviet Union, or is it now about my schooling? MBA, how inspirational!

    Mr. Hack in a debate it does not matter if one of us is a Nobelist, only thing what matters is how solid and well established our arguments are.

    Your agenda is old and false, an agenda of victimization, a poor Ukraine as an unique victim of Soviet Union, that evil country driven by Great Russian chauvinism. There are couple words that I would like to utter, they are about victimization, but nay, better that Im silent, Ill just say that its not worthy of a man to play a victim, maybe there are people who like such plays, yes America is full of them, but I am not one of them.

    Russians and Ukrainians suffered horribly in the hands of communists, but there were many small peoples that suffered even more, proportionally speaking… like Crimean Tatars, Kalmyks, Russian Koreans and Germans etc…

    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @AltanBakshi

    I think the world of that era was a world of suffering, through starvation and disease. I there were certainly famines in Russia before the Bolsheviks came to power, just like there were famines in Africa and India before the British and other Europeans came.

    The fact remains that under Communism (after the Trotskyists had been purged), Russia and other Republics took on the might of the American Empire for decades.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @AP, @EldnahYm

    , @AP
    @AltanBakshi


    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought
     
    Based on PISA scores, Americans of European descent outperform kids from most European countries including Nordic ones, other than Finland, Estonia, Netherlands, Poland and Switzerland. The overall American average is worse than mist of Europe simply because of all the Americans not of European descent:

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2013/12/overall-pisa-rankings-include-america.html?m=1

    As for the rest, acknowledging rather than ignoring evils done to one’s people is not necessarily the same as celebrating victimhood, and is better than ignoring such crimes as is often done in America where criminals’ pictures are often censored in the media in order to minimize politically inconvenient facts.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi


    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought?

    Not going to disclose more about my life, especially when we were debating about whose narrative is less biased and sensational in regards of the Soviet Union, or is it now about my schooling? MBA, how inspirational!

    Mr. Hack in a debate it does not matter if one of us is a Nobelist, only thing what matters is how solid and well established our arguments are.
     

    You certainly can be, as they say it in the Midwest, "a strange kettle of fish", Altan. Your the one who first brought up the topics of your schooling, and stating that it was much better than anything in the US, and that you've spent a considerable amount of time living in Russia. If you don't want to discuss these matters, then please don't bring them up! I'm not an interrogator of any sort, I only was genuinely interested in these items that you brought up during our discussion.

    I'm glad to see that my own educational background inspires you, although to be quite frank, I don't understand how it might inspire you? :-)


    Your agenda is old and false, an agenda of victimization, a poor Ukraine as an unique victim of Soviet Union, that evil country driven by Great Russian chauvinism. There are couple words that I would like to utter, they are about victimization, but nay, better that Im silent, Ill just say that its not worthy of a man to play a victim, maybe there are people who like such plays, yes America is full of them, but I am not one of them.
     
    I never thought of myself as a victim before, but after thinking about it some more and thanks to you, I now think that I am. There's absolutely nothing wrong with remembering historical events that were inspired by lunatics and that resulted in the needless deaths of millions of people. I'm glad to see that many historians and even filmmakers are interested in these events too and are making them more and more accessible to the general public.
  278. @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack


    I’m interested to know what school you attended and why it was so very much better than the ones in America?
     
    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought?

    Not going to disclose more about my life, especially when we were debating about whose narrative is less biased and sensational in regards of the Soviet Union, or is it now about my schooling? MBA, how inspirational!

    Mr. Hack in a debate it does not matter if one of us is a Nobelist, only thing what matters is how solid and well established our arguments are.

    Your agenda is old and false, an agenda of victimization, a poor Ukraine as an unique victim of Soviet Union, that evil country driven by Great Russian chauvinism. There are couple words that I would like to utter, they are about victimization, but nay, better that Im silent, Ill just say that its not worthy of a man to play a victim, maybe there are people who like such plays, yes America is full of them, but I am not one of them.

    Russians and Ukrainians suffered horribly in the hands of communists, but there were many small peoples that suffered even more, proportionally speaking... like Crimean Tatars, Kalmyks, Russian Koreans and Germans etc...

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell, @AP, @Mr. Hack

    I think the world of that era was a world of suffering, through starvation and disease. I there were certainly famines in Russia before the Bolsheviks came to power, just like there were famines in Africa and India before the British and other Europeans came.

    The fact remains that under Communism (after the Trotskyists had been purged), Russia and other Republics took on the might of the American Empire for decades.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    https://twitter.com/akarlin88/status/1016243977278943232

    , @AP
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell


    I there were certainly famines in Russia before the Bolsheviks came to power
     
    Not close to that scale, and in times when technology was far more backward. Worst recent famine under tsars had claimed an upper estimate of 500,000 lives. The worst of several 20th century (!) Soviet famines killed about 6-7million people. The overall demographic impact of Bolshevism is that there are several tens of millions fewer eastern Slavs in the world than there had been if they hadn’t gotten into power.

    The fact remains that under Communism (after the Trotskyists had been purged), Russia and other Republics took on the might of the American Empire for decades.
     
    They played second fiddle for a few decades, barely keeping up militarily while not keeping up on all other measures, before collapsing into poverty and ruin. This, for what was supposed to be the largest and most populated country on Earth blessed with best natural resources and a mostly European population.

    Basically the main impact of Bolshevism was to limit Russia’s rise and ultimately to remove Russia from contention as a global superpower. Lenin and his heirs were the best thing the Anglo world could have asked for. As a bonus, Lenin-Stalin student Mao managed to hold China back for awhile too.

    , @EldnahYm
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell


    The fact remains that under Communism (after the Trotskyists had been purged), Russia and other Republics took on the might of the American Empire for decades.
     
    They didn't really take on the "might" of the American Empire, considering neither side really fought each other much.

    The Cold War was a total drain on Russia which they got nothing out of. The biggest beneficiaries of the Cold War were China and Japan. Taking on the U.S. is evidence of Soviet foolishness more than anything.

    Ideological conflicts are for suckers. Both sides tend to destroy themselves in such set-ups.
  279. @Bashibuzuk
    @Thulean Friend

    I believe you might benefit from reading the following:



    "Abandoning false speech, he abstains from false speech. He speaks the truth, holds to the truth, is firm, reliable, no deceiver of the world. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    "Abandoning divisive speech he abstains from divisive speech. What he has heard here he does not tell there to break those people apart from these people here. What he has heard there he does not tell here to break these people apart from those people there. Thus reconciling those who have broken apart or cementing those who are united, he loves concord, delights in concord, enjoys concord, speaks things that create concord. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    "Abandoning abusive speech, he abstains from abusive speech. He speaks words that are soothing to the ear, that are affectionate, that go to the heart, that are polite, appealing and pleasing to people at large. This, too, is part of his virtue.

    "Abandoning idle chatter, he abstains from idle chatter. He speaks in season, speaks what is factual, what is in accordance with the goal, the Dhamma, and the Vinaya. He speaks words worth treasuring, seasonable, reasonable, circumscribed, connected with the goal. This, too, is part of his virtue.

     

    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.11.0.than.html

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Yes what you post is very good and educational, but I would like to remind you that most Theravada texts are addressed to those who are ordained. There is a special list of monastic rules or Vinaya where it is said what modes of behaviour are prohibited, like idle chatter, abusive speech, how to eat properly, when to eat and so on. Theravada monks have given vows that they will follow Vinaya. Its wonderful if laypersons follow such codes of conduct, but its not like laypersons need to follow them. In Mahayana its even more complicated matter, we think much less literally and abusive speech for us is if someone truly has an inner motivation to harm others by his words etc…. we are much less literalist and strict with the rules and again those rules do not concern laypersons. For us Pratimoksha and Samaya vows are more important than minor Vinaya rules.

    • Replies: @Bashibuzuk
    @AltanBakshi

    Please see my comment # 141 and your own reply about it.


    Abandoning idle chatter, he abstains from idle chatter. He speaks in season, speaks what is factual, what is in accordance with the goal, the Dhamma, and the Vinaya. He speaks words worth treasuring, seasonable, reasonable, circumscribed, connected with the goal. This, too, is part of his virtue.
     
    , @sher singh
    @AltanBakshi

    https://twitter.com/BhurianWale/status/1163220235907825664?s=20

    Hmm, interesting on the different rules though.

    In Sikhi like no smoking/cutting hair is universal thing (hair on head for women).
    Idk, I like the map. :shrug:

    Up to Gwalior in West UP was other Chiefs.

  280. From the 1937 cultural exhibit 2000 Jahre Deutscher Kultur (2000 Year or German Culture)

    [MORE]


    “Ay yo hol’ up, you tellin’ me we wuz vikangz and ancient Greeks n shieet?”

  281. @Europe Europa
    @songbird


    According to my theory, this is because the most status-seeking ones left to go to London. Perhaps, it is also linked to intelligence, and people closer to the mean are less autistic? (And the smartest left for London.)
     
    So intelligent rural Northerners only go to work in London, and not Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield, Newcastle, Liverpool, and the other large Northern towns and cities? The reality is the North of England is probably less rural than the South overall, it is heavily urbanised.

    You make it sound like London is the only city in England, which sounds like more clueless foreign stereotyping to me, that England is just London and nothing else. Maybe it's the only one you've heard of.

    Replies: @songbird

    You make it sound like London is the only city in England, which sounds like more clueless foreign stereotyping to me

    London’s brain-drain on England proper is a well-understood historical phenomenon. Quite easy to read the biographical info of eminent men, see where they were born and where they moved.

    I prefer smaller cities myself, but I think the time to boost English cities is past, as they are all filled with non-whites.

  282. @AltanBakshi
    @Bashibuzuk

    Yes what you post is very good and educational, but I would like to remind you that most Theravada texts are addressed to those who are ordained. There is a special list of monastic rules or Vinaya where it is said what modes of behaviour are prohibited, like idle chatter, abusive speech, how to eat properly, when to eat and so on. Theravada monks have given vows that they will follow Vinaya. Its wonderful if laypersons follow such codes of conduct, but its not like laypersons need to follow them. In Mahayana its even more complicated matter, we think much less literally and abusive speech for us is if someone truly has an inner motivation to harm others by his words etc.... we are much less literalist and strict with the rules and again those rules do not concern laypersons. For us Pratimoksha and Samaya vows are more important than minor Vinaya rules.

    Replies: @Bashibuzuk, @sher singh

    Please see my comment # 141 and your own reply about it.

    [MORE]

    Abandoning idle chatter, he abstains from idle chatter. He speaks in season, speaks what is factual, what is in accordance with the goal, the Dhamma, and the Vinaya. He speaks words worth treasuring, seasonable, reasonable, circumscribed, connected with the goal. This, too, is part of his virtue.

  283. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird

    Sweden has traditionally been quite egalitarian, too. We were among the earliest societies to have given formal representation to farmers and peasants through fyrståndsriksdagen. The first three populations - priests, nobles and burghers - were not any different but the fourth - farmers - was pretty revolutionary for its time.

    In 1866, most formal noble privileges were abolished. Literacy was promoted to the less advantaged sections of society early on.

    Yet all this egalitarianism didn't make Swedes particularly gregarious or sociable. So, I am somewhat skeptical about your egalitarian hypothesis. Swedes also used to have big families until recently, yet it did not seem to make much difference there either.

    I think your comments about climate is more plausible. If you look at the latitude of US cities over Europe, you realise how much further north most of Europe is (and why it gets far less sunshine). Warmer, sunnier climate affects our hormonal levels. There are even "light therapy" studios in Scandinavia to combat winter depression. But while climate/geology may play one role, there should probably be more factors at work.

    Replies: @songbird

    Sunlight is an interesting theory. I could see how it might be a factor in winter, and maybe some of that would carry over, to a year-round culture. Though, on the other hand, Ireland is quite a cloudy country. And wouldn’t redheads absorb more of this light? And be more extroverted? Personally, I’ve never noticed, if they are.

    I find it curious that you would characterize Sweden as introverted. I have brought it up before in this thread, the ethnic Swedes in Finland are considered very extroverted. Maybe, they are not represenatative? Isn’t there a subgroup of Finns in Finland who were pioneers who expanded into uninhabited or thinly populated territory, and are known for being more extroverted?

    Perhaps, America would have an effect from being descended from immigrants and pioneers.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @songbird


    I have brought it up before in this thread, the ethnic Swedes in Finland are considered very extroverted.
     
    I have met precisely one finnlandssvensk, at university to be exact, and he didn't strike me as particularly extroverted or socialable. Though n=1 and all that.

    Though, on the other hand, Ireland is quite a cloudy country. And wouldn’t redheads absorb more of this light?
     
    Yeah, I think it has more to do with the temperate climate. Then again, London is fairly mild too. Hence the minor mystery of how too fairly similar countries geographically speaking can produce quite different social outcomes. It is easier to explain countries like the US or Australia vis-a-vis Britain. Harder to do Ireland vs England.

    Isn’t there a subgroup of Finns in Finland who were pioneers who expanded into uninhabited or thinly populated territory, and are known for being more extroverted?
     
    I know quite little about Finland so I won't hazard a guess. I can speak about the Swedish situation, though.

    There is a substantial minority of Finns living in Sweden, I grew up with some of them. Generally speaking, I would categorise them as slightly more extroverted than ethnic Swedes, but this goes against popular stereotype of Finns being colder & more introverted than Swedes.

    This circle can be squared by looking at the psychological profile of those who leave their countries. They tend to be more adventurous and entrepreneurial, ceteris paribus, than the baseline population from hence they came (and presumably more extroverted).

    Replies: @Europe Europa

  284. @Europe Europa
    @Thulean Friend

    Are British people really more "dour" than the Irish? Give some examples of what you mean. It seems both have fundamentally identical cultures to me, revolving around the pub and following sports mainly. They're probably less noticeably different than Catalans and the rest of Spain.

    The idea that British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically like tired old anti-British stereotyping to me, like the bad teeth and bad food nonsense. You probably think Ireland has better food than Britain as well, despite Irish and British food being 99% identical.

    Also, it doesn't seem plausible to me that the British would be naturally highly introverted when its two main culturally descendants, the US and Australia, are typically thought of as highly extroverted countries.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Tor597, @Dmitry

    Are British people really more “dour” than the Irish?

    Yes. Without doxxing myself, let’s just say I have visited Britain a significant number of times for personal reasons, and I’ve crossed into Ireland on a minority of those trips. There is a distinct difference.

    British humor is widely appreciated in Scandinavia, where the sarcastic and ironic sense of humor (á la Monty Python etc) is a natural hit. I’ve always been a bit of an outlier in preferring the Irish, who are more jocular and flamboyant. But the flipside of that is that Brits are just more dour and debbie downers.

    The idea that British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically like tired old anti-British stereotyping to me, like the bad teeth and bad food nonsense.

    Reminder that these are 10/10 in bongland 🙂

    But seriously speaking, some of those stereotypes are absolutely true (e.g. food). Bad British teeth were also true at one point, because the UK didn’t invest in making dental care cheap for much of its proles the way it was in Scandinavia. The UK has always been more of a class-based society than us, with less willingless of its well-off to help the downtrodden. One exemplification of that was bad teeth (though that has changed, stereotypes are hard to kill…).

    Also, it doesn’t seem plausible to me that the British would be naturally highly introverted when its two main culturally descendants, the US and Australia, are typically thought of as highly extroverted countries.

    This is an excellent point, and one which I grappled with in my OP. I have never been to Australia myself, but people who did have told me that there is far more extroversion there. Another feather in the cap for the geographic/weather hypothesis? Australia is very sunny and warm, which may lend itself to produce a different social climate?

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @Thulean Friend


    But the flipside of that is that Brits are just more dour and debbie downers.
     
    There are also significant regional variations. Dour and debbie downers is more of a northern thing.

    Replies: @A123

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @Thulean Friend

    To be fair, they have adopted the appropriate padding to protect against the chill with minimal clothing. This is a necessary adaptation until you develop antifreeze in your blood, like Russians.

  285. @Gerard.Gerard
    @Dmitry

    Sweden is surprising to see listed as introvert. Swedes en masse speak excellent English and appear to be a part of every globohomo cause/initiative - both features seem to me typical of extrovert people. I would say that equal or maybe even more Swedes are able and happy to speak in English.... than Finns are to speaking Russian to us (which is a large number). I know that alot of Scandinavians are very weird, but it's unfair to group Swedes with the considerably more introvert Finns..... and particularly with the very introvert, disdainful and hierarchical Japanese society, which is if course more monoculture than Swedes are for the last 30 years.

    Spain, US, Brazil, Ireland I, and I'm sure many others can confirm, are definitely highly extrovert societies. As are Australia, South Africa - which goes with my theory that in Anglo empire they have this extrovert/introvert neighbour dynamic with Australia /NZ, South Africa/Zimbabwe ( well, the white section)..... and of course US/Canada.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Thulean Friend

    Sweden is surprising to see listed as introvert. Swedes en masse speak excellent English and appear to be a part of every globohomo cause/initiative – both features seem to me typical of extrovert people

    This is simply Sweden being extremely quick to take up new trends. In the 1930s, we were leading ‘race science’ with research centers such as Rasbiologiska institutet at Uppsala University.

    Fredrik Lindström has spoken about this a lot in his TV special Världens Modernaste Land. You can probably figure out what it means without knowing the language. Swedes are simply obsessed with new trends, socially or technologically, and are highly conformist. That meant out-Nazi the Nazis in the 1920s and 30s and now it means out-liberal the liberals in the US.

    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    • Thanks: Gerard.Gerard
    • Replies: @joniel
    @Thulean Friend

    SJWs are the new Nazis. Germany is ahead on that front once again.

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    @Thulean Friend

    Thorfinnsson has long had the same take.

  286. @songbird
    @Thulean Friend

    Sunlight is an interesting theory. I could see how it might be a factor in winter, and maybe some of that would carry over, to a year-round culture. Though, on the other hand, Ireland is quite a cloudy country. And wouldn't redheads absorb more of this light? And be more extroverted? Personally, I've never noticed, if they are.

    I find it curious that you would characterize Sweden as introverted. I have brought it up before in this thread, the ethnic Swedes in Finland are considered very extroverted. Maybe, they are not represenatative? Isn't there a subgroup of Finns in Finland who were pioneers who expanded into uninhabited or thinly populated territory, and are known for being more extroverted?

    Perhaps, America would have an effect from being descended from immigrants and pioneers.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    I have brought it up before in this thread, the ethnic Swedes in Finland are considered very extroverted.

    I have met precisely one finnlandssvensk, at university to be exact, and he didn’t strike me as particularly extroverted or socialable. Though n=1 and all that.

    Though, on the other hand, Ireland is quite a cloudy country. And wouldn’t redheads absorb more of this light?

    Yeah, I think it has more to do with the temperate climate. Then again, London is fairly mild too. Hence the minor mystery of how too fairly similar countries geographically speaking can produce quite different social outcomes. It is easier to explain countries like the US or Australia vis-a-vis Britain. Harder to do Ireland vs England.

    Isn’t there a subgroup of Finns in Finland who were pioneers who expanded into uninhabited or thinly populated territory, and are known for being more extroverted?

    I know quite little about Finland so I won’t hazard a guess. I can speak about the Swedish situation, though.

    There is a substantial minority of Finns living in Sweden, I grew up with some of them. Generally speaking, I would categorise them as slightly more extroverted than ethnic Swedes, but this goes against popular stereotype of Finns being colder & more introverted than Swedes.

    This circle can be squared by looking at the psychological profile of those who leave their countries. They tend to be more adventurous and entrepreneurial, ceteris paribus, than the baseline population from hence they came (and presumably more extroverted).

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Thulean Friend


    Yeah, I think it has more to do with the temperate climate. Then again, London is fairly mild too. Hence the minor mystery of how too fairly similar countries geographically speaking can produce quite different social outcomes. It is easier to explain countries like the US or Australia vis-a-vis Britain. Harder to do Ireland vs England.
     
    Which European country would you say is closest to England culturally and in terms of character?
  287. RIP Ezra Vogel, one of the few in the United States, who truly understood China.

    Ezra Vogel: The Transformation of China (2011 Interview)

  288. @Dmitry
    @songbird


    English vs. Irish stereotype would be industrialization.
     
    Irish almost seem more like Southern Europeans in their personality though. Maybe their Southern style of extraversion, is related the history of Catholicism? (Although equally Catholics Poles on average seem much more socially awkward).

    England, has damaged social trust
     
    In England, there is very high social trust in the bourgeois areas where the population seems the most introverted and quiet. The elite areas of England, are a kind of utopia of introverted nerdy people, who display their vast book collections from the windows of the front rooms of their house. And where the streets go almost silent after 8pm.

    Proletarian areas might be the more noisy and extroverted culture for England.


    impressions of England and France are dominated by their biggest cities, London and Paris. These would be the centers of wealth, status-seeking, and social exclusion.
     
    I think in France, people in the countryside can be the most disagreeable. I remember (my family) were being shouted at by old French women we rented a house from, once when we visited the French countryside. Also I remember visiting cathedral in the provincial France, and people shouting at us for talking.

    My impression is that in Paris it's perhaps slightly more friendly, or they are a little less rude to foreigners (also there are so many Arabs in Paris - those Arab hotel staff of Paris seemed friendly in my memory).

    From Germany, I had an almost opposite memory, of being shouted at in France. I remember in a shop in Berlin, these very nice assistants (old women) said to us after we bought something "we like you, you are attractive young people". There is some sense of awkward directness of Germany, but I don't remember anyone being unfriendly.

    Replies: @Coconuts, @songbird, @Anatoly Karlin

    Uriah had some curious speculations about the Irish in his various threads: https://twitter.com/crimkadid/status/1278677731635494913

  289. @Thulean Friend
    @Gerard.Gerard


    Sweden is surprising to see listed as introvert. Swedes en masse speak excellent English and appear to be a part of every globohomo cause/initiative – both features seem to me typical of extrovert people
     
    This is simply Sweden being extremely quick to take up new trends. In the 1930s, we were leading 'race science' with research centers such as Rasbiologiska institutet at Uppsala University.

    Fredrik Lindström has spoken about this a lot in his TV special Världens Modernaste Land. You can probably figure out what it means without knowing the language. Swedes are simply obsessed with new trends, socially or technologically, and are highly conformist. That meant out-Nazi the Nazis in the 1920s and 30s and now it means out-liberal the liberals in the US.

    Replies: @joniel, @Anatoly Karlin

    SJWs are the new Nazis. Germany is ahead on that front once again.

  290. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @AltanBakshi

    I think the world of that era was a world of suffering, through starvation and disease. I there were certainly famines in Russia before the Bolsheviks came to power, just like there were famines in Africa and India before the British and other Europeans came.

    The fact remains that under Communism (after the Trotskyists had been purged), Russia and other Republics took on the might of the American Empire for decades.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @AP, @EldnahYm

    • Agree: AP
  291. @Thulean Friend
    @Europe Europa


    Are British people really more “dour” than the Irish?
     
    Yes. Without doxxing myself, let's just say I have visited Britain a significant number of times for personal reasons, and I've crossed into Ireland on a minority of those trips. There is a distinct difference.

    British humor is widely appreciated in Scandinavia, where the sarcastic and ironic sense of humor (á la Monty Python etc) is a natural hit. I've always been a bit of an outlier in preferring the Irish, who are more jocular and flamboyant. But the flipside of that is that Brits are just more dour and debbie downers.

    The idea that British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically like tired old anti-British stereotyping to me, like the bad teeth and bad food nonsense.
     
    Reminder that these are 10/10 in bongland :)

    https://i.imgur.com/XwPQqqK.jpg

    But seriously speaking, some of those stereotypes are absolutely true (e.g. food). Bad British teeth were also true at one point, because the UK didn't invest in making dental care cheap for much of its proles the way it was in Scandinavia. The UK has always been more of a class-based society than us, with less willingless of its well-off to help the downtrodden. One exemplification of that was bad teeth (though that has changed, stereotypes are hard to kill...).

    Also, it doesn’t seem plausible to me that the British would be naturally highly introverted when its two main culturally descendants, the US and Australia, are typically thought of as highly extroverted countries.
     
    This is an excellent point, and one which I grappled with in my OP. I have never been to Australia myself, but people who did have told me that there is far more extroversion there. Another feather in the cap for the geographic/weather hypothesis? Australia is very sunny and warm, which may lend itself to produce a different social climate?

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Daniel Chieh

    But the flipside of that is that Brits are just more dour and debbie downers.

    There are also significant regional variations. Dour and debbie downers is more of a northern thing.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Because the Church of England [CoE] is influential in Politics, their stiff members (a phrase they would never use) get more than their share of international coverage. I strongly suspect that this skews foreign perception of the UK.

    https://youtu.be/qUSTKisEgTo

    I have quickly gained rapport with the UK nationals that I have conversed with. I concede that I follow international auto racing, which provides an immediate touch point. Look at this Bently.... I want one...
     

    https://automototale.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/cautofotoendurance-bathurst-12-hour-202-2-800x420.jpg
     

    PEACE 😇

  292. @Thulean Friend
    @Gerard.Gerard


    Sweden is surprising to see listed as introvert. Swedes en masse speak excellent English and appear to be a part of every globohomo cause/initiative – both features seem to me typical of extrovert people
     
    This is simply Sweden being extremely quick to take up new trends. In the 1930s, we were leading 'race science' with research centers such as Rasbiologiska institutet at Uppsala University.

    Fredrik Lindström has spoken about this a lot in his TV special Världens Modernaste Land. You can probably figure out what it means without knowing the language. Swedes are simply obsessed with new trends, socially or technologically, and are highly conformist. That meant out-Nazi the Nazis in the 1920s and 30s and now it means out-liberal the liberals in the US.

    Replies: @joniel, @Anatoly Karlin

    Thorfinnsson has long had the same take.

  293. @Europe Europa
    @Thulean Friend

    Are British people really more "dour" than the Irish? Give some examples of what you mean. It seems both have fundamentally identical cultures to me, revolving around the pub and following sports mainly. They're probably less noticeably different than Catalans and the rest of Spain.

    The idea that British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically like tired old anti-British stereotyping to me, like the bad teeth and bad food nonsense. You probably think Ireland has better food than Britain as well, despite Irish and British food being 99% identical.

    Also, it doesn't seem plausible to me that the British would be naturally highly introverted when its two main culturally descendants, the US and Australia, are typically thought of as highly extroverted countries.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Tor597, @Dmitry

    Yes, the British are more dour than the Irish. This is obvious to anyone that has been to both countries.

    I think the biggest difference is that the British are driven by elites, they have the British Royal Family for instance, while the Irish people just seem like regular folk.

    Also, the Irish are not hell bent on taking over the world and forcing other countries into multiculturalism like the British are.

    • Replies: @Coconuts
    @Tor597


    Also, the Irish are not hell bent on taking over the world and forcing other countries into multiculturalism like the British are.
     
    In the 1920s 43% of Irish born people lived abroad, in the US, in the UK, in the British Empire. This leads to the kind of situation you have in the UK now where 10% of the population has at least one Irish grandparent, 25% are of Irish descent if you go further back.

    They don't need to be hell bent on it because given the relatively small size of the Irish people they already did it.
  294. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @AltanBakshi

    I think the world of that era was a world of suffering, through starvation and disease. I there were certainly famines in Russia before the Bolsheviks came to power, just like there were famines in Africa and India before the British and other Europeans came.

    The fact remains that under Communism (after the Trotskyists had been purged), Russia and other Republics took on the might of the American Empire for decades.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @AP, @EldnahYm

    I there were certainly famines in Russia before the Bolsheviks came to power

    Not close to that scale, and in times when technology was far more backward. Worst recent famine under tsars had claimed an upper estimate of 500,000 lives. The worst of several 20th century (!) Soviet famines killed about 6-7million people. The overall demographic impact of Bolshevism is that there are several tens of millions fewer eastern Slavs in the world than there had been if they hadn’t gotten into power.

    The fact remains that under Communism (after the Trotskyists had been purged), Russia and other Republics took on the might of the American Empire for decades.

    They played second fiddle for a few decades, barely keeping up militarily while not keeping up on all other measures, before collapsing into poverty and ruin. This, for what was supposed to be the largest and most populated country on Earth blessed with best natural resources and a mostly European population.

    Basically the main impact of Bolshevism was to limit Russia’s rise and ultimately to remove Russia from contention as a global superpower. Lenin and his heirs were the best thing the Anglo world could have asked for. As a bonus, Lenin-Stalin student Mao managed to hold China back for awhile too.

    • Agree: Bashibuzuk
  295. @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack


    I’m interested to know what school you attended and why it was so very much better than the ones in America?
     
    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought?

    Not going to disclose more about my life, especially when we were debating about whose narrative is less biased and sensational in regards of the Soviet Union, or is it now about my schooling? MBA, how inspirational!

    Mr. Hack in a debate it does not matter if one of us is a Nobelist, only thing what matters is how solid and well established our arguments are.

    Your agenda is old and false, an agenda of victimization, a poor Ukraine as an unique victim of Soviet Union, that evil country driven by Great Russian chauvinism. There are couple words that I would like to utter, they are about victimization, but nay, better that Im silent, Ill just say that its not worthy of a man to play a victim, maybe there are people who like such plays, yes America is full of them, but I am not one of them.

    Russians and Ukrainians suffered horribly in the hands of communists, but there were many small peoples that suffered even more, proportionally speaking... like Crimean Tatars, Kalmyks, Russian Koreans and Germans etc...

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell, @AP, @Mr. Hack

    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought

    Based on PISA scores, Americans of European descent outperform kids from most European countries including Nordic ones, other than Finland, Estonia, Netherlands, Poland and Switzerland. The overall American average is worse than mist of Europe simply because of all the Americans not of European descent:

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2013/12/overall-pisa-rankings-include-america.html?m=1

    As for the rest, acknowledging rather than ignoring evils done to one’s people is not necessarily the same as celebrating victimhood, and is better than ignoring such crimes as is often done in America where criminals’ pictures are often censored in the media in order to minimize politically inconvenient facts.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @AP

    https://i.imgur.com/X50IpUU.png

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. XYZ

  296. @AP
    @AltanBakshi


    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought
     
    Based on PISA scores, Americans of European descent outperform kids from most European countries including Nordic ones, other than Finland, Estonia, Netherlands, Poland and Switzerland. The overall American average is worse than mist of Europe simply because of all the Americans not of European descent:

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2013/12/overall-pisa-rankings-include-america.html?m=1

    As for the rest, acknowledging rather than ignoring evils done to one’s people is not necessarily the same as celebrating victimhood, and is better than ignoring such crimes as is often done in America where criminals’ pictures are often censored in the media in order to minimize politically inconvenient facts.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    • Thanks: AP
    • Replies: @AP
    @Blinky Bill

    The data I linked to was older. Presumably Altanbakshi was not a student in 2018. Interesting to see that in 2018 European-Americans were about the same (slightly better than) the people of Ireland and Iceland.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    , @Mr. XYZ
    @Blinky Bill

    Southeastern and to some extent southern Europe, underperforming as usual! :(

  297. @Thulean Friend
    @Europe Europa


    Are British people really more “dour” than the Irish?
     
    Yes. Without doxxing myself, let's just say I have visited Britain a significant number of times for personal reasons, and I've crossed into Ireland on a minority of those trips. There is a distinct difference.

    British humor is widely appreciated in Scandinavia, where the sarcastic and ironic sense of humor (á la Monty Python etc) is a natural hit. I've always been a bit of an outlier in preferring the Irish, who are more jocular and flamboyant. But the flipside of that is that Brits are just more dour and debbie downers.

    The idea that British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically like tired old anti-British stereotyping to me, like the bad teeth and bad food nonsense.
     
    Reminder that these are 10/10 in bongland :)

    https://i.imgur.com/XwPQqqK.jpg

    But seriously speaking, some of those stereotypes are absolutely true (e.g. food). Bad British teeth were also true at one point, because the UK didn't invest in making dental care cheap for much of its proles the way it was in Scandinavia. The UK has always been more of a class-based society than us, with less willingless of its well-off to help the downtrodden. One exemplification of that was bad teeth (though that has changed, stereotypes are hard to kill...).

    Also, it doesn’t seem plausible to me that the British would be naturally highly introverted when its two main culturally descendants, the US and Australia, are typically thought of as highly extroverted countries.
     
    This is an excellent point, and one which I grappled with in my OP. I have never been to Australia myself, but people who did have told me that there is far more extroversion there. Another feather in the cap for the geographic/weather hypothesis? Australia is very sunny and warm, which may lend itself to produce a different social climate?

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Daniel Chieh

    To be fair, they have adopted the appropriate padding to protect against the chill with minimal clothing. This is a necessary adaptation until you develop antifreeze in your blood, like Russians.

  298. @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack


    I’m interested to know what school you attended and why it was so very much better than the ones in America?
     
    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought?

    Not going to disclose more about my life, especially when we were debating about whose narrative is less biased and sensational in regards of the Soviet Union, or is it now about my schooling? MBA, how inspirational!

    Mr. Hack in a debate it does not matter if one of us is a Nobelist, only thing what matters is how solid and well established our arguments are.

    Your agenda is old and false, an agenda of victimization, a poor Ukraine as an unique victim of Soviet Union, that evil country driven by Great Russian chauvinism. There are couple words that I would like to utter, they are about victimization, but nay, better that Im silent, Ill just say that its not worthy of a man to play a victim, maybe there are people who like such plays, yes America is full of them, but I am not one of them.

    Russians and Ukrainians suffered horribly in the hands of communists, but there were many small peoples that suffered even more, proportionally speaking... like Crimean Tatars, Kalmyks, Russian Koreans and Germans etc...

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell, @AP, @Mr. Hack

    Its commonly assumed that schooling is better in the Nordic countries than in America, or so I have thought?

    Not going to disclose more about my life, especially when we were debating about whose narrative is less biased and sensational in regards of the Soviet Union, or is it now about my schooling? MBA, how inspirational!

    Mr. Hack in a debate it does not matter if one of us is a Nobelist, only thing what matters is how solid and well established our arguments are.

    You certainly can be, as they say it in the Midwest, “a strange kettle of fish”, Altan. Your the one who first brought up the topics of your schooling, and stating that it was much better than anything in the US, and that you’ve spent a considerable amount of time living in Russia. If you don’t want to discuss these matters, then please don’t bring them up! I’m not an interrogator of any sort, I only was genuinely interested in these items that you brought up during our discussion.

    I’m glad to see that my own educational background inspires you, although to be quite frank, I don’t understand how it might inspire you? 🙂

    Your agenda is old and false, an agenda of victimization, a poor Ukraine as an unique victim of Soviet Union, that evil country driven by Great Russian chauvinism. There are couple words that I would like to utter, they are about victimization, but nay, better that Im silent, Ill just say that its not worthy of a man to play a victim, maybe there are people who like such plays, yes America is full of them, but I am not one of them.

    I never thought of myself as a victim before, but after thinking about it some more and thanks to you, I now think that I am. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with remembering historical events that were inspired by lunatics and that resulted in the needless deaths of millions of people. I’m glad to see that many historians and even filmmakers are interested in these events too and are making them more and more accessible to the general public.

  299. @Blinky Bill
    @AP

    https://i.imgur.com/X50IpUU.png

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. XYZ

    The data I linked to was older. Presumably Altanbakshi was not a student in 2018. Interesting to see that in 2018 European-Americans were about the same (slightly better than) the people of Ireland and Iceland.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    Off-topic, but what percent of Ukraine's population do you think will identify as Russian on its next census? In 2001, it was 17.3%, but on Ukraine's next census (whenever it will be), I suspect that this figure will be more like 10% or less due to the loss of Crimea and the Donbass as well as possibly due to Russian emigration from Ukraine.

    Replies: @AP

  300. @AP
    @Znzn

    Chemistry is like cooking. My wife is not a chemist but she loves to cook; chemistry was her favourite science and the one she was best at.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    Ditto for my own mom! It’s hard to find a decent job (more than $50,000-$60,000 a year) as a chemist, though. At least based on my own family’s experience–even with a Master’s Degree in Chemistry from a top Russian university! 🙁

    • Replies: @A123
    @Mr. XYZ


    It’s hard to find a decent job (more than $50,000-$60,000 a year) as a chemist, though. At least based on my own family’s experience–even with a Master’s Degree in Chemistry from a top Russian university!
     
    A Liberal Arts & Sciences, Masters Degree comes with a bit of suspicion in the U.S. In the normal order of things, students get an M.S. matching their B.S. on the way to a Ph.D. in that field. Having only a Masters raises the spectre of possibly not being good enough, especially if a Ph.D. is involved in the hiring process.

    To make the resume powerful the 2nd degree needs to tie to a specific characteristic that provides value to the hiring business. For example, a few years ago having specialized studies in oil & gas well head sampling and analysis would have been a six-digit salary ticket supporting the fracking industry. A Masters degree holder would have the knowledge to select appropriate/optimum models being pontificated about by University Ph.D.'s trying to justify their own existence via "over-publishing" in the hot field of the day.
    ____

    The huge pool of hired 2nd degree holders (e.g. Masters) are functional expansions MBA, JD, and certain Nursing degrees where law & regulation makes this functionally advantageous. You also have a fair number of continuously employed 2nd degree holders gaining union position/seniority advantage, such as Teaching).

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

  301. @Blinky Bill
    @AP

    https://i.imgur.com/X50IpUU.png

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. XYZ

    Southeastern and to some extent southern Europe, underperforming as usual! 🙁

  302. @AP
    @Blinky Bill

    The data I linked to was older. Presumably Altanbakshi was not a student in 2018. Interesting to see that in 2018 European-Americans were about the same (slightly better than) the people of Ireland and Iceland.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    Off-topic, but what percent of Ukraine’s population do you think will identify as Russian on its next census? In 2001, it was 17.3%, but on Ukraine’s next census (whenever it will be), I suspect that this figure will be more like 10% or less due to the loss of Crimea and the Donbass as well as possibly due to Russian emigration from Ukraine.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. XYZ

    10% or so seems about right.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

  303. @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    Off-topic, but what percent of Ukraine's population do you think will identify as Russian on its next census? In 2001, it was 17.3%, but on Ukraine's next census (whenever it will be), I suspect that this figure will be more like 10% or less due to the loss of Crimea and the Donbass as well as possibly due to Russian emigration from Ukraine.

    Replies: @AP

    10% or so seems about right.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    OK. Also, do you think that this figure will decline to 5% or less by the late 21st century?

    BTW, how many Crimean Tatars do you think Ukraine will have in the next census? As in, just how many of them left Crimea and moved to other parts of Ukraine?

    In addition, off-topic, but you might be interested in this:

    https://digitalcommons.spu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1001&context=works

    It's a 1998 academic article (possibly over 100 pages long in total, with a lot of pictures and photos) written jointly by US and ex-USSR academics comparing various US and ex-USSR regions and territories.

    What do you think of it and do you actually agree with all of it?

    Replies: @AP

  304. @Tor597
    @Europe Europa

    Yes, the British are more dour than the Irish. This is obvious to anyone that has been to both countries.

    I think the biggest difference is that the British are driven by elites, they have the British Royal Family for instance, while the Irish people just seem like regular folk.

    Also, the Irish are not hell bent on taking over the world and forcing other countries into multiculturalism like the British are.

    Replies: @Coconuts

    Also, the Irish are not hell bent on taking over the world and forcing other countries into multiculturalism like the British are.

    In the 1920s 43% of Irish born people lived abroad, in the US, in the UK, in the British Empire. This leads to the kind of situation you have in the UK now where 10% of the population has at least one Irish grandparent, 25% are of Irish descent if you go further back.

    They don’t need to be hell bent on it because given the relatively small size of the Irish people they already did it.

  305. @AP
    @Mr. XYZ

    10% or so seems about right.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    OK. Also, do you think that this figure will decline to 5% or less by the late 21st century?

    BTW, how many Crimean Tatars do you think Ukraine will have in the next census? As in, just how many of them left Crimea and moved to other parts of Ukraine?

    In addition, off-topic, but you might be interested in this:

    https://digitalcommons.spu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1001&context=works

    It’s a 1998 academic article (possibly over 100 pages long in total, with a lot of pictures and photos) written jointly by US and ex-USSR academics comparing various US and ex-USSR regions and territories.

    What do you think of it and do you actually agree with all of it?

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. XYZ


    OK. Also, do you think that this figure will decline to 5% or less by the late 21st century?
     
    Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.

    BTW, how many Crimean Tatars do you think Ukraine will have in the next census? As in, just how many of them left Crimea and moved to other parts of Ukraine?
     
    Some but not many. I think around 10% of Tatars left Crimea.

    https://digitalcommons.spu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1001&context=works

    It’s a 1998 academic article (possibly over 100 pages long in total, with a lot of pictures and photos) written jointly by US and ex-USSR academics comparing various US and ex-USSR regions and territories.

    What do you think of it and do you actually agree with all of it?
     
    I just skimmed it. Seems interesting.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

  306. @Anatoly Karlin
    @Thulean Friend


    But the flipside of that is that Brits are just more dour and debbie downers.
     
    There are also significant regional variations. Dour and debbie downers is more of a northern thing.

    Replies: @A123

    Because the Church of England [CoE] is influential in Politics, their stiff members (a phrase they would never use) get more than their share of international coverage. I strongly suspect that this skews foreign perception of the UK.

    I have quickly gained rapport with the UK nationals that I have conversed with. I concede that I follow international auto racing, which provides an immediate touch point. Look at this Bently…. I want one…
     


     

    PEACE 😇

  307. @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    Ditto for my own mom! It's hard to find a decent job (more than $50,000-$60,000 a year) as a chemist, though. At least based on my own family's experience--even with a Master's Degree in Chemistry from a top Russian university! :(

    Replies: @A123

    It’s hard to find a decent job (more than $50,000-$60,000 a year) as a chemist, though. At least based on my own family’s experience–even with a Master’s Degree in Chemistry from a top Russian university!

    A Liberal Arts & Sciences, Masters Degree comes with a bit of suspicion in the U.S. In the normal order of things, students get an M.S. matching their B.S. on the way to a Ph.D. in that field. Having only a Masters raises the spectre of possibly not being good enough, especially if a Ph.D. is involved in the hiring process.

    To make the resume powerful the 2nd degree needs to tie to a specific characteristic that provides value to the hiring business. For example, a few years ago having specialized studies in oil & gas well head sampling and analysis would have been a six-digit salary ticket supporting the fracking industry. A Masters degree holder would have the knowledge to select appropriate/optimum models being pontificated about by University Ph.D.’s trying to justify their own existence via “over-publishing” in the hot field of the day.
    ____

    The huge pool of hired 2nd degree holders (e.g. Masters) are functional expansions MBA, JD, and certain Nursing degrees where law & regulation makes this functionally advantageous. You also have a fair number of continuously employed 2nd degree holders gaining union position/seniority advantage, such as Teaching).

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @A123

    My mom did work on her PhD but didn't finish. Of course, this wasn't helped by the fact that my parents couldn't permanently stay in the Moscow area but instead had to move back to Bryansk Oblast. IDK, maybe my mom could have stayed in the Moscow area if she would have decided to continue her PhD, but would my dad have likewise been able to do this? Anyway, this was back in the mid-1980s, I believe, so no point in worrying about this 35+ years later.

  308. @A123
    @Mr. XYZ


    It’s hard to find a decent job (more than $50,000-$60,000 a year) as a chemist, though. At least based on my own family’s experience–even with a Master’s Degree in Chemistry from a top Russian university!
     
    A Liberal Arts & Sciences, Masters Degree comes with a bit of suspicion in the U.S. In the normal order of things, students get an M.S. matching their B.S. on the way to a Ph.D. in that field. Having only a Masters raises the spectre of possibly not being good enough, especially if a Ph.D. is involved in the hiring process.

    To make the resume powerful the 2nd degree needs to tie to a specific characteristic that provides value to the hiring business. For example, a few years ago having specialized studies in oil & gas well head sampling and analysis would have been a six-digit salary ticket supporting the fracking industry. A Masters degree holder would have the knowledge to select appropriate/optimum models being pontificated about by University Ph.D.'s trying to justify their own existence via "over-publishing" in the hot field of the day.
    ____

    The huge pool of hired 2nd degree holders (e.g. Masters) are functional expansions MBA, JD, and certain Nursing degrees where law & regulation makes this functionally advantageous. You also have a fair number of continuously employed 2nd degree holders gaining union position/seniority advantage, such as Teaching).

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    My mom did work on her PhD but didn’t finish. Of course, this wasn’t helped by the fact that my parents couldn’t permanently stay in the Moscow area but instead had to move back to Bryansk Oblast. IDK, maybe my mom could have stayed in the Moscow area if she would have decided to continue her PhD, but would my dad have likewise been able to do this? Anyway, this was back in the mid-1980s, I believe, so no point in worrying about this 35+ years later.

  309. @Thulean Friend
    @songbird


    I have brought it up before in this thread, the ethnic Swedes in Finland are considered very extroverted.
     
    I have met precisely one finnlandssvensk, at university to be exact, and he didn't strike me as particularly extroverted or socialable. Though n=1 and all that.

    Though, on the other hand, Ireland is quite a cloudy country. And wouldn’t redheads absorb more of this light?
     
    Yeah, I think it has more to do with the temperate climate. Then again, London is fairly mild too. Hence the minor mystery of how too fairly similar countries geographically speaking can produce quite different social outcomes. It is easier to explain countries like the US or Australia vis-a-vis Britain. Harder to do Ireland vs England.

    Isn’t there a subgroup of Finns in Finland who were pioneers who expanded into uninhabited or thinly populated territory, and are known for being more extroverted?
     
    I know quite little about Finland so I won't hazard a guess. I can speak about the Swedish situation, though.

    There is a substantial minority of Finns living in Sweden, I grew up with some of them. Generally speaking, I would categorise them as slightly more extroverted than ethnic Swedes, but this goes against popular stereotype of Finns being colder & more introverted than Swedes.

    This circle can be squared by looking at the psychological profile of those who leave their countries. They tend to be more adventurous and entrepreneurial, ceteris paribus, than the baseline population from hence they came (and presumably more extroverted).

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    Yeah, I think it has more to do with the temperate climate. Then again, London is fairly mild too. Hence the minor mystery of how too fairly similar countries geographically speaking can produce quite different social outcomes. It is easier to explain countries like the US or Australia vis-a-vis Britain. Harder to do Ireland vs England.

    Which European country would you say is closest to England culturally and in terms of character?

  310. @AltanBakshi
    @Not Raul

    Ethiopian Highlands is to north, the area of smallest brains is in Uganda according that map or at southernmost Ethiopia, where tribal people live, who are very different from Ethiopian highlander Amharas and Tigreys.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    Ah . . . I see.

    It was hard to tell on the map.

    Thanks.

  311. @Shortsword
    @German_reader

    It's manufactured in the sense of giving attention to something insignificant. How many Westerners know of any Nazi massacre committed against Russians? The large amounts of deaths in Soviet Union is usually attributed to using cannon fodder human waves tactics or something like that. You can joke about it.

    I'd argue that you hear more about Russians committing atrocities against Germans than the opposite. Being a Nazi victim is heavily monopolized by Jews.

    Replies: @German_reader, @Europe Europa

    I don’t think that much is made of it by WW2 historians, if anything I’d say Soviet war crimes, especially against civilians, is one of the most taboo and least talked about subjects of WW2 history.

    I hear the bombings of Hamburg and Dresden mentioned much more often by historians as a war crime than the Rape of Berlin, which is hardly ever mentioned by mainstream historians.

    The most serious discussions of Soviet war crimes I’ve seen have been by non-mainstream historical revisionist types, often with a pro-Nazi bias.

  312. @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    OK. Also, do you think that this figure will decline to 5% or less by the late 21st century?

    BTW, how many Crimean Tatars do you think Ukraine will have in the next census? As in, just how many of them left Crimea and moved to other parts of Ukraine?

    In addition, off-topic, but you might be interested in this:

    https://digitalcommons.spu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1001&context=works

    It's a 1998 academic article (possibly over 100 pages long in total, with a lot of pictures and photos) written jointly by US and ex-USSR academics comparing various US and ex-USSR regions and territories.

    What do you think of it and do you actually agree with all of it?

    Replies: @AP

    OK. Also, do you think that this figure will decline to 5% or less by the late 21st century?

    Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.

    BTW, how many Crimean Tatars do you think Ukraine will have in the next census? As in, just how many of them left Crimea and moved to other parts of Ukraine?

    Some but not many. I think around 10% of Tatars left Crimea.

    https://digitalcommons.spu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1001&context=works

    It’s a 1998 academic article (possibly over 100 pages long in total, with a lot of pictures and photos) written jointly by US and ex-USSR academics comparing various US and ex-USSR regions and territories.

    What do you think of it and do you actually agree with all of it?

    I just skimmed it. Seems interesting.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @AP


    Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.
     
    Through mass intermarriage?

    BTW, do you foresee Ukraine's population falling to 15-20 million by 2100 before beginning to rise again?

    Some but not many. I think around 10% of Tatars left Crimea.
     
    Where in Ukraine did they primarily settle? In Kiev?

    I just skimmed it. Seems interesting.
     
    Yeah, it's certainly worth looking at! :) Quite a fun and interesting exercise--comparing various regions and territories in the US and ex-USSR like that! :)

    Anyway, off-topic, but it's interesting to look at this 2010 blog post by Anatoly Karlin in hindsight:

    https://akarlin.com/2010/05/the-peoples-choice-ukraine/

    I've offered my own, recent thoughts on this blogpost here:

    https://twitter.com/Go321D/status/1341203407525146624

    It's a long Twitter thread, BTW. :)

    Replies: @AP

  313. @Europe Europa
    @Thulean Friend

    Are British people really more "dour" than the Irish? Give some examples of what you mean. It seems both have fundamentally identical cultures to me, revolving around the pub and following sports mainly. They're probably less noticeably different than Catalans and the rest of Spain.

    The idea that British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically like tired old anti-British stereotyping to me, like the bad teeth and bad food nonsense. You probably think Ireland has better food than Britain as well, despite Irish and British food being 99% identical.

    Also, it doesn't seem plausible to me that the British would be naturally highly introverted when its two main culturally descendants, the US and Australia, are typically thought of as highly extroverted countries.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Tor597, @Dmitry

    Average people in Ireland seem more extroverted, while in England more introverted.

    It’s a difficulty for a climate explanation of extraversion, as Ireland is Northern Europe, yet extroversion of people is more like you would expect in Southern Europe.

    British are really cold, miserable and distant, which I guess is what you mean, sounds basically

    Extraversion or introversion of nationalities, is neither something “better or worse”. But it is a significant difference.

    You don’t have to be so paranoid, and think there is antianglosaxonism in all our comments. Besides, that anglophiles are usually more attracted by the majority introverted nerd culture of the English people, rather than the small minority of noisy football hooligans that also live in that island.

  314. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    Great Britain has the most Anglo IMO team out of the Anglo nation.

    https://i.ibb.co/w4hDxxQ/84b1b3469aa3295113a4535f0889491b766608bb7d88124ae346abb3ec450a55.jpg

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Dmitry

    UK instead of having Jews – has Indians and Chinese in the same niches.

    Indians especially seem to be successful in the UK. For example, in the elite university in United Kingdom – it looks usually like maybe 1/6 of the students are brown people.

    Indians are only 2% of the Kingdom’s population, so there is clearly many times overrepresentation of Indian youth in the elite universities of England, relative to their proportion of the country.

    I think Indians and Chinese are going to be the main groups assimilating into a nerdy anglosaxon middle class.

    For example, video of student population in a stereotypical English university. If you add Indians and Chinese together, it is like 1/4 of students. In addition, Indians will be more predominant in the professional courses.

  315. @AP
    @Mr. XYZ


    OK. Also, do you think that this figure will decline to 5% or less by the late 21st century?
     
    Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.

    BTW, how many Crimean Tatars do you think Ukraine will have in the next census? As in, just how many of them left Crimea and moved to other parts of Ukraine?
     
    Some but not many. I think around 10% of Tatars left Crimea.

    https://digitalcommons.spu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1001&context=works

    It’s a 1998 academic article (possibly over 100 pages long in total, with a lot of pictures and photos) written jointly by US and ex-USSR academics comparing various US and ex-USSR regions and territories.

    What do you think of it and do you actually agree with all of it?
     
    I just skimmed it. Seems interesting.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.

    Through mass intermarriage?

    BTW, do you foresee Ukraine’s population falling to 15-20 million by 2100 before beginning to rise again?

    Some but not many. I think around 10% of Tatars left Crimea.

    Where in Ukraine did they primarily settle? In Kiev?

    I just skimmed it. Seems interesting.

    Yeah, it’s certainly worth looking at! 🙂 Quite a fun and interesting exercise–comparing various regions and territories in the US and ex-USSR like that! 🙂

    Anyway, off-topic, but it’s interesting to look at this 2010 blog post by Anatoly Karlin in hindsight:

    https://akarlin.com/2010/05/the-peoples-choice-ukraine/

    I’ve offered my own, recent thoughts on this blogpost here:

    It’s a long Twitter thread, BTW. 🙂

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. XYZ


    “Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.”

    Through mass intermarriage?
     
    Yes. I’ve seen this in Lviv, where half of the ethnic Russians are primarily Ukrainian-speaking, they intermarry and the kids are Ukrainians. I spoke to one quarter-Russian 20-something hardcore Banderist whose ethnic Russian grandfather had been a hero at Stalingrad, settled in Lviv, married local. This process will also occur in Kiev, etc. The only places with long-term viable Russian populations (Crimea and Donbas) are gone.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @Mr. XYZ

  316. @songbird
    @Dmitry


    Maybe their Southern style of extraversion, is related the history of Catholicism?
     
    This is an interesting theory. Some say that Protestants were the original SJWs. Maybe that would cause people to clam up before strangers.

    But I have been in Northern Germany before, and the drinking culture seemed very lax compared to America. For instance, kids could drink at their school at night. The police would even see them and not care. In America, this would be like profaning a church. The police hunt kids down in the woods here.

    said to us after we bought something “we like you, you are attractive young people”
     
    Very curious. Prototypically, un-German, I believe? In America, you will often hear strangers give you compliments, but I believe Germans consider this behavior to be bizarre. (Or at least in my conception of them, which may or may not be accurate)

    My impression is that in Paris it’s perhaps slightly more friendly, or they are a little less rude to foreigners
     
    I've never been to Paris, but in America, there's a stereotype that Parisians are very rude to Americans. I believe there is a scene to that effect in National Lampoon's European Vacation (1985).

    Replies: @Dmitry

    kids could drink at their school at night.

    Lol and we have previous discussions with AP about this American attitude on alcohol.

    Paris, but in America, there’s a stereotype that Parisians are very rude to Americans.

    Perhaps more in the 1980s? Nowadays, surely a lot of people which tourists will interact with in Paris (i.e. hotel staff), are Arabs, Africans or Poles. And I feel like such hotel workers have a culture of trying to be friendly to tourists – at least they seem to be somewhat aware we tourists are the goose that lays the golden eggs for the hospitality industry.

    Service workers in Paris have nowadays a high proportion of Arabs. When there was a terrorist attack in Paris November 2015, I was looking on the map, and trying to remember the area of Paris where the attacks were. I realize I know these areas of Paris which were attacked, quite well from staying in it during vacation, and at the time I thought such areas of Paris have a lot of Arabs. So even those quite central areas of Paris which terrorists were attacking, will be quite Arabian in terms of the workers there.

  317. To keep Daniel Chieh (and presumably Anatoly) happy I’ve moved my reply to this comment from 128 to the open thread. I’m also establishing my autistic credentials.

    if someone were to come up with a psychoanalysis of Unz personnel and commenters I wonder what the general picture would look like?

    An extraordinarily high rate of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. An inability to deal with the existence of the real world. An inordinate tendency to believe the craziest conspiracy theories would seem to be overwhelming proof of this.

    You don’t notice it so much on Anatoly’s blog because he filters out the worst of the crazies (as do Audacious Epigone and a couple of other contributors). But wander into some of the less salubrious neighbourhoods on UR and it’s like visiting the locked ward of a mental hospital.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @dfordoom

    It has the atmosphere of a psychiatric hospital. And now you have to admit, probably this also is the reason, that you enjoy to post here.

    Even if you are not a freak yourself - you've likely become addicted to writing among freaks, and now after this habituation to post on another forum that had normal people would feel to you too boring and bland.

    For myself, in real life, I'd feel safer to talk with "healthy people", that shower regularly, and don't smell. But what about procrastinating on the internet forum that consists only of pieces of text? Writing alongside "colourful" authors who are little schizoaffective, that reply to your texts with a lot of passion, anger, and even delusion, and a written form of tourettes syndrome? Or writing on a forum that had calm, normal authors, making polite posts about their children's schools and their company car?

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @AP
    @dfordoom


    An extraordinarily high rate of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.
     
    Unz in general or AK’s micro environment in particular? Such types are rare here - the “worst“ are a couple of cases of paranoid personality disorder, and some cases of high-functioning people on the autism spectrum.



    I was an undergraduate in the early 90s at a school that actively recruited kids of second-tier post-commie elites from Russia, Poland, Caucuses, Central Asia, Czechia, etc. (I ended up marrying one of them, the daughter of a guy who worked for the ЦК КПСС). It was a fortuitous time - a few years later such types would go to London or Switzerland as would be the case with some of their younger siblings. We used to sometimes have fascinating and passionate historical discussions; this blog recreates that free-for-all atmosphere.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @dfordoom

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @dfordoom

    To be honest, the blog resembles nothing more than the old phpBBs with the same freewheeling insanity. I still somewhat miss the old Pilot's Lounge in Starcraft, where I started to write a great deal, made some excellent friends and still remember the complete insane posts like "Suggestion Form to God for background music."

    MAKE THE INTERNET GREAT AGAIN.

    Replies: @songbird, @Bashibuzuk, @dfordoom

  318. increased food production, while necessary, is not sufficient alone to
    achieve food security. Huge stocks of grain have accumulated in India, while tens of millions need more food but do not have the purchasing power to buy it”- Norman Borlaug, Father of Green Revolution.

  319. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @AltanBakshi

    I think the world of that era was a world of suffering, through starvation and disease. I there were certainly famines in Russia before the Bolsheviks came to power, just like there were famines in Africa and India before the British and other Europeans came.

    The fact remains that under Communism (after the Trotskyists had been purged), Russia and other Republics took on the might of the American Empire for decades.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @AP, @EldnahYm

    The fact remains that under Communism (after the Trotskyists had been purged), Russia and other Republics took on the might of the American Empire for decades.

    They didn’t really take on the “might” of the American Empire, considering neither side really fought each other much.

    The Cold War was a total drain on Russia which they got nothing out of. The biggest beneficiaries of the Cold War were China and Japan. Taking on the U.S. is evidence of Soviet foolishness more than anything.

    Ideological conflicts are for suckers. Both sides tend to destroy themselves in such set-ups.

    • Agree: sher singh
  320. @songbird
    @Thulean Friend


    This gels with my personal experiences. One thing I never understood is why the Irish are so gregarious, compared to the dour British.
     
    I can think of a lot of possible explanations.

    In the case of Finland, it seems to at least partly be about climate. Well, Ireland has a milder climate than England due to the Gulf Stream. There's a difference between English oak and Irish oak.

    Also, Irish culture is more egalitarian than in England. The native Irish gentry were practically completely destroyed - at one point, only 3% of Irish land was owned by Catholics. Under the penal laws, natives were banned from trades, so practically everyone was a tenant farmer or a laborer. If you owned practically anything, like a boat, it could be seized by the landlord, if you were in arrears. The schools were called "hedge schools" - quite a different conception than ivory towers. And before that - even though it had an aristocratic elite - clan society is still probably more egalitarian.

    Also, the Irish language is arguably more loquacious than English. It still effects patterns of speech, even though it is not spoken, by many anymore - people are still offended by short answers. For example, traditionally, it is not possible to give a simple "no" reply.

    Of course, I think the main explanation is that it was a fairly homogeneous, traditional and rural society, until recently. Very few cities. Until recently, not really much that would be considered suburbs. People used to have big families, which helped train people to talk. And going to church helped unite communities - Ireland was one of the last religious holdouts in Western Europe - but no more.

    I don't think the friendliness will survive the invasion. I don't think it can.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @EldnahYm

    Maybe the personality differences between Irish and English are because of more Germanic ancestry in the English. In any case, it seems comparisons of the Welsh and Scots to English and Irish would be helpful.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @EldnahYm

    In England I would say the Irish have a reputation of being significantly more friendly and sociable than the Scots.

    The Scots are mostly seen as somewhat awkward and aloof, and maybe a bit angry. Also, the Irish have a reputation of being friendly when drunk, whereas the Scots have a reputation of being aggressive when drunk. There is also this perception of Scots as very stingy and miserly.

    In general I think you're a lot more likely to hear English people express positive views about Irish culture than Scottish culture, if English people were to express positive views about Scotland it would usually be more to do with the scenery than the people/culture.

    , @songbird
    @EldnahYm


    Maybe the personality differences between Irish and English are because of more Germanic ancestry in the English.
     
    Certainly possible.

    In any case, it seems comparisons of the Welsh and Scots to English and Irish would be helpful.
     
    I suspect that there would be a dichotomy within Wales between the areas that industrialized early and those areas that never industrialized. Perhaps, the same in Scotland.

    Where I come from in the south it’s not that uncommon to eat fried chicken livers or gizzards.
     
    I find it remarkable how chicken feet seem to be a popular food in East Asia.

    Hard to imagine brains making a comeback, with what we know of prions. I believe in hunter gatherer societies, maybe the Arabs too, they used to give the brains to women and children, as it was considered the worst food.

    I think pigs feet at the supermarket is for nonwhite immigrants.

    I love meat, but I like it well-cooked. I know too much about parasites to feel otherwise; I've seen a lot of graphic images.

    Replies: @EldnahYm

  321. @songbird
    @AltanBakshi

    I wouldn't say that European food, as a whole, is weird. I think it is not very weird in a global context, but only in a more bourgeoisie American one. My own grandfather was absolutely revolted at the idea that anyone would eat rabbit - one of the filthiest animals, as he conceived it. Which is quite funny, considering the isolated valleys where his folks came from.

    But the other side of my family, overseas, often ate animal organs, as they were quite poor.

    Personally - a food many of my relatives like - black pudding - I don't know about the taste - but it is revolting to see it made.

    As to Mongolian food, have you ever seen that drink they make with a sheep's eyeball in carrot juice?

    Incidentally, that reminds me, of a thought I had the other day: I don't know if any history written by a Westerner who is a vegetarian is really believable.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Saucier, @Saucier, @Saucier, @EldnahYm

    Eating animal organs used to be very common. Most people’s grandparents ate lots of them(my grandmother apparently used to make sausages herself with intestines). Today it’s out of fashion. Where I come from in the south it’s not that uncommon to eat fried chicken livers or gizzards. But liver or chicken gizzards is about it. Intestines, tripe, kidney, pancreas, brains, lungs, etc. are not popular to say the least. Feet or tongues aren’t popular either(though you can find pickled pigs feet in the grocery store).

    You’re lucky to have relatives who eat blood pudding. Blood is delicious.

  322. @dfordoom
    To keep Daniel Chieh (and presumably Anatoly) happy I've moved my reply to this comment from 128 to the open thread. I'm also establishing my autistic credentials.

    if someone were to come up with a psychoanalysis of Unz personnel and commenters I wonder what the general picture would look like?
     
    An extraordinarily high rate of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. An inability to deal with the existence of the real world. An inordinate tendency to believe the craziest conspiracy theories would seem to be overwhelming proof of this.

    You don't notice it so much on Anatoly's blog because he filters out the worst of the crazies (as do Audacious Epigone and a couple of other contributors). But wander into some of the less salubrious neighbourhoods on UR and it's like visiting the locked ward of a mental hospital.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @AP, @Daniel Chieh

    It has the atmosphere of a psychiatric hospital. And now you have to admit, probably this also is the reason, that you enjoy to post here.

    Even if you are not a freak yourself – you’ve likely become addicted to writing among freaks, and now after this habituation to post on another forum that had normal people would feel to you too boring and bland.

    For myself, in real life, I’d feel safer to talk with “healthy people”, that shower regularly, and don’t smell. But what about procrastinating on the internet forum that consists only of pieces of text? Writing alongside “colourful” authors who are little schizoaffective, that reply to your texts with a lot of passion, anger, and even delusion, and a written form of tourettes syndrome? Or writing on a forum that had calm, normal authors, making polite posts about their children’s schools and their company car?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Dmitry


    It has the atmosphere of a psychiatric hospital. And now you have to admit, probably this also is the reason, that you enjoy to post here.

    Even if you are not a freak yourself – you’ve likely become addicted to writing among freaks, and now after this habituation to post on another forum that had normal people would feel to you too boring and bland.
     
    Yes, it's true that loonies can be entertaining. In the past week the denizens of Unz Review have introduced me to three brand-new conspiracy theories. My favourite is the one that says that nuclear weapons are a hoax. You don't get fun like that anywhere else.
  323. @EldnahYm
    @songbird

    Maybe the personality differences between Irish and English are because of more Germanic ancestry in the English. In any case, it seems comparisons of the Welsh and Scots to English and Irish would be helpful.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @songbird

    In England I would say the Irish have a reputation of being significantly more friendly and sociable than the Scots.

    The Scots are mostly seen as somewhat awkward and aloof, and maybe a bit angry. Also, the Irish have a reputation of being friendly when drunk, whereas the Scots have a reputation of being aggressive when drunk. There is also this perception of Scots as very stingy and miserly.

    In general I think you’re a lot more likely to hear English people express positive views about Irish culture than Scottish culture, if English people were to express positive views about Scotland it would usually be more to do with the scenery than the people/culture.

  324. @Dieter Kief
    @Jatt Aryaa

    Jatt Aryaa - you mean to say what - that they are - efficient soldiers? - what do you mean saying that only cow slaughter was banned? - Would you mind to elaborate - about the video too. It sounds (and looks) interesting (not very peaceful, of course), I get that.

    Replies: @sher singh

    • Thanks: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @sher singh

    That's - graphic...

    (At times I wonder what happens with thoughts like the ones expressed here in our times of thee "forbidden hate".)

  325. @Dmitry
    @dfordoom

    It has the atmosphere of a psychiatric hospital. And now you have to admit, probably this also is the reason, that you enjoy to post here.

    Even if you are not a freak yourself - you've likely become addicted to writing among freaks, and now after this habituation to post on another forum that had normal people would feel to you too boring and bland.

    For myself, in real life, I'd feel safer to talk with "healthy people", that shower regularly, and don't smell. But what about procrastinating on the internet forum that consists only of pieces of text? Writing alongside "colourful" authors who are little schizoaffective, that reply to your texts with a lot of passion, anger, and even delusion, and a written form of tourettes syndrome? Or writing on a forum that had calm, normal authors, making polite posts about their children's schools and their company car?

    Replies: @dfordoom

    It has the atmosphere of a psychiatric hospital. And now you have to admit, probably this also is the reason, that you enjoy to post here.

    Even if you are not a freak yourself – you’ve likely become addicted to writing among freaks, and now after this habituation to post on another forum that had normal people would feel to you too boring and bland.

    Yes, it’s true that loonies can be entertaining. In the past week the denizens of Unz Review have introduced me to three brand-new conspiracy theories. My favourite is the one that says that nuclear weapons are a hoax. You don’t get fun like that anywhere else.

  326. @Mr. XYZ
    @AP


    Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.
     
    Through mass intermarriage?

    BTW, do you foresee Ukraine's population falling to 15-20 million by 2100 before beginning to rise again?

    Some but not many. I think around 10% of Tatars left Crimea.
     
    Where in Ukraine did they primarily settle? In Kiev?

    I just skimmed it. Seems interesting.
     
    Yeah, it's certainly worth looking at! :) Quite a fun and interesting exercise--comparing various regions and territories in the US and ex-USSR like that! :)

    Anyway, off-topic, but it's interesting to look at this 2010 blog post by Anatoly Karlin in hindsight:

    https://akarlin.com/2010/05/the-peoples-choice-ukraine/

    I've offered my own, recent thoughts on this blogpost here:

    https://twitter.com/Go321D/status/1341203407525146624

    It's a long Twitter thread, BTW. :)

    Replies: @AP

    “Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.”

    Through mass intermarriage?

    Yes. I’ve seen this in Lviv, where half of the ethnic Russians are primarily Ukrainian-speaking, they intermarry and the kids are Ukrainians. I spoke to one quarter-Russian 20-something hardcore Banderist whose ethnic Russian grandfather had been a hero at Stalingrad, settled in Lviv, married local. This process will also occur in Kiev, etc. The only places with long-term viable Russian populations (Crimea and Donbas) are gone.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    What about Kharkiv, Zaporizhia, Odessa, and the Budjak?

    Also, what do you think about my Twitter thread in my quoted post above?

    , @Mr. XYZ
    @AP

    BTW, off-topic, but do you think that Kiev (including its metropolitan area) can be compared to the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area?

  327. @dfordoom
    To keep Daniel Chieh (and presumably Anatoly) happy I've moved my reply to this comment from 128 to the open thread. I'm also establishing my autistic credentials.

    if someone were to come up with a psychoanalysis of Unz personnel and commenters I wonder what the general picture would look like?
     
    An extraordinarily high rate of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. An inability to deal with the existence of the real world. An inordinate tendency to believe the craziest conspiracy theories would seem to be overwhelming proof of this.

    You don't notice it so much on Anatoly's blog because he filters out the worst of the crazies (as do Audacious Epigone and a couple of other contributors). But wander into some of the less salubrious neighbourhoods on UR and it's like visiting the locked ward of a mental hospital.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @AP, @Daniel Chieh

    An extraordinarily high rate of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

    Unz in general or AK’s micro environment in particular? Such types are rare here – the “worst“ are a couple of cases of paranoid personality disorder, and some cases of high-functioning people on the autism spectrum.

    [MORE]

    I was an undergraduate in the early 90s at a school that actively recruited kids of second-tier post-commie elites from Russia, Poland, Caucuses, Central Asia, Czechia, etc. (I ended up marrying one of them, the daughter of a guy who worked for the ЦК КПСС). It was a fortuitous time – a few years later such types would go to London or Switzerland as would be the case with some of their younger siblings. We used to sometimes have fascinating and passionate historical discussions; this blog recreates that free-for-all atmosphere.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @AP

    Maybe if your international school, was more like a psychiatric hospital- I expect it could resemble this forum.

    But from the point of view of internet discussion, the mentally unbalanced demographic like us here, is more fun, than a forum that had normal people. The eccentricity of the guests is what creates the unpredictability and tension here - strange people here arguing over all kinds of esoteric things which are irrelevant to their lives.

    If we filled an internet forum with calm and normal users, that didn't have unusual obsessions, or who were not spending hours arguing about whether user was Indian or Swedish, we would lose the substance of the discussion, and any warm addictive anticipation you feel to click on the refresh button for the next unpredictable reply.

    , @dfordoom
    @AP



    An extraordinarily high rate of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.
     
    Unz in general or AK’s micro environment in particular?
     
    Unz Review in general. AK filters out most of the full-on crazies (as does Audacious Epigone) . Reading AK's blog gives the impression that UR readers are perhaps a little eccentric but mostly sane. Reading the comments section elsewhere dispels that illusion. UR is a magnet for unmedicated schizophrenics.

    If you want to keep your sanity it's best to stick to AK's and AE's blogs and avoid the rest of Unz Review like the plague.

    Replies: @songbird, @AP

  328. One of the better parts of jul: lussebullar.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @Thulean Friend

    What's side of them? :D

  329. @EldnahYm
    @songbird

    Maybe the personality differences between Irish and English are because of more Germanic ancestry in the English. In any case, it seems comparisons of the Welsh and Scots to English and Irish would be helpful.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @songbird

    Maybe the personality differences between Irish and English are because of more Germanic ancestry in the English.

    Certainly possible.

    In any case, it seems comparisons of the Welsh and Scots to English and Irish would be helpful.

    I suspect that there would be a dichotomy within Wales between the areas that industrialized early and those areas that never industrialized. Perhaps, the same in Scotland.

    Where I come from in the south it’s not that uncommon to eat fried chicken livers or gizzards.

    I find it remarkable how chicken feet seem to be a popular food in East Asia.

    Hard to imagine brains making a comeback, with what we know of prions. I believe in hunter gatherer societies, maybe the Arabs too, they used to give the brains to women and children, as it was considered the worst food.

    I think pigs feet at the supermarket is for nonwhite immigrants.

    I love meat, but I like it well-cooked. I know too much about parasites to feel otherwise; I’ve seen a lot of graphic images.

    • Replies: @EldnahYm
    @songbird


    I find it remarkable how chicken feet seem to be a popular food in East Asia.
     
    I like them. The gelatinous texture may not be to everyone's liking, but it is to mine. Otherwise chicken feet are not so different from chicken skin. In East Asia women in particular like chicken feet because they believe it's good for their skin.

    Hard to imagine brains making a comeback, with what we know of prions. I believe in hunter gatherer societies, maybe the Arabs too, they used to give the brains to women and children, as it was considered the worst food.
     
    Agreed about brains, I have never had them and don't plan to specifically because of prion diseases, even though it's a relatively rare occurrence.

    The Kuru disease among the Fore of Papau New Guinea was most commonly a disease for women and children because brains were less valued. That was a case of cannibalism, eating brains from the recently deceased.

    I have heard of other cultures where intestines are less valued and more commonly eaten by women.


    I think pigs feet at the supermarket is for nonwhite immigrants.
     
    Not the case actually. In the south there is a tradition of eating picked pigs feet. I can go to the local grocery store and find large jars of pickled pigs feet. I have never tried it myself, the pickled part doesn't sound appetizing. Maybe I will try it some time.

    Replies: @songbird

  330. @AP
    @dfordoom


    An extraordinarily high rate of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.
     
    Unz in general or AK’s micro environment in particular? Such types are rare here - the “worst“ are a couple of cases of paranoid personality disorder, and some cases of high-functioning people on the autism spectrum.



    I was an undergraduate in the early 90s at a school that actively recruited kids of second-tier post-commie elites from Russia, Poland, Caucuses, Central Asia, Czechia, etc. (I ended up marrying one of them, the daughter of a guy who worked for the ЦК КПСС). It was a fortuitous time - a few years later such types would go to London or Switzerland as would be the case with some of their younger siblings. We used to sometimes have fascinating and passionate historical discussions; this blog recreates that free-for-all atmosphere.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @dfordoom

    Maybe if your international school, was more like a psychiatric hospital- I expect it could resemble this forum.

    But from the point of view of internet discussion, the mentally unbalanced demographic like us here, is more fun, than a forum that had normal people. The eccentricity of the guests is what creates the unpredictability and tension here – strange people here arguing over all kinds of esoteric things which are irrelevant to their lives.

    If we filled an internet forum with calm and normal users, that didn’t have unusual obsessions, or who were not spending hours arguing about whether user was Indian or Swedish, we would lose the substance of the discussion, and any warm addictive anticipation you feel to click on the refresh button for the next unpredictable reply.

  331. @songbird
    @EldnahYm


    Maybe the personality differences between Irish and English are because of more Germanic ancestry in the English.
     
    Certainly possible.

    In any case, it seems comparisons of the Welsh and Scots to English and Irish would be helpful.
     
    I suspect that there would be a dichotomy within Wales between the areas that industrialized early and those areas that never industrialized. Perhaps, the same in Scotland.

    Where I come from in the south it’s not that uncommon to eat fried chicken livers or gizzards.
     
    I find it remarkable how chicken feet seem to be a popular food in East Asia.

    Hard to imagine brains making a comeback, with what we know of prions. I believe in hunter gatherer societies, maybe the Arabs too, they used to give the brains to women and children, as it was considered the worst food.

    I think pigs feet at the supermarket is for nonwhite immigrants.

    I love meat, but I like it well-cooked. I know too much about parasites to feel otherwise; I've seen a lot of graphic images.

    Replies: @EldnahYm

    I find it remarkable how chicken feet seem to be a popular food in East Asia.

    I like them. The gelatinous texture may not be to everyone’s liking, but it is to mine. Otherwise chicken feet are not so different from chicken skin. In East Asia women in particular like chicken feet because they believe it’s good for their skin.

    Hard to imagine brains making a comeback, with what we know of prions. I believe in hunter gatherer societies, maybe the Arabs too, they used to give the brains to women and children, as it was considered the worst food.

    Agreed about brains, I have never had them and don’t plan to specifically because of prion diseases, even though it’s a relatively rare occurrence.

    The Kuru disease among the Fore of Papau New Guinea was most commonly a disease for women and children because brains were less valued. That was a case of cannibalism, eating brains from the recently deceased.

    I have heard of other cultures where intestines are less valued and more commonly eaten by women.

    I think pigs feet at the supermarket is for nonwhite immigrants.

    Not the case actually. In the south there is a tradition of eating picked pigs feet. I can go to the local grocery store and find large jars of pickled pigs feet. I have never tried it myself, the pickled part doesn’t sound appetizing. Maybe I will try it some time.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @EldnahYm


    Not the case actually. In the south there is a tradition of eating picked pigs feet. I can go to the local grocery store and find large jars of pickled pigs feet.
     
    In the NE, their availability varies by zip. Harder to find in whiter areas. I think some places where they sell them, it is hard to find steak. I don't know if people don't buy it because they can't afford it, or whether the stores don't stock it because of shoplifting.

    I presume it is for nonwhites in the NE. Could be wrong.
  332. @AP
    @Mr. XYZ


    “Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.”

    Through mass intermarriage?
     
    Yes. I’ve seen this in Lviv, where half of the ethnic Russians are primarily Ukrainian-speaking, they intermarry and the kids are Ukrainians. I spoke to one quarter-Russian 20-something hardcore Banderist whose ethnic Russian grandfather had been a hero at Stalingrad, settled in Lviv, married local. This process will also occur in Kiev, etc. The only places with long-term viable Russian populations (Crimea and Donbas) are gone.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @Mr. XYZ

    What about Kharkiv, Zaporizhia, Odessa, and the Budjak?

    Also, what do you think about my Twitter thread in my quoted post above?

  333. @Thulean Friend
    One of the better parts of jul: lussebullar.

    https://i.imgur.com/9x4137O.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    What’s side of them? 😀

  334. @AP
    @Mr. XYZ


    “Probably, as many of the remaining heavily outnumbered Russians will be absorbed by the Ukrainian population.”

    Through mass intermarriage?
     
    Yes. I’ve seen this in Lviv, where half of the ethnic Russians are primarily Ukrainian-speaking, they intermarry and the kids are Ukrainians. I spoke to one quarter-Russian 20-something hardcore Banderist whose ethnic Russian grandfather had been a hero at Stalingrad, settled in Lviv, married local. This process will also occur in Kiev, etc. The only places with long-term viable Russian populations (Crimea and Donbas) are gone.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ, @Mr. XYZ

    BTW, off-topic, but do you think that Kiev (including its metropolitan area) can be compared to the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area?

  335. @EldnahYm
    @songbird


    I find it remarkable how chicken feet seem to be a popular food in East Asia.
     
    I like them. The gelatinous texture may not be to everyone's liking, but it is to mine. Otherwise chicken feet are not so different from chicken skin. In East Asia women in particular like chicken feet because they believe it's good for their skin.

    Hard to imagine brains making a comeback, with what we know of prions. I believe in hunter gatherer societies, maybe the Arabs too, they used to give the brains to women and children, as it was considered the worst food.
     
    Agreed about brains, I have never had them and don't plan to specifically because of prion diseases, even though it's a relatively rare occurrence.

    The Kuru disease among the Fore of Papau New Guinea was most commonly a disease for women and children because brains were less valued. That was a case of cannibalism, eating brains from the recently deceased.

    I have heard of other cultures where intestines are less valued and more commonly eaten by women.


    I think pigs feet at the supermarket is for nonwhite immigrants.
     
    Not the case actually. In the south there is a tradition of eating picked pigs feet. I can go to the local grocery store and find large jars of pickled pigs feet. I have never tried it myself, the pickled part doesn't sound appetizing. Maybe I will try it some time.

    Replies: @songbird

    Not the case actually. In the south there is a tradition of eating picked pigs feet. I can go to the local grocery store and find large jars of pickled pigs feet.

    In the NE, their availability varies by zip. Harder to find in whiter areas. I think some places where they sell them, it is hard to find steak. I don’t know if people don’t buy it because they can’t afford it, or whether the stores don’t stock it because of shoplifting.

    I presume it is for nonwhites in the NE. Could be wrong.

  336. @AP
    @dfordoom


    An extraordinarily high rate of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.
     
    Unz in general or AK’s micro environment in particular? Such types are rare here - the “worst“ are a couple of cases of paranoid personality disorder, and some cases of high-functioning people on the autism spectrum.



    I was an undergraduate in the early 90s at a school that actively recruited kids of second-tier post-commie elites from Russia, Poland, Caucuses, Central Asia, Czechia, etc. (I ended up marrying one of them, the daughter of a guy who worked for the ЦК КПСС). It was a fortuitous time - a few years later such types would go to London or Switzerland as would be the case with some of their younger siblings. We used to sometimes have fascinating and passionate historical discussions; this blog recreates that free-for-all atmosphere.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @dfordoom

    An extraordinarily high rate of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

    Unz in general or AK’s micro environment in particular?

    Unz Review in general. AK filters out most of the full-on crazies (as does Audacious Epigone) . Reading AK’s blog gives the impression that UR readers are perhaps a little eccentric but mostly sane. Reading the comments section elsewhere dispels that illusion. UR is a magnet for unmedicated schizophrenics.

    If you want to keep your sanity it’s best to stick to AK’s and AE’s blogs and avoid the rest of Unz Review like the plague.